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Sample records for mediating adhesion cytolysis

  1. An improved europium release assay for complement-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Bystryn, J C

    1992-02-14

    An improved assay for complement-mediated cytolysis is described. The target cells are labeled with europium complexed to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (Eu-DTPA). Cytolysis caused by antibody plus complement leads to the release of the Eu-DTPA complex which is then formed into a highly fluorescent chelate by the addition of 2-naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (2-NTA). The amount of europium chelate formed--a measurement of cell death--is then quantified with a time-resolved fluorometer. The results of the assay are reproducible. Complement-mediated cytolysis when measured by europium release was five times more sensitive than when measured by conventional 51Cr release and three times than when measured by trypan blue exclusion. Because europium does not decay, target cells can be labelled in batches and stored frozen until use, which speeds and simplifies the assay. Thus, europium release assay is a simple and quantitative method to measure complement-mediated cytolysis which is sensitive and more rapid than conventional assays. PMID:1541836

  2. Early membrane rupture events during neutrophil-mediated antibody-dependent tumor cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-03-15

    Although cell-mediated cytolysis is a fundamental immune effector response, its mechanism remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In this report, we image for the first time transient ruptures, as inferred by cytoplasmic marker release, in tumor cell membranes during Ab-dependent cellular cytolysis. The cytosol of IgG-opsonized YAC tumor cells was labeled with tetra-methylrhodamine diacetate followed by the formation of tumor cell-neutrophil conjugates. We hypothesized that tumor cell cytolysis proceeds via a series of discrete membrane rupture/resealing events that contribute to marker release. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the fluorescence image of the labeled tumor cells by passing an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane between the light source and the sample. Multiple small bursts of fluorescent label release from tumor cells could be detected using a photomultiplier tube. Similarly, multiple fluorescent plumes were observed at various sites around the perimeter of a target. These findings support a multihit model of target cytolysis and suggest that cytolytic release is not focused at specific sites. Cytolytic bursts were generally observed at 20-s intervals, which match the previously described reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and superoxide release oscillation periods for neutrophils; we speculate that metabolic oscillations of the effector cell drive the membrane damage of the target. PMID:10092769

  3. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  4. Glycosylation Status of CD43 Protein Is Associated with Resistance of Leukemia Cells to CTL-Mediated Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kana; Tanaka, Satomi; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakano, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Hiroko; Okumura, Atsushi; Fujioka, Yuka; Urakawa, Rika; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tatsumi, Naoya; Nakata, Jun; Takashima, Satoshi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Oji, Yusuke; Miyoshi, Eiji; Hirata, Takako; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo; Hosen, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    To improve cancer immunotherapy, it is important to understand how tumor cells counteract immune-surveillance. In this study, we sought to identify cell-surface molecules associated with resistance of leukemia cells to cytotoxic T cell (CTL)-mediated cytolysis. To this end, we first established thousands of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that react with MLL/AF9 mouse leukemia cells. Only two of these mAbs, designated R54 and B2, bound preferentially to leukemia cells resistant to cytolysis by a tumor cell antigen–specific CTLs. The antigens recognized by these mAbs were identified by expression cloning as the same protein, CD43, although their binding patterns to subsets of hematopoietic cells differed significantly from each other and from a pre-existing pan-CD43 mAb, S11. The epitopes of R54 and B2, but not S11, were sialidase-sensitive and expressed at various levels on leukemia cells, suggesting that binding of R54 or B2 is associated with the glycosylation status of CD43. R54high leukemia cells, which are likely to express sialic acid-rich CD43, were highly resistant to CTL-mediated cytolysis. In addition, loss of CD43 in leukemia cells or neuraminidase treatment of leukemia cells sensitized leukemia cells to CTL-mediated cell lysis. These results suggest that sialic acid-rich CD43, which harbors multiple sialic acid residues that impart a net negative surface charge, protects leukemia cells from CTL-mediated cell lysis. Furthermore, R54high or B2high leukemia cells preferentially survived in vivo in the presence of adaptive immunity. Taken together, these results suggest that the glycosylation status of CD43 on leukemia is associated with sensitivity to CTL-mediated cytolysis in vitro and in vivo. Thus, regulation of CD43 glycosylation is a potential strategy for enhancing CTL-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:27011118

  5. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  6. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  7. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  8. Mechanism of lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis: functional cytolytic T cells lacking perforin and granzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Berke, G; Rosen, D; Ronen, D

    1993-01-01

    Involvement of the lytic protein perforin (c. 65,000 MW) and of granule proteases (granzymes) in cell lysis induced by cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) has been suggested, but is still controversial. For example, in vivo-primed peritoneal exudate CTL (PEL) have been found to express perforin and granzyme activity in amounts comparable to those found in non-lytic lymphocytes, although PEL are the most potent of all CTL. Exploiting several cloned CTL hybridomas developed in this laboratory and newly available molecular probes for detecting perforin, granzymes, protein and mRNA, we now directly demonstrate killer T lymphocytes which kill effectively and specifically, but are free from perforin, lytic granules and granzymes, all three of which have been postulated to be involved in lymphocyte-mediated killing. The CTL hybridomas are completely devoid of perforin and granzymes prior to, during, and after activation by antigen, mitogen or interleukin-2 (IL-2). The induction of lytic granules, perforin, and granzymes in the in vivo-primed PEL, but not in the cloned CTL hybridomas, upon cultivation in IL-2, further suggests the involvement of these constituents in antigen/lymphokine-induced CTL activation and differentiation rather than directly in their cytocidal activity. Together, these findings support a perforin- and granzyme-independent CTL lytic mechanism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8436395

  9. Functional balance between T cell chimeric receptor density and tumor associated antigen density: CTL mediated cytolysis and lymphokine production.

    PubMed

    Weijtens, M E; Hart, E H; Bolhuis, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered expression of tumor-specific single chain antibody chimeric receptors (ch-Rec) on human T lymphocytes endow these cells with the parental monoclonal antibody (mAb) dictated tumor specificity and may be useful for clinical immuno-genetherapy. Therefore it was of importance to assess how the densities of tumor-specific receptors and tumor associated antigens (TAA), respectively, affect primary human T lymphocyte functions in relation to target cell susceptibilities to lysis. We therefore studied the functional balance between ch-Rec densities on human T lymphocytes and TAA on tumor cells. The gene construct encoding a ch-Rec derived from (1) a renal carcinoma cell (RCC) specific mouse mAb (G250), and (2) the human signal transducing Fc(epsilon)RI gamma-chain was used. To obtain ch-RecHIGH-POS and ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes, two distinct retroviral vectors were used to introduce the gene constructs into primary human T lymphocytes. Levels of ch-Rec-redirected T lymphocyte mediated tumor cell lysis, as well as lymphokine production were determined using RCC lines as target/stimulator cells, which express either no or increasing densities of the TAA. A functional and dynamic balance between ch-Rec densities on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on the one hand and TAA densities on RCCs on the other, was found. In short, ch-RecHIGH-POS CTLs are triggered by TAAHIGH-POS as well as TAALOW-POS RCCs to lyse tumor cells and produce (IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) lymphokine. In contrast, ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes are only triggered for cytolysis and lymphokine production by relatively TAAHIGH-POS RCCs. In conclusion, (1) the activation of T lymphocyte responses is co-determined by the expression levels of the ch-Rec on T lymphocytes and the TAA on tumor cells and (2) at relatively high T lymphocyte ch-Rec expression levels the CTLs lyse tumor cells with a wide range of TAA densities. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 35-42. PMID:10680014

  10. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  11. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fc gamma -receptors.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-08-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human gamma1 and kappa constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcgammaRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcgammaRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCgammaRII and G-CSF-induced FcgammaRI. The anti-FcgammaRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcgammaRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. PMID:11487281

  12. Chimaeric Lym-1 monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis by neutrophils from G-CSF-treated patients: stimulation by GM-CSF and role of Fcγ-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Tortolina, G; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2001-01-01

    Chimaeric Lym-1 (chLym-1) is a monoclonal antibody generated by fusing the variable region genes of murine Lym-1 to human γ1 and κ constant regions. Owing to its selectivity and avidity for human malignant B cells, it is an attractive candidate for developing immune-interventions in B-lymphomas. In the attempt to identify rational bases for optimizing potential chLym-1 related therapeutic approaches, we studied the ability of this ch-mAb to trigger neutrophil-mediated Raji cell cytolysis in cooperation with two neutrophil-related cytokines, G-CSF and GM-CSF. ChLym-1 triggered low levels of cytolysis by normal neutrophils but induced consistent cytolysis in neutrophils from individuals treated with G-CSF. When exposed to GM-CSF, neutrophils from subjects treated with G-CSF became potent effectors, also leading to 75% lysis. By using mAbs specific for distinct FcγRs, normal neutrophils were inhibited by mAb IV.3, suggesting the intervention of FcγRII, constitutively expressed on the cells. On the other hand, neutrophils from patients treated with G-CSF were inhibited by mAb IV.3 plus mAb 197, a finding consistent with a cooperative intervention of FCγRII and G-CSF-induced FcγRI. The anti-FcγRIII mAb 3G8 promoted significant enhancement of the neutrophil cytolytic efficiency. Therefore, neutrophil FcγRIII behaves as a down-regulator of the cytolytic potential. The present findings suggest new attempts to develop mAb-based and G-CSF/GM-CSF combined immune-interventions in B lymphomas. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487281

  13. Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting proteins direct T cell–mediated cytolysis of latently HIV-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julia A.M.; Pickeral, Joy; Liu, Liqin; Stanfield-Oakley, Sherry A.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Garrido, Carolina; Pollara, Justin; LaBranche, Celia; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Yang, Yinhua; Parks, Robert; Archin, Nancie; Allard, Brigitte; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Gay, Cynthia L.; Cohen, Myron S.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Soderberg, Kelly; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David; Moore, Paul; Johnson, Syd; Koenig, Scott; Haynes, Barton F.; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.; Margolis, David M.; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of HIV-specific immunity is likely required to eliminate latent HIV infection. Here, we have developed an immunotherapeutic modality aimed to improve T cell–mediated clearance of HIV-1–infected cells. Specifically, we employed Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting (DART) proteins, which are bispecific, antibody-based molecules that can bind 2 distinct cell-surface molecules simultaneously. We designed DARTs with a monovalent HIV-1 envelope-binding (Env-binding) arm that was derived from broadly binding, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity–mediating antibodies known to bind to HIV-infected target cells coupled to a monovalent CD3 binding arm designed to engage cytolytic effector T cells (referred to as HIVxCD3 DARTs). Thus, these DARTs redirected polyclonal T cells to specifically engage with and kill Env-expressing cells, including CD4+ T cells infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, thereby obviating the requirement for HIV-specific immunity. Using lymphocytes from patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), we demonstrated that DARTs mediate CD8+ T cell clearance of CD4+ T cells that are superinfected with the HIV-1 strain JR-CSF or infected with autologous reservoir viruses isolated from HIV-infected–patient resting CD4+ T cells. Moreover, DARTs mediated CD8+ T cell clearance of HIV from resting CD4+ T cell cultures following induction of latent virus expression. Combined with HIV latency reversing agents, HIVxCD3 DARTs have the potential to be effective immunotherapeutic agents to clear latent HIV-1 reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26413868

  14. Susceptibility of mammary tumor cells to complement-mediated cytolysis after in vitro or in vivo fatty acid manipulation.

    PubMed

    Erickson, K L; Thomas, I K

    1985-08-01

    The susceptibility of line 168 murine mammary tumor cells to complement (C)-mediated lysis was tested after in vitro treatment with several saturated or unsaturated fatty acids dissolved in different solvents or presented in the form of micelles to the cells. The lytic susceptibility of these cultured cells was compared with similar tumor cells obtained either from mice maintained on diets containing different concentrations and saturations of fatty acids or from cultures supplemented with serum from tumor-free control mice fed pair-matched diets. Although changes in dietary fat concentration and saturation resulted in alterations of the tumor cell fatty acid composition, those alterations did not influence the susceptibility of tumor cells to C-mediated lysis. However, single, or combinations of, unsaturated fatty acids dissolved in ethanol, unlike saturated fatty acids, reduced the lytic susceptibility of tumor cells in vitro. Hexane added to culture medium significantly suppressed the lytic susceptibility; however, when used as a carrier no significant differences were observed among treatments with the individual fatty acids at several concentrations. This result may be due to the effect of hexane on the cell membrane because this treatment also affected the osmotic fragility of the cells. Fatty acids as micelles did not influence the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis. We concluded that only in vitro manipulation of fatty acids in some vehicles influenced the susceptibility of target tumor cells to C-mediated lysis; this finding did not parallel the situation that occurred in vivo. Moreover, the use of different vehicles to present fatty acids to tumor cells may further alter the susceptibility to C-mediated lysis. PMID:3860685

  15. Antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) with antibody-coated effectors: rat and human effectors versus tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Jones, J F; Titus, J A; Segal, D M

    1981-06-01

    We have previously described techniques that cause antibody molecules to remain bound to P388D1 cells for at least 18 hr, and enable these cells to lyse hapten-coated erythrocytes not sensitized with antibody. These methods collectively are called "franking." In this study, we have determined that these methods are applicable to other systems. We franked rat splenocytes and human peripheral blood leukocytes with rabbit anti-TNP antibody, and showed that they were capable of lysing TNP-tumor and erythrocyte targets (not coated with antibody) in a hapten-specific, antibody-dependent fashion. Both the mononuclear and the polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte fractions of the human cells were capable of mediating lysis. Additionally, human leukocytes franked with rabbit antibody were stained with fluorescent goat anti-rabbit IgG Fab, and were analyzed for fluorescence by flow microfluorometry. Nearly all of the PMN cells and about one-half of the mononuclear cells had IgG on their surfaces after franking. Clearly, not all cells can be franked, but those that can retain significant numbers of antibody molecules (approximately 5 X 10(4), in the case of PMN cells) on their surfaces. PMID:7014718

  16. Antibody-dependent cytolysis of chicken erythrocytes by an in vitro-established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S; Demus, A

    1975-02-01

    An in vitro-established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) was tested for its ability to mediate the cytolysis of 51chromiun-labeled chicken erythrocytes. In the presence of specific antibody, but independently of complement, the macrophages phagocytized and lysed labeled erythrocytes. The phagocytic process proved to be functionally distinct from the cytolytic reaction as demonstrated by enhanced cytolysis in the presence of iodoacetate, an inhibitor of phagocytosis. This cell line, because of its effector activity in antibody-dependent cell-mediated immune reactions, will be useful in characterizing the mechanism(s) involved in macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:1167563

  17. Interruption of the Sequential Release of Small and Large Molecules from Tumor Cells by Low Temperature During Cytolysis Mediated by Immune T-Cells or Complement

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Eric; Burakoff, Steven J.; Benacerraf, Baruj

    1974-01-01

    Specific lysis of tumor cells by thymus-derived lymphocytes from alloimmunized mice (T-effector specific lysis) was studied with target cells labeled with isotopes attached to both small (14C-labeled nicotinamide) and large (51Cr-labeled) molecules. The results confirm and extend previous reports that target cells release small molecules considerably earlier than large molecules during T-effector specific lysis. After interruption of T-effector specific lysis by specific antibody and complement directed against the killer cells, or by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, release of both isotopes continued, eventually reaching identical levels of specific release, the value of which represents the fraction of the target cell population which had been committed to die at the time these treatments were applied. On the other hand, release of both isotopes during T-effector specific lysis stops immediately when the cultures are cooled to 0°. Thus, while ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or specific complement-mediated lysis of the killer cells merely prevents the initiation of any new damage to target cells, cooling to 0° also stops the lytic process in already-damaged target cells. The colloid osmotic phase of target cell lysis induced by specific antibody and complement was similarly stopped at 0° in tumor cells, but not in erythrocytes. Thus, in tumor target cells, both T-effector specific lysis and complement cause a sequential release of progressively larger molecules which can be immediately stopped at any point by cooling to 0°. PMID:4359327

  18. A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area defines adhesion size and lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Lock, John G.; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized adhesions, small and large adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix adhesion properties. PMID:26109125

  19. Analysis of the behaviours mediating barnacle cyprid reversible adhesion.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens T; Maruzzo, Diego; Clare, Anthony S

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic 'walking' behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as 'footprints' on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic 'suction cup'. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous 'temporary adhesive', 'dry' adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface - presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond - seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion, inherently sticky and

  20. Analysis of the Behaviours Mediating Barnacle Cyprid Reversible Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens T.; Maruzzo, Diego; Clare, Anthony S.

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic ‘walking’ behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as ‘footprints’ on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic ‘suction cup’. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous ‘temporary adhesive’, ‘dry’ adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface – presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond – seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion

  1. Cell adhesion molecules mediate radiation-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D; Kuchibhotla, J; Wyble, C

    1996-11-15

    The predominant early histological changes in irradiated tissues are edema and leukocyte infiltration. Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are required for the extravasation of leukocytes from the circulation. To study the role of CAMs in the pathogenesis of radiation-mediated inflammation, we quantified the expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 glycoproteins on the surface of irradiated human endothelial cells. We found that E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression increased after irradiation, whereas there was no increased expression of other cytokine-inducible adhesion molecules (P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). We found a dose- and time-dependent increase in radiation-induced expression of both E-selectin and ICAM-1. Furthermore, the threshold dose for E-selectin expression was 1 Gy, whereas the threshold dose for ICAM-1 synthesis was 5 Gy of X-rays. Northern blot analysis of RNA from irradiated endothelial cells demonstrated that ICAM-1 is expressed at 3-6 h following irradiation. No de novo protein synthesis was required for increased ICAM-1 mRNA expression. The 1.1-kb segment of the 5' untranslated region of the ICAM-1 gene was sufficient for X-ray induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expression. We measured whether ICAM-1 mediates adhesion of leukocyte to the irradiated endothelium and found that leukocyte adhesion occurred concurrently with ICAM-1 induction. Radiation-mediated leukocyte adhesion was prevented by anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibodies. These data indicate that ICAM-1 participates in the inflammatory response to ionizing radiation. Moreover, radiation induction of these CAMs occurs in the absence of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 production. PMID:8912850

  2. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  3. The Talin Head Domain Reinforces Integrin-Mediated Adhesion by Promoting Adhesion Complex Stability and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Stephanie J.; Lostchuck, Emily; Goult, Benjamin T.; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Fairchild, Michael J.; López-Ceballos, Pablo; Calderwood, David A.; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Talin serves an essential function during integrin-mediated adhesion in linking integrins to actin via the intracellular adhesion complex. In addition, the N-terminal head domain of talin regulates the affinity of integrins for their ECM-ligands, a process known as inside-out activation. We previously showed that in Drosophila, mutating the integrin binding site in the talin head domain resulted in weakened adhesion to the ECM. Intriguingly, subsequent studies showed that canonical inside-out activation of integrin might not take place in flies. Consistent with this, a mutation in talin that specifically blocks its ability to activate mammalian integrins does not significantly impinge on talin function during fly development. Here, we describe results suggesting that the talin head domain reinforces and stabilizes the integrin adhesion complex by promoting integrin clustering distinct from its ability to support inside-out activation. Specifically, we show that an allele of talin containing a mutation that disrupts intramolecular interactions within the talin head attenuates the assembly and reinforcement of the integrin adhesion complex. Importantly, we provide evidence that this mutation blocks integrin clustering in vivo. We propose that the talin head domain is essential for regulating integrin avidity in Drosophila and that this is crucial for integrin-mediated adhesion during animal development. PMID:25393120

  4. Minimal Synthetic Cells to Study Integrin-Mediated Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Frohnmayer, Johannes P; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Eberhard, Christian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Mollenhauer, Christine; Boehm, Heike; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-01-01

    To shed light on cell-adhesion-related molecular pathways, synthetic cells offer the unique advantage of a well-controlled model system with reduced molecular complexity. Herein, we show that liposomes with the reconstituted platelet integrin αIIbβ3 as the adhesion-mediating transmembrane protein are a functional minimal cell model for studying cellular adhesion mechanisms in a defined environment. The interaction of these synthetic cells with various extracellular matrix proteins was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The data indicated that integrin was functionally incorporated into the lipid vesicles, thus enabling integrin-specific adhesion of the engineered liposomes to fibrinogen- and fibronectin-functionalized surfaces. Then, we were able to initiate the detachment of integrin liposomes from these surfaces in the presence of the peptide GRGDSP, a process that is even faster with our newly synthesized peptide mimetic SN529, which specifically inhibits the integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26257266

  5. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  6. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  7. The structural analysis of adhesions mediated by Ep-CAM.

    PubMed

    Balzar, M; Prins, F A; Bakker, H A; Fleuren, G J; Warnaar, S O; Litvinov, S V

    1999-01-10

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule Ep-CAM is capable of mediating Ca2+-independent homotypic cell-cell adhesion when introduced into cells lacking their own means of cell-cell interactions. We used (confocal) immunofluorescent and (immuno-) electron microscopy to investigate the structural organization of Ep-CAM-mediated adhesions and their relation to other types of intercellular adhesions. Ep-CAM-transfected cell lines, cells of epithelial origin, and epithelial tissues were analyzed. In transfected L cells Ep-CAM brings the opposing intercellular membranes into a close proximity (approximately 10-14 nm) at sporadic contacts; however, no structures resembling junctional complexes were observed. In L cells cotransfected with Ep-CAM and E-cadherin, both molecules localize at the sites of cell-cell contact, forming independent adhesion sites with no Ep-CAM detectable within the structurally distinguishable cadherin-mediated adherens junctions. In well-differentiated carcinoma cell lines Ep-CAM colocalized with E-cadherin practically along the whole lateral domain; however, no colocalization was observed between Ep-CAM and the components of the tight junction complex (occludin and ZO-1), desmosomes (desmoplakins I/II), or cell-substrate adhesions (beta1 integrins). This was confirmed by analysis of polarized epithelium of normal colon where Ep-CAM was present at the lateral membrane including the adherens junction areas, but was fully excluded from the apical cell membrane (microvilli), tight junctions, and desmosomes. We conclude that (1) Ep-CAM does not form junctional complexes in L cells, (2) in epithelial cells, cell surface Ep-CAM is present at the lateral cell membrane, but is excluded from tight junctions and desmosomes, and (3) in epithelial cells, Ep-CAM is present within adhesions mediated by the classic cadherins (especially E-cadherin) with both types of molecules remaining as independent clusters. The colocalization with cadherins might be important

  8. Getting a grip: hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer E.; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2004-10-01

    Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) techniques are further developed to study hyaluronan-mediated adhesion of chondrocyte cells. We present a calibration scheme and address fundamental issues concerning the use of HOTs for quantitative force measurements. Influence of SLM pixelation on trap stiffness is observed and can be utilized to design calibrated HOTs more effectively. It is also shown that the HOTs trapping stiffness can vary significantly over short distances. Then we use HOTs cell adhesion assays investigate the viscoelastic and adhesive nature of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix (PCM) at two different time steps (30 minute and 24 hour incubation periods). Surprisingly, no physical influence of the large, presumably gel-like PCM is observed. However, a difference is discerned in the adhesiveness of the two sets of cells. The early-stage cells have reversible adhesion with negatively-charged and fibronectin-coated microspheres even after they are held at the cell surface for 10 seconds. In contrast, late stage cells stick irreversibly to all types of beads: positive, negative, fibronectin and hyaluronan-coated. Additionally, only the late stage cells produce membrane tethers. These observations suggest that the late-stage chondrocytes have less surface-associated hyaluronan and have interesting implications for the role of hyaluronan in the early stages of cell adhesion.

  9. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  10. Cyclosporin A renders target cells resistant to immune cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Hudnall, S D

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of cytolytically susceptible human target cells with therapeutic concentrations of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A renders these cells highly resistant to T cell-mediated, natural killer (NK) cell-mediated, and complement-mediated cytolysis. The resistance is dose dependent, time dependent and reversible. The resistance is accompanied by target cell growth inhibition as measured by thymidine uptake. Surprisingly, target cell growth inhibition induced by serum depletion is associated with cell-mediated cytolytic resistance. These data suggest that cyclosporin A (CsA) may block some target cell biochemical pathway(s) important in the suicidal cytolytic process which is (are) linked to some G0/G1 cell cycle events. In addition, these results suggest that the increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disease in human organ transplant recipients may be contributed to by CsA-induced resistance of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes to immune cytolysis. In the post-transplant setting, CsA probably blocks T cell-dependent responses to EBV-transformed B lymphocytes (Bird, A.G., McLachlan, S.M. and Britton, S., Nature 1981, 289: 300) yet leaving the NK cell and antibody-dependent responses intact (Shao-Hsien, C. et al. Transplantation 1983. 35: 127). However, given the direct effect of CsA upon EBV-transformed B lymphocytes, these cells would be rendered resistant to nearly all forms of cytolytic immune control (cytotoxic T lymphocyte, natural killer, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement). Unregulated EBV-transformed B lymphocytes may then proliferate in the CsA-treated host thus leading to a polyclonal B cell hyperplasia. Our data would suggest that this early pre-malignant process is likely to be reversible following CsA dose reduction. Indeed, EBV-dependent polyclonal B cell hyperplasia is seen in early post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (Hanto, D.W., et al., Transplantation 1989, 47: 458

  11. Polarized Integrin Mediates Human Keratinocyte Adhesion to Basal Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, Michele; Tamura, Richard N.; Kajiji, Shama; Bondanza, Sergio; Rossino, Paola; Cancedda, Ranieri; Carlo Marchisio, Pier; Quaranta, Vito

    1990-09-01

    Epithelial cell interactions with matrices are critical to tissue organization. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitations of cell lysates prepared from stratified cultures of human epidermal cells showed that the major integrins expressed by keratinocytes are α_Eβ_4 (also called α_6β_4) and α_2β_1/α_3β_1. The α_Eβ_4 integrin is localized at the surface of basal cells in contact with the basement membrane, whereas α_2β_1/ α_3β_1 integrins are absent from the basal surface and are localized only on the lateral surface of basal and spinous keratinocytes. Anti-β_4 antibodies potently inhibited keratinocyte adhesion to matrigel or purified laminin, whereas anti-β_1 antibodies were ineffective. Only anti-β_4 antibodies were able to detach established keratinocyte colonies. These data suggest that α_Eβ_4 mediates keratinocyte adhesion to basal lamina, whereas the β_1 subfamily is involved in cell-cell adhesion of keratinocytes.

  12. M protein mediates streptococcal adhesion to HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J R; Stinson, M W

    1994-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes adheres to human epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. To identify adhesins, cell wall components were extracted from S. pyogenes M6 with alkali or by treatment with mutanolysin and lysozyme. HEp-2 cells were incubated with extracts of S. pyogenes M6 and then analyzed by Western blot (immunoblot) assays, using antibodies to S. pyogenes. Only one streptococcal component (62 kDa) was bound to HEp-2 cells and was identified serologically as M6 protein. Experiments with pepsin-cleaved fragments of M protein indicated that the binding site was located at the N-terminal half of the molecule. M protein was bound selectively to two trypsin-sensitive surface components, 97 and 205 kDa, of HEp-2 cells on nitrocellulose blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Tritium-labeled lipoteichoic acid bound to different HEp-2 cell components, 34 and 35 kDa, in a parallel experiment, indicating that lipoteichoic acid was not complexed with M protein and does not mediate M-protein binding. The four HEp-2 components were unrelated to fibronectin since they did not react with specific antibodies. An M-protein-deficient (M-) strain of streptococcus (JRS75), grown in chemically defined medium, showed 73% less adhesion activity to HEp-2 monolayers than an M+ strain (JRS4). Streptococcal adhesion was insensitive to competitive inhibition by selected monosaccharides. These results indicate that M protein binds directly to certain HEp-2 cell membrane components and mediates streptococcal adhesion. PMID:8300205

  13. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. This induction of cell adhesion is likely due to clustering of ALCAM at the cell surface, which is observed after CytD treatment. Single-particle tracking demonstrated that the lateral mobility of ALCAM in the cell membrane is increased 30-fold after CytD treatment. In contrast, both surface distribution and adhesion of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored ALCAM mutant are insensitive to CytD, despite the increase in lateral mobility of GPI-ALCAM upon CytD treatment. This demonstrates that clustering of ALCAM is essential for cell adhesion, whereas enhanced diffusion of ALCAM alone is not sufficient for cluster formation. In addition, upon ligand binding, both free diffusion and the freely dragged distance of wild-type ALCAM, but not of GPI-ALCAM, are reduced over time, suggesting strengthening of the cytoskeleton linkage. From these findings we conclude that activation of ALCAM-mediated adhesion is dynamically regulated through actin cytoskeleton-dependent clustering. PMID:10848629

  14. Talins and kindlins; partners in integrin-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, David A; Campbell, Iain D; Critchley, David R

    2014-01-01

    Integrin receptors provide a dynamic tightly-regulated link between the extracellular matrix (or cellular counter-receptors) and intracellular cytoskeletal and signalling networks, enabling cells to sense and respond to their chemical and physical environment. Talins and kindlins, two families of FERM–domain proteins, bind the cytoplasmic tail of integrins, recruit cytoskeletal and signalling proteins involved in mechano-transduction, and synergise to activate integrin binding to extracellular ligands. New data reveal the domain structure of full-length talin, provide insights into talin-mediated integrin activation, and show that RIAM recruits talin to the plasma membrane while vinculin stabilises talin in cell–matrix junctions. How Kindlins’ act is less well defined, but disease-causing mutations show that kindlins are also essential for integrin activation, adhesion, cell spreading and signalling. PMID:23860236

  15. Direct measurement of DNA-mediated adhesion between lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Shimobayashi, S F; Mognetti, B M; Parolini, L; Orsi, D; Cicuta, P; Di Michele, L

    2015-06-28

    Multivalent interactions between deformable mesoscopic units are ubiquitous in biology, where membrane macromolecules mediate the interactions between neighbouring living cells and between cells and solid substrates. Lately, analogous artificial materials have been synthesised by functionalising the outer surface of compliant Brownian units, for example emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles, with selective linkers, in particular short DNA sequences. This development extended the range of applicability of DNA as a selective glue, originally applied to solid nano and colloidal particles. On very deformable lipid vesicles, the coupling between statistical effects of multivalent interactions and mechanical deformation of the membranes gives rise to complex emergent behaviours, as we recently contributed to demonstrate [Parolini et al., Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 5948]. Several aspects of the complex phenomenology observed in these systems still lack a quantitative experimental characterisation and a fundamental understanding. Here we focus on the DNA-mediated multivalent interactions of a single liposome adhering to a flat supported bilayer. This simplified geometry enables the estimate of the membrane tension induced by the DNA-mediated adhesive forces acting on the liposome. Our experimental investigation is completed by morphological measurements and the characterisation of the DNA-melting transition, probed by in situ Förster Resonant Energy Transfer spectroscopy. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of an analytical theory that couples the deformation of the vesicle to a full description of the statistical mechanics of mobile linkers. With at most one fitting parameter, our theory is capable of semi-quantitatively matching experimental data, confirming the quality of the underlying assumptions. PMID:25989828

  16. Deacetylation of Fungal Exopolysaccharide Mediates Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mark J.; Geller, Alexander M.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Liu, Hong; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Le Mauff, François; Chabot, Joseé; Ralph, Benjamin; Ostapska, Hanna; Lehoux, Mélanie; Cerone, Robert P.; Baptista, Stephanie D.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Filler, Scott G.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive infection in immunocompromised patients. Recently, galactosaminogalactan (GAG), an exopolysaccharide composed of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), was identified as a virulence factor required for biofilm formation. The molecular mechanisms underlying GAG biosynthesis and GAG-mediated biofilm formation were unknown. We identified a cluster of five coregulated genes that were dysregulated in GAG-deficient mutants and whose gene products share functional similarity with proteins that mediate the synthesis of the bacterial biofilm exopolysaccharide poly-(β1-6)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG). Bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GAG cluster gene agd3 encodes a protein containing a deacetylase domain. Because deacetylation of N-acetylglucosamine residues is critical for the function of PNAG, we investigated the role of GAG deacetylation in fungal biofilm formation. Agd3 was found to mediate deacetylation of GalNAc residues within GAG and render the polysaccharide polycationic. As with PNAG, deacetylation is required for the adherence of GAG to hyphae and for biofilm formation. Growth of the Δagd3 mutant in the presence of culture supernatants of the GAG-deficient Δuge3 mutant rescued the biofilm defect of the Δagd3 mutant and restored the adhesive properties of GAG, suggesting that deacetylation is an extracellular process. The GAG biosynthetic gene cluster is present in the genomes of members of the Pezizomycotina subphylum of the Ascomycota including a number of plant-pathogenic fungi and a single basidiomycete species, Trichosporon asahii, likely a result of recent horizontal gene transfer. The current study demonstrates that the production of cationic, deacetylated exopolysaccharides is a strategy used by both fungi and bacteria for biofilm formation. PMID:27048799

  17. Nectin spot: a novel type of nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Kiyohito; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-09-15

    Nectins are Ca(2+)-independent immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily cell adhesion molecules constituting a family with four members, all of which have three Ig-like loops at their extracellular regions. Nectins play roles in the formation of a variety of cell-cell adhesion apparatuses. There are at least three types of nectin-mediated cell adhesions: afadin- and cadherin-dependent, afadin-dependent and cadherin-independent, and afadin- and cadherin-independent. In addition, nectins trans-interact with nectin-like molecules (Necls) with three Ig-like loops and other Ig-like molecules with one to three Ig-like loops. Furthermore, nectins and Necls cis-interact with membrane receptors and integrins, some of which are associated with the nectin-mediated cell adhesions, and play roles in the regulation of many cellular functions, such as cell polarization, movement, proliferation, differentiation, and survival, co-operatively with these cell surface proteins. The nectin-mediated cell adhesions are implicated in a variety of diseases, including genetic disorders, neural disorders, and cancers. Of the three types of nectin-mediated cell adhesions, the afadin- and cadherin-dependent apparatus has been most extensively investigated, but the examples of the third type of apparatus independent of afadin and cadherin are recently increasing and its morphological and functional properties have been well characterized. We review here recent advances in research on this type of nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus, which is named nectin spot. PMID:27621480

  18. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... adhesions Ovarian cyst References Munireddy S, Kavalukas SL, Barbul A. Intra-abdominal healing: gastrointestinal tract and adhesions. Surg Clin N Am Kulaylat MN, Dayton, MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, ...

  19. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  20. Integrins mediate adhesion of medulloblastoma cells to tenascin and activate pathways associated with survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Paul; Partridge, Darren; Staniszewska, Izabela; Wang, Jin Y; Grabacka, Maja; So, Kelvin; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Reiss, Krzysztof; Khalili, Kamel; Croul, Sidney E

    2008-11-01

    Medulloblastoma spreads by leptomeningeal dissemination rather than by infiltration that characterizes other CNS tumors, eg, gliomas. This study represents an initial attempt to identify both the molecules that mediate medulloblastoma adhesion to leptomeninges and the pathways that are key to survival and proliferation of tumor following adhesion. As a first step in molecule identification, we produced adhesion of D283 medulloblastoma cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of H4 glioma cells in vitro. Within this context, D283 cells preferentially expressed the alpha9 and beta1 integrin subunits; antibody and disintegrin blockade of alpha9 and beta1 binding eliminated the adhesion. The H4 ECM was enriched in tenascin, a binding partner for the alpha9beta1 integrin heterodimer. Purified tenascin-C supported D283 cell adhesion. The adhesion was blocked by antibodies to alpha9 and beta1 integrin. In vivo data were similar; immunohistochemistry of primary human medulloblastomas with leptomeningeal extension demonstrated increased expression of alpha9 and beta1 integrins as well as tenascin at the interface of brain and leptomeningeal tumor. These data suggest that tumor-cell expressions of alpha9 and beta1 integrins in combination with extracellular tenascin are necessary for medulloblastoma adhesion to the leptomeninges. As a first step in the identification of pathways that mediate survival and proliferation of tumor following adhesion, we demonstrated that adhesion to H4 ECM was associated with survival and proliferation of D283 cells as well as activation of the MAPK pathway in a growth factor deficient environment. Antibody blockade of alpha9 and beta1 integrin binding that eliminated adhesion also eliminated the in vitro survival benefit. These data suggest that adhesion of medulloblastoma to the meninges is necessary for the survival and proliferation of these tumor cells at the secondary site. PMID:18794852

  1. Mini-review: The role of redox in DOPA-mediated marine adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Nicklisch, Sascha; Waite, J. Herbert

    2012-01-01

    3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylanine (Dopa)-containing proteins are key to wet adhesion in mussels and possibly other sessile organisms also. However, Dopa-mediated adhesive bonding is a hard act to follow in that, at least in mussels, bonding depends on Dopa in both reduced and oxidized forms, for adhesion and cohesion, respectively. Given the vulnerability of Dopa to spontaneous oxidation, the most significant challenge to using it in practical adhesion is controlling Dopa redox in a temporally- and spatially defined manner. Mussels appear to achieve such control in their byssal attachment plaques, and factors involved in redox control can be measured with precision using redox probes such as the diphenylpicryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. Understanding the specifics of natural redox control may provide fundamentally important insights for adhesive polymer engineering and antifouling strategies. PMID:22924420

  2. Sea urchin coelomic fluid agglutinin mediates coelomocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Canicattì, C; Pagliara, P; Stabili, L

    1992-08-01

    The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus coelomic fluid was found to contain agglutinin which agglutinates animal erythrocytes and promotes adhesion of autologous coelomocytes. Hemagglutinating activity depended upon the presence of calcium ions and was relatively heat-stable. Through a combination of methods including ammonium sulfate precipitation and both size exclusion and ion exchange chromatographies, we purified the anti-rabbit agglutinating factor. The intact agglutinin migrates as a single band with an apparent M(r) of over 200,000. Three distinct protein bands with a calculated M(r) of 174,000, 137,000, and 76,000, respectively were observed under reducing conditions. The purified agglutinin strongly promoted the in vitro adhesion of autologous coelomocytes. PMID:1425767

  3. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1–Dependent Neutrophil Adhesion to Endothelial Cells Induces Caveolae-Mediated Pulmonary Vascular Hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guochang; Vogel, Stephen M.; Schwartz, David E.; Malik, Asrar B.; Minshall, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of caveolae in the mechanism of increased pulmonary vascular permeability and edema formation induced by the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We observed that the increase in lung vascular permeability induced by the activation of PMNs required caveolin-1, the caveolae scaffold protein. The permeability increase induced by PMN activation was blocked in caveolin-1 knockout mice and by suppressing caveolin-1 expression in rats. The response was also dependent on Src phosphorylation of caveolin-1 known to activate caveolae-mediated endocytosis in endothelial cells. To address the role of PMN interaction with endothelial cells, we used an intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 blocking monoclonal antibody. Preventing the ICAM-1–mediated PMN binding to endothelial cells abrogated Src phosphorylation of caveolin-1, as well as the increase in endothelial permeability. Direct ICAM-1 activation by crosslinking recapitulated these responses, suggesting that ICAM-1 activates caveolin-1 signaling responsible for caveolae-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability. Our results provide support for the novel concept that a large component of pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability induced by activation of PMNs adherent to the vessel wall is dependent on signaling via caveolin-1 and increased caveolae-mediated transcytosis. Thus, it is important to consider the role of the transendothelial vesicular permeability pathway that contributes to edema formation in developing therapeutic interventions against PMN-mediated inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury. PMID:18511851

  4. Localized, Positive Charge Mediates Adhesion of Rhodosporidium toruloides to Barley Leaves and Polystyrene

    PubMed Central

    Buck, James W.; Andrews, John H.

    1999-01-01

    The physicochemical forces that mediate attachment of yeasts to the phylloplane are unknown. Cell surface charge and hydrophobicity and adhesion to polystyrene, glass, and barley were assessed for wild-type Rhodosporidium toruloides and attachment-minus (Att−) mutants. Cells were grown under conditions promoting (excess carbon) or not promoting (excess nitrogen) capsule production. Hydrophobicity was measured by adhesion to xylenes, and surface charge characteristics were assessed by attachment to either DEAE (positive)- or carboxymethyl (CM) (negative)-Sephadex ion-exchange beads. Hydrophobicity and adhesiveness of nonencapsulated, wild-type R. toruloides decreased from mid-log to late stationary phase. Encapsulated wild-type R. toruloides cells were more hydrophobic and more adhesive than nonencapsulated cells. However, two encapsulated Att− mutants were more hydrophobic than the wild type and levels of adhesion of R. toruloides were similar on polystyrene and less hydrophobic glass surfaces. Adhesion of wild-type yeast to barley and polystyrene was correlated with attachment to CM-Sephadex beads, indicating a positive cell surface charge. Sixteen Att− mutants did not exhibit a positive cell surface charge, and wild-type yeast cells that did not attach to CM-Sephadex did not adhere to either polystyrene or barley. Wild-type R. toruloides attached to CM-Sephadex beads by the poles of the cells, indicating a localization of positive charge which was also visualized with India ink. We conclude that localized, positive charge, and not hydrophobic interactions, mediates attachment of R. toruloides to barley leaves. PMID:10224017

  5. Distinct CD55 Isoform Synthesis and Inhibition of Complement-Dependent Cytolysis by Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Chan; Kim, Hangeun; Meyer, Keith; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Ray, Ranjit

    2016-08-15

    CD55/DAF, one of the regulators of complement activation, is known to limit excess complement activation on the host cell surface by accelerating the decay of C3 convertase. We reported previously that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection or virus core protein expression upregulates CD55 expression. CD55 associates with HCV particles, potentially protecting HCV from lysis in circulation. An increase in CD55 on the surface of HCV-infected cells may inhibit complement-mediated cell killing. In this study, we show that Abs against cancer cell surface proteins induce complement-dependent cytolysis or Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of immortalized human hepatocytes in the presence of CD55-blocking Ab. CD55 has a secreted isoform (sCD55) that is generated by alternative splicing. We observed that sCD55 is induced in HCV-infected or HCV replicon-harboring cells, as well as in liver biopsy samples from chronically HCV-infected patients. Conditioned medium from HCV-infected hepatoma cells (Huh7.5 cells) or immortalized human hepatocytes inhibited C3 convertase activity and complement-dependent cytolysis of sheep blood erythrocytes. Chronically HCV-infected patient sera inhibited C3 convertase activity, further implicating HCV-specific impairment of complement function in infected humans. CD55-blocking Ab inhibited erythrocyte lysis by conditioned medium, suggesting that CD55/sCD55 impairs convertase activity. Together, our data show that HCV infection induces sCD55 expression in HCV-infected cell culture-conditioned medium and inhibits C3 convertase activity. This may have implications for modulating complement-mediated immune function in the microenvironment and on HCV-harboring cells. PMID:27357152

  6. Adhesion molecule-mediated hippo pathway modulates hemangioendothelioma cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Madri, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    Hemangioendotheliomas are categorized as intermediate-grade vascular tumors that are commonly localized in the lungs and livers. The regulation of this tumor cell's proliferative and apoptotic mechanisms is ill defined. We recently documented an important role for Hippo pathway signaling via endothelial cell adhesion molecules in brain microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. We found that endothelial cells lacking cell adhesion molecules escaped from contact inhibition and exhibited abnormal proliferation and apoptosis. Here we report on the roles of adherens junction molecule modulation of survivin and the Hippo pathway in the proliferation and apoptosis of a murine hemangioendothelioma (EOMA) cell. We demonstrated reduced adherens junction molecule (CD31 and VE-cadherin) expression, increased survivin and Ajuba expression, and a reduction in Hippo pathway signaling resulting in increased proliferation and decreased activation of effector caspase 3 in postconfluent EOMA cell cultures. Furthermore, we confirmed that YM155, an antisurvivin drug that interferes with Sp1-survivin promoter interactions, and survivin small interference RNA (siRNA) transfection elicited induction of VE-cadherin, decreased Ajuba expression, increased Hippo pathway and caspase activation and apoptosis, and decreased cell proliferation. These findings support the importance of the Hippo pathway in hemangioendothelioma cell proliferation and survival and YM155 as a potential therapeutic agent in this category of vascular tumors. PMID:25266662

  7. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony; Sarthok Sircar / Anthony Roberts Collaboration

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a select range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function g*) between the adhesion phase (when g*>0.5) and the fragmentation phase (when g*<0.5) is attributed to a nonlinear relation between the total nanoscale binding forces and the separation gap between the cells. We show that adhesion is favored in highly ionic fluids, increased deformability of the cells, elastic binders and a higher fluid shear rate (until a critical value). Continuation of the limit points (i.e., the turning points where the slope of the function g* changes sign within a select range of critical shear SS is supported by the Adelaide University startup funds and AR is supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP150102385.

  8. Friction and adhesion mediated by supramolecular host-guest complexes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Roberto; Benassi, Andrea; Vanossi, Andrea; Ma, Ming; Urbakh, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The adhesive and frictional response of an AFM tip connected to a substrate through supramolecular host-guest complexes is investigated by dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. Here, the variation of the pull-off force with the unloading rate recently observed in experiments is unraveled by evidencing simultaneous (progressive) breaking of the bonds at fast (slow) rates. The model reveals the origin of the observed plateaus in the retraction force as a function of the tip-surface distance, showing that they result from the tip geometrical features. In lateral sliding, the model exhibits a wide range of dynamic behaviors ranging from smooth sliding to stick-slip at different velocities, with the average friction force determined by the characteristic formation/rupture rates of the complexes. In particular, it is shown that for some molecular complexes friction can become almost constant over a wide range of velocities. Also, we show the possibility of exploiting the ageing effect through slide-hold-slide experiments, in order to infer the characteristic formation rate. Finally, our model predicts a novel "anti-ageing" effect which is characterized by a decrease of the static friction force with the hold time. Such an effect is explained in terms of enhancement of adhesion during sliding, especially observed at high driving velocities. PMID:26975343

  9. Monoclonal Lym-1 antibody-targeted lysis of B lymphoma cells by neutrophils. Evidence for two mechanisms of FcgammaRII-dependent cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Mancini, M; Amelotti, M; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2000-11-01

    Human neutrophils incubated with the anti-HLA-DR mAb Lym-1, plus PMA, induced significant cytolysis of B lymphoma cells compared with Lym-1 and PMA alone. The effect of PMA was independent of the ability of the compound to stimulate neutrophil-respiratory burst. In fact, first, neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease were cytolytically effective in spite of their inability to produce oxidants. Second, various kinase inhibitors exerted different effects on the PMA-stimulated cytolytic system and neutrophil-oxidative burst. Previous studies have shown the involvement of the FcgammaRII, CD11b-CD18 integrins, and CD66b glycoproteins in the Lym-1 mAb-dependent cytolysis by GM-CSF-stimulated neutrophils. The present PMA-stimulated system was inhibited by the anti-FcgammaRII mAb IV.3, the anti-CD18 mAb MEM 48, and the anti-CD11b mAb 2LPM19c but not by the anti-CD66b mAb 80H3 and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Furthermore, the PMA- and GM-CSF-stimulated cytolysis was insensitive and sensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin, respectively. Thus, the use of PMA and GMCSF as neutrophil stimulants uncovers the existence of distinct mechanisms of Lym-1 mAb-mediated cytolysis. PMID:11073105

  10. Glucosyltransferase mediates adhesion of Streptococcus gordonii to human endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Vacca-Smith, A M; Jones, C A; Levine, M J; Stinson, M W

    1994-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used as an experimental host model to investigate the mechanism(s) of streptococcal adhesion in infective endocarditis. Adhesion activity of Streptococcus gordonii was maximal during the logarithmic phase of growth and was greatly reduced or eliminated by pretreatment of bacteria with heat, formaldehyde, or trypsin. At saturating numbers of streptococci, an average of 81 bacteria were bound per HUVEC. Streptococcal adhesion was inhibited by low-molecular-weight dextran and heparin but not by sucrose, fibronectin, or laminin. Adhesion was also prevented by pretreatment of HUVEC with proteins dissociated from the surface of S. gordonii with 10 mM EDTA or isolated from spent culture medium. Western blot (immunoblot) assays detected a single adhesion protein of 153 kDa (AP153) on HUVEC after incubation with unfractionated extracts of streptococci. The adhesin exhibited glucosyltransferase (GTF) activity when incubated with sucrose and Triton X-100 after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The AP153 was purified by affinity chromatography on dextran beads and show to have binding activity for HUVEC, GTF activity, an amino acid composition similar to that reported for GTF of S. gordonii, and the ability to inhibit S. gordonii adhesion. Incubation of the streptococci with antibodies to the adhesin inhibited bacterial attachment to HUVEC monolayers. These results indicate that surface-localized GTF mediates adhesion of S. gordonii to HUVEC in vitro and may serve as a mechanism for colonization of the endocardium in infective endocarditis. Images PMID:8188339

  11. Formation of semi-dilute adhesion domains driven by weak elasticity-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2016-08-21

    Cell-cell adhesion is established by specific binding of receptor and ligand proteins anchored in the cell membranes. The adhesion bonds attract each other and often aggregate into large clusters that are central to many biological processes. One possible origin of attractive interactions between adhesion bonds is the elastic response of the membranes to their deformation by the bonds. Here, we analyze these elasticity-mediated interactions using a novel mean-field approach. Our analysis of systems at different densities of bonds, ϕ, reveals that the phase diagram, i.e., the binodal and spinodal lines, exhibit a nearly universal behavior when the temperature T is plotted against the scaled density x = ϕξ(2), where ξ is the linear size of the membrane's region affected by the presence of a single isolated bond. The critical point (ϕc , Tc) is located at very low densities, and slightly below Tc we identify phase coexistence between two low-density phases. Dense adhesion domains are observed only when the height by which the bonds deform the membranes, h0, is much larger than their thermal roughness, Δ, which occurs at very low temperatures T≪Tc. We, thus, conclude that the elasticity-mediated interactions are weak and cannot be regarded as responsible for the formation of dense adhesion domains. The weakness of the elasticity-mediated effect and its relevance to dilute systems only can be attributed to the fact that the membrane's elastic energy saturates in the semi-dilute regime, when the typical spacing between the bonds r≳ξ, i.e., for x≲ 1. Therefore, at higher densities, only the mixing entropy of the bonds (which always favors uniform distributions) is thermodynamically relevant. We discuss the implications of our results for the question of immunological synapse formation, and demonstrate that the elasticity-mediated interactions may be involved in the aggregation of these semi-dilute membrane domains. PMID:27426284

  12. Role for different cell proteinases in cancer invasion and cytolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, S.; Beck, G.; DiStefano, J. F.; Lysik, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The crucial role of non-plasminogen dependent serine proteinases is tissue invasive and cytolytic functions of Walker 256 cancer cells has been documented using a rat urinary bladder invasion and a 125I-labelled fibroblast cytolysis assay. The invasive capacity of these cancer cells was abrogated by non toxic concentrations of the serine proteinase inhibitors, diisopropylfluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, but not by metallo or cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Although tumour cell collagenase activity and plasminogen activator were demonstrated, these proteolytic enzymes were not essential in these in vitro assays. These results suggest that different categories of proteinases play specific roles in the complicated process of cancer invasion. PMID:2992566

  13. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  14. α- and γ-mangostin cause shape changes, inhibit aggregation and induce cytolysis of rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingqiu; Park, Jung-Min; Chang, Kyung-Hwa; Chin, Young-Won; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2015-10-01

    α- and γ-mangostin are natural xanthones isolated from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) and the major constituents responsible for the plant's diverse biological activities. In this study, the effects of α- and γ-mangostin on platelets were investigated based on their possible antiplatelet activity. Treatment of isolated platelets with α-mangostin resulted in attenuation of platelet aggregatory response to collagen, thrombin or ADP. Such antiaggregatory effects were concentration-dependent in ranges of 1-10 μM. Interestingly, α-mangostin alone induced shape changes in platelets at the same concentration, and higher levels, 25 and 50 μM caused platelet lysis. Similarly, γ-mangostin induced shape changes and inhibited aggregation at 2.5-25 μM, while 50 and 100 μM γ-mangostin exhibited cytotoxicity. Platelet shape change induced by α- and γ-mangostin was accompanied by increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. MLC phosphorylation and subsequent shape changes were prevented by pretreatment with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, but not by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelating with BAPTA-AM and extracellular Ca(2+) removal. Cytolysis by both α- and γ-mangostin was abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Taken together, α- and γ-mangostin have differential effects on platelets depending on their concentration, which includes inducing shape change, inhibiting aggregation and causing cytolysis. Platelet shape change is attributed to stimulation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway, while platelet lysis is presumably mediated by extracellular Ca(2+) influx. These results suggest that mangosteen consumption may have potential platelet effects, although the in vivo or clinical consequences have yet to be assessed. PMID:26343955

  15. Placental fractalkine mediates adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to villous trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Siwetz, Monika; Sundl, Monika; Kolb, Dagmar; Hiden, Ursula; Herse, Florian; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1) recently attracted increasing attention in the field of placenta research due to its dual nature, acting both as membrane-bound and soluble form. While the membrane-bound form mediates flow resistant adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial and epithelial cells via its corresponding receptor CX3CR1, the soluble form arises from metalloprotease dependent shedding and bears chemoattractive activity for monocytes, natural killer cells and T-cells. In human placenta, fractalkine is expressed at the apical microvillous plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast, which may enable close physical contact with circulating maternal leukocytes. Based on these observations we tested the hypothesis that fractalkine mediates adhesion of monocytes to the villous trophoblast. Forskolin-induced differentiation and syncytialization of the trophoblast cell line BeWo was accompanied with a substantial upregulation in fractalkine expression and led to increased adhesion of the monocyte cell line THP-1, which preferentially bound to syncytia. Blocking as well as silencing of the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 proved involvement of the fractalkine/CX3CR1 system in adherence of THP-1 monocytes to villous trophoblast. Pre-incubation of THP-1 monocytes with human recombinant fractalkine as well as silencing of CX3CR1 expression in THP-1 monocytes significantly impaired their adherence to BeWo cells and primary term trophoblasts. The present study suggests fractalkine as another candidate amongst the panel of adhesion molecules enabling stable interaction between leukocytes and the syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:25566740

  16. Structural specializations of α4β7, an integrin that mediates rolling adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yamei; Zhu, Jianghai; Mi, Li-Zhi; Walz, Thomas; Sun, Hao; Chen, JianFeng

    2012-01-01

    The lymphocyte homing receptor integrin α4β7 is unusual for its ability to mediate both rolling and firm adhesion. α4β1 and α4β7 are targeted by therapeutics approved for multiple sclerosis and Crohn’s disease. Here, we show by electron microscopy and crystallography how two therapeutic Fabs, a small molecule (RO0505376), and mucosal adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) bind α4β7. A long binding groove at the α4–β7 interface for immunoglobulin superfamily domains differs in shape from integrin pockets that bind Arg-Gly-Asp motifs. RO0505376 mimics an Ile/Leu-Asp motif in α4 ligands, and orients differently from Arg-Gly-Asp mimics. A novel auxiliary residue at the metal ion–dependent adhesion site in α4β7 is essential for binding to MAdCAM-1 in Mg2+ yet swings away when RO0505376 binds. A novel intermediate conformation of the α4β7 headpiece binds MAdCAM-1 and supports rolling adhesion. Lack of induction of the open headpiece conformation by ligand binding enables rolling adhesion to persist until integrin activation is signaled. PMID:22232704

  17. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (Ep-CAM) Modulates Cell–Cell Interactions Mediated by Classic Cadherins

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Sergey V.; Balzar, Maarten; Winter, Manon J.; Bakker, Hellen A.M.; Bruijn, Inge H. Briaire-de; Prins, Frans; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Warnaar, Sven O.

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of noncadherin-type, Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion molecules to the organization of epithelial tissues is, as yet, unclear. A homophilic, epithelial Ca2+-independent adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in most epithelia, benign or malignant proliferative lesions, or during embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Ep-CAM, when expressed in cells interconnected by classic cadherins (E- or N-cadherin), induces segregation of the transfectants from the parental cell type in coaggregation assays and in cultured mixed aggregates, respectively. In the latter assay, Ep-CAM–positive transfectants behave like cells with a decreased strength of cell–cell adhesion as compared to the parental cells. Using transfectants with an inducible Ep-CAM–cDNA construct, we demonstrate that increasing expression of Ep-CAM in cadherin-positive cells leads to the gradual abrogation of adherens junctions. Overexpression of Ep-CAM has no influence on the total amount of cellular cadherin, but affects the interaction of cadherins with the cytoskeleton since a substantial decrease in the detergent-insoluble fraction of cadherin molecules was observed. Similarly, the detergent-insoluble fractions of α- and β-catenins decreased in cells overexpressing Ep-CAM. While the total β-catenin content remains unchanged, a reduction in total cellular α-catenin is observed as Ep-CAM expression increases. As the cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesions diminish, Ep-CAM–mediated intercellular connections become predominant. An adhesion-defective mutant of Ep-CAM lacking the cytoplasmic domain has no effect on the cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesions. The ability of Ep-CAM to modulate the cadherin-mediated cell–cell interactions, as demonstrated in the present study, suggests a role for this molecule in development of the proliferative, and probably malignant, phenotype of epithelial cells, since an increase of Ep-CAM expression was observed in vivo in

  18. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) modulates cell-cell interactions mediated by classic cadherins.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, S V; Balzar, M; Winter, M J; Bakker, H A; Briaire-de Bruijn, I H; Prins, F; Fleuren, G J; Warnaar, S O

    1997-12-01

    The contribution of noncadherin-type, Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion molecules to the organization of epithelial tissues is, as yet, unclear. A homophilic, epithelial Ca2+-independent adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in most epithelia, benign or malignant proliferative lesions, or during embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Ep-CAM, when expressed in cells interconnected by classic cadherins (E- or N-cadherin), induces segregation of the transfectants from the parental cell type in coaggregation assays and in cultured mixed aggregates, respectively. In the latter assay, Ep-CAM-positive transfectants behave like cells with a decreased strength of cell-cell adhesion as compared to the parental cells. Using transfectants with an inducible Ep-CAM-cDNA construct, we demonstrate that increasing expression of Ep-CAM in cadherin-positive cells leads to the gradual abrogation of adherens junctions. Overexpression of Ep-CAM has no influence on the total amount of cellular cadherin, but affects the interaction of cadherins with the cytoskeleton since a substantial decrease in the detergent-insoluble fraction of cadherin molecules was observed. Similarly, the detergent-insoluble fractions of alpha- and beta-catenins decreased in cells overexpressing Ep-CAM. While the total beta-catenin content remains unchanged, a reduction in total cellular alpha-catenin is observed as Ep-CAM expression increases. As the cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions diminish, Ep-CAM-mediated intercellular connections become predominant. An adhesion-defective mutant of Ep-CAM lacking the cytoplasmic domain has no effect on the cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions. The ability of Ep-CAM to modulate the cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions, as demonstrated in the present study, suggests a role for this molecule in development of the proliferative, and probably malignant, phenotype of epithelial cells, since an increase of Ep-CAM expression was observed in vivo in association

  19. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynamic shear environment of the vasculature, we show that TNF-α-activated THP1/primary human monocytes and MDA-MB-231 cells form stable aggregates, and that the monocytes in these aggregates mediate the adhesion of otherwise nonadherent MDA-MB-231 cells to inflamed endothelium under flow (55±2.4 vs. 1.7±0.82 at a shear stress of 0.5 dyn/cm2, P<0.01). We also show that the hydrodynamic forces determine the size and orientation of aggregates adhered to the endothelium, and strongly favor the attachment of small aggregates with tumor cells downstream of flow (74–86% doublets at 0.5–2 dyn/cm2, P<0.01). The 5-fold up-regulation of ICAM-1 on TNF-α-activated MDA-MB-231 cells through the Nf-κB pathway was found to be critical in MDA-MB-231–monocyte aggregation and endothelial adhesion. Our results demonstrate that, under inflammatory conditions, monocytes may serve to disseminate tumor cells through circulation, and the tumor–monocyte–endothelial axis may represent a new therapeutic target to reduce cancer metastasis.—Evani, S. J., Prabhu, R. G., Gnanaruban, V., Finol, E. A., Ramasubramanian, A. K. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow. PMID:23616566

  20. Glycosylation Inhibitors Efficiently Inhibit P-Selectin-Mediated Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD

  1. Enhanced cell adhesion on bioinert ceramics mediated by the osteogenic cell membrane enzyme alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Alieh; Shirzadi, Bahareh; Azizi, Zahra; Maedler, Kathrin; Volkmann, Eike; Hildebrand, Nils; Maas, Michael; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-12-01

    Functional bone and dental implant materials are required to guide cell response, offering cues that provide specific instructions to cells at the implant/tissue interface while maintaining full biocompatibility as well as the desired structural requirements and functions. In this work we investigate the influence of covalently immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in bone mineralization, on the first contact and initial cell adhesion. To this end, ALP is covalently immobilized by carbodiimide-mediated chemoligation on two highly bioinert ceramics, alpha-alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) that are well-established for load-bearing applications. The physicochemical surface properties are evaluated by profilometry, zeta potential and water contact angle measurements. The initial cell adhesion of human osteoblasts (HOBs), human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) was investigated. Cell adhesion was assessed at serum free condition via quantification of percentage of adherent cells, adhesion area and staining of the focal adhesion protein vinculin. Our findings show that after ALP immobilization, the Al2O3 and Y-TZP surfaces gained a negative charge and their hydrophilicity was increased. In the presence of surface-immobilized ALP, a higher cell adhesion, more pronounced cell spreading and a higher number of focal contact points were found. Thereby, this work gives evidence that surface functionalization with ALP can be utilized to modify inert materials for biological conversion and faster bone regeneration on inert and potentially load-bearing implant materials. PMID:27612703

  2. The Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule, SynCAM1, Mediates Astrocyte-to-Astrocyte and Astrocyte-to-GnRH Neuron Adhesiveness in the Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Sandau, Ursula S.; Mungenast, Alison E.; McCarthy, Jack; Biederer, Thomas; Corfas, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1 (SynCAM1) as a component of a genetic network involved in the hypothalamic control of female puberty. Although it is well established that SynCAM1 is a synaptic adhesion molecule, its contribution to hypothalamic function is unknown. Here we show that, in addition to the expected neuronal localization illustrated by its presence in GnRH neurons, SynCAM1 is expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes. Cell adhesion assays indicated that SynCAM is recognized by both GnRH neurons and astrocytes as an adhesive partner and promotes cell-cell adhesiveness via homophilic, extracellular domain-mediated interactions. Alternative splicing of the SynCAM1 primary mRNA transcript yields four mRNAs encoding membrane-spanning SynCAM1 isoforms. Variants 1 and 4 are predicted to be both N and O glycosylated. Hypothalamic astrocytes and GnRH-producing GT1-7 cells express mainly isoform 4 mRNA, and sequential N- and O-deglycosylation of proteins extracted from these cells yields progressively smaller SynCAM1 species, indicating that isoform 4 is the predominant SynCAM1 variant expressed in astrocytes and GT1-7 cells. Neither cell type expresses the products of two other SynCAM genes (SynCAM2 and SynCAM3), suggesting that SynCAM-mediated astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-GnRH neuron adhesiveness is mostly mediated by SynCAM1 homophilic interactions. When erbB4 receptor function is disrupted in astrocytes, via transgenic expression of a dominant-negative erbB4 receptor form, SynCAM1-mediated adhesiveness is severely compromised. Conversely, SynCAM1 adhesive behavior is rapidly, but transiently, enhanced in astrocytes by ligand-dependent activation of erbB4 receptors, suggesting that erbB4-mediated events affecting SynCAM1 function contribute to regulate astrocyte adhesive communication. PMID:21486931

  3. Keratins control intercellular adhesion involving PKC-α–mediated desmoplakin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Cornelia; Loschke, Fanny; Schwarz, Nicole; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell adhesion is crucial for epidermal morphogenesis and homeostasis and relies predominantly on the interaction of keratins with desmosomes. Although the importance of desmosomes to epidermal coherence and keratin organization is well established, the significance of keratins in desmosome organization has not been fully resolved. Here, we report that keratinocytes lacking all keratins show elevated, PKC-α–mediated desmoplakin phosphorylation and subsequent destabilization of desmosomes. We find that PKC-α activity is regulated by Rack1–keratin interaction. Without keratins, desmosomes assemble but are endocytosed at accelerated rates, rendering epithelial sheets highly susceptible to mechanical stress. Re-expression of the keratin pair K5/14, inhibition of PKC-α activity, or blocking of endocytosis reconstituted both desmosome localization at the plasma membrane and epithelial adhesion. Our findings identify a hitherto unknown mechanism by which keratins control intercellular adhesion, with potential implications for tumor invasion and keratinopathies, settings in which diminished cell adhesion facilitates tissue fragility and neoplastic growth. PMID:23690176

  4. Modeling of cell adhesion and deformation mediated by receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Golestaneh, Amirreza F; Nadler, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The current work is devoted to studying adhesion and deformation of biological cells mediated by receptors and ligands in order to enhance the existing models. Due to the sufficient in-plane continuity and fluidity of the phospholipid molecules, an isotropic continuum fluid membrane is proposed for modeling the cell membrane. The developed constitutive model accounts for the influence of the presence of receptors on the deformation and adhesion of the cell membrane through the introduction of spontaneous area dilation. Motivated by physics, a nonlinear receptor-ligand binding force is introduced based on charge-induced dipole interaction. Diffusion of the receptors on the membrane is governed by the receptor-ligand interaction via Fick's Law and receptor-ligand interaction. The developed model is then applied to study the deformation and adhesion of a biological cell. The proposed model is used to study the role of the material, binding, spontaneous area dilation and environmental properties on the deformation and adhesion of the cell. PMID:26093646

  5. Horizontal Top Connectors Mediate a Sliding Adhesion to Hair Cell Stereocilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavitaki, K. D.; Corey, D. P.

    2011-11-01

    When the tip of a hair bundle is deflected, the stereocilia pivot as a unit, producing a shearing displacement between adjacent tips. It is not clear how stereocilia can stick together laterally but still shear. We used dissociated hair cells from the bullfrog saccule and high-speed video imaging to characterize this sliding adhesion. Movement of individual stereocilia was proportional to height, indicating that stereocilia pivot at their basal insertion points. All stereocilia moved by approximately the same angular deflection, and the same motion was observed at 1, 20 and 700 Hz stimulus frequency. Motions were consistent with a geometric model that assumes the stiffness of lateral links holding stereocilia together is >1000 times the pivot stiffness of stereocilia and that these links can slide in the membrane—in essence, that stereocilia shear without separation. The same motion was observed when bundles were moved perpendicular to the tip links, or when tip links, ankle links and shaft connectors were cut, ruling out these links as the basis for sliding adhesion. Stereocilia rootlet angles tend to push stereocilia tips together. However, stereocilia remained cohesive for large deflections, ruling out rootlet prestressing as the basis for sliding adhesion. The horizontal top connectors apparently mediate a sliding adhesion. Consequently, all transduction channels of a hair cell are mechanically in parallel, an arrangement that may enhance amplification in the inner ear.

  6. Stochastic Model of Integrin-Mediated Signaling and Adhesion Dynamics at the Leading Edges of Migrating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cirit, Murat; Krajcovic, Matej; Choi, Colin K.; Welf, Erik S.; Horwitz, Alan F.; Haugh, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    Productive cell migration requires the spatiotemporal coordination of cell adhesion, membrane protrusion, and actomyosin-mediated contraction. Integrins, engaged by the extracellular matrix (ECM), nucleate the formation of adhesive contacts at the cell's leading edge(s), and maturation of nascent adhesions to form stable focal adhesions constitutes a functional switch between protrusive and contractile activities. To shed additional light on the coupling between integrin-mediated adhesion and membrane protrusion, we have formulated a quantitative model of leading edge dynamics combining mechanistic and phenomenological elements and studied its features through classical bifurcation analysis and stochastic simulation. The model describes in mathematical terms the feedback loops driving, on the one hand, Rac-mediated membrane protrusion and rapid turnover of nascent adhesions, and on the other, myosin-dependent maturation of adhesions that inhibit protrusion at high ECM density. Our results show that the qualitative behavior of the model is most sensitive to parameters characterizing the influence of stable adhesions and myosin. The major predictions of the model, which we subsequently confirmed, are that persistent leading edge protrusion is optimal at an intermediate ECM density, whereas depletion of myosin IIA relieves the repression of protrusion at higher ECM density. PMID:20195494

  7. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    SciTech Connect

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  8. Ionizing radiation mediates expression of cell adhesion molecules in distinct histological patterns within the lung.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration of the lung is a predominant histopathological change that occurs during radiation pneumonitis. Emigration of inflammatory cells from the circulation requires the interaction between cell adhesion molecules on the vascular endothelium and molecules on the surface of leukocytes. We studied the immunohistochemical pattern of expression of cell adhesion molecules in lungs from mice treated with thoracic irradiation. After X-irradiation, the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1; E-selectin) was primarily expressed in the pulmonary endothelium of larger vessels and minimally in the microvascular endothelium. Conversely, the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) was expressed in the pulmonary capillary endothelium and minimally in the endothelium of larger vessels. Radiation-mediated E-selectin expression was first observed at 6 h, whereas ICAM-1 expression initially increased at 24 h after irradiation. ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression persisted for several days. P-selectin is constitutively expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies in the endothelium, which moved to the vascular lumen within 30 min after irradiation. P-selectin was not detected in the pulmonary endothelium at 6 h after irradiation. The radiation dose required for increased cell adhesion molecule expression within the pulmonary vascular endothelium was 2 Gy, and expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression is increased in the pulmonary endothelium following thoracic irradiation. The pattern of expression of E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 is distinct from one another. PMID:9187101

  9. From flexibility to cooperativity: multiscale modeling of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yinghao

    2013-03-01

    Cadherins constitute a large family of Ca2 +-dependent adhesion molecules in the Inter-cellular junctions that play a pivotal role in the assembly of cells into specific three-dimensional tissues. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin-mediated cell adhesion are still not fully understood, it seems likely that both cis dimers that are formed by binding of extracellular domains of two cadherins on the same cell surface, and trans-dimers formed between cadherins on opposing cell surfaces, are critical to trigger the junction formation. Here we present a new multiscale computational strategy to model the process of junction formation based on the knowledge of cadherin molecular structures and its 3D binding affinities. The cell interfacial region is defined by a simplified system where each of two interacting membrane surfaces is represented as a two-dimensional lattice with each cadherin molecule treated as a randomly diffusing unit. The binding energy for a pair of interacting cadherins in this two-dimensional discrete system is obtained from 3D binding affinities through a renormalization process derived from statistical thermodynamics. The properties of individual cadherins used in the lattice model are based on molecular level simulations. Our results show that within the range of experimentally-measured binding affinities, cadherins condense into junctions driven by the coupling of cis and trans interactions. The key factor appears to be a loss of molecular flexibility during trans dimerization that increases the magnitude of lateral cis interactions. We have also developed stochastic dynamics to study the adhesion of multiple cells. Each cell in the system is described as a mechanical entity and adhesive properties between two cells are derived from the lattice model. The cellular simulations are used to study the specific problems of tissue morphogenesis and tumor metastasis. The consequent question and upcoming challenge is to understand the

  10. Multi-scale Simulation of Receptor-Ligand-Mediated Adhesion of Two (PMN) Leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vijay; Konstantopoulos, Kostas; Eggleton, Charles

    2008-11-01

    Leukocytes are recruited from the bloodstream to the site of inflammation through interactions between cell surface receptors and complementary ligands expressed on the surface of the endothelium. PMNs rolling on activated endothelium can mediate secondary capture of PMNs flowing in the free stream through homotypic interactions. This interaction is mediated by L-selectin binding to PSGL-1 between the free-stream and adherent PMNs. Both L-selectin and PSGL-1 molecules are concentrated on the tips of PMN microvilli. It has been demonstrated that steady application of a threshold level of shear rate is necessary to support PMN homotypic aggregation in bulk suspension. A reduction of shear rate below a threshold value diminishes the probability of cell adhesion. Cell aggregation is a complex phenomenon involving the interplay of bond kinetics and hydrodynamics. We simulate PSGL-1--L-selectin-mediated homotypic leukocyte adhesion-dissociation under an externally applied force field using the Immersed Boundary Method. We investigate the influence of membrane elasticity and kinetic parameters on contact area, bond dynamics, average number of bonds formed and their respective life time. A Hookean spring model is used to characterize receptor-ligand bonds and their stochastic nature is simulated using the Monte Carlo technique.

  11. Introduction of p130cas signaling complex formation upon integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a role for Src family kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Vuori, K; Hirai, H; Aizawa, S; Ruoslahti, E

    1996-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion triggers intracellular signaling cascades, including tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins. Among these are the focal adhesion proteins p130cas (Cas) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here we identify the kinase(s) mediating integrin-induced Cas phosphorylation and characterize protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphorylated Cas. We found that expression of a constitutively active FAK in fibroblasts results in a consecutive tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. This effect required the autophosphorylation site of FAK, which is a binding site for Src family kinases. Integrin-mediated phosphorylation of Cas was not, however, compromised in fibroblasts lacking FAK. In contrast, adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas was reduced in cells lacking Src, whereas enhanced phosphorylation of Cas was observed Csk- cells, in which Src kinases are activated. These results suggest that Src kinases are responsible for the integrin-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Cas. FAK seems not to be necessary for phosphorylation of Cas, but when autophosphorylated, FAK may recruit Src family kinases to phosphorylate Cas. Cas was found to form complexes with Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing signaling molecules, such as the SH2/SH3 adapter protein Crk, following integrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors C3G and Sos were found in the Cas-Crk complex upon integrin ligand binding. These observations suggest that Cas serves as a docking protein and may transduce signals to downstream signaling pathways following integrin-mediated cell adhesion. PMID:8649368

  12. Saikosaponin D isolated from Bupleurum falcatum inhibits selectin-mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoung-Jun; Kim, Ye Sol; Bae, Eun Young; Oh, Tae-Seok; Choi, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jung-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Seung Woong

    2014-01-01

    Three saikosaponins were isolated from the MeOH extract of the roots of Bupleurum falcatum L.: saikosaponins B3 (1); B4 (2); and D (3). Of the three, compound 3 inhibited the interaction of selectins (E, L, and P) and THP-1 cells with IC50 values of 1.8, 3.0 and 4.3 µM, respectively. Also, the aglycone structure 4 of compound 3 showed moderate inhibitory activity on L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion. From these results, we suspect that compound 3 isolated from Bupleurum falcatum roots would be a good candidate for therapeutic strategies to treat inflammation. PMID:25486247

  13. A common clathrin-mediated machinery coordinates cell-cell adhesion and bacterial internalization

    PubMed Central

    Bonazzi, Matteo; Kühbacher, Andreas; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Mallet, Adeline; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Brodsky, Frances M.; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Invasive bacterial pathogens often target cellular proteins involved in adhesion as a first event during infection. For example, Listeria monocytogenes uses the bacterial protein InlA to interact with E-cadherin, hijack the host adherens junction machinery, and invade non-phagocytic cells by a clathrin-dependent mechanism. Here we investigate a potential role for clathrin in cell-cell adhesion. We observed that the initial steps of adherens junction formation trigger the phosphorylation of clathrin, and its transient localization at forming cell-cell contacts. Furthermore, we show that clathrin serves as a hub for the recruitment of proteins that are necessary for the actin rearrangements that accompany the maturation of adherens junctions. Using an InlA/E-cadherin chimera, we show that adherent cells expressing the chimera form adherens junctions with cells expressing E-cadherin. To model bacterial invasion, we demonstrate that non-adherent cells expressing the InlA chimera can be internalized by E-cadherin-expressing adherent cells. Together these results reveal that a common clathrin-mediated machinery may regulate internalization and cell adhesion and that the relative mobility of one of the interacting partners plays an important role in the commitment to either one of these processes. PMID:22984946

  14. Receptor-mediated adhesion phenomena. Model studies with the Radical-Flow Detachment Assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenberger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion phenomena play a vital role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. To investigate the physical and chemical factors that influence the cell/surface interaction, we have used a radial flow device, a so-called Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA). The RFDA allows us to make direct observations of the detachment process under specified experimental conditions. In results reported here, we have studied the detachment of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) from ligand-coated glass surfaces. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine several aspects of the adhesion process with particles having uniform properties that can be varied systematically. Advantages of the RFDA are many, especially direct observation of cell detachment over a range of shear stresses with quantitative measurement of the adhesive force. We focus our studies on the effects of ligand and receptor densities, along with the influence of pH and ionic strength of the medium. These data are analyzed with a mathematical model based on the theoretical framework of Bell, G. I. (1978. Science [Wash. DC]. 200:618-627) and Hammer, D. A. and D. A. Lauffenburger (1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487). We demonstrate experimental validation of a theoretical expression for the critical shear stress for particle detachment, and show that it is consistent with reasonable estimates for the receptor-ligand bond affinity. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2166596

  15. F4+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesion mediated by the major fimbrial subunit FaeG.

    PubMed

    Xia, Pengpeng; Song, Yujie; Zou, Yajie; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-09-01

    The FaeG subunit is the major constituent of F4(+) fimbriae, associated with glycoprotein and/or glycolipid receptor recognition and majorly contributes to the pathogen attachment to the host cells. To investigate the key factor involved in the fimbrial binding of F4(+) Escherichia coli, both the recombinant E. coli SE5000 strains carrying the fae operon gene clusters that express the different types of fimbriae in vitro, named as rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad, respectively, corresponding to the fimbrial types F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad, and the three isogenic in-frame faeG gene deletion mutants were constructed. The adhesion assays and adhesion inhibition assays showed that ΔfaeG mutants had a significant reduction in the binding to porcine brush border as well as the intestinal epithelial cell lines, while the complemented strain ΔfaeG/pfaeG restored the adhesion function. The recombinant bacterial strains rF4ab, rF4ac, and rF4ad have the same binding property as wild-type F4(+) E. coli strains do and improvement in terms of binding to porcine brush border and the intestinal epithelial cells, and the adherence was blocked by the monoclonal antibody anti-F4 fimbriae. These data demonstrate that the fimbrial binding of F4(+) E. coli is directly mediated by the major FaeG subunit. PMID:25847483

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma cells acquire the resistance to anti-cancer drugs through physical and functional interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment via two overlapping mechanisms. First, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) produce soluble factors, such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1, to activate signal transduction pathways leading to drug resistance (soluble factor-mediated drug resistance). Second, BMSCs up-regulate the expression of cell cycle inhibitors, anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family and ABC drug transporters in myeloma cells upon direct adhesion [cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR)]. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying drug resistance may greatly contribute to the advancement of cancer therapies. Recent investigations, including ours, have revealed the involvement of epigenetic alterations in drug resistance especially CAM-DR. For example, we found that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) determine the sensitivity of proteasome inhibitors and the histone methyltransferase EZH2 regulates the transcription of anti-apoptotic genes during the acquisition of CAM-DR by myeloma cells. In addition, another histone methyltransferase MMSET was shown to confer drug resistance to myeloma cells by facilitating DNA repair. These findings provide a rationale for the inclusion of epigenetic drugs, such as HDAC inhibitors and histone methylation modifiers, in combination chemotherapy for MM patients to increase the therapeutic index. PMID:27411688

  17. Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein is involved in αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shigeru; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D

    2006-01-01

    The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disorder. The most common symptom seen in WAS patients is bleeding. One of the main causes of bleeding is defective platelet aggregation. The causative gene of WAS encodes WAS protein (WASP). Here, we show that WASP binds to the calcium- and integrin-binding protein (CIB) in platelets. CIB was originally identified as a protein binding to the αIIb cytoplasmic tail of platelet integrin αIIbβ3, which has a primary role in platelet aggregation. We also show that the WASP–CIB complex is important in αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion, and that in patients mutant forms of WASP are expressed at reduced levels or show lower affinities for CIB than wild-type WASP. Our results indicate that impaired complex formation between mutant WASPs and CIB reduces αIIbβ3-mediated cell adhesion and causes defective platelet aggregation, resulting in bleeding. PMID:16582881

  18. Structural alterations of adhesion mediating components in cells cultured on poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Nebe, B; Forster, C; Pommerenke, H; Fulda, G; Behrend, D; Bernewski, U; Schmitz, K P; Rychly, J

    2001-09-01

    Polymers may serve as a biodegradable material in tissue engineering. To assess the biocompatibility of poly-beta-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB), we studied the structural organization of cellular molecules involved in adhesion using osteoblastic and epithelial cell lines. On PHB, both cell lines revealed a rounded cell shape due to reduced spreading. The filamentous organization of the actin cytoskeleton was impaired. In double immunofluorescence analyses we demostrated that the colocalization of the fibronectin fibrils with the actin filaments was lost in cultures on PHB. Similarly, collagen II distribution was altered, whereas the organization of collagen I was not obviously affected. Further evidence for impaired structural organization was obtained for the beta1-integrin receptor and vinculin which mediate the interaction of the cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix. In confluent epithelial cells, the tight junction protein ZO-1 showed a larger lateral extension in the cell-cell contacts when cells were grown on PHB. Because structural organization of components which mediate cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion controls cell physiology these parameters could be a sensitive indicator for the biocompatibility of implant materials. PMID:11511040

  19. Macrophages Mediate the Repair of Brain Vascular Rupture through Direct Physical Adhesion and Mechanical Traction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Wu, Chuan; Yang, Qifen; Gao, Jing; Li, Li; Yang, Deqin; Luo, Lingfei

    2016-05-17

    Hemorrhagic stroke and brain microbleeds are caused by cerebrovascular ruptures. Fast repair of such ruptures is the most promising therapeutic approach. Due to a lack of high-resolution in vivo real-time studies, the dynamic cellular events involved in cerebrovascular repair remain unknown. Here, we have developed a cerebrovascular rupture system in zebrafish by using multi-photon laser, which generates a lesion with two endothelial ends. In vivo time-lapse imaging showed that a macrophage arrived at the lesion and extended filopodia or lamellipodia to physically adhere to both endothelial ends. This macrophage generated mechanical traction forces to pull the endothelial ends and facilitate their ligation, thus mediating the repair of the rupture. Both depolymerization of microfilaments and inhibition of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase or Rac1 activity disrupted macrophage-endothelial adhesion and impaired cerebrovascular repair. Our study reveals a hitherto unexpected role for macrophages in mediating repair of cerebrovascular ruptures through direct physical adhesion and mechanical traction. PMID:27156384

  20. MUC16 contributes to the metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through focal adhesion mediated signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Seema; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Gupta, Suprit; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Smith, Lynette M.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2016-01-01

    MUC16, a heavily glycosylated type-I transmembrane mucin is overexpressed in several cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Previously, we have shown that MUC16 is significantly overexpressed in human PDAC tissues. However, the functional consequences and its role in PDAC is poorly understood. Here, we show that MUC16 knockdown decreases PDAC cell proliferation, colony formation and migration in vitro. Also, MUC16 knockdown decreases the tumor formation and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Mechanistically, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses confirms MUC16 interaction with galectin-3 and mesothelin in PDAC cells. Adhesion assay displayed decreased cell attachment of MUC16 knockdown cells with recombinant galectin-1 and galectin-3 protein. Further, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MUC16 knockout cells show decreased tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (T and Tn) in PDAC cells. Importantly, carbohydrate antigens were decreased in the region that corresponds to MUC16 and suggests for the decreased MUC16-galectin interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation also revealed a novel interaction between MUC16 and FAK in PDAC cells. Interestingly, we observed decreased expression of mesenchymal and increased expression of epithelial markers in MUC16-silenced cells. Additionally, MUC16 loss showed a decreased FAK-mediated Akt and ERK/MAPK activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that MUC16-focal adhesion signaling may play a critical role in facilitating PDAC growth and metastasis. PMID:27382435

  1. Human neutrophil Fc receptor-mediated adhesion under flow: a hollow fibre model of intravascular arrest.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, C; Candal-Couto, J J; Greer, M; Veale, D J; Woof, J M

    1995-04-01

    Human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were found to adhere to a novel model of blood vessel wall-associated IgG. The internal surfaces of cellulose acetate hollow fibres, of comparable internal diameter to small blood vessels, were coated with normal serum human IgG, heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG), laminin or fibrinogen. Under conditions of flow mimicking those in a small vessel, PMN were found to adhere markedly only to immunoglobulin-coated fibres. Arrest on HAIgG was inhibited by excess soluble IgG but not by bovine serum albumin (BSA), demonstrating that the adhesion was IgG-specific and presumably mediated by Fc gamma R on the PMN surface. Pre-adsorption of serum components onto HAIgG-coated fibres enhanced PMN arrest, due most probably to fixation of complement components by immobilized HAIgG, resulting in additional potential to entrap PMN via complement receptors such as CR3. Treatment of PMN with the regulatory neuropeptide substance P also enhanced adhesion to HAIgG-coated fibres and caused increased surface expression of Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RII and Fc gamma RIII. A mouse cell line derived from L cells, hR4C6, stably transfected with human Fc gamma RII, was found to adhere under flow to HAIgG-coated fibres, whilst untransfected parent L cells did not. This adhesion was similarly inhibited by excess soluble IgG, confirming the capability of Fc gamma R to mediate cell arrest. The study strongly suggests that Fc gamma R may play an important role in intravascular PMN arrest and we speculate that in inflammatory diseases PMN may adhere via Fc gamma R to immobilized immunoglobulin on the vascular endothelium, with subsequent degranulation and tissue damage. PMID:7535210

  2. Simulation of cell rolling and adhesion on surfaces in shear flow: general results and analysis of selectin-mediated neutrophil adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, D A; Apte, S M

    1992-01-01

    The receptor-mediated adhesion of cells to ligand-coated surfaces in viscous shear flow is an important step in many physiological processes, such as the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory response, lymphocyte homing, and tumor cell metastasis. This paper describes a calculational method which simulates the interaction of a single cell with a ligand-coated surface under flow. The cell is idealized as a microvilli-coated hard sphere covered with adhesive springs. The distribution of microvilli on the cell surface, the distribution of receptors on microvilli tips, and the forward and reverse reaction between receptor and ligand are all simulated using random number sampling of appropriate probability functions. The velocity of the cell at each time step in the simulation results from a balance of hydrodynamic, colloidal and bonding forces; the bonding force is derived by summing the individual contributions of each receptor-ligand tether. The model can simulate the effect of many parameters on adhesion, such as the number of receptors on microvilli tips, the density of ligand, the rates of reaction between receptor and ligand, the stiffness of the resulting receptor-ligand springs, the response of springs to strain, and the magnitude of the bulk hydrodynamic stresses. The model can successfully recreate the entire range of expected and observed adhesive phenomena, from completely unencumbered motion, to rolling, to transient attachment, to firm adhesion. Also, the method can generate meaningful statistical measures of adhesion, including the mean and variance in velocity, rate constants for cell attachment and detachment, and the frequency of adhesion. We find a critical modulating parameter of adhesion is the fractional spring slippage, which relates the strain of a bond to its rate of breakage; the higher the slippage, the faster the breakage for the same strain. Our analysis of neutrophil adhesive behavior on selectin-coated (CD62-coated) surfaces in viscous shear

  3. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  4. Two distinct actin networks mediate traction oscillations to confer mechanosensitivity of focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhanghan; Plotnikov, Sergey; Waterman, Clare; Liu, Jian

    Cells sense the mechanical stiffness of their extracellular matrix (ECM) by exerting traction force through focal adhesions (FAs), which are integrin-based protein assemblies. Strikingly, FA-mediated traction forces oscillate in time and space and govern durotaxis - the tendency of most cell types to migrate toward stiffer ECM. The underlying mechanism of this intriguing oscillation of FA traction force is unknown. Combing theory and experiment, we develop a model of FA growth, which integrates coordinated contributions of a branched actin network and stress fibers in the process. We show that retrograde flux of branched actin network contributes to a traction peak near the FA distal tip and that stress fiber-mediated actomyosin Contractility generates a second traction peak near the FA center. Formin-mediated stress fiber elongation negatively feeds back with actomyosin Contractility, resulting in the central traction peak oscillation. This underpins observed spatio-temporal patterns of the FA traction, and broadens the ECM stiffness range, over which FAs could accurately adapt with traction force generation. Our findings shed light on the fundamental mechanism of FA mechanosensing and hence durotaxis.

  5. Neurite Fasciculation Mediated by Complexes of Axonin-1 and Ng Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Stefan; Spirig, Marianne; Ginsburg, Claudia; Buchstaller, Andrea; Berger, Philipp; Lanz, Rainer; Rader, Christoph; Vogt, Lorenz; Kunz, Beat; Sonderegger, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecules composed of immunoglobulin and fibronectin type III-like domains have been implicated in cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth, and fasciculation. Axonin-1 and Ng cell adhesion molecule (NgCAM), two molecules with predominantly axonal expression exhibit homophilic interactions across the extracellular space (axonin- 1/axonin-1 and NgCAM/NgCAM) and a heterophilic interaction (axonin-1–NgCAM) that occurs exclusively in the plane of the same membrane (cis-interaction). Using domain deletion mutants we localized the NgCAM homophilic binding in the Ig domains 1-4 whereas heterophilic binding to axonin-1 was localized in the Ig domains 2-4 and the third FnIII domain. The NgCAM–NgCAM interaction could be established simultaneously with the axonin-1–NgCAM interaction. In contrast, the axonin-1–NgCAM interaction excluded axonin-1/axonin-1 binding. These results and the examination of the coclustering of axonin-1 and NgCAM at cell contacts, suggest that intercellular contact is mediated by a symmetric axonin-12/NgCAM2 tetramer, in which homophilic NgCAM binding across the extracellular space occurs simultaneously with a cis-heterophilic interaction of axonin-1 and NgCAM. The enhanced neurite fasciculation after overexpression of NgCAM by adenoviral vectors indicates that NgCAM is the limiting component for the formation of the axonin-12/NgCAM2 complexes and, thus, neurite fasciculation in DRG neurons. PMID:9852159

  6. Dependence of plasmin-mediated degradation of platelet adhesive receptors on temperature and Ca sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, K.J.; Eisenberg, P.R.; Jaffe, A.S.; Santoro, S.A. )

    1990-10-15

    The effects of activation of plasminogen by streptokinase and tissue-type-plasminogen activator on platelet activation and the membrane glycoproteins (GPs) that mediate platelet adhesion and aggregation are not yet fully defined. To clarify effects on platelets during activation of plasminogen in vitro, we used monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), flow cytometry, and platelets surface-labeled with {sup 125}I to characterize changes in receptors for fibrinogen (GPIIb-IIIa), von Willebrand factor (GPIb), and collagen (GPIa-IIa). Activation of plasminogen in plasma with pharmacologic concentrations of plasminogen activators did not degrade GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb, and caused only a modest decrease in GPIa. In washed platelets GPIIb-IIIa was extensively degraded by plasmin at 37{degrees}C in the absence of exogenous Ca{sup 2+}, conditions that destabilize the IIb-IIIa complex. Degradation of GPIb in washed platelets displayed a similar although less-marked dependence on temperature and the absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The binding of activation-specific MoAbs did not increase during activation of plasminogen in plasma. We conclude that during pharmacologic fibrinolysis, reported inhibition of platelet function in plasma is not due to degradation of platelet-adhesive receptors. In addition, platelet activation observed during thrombolytic therapy does not appear to be a direct consequence of plasminogen activation.

  7. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  8. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development. PMID:26757815

  9. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  10. Role of platelet adhesion in homeostasis and immunopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Männel, D N; Grau, G E

    1997-01-01

    Various molecules expressed on the surface of platelets have been shown to mediate the protective or deleterious role of these cells in immuno-inflammatory mechanisms. Increasing evidence points to the involvement of the cell adhesion molecules, gpIIb-IIIa, P-selectin, CD31, LFA-1, and CD36 in the interaction between platelets and endothelial cells as well as other cell types. The possible role of these molecules in the ability of platelets to support endothelium and to protect against tumour necrosis factor mediated cytolysis or parasitic invasion are reviewed. The involvement of platelets as effectors of tissue damage in cerebral malaria, lipopolysaccharide induced pathology, and pulmonary fibrosis is also discussed. This has then been extended to include the intercellular mechanisms underpinning their pathogenic role in metastasis, transplant rejection, stroke, brain hypoxia, and related conditions. A better understanding of the complex regulation and hierarchical organisation of these various platelet adhesion molecules may prove useful in the development of new approaches to the treatment of such diseases. Images PMID:9350300

  11. Direct role of interrod spacing in mediating cell adhesion on Sr-HA nanorod-patterned coatings

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianhong; Han, Yong; Lu, Shemin

    2014-01-01

    The process in which nanostructured surfaces mediate cell adhesion is not well understood, and may be indirect (via protein adsorption) or direct. We prepared Sr-doped hydroxyapatite (Sr1-HA) 3D nanorods (with interrod spacing of 67.3±3.8, 95.7±4.2, and 136.8±8.7 nm) and 2D nanogranulate patterned coatings on titanium. Employing the coatings under the same surface chemistry and roughness, we investigated the indirect/direct role of Sr1-HA nanotopographies in the regulation of osteoblast adhesion in both serum-free and serum-containing Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle/Ham’s Medium. The results reveal that the number of adherent cells, cell-secreted anchoring proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin, and collagen), vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) denoted focal adhesion (FA) contact, and gene expression of vinculin, FAK, and integrin subunits (α2, α5, αv, β1, and β3), undergo significant changes in the inter-nanorod spacing and dimensionality of Sr1-HA nanotopographies in the absence of serum; they are significantly enhanced on the <96 nm spaced nanorods and more pronounced with decreasing interrod spacing. However, they are inhibited on the >96 nm spaced nanorods compared to nanogranulated 2D topography. Although the adsorption of fibronectin and vitronectin from serum are higher on 136.8±8.7 nm spaced nanorod patterned topography than nanogranulated topography, cell adhesion is inhibited on the former compared to the latter in the presence of serum, further suggesting that reduced cell adhesion is independent of protein adsorption. It is clearly indicated that 3D nanotopography can directly modulate cell adhesion by regulating integrins, which subsequently mediate anchoring proteins’ secretion and FA formation rather than via protein adsorption. PMID:24634585

  12. Direct role of interrod spacing in mediating cell adhesion on Sr-HA nanorod-patterned coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhong; Han, Yong; Lu, Shemin

    2014-01-01

    The process in which nanostructured surfaces mediate cell adhesion is not well understood, and may be indirect (via protein adsorption) or direct. We prepared Sr-doped hydroxyapatite (Sr1-HA) 3D nanorods (with interrod spacing of 67.3 ± 3.8, 95.7 ± 4.2, and 136.8 ± 8.7 nm) and 2D nanogranulate patterned coatings on titanium. Employing the coatings under the same surface chemistry and roughness, we investigated the indirect/direct role of Sr1-HA nanotopographies in the regulation of osteoblast adhesion in both serum-free and serum-containing Dulbecco's Modified Eagle/Ham's Medium. The results reveal that the number of adherent cells, cell-secreted anchoring proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin, and collagen), vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) denoted focal adhesion (FA) contact, and gene expression of vinculin, FAK, and integrin subunits (α2, α5, αv, β1, and β3), undergo significant changes in the inter-nanorod spacing and dimensionality of Sr1-HA nanotopographies in the absence of serum; they are significantly enhanced on the <96 nm spaced nanorods and more pronounced with decreasing interrod spacing. However, they are inhibited on the >96 nm spaced nanorods compared to nanogranulated 2D topography. Although the adsorption of fibronectin and vitronectin from serum are higher on 136.8 ± 8.7 nm spaced nanorod patterned topography than nanogranulated topography, cell adhesion is inhibited on the former compared to the latter in the presence of serum, further suggesting that reduced cell adhesion is independent of protein adsorption. It is clearly indicated that 3D nanotopography can directly modulate cell adhesion by regulating integrins, which subsequently mediate anchoring proteins' secretion and FA formation rather than via protein adsorption. PMID:24634585

  13. Integrin-Mediated Adhesion and Proliferation of Human MCs Elicited by A Hydroxyproline-Lacking, Collagen-like Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Ohm D.; Jha, Amit K.; Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the competence of a rationally designed collagen-like peptide (CLP-Cys) sequence - containing the minimal essential Glycine-Glutamic acid-Arginine (GER) triplet but lacking the hydroxyproline residue - for supporting human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Cellular responses to the CLP-Cys sequence were analyzed by conjugating the peptide to two different substrates – a hard, planar glass surface and a soft hyaluronic acid (HA) particle-based hydrogel. Integrin-mediated cell spreading and adhesion were observed for hMSCs cultivated on the CLP-Cys functionalized surfaces, whereas on control surfaces lacking the peptide motif, cells either did not adhere or maintained a round morphology. On the glass surface, CLP-Cys-mediated spreading led to the formation of extended and well developed stress fibers composed of F-actin bundles and focal adhesion complexes while on the soft gel surface, less cytoskeletal reorganization was observed. The hMSCs proliferated significantly on the surfaces presenting CLP-Cys, compared to the control surfaces lacking CLP-Cys. Competitive binding assay employing soluble CLP-Cys revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of hMSC adhesion to the CLP-Cys-presenting surfaces. Blocking the α2β1 receptor on hMSC also resulted in a reduction of cell adhesion on both types of CLP-Cys surfaces, confirming the affinity of CLP-Cys to α2β1 receptors. These results established the competence of the hydroxyproline-free CLP-Cys for eliciting integrin-mediated cellular responses including adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Thus, CLP-Cys-modified HA hydrogels are attractive candidates as bioactive scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:21658756

  14. Integrin-mediated adhesion and proliferation of human MSCs elicited by a hydroxyproline-lacking, collagen-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Ohm D; Jha, Amit K; Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the competence of a rationally designed collagen-like peptide (CLP-Cys) sequence - containing the minimal essential Glycine-Glutamic acid-Arginine (GER) triplet but lacking the hydroxyproline residue - for supporting human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Cellular responses to the CLP-Cys sequence were analyzed by conjugating the peptide to two different substrates - a hard, planar glass surface and a soft hyaluronic acid (HA) particle-based hydrogel. Integrin-mediated cell spreading and adhesion were observed for hMSCs cultivated on the CLP-Cys functionalized surfaces, whereas on control surfaces lacking the peptide motif, cells either did not adhere or maintained a round morphology. On the glass surface, CLP-Cys-mediated spreading led to the formation of extended and well developed stress fibers composed of F-actin bundles and focal adhesion complexes while on the soft gel surface, less cytoskeletal reorganization organization was observed. The hMSCs proliferated significantly on the surfaces presenting CLP-Cys, compared to the control surfaces lacking CLP-Cys. Competitive binding assay employing soluble CLP-Cys revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of hMSC adhesion to the CLP-Cys-presenting surfaces. Blocking the α(2)β(1) receptor on hMSC also resulted in a reduction of cell adhesion on both types of CLP-Cys surfaces, confirming the affinity of CLP-Cys to α(2)β(1) receptors. These results established the competence of the hydroxyproline-free CLP-Cys for eliciting integrin-mediated cellular responses including adhesion, spreading and proliferation. Thus, CLP-Cys-modified HA hydrogels are attractive candidates as bioactive scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:21658756

  15. Galaptin Mediates the Effect of Hypergravity on Vascular Smooth Muscle cell (SMC) Adhesion to Laminin Containing Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enahora, Fatisha T.; Bosah, Francis N.; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    Galaptin, an endogenous beta-galactoside specific lectin, has been reported to bind to laminin and subsequently decrease the binding of SMC. Cellular function depend on cell:matrix interactions. Hypergravity (HGrav) affect a number of cellular functions, yet little is known about its affect on cell adhesion. We examined the possibility that galaptin mediates the effects of hypergravity on SMC adherence. Confluent primate aorta SMC cultures were subjected to Hgrav (centrifuged at 6G) for 24 and 48 hr. Cells were non-enzymatically dispersed, pretreated with antisense (AS-oligo) or control sense (SS-oligo) oligonucleotides to galaptin mRNA (0.01 micro g/ml), then seeded in uncoated or ECL-matrix coated plates. Adhesion of cells were monitored after 6 hr. HGrav increased adhesion by 100-300% compared to controls. AS-oligo decreased adhesion for both HGrav and control cells. SS-oligo did not affect adhesion for either HGrav or control cells. These studies show that HGrav affects cell adhesion and that galaptin expression is required for this effect.

  16. Attachment of the Yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Is Mediated by Adhesives Localized at Sites of Bud Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Buck, James W.; Andrews, John H.

    1999-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides (anamorph, Rhodotorula glutinis) is a common phylloplane epiphyte with biocontrol potential. To understand how R. toruloides adheres to plant surfaces, we obtained nonadherent fungal mutants after chemical mutagenesis with methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester. Sixteen attachment-minus (Att−) mutants were identified by three methods: (i) screening capsule-minus colonies for loss of adhesive ability; (ii) enrichment for mutants unable to attach to polystyrene; and (iii) selection for reduced fluorescence of fluorescein isothiocyanate-concanavalin A (Con A)-stained cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. None of the 16 mutants attached to polystyrene or barley leaves. The lectin Con A eliminated adhesion in all of the wild-type isolates tested. Hapten competition assays indicated that Con A bound to mannose residues on the cell surface. Adhesion of wild-type R. toruloides was transient; nonadhesive cells subsequently became adhesive, with bud development. All Att− mutants and nonattaching wild-type cells lacked polar regions that stained intensely with fluorescein isothiocyanate-Con A and India ink. Lectin, enzyme, and chemical treatments showed that the polar regions consisted of alkali-soluble materials, including mannose residues. Tunicamycin treatment reduced wild-type adhesion, indicating that the mannose residues could be associated with glycoproteins. We concluded that compounds, including mannose residues, that are localized at sites of bud development mediate adhesion of R. toruloides to both polystyrene and barley leaf surfaces. PMID:9925569

  17. Hic-5 mediates TGFβ-induced adhesion in vascular smooth muscle cells by a Nox4-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Isabel; Martin-Garrido, Abel; Zhou, Dennis W.; Clempus, Roza E.; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Valdivia, Alejandra; Lassègue, Bernard; García, Andrés J.; Griendling, Kathy K.; Martin, Alejandra San

    2015-01-01

    Objective Focal adhesions (FAs) link the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and as such play important roles in growth, migration and contractile properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Recently, it has been shown that downregulation of Nox4, a transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-inducible, H2O2-producing enzyme, affects the number of FAs. However, the effectors downstream of Nox4 that mediate FA regulation are unknown. The FA resident protein hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is H2O2- and TGFβ-inducible, and a binding partner of the heat shock protein (Hsp)27. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which Hic-5 and Hsp27 participate in TGFβ-induced, Nox4-mediated VSMC adhesion and migration. Approach and Results Through a combination of molecular biology and biochemistry techniques, we found that TGFβ, by a Nox4-dependent mechanism, induces the expression and interaction of Hic-5 and Hsp27, which is essential for Hic-5 localization to FAs. Importantly, we found that Hic-5 expression is required for the TGFβ-mediated increase in FA number, and adhesive forces and migration. Mechanistically, Nox4 downregulation impedes Smad signaling by TGFβ, and Hsp27 and Hic-5 upregulation by TGFβ is blocked in Smad4-deficient cells. Conclusions Hic-5 and Hsp27 are effectors of Nox4 required for TGFβ-stimulated FA formation and adhesion strength and migration in VSMC. PMID:25814672

  18. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages. PMID:26934296

  19. Laminin α2-Mediated Focal Adhesion Kinase Activation Triggers Alport Glomerular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M.; Meehan, Daniel T.; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages. PMID:24915008

  20. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Ivey A; Gurr, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs), and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms governing

  1. Chitosan Mediates Germling Adhesion in Magnaporthe oryzae and Is Required for Surface Sensing and Germling Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Ivey A.; Gurr, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal cell wall not only plays a critical role in maintaining cellular integrity, but also forms the interface between fungi and their environment. The composition of the cell wall can therefore influence the interactions of fungi with their physical and biological environments. Chitin, one of the main polysaccharide components of the wall, can be chemically modified by deacetylation. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as chitin deacetylases (CDAs), and results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-glucosamine. Chitosan has previously been shown to accumulate in the cell wall of infection structures in phytopathogenic fungi. Here, it has long been hypothesized to act as a 'stealth' molecule, necessary for full pathogenesis. In this study, we used the crop pathogen and model organism Magnaporthe oryzae to test this hypothesis. We first confirmed that chitosan localizes to the germ tube and appressorium, then deleted CDA genes on the basis of their elevated transcript levels during appressorium differentiation. Germlings of the deletion strains showed loss of chitin deacetylation, and were compromised in their ability to adhere and form appressoria on artificial hydrophobic surfaces. Surprisingly, the addition of exogenous chitosan fully restored germling adhesion and appressorium development. Despite the lack of appressorium development on artificial surfaces, pathogenicity was unaffected in the mutant strains. Further analyses demonstrated that cuticular waxes are sufficient to over-ride the requirement for chitosan during appressorium development on the plant surface. Thus, chitosan does not have a role as a 'stealth' molecule, but instead mediates the adhesion of germlings to surfaces, thereby allowing the perception of the physical stimuli necessary to promote appressorium development. This study thus reveals a novel role for chitosan in phytopathogenic fungi, and gives further insight into the mechanisms governing

  2. Tetanus neurotoxin-mediated cleavage of cellubrevin impairs epithelial cell migration and integrin-dependent cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Gavard, Julie; Irinopoulou, Theano; Mège, René-Marc; Galli, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    A role for endocytosis and exocytosis in cell migration has been proposed but not yet demonstrated. Here, we show that cellubrevin (Cb), an early endosomal v-SNARE, mediates trafficking in the lamellipod of migrating epithelial cells and partially colocalizes with markers of focal contacts. Expression of tetanus neurotoxin, which selectively cleaves Cb, significantly reduced the speed of migrating epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of tetanus neurotoxin enhanced the adhesion of epithelial cells to collagen, laminin, fibronectin, and E-cadherin; altered spreading on collagen; and impaired the recycling of β1 integrins. These results suggest that Cb-dependent membrane trafficking participates in cell motility through the regulation of cell adhesion. PMID:15851685

  3. Epidermal growth factor-like repeats mediate lateral and reciprocal interactions of Ep-CAM molecules in homophilic adhesions.

    PubMed

    Balzar, M; Briaire-de Bruijn, I H; Rees-Bakker, H A; Prins, F A; Helfrich, W; de Leij, L; Riethmüller, G; Alberti, S; Warnaar, S O; Fleuren, G J; Litvinov, S V

    2001-04-01

    Ep-CAM is a new type of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) which does not structurally resemble the members of the four major families (cadherins, integrins, selectins, and CAMs of the immunoglobulin superfamily) and mediates Ca(2+)-independent, homophilic adhesions. The extracellular domain of Ep-CAM consists of a cysteine-rich region, containing two type II epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, followed by a cysteine-poor region. We generated mutated Ep-CAM forms with various deletions in the extracellular domain. These deletion mutants, together with monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes in the extracellular domain, were used to investigate the role of the EGF-like repeats in the formation of intercellular contacts mediated by Ep-CAM molecules. We established that both EGF-like repeats are required for the formation of Ep-CAM-mediated homophilic adhesions, including the accumulation of Ep-CAM molecules at the cell-cell boundaries, and the anchorage of the Ep-CAM adhesion complex to F-actin via alpha-actinin. Deletion of either EGF-like repeat was sufficient to inhibit the adhesion properties of the molecule. The first EGF-like repeat of Ep-CAM is required for reciprocal interactions between Ep-CAM molecules on adjacent cells, as was demonstrated with blocking antibodies. The second EGF-like repeat was mainly required for lateral interactions between Ep-CAM molecules. Lateral interactions between Ep-CAM molecules result in the formation of tetramers, which might be the first and necessary step in the formation of Ep-CAM-mediated intercellular contacts. PMID:11259604

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Repeats Mediate Lateral and Reciprocal Interactions of Ep-CAM Molecules in Homophilic Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Balzar, M.; Briaire-de Bruijn, I. H.; Rees-Bakker, H. A. M.; Prins, F. A.; Helfrich, W.; de Leij, L.; Riethmüller, G.; Alberti, S.; Warnaar, S. O.; Fleuren, G. J.; Litvinov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    Ep-CAM is a new type of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) which does not structurally resemble the members of the four major families (cadherins, integrins, selectins, and CAMs of the immunoglobulin superfamily) and mediates Ca2+-independent, homophilic adhesions. The extracellular domain of Ep-CAM consists of a cysteine-rich region, containing two type II epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, followed by a cysteine-poor region. We generated mutated Ep-CAM forms with various deletions in the extracellular domain. These deletion mutants, together with monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes in the extracellular domain, were used to investigate the role of the EGF-like repeats in the formation of intercellular contacts mediated by Ep-CAM molecules. We established that both EGF-like repeats are required for the formation of Ep-CAM-mediated homophilic adhesions, including the accumulation of Ep-CAM molecules at the cell-cell boundaries, and the anchorage of the Ep-CAM adhesion complex to F-actin via α-actinin. Deletion of either EGF-like repeat was sufficient to inhibit the adhesion properties of the molecule. The first EGF-like repeat of Ep-CAM is required for reciprocal interactions between Ep-CAM molecules on adjacent cells, as was demonstrated with blocking antibodies. The second EGF-like repeat was mainly required for lateral interactions between Ep-CAM molecules. Lateral interactions between Ep-CAM molecules result in the formation of tetramers, which might be the first and necessary step in the formation of Ep-CAM-mediated intercellular contacts. PMID:11259604

  5. The 19-kilodalton adenovirus E1B transforming protein inhibits programmed cell death and prevents cytolysis by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    White, E; Sabbatini, P; Debbas, M; Wold, W S; Kusher, D I; Gooding, L R

    1992-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A and E1B proteins are required for transformation of primary rodent cells. When expressed in the absence of the 19,000-dalton (19K) E1B protein, however, the E1A proteins are acutely cytotoxic and induce host cell chromosomal DNA fragmentation and cytolysis, analogous to cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis). E1A alone can efficiently initiate the formation of foci which subsequently undergo abortive transformation whereby stimulation of cell growth is counteracted by continual cell death. Cell lines with an immortalized growth potential eventually arise with low frequency. Coexpression of the E1B 19K protein with E1A is sufficient to overcome abortive transformation to produce high-frequency transformation. Like E1A, the tumoricidal cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) evokes a programmed cell death response in many tumor cell lines by inducing DNA fragmentation and cytolysis. Expression of the E1B 19K protein by viral infection, by transient expression, or in transformed cells completely and specifically blocks this TNF-alpha-induced DNA fragmentation and cell death. Cosegregation of 19K protein transforming activity with protection from TNF-alpha-mediated cytolysis demonstrates that both activities are likely the consequence of the same function of the protein. Therefore, we propose that by suppressing an intrinsic cell death mechanism activated by TNF-alpha or E1A, the E1B 19K protein enhances the transforming activity of E1A and enables adenovirus to evade TNF-alpha-dependent immune surveillance. Images PMID:1317006

  6. Structural Insights into SraP-Mediated Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Lei; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Ren, Yan-Min; Li, Na; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Zhiyong; Gong, Qingguo; Mei, Yide; Xue, Ting; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium causes a number of devastating human diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and sepsis. S. aureus SraP, a surface-exposed serine-rich repeat glycoprotein (SRRP), is required for the pathogenesis of human infective endocarditis via its ligand-binding region (BR) adhering to human platelets. It remains unclear how SraP interacts with human host. Here we report the 2.05 Å crystal structure of the BR of SraP, revealing an extended rod-like architecture of four discrete modules. The N-terminal legume lectin-like module specifically binds to N-acetylneuraminic acid. The second module adopts a β-grasp fold similar to Ig-binding proteins, whereas the last two tandem repetitive modules resemble eukaryotic cadherins but differ in calcium coordination pattern. Under the conditions tested, small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamic simulation indicated that the three C-terminal modules function as a relatively rigid stem to extend the N-terminal lectin module outwards. Structure-guided mutagenesis analyses, in addition to a recently identified trisaccharide ligand of SraP, enabled us to elucidate that SraP binding to sialylated receptors promotes S. aureus adhesion to and invasion into host epithelial cells. Our findings have thus provided novel structural and functional insights into the SraP-mediated host-pathogen interaction of S. aureus. PMID:24901708

  7. Identification of PblB mediating galactose-specific adhesion in a successful Streptococcus pneumoniae clone

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Lin, Che-Ming; Wang, Jin-Town

    2015-01-01

    The pneumococcal genome is variable and there are minimal data on the influence of the accessory genome on phenotype. Pneumococcal serotype 14 sequence type (ST) 46 had been the most prevalent clone causing pneumonia in children in Taiwan. A microarray was constructed using the genomic DNA of a clinical strain (NTUH-P15) of serotype 14 ST46. Using DNA hybridization, genomic variations in NTUH-P15 were compared to those of 3 control strains. Microarray analysis identified 7 genomic regions that had significant increases in hybridization signals in the NTUH-P15 strain compared to control strains. One of these regions encoded PblB, a phage-encoded virulence factor implicated (in Streptococcus mitis) in infective endocarditis. The isogenic pblB mutant decreased adherence to A549 human lung epithelial cell compared to wild-type NTUH-P15 strain (P = 0.01). Complementation with pblB restored the adherence. PblB is predicted to contain a galactose-binding domain-like region. Preincubation of NTUH-P15 with D-galactose resulted in decreases of adherence to A549 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge of mice with NTUH-P15, isogenic pblB mutant and pblB complementation strains determined that PblB was required for bacterial persistence in the nasopharynx and lung. PblB, as an adhesin mediating the galactose-specific adhesion activity of pneumococci, promote pneumococcal clonal success. PMID:26193794

  8. Notch Signaling Mediates the Age-Associated Decrease in Adhesion of Germline Stem Cells to the Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Wan, Chih-Ling; Cho, Yueh; Tung, Shu-Yun; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs), and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention) is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion. PMID:25521289

  9. Evidence of a Role for CD44 and Cell Adhesion in Mediating Resistance to Lenalidomide in Multiple Myeloma: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bjorklund, Chad C.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Lin, Heather Y.; Jones, Richard J.; Kuiatse, Isere; Wang, Hua; Yang, Jing; Shah, Jatin J.; Thomas, Sheeba K.; Wang, Michael; Weber, Donna M.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of myeloma to lenalidomide is an emerging clinical problem, and though it has been associated in part with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the mediators of this phenotype remained undefined. Lenalidomide-resistant models were found to overexpress the hyaluronan (HA)-binding protein CD44, a downstream Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target. Consistent with a role of CD44 in cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistance (CAM-DR), lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells were more adhesive to bone marrow stroma and HA-coated plates. Blockade of CD44 with monoclonal antibodies, free HA, or CD44 knockdown reduced adhesion and sensitized to lenalidomide. Wnt/β-catenin suppression by FH535 enhanced the activity of lenalidomide, as did interleukin-6 neutralization with siltuximab. Notably, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) down-regulated total β-catenin, cell-surface and total CD44, reduced adhesion of lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells, and enhanced the activity of lenalidomide in a lenalidomide-resistant in vivo murine xenograft model. Finally, ATRA sensitized primary myeloma samples from patients that had relapsed and/or refractory disease after lenalidomide therapy to this immunomodulatory agent ex vivo. Taken together, our findings support the hypotheses that CD44 and CAM-DR contribute to lenalidomide-resistance in multiple myeloma, that CD44 should be evaluated as a putative biomarker of sensitivity to lenalidomide, and that ATRA or other approaches that target CD44 may overcome clinical lenalidomide resistance. PMID:23760401

  10. Human heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 interferes with Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA)-mediated adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Paolo; Bozza, Giuseppe; Capecchi, Barbara; Caproni, Elena; Barrile, Riccardo; Norais, Nathalie; Capitani, Mirco; Sallese, Michele; Cecchini, Paola; Ciucchi, Laura; Gao, Zhenai; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Aricò, Beatrice; Merola, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    NadA (N eisseria meningitidisadhesin A), a meningococcal surface protein, mediates adhesion to and invasion of human cells, an activity in which host membrane proteins have been implicated. While investigating these host factors in human epithelial cells by affinity chromatography, we discovered an unanticipated interaction of NadA with heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, a molecular chaperone. The specific in vitro interaction of recombinant soluble NadA and Hsp90 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations, dot and far-Western blot. Intriguingly, ADP, but not ATP, was required for this association, and the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG promoted complex formation. Hsp90 binding to an Escherichia coli strain used as carrier to express surface exposed NadA confirmed these results in live bacteria. We also examined RNA interference, plasmid-driven overexpression, addition of exogenous rHsp90 and 17-AAG inhibition in human epithelial cells to further elucidate the involvement of Hsp90 in NadA-mediated adhesion and invasion. Together, these data suggest an inverse correlation between the amount of host Hsp90 and the NadA adhesive/invasive phenotype. Confocal microscopy also demonstrated that meningococci interact with cellular Hsp90, a completely novel finding. Altogether our results show that variation of host Hsp90 expression or activity interferes with adhesive and invasive events driven by NadA. PMID:22066472

  11. CD44-mediated Adhesion to Hyaluronic Acid Contributes to Mechanosensing and Invasive Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yushan; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronic acid (HA), makes up a significant portion of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM). Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly invasive brain tumor, is associated with aberrant HA secretion, tissue stiffening, and overexpression of the HA receptor CD44. Here, transcriptomic analysis, engineered materials, and measurements of adhesion, migration, and invasion were used to investigate how HA/CD44 ligation contributes to the mechanosensing and invasive motility of GBM tumor cells, both intrinsically and in the context of RGD/integrin adhesion. Analysis of transcriptomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals up-regulation of transcripts associated with HA/CD44 adhesion. CD44 suppression in culture reduces cell adhesion to HA on short time scales (0.5h post-incubation) even if RGD is present, whereas maximal adhesion on longer time scales (3h) requires both CD44 and integrins. Moreover, time-lapse imaging demonstrates that cell adhesive structures formed during migration on bare HA matrices are more short-lived than cellular protrusions formed on surfaces containing RGD. Interestingly, adhesion and migration speed were dependent on HA hydrogel stiffness, implying that CD44-based signaling is intrinsically mechanosensitive. Finally, CD44 expression paired with an HA-rich microenvironment maximized three-dimensional invasion, whereas CD44 suppression or abundant integrin-based adhesion limited it. These findings demonstrate that CD44 transduces HA-based stiffness cues, temporally precedes integrin-based adhesion maturation, and facilitates invasion. PMID:24962319

  12. Protein-mediated adhesion of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Caccavo, F. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The rate and extent of bacterial Fe(III) mineral reduction are governed by molecular-scale interactions between the bacterial cell surface and the mineral surface. These interactions are poorly understood. This study examined the role of surface proteins in the adhesion of Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Enzymatic degradation of cell surface polysaccharides had no effect on cell adhesion to HFO. The proteolytic enzymes Streptomyces griseus protease and chymotrypsin inhibited the adhesion of S. alga BrY cells to HFO through catalytic degradation of surface proteins. Trypsin inhibited S. alga BrY adhesion solely through surface-coating effects. Protease and chymotrypsin also mediated desorption of adhered S. alga BrY cells from HFO while trypsin did not mediate cell desorption. Protease removed a single peptide band that represented a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. Chymotrypsin removed two peptide bands that represented proteins with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 31 kDa. These proteins represent putative HGO adhesion molecules. A. alga BrY adhesion was inhibited by up to 46% when cells were cultured at sub-MICs of chloramphenicol, suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for adhesion. Proteins extracted from the surface of S. alga BrY cells inhibited adhesion to HFO by up to 41%. A number of these proteins bound specifically to HFO, suggesting that a complex system of surface proteins mediates S. alga BrY adhesion to HFO.

  13. Rapid Reversible Photoswitching of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Holz, Michelle; Suana, Kristine Grace; Li, Qian; Lamprecht, Constanze; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and reversible photoswitching of cell adhesion is achieved by c(RGDfK)-azobenzenes embedded in a poly(ethylene glycol) background on surfaces. The light-induced cis-trans-isomerization of the azobenzene enables switching of cell adhesion on the surface. Reversibility of switching over several consecutive switching cycles is demonstrated by single-cell force spectroscopy. PMID:26685922

  14. Divergent evolution of vitamin B9 binding underlies Juno-mediated adhesion of mammalian gametes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ling; Nishimura, Kaoru; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J.; Jovine, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Summary The interaction between egg and sperm is the first necessary step of fertilization in all sexually reproducing organisms. A decade-long search for a protein pair mediating this event in mammals culminated in the identification of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein Juno as the egg plasma membrane receptor of sperm Izumo1 1, 2. The Juno–Izumo1 interaction was shown to be essential for fertilization since mice lacking either gene exhibit sex-specific sterility, making these proteins promising non-hormonal contraceptive targets 1, 3. No structural information is available on how gamete membranes interact at fertilization, and it is unclear how Juno — which was previously named folate receptor (FR) 4, based on sequence similarity considerations — triggers membrane adhesion by binding Izumo1. Here, we report the crystal structure of Juno and find that the overall fold is similar to that of FRα and FRβ but with significant flexibility within the area that corresponds to the rigid ligand-binding site of these bona fide folate receptors. This explains both the inability of Juno to bind vitamin B9/folic acid [1], and why mutations within the flexible region can either abolish or change the species specificity of this interaction. Furthermore, structural similarity between Juno and the cholesterol-binding Niemann-Pick disease type C1 protein (NPC1) suggests how the modified binding surface of Juno may recognize the helical structure of the amino-terminal domain of Izumo1. As Juno appears to be a mammalian innovation, our study indicates that a key evolutionary event in mammalian reproduction originated from the neofunctionalization of the vitamin B9-binding pocket of an ancestral folate receptor molecule. PMID:26859261

  15. Divergent evolution of vitamin B9 binding underlies Juno-mediated adhesion of mammalian gametes.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling; Nishimura, Kaoru; Sadat Al Hosseini, Hamed; Bianchi, Enrica; Wright, Gavin J; Jovine, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between egg and sperm is the first necessary step of fertilization in all sexually reproducing organisms. A decade-long search for a protein pair mediating this event in mammals culminated in the identification of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein Juno as the egg plasma membrane receptor of sperm Izumo1 [1,2]. The Juno-Izumo1 interaction was shown to be essential for fertilization since mice lacking either gene exhibit sex-specific sterility, making these proteins promising non-hormonal contraceptive targets [1,3]. No structural information is available on how gamete membranes interact at fertilization, and it is unclear how Juno - which was previously named folate receptor (FR) 4, based on sequence similarity considerations - triggers membrane adhesion by binding Izumo1. Here, we report the crystal structure of Juno and find that the overall fold is similar to that of FRα and FRβ but with significant flexibility within the area that corresponds to the rigid ligand-binding site of these bona fide folate receptors. This explains both the inability of Juno to bind vitamin B9/folic acid [1], and why mutations within the flexible region can either abolish or change the species specificity of this interaction. Furthermore, structural similarity between Juno and the cholesterol-binding Niemann-Pick disease type C1 protein (NPC1) suggests how the modified binding surface of Juno may recognize the helical structure of the amino-terminal domain of Izumo1. As Juno appears to be a mammalian innovation, our study indicates that a key evolutionary event in mammalian reproduction originated from the neofunctionalization of the vitamin B9-binding pocket of an ancestral folate receptor molecule. PMID:26859261

  16. The adhesion molecule PECAM-1 enhances the TGF-β-mediated inhibition of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Newman, Debra K; Fu, Guoping; Adams, Tamara; Cui, Weiguo; Arumugam, Vidhyalakshmi; Bluemn, Theresa; Riese, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is an immunosuppressive cytokine that inhibits the proinflammatory functions of T cells, and it is a major factor in abrogating T cell activity against tumors. Canonical TGF-β signaling results in the activation of Smad proteins, which are transcription factors that regulate target gene expression. We found that the cell surface molecule platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) facilitated noncanonical (Smad-independent) TGF-β signaling in T cells. Subcutaneously injected tumor cells that are dependent on TGF-β-mediated suppression of immunity for growth grew more slowly in PECAM-1(-/-) mice than in their wild-type counterparts. T cells isolated from PECAM-1(-/-) mice demonstrated relative insensitivity to the TGF-β-dependent inhibition of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production, granzyme B synthesis, and cellular proliferation. Similarly, human T cells lacking PECAM-1 demonstrated decreased sensitivity to TGF-β in a manner that was partially restored by reexpression of PECAM-1. Co-incubation of T cells with TGF-β and a T cell-activating antibody resulted in PECAM-1 phosphorylation on an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and the recruitment of the inhibitory Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2). Such conditions also induced the colocalization of PECAM-1 with the TGF-β receptor complex as identified by coimmunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy, and proximity ligation assays. These studies indicate a role for PECAM-1 in enhancing the inhibitory functions of TGF-β in T cells and suggest that therapeutic targeting of the PECAM-1-TGF-β inhibitory axis represents a means to overcome TGF-β-dependent immunosuppression within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26956486

  17. A host GPCR signaling network required for the cytolysis of infected cells facilitates release of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Millholland, Melanie G; Mishra, Satish; Dupont, Christopher D; Love, Melissa S; Patel, Bhumit; Shilling, Dustin; Kazanietz, Marcelo G; Foskett, J Kevin; Hunter, Christopher A; Sinnis, Photini; Greenbaum, Doron C

    2013-01-16

    Following intracellular replication, the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii cause host cell cytolysis to facilitate parasite release and disease progression. Parasite exit from infected cells requires the interplay of parasite-derived proteins and host actin cytoskeletal changes; however, the host proteins underlying these changes remain obscure. We report the identification of a Gα(q)-coupled host-signaling cascade required for the egress of both P. falciparum and T. gondii. Gα(q)-coupled signaling results in protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated loss of the host cytoskeletal protein adducin and weakening of the cellular cytoskeleton. This cytoskeletal compromise induces catastrophic Ca(2+) influx mediated by the mechanosensitive cation channel TRPC6, which activates host calpain that proteolyzes the host cytoskeleton allowing parasite release. Reinforcing the feasibility of targeting host proteins as an antiparasitic strategy, mammalian PKC inhibitors demonstrated activity in murine models of malaria and toxoplasmosis. Importantly, an orally bioavailable PKC inhibitor prolonged survival in an experimental cerebral malaria model. PMID:23332153

  18. The Terminal A Domain of the Fibrillar Accumulation-Associated Protein (Aap) of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mediates Adhesion to Human Corneocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Macintosh, Robin L.; Brittan, Jane L.; Bhattacharya, Ritwika; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Derrick, Jeremy; Upton, Mathew; Handley, Pauline S.

    2009-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis colonizes indwelling medical devices by biofilm formation but is primarily a skin resident. In many S. epidermidis strains biofilm formation is mediated by a cell wall-anchored protein, the accumulation-associated protein (Aap). Here, we investigate the role of Aap in skin adhesion. Aap is an LPXTG protein with a domain architecture including a terminal A domain and a B-repeat region. S. epidermidis NCTC 11047 expresses Aap as localized, lateral tufts of fibrils on one subpopulation of cells (Fib+), whereas a second subpopulation does not express these fibrils of Aap (Fib−). Flow cytometry showed that 72% of NCTC 11047 cells expressed Aap and that 28% of cells did not. Aap is involved in the adhesion of Fib+ cells to squamous epithelial cells from the hand (corneocytes), as the recombinant A-domain protein partially blocked binding to corneocytes. To confirm the role of the Aap A domain in corneocyte attachment, Aap was expressed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 as sparsely distributed, peritrichous fibrils. The expression of Aap increased corneocyte adhesion 20-fold compared to L. lactis carrying Aap without an A domain. S. epidermidis isolates from catheters, artificial joints, skin, and the nose also used the A domain of Aap to adhere to corneocytes, emphasizing the role of Aap in skin adhesion. In addition, L. lactis expressing Aap with different numbers of B repeats revealed a positive correlation between the number of B repeats and adhesion to corneocytes, suggesting an additional function for the B region in enhancing A-domain-dependent attachment to skin. Therefore, in addition to its established role in biofilm formation, Aap can also promote adhesion to corneocytes and is likely to be an important adhesin in S. epidermidis skin colonization. PMID:19749046

  19. Recognition molecules myelin-associated glycoprotein and tenascin-C inhibit integrin-mediated adhesion of neural cells to collagen.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, M; Conscience, J F; Probstmeier, R; Carbonetto, S; Schachner, M

    1995-03-01

    Because of the importance of collagens in mediating cell-substrate interactions and the association of collagens with neural recognition molecules in the peripheral nervous system, the ability of neural recognition molecules to modify the substrate properties of collagens, in particular collagen type I, for cell adhesion was determined. Two cell lines, the N2A neuroblastoma and PC12 pheochromocytoma, were investigated for their capacity to adhere to different collagen types in the absence or presence of several neural recognition molecules. Adhesion of N2A or PC12 cells and membrane vesicles from PC12 cells to collagen type I was reduced when the collagen had been preincubated prior to its application as substrate with the extracellular domain of myelin-associated glycoprotein (s-MAG) or, as control, fibroblast tenascin-C (F-tenascin). In mixture with other collagen types, s-MAG was only able to reduce the adhesiveness of collagen types III and V, but not of collagen types II and IV. F-tenascin reduced the adhesiveness of all collagen types tested. In contrast to F-tenascin, s-MAG had to be present during fibrillogenesis to exert its effect, indicating that it must be coassembled into the collagen fibril to block the binding site. Cell adhesion to collagen type I was dependent on Mg2+ or Mn2+ and inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the alpha 1 integrin subunit. The combined observations indicate that s-MAG and F-tenascin interfere with cell binding, most probably by modifying the integrin binding site, and that the two molecules act by different mechanisms, both leading to reduction of adhesion. PMID:7542351

  20. Tumor Therapeutics Work as Stress Inducers to Enhance Tumor Sensitivity to Natural Killer (NK) Cell Cytolysis by Up-regulating NKp30 Ligand B7-H6.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guoshuai; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-12-11

    Immune cells are believed to participate in initiating anti-tumor effects during regular tumor therapy such as chemotherapy, radiation, hyperthermia, and cytokine injection. One of the mechanisms underlying this process is the expression of so-called stress-inducible immunostimulating ligands. Although the activating receptor NKG2D has been proven to play roles in tumor therapy through targeting its ligands, the role of NKp30, another key activating receptor, is seldom addressed. In this study, we found that the NKp30 ligand B7-H6 was widely expressed in tumor cells and closely correlated to their susceptibility to NK cell lysis. Further studies showed that treatment of tumor cells with almost all standard tumor therapeutics, including chemotherapy (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil), radiation therapy, non-lethal heat shock, and cytokine therapy (TNF-α), could up-regulate the expression of B7-H6 in tumor cells and enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis. B7-H6 shRNA treatment effectively dampened sensitization of tumor cells to NK-mediated lysis. Our study not only reveals the possibility that tumor therapeutics work as stress inducers to enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis but also suggests that B7-H6 could be a potential target for tumor therapy in the future. PMID:26472927

  1. P-glycoprotein Mediates Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesion Formation by Enhancing Phosphorylation of the Chloride Channel-3

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lulu; Li, Qin; Lin, Guixian; Huang, Dan; Zeng, Xuxin; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Ping; Jin, Xiaobao; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Chunmei; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shulin; Shao, Hongwei; Xu, Bin; Mao, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene and is well studied as a multi-drug resistance transporter. Peritoneal adhesion formation following abdominal surgery remains an important clinical problem. Here, we found that P-gp was highly expressed in human adhesion fibroblasts and promoted peritoneal adhesion formation in a rodent model. Knockdown of P-gp expression by intraperitoneal injection of MDR1-targeted siRNA significantly reduced both the peritoneal adhesion development rate and adhesion grades. Additionally, we found that operative injury up-regulated P-gp expression in peritoneal fibroblasts through the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway and histone H3 acetylation. The overexpression of P-gp accelerated migration and proliferation of fibroblasts via volume-activated Cl- current and cell volume regulation by enhancing phosphorylation of the chloride channel-3. Therefore, P-gp plays a critical role in postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation and may be a valuable therapeutic target for preventing the formation of peritoneal adhesions. PMID:26877779

  2. Effect of hypoxia on integrin-mediated adhesion of endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Ralf; Friedrich, Denise; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Böhm, Michael; Friedrich, Erik B

    2012-01-01

    Homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is crucial for neoangiogenesis, which might be negatively affected by hypoxia. We investigated the influence of hypoxia on fibronectin binding integrins for migration and cell-matrix-adhesion. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) were examined as possible effectors of hypoxia.Human EPCs were expanded on fibronectin (FN) and integrin expression was profiled by flow cytometry. Cell-matrix-adhesion- and migration-assays on FN were performed to examine the influence of hypoxia and AMPK-activation. Regulation of AMPK and ILK was shown by Western blot analysis. We demonstrate the presence of integrin β1, β2 and α5 on EPCs. Adhesion to FN is reduced by blocking β1 and α5 (49% and 2% of control, P < 0.05) whereas α4-blockade has no effect. Corresponding effects were shown for migration. Hypoxia and AMPK-activation decrease adhesion on FN. Although total AMPK-expression remains unchanged, phospho-AMPK increases eightfold.The EPCs require α5 for adhesion on FN. Hypoxia and AMPK-activation decrease adhesion. As α5 is the major adhesive factor for EPCs on FN, this suggests a link between AMPK and α5-integrins. We found novel evidence for a connection between hypoxia, AMPK-activity and integrin activity. This might affect the fate of EPCs in ischaemic tissue. PMID:22353471

  3. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin-Binding Protein A Mediates Cell-Cell Adhesion through Low-Affinity Homophilic Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Herman-Bausier, Philippe; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Foster, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen which is a leading cause of biofilm-associated infections on indwelling medical devices. The cell surface-located fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) plays an important role in the accumulation phase of biofilm formation by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), but the underlying molecular interactions are not yet established. Here, we use single-cell and single-molecule atomic force microscopy to unravel the mechanism by which FnBPA mediates intercellular adhesion. We show that FnBPA is responsible for specific cell-cell interactions that involve the FnBPA A domain and cause microscale cell aggregation. We demonstrate that the strength of FnBPA-mediated adhesion originates from multiple low-affinity homophilic interactions between FnBPA A domains on neighboring cells. Low-affinity binding by means of FnBPA may be important for biofilm dynamics. These results provide a molecular basis for the ability of FnBPA to promote cell accumulation during S. aureus biofilm formation. We speculate that homophilic interactions may represent a generic strategy among staphylococcal cell surface proteins for guiding intercellular adhesion. As biofilm formation by MRSA strains depends on proteins rather than polysaccharides, our approach offers exciting prospects for the design of drugs or vaccines to inhibit protein-dependent intercellular interactions in MRSA biofilms. PMID:26015495

  5. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery.

  6. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  7. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  8. Actin polymerization stabilizes α4β1 integrin anchors that mediate monocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Henry; Hyduk, Sharon J.; Wong, Janice C.; Digby, Genevieve; Arora, Pamma D.; Cano, Adrianet Puig; Hartwig, John; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes arrested on inflamed endothelium via integrins are subjected to force imparted by flowing blood. How leukocytes respond to this force and resist detachment is poorly understood. Live-cell imaging with Lifeact-transfected U937 cells revealed that force triggers actin polymerization at upstream α4β1 integrin adhesion sites and the adjacent cortical cytoskeleton. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that this culminates in the formation of structures that anchor monocyte adhesion. Inhibition of actin polymerization resulted in cell deformation, displacement, and detachment. Transfection of dominant-negative constructs and inhibition of function or expression revealed key signaling steps required for upstream actin polymerization and adhesion stabilization. These included activation of Rap1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ isoform, and Rac but not Cdc42. Thus, rapid signaling and structural adaptations enable leukocytes to stabilize adhesion and resist detachment forces. PMID:22472442

  9. Discoidin Domain Receptors Promote α1β1- and α2β1-Integrin Mediated Cell Adhesion to Collagen by Enhancing Integrin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Bihan, Dominique; Chang, Francis; Huang, Paul H.; Farndale, Richard W.; Leitinger, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that bind to and are activated by collagens. Similar to collagen-binding β1 integrins, the DDRs bind to specific motifs within the collagen triple helix. However, these two types of collagen receptors recognize distinct collagen sequences. While GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) functions as a major DDR binding motif in fibrillar collagens, integrins bind to sequences containing Gxx’GEx”. The DDRs are thought to regulate cell adhesion, but their roles have hitherto only been studied indirectly. In this study we used synthetic triple-helical collagen-derived peptides that incorporate either the DDR-selective GVMGFO motif or integrin-selective motifs, such as GxOGER and GLOGEN, in order to selectively target either type of receptor and resolve their contributions to cell adhesion. Our data using HEK293 cells show that while cell adhesion to collagen I was completely inhibited by anti-integrin blocking antibodies, the DDRs could mediate cell attachment to the GVMGFO motif in an integrin-independent manner. Cell binding to GVMGFO was independent of DDR receptor signalling and occurred with limited cell spreading, indicating that the DDRs do not mediate firm adhesion. However, blocking the interaction of DDR-expressing cells with collagen I via the GVMGFO site diminished cell adhesion, suggesting that the DDRs positively modulate integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Indeed, overexpression of the DDRs or activation of the DDRs by the GVMGFO ligand promoted α1β1 and α2β1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion to medium- and low-affinity integrin ligands without regulating the cell surface expression levels of α1β1 or α2β1. Our data thus demonstrate an adhesion-promoting role of the DDRs, whereby overexpression and/or activation of the DDRs leads to enhanced integrin-mediated cell adhesion as a result of higher integrin activation state. PMID:23284937

  10. Surface roughness mediated adhesion forces between borosilicate glass and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Emily; Perni, Stefano; Nipiĉ, Damijan; Bohinc, Klemen; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-08-12

    It is well-known that a number of surface characteristics affect the extent of adhesion between two adjacent materials. One of such parameters is the surface roughness as surface asperities at the nanoscale level govern the overall adhesive forces. For example, the extent of bacterial adhesion is determined by the surface topography; also, once a bacteria colonizes a surface, proliferation of that species will take place and a biofilm may form, increasing the resistance of bacterial cells to removal. In this study, borosilicate glass was employed with varying surface roughness and coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to replicate the protein layer that covers orthopedic devices on implantation. As roughness is a scale-dependent process, relevant scan areas were analyzed using atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine Ra; furthermore, appropriate bacterial species were attached to the tip to measure the adhesion forces between cells and substrates. The bacterial species chosen (Staphylococci and Streptococci) are common pathogens associated with a number of implant related infections that are detrimental to the biomedical devices and patients. Correlation between adhesion forces and surface roughness (Ra) was generally better when the surface roughness was measured through scanned areas with size (2 × 2 μm) comparable to bacteria cells. Furthermore, the BSA coating altered the surface roughness without correlation with the initial values of such parameter; therefore, better correlations were found between adhesion forces and BSA-coated surfaces when actual surface roughness was used instead of the initial (nominal) values. It was also found that BSA induced a more hydrophilic and electron donor characteristic to the surfaces; in agreement with increasing adhesion forces of hydrophilic bacteria (as determined through microbial adhesion to solvents test) on BSA-coated substrates. PMID:25019516

  11. Interface Immobilization Chemistry of cRGD-based Peptides Regulates Integrin Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pallarola, Diego; Bochen, Alexander; Boehm, Heike; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq R; Spatz, Joachim P; Kessler, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of specific surface receptors of the integrin family with different extracellular matrix-based ligands is of utmost importance for the cellular adhesion process. A ligand consists of an integrin-binding group, here cyclic RGDfX, a spacer molecule that lifts the integrin-binding group from the surface and a surface anchoring group. c(-RGDfX-) peptides are bound to gold nanoparticle structured surfaces via polyproline, polyethylene glycol or aminohexanoic acid containing spacers of different lengths. Although keeping the integrin-binding c(-RGDfX-) peptides constant for all compounds, changes of the ligand's spacer chemistry and length reveal significant differences in cell adhesion activation and focal adhesion formation. Polyproline-based peptides demonstrate improved cell adhesion kinetics and focal adhesion formation compared with common aminohexanoic acid or polyethylene glycol spacers. Binding activity can additionally be improved by applying ligands with two head groups, inducing a multimeric effect. This study gives insights into spacer-based differences in integrin-driven cell adhesion processes and remarkably highlights the polyproline-based spacers as suitable ligand-presenting templates for surface functionalization. PMID:25810710

  12. Suboptimal Activation of Protease-activated Receptors Enhances α2β1 Integrin-mediated Platelet Adhesion to Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, Robin J.; Voss, Bryan; Pan, Yumei; Dickeson, S. Kent; Zutter, Mary M.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Santoro, Samuel A.

    2009-01-01

    Thrombin and fibrillar collagen are potent activators of platelets at sites of vascular injury. Both agonists cause platelet shape change, granule secretion, and aggregation to form the primary hemostatic plug. Human platelets express two thrombin receptors, protease-activated receptors 1 and 4 (PAR1 and PAR4) and two collagen receptors, the α2β1 integrin (α2β1) and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI)/FcRγ chain complex. Although these receptors and their signaling mechanisms have been intensely studied, it is not known whether and how these receptors cooperate in the hemostatic function of platelets. This study examined cooperation between the thrombin and collagen receptors in platelet adhesion by utilizing a collagen-related peptide (α2-CRP) containing the α2β1-specific binding motif, GFOGER, in conjunction with PAR-activating peptides. We demonstrate that platelet adhesion to α2-CRP is substantially enhanced by suboptimal PAR activation (agonist concentrations that do not stimulate platelet aggregation) using the PAR4 agonist peptide and thrombin. The enhanced adhesion induced by suboptimal PAR4 activation was α2β1-dependent and GPVI/FcRγ-independent as revealed in experiments with α2β1- or FcRγ-deficient mouse platelets. We further show that suboptimal activation of other platelet Gq-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) produces enhanced platelet adhesion to α2-CRP. The enhanced α2β1-mediated platelet adhesion is controlled by phospholipase C (PLC), but is not dependent on granule secretion, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, or on phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate a platelet priming mechanism initiated by suboptimal activation of PAR4 or other platelet Gq-linked GPCRs through a PLC-dependent signaling cascade that promotes enhanced α2β1 binding to collagens containing GFOGER sites. PMID:19815553

  13. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  14. Protein Kinase C beta Mediates CD40 Ligand-Induced Adhesion of Monocytes to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeyu; Zhao, Gang; Peng, Lin; Du, Jialin; Wang, Sanming; Huang, Yijie; Ou, Jinrui; Jian, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the early involvement of monocyte/macrophage recruitment to activated endothelial cells by leukocyte adhesion molecules during atherogenesis. CD40 and its ligand CD40L are highly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but its impact on monocyte adhesion and the related molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the direct effect of CD40L on monocytic cell adhesion and gain mechanistic insight into the signaling coupling CD40L function to the proinflammatory response. Exposure of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to clinically relevant concentrations of CD40L (20 to 80 ng/mL) dose-dependently increased human monocytic THP-1 cells to adhere to them under static condition. CD40L treatment induced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA and protein expression in HAECs. Furthermore, exposure of HAECs to CD40L robustly increased the activation of protein kinase C beta (PKCβ) in ECs. A selective inhibitor of PKCβ prevented the rise in VCAM-1 and THP-1 cell adhesion to ECs. Moreover, stimulation of ECs to CD40L induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. PKCβ inhibition abolished CD40L-induced NF-κB activation, and NF-κB inhibition reduced expression of VCAM-1, each resulting in reduced THP-1 cell adhesion. Our findings provide the evidence that CD40L increases VCAM-1 expression in ECs by activating PKCβ and NF-κB, suggesting a novel mechanism for EC activation. Finally, administration of CD40L resulted in PKCβ activation, increased VCAM-1 expression and activated monocytes adhesiveness to HAECs, processes attenuated by PKCβ inhibitor. Therefore, CD40L may contribute directly to atherogenesis by activating ECs and recruiting monocytes to them. PMID:24039784

  15. Probing effects of pH change on dynamic response of Claudin-2 mediated adhesion using single molecule force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tong Seng; Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hui Shi; Kausalya, P. Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2008-08-15

    Claudins belong to a large family of transmembrane proteins that localize at tight junctions (TJs) where they play a central role in regulating paracellular transport of solutes and nutrients across epithelial monolayers. Their ability to regulate the paracellular pathway is highly influenced by changes in extracellular pH. However, the effect of changes in pH on the strength and kinetics of claudin mediated adhesion is poorly understood. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the kinetic properties of homophilic trans-interactions between full length recombinant GST tagged Claudin-2 (Cldn2) under different pH conditions. In measurements covering three orders of magnitude change in force loading rate of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} pN/s, the Cldn2/Cldn2 force spectrum (i.e., unbinding force versus loading rate) revealed a fast and a slow loading regime that characterized a steep inner activation barrier and a wide outer activation barrier throughout pH range of 4.5-8. Comparing to the neutral condition (pH 6.9), differences in the inner energy barriers for the dissociation of Cldn2/Cldn2 mediated interactions at acidic and alkaline environments were found to be < 0.65 k{sub B}T, which is much lower than the outer dissociation energy barrier (> 1.37 k{sub B}T). The relatively stable interaction of Cldn2/Cldn2 in neutral environment suggests that electrostatic interactions may contribute to the overall adhesion strength of Cldn2 interactions. Our results provide an insight into the changes in the inter-molecular forces and adhesion kinetics of Cldn2 mediated interactions in acidic, neutral and alkaline environments.

  16. Probing effects of pH change on dynamic response of Claudin-2 mediated adhesion using single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tong Seng; Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hui, Shi; Kausalya, P Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2008-08-15

    Claudins belong to a large family of transmembrane proteins that localize at tight junctions (TJs) where they play a central role in regulating paracellular transport of solutes and nutrients across epithelial monolayers. Their ability to regulate the paracellular pathway is highly influenced by changes in extracellular pH. However, the effect of changes in pH on the strength and kinetics of claudin mediated adhesion is poorly understood. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the kinetic properties of homophilic trans-interactions between full length recombinant GST tagged Claudin-2 (Cldn2) under different pH conditions. In measurements covering three orders of magnitude change in force loading rate of 10(2)-10(4) pN/s, the Cldn2/Cldn2 force spectrum (i.e., unbinding force versus loading rate) revealed a fast and a slow loading regime that characterized a steep inner activation barrier and a wide outer activation barrier throughout pH range of 4.5-8. Comparing to the neutral condition (pH 6.9), differences in the inner energy barriers for the dissociation of Cldn2/Cldn2 mediated interactions at acidic and alkaline environments were found to be <0.65 k(B)T, which is much lower than the outer dissociation energy barrier (>1.37 k(B)T). The relatively stable interaction of Cldn2/Cldn2 in neutral environment suggests that electrostatic interactions may contribute to the overall adhesion strength of Cldn2 interactions. Our results provide an insight into the changes in the inter-molecular forces and adhesion kinetics of Cldn2 mediated interactions in acidic, neutral and alkaline environments. PMID:18602630

  17. AtaA, a New Member of the Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesins from Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 Mediating High Adhesiveness to Various Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masahito; Nakatani, Hajime; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 exhibits an autoagglutinating nature and noteworthy adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. Although previous studies have suggested that bacterionanofibers on Tol 5 cells are involved in the adhesive phenotype of Tol 5, the fiber that directly mediates Tol 5 adhesion has remained unknown. Here, we present a new member of trimeric autotransporter adhesins designated AtaA, which we discovered by analyzing a less adhesive mutant of Tol 5, T1, obtained by transposon mutagenesis. AtaA forms thinner and shorter nanofibers than fimbriae on Tol 5 cells. We performed target disruption of ataA by allelic marker exchange, and the resulting ΔataA strain was complemented with ataA on the Escherichia coli-Acinetobacter shuttle vector, which was newly constructed. These results proved that AtaA is essential for Tol 5’s autoagglutinating nature and high adhesiveness to surfaces of various materials. In addition, the adhesiveness to solid surfaces mediated by AtaA is notably higher than that mediated by YadA of Yersinia enterocolitica WA-314. Moreover, and importantly, these characteristics can be conferred to the non-adhesive, non-agglutinating bacterium Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 in trans by transformation with ataA, with expected applications to microbial immobilization. PMID:23155410

  18. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth's biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  19. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth’s biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  20. Distinct sites on tenascin-C mediate repellent or adhesive interactions with different neuronal cell types.

    PubMed

    Husmann, K; Carbonetto, S; Schachner, M

    1995-11-01

    In this study we have determined the binding specificities of four different neuronal cell types to tenascin-C (TN-C) and laminin using a cell adhesion assay. TN-C was repulsive for small cerebellar neurons and PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells, since after short-term adhesion to the substrate-bound molecule with a maximum of cell binding at 45 min, the cells detached from the substrate and after 22 h only about 25% of the originally adherent cells were still bound. For N2A neuroblastoma cells and retinal cells TN-C was an adhesive substrate, since the number of adherent cells did not decrease after the initial attachment period. All four cell types adhered well to laminin at all time points studied. For short-term adhesion of small cerebellar neurons and PC12 cells two binding sites were identified on TN-C, one being localized within the epidermal growth factor-like repeats three to five and the second within fibronectin type III-like repeats three and four. One binding site for N2A and retinal cells was localized within fibronectin type III-like repeat seven. Binding of small cerebellar neurons to TN-C was dependent on Ca2+, but not on Mg2+ and was inhibitable by polyclonal antibodies to beta 1 integrin. Short-term adhesion of small cerebellar neurons was also inhibitable with a mixture of recombinant fragments of TN-C encompassing the whole molecule, although the specific inhibitory activity of this mixture was ten-fold lower on a molar basis when compared to the native molecule. Our observations indicate that different neuronal cell types use distinct binding sites on TN-C for repellent or adhesive interactions and that beta 1 integrin is involved in the recognition event leading to repulsion of small cerebellar neurons. PMID:8821032

  1. Biodegradable-Polymer-Blend-Based Surgical Sealant with Body-Temperature-Mediated Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Lee, Nora G; Casey, Brendan J; Srinivasan, Priya; Sikorski, Michael J; Daristotle, John L; Sandler, Anthony D; Kofinas, Peter

    2015-12-22

    The development of practical and efficient surgical sealants has the propensity to improve operational outcomes. A biodegradable polymer blend is fabricated as a nonwoven fiber mat in situ. After direct deposition onto the tissue of interest, the material transitions from a fiber mat to a film. This transition promotes polymer-substrate interfacial interactions leading to improved adhesion and surgical sealant performance. PMID:26554545

  2. BigA is a novel adhesin of Brucella that mediates adhesion to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Czibener, Cecilia; Merwaiss, Fernando; Guaimas, Francisco; Del Giudice, Mariela Giselda; Serantes, Diego Armando Rey; Spera, Juan Manuel; Ugalde, Juan Esteban

    2016-04-01

    Adhesion to cells is the initial step in the infectious cycle of basically all pathogenic bacteria, and to do so, microorganisms have evolved surface molecules that target different cellular receptors. Brucella is an intracellular pathogen that infects a wide range of mammals whose virulence is completely dependent on the capacity to replicate in phagocytes. Although much has been done to elucidate how Brucella multiplies in macrophages, we still do not understand how bacteria invade epithelial cells to perform a replicative cycle or what adhesion molecules are involved in the process. We report the identification in Brucella abortus of a novel adhesin that harbours a bacterial immunoglobulin-like domain and demonstrate that this protein is involved in the adhesion to polarized epithelial cells such as the Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney models targeting the bacteria to the cell-cell interaction membrane. While deletion of the gene significantly reduced adhesion, over-expression dramatically increased it. Addition of the recombinant protein to cells induced cytoskeleton rearrangements and showed that this adhesin targets proteins of the cell-cell interaction membrane in confluent cultures. PMID:26400021

  3. Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor mediates muscarinic stimulation of focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Calandrella, Sean O; Barrett, Kim E; Keely, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that the Gq protein coupled receptor (GqPCR) agonist, carbachol (CCh), transactivates and recruits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr)-dependent signaling mechanisms in intestinal epithelial cells. Increasing evidence suggests that GqPCR agonists can also recruit focal adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in some cell types. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if CCh stimulates activation of the focal adhesion-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), in intestinal epithelia and, if so, to examine the signaling mechanisms involved. Experiments were carried out on monolayers of T84 cells grown on permeable supports. CCh rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK in T84 cells. This effect was accompanied by phosphorylation of another focal adhesion-associated protein, paxillin, and association of FAK with paxillin. CCh-stimulated FAK phosphorylation was inhibited by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, BAPTA/AM (20 microM), and was mimicked by thapsigargin (2 microM), which mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-independent fashion. CCh also induced association of FAK with the EGFr and FAK phosphorylation was attenuated by an EGFr inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, and an inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. The actin cytoskeleton disruptor, cytochalasin D (20 microM), abolished FAK phosphorylation in response to CCh but did not alter CCh-induced EGFr or ERK MAPK activation. In summary, these data demonstrate that agonists of GqPCRs have the ability to induce FAK activation in intestinal epithelial cells. GqPCR-induced FAK activation is mediated by via a pathway involving transactivation of the EGFr and alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:15389641

  4. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  5. β Integrin-like protein-mediated adhesion and its disturbances during cell cultivation of the mussel Mytilus trossulus.

    PubMed

    Maiorova, Mariia A; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we focus on the specific contribution of β integrin-like protein to adhesion-mediated events in molluscan larval cells in culture that could not have been investigated within the whole animal. An analysis of disturbances to cell-substratum adhesion, caused by the integrin receptor inhibiting Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS)-peptide, the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-chelators and the stress influence of freezing-thawing, reveals that all these factors resulted in the partial destruction of the integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction in culture and, in particular, changes in the distribution and relative abundance of β integrin-positive cells. The experiments, carried out on selected substrates, found that β integrin-positive cells demonstrate different affinities for the substrates. This finding further supports the assumption that epithelial differentiation in cultivated cells of larval Mytilus may be mediated by β integrin-like proteins via binding to laminin; direct binding to other components of the ECM could not be demonstrated. The mussel β integrin-positive cells are not involved in myogenic or neuronal differentiation on any of the substrates but part of them has tubulin-positive cilia, forming some epithelia-like structures. Our data indicate that β integrin-positive cells are able to proliferate in vitro which suggests that they could participate in renewing the digestive epithelium in larvae. The findings provide evidence that the distribution pattern of β integrin-like protein depends on the cell type and the factors influencing the adhesion. PMID:25673210

  6. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  7. ENO1 promotes tumor proliferation and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xinghua; Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Li, Chunsun; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yushan; Chen, Yali; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yuchan; He, Song

    2015-07-15

    Enolases are glycolytic enzymes responsible for the ATP-generated conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate. In addition to the glycolytic function, Enolase 1 (ENO1) has been reported up-regulation in several tumor tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression and biologic function of ENO1 in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas (NHLs). Clinically, by western blot analysis we observed that ENO1 expression was apparently higher in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma than in the reactive lymphoid tissues. Subsequently, immunohistochemical staining of 144 NHLs suggested that the expression of ENO1 was significantly lower in the indolent lymphomas compared with the progressive lymphomas. Further, we identified ENO1 as an independent prognostic factor, and it was significantly correlated with overall survival of NHL patients. In addition, we found that ENO1 could promote cell proliferation, regulate cell cycle associated gene and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in NHLs. Finally, we verified that ENO1 participated in the process of lymphoma cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Adhesion to FN or HS5 cells significantly protected OCI-Ly8 and Daudi cells from cytotoxicity compared with those cultured in suspension, and these effects were attenuated when transfected with ENO1-siRNA. Based on the study, we propose that inhibition of ENO1 expression may be a novel strategy for therapy for NHLs patients, and it may be a target for drug resistance. - Highlights: • ENO1 expression is reversely correlated with clinical outcomes of patients with NHLs. • ENO1 promotes the proliferation of NHL cells. • ENO1 regulates cell adhesion mediated drug resistance.

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles disturb the fibronectin-mediated adhesion and spreading of pre-osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Marie-Charlotte; Besse, Marie; Vayssade, Muriel; Morandat, Sandrine; El Kirat, Karim

    2012-09-25

    In the context of rapid development of nanoparticles (NPs) for industrial applications, the question of their toxicity and biological effects must be considered. In this work, we have assessed the influence of titanium dioxide NPs on the adhesion and spreading of MC-3T3 pre-osteoblasts by using a cell subclone that does not produce its own extracellular matrix. Petri dishes were coated with the important adhesion protein fibronectin (Fn). By incubating these Fn-coated surfaces with different amounts of TiO(2) NPs, we have shown that the adhesion of pre-osteoblasts is disturbed, with an important decrease in the number of adherent cells (from 40 to 75% depending upon the concentration and type of NPs). Petri-dish surfaces were analyzed with environmental scanning electron microscropy (ESEM), with images showing that TiO(2) NP aggregates are bound to the layer of adsorbed Fn molecules. The cells cultured on these Fn/NP surfaces adopted an irregular shape and an aberrant organization of actin cytoskeleton, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Most importantly, these results, taken together, have revealed that the actin cytoskeleton forms abnormal aggregates, even on top of the nucleus, that coincide with the presence of large aggregates of NPs on top of cells. On the basis of these observations, we propose that some Fn molecules are able to desorb from the Petri dish surface to coat TiO(2) NPs. Fn/NP complexes are not attached firmly enough on the surface to allow for normal cell adhesion/spreading and the development of tense actin fibers. These results stress the paramount need for the assessment of the toxicology of NPs, with special attention to their interactions with biomolecules. PMID:22934655

  9. The Ret receptor regulates sensory neuron dendrite growth and integrin mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Soba, Peter; Han, Chun; Zheng, Yi; Perea, Daniel; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2015-01-01

    Neurons develop highly stereotyped receptive fields by coordinated growth of their dendrites. Although cell surface cues play a major role in this process, few dendrite specific signals have been identified to date. We conducted an in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (C4da) neurons and identified the conserved Ret receptor, known to play a role in axon guidance, as an important regulator of dendrite development. The loss of Ret results in severe dendrite defects due to loss of extracellular matrix adhesion, thus impairing growth within a 2D plane. We provide evidence that Ret interacts with integrins to regulate dendrite adhesion via rac1. In addition, Ret is required for dendrite stability and normal F-actin distribution suggesting it has an essential role in dendrite maintenance. We propose novel functions for Ret as a regulator in dendrite patterning and adhesion distinct from its role in axon guidance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05491.001 PMID:25764303

  10. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Nobrega, Marcelo M.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  11. Hepatitis C virus p7 mediates membrane-to-membrane adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi Young; Lee, Sora; Lee, Hye-Ra; Yoo, Young Do

    2016-09-01

    Viroporin p7 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) acts as an ion channel for pH equilibration to stabilize HCV particles; most studies of p7 have focused on this role. However, pH equilibration by p7 via its ion channel activity does not fully explain the importance of p7 in HCV particle production. Indeed, several researchers have suggested p7 to have an unidentified ion channel-independent function. Here, we show that p7 has a novel role as a lipid raft adhesion factor, which is independent of its ion channel activity. We found that p7 targets not only the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase, but also the negatively-charged liquid-ordered (Lo) phase that can be represented as a lipid raft. p7 clusters at the phase boundary of the neutral Ld phase and the negatively-charged Lo phase. Interestingly, p7 targeting the Lo phase facilitates membrane-to-membrane adhesion, and this activity is not inhibited by p7 ion channel inhibitors. Our results demonstrated that HCV p7 has dual roles as a viroporin and as a lipid raft adhesion factor. This ion channel-independent function of p7 might be an attractive target for development of anti-HCV compounds. PMID:27320856

  12. The blot rolling assay: a method for identifying adhesion molecules mediating binding under shear conditions.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Adhesive interactions of cells with blood vessel walls under flow conditions are critical to a variety of processes, including hemostasis, leukocyte trafficking, tumor metastasis, and atherosclerosis. We have developed a new technique for the observation of binding interactions under shear, which we have termed the "blot rolling assay." In this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis and transferred to a membrane. This membrane can be rendered semitransparent and incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber under controlled flow, and their interactions with individual components of the immobilized substrates can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecules can be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. Thus, this method allows for the identification, within a complex mixture and without previous isolation or purification, of both known and novel adhesion molecules capable of binding under shear conditions. PMID:16799202

  13. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  14. Reduced bacterial adhesion to hydrocephalus shunt catheters mediated by cerebrospinal fluid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, H L; Bayston, R; Hayward, R; Harkness, W

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Prosthetic infections are a major problem, requiring complex and lengthy management. The role of blood proteins in the pathogenesis of implant infection has been investigated, but research into the role of CSF protein in shunt infections has not been undertaken, even though a high CSF protein has been assumed to increase the risk of such infections. METHODS--New shunt catheters were exposed to either CSF or individual protein solutions, and the numbers of radiolabelled staphylococci that adhered to them were compared with controls that had been exposed to saline only. RESULTS--A significant reduction in bacteria adhering to the test catheter was found in each instance. Furthermore, the CSF with the highest protein content, from a patient with intraventricular haemorrhage, had the greatest inhibitory effect on bacterial adhesion. The effect of the solutions on the hydrophobicity of the silicone rubber was also investigated. The silicone rubber was more hydrophilic, and bacterial adhesion was less, with solutions containing a higher protein content, and these findings were in keeping with the current theories on the mechanism of bacterial adhesion to polymers. CONCLUSIONS--A high CSF protein content does not predispose to the development of shunt infections. PMID:8648336

  15. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and the integrin VLA-4 mediate adhesion of human B cell precursors to cultured bone marrow adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, D H; Nuccie, B L; Abboud, C N; Winslow, J M

    1991-01-01

    Adhesion of B cell precursors to accessory cells in the bone marrow microenvironment may be required for normal early B cell development. Human bone marrow B cell precursors adhere more avidly than mature B cells to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts. To determine the mechanism of this adhesion, expression of adhesion proteins on human B precursor cells and cell lines was measured by flow cytometry. The very late antigen (VLA) integrins VLA-4 and VLA-5 were the only adhesion proteins expressed at higher levels in B cell precursors than mature B cells. Antibodies to the alpha and beta chains of VLA-4, but not VLA-5, significantly blocked binding to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts of immature B cells and cell lines. Although fibronectin is a ligand for VLA-4, anti-fibronectin antibody and a soluble fibronectin fragment containing the VLA-4 binding domain did not block adhesion, suggesting that VLA-4 is involved in adhesion of B cell precursors, but not as a fibronectin receptor. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), the other known counterreceptor for VLA-4, was identified on bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, and anti-VCAM-1 significantly blocked adhesion of normal B cell precursors to bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, indicating that VLA-4/VCAM-1 interactions are important in adhesion of B cell precursors to the bone marrow microenvironment. Images PMID:1715889

  16. GRASP: a novel heparin-binding serum glycoprotein that mediates oligodendrocyte-substratum adhesion.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, E C; Farooqui, J; Polak, P E; Szuchet, S

    1994-11-01

    Cell-substratum adhesion plays a crucial part in the cascade of events that control growth or turn on and consummate a differentiation program. We are investigating the molecular basis of oligodendrocyte (OLG) cytodifferentiation, employing pure cultures of OLGs isolated from postmyelination brains. We have shown that such OLGs will regenerate in vitro and reenact the ontogenic development of myelin, but to do so they need a signal. Adherence to a polylysine surface in the presence of 20% horse serum generates such a signal. Among the events that are turned on upon OLG adhesion is the phosphorylation of myelin basic protein; no such phosphorylation takes place in the non-adhered cell. We postulated that horse serum provides an adhesion molecule. Laminin, fibronectin, collagen and native vitronectin failed to replace horse serum. Hence, we set out to fractionate horse serum by screening with an adhesion assay. We report here the identification, purification and partial characterization of a novel, heparin-binding horse serum glycoprotein that we have termed Glycine-Rich Adhesion Serum Protein--GRASP--to stress the fact that this protein has a high content of glycine and functions, in vitro, as an adhesion molecule for OLGs. There is 61% similarity at the N-terminus between GRASP and histidine-rich glycoprotein precursor (HRGP), an alpha 2-glycoprotein from human plasma. However, our data suggest that GRASP is not the horse serum homolog of HRGP. First, the two Gps are functionally distinct: HRGP does not promote the adhesion of OLGs. Second, the amino acid compositions differ significantly, e.g., GRASP is not histidine- but rather glycine-rich. Third, the region of sequence similarity between GRASP and HRGP is conserved throughout the cystatin superfamily. Fourth, anti-Gp55 polyclonal Abs recognize a similar set of polypeptides--save for slight differences in M(r)-in human serum as in horse serum, indicating that HRGP and GRASP are two distinct but related proteins

  17. Positive and negative regulation by SLP-76/ADAP and Pyk2 of chemokine-stimulated T-lymphocyte adhesion mediated by integrin α4β1

    PubMed Central

    Dios-Esponera, Ana; Isern de Val, Soledad; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; García-Verdugo, Rosa; García-Bernal, David; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation by chemokines of integrin α4β1–dependent T-lymphocyte adhesion is a crucial step for lymphocyte trafficking. The adaptor Vav1 is required for chemokine-activated T-cell adhesion mediated by α4β1. Conceivably, proteins associating with Vav1 could potentially modulate this adhesion. Correlating with activation by the chemokine CXCL12 of T-lymphocyte attachment to α4β1 ligands, a transient stimulation in the association of Vav1 with SLP-76, Pyk2, and ADAP was observed. Using T-cells depleted for SLP-76, ADAP, or Pyk2, or expressing Pyk2 kinase–inactive forms, we show that SLP-76 and ADAP stimulate chemokine-activated, α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes T-cell attachment. While CXCL12-promoted generation of high-affinity α4β1 is independent of SLP-76, ADAP, and Pyk2, the strength of α4β1-VCAM-1 interaction and cell spreading on VCAM-1 are targets of regulation by these three proteins. GTPase assays, expression of activated or dominant-negative Rac1, or combined ADAP and Pyk2 silencing indicated that Rac1 activation by CXCL12 is a common mediator response in SLP-76–, ADAP-, and Pyk2-regulated cell adhesion involving α4β1. Our data strongly suggest that chemokine-stimulated associations between Vav1, SLP-76, and ADAP facilitate Rac1 activation and α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes this adhesion by limiting Rac1 activation. PMID:26202465

  18. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. Results In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Conclusion Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of

  19. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  20. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis, cell adhesion and rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that sialyl Lewisy, synthesized by fucosyltransferases, is involved in angiogenesis. Fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) is an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase responsible for synthesis of the H blood group and Lewisy antigens. However, the angiogenic involvement of fut 1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST) has not been clearly defined. Methods Assay of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA was performed by enzyme-linked lectin assay. Fut1 expression was determined in RA ST samples by immunohistological staining. We performed angiogenic Matrigel assays using a co-culture system of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and fut1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. To determine if fut1 played a role in leukocyte retention and cell proliferation in the RA synovium, myeloid THP-1 cell adhesion assays and fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblast proliferation assays were performed. Results Total α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA ST were significantly higher compared to normal (NL) ST. Fut1 expression on RA ST lining cells positively correlated with ST inflammation. HMVECs from a co-culture system with fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts exhibited decreased endothelial cell tube formation compared to control siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. Fut1 siRNA also inhibited myeloid THP-1 adhesion to RA synovial fibroblasts and RA synovial fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions These data show that α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins are upregulated in RA ST compared to NL ST. We also show that fut1 in RA synovial fibroblasts is important in angiogenesis, leukocyte-synovial fibroblast adhesion, and synovial fibroblast proliferation, all key processes in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24467809

  1. Phosphoproteomic profiling identifies focal adhesion kinase as a mediator of docetaxel resistance in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian Y; Hochgräfe, Falko; Lin, Hui-Ming; Castillo, Lesley; Wu, Jianmin; Raftery, Mark J; Martin Shreeve, S; Horvath, Lisa G; Daly, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel remains the standard-of-care for men diagnosed with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, only approximately 50% of patients benefit from treatment and all develop docetaxel-resistant disease. Here, we characterize global perturbations in tyrosine kinase signaling associated with docetaxel resistance and thereby develop a potential therapeutic strategy to reverse this phenotype. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified that metastatic docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cell lines (DU145-Rx and PC3-Rx) exhibit increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on Y397 and Y576, in comparison with parental controls (DU145 and PC3, respectively). Bioinformatic analyses identified perturbations in pathways regulating focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton and in protein-protein interaction networks related to these pathways in docetaxel-resistant cells. Treatment with the FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) PF-00562271 reduced FAK phosphorylation in the resistant cells, but did not affect cell viability or Akt phosphorylation. Docetaxel administration reduced FAK and Akt phosphorylation, whereas cotreatment with PF-00562271 and docetaxel resulted in an additive attenuation of FAK and Akt phosphorylation and overcame the chemoresistant phenotype. The enhanced efficacy of cotreatment was due to increased autophagic cell death, rather than apoptosis. These data strongly support that enhanced FAK activation mediates chemoresistance in CRPC, and identify a potential clinical niche for FAK TKIs, where coadministration with docetaxel may be used in patients with CRPC to overcome chemoresistance. PMID:24194567

  2. Inhibition of S-fimbria-mediated adhesion to human ileostomy glycoproteins by a protein isolated from bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwehand, A C; Conway, P L; Salminen, S J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and purify the component in bovine colostrum which is responsible for the inhibition of S-fimbria-mediated adhesion of Escherichia coli. Whey from defatted colostrum was fractionated by ultrafiltration, and the < 100K, < 30K, and < 10K fractions and the colostral whey were tested for inhibition of in vitro adhesion of radiolabelled S-fimbria-bearing E. coli to human ileostomy glycoproteins, which provide a model for human intestinal mucus. The inhibiting compound was purified from a dialyzed < 30K fraction with an anion exchange column which was eluted with a NaCl gradient (0 to 1.0 M). The compound was found to be a heat-resistant but pepsin-sensitive protein with an Mr of approximately 18,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 5.75. The protein appears to block receptor sites for S-fimbriae on ileostomy glycoproteins, with steric hindrance being the most likely mechanism. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the amino terminus of the 18K protein showed similarity with the sequence of beta-lactoglobulin. PMID:7591156

  3. Kindlin-3–mediated integrin adhesion is dispensable for quiescent but essential for activated hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Raphael; Moser, Markus; Sperandio, Markus; Rognoni, Emanuel; Orban, Martin; Liu, Wen-Hsin; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Massberg, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate highly dividing hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), which produce all blood cell lineages. HSCs are usually quiescent, retained by integrins in specific niches, and become activated when the pools of HPCs decrease. We report that Kindlin-3–mediated integrin activation controls homing of HSCs to the bone marrow (BM) and the retention of activated HSCs and HPCs but not of quiescent HSCs in their BM niches. Consequently, Kindlin-3–deficient HSCs enter quiescence and remain in the BM when cotransplanted with wild-type hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), whereas they are hyperactivated and lost in the circulation when wild-type HSPCs are absent, leading to their exhaustion and reduced survival of recipients. The accumulation of HSPCs in the circulation of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type III patients, who lack Kindlin-3, underlines the conserved functions of Kindlin-3 in man and the importance of our findings for human disease. PMID:26282877

  4. Stick-slip at soft adhesive interfaces mediated by slow frictional waves.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-06-28

    Stick-slip is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from squealing automobile brakes to earthquakes. At soft adhesive interfaces, this instability has long been attributed to Schallamach waves, which are a type of slow frictional wave. We use a contact configuration capable of isolating single wave events, coupled with high speed in situ imaging, to demonstrate the existence of two new stick-slip modes. It is shown that these modes also correspond to the passage of slow waves-separation pulse and slip pulse-with distinct nucleation and propagation characteristics. The slip pulse, characterized by a sharp stress front, propagates in the same direction as the Schallamach wave. In contrast, the separation pulse, involving local interface detachment and resembling a tensile neck, travels in exactly the opposite direction. A change in the stick-slip mode from the separation to the slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Taken together, the three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in low-velocity sliding. The detailed observations enable us to present a phase diagram delineating the domains of occurrence of these waves. We suggest a direct analogy between the observed slow frictional waves and well known muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied organisms. Our work answers basic questions about adhesive mechanisms of frictional instabilities in natural and engineered systems, with broader implications for slow surface wave phenomena. PMID:27118236

  5. Control of shape and size of nanopillar assembly by adhesion-mediated elastocapillary interaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung H; Pokroy, Boaz; Mahadevan, L; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2010-11-23

    Control of self-organization of nanofibers into regular clusters upon evaporation-induced assembly is receiving increasing attention due to the potential importance of this process in a range of applications including particle trapping, adhesives, and structural color. Here we present a comprehensive study of this phenomenon using a periodic array of polymeric nanopillars with tunable parameters as a model system to study how geometry, mechanical properties, as well as surface properties influence capillary-induced self-organization. In particular, we show that varying the parameters of the building blocks of self-assembly provides us with a simple means of controlling the size, chirality, and anisotropy of complex structures. We observe that chiral assemblies can be generated within a narrow window for each parameter even in the absence of chiral building blocks or a chiral environment. Furthermore, introducing anisotropy in the building blocks provides a way to control both the chirality and the size of the assembly. While capillary-induced self-assembly has been studied and modeled as a quasi-static process involving the competition between only capillary and elastic forces, our results unequivocally show that both adhesion and kinetics are equally important in determining the final assembly. Our findings provide insight into how multiple parameters work together in capillary-induced self-assembly and provide us with a diverse set of options for fabricating a variety of nanostructures by self-assembly. PMID:21038896

  6. Adhesion-mediated self-renewal abilities of Ph+ blastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Funayama, Keiji; Saito-Kurimoto, Yumi; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Ko-ichiro; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-05-28

    The Philadelphia chromosome-positive blastoma, maintained by serial subcutaneous transplantation in nude mice, is a highly proliferating biological mass consisting of homogenous CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} myeloblastoid cells. These cells newly evolved from pluripotent leukemia stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase. Therefore, this mass may provide a unique tool for better understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of self-renewal of leukemia stem cells. In this paper, we demonstrated that intravenously injected blastoma cells can cause Ph+ blastic leukemia with multiple invasive foci in NOD/SCID mice but not in nude mice. In addition, using an in vitro culture system, we clearly showed that blastoma cell adhesion to OP9 stromal cells accelerates blastoma cell proliferation that is associated with up-regulation of BMI1 gene expression; increased levels of {beta}-catenin and the Notch1 intra-cellular domain; and changed the expression pattern of variant CD44 forms, which are constitutively expressed in these blastoma cells. These findings strongly suggest that adhesion of leukemic stem cells to stromal cells via CD44 might be indispensable for their cellular defense against attack by immune cells and for maintenance of their self-renewal ability.

  7. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  8. β-catenin-mediated adhesion is required for successful preimplantation mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Daniel; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; Lorthongpanich, Chanchao; Balu, Sathish; Solter, Davor; Knowles, Barbara B

    2016-06-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1) is integral to cell adhesion and to the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. The effects of maternal and zygotic CTNNB1 on embryogenesis have each been separately assessed, whereas the effect of its total absence has not. As the 'traditional' conditional Ctnnb1 knockout alleles give rise to truncated CTNNB1 fragments, we designed a new knockout allele incapable of CTNNB1 production. Mouse embryos lacking intact maternal/zygotic CTNNB1 from two knockout strains were examined in detail. Preimplantation embryos are formed, yet abnormalities in their size and shape were found throughout pre- and early postimplantation development. In the absence of the zona pellucida, embryos lacking CTNNB1 undergo fission and these separated blastomeres can become small trophoblastic vesicles, which in turn induce decidual reactions. Comparing the severity of this defective adhesion phenotype in embryos bearing the null allele with those carrying the 'traditional' knockout allele suggests a hypomorphic effect of the truncated CTNNB1 protein fragment, an important observation with possible impact on previous and future studies. PMID:27246714

  9. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    van Miltenburg, M H A M; van Nimwegen, M J; Tijdens, I; Lalai, R; Kuiper, R; Klarenbeek, S; Schouten, P C; de Vries, A; Jonkers, J; van de Water, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneous mammary tumour development caused by loss of tumour suppressor genes such as p53 is lacking. Alterations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 have been implicated in over 50% of human breast cancers. Given that elevated FAK expression highly correlates with p53 mutation status in human breast cancer, we set out to investigate the importance of FAK in p53-mediated spontaneous mammary tumour development. Methods: To directly assess the role of FAK, we generated mice with conditional inactivation of FAK and p53. We generated female p53lox/lox/FAK+/+/WapCre, p53lox/lox/FAKflox/+/WapCre and p53lox/lox/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice, and mice with WapCre-mediated conditional expression of p53R270H, the mouse equivalent of human p53R273H hot spot mutation, together with conditional deletion of FAK, P53R270H/+/FAKlox/+/WapCre and p53R270H/+/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice. All mice were subjected to one pregnancy to induce WapCre-mediated deletion of p53 or expression of p53 R270H, and Fak genes flanked by two loxP sites, and subsequently followed the development of mammary tumours. Results: Using this approach, we show that FAK is important for p53-induced mammary tumour development. In addition, mice with the mammary gland-specific conditional expression of p53 point mutation R270H, the mouse equivalent to human R273H, in combination with conditional deletion of Fak showed reduced incidence of p53R270H-induced mammary tumours. In both models these effects of FAK were related to reduced proliferation in preneoplastic lesions in the mammary gland ductal structures. Conclusions: Mammary gland-specific ablation of FAK hampers p53-regulated spontaneous mammary tumour formation. Focal adhesion

  10. Integrin αVβ3 and αVβ5 are required for leukemia inhibitory factor-mediated the adhesion of trophoblast cells to the endometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hyung Sik; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-22

    The embryo implantation including adhesion between trophoblast and endometrium is a crucial process for the successful pregnancy. LIF and adhesion molecules including integrins are known as significant factors for embryo implantation. However, the function of LIF on the regulation of adhesion molecule expression and promotion of trophoblast adhesion to endometrial cells has not been fully elucidated. Here we show that LIF significantly induced mRNA expression of ITGAV, ITGB3, and ITGB5 in endometrial cells, as evidenced by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analysis. Based on the results from treatment of antagonist for LIF receptor (hLA), LIF positively regulates expression of integrin αV, β3, and β5, and adhesion of the human trophectoderm-derived JAr cells to endometrial Ishikawa cells. Furthermore, the adhesion between trophoblastic cells and LIF-stimulated endometrial cells was significantly reduced by neutralization of LIF-mediated integrin β3 and β5 expression on endometrial cell surface with integrin subunit β3 and β5 antibodies. Taken together, we firstly demonstrate that LIF enhances the adhesion of trophoblastic cells to endometrial cells by up-regulating expression of integrin heterodimer αVβ3 and αVβ5, indicating the promotion of endometrial receptivity for embryo implantation. PMID:26723254

  11. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Diego A; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-07-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  12. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Diego A.; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  13. Fibrinogen-independent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium mediated by glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex at high shear rate.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H J; Hawiger, J; Ruggeri, Z M; Turitto, V T; Thiagarajan, P; Hoffmann, T

    1989-01-01

    Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium, studied at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, were inhibited by two synthetic peptides known to interact with GPIIb-IIIa. One peptide (HHLGGAKQAGDV) corresponds to the carboxyl terminal segment of the fibrinogen gamma-chain (gamma 400-411) and the other (RGDS) contains the amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) common to fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin and the alpha-chain of fibrinogen. Neither platelet adhesion nor thrombus formation were decreased in a patient with severe congenital fibrinogen deficiency and this was equally true when his blood was further depleted of the small amounts of fibrinogen present utilizing an anti-fibrinogen antibody. In normal subjects, adhesion and thrombus formation were inhibited by the Fab' fragments of a monoclonal anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-CP8), which interferes with the interaction of platelets with all four adhesive proteins in both the fluid and solid phase. However, another anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-P5) that had minimal effects on the interaction of platelets with fibrinogen, but inhibited to varying degrees platelet interaction with other adhesive proteins, was equally effective. The findings demonstrate that, at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, adhesive proteins other than fibrinogen are involved in GPIIb-IIIa-mediated platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium. In addition, since LJ-P5 inhibited the binding of soluble von Willebrand factor and vitronectin, these adhesive proteins may be involved in platelet thrombus formation. In contrast to the results obtained at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, fibrinogen could play a role in mediating platelet-platelet interactions with weak agonists or lower shear rates. PMID:2910912

  14. The adhesion GPCR BAI1 mediates macrophage ROS production and microbicidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Emily A.; Lee, Chang Sup; Owen, Katherine A.; D’Souza, Ryan S.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Casanova, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of microbes and initiation of an innate immune response occur through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines and activation of the cellular microbicidal machinery. In particular, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase complex is a critical component of the macrophage bactericidal machinery. We previously characterized brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a member of the adhesion family of G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a PRR that mediates the selective phagocytic uptake of Gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. We showed that BAI1 promoted phagosomal ROS production through activation of the Rho family guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, thereby stimulating NADPH oxidase activity. Primary BAI1-deficient macrophages exhibited attenuated Rac GTPase activity and reduced ROS production in response to several Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in impaired microbicidal activity. Furthermore, in a peritoneal infection model, BAI1-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to death by bacterial challenge because of impaired bacterial clearance. Together, these findings suggest that BAI1 mediates the clearance of Gram-negative bacteria by stimulating both phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase activation, thereby coupling bacterial detection to the cellular microbicidal machinery. PMID:26838550

  15. RANK-RANKL interactions are involved in cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Yoshizumi, Misako; Ueda, Emi; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between multiple myeloma (MM) cells and the bone marrow microenvironment plays a critical role in MM pathogenesis and the development of drug resistance. Recently, it has been reported that MM cells express the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) (RANK). However, the role of the RANK/RANK ligand (RANKL) system in drug resistance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated a novel function of the RANK/RANKL system in promoting drug resistance in MM. We found that RANKL treatment induced drug resistance in RANK-expressing but not RANK-negative cell lines. RANKL stimulation of RANK-expressing cells increased multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein 1 (LRP1) expression and decreased Bim expression through various signaling molecules. RNA silencing of Bim expression induced drug resistance, but the RANKL-mediated drug resistance could not be overcome through the RNA silencing of MDR1, BCRP, and LRP1 expression. These results indicate that the RANK/RANKL system induces chemoresistance through the activation of multiple signal transduction pathways and by decreasing Bim expression in RANK-positive MM cells. These findings may prove to be useful in the development of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance inhibitors in RANK-positive MM cells. PMID:26762414

  16. The PI3-Kinase Delta Inhibitor Idelalisib (GS-1101) Targets Integrin-Mediated Adhesion of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cell to Endothelial and Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O’Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G.; Keating, Michael J.; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E.; Lannutti, Brian J.; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood. PMID:24376763

  17. Impaired P2X1 Receptor-Mediated Adhesion in Eosinophils from Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn; Symon, Fiona; Sylvius, Nicolas; Ran, Shaun; Bafadhel, Mona; Muessel, Michelle; Bradding, Peter; Wardlaw, Andrew; Vial, Catherine

    2016-06-15

    Eosinophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and can be activated by extracellular nucleotides released following cell damage or inflammation. For example, increased ATP concentrations were reported in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of asthmatic patients. Although eosinophils are known to express several subtypes of P2 receptors for extracellular nucleotides, their function and contribution to asthma remain unclear. In this article, we show that transcripts for P2X1, P2X4, and P2X5 receptors were expressed in healthy and asthmatic eosinophils. The P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP; 10 μM) evoked rapidly activating and desensitizing inward currents (peak 18 ± 3 pA/pF at -60 mV) in healthy eosinophils, typical of P2X1 homomeric receptors, which were abolished by the selective P2X1 antagonist NF449 (1 μM) (3 ± 2 pA/pF). α,β-meATP-evoked currents were smaller in eosinophils from asthmatic patients (8 ± 2 versus 27 ± 5 pA/pF for healthy) but were enhanced following treatment with a high concentration of the nucleotidase apyrase (17 ± 5 pA/pF for 10 IU/ml and 11 ± 3 pA/pF for 0.32 IU/ml), indicating that the channels are partially desensitized by extracellular nucleotides. α,β-meATP (10 μM) increased the expression of CD11b activated form in eosinophils from healthy, but not asthmatic, donors (143 ± 21% and 108 ± 11% of control response, respectively). Furthermore, α,β-meATP increased healthy (18 ± 2% compared with control 10 ± 1%) but not asthmatic (13 ± 1% versus 10 ± 0% for control) eosinophil adhesion. Healthy human eosinophils express functional P2X1 receptors whose activation leads to eosinophil αMβ2 integrin-dependent adhesion. P2X1 responses are constitutively reduced in asthmatic compared with healthy eosinophils, probably as the result of an increase in extracellular nucleotide concentration. PMID:27183585

  18. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  19. αvβ3 Integrin Mediates the Cell-adhesive Capacity and Biological Activity of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) in Cultured Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rusnati, Marco; Tanghetti, Elena; Dell’Era, Patrizia; Gualandris, Anna; Presta, Marco

    1997-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) immobilized on non-tissue culture plastic promotes adhesion and spreading of bovine and human endothelial cells that are inhibited by anti-FGF-2 antibody. Heat-inactivated FGF-2 retains its cell-adhesive activity despite its incapacity to bind to tyrosine-kinase FGF receptors or to cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Recombinant glutathione-S-transferase-FGF-2 chimeras and synthetic FGF-2 fragments identify two cell-adhesive domains in FGF-2 corresponding to amino acid sequences 38–61 and 82–101. Both regions are distinct from the FGF-receptor-binding domain of FGF-2 and contain a DGR sequence that is the inverse of the RGD cell-recognition sequence. Calcium deprivation, RGD-containing eptapeptides, soluble vitronectin (VN), but not fibronectin (FN), inhibit cell adhesion to FGF-2. Conversely, soluble FGF-2 prevents cell adhesion to VN but not FN, thus implicating VN receptor in the cell-adhesive activity of FGF-2. Accordingly, monoclonal and polyclonal anti-αvβ3 antibodies prevent cell adhesion to FGF-2. Also, purified human αvβ3 binds to immobilized FGF-2 in a cation-dependent manner, and this interaction is competed by soluble VN but not by soluble FN. Finally, anti-αvβ3 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specifically inhibit mitogenesis and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) up-regulation induced by free FGF-2 in endothelial cells adherent to tissue culture plastic. These data demonstrate that FGF-2 interacts with αvβ3 integrin and that this interaction mediates the capacity of the angiogenic growth factor to induce cell adhesion, mitogenesis, and uPA up-regulation in endothelial cells. PMID:9398667

  20. Plasma cell survival is mediated by synergistic effects of cytokines and adhesion-dependent signals.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Giuliana; Arce, Sergio; Hauser, Anja E; Lehnert, Katja; Moewes, Beate; Mostarac, Miro; Muehlinghaus, Gwendolin; Szyska, Martin; Radbruch, Andreas; Manz, Rudolf A

    2003-08-15

    Recent results suggest that plasma cell longevity is not an intrinsic capacity, but depends on yet unknown factors produced in their environment. In this study, we show that the cytokines IL-5, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha as well as signaling via CD44 support the survival of isolated bone marrow plasma cells. The cytokines IL-7 and stem cell factor, crucially important for early B cell development, do not mediate plasma cell survival, indicating that plasma cells and early B cells have different survival requirements. As shown in IL-6-deficient mice, IL-6 is required for a normal induction, but not for the maintenance of plasma cell responses in vivo, indicating that the effects of individual survival factors are redundant. Optimal survival of isolated plasma cells requires stimulation by a combination of factors acting synergistically. These results strongly support the concept that plasma cell survival depends on niches in which a combination of specific signals, including IL-5, IL-6, stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha, TNF-alpha, and ligands for CD44, provides an environment required to mediate plasma cell longevity. PMID:12902466

  1. Integrin-mediated adhesion as self-sustained waves of enzymatic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, M. R.; Destaing, O.; Petropoulos, C.; Planus, E.; Albigès-Rizo, C.; Fourcade, B.

    2015-10-01

    Integrin receptors mediate interaction between the cellular actin-cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. Based on their activation properties, we propose a reaction-diffusion model where the kinetics of the two-state receptors is modulated by their lipidic environment. This environment serves as an activator variable, while a second variable plays the role of a scaffold protein and controls the self-sustained activation of the receptors. Due to receptor diffusion which couples dynamically the activator and the inhibitor, our model connects major classes of reaction diffusion systems for excitable media. Spot and rosette solutions, characterized by receptor clustering into localized static or dynamic structures, are organized into a phase diagram. It is shown that diffusion and kinetics of receptors determines the dynamics and the stability of these structures. We discuss this model as a precursor model for cell signaling in the context of podosomes forming actoadhesive metastructures, and we study how generic signaling defects influence their organization.

  2. Integrin-mediated adhesion as self-sustained waves of enzymatic activation.

    PubMed

    Block, M R; Destaing, O; Petropoulos, C; Planus, E; Albigès-Rizo, C; Fourcade, B

    2015-10-01

    Integrin receptors mediate interaction between the cellular actin-cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. Based on their activation properties, we propose a reaction-diffusion model where the kinetics of the two-state receptors is modulated by their lipidic environment. This environment serves as an activator variable, while a second variable plays the role of a scaffold protein and controls the self-sustained activation of the receptors. Due to receptor diffusion which couples dynamically the activator and the inhibitor, our model connects major classes of reaction diffusion systems for excitable media. Spot and rosette solutions, characterized by receptor clustering into localized static or dynamic structures, are organized into a phase diagram. It is shown that diffusion and kinetics of receptors determines the dynamics and the stability of these structures. We discuss this model as a precursor model for cell signaling in the context of podosomes forming actoadhesive metastructures, and we study how generic signaling defects influence their organization. PMID:26565269

  3. The constitutive activity of the adhesion GPCR GPR114/ADGRG5 is mediated by its tethered agonist.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Caroline; Fischer, Liane; Lede, Vera; Kirchberger, Jürgen; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Liebscher, Ines

    2016-02-01

    Adhesion GPCRs (aGPCRs) form the second largest, yet most enigmatic class of the GPCR superfamily. Although the physiologic importance of aGPCRs was demonstrated in several studies, the majority of these receptors is still orphan with respect to their agonists and signal transduction. Recent studies reported that aGPCRs are activated through a tethered peptide agonist, coined the Stachel sequence. The Stachel sequence is the most C-terminal part of the highly conserved GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing domain. Here, we used cell culture-based assays to investigate 2 natural splice variants within the Stachel sequence of the orphan Gs coupling aGPCR GPR114/ADGRG5. There is 1 variant constitutively active in cAMP assays (∼25-fold over empty vector) and sensitive to mechano-activation. The other variant has low basal activity in cAMP assays (6-fold over empty vector) and is insensitive to mechano-activation. In-depth mutagenesis studies of these functional differences revealed that the N-terminal half of the Stachel sequence confers the agonistic activity, whereas the C-terminal part orientates the agonistic core sequence to the transmembrane domain. Sequence comparison and functional testing suggest that the proposed mechanism of Stachel-mediated activation is relevant not only to GPR114 but to aGPCRs in general. PMID:26499266

  4. SPRY1 promotes the degradation of uPAR and inhibits uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiufeng; Lan, Yan; Zhang, Di; Wang, Kai; Wang, Yao; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a GPI anchored cell surface protein that is closely associated with invasion, migration, and metastasis of cancer cells. Many functional extracellular proteins and transmembrane receptors interact with uPAR. However, few studies have examined the association of uPAR with cytoplasm proteins. We previously used yeast two-hybrid screening to isolate several novel uPAR-interacting cytoplasmic proteins, including Sprouty1 (SPRY1), an inhibitor of the (Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase) MAPK pathway. In this study, we show that SPRY1 interacts with uPAR and directs it toward lysosomal-mediated degradation. Overexpression of SPRY1 decreased the cell surface and cytoplasmic uPAR protein level. Moreover, SPRY1 overexpression augmented uPAR-induced cell adhesion to vitronectin as well as proliferation of cancer cells. Our results also further support the critical role of SPRY1 contribution to tumor growth. In a subcutaneous tumor model, overexpression of SPRY1 in HCT116 or A549 xenograft in athymic nude mice led to great suppression of tumor growth. These results show that SPRY1 may affect tumor cell function through direct interaction with uPAR and promote its lysosomal degradation. PMID:25520860

  5. Nepmucin, a novel HEV sialomucin, mediates L-selectin–dependent lymphocyte rolling and promotes lymphocyte adhesion under flow

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kanda, Hidenobu; Jin, Soojung; Tohya, Kazuo; Otani, Kazuhiro; Matsutani, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Masanori; Ebisuno, Yukihiko; Jang, Myoung Ho; Fukuda, Minoru; Hirata, Takako; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Lymphocyte trafficking to lymph nodes (LNs) is initiated by the interaction between lymphocyte L-selectin and certain sialomucins, collectively termed peripheral node addressin (PNAd), carrying specific carbohydrates expressed by LN high endothelial venules (HEVs). Here, we identified a novel HEV-associated sialomucin, nepmucin (mucin not expressed in Peyer's patches [PPs]), that is expressed in LN HEVs but not detectable in PP HEVs at the protein level. Unlike conventional sialomucins, nepmucin contains a single V-type immunoglobulin (Ig) domain and a mucin-like domain. Using materials affinity-purified from LN lysates with soluble L-selectin, we found that two higher molecular weight species of nepmucin (75 and 95 kD) were decorated with oligosaccharides that bind L-selectin as well as an HEV-specific MECA-79 monoclonal antibody. Electron microscopic analysis showed that nepmucin accumulates in the extended luminal microvillus processes of LN HEVs. Upon appropriate glycosylation, nepmucin supported lymphocyte rolling via its mucin-like domain under physiological flow conditions. Furthermore, unlike most other sialomucins, nepmucin bound lymphocytes via its Ig domain, apparently independently of lymphocyte function–associated antigen 1 and very late antigen 4, and promoted shear-resistant lymphocyte binding in combination with intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Collectively, these results suggest that nepmucin may serve as a dual-functioning PNAd in LN HEVs, mediating both lymphocyte rolling and binding via different functional domains. PMID:16754720

  6. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  7. Breast cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for intercellular adhesion molecule 1-mediated binding to the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Abhishek; Friedrichs, Jens; Bonin, Malte von; Bejestani, Elham Peshali; Werner, Carsten; Wobus, Manja; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Adhesion-based cellular interactions involved in breast cancer metastasis to the bone marrow remain elusive. We identified that breast cancer cells directly compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for retention in the bone marrow microenvironment. To this end, we established two models of competitive cell adhesion-simultaneous and sequential-to study a potential competition for homing to the niche and displacement of the endogenous HSPCs upon invasion by tumor cells. In both models, breast cancer cells but not non-tumorigenic cells competitively reduced adhesion of HSPCs to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a tumor cell number-dependent manner. Higher adhesive force between breast cancer cells and MSCs, as compared with HSPCs, assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy could partially account for tumor cell mediated reduction in HSPC adhesion to MSCs. Genetic inactivation and blockade studies revealed that homophilic interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expressed on tumor cells and MSCs, respectively, regulate the competition between tumor cells and HSPCs for binding to MSCs. Moreover, tumor cell-secreted soluble ICAM-1(sICAM-1) also impaired HSPC adhesion via blocking CD18-ICAM-1 binding between HSPCs and MSCs. Xenotransplantation studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice revealed reduction of human HSPCs in the bone marrow via metastatic breast cancer cells. These findings point to a direct competitive interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and HSPCs within the bone marrow micro environment. This interaction might also have implications on niche-based tumor support. Therefore, targeting this cross talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:27207667

  8. Sensitivity of locally recurrent rat mammary tumour cell lines to syngeneic polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Aeed, P A; Welch, D R

    1988-12-01

    Using a recently developed model for studying the biology of locally recurrent (LR) mammary tumours in the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma system, we examined the sensitivity to polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis. The parental MTF7(T20) cell line; the 'primary' tumours which arose following subcutaneous inoculation into the mammary fat pad, sc1 and sc3; and the local recurrences (following surgical excision) LR1 and LR1a from sc1, and LR3 from sc3 were all cells generally resistant to specific PMN cytolysis. LPS-activated macrophages caused 25.1%, 38.7% and 58.8% specific cytolysis in MTF7, sc1 and LR1 cells, respectively at E:T of 20:1 and 72 h co-incubation. LR1a, sc3 and LR3 lysis ranged from 0-4.4% under the same conditions. Non-activated macrophages did not lyse any of the cell lines. Locally recurrent and 'primary' tumour cell lines were also not lysed by naive NK cells (range 0.5-4.0% cytolysis). NK cells activated with bropirimine, a potent immunomodulator currently being studied in clinical trials, and/or interleukin-2 were mildly more effective at killing LR cells. Our results show that locally recurrent tumours exhibit heterogeneous sensitivities and are different from 'primary' tumour cells in sensitivities to immune cell killing, but they are not necessarily more or less sensitive. Results with bropirimine-activated or IL-2-activated NK cells emphasize that nonspecific activation is insufficient to eliminate all tumour subpopulations. PMID:3224080

  9. The cell-adhesion and signaling molecule PECAM-1 is a molecular mediator of resistance to genotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Goel, Reema; Paddock, Cathy; Gao, Cunji; Newman, Debra K; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Newman, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptotic pathways have been implicated in the emergence of cancers resistant to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Identification of novel signaling molecules that influence cell survival has the potential to facilitate the development of new cancer therapies. The cell adhesion and signaling molecule, PECAM-1, is expressed in many hematopoietic and endothelial cell malignancies, and has previously been shown to suppress mitochondrial-dependent, Bax-mediated apoptosis. The ability of PECAM-1 to influence tumor cell survival following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, however, is not known. Here we show that, when overexpressed in HEK293 and REN mesothelioma cells, PECAM-1 confers resistance to apoptosis induced by the DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide. Surprisingly, PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection was found to be largely independent of its ability to form a signaling complex with the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, as virtually no tyrosine phosphorylation of, or SHP-2 association with, PECAM-1 could be detected after etoposide treatment. Furthermore, PECAM-1 retained its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cells with SHP-2 levels significantly reduced using SHP-2-specific siRNA, and in cells in which Erk1/2--a downstream effector of SHP-2--had been inhibited. Finally, to determine whether endogenous PECAM-1 confers resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lymphoid malignancies and endothelial cells, we used a lentiviral vector to stably express PECAM-1-specific siRNA in the Jurkat leukemia cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). siRNA-expressing Jurkat cells with a 70% reduction of PECAM-1 expression were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. HUVECs with PECAM-1 expression reduced 75% were also markedly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Taken together, these data demonstrate that endogenous PECAM-1 expression on lymphoid

  10. Optimization of intrinsic and extrinsic tendon healing through controllable water-soluble mitomycin-C release from electrospun fibers by mediating adhesion-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Shichao; Liu, Shen; Chen, Shuai; Lin, Zhi Yuan William; Pan, Guoqing; He, Fan; Li, Fengfeng; Fan, Cunyi; Cui, Wenguo

    2015-08-01

    To balance intrinsic and extrinsic healing during tendon repair is challenging in tendon surgery. We hypothesized that by mediating apoptotic gene and collagen synthesis of exogenous fibroblasts, the adhesion formation induced by extrinsic healing could be inhibited. With the maintenance of intrinsic healing, the tendon could be healed with proper function with no adhesion. In this study, we loaded hydrophilic mitomycin-C (MMC) into hyaluronan (HA) hydrosols, which were then encapsulated in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers by micro-sol electrospinning. This strategy successfully provided a controlled release of MMC to inhibit adhesion formations with no detrimental effect on intrinsic healing. We found that micro-sol electrospinning was an effective and facile approach to incorporate and control hydrophilic drug release from hydrophobic polyester fibers. MMC exhibited an initially rapid, and gradually steadier release during 40 days, and the release rates could be tuned by its concentration. In vitro studies revealed that low concentrations of MMC could inhibit fibroblast adhesion and proliferation. When lacerate tendons were healed using the MMC-HA loaded PLLA fibers in vivo, they exhibited comparable mechanical strength to the naturally healed tendons but with no significant presence of adhesion formation. We further identified the up-regulation of apoptotic protein Bax expression and down-regulation of proteins Bcl2, collage I, collagen III and α-SMA during the healing process associated with minimum adhesion formations. This approach presented here leverages new advances in drug delivery and nanotechnology and offers a promising strategy to balance intrinsic and extrinsic tendon healing through modulating genes associated with fibroblast apoptosis and collagen synthesis. PMID:25996412

  11. Evaluation of boronate-containing polymer brushes and gels as substrates for carbohydrate-mediated adhesion and cultivation of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander E; Kumar, Ashok; Nilsang, Suthasinee; Aguilar, Maria-Rosa; Mikhalovska, Lyubov I; Savina, Irina N; Nilsson, Lars; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Kuzimenkova, Marina V; Galaev, Igor Yu

    2010-02-01

    Boronate-containing thin polyacrylamide gels (B-Gel), polymer brushes (B-Brush) and chemisorbed organosilane layers (B-COSL) were prepared on the surface of glass slides and studied as substrates for carbohydrate-mediated cell adhesion. B-COSL- and B-Brush-modified glass samples exhibited multiple submicron structures densely and irregularly distributed on the glass surface, as found by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. B-Gel was ca. 0.1 mm thick and contained pores with effective size of 1-2 microm in the middle and of 5-20 microm on the edges of the gel sample as found by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Evidence for the presence of phenylboronic acid in the samples was given by time-of-flight secondary ion mass-spectrometry (ToF SIMS), contact angle measurements performed in the presence of fructose, and staining with Alizarin Red S dye capable of formation specific, fluorescent complexes with boronic acids. A comparative study of adhesion and cultivation of animal cells on the above substrates was carried out using murine hybridoma M2139 cell line as a model. M2139 cells adhered to the substrates in the culture medium without glucose or sodium pyruvate at pH 8.0, and then were cultivated in the same medium at pH 7.2 for 4 days. It was found that the substrates of B-Brush type were superior both regarding cell adhesion and viability of the adhered cells, among the substrates studied. MTT assay confirmed proliferation of M2139 cells on B-Brush substrates. Some cell adhesion was also registered in the macropores of B-Gel substrate. The effects of surface microstructure of the boronate-containing polymers on cell adhesion are discussed. Transparent glass substrates grafted with boronate-containing copolymers offer good prospects for cell adhesion studies and development of cell-based assays. PMID:19837569

  12. The Peptide-binding Cavity Is Essential for Als3-mediated Adhesion of Candida albicans to Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Jones, Rhian; Garnett, James A.; Salgado, Paula S.; Rusnakova, Sophia; Matthews, Steve J.; Hoyer, Lois L.; Cota, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The adhesive phenotype of Candida albicans contributes to its ability to colonize the host and cause disease. Als proteins are one of the most widely studied C. albicans virulence attributes; deletion of ALS3 produces the greatest reduction in adhesive function. Although adhesive activity is thought to reside within the N-terminal domain of Als proteins (NT-Als), the molecular mechanism of adhesion remains unclear. We designed mutations in NT-Als3 that test the contribution of the peptide-binding cavity (PBC) to C. albicans adhesion and assessed the adhesive properties of other NT-Als3 features in the absence of a functional PBC. Structural analysis of purified loss-of-PBC-function mutant proteins showed that the mutations did not alter the overall structure or surface properties of NT-Als3. The mutations were incorporated into full-length ALS3 and integrated into the ALS3 locus of a deletion mutant, under control of the native ALS3 promoter. The PBC mutant phenotype was evaluated in assays using monolayers of human pharyngeal epithelial and umbilical vein endothelial cells, and freshly collected human buccal epithelial cells in suspension. Loss of PBC function resulted in an adhesion phenotype that was indistinguishable from the Δals3/Δals3 strain. The adhesive contribution of the Als3 amyloid-forming-region (AFR) was also tested using these methods. C. albicans strains producing cell surface Als3 in which the amyloidogenic potential was destroyed showed little contribution of the AFR to adhesion, instead suggesting an aggregative function for the AFR. Collectively, these results demonstrate the essential and principal role of the PBC in Als3 adhesion. PMID:24802757

  13. CD100 and plexins B2 and B1 mediate monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and might take part in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luque, Maria Carolina A; Gutierrez, Paulo S; Debbas, Victor; Kalil, Jorge; Stolf, Beatriz S

    2015-10-01

    Leukocyte migration is essential for the function of the immune system. Their recruitment from the vessels to the tissues involves sequential molecular interactions between leukocytes and endothelial cells (ECs). Many adhesion molecules involved in this process have already been described. However, additional molecules may be important in this interaction, and here we explore the potential role for CD100 and plexins in monocyte-EC binding. CD100 was shown to be involved in platelet-endothelial cell interaction, an important step in atherogenesis and thrombus formation. In a recent work we have described CD100 expression in monocytes and in macrophages and foam cells of human atherosclerotic plaques. In the present work, we have identified plexin B2 as a putative CD100 receptor in these cells. We have detected CD100 expression in the endothelium as well as in in vitro cultured endothelial cells. Blocking of CD100, plexin B1 and/or B2 in adhesion experiments have shown that both CD100 and plexins act as adhesion molecules involved in monocyte-endothelial cell binding. This effect may be mediated by CD100 expressed in both cell types, probably coupled to the receptors endothelial plexin B1 and monocytic plexin B2. These results can bring new insights about a possible biological activity of CD100 in monocyte adhesion and atherosclerosis, as well as a future candidate for targeting therapeutics. PMID:26275342

  14. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1-Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1-100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:27480614

  15. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1–Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1–100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:27480614

  16. Matrix stiffness exerts biphasic control over monocyte-endothelial adhesion via Rho-mediated ICAM-1 clustering.

    PubMed

    Scott, Harry A; Quach, Boi; Yang, Xiao; Ardekani, Soroush; Cabrera, Andrea P; Wilson, Randall; Messaoudi-Powers, Ilhem; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-08-01

    Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is a critical early step in chronic vascular inflammation associated with diabetes, emphysema, and aging. Importantly, these conditions are also marked by abnormal subendothelial matrix crosslinking (stiffness). Yet, whether and how abnormal matrix stiffness contributes to leukocyte-endothelial adhesion remains poorly understood. Using a co-culture of human monocytic cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) grown on matrices of tunable stiffness, we demonstrate that matrix stiffness exerts biphasic control over monocyte-EC adhesion, with both matrix softening and stiffening eliciting a two-fold increase in this adhesive interaction. This preferential endothelial adhesivity on softer and stiffer matrices was consistent with a significant increase in α-actinin-4-associated endothelial ICAM-1 clustering, a key determinant of monocyte-EC adhesion. Further, the enhanced ICAM-1 clustering on soft and stiff matrices correlated strongly with an increase in Rho activity and ROCK2 expression. Importantly, inhibition of Rho/ROCK activity blocked the effects of abnormal matrix stiffness on ICAM-1 clustering and monocyte-EC adhesion. Thus, these findings implicate matrix stiffness-dependent ICAM-1 clustering as an important regulator of vascular inflammation and provide the rationale for closely examining mechanotransduction pathways as new molecular targets for anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:27444067

  17. An Elmo–Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    Cell–cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell–cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell–cell adhesion identified an Elmo–Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo–Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell–cell contacts in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. At cell–cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell–cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell–cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell–cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell–cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo–Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell–cell adhesion. PMID:25452388

  18. Rapid cytolysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by faropenem, an orally bioavailable β-lactam antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Neeraj; Dubée, Vincent; Ballell, Lluis; Cuinet, Guillaume; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Signorino-Gelo, François; Barros, David; Arthur, Michel; McKinney, John D

    2015-02-01

    Recent clinical studies indicate that meropenem, a β-lactam antibiotic, is a promising candidate for therapy of drug-resistant tuberculosis. However, meropenem is chemically unstable, requires frequent intravenous injection, and must be combined with a β-lactamase inhibitor (clavulanate) for optimal activity. Here, we report that faropenem, a stable and orally bioavailable β-lactam, efficiently kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis even in the absence of clavulanate. The target enzymes, L,D-transpeptidases, were inactivated 6- to 22-fold more efficiently by faropenem than by meropenem. Using a real-time assay based on quantitative time-lapse microscopy and microfluidics, we demonstrate the superiority of faropenem to the frontline antituberculosis drug isoniazid in its ability to induce the rapid cytolysis of single cells. Faropenem also showed superior activity against a cryptic subpopulation of nongrowing but metabolically active cells, which may correspond to the viable but nonculturable forms believed to be responsible for relapses following prolonged chemotherapy. These results identify faropenem to be a potential candidate for alternative therapy of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25421469

  19. Rapid Cytolysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Faropenem, an Orally Bioavailable β-Lactam Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Neeraj; Dubée, Vincent; Ballell, Lluis; Cuinet, Guillaume; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Signorino-Gelo, François; Arthur, Michel; McKinney, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical studies indicate that meropenem, a β-lactam antibiotic, is a promising candidate for therapy of drug-resistant tuberculosis. However, meropenem is chemically unstable, requires frequent intravenous injection, and must be combined with a β-lactamase inhibitor (clavulanate) for optimal activity. Here, we report that faropenem, a stable and orally bioavailable β-lactam, efficiently kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis even in the absence of clavulanate. The target enzymes, l,d-transpeptidases, were inactivated 6- to 22-fold more efficiently by faropenem than by meropenem. Using a real-time assay based on quantitative time-lapse microscopy and microfluidics, we demonstrate the superiority of faropenem to the frontline antituberculosis drug isoniazid in its ability to induce the rapid cytolysis of single cells. Faropenem also showed superior activity against a cryptic subpopulation of nongrowing but metabolically active cells, which may correspond to the viable but nonculturable forms believed to be responsible for relapses following prolonged chemotherapy. These results identify faropenem to be a potential candidate for alternative therapy of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25421469

  20. Thermodynamic evidence for Ca2+-mediated self-aggregation of Lewis X gold glyconanoparticles. A model for cell adhesion via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesús M; Eaton, Peter; Barrientos, Africa G; Menéndez, Margarita; Penadés, Soledad

    2005-05-01

    Thermodynamic evidence for the selective Ca(2+)-mediated self-aggregation via carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of gold glyconanoparticles functionalized with the disaccharides lactose (lacto-Au) and maltose (malto-Au), or the biologically relevant trisaccharide Lewis X (Le(X)-Au), was obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry. The aggregation process was also directly visualized by atomic force microscopy. It was shown in the case of the trisaccharide Lewis X that the Ca(2+)-mediated aggregation is a slow process that takes place with a decrease in enthalpy of 160 +/- 30 kcal mol(-)(1), while the heat evolved in the case of lactose and maltose glyconanoparticles was very low and thermal equilibrium was quickly achieved. Measurements in the presence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) cations confirm the selectivity for Ca(2+) of Le(X)-Au glyconanoparticles. The relevance of this result to cell-cell adhesion process mediated by carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions is discussed. PMID:15853323

  1. Studies of adhesion molecules mediating interactions between cells of peripheral nervous system indicate a major role for L1 in mediating sensory neuron growth on Schwann cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Seilheimer, B; Schachner, M

    1988-07-01

    The involvement of the adhesion molecules L1, N-CAM, and J1 in adhesion and neurite outgrowth in the peripheral nervous system was investigated. We prepared Schwann cells and fibroblasts (from sciatic nerves) and neurons (from dorsal root ganglia) from 1-d mice. These cells were allowed to interact with each other in a short-term adhesion assay. We also measured outgrowth of dorsal root ganglion neurons on Schwann cell and fibroblast monolayers. Schwann cells (which express L1, N-CAM, and J1) adhered most strongly to dorsal root ganglion neurons by an L1-dependent mechanism and less by N-CAM and J1. Schwann cell-Schwann cell adhesion was mediated by L1 and N-CAM, but not J1. Adhesion of fibroblasts (which express N-CAM, but not L1 or J1) to neurons or Schwann cells was mediated by L1 and N-CAM and not J1. However, inhibition by L1 and N-CAM antibodies was found to be less pronounced with fibroblasts than with Schwann cells. N-CAM was also strongly involved in fibroblast-fibroblast adhesion. Neurite outgrowth was most extensive on Schwann cells and less on fibroblasts. A difference in extent of neurite elongation was seen between small- (10-20 microns) and large- (20-35 microns) diameter neurons, with the larger neurons tending to exhibit longer neurites. Fab fragments of polyclonal L1, N-CAM, and J1 antibodies exerted slightly different inhibitory effects on neurite outgrowth, depending on whether the neurites were derived from small or large neurons. L1 antibodies interfered most strikingly with neurite outgrowth on Schwann cells (inhibition of 88% for small and 76% for large neurons), while no inhibition was detectable on fibroblasts. Similarly, although to a smaller extent than L1, N-CAM appeared to be involved in neurite outgrowth on Schwann cells and not on fibroblasts. Antibodies to J1 only showed a very small effect on neurite outgrowth of large neurons on Schwann cells. These observations show for the first time that identified adhesion molecules are potent

  2. Adhesion of monocytes to medical steel as used for vascular stents is mediated by the integrin receptor Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18; alphaM beta2) and can be inhibited by semiconductor coating.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Pia; Assefa, Dawit; Ylänne, Jari; Basler, Nicole; Olschewski, Manfred; Ahrens, Ingo; Nordt, Thomas; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz

    2003-01-01

    Implantation of stents into stenosed arteries helps to restore normal blood flow in ischemic organs. However, limited biocompatibility of the applied medical steel can cause acute thrombosis and long-term restenosis. Adhesion of monocytes to stent metal may participate in those acute and long-term complications of stent placement. Based on described prominent electrochemical properties of the interaction between the monocyte integrin receptor Mac-1 and its various ligands, we hypothesized, that this receptor is a central mediator of monocyte adhesion to stent metal and that semiconductor coating of medical steel reduces monocyte adhesion. Adhesion of monocytes on L-316 stainless steel was directly evaluated by light microscopy. Mac-1 could be identified as mediator of monocyte adhesion, since cell adhesion could be blocked by anti-Mac-1-antibodies, including the cross-reacting anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody fragment abciximab. To further prove the central role of Mac-1, two CHO cell lines were generated expressing recombinant Mac-1 either as wild type, resulting in a low affinity receptor, or mutant with a GFFKR deletion of the alpha(M) subunit, resulting in a high affinity receptor. Indeed, adhesion was specific for Mac-1 and dependent on the affinity state of this integrin. Finally, we could demonstrate that Mac-1-mediated adhesion of monocytes to stents can be significantly inhibited by silicon carbide coating of the stent metal. In conclusion, the integrin Mac-1 and its affinity state could be identified as major mediators of monocyte adhesion on medical steel. As therapeutic strategies, the blockade of Mac-1 by antibodies or silicon carbide coating of steel inhibits monocyte adhesion on stents. PMID:12881037

  3. Monoclonal Lym-1 antibody-dependent cytolysis by neutrophils exposed to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor: intervention of FcgammaRII (CD32), CD11b-CD18 integrins, and CD66b glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Epstein, A L; Dapino, P; Barbera, P; Morone, P; Dallegri, F

    1999-05-15

    Murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) Lym-1 is an IgG2a able to bind HLA-DR variants on malignant B cells and suitable for serotherapeutic approaches in B-lymphoma patients. We have previously shown that Lym-1 can synergize with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to trigger neutrophil cytolysis towards Raji cells used as a model of B-lymphoma targets. Here we provide evidence for the intervention of certain neutrophil receptors or surface molecules in this model of cell-mediated lysis. The lysis was completely inhibited by the anti-FcgammaRII MoAb IV.3 and unaffected by the anti-FcgammaRIII MoAb 3G8. This suggests that neutrophil cytolysis involves FcgammaRII without cooperation of this receptor with FcgammaRIII. Moreover, the lysis was inhibited by an anti-CD18 MoAb (MEM48) and by a MoAb specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like and glycophosphatidyl inositol (GPI)-linked glycoproteins (CD66b). Using an immunofluorescence staining procedure, cross-linking of CD66b induced the redistribution of CD11b on neutrophils with distinct areas of CD11b clustering via a process susceptible of inhibition by D-mannose. This is consistent with the ability of CD11b-CD18 and CD66b to undergo lectin-like physical interactions on the neutrophil surface. Such a type of interaction is presumably instrumental for neutrophil cytolytic activity in that the lysis was inhibited by D-mannose and enhanced by the MoAb VIM-12, which mimics the cooperation between CD11b and GPI-anchored molecules by specifically interacting with CD11b lectin-like sites. Therefore, the present results prove the absolute requirement for FcgammaRII in neutrophil GM-CSF/Lym-1-mediated cytolysis and, on the other hand, define the crucial role of CD66b and CD11b/CD18 in the expression of the cell lytic potential. PMID:10233903

  4. A mechanism for inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by the membrane-associated mucin episialin/MUC1.

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, J; van der Valk, S W; Hilkens, J

    1996-01-01

    Episialin (MUC1, PEM, EMA, CA15-3 antigen) is a sialylated, membrane-associated glycoprotein with an extended mucin-like ectodomain. This domain mainly consists of 30-90 homologous 20-amino acid repeats that are rich in O-glycosylation sites (serines and threonines). It is likely that this part forms a polyproline beta-turn helix. As a result, the ectodomain can protrude more than 200 nm above the cell surface, whereas most cell surface molecules do not exceed a length of 35 nm. Normally, episialin is present at the apical side of glandular epithelial cells. On carcinoma cells, however, it can be strongly overexpressed and it is often present over the entire cell surface. We have previously shown that episialin, if it is interspersed between adhesion molecules, nonspecifically reduces cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions in vitro and in vivo, presumably by steric hindrance caused by the extreme length and high density of the episialin molecules at the cell surface. To analyze the molecular mechanism for this anti-adhesion effect in more detail, we have now deleted an increasing number of repeats in the episialin cDNA and transfected the resulting mutants into murine L929 cells expressing the homophilic adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Here we show that the length of episialin is the dominant factor that determines the inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions. For the anti-adhesive effect mediated by the full length episialin, charge repulsion by negatively charged sialylated O-linked glycans is far less important. Images PMID:8730100

  5. Adhesion molecules of cultured hematopoietic malignancies. A calcium-dependent lectin is the principle mediator of binding to the high endothelial venule of lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoolman, L M; Ebling, H

    1989-01-01

    This study documents that a calcium-dependent phosphomanosyl-binding site on human lymphoid malignancies mediates attachment to the peripheral node high endothelial venule (PNHEV). The phorbol ester PMA coordinately upregulates lectin activity and binding to the PNHEV in the human T-lymphoblastic cell line Jurkat but not in the less phenotypically mature lines HSB2, Molt4, CEM, and HPB-ALL. In contrast, expression of CD18, CD2, and several common epitopes of the putative adhesion receptor gp90Hermes (CD44) did not correlate with attachment to PNHEV in this series of cell lines. Insensitivity to inhibition by the CD18 MAb TS 1.18, temperature and divalent cation requirements further distinguish the Jurkat-PNHEV adhesive interaction from CD11a/18- and CD2-mediated adhesion. The PMA-induced phenotypic changes in the Jurkat line parallel late thymocyte differentiation as well as lymphocyte activation, suggesting that expression of the endothelial-binding lectin may be linked to one or both of these processes. The lectin-like activity on Jurkat cells is functionally indistinguishable from those previously linked to PNHEV recognition in normal human lymphocytes, normal rat lymphocytes and both normal and malignant murine lymphoid cells. In the mouse, this activity is either contained in or functionally linked to a member of the LEC-CAM family gp90Mel14, suggesting that Jurkat cells express the human homologue of the murine nodal homing receptor. Thus cultured T lymphoblastic malignancies express a variety of potential endothelial adhesion molecules but use primarily a highly conserved surface lectin to interact with PNHEV. Images PMID:2794056

  6. Thermogelling bioadhesive scaffolds for intervertebral disk tissue engineering: preliminary in vitro comparison of aldehyde-based versus alginate microparticle-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wiltsey, C; Christiani, T; Williams, J; Scaramazza, J; Van Sciver, C; Toomer, K; Sheehan, J; Branda, A; Nitzl, A; England, E; Kadlowec, J; Iftode, C; Vernengo, J

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering of certain load-bearing parts of the body can be dependent on scaffold adhesion or integration with the surrounding tissue to prevent dislocation. One such area is the regeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted with chondroitin sulfate (CS) (PNIPAAm-g-CS) and blended with aldehyde-modified CS to generate an injectable polymer that can form covalent bonds with tissue upon contact. However, the presence of the reactive aldehyde groups can compromise the viability of encapsulated cells. Thus, liposomes were encapsulated in the blend, designed to deliver the ECM derivative, gelatin, after the polymer has adhered to tissue and reached physiological temperature. This work is based on the hypothesis that the discharge of gelatin will enhance the biocompatibility of the material by covalently reacting with, or "end-capping", the aldehyde functionalities within the gel that did not participate in bonding with tissue upon contact. As a comparison, formulations were also created without CS aldehyde and with an alternative adhesion mediator, mucoadhesive calcium alginate particles. Gels formed from blends of PNIPAAm-g-CS and CS aldehyde exhibited increased adhesive strength compared to PNIPAAm-g-CS alone (p<0.05). However, the addition of gelatin-loaded liposomes to the blend significantly decreased the adhesive strength (p<0.05). The encapsulation of alginate microparticles within PNIPAAm-g-CS gels caused the tensile strength to increase twofold over that of PNIPAAm-g-CS blends with CS aldehyde (p<0.05). Cytocompatibility studies indicate that formulations containing alginate particles exhibit reduced cytotoxicity over those containing CS aldehyde. Overall, the results indicated that the adhesives composed of alginate microparticles encapsulated in PNIPAAm-g-CS have the potential to serve as a scaffold for IVD regeneration. PMID:25641647

  7. Distinct kinetic and mechanical properties govern mucin 16- and podocalyxin-mediated tumor cell adhesion to E- and L-selectin in shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Daniel J.; Wirtz, Denis; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Selectin-mediated tumor cell tethering to host cells, such as vascular endothelial cells, is a critical step in the process of cancer metastasis. We recently identified sialofucosylated mucin16 (MUC16) and podocalyxin (PODXL) as the major functional E- and L-selectin ligands expressed on the surface of metastatic pancreatic cancer cells. While the biophysics of leukocyte binding to selectins has been well studied, little is known about the mechanics of selectin-mediated adhesion pertinent to cancer metastasis. We thus sought to evaluate the critical parameters of selectin-mediated pancreatic tumor cell tethering and rolling. Using force spectroscopy, we characterized the binding interactions of MUC16 and PODXL to E- and L-selectin at the single-molecule level. To further analyze the response of these molecular interactions under physiologically relevant regimes, we used a microfluidic assay in conjunction with a mathematical model to study the biophysics of selectin-ligand binding as a function of fluid shear stress. We demonstrate that both MUC16 and PODXL-E-selectin-mediated interactions are mechanically stronger than like L-selectin interactions at the single-molecule level, and display a higher binding frequency at all contact times. The single-molecule kinetic and micromechanical properties of selectin-ligand bonds, along with the number of receptor-ligand bonds needed to initiate tethering, regulate the average velocity of ligand-coated microspheres rolling on selectin-coated surfaces in shear flow. Understanding the biophysics of selectin-ligand bonds and their responses to physiologically relevant shear stresses is vital for developing diagnostic assays and/or preventing the metastatic spread of tumor cells by interfering with selectin-mediated adhesion. PMID:26329844

  8. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with a fragment of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 stimulate L1-mediated functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Florian; Lutz, David; Rusche, Norman; Bastús, Neus G.; Stieben, Martin; Höltig, Michael; Grüner, Florian; Weller, Horst; Schachner, Melitta; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Loers, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is involved in nervous system development and promotes regeneration in animal models of acute and chronic injury of the adult nervous system. To translate these conducive functions into therapeutic approaches, a 22-mer peptide that encompasses a minimal and functional L1 sequence of the third fibronectin type III domain of murine L1 was identified and conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to obtain constructs that interact homophilically with the extracellular domain of L1 and trigger the cognate beneficial L1-mediated functions. Covalent conjugation was achieved by reacting mixtures of two cysteine-terminated forms of this L1 peptide and thiolated poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) ligands (~2.1 kDa) with citrate stabilized AuNPs of two different sizes (~14 and 40 nm in diameter). By varying the ratio of the L1 peptide-PEG mixtures, an optimized layer composition was achieved that resulted in the expected homophilic interaction of the AuNPs. These AuNPs were stable as tested over a time period of 30 days in artificial cerebrospinal fluid and interacted with the extracellular domain of L1 on neurons and Schwann cells, as could be shown by using cells from wild-type and L1-deficient mice. In vitro, the L1-derivatized particles promoted neurite outgrowth and survival of neurons from the central and peripheral nervous system and stimulated Schwann cell process formation and proliferation. These observations raise the hope that, in combination with other therapeutic approaches, L1 peptide-functionalized AuNPs may become a useful tool to ameliorate the deficits resulting from acute and chronic injuries of the mammalian nervous system.The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is involved in nervous system development and promotes regeneration in animal models of acute and chronic injury of the adult nervous system. To translate these conducive functions into therapeutic approaches, a 22-mer peptide that encompasses a minimal and functional L1

  9. Adxanthromycins A and B, new inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1 mediated cell adhesion molecule from Streptomyces sp. NA-148. II. Physico-chemical properties and structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Nakano, T; Koiwa, T; Noshita, T; Funayama, S; Koshino, H; Nakagawa, A

    2000-02-01

    Adxanthromycins A and B are new inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1 mediated cell adhesion molecule isolated from the fermentation broth of Streptomyces sp. NA-148. The molecular formula of adxanthromycins A and B were determined as C42H40O17 and C48H50O22, respectively by FAB-MS and NMR spectral analyses, and the structures of both compounds were elucidated to be a dimeric anthrone peroxide skeleton containing alpha-D-galactose by various NMR spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10805577

  10. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    Epidemiological evidence has established terrestrial radiation exposure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. For example, a major side effect of therapeutic radiation, especially for breast and head-and-neck cancers, is atherosclerosis, which can result in stroke years after treatment. Similarly, atomic bomb survivors were significantly more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than their countrymen. Even radiation technologists, prior to 1950 (when regulations governing shielding and occupational exposure were less rigorous) had an increased risk of clinically significant atherosclerosis. We have recently shown that 600 MeV (56) Fe similarly exacerbates plaque formation in the apoE mouse atherosclerosis model at doses 4-7 fold lower than required for x-rays to produce a similar pro-atherogenic effect. This raises concern that exposure to cosmic radiation might pose a similar risk for astronauts. Because so little is known about the mechanism of pro-atherogenic radiation effects, however, the current strategy to minimize risk from terrestrial radiation sources is to limit exposure. For astronauts on deep space missions, exposure to a significant amount of radiation will be unavoidable. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced atherosclerosis will be essential in order to develop countermeasures. Radiation can cause increased adhesiveness of vascular endothelium, leading to inappropriate accumulation of monocytes and other white blood cells, which can initiate a self-perpetuating inflammatory response. This vascular inflammation is an early event in atherosclerosis that can eventually lead to clinically significant cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. We showed earlier that x-rays, (56) Fe, and (28) Si all accelerate development of atherosclerosis in the apoE -/- mouse model. We also demonstrated that both x-rays and heavy ions increase adhesion of monocytic cells to vascular human aortic endothelial

  11. Molecular association of CD98, CD29, and CD147 critically mediates monocytic U937 cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion events of monocytes represent an important step in inflammatory responses induced by chemokines. The β1-integrin CD29 is a major adhesion molecule regulating leukocyte migration and extravasation. Although several adhesion molecules have been known as regulators of CD29, the molecular interactions between CD29 and its regulatory adhesion molecules (such as CD98 and CD147) have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in this study, we examined whether these molecules are functionally, biochemically, and cell-biologically associated using monocytic U937 cells treated with aggregation-stimulating and blocking antibodies, as well as enzyme inhibitors. The surface levels of CD29, CD98, and CD147 (but not CD43, CD44, and CD82) were increased. The activation of CD29, CD98, and CD147 by ligation of them with aggregation-activating antibodies triggered the induction of cell-cell adhesion, and sensitivity to various enzyme inhibitors and aggregation-blocking antibodies was similar for CD29-, CD98-, and CD147-induced U937 cell aggregation. Molecular association between these molecules and the actin cytoskeleton was confirmed by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation. These results strongly suggest that CD29 might be modulated by its biochemical and cellular regulators, including CD98 and CD147, via the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27610038

  12. Modulation of selectin-mediated adhesion of flowing lymphoma and bone marrow cells by immobilized SDF-1.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Elizabeth A; Hughes, Andrew D; Liesveld, Jane L; King, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The α-chemokine, stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), has been linked to the homing of circulating tumor cells to bone. SDF-1 is expressed by bone microvascular cells and osteoblasts and normally functions to attract blood-borne hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to marrow. It has been shown that treatment of cancer cells with soluble SDF-1 results in a more aggressive phenotype; however, the relevance of the administration of the soluble protein is unclear. As such, a flow device was functionalized with P-selectin and SDF-1 to mimic the bone marrow microvasculature and the initial steps of cell adhesion. The introduction of SDF-1 onto the adhesive surface was found to significantly enhance the adhesion of lymphoma cells, as well as low-density bone marrow cells (LDBMC), both in terms of the number of adherent cells and the strength of cell adhesion. Thus, SDF-1 has a synergistic effect with P-selectin on cancer cell adhesion and may be sufficient to promote preferential metastasis to bone. PMID:25167133

  13. Molecular association of CD98, CD29, and CD147 critically mediates monocytic U937 cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion events of monocytes represent an important step in inflammatory responses induced by chemokines. The β1-integrin CD29 is a major adhesion molecule regulating leukocyte migration and extravasation. Although several adhesion molecules have been known as regulators of CD29, the molecular interactions between CD29 and its regulatory adhesion molecules (such as CD98 and CD147) have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in this study, we examined whether these molecules are functionally, biochemically, and cell-biologically associated using monocytic U937 cells treated with aggregation-stimulating and blocking antibodies, as well as enzyme inhibitors. The surface levels of CD29, CD98, and CD147 (but not CD43, CD44, and CD82) were increased. The activation of CD29, CD98, and CD147 by ligation of them with aggregation-activating antibodies triggered the induction of cell-cell adhesion, and sensitivity to various enzyme inhibitors and aggregation-blocking antibodies was similar for CD29-, CD98-, and CD147-induced U937 cell aggregation. Molecular association between these molecules and the actin cytoskeleton was confirmed by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation. These results strongly suggest that CD29 might be modulated by its biochemical and cellular regulators, including CD98 and CD147, via the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27610038

  14. Vesicular Transport of Progeny Parvovirus Particles through ER and Golgi Regulates Maturation and Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.

    2013-01-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway. PMID:24068925

  15. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riestra, Angelica M.; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis. PMID:26684303

  16. Characterizing pilus-mediated adhesion of biofilm-forming E. coli to chemically diverse surfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, He; Murdaugh, Anne E; Chen, Wei; Aidala, Katherine E; Ferguson, Megan A; Spain, Eileen M; Núñez, Megan E

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E. coli ZK1056 provides an intriguing model system for pathogenic E. coli strains because it forms biofilms robustly on a wide range of surfaces.E. coli ZK1056 cells spontaneously form living biofilms on polylysine-coated AFM cantilevers, allowing us to measure quantitatively by AFM the adhesion between native biofilm cells and substrates of our choice. We use these biofilm-covered cantilevers to probe E. coli ZK1056 adhesion to five substrates with distinct and well-characterized surface chemistries, including fluorinated, amine-terminated, and PEG-like monolayers, as well as unmodified silicon wafer and mica. Notably, after only 0-10 s of contact time, the biofilms adhere strongly to fluorinated and amine-terminated monolayers as well as to mica and weakly to "antifouling" PEG monolayers, despite the wide variation in hydrophobicity and charge of these substrates. In each case the AFM retraction curves display distinct adhesion profiles in terms of both force and distance, highlighting the cells' ability to adapt their adhesive properties to disparate surfaces. Specific inhibition of the pilus protein FimH by a nonhydrolyzable mannose analogue leads to diminished adhesion in all cases, demonstrating the critical role of type I pili in adhesion by this strain to surfaces bearing widely different functional groups. The strong and adaptable binding of FimH to diverse surfaces has unexpected implications for the design of antifouling surfaces and antiadhesion therapies. PMID

  17. Characterizing Pilus-Mediated Adhesion of Biofilm-Forming E. coli to Chemically Diverse Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms living together at an interface. Because biofilms are often associated with contamination and infection, it is critical to understand how bacterial cells adhere to surfaces in the early stages of biofilm formation. Even harmless commensal Escherichia coli naturally forms biofilms in the human digestive tract by adhering to epithelial cells, a trait that presents major concerns in the case of pathogenic E. coli strains. The laboratory strain E. coli ZK1056 provides an intriguing model system for pathogenic E. coli strains because it forms biofilms robustly on a wide range of surfaces.E. coli ZK1056 cells spontaneously form living biofilms on polylysine-coated AFM cantilevers, allowing us to measure quantitatively by AFM the adhesion between native biofilm cells and substrates of our choice. We use these biofilm-covered cantilevers to probe E. coli ZK1056 adhesion to five substrates with distinct and well-characterized surface chemistries, including fluorinated, amine-terminated, and PEG-like monolayers, as well as unmodified silicon wafer and mica. Notably, after only 0–10 s of contact time, the biofilms adhere strongly to fluorinated and amine-terminated monolayers as well as to mica and weakly to “antifouling” PEG monolayers, despite the wide variation in hydrophobicity and charge of these substrates. In each case the AFM retraction curves display distinct adhesion profiles in terms of both force and distance, highlighting the cells’ ability to adapt their adhesive properties to disparate surfaces. Specific inhibition of the pilus protein FimH by a nonhydrolyzable mannose analogue leads to diminished adhesion in all cases, demonstrating the critical role of type I pili in adhesion by this strain to surfaces bearing widely different functional groups. The strong and adaptable binding of FimH to diverse surfaces has unexpected implications for the design of antifouling surfaces and antiadhesion therapies

  18. Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Interactions Mediated by Sulfate Esters and Calcium Provide the Cell Adhesion Required for the Emergence of Early Metazoans.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Santos, Gustavo R C; Aquino, Rafael S; Valle-Delgado, Juan J; Anselmetti, Dario; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2016-04-29

    Early metazoans had to evolve the first cell adhesion mechanism addressed to maintain a distinctive multicellular morphology. As the oldest extant animals, sponges are good candidates for possessing remnants of the molecules responsible for this crucial evolutionary innovation. Cell adhesion in sponges is mediated by the calcium-dependent multivalent self-interactions of sulfated polysaccharides components of extracellular membrane-bound proteoglycans, namely aggregation factors. Here, we used atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that the aggregation factor of the sponge Desmapsamma anchorata has a circular supramolecular structure and that it thus belongs to the spongican family. Its sulfated polysaccharide units, which were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, consist preponderantly of a central backbone composed of 3-α-Glc1 units partially sulfated at 2- and 4-positions and branches of Pyr(4,6)α-Gal1→3-α-Fuc2(SO3)1→3-α-Glc4(SO3)1→3-α-Glc→4-linked to the central α-Glc units. Single-molecule force measurements of self-binding forces of this sulfated polysaccharide and their chemically desulfated and carboxyl-reduced derivatives revealed that the sulfate epitopes and extracellular calcium are essential for providing the strength and stability necessary to sustain cell adhesion in sponges. We further discuss these findings within the framework of the role of molecular structures in the early evolution of metazoans. PMID:26917726

  19. VAMP3 regulates podosome organisation in macrophages and together with Stx4/SNAP23 mediates adhesion, cell spreading and persistent migration.

    PubMed

    Veale, Kelly J; Offenhäuser, Carolin; Lei, Nazi; Stanley, Amanda C; Stow, Jennifer L; Murray, Rachael Z

    2011-08-01

    The ability of cells to adhere, spread and migrate is essential to many physiological processes, particularly in the immune system where cells must traffic to sites of inflammation and injury. By altering the levels of individual components of the VAMP3/Stx4/SNAP23 complex we show here that this SNARE complex regulates efficient macrophage adhesion, spreading and migration on fibronectin. During cell spreading this complex mediates the polarised exocytosis of VAMP3-positive recycling endosome membrane into areas of membrane expansion, where VAMP3's surface partner Q-SNARE complex Stx4/SNAP23 was found to accumulate. Lowering the levels of VAMP3 in spreading cells resulted in a more rounded cell morphology and most cells were found to be devoid of the typical ring-like podosome superstructures seen normally in spreading cells. In migrating cells lowering VAMP3 levels disrupted the polarised localisation of podosome clusters. The reduced trafficking of recycling endosome membrane to sites of cell spreading and the disorganised podosome localisation in migrating macrophages greatly reduced their ability to persistently migrate on fibronectin. Thus, this important SNARE complex facilitates macrophage adhesion, spreading, and persistent macrophage migration on fibronectin through the delivery of VAMP3-positive membrane with its cargo to expand the plasma membrane and to participate in organising adhesive podosome structures. PMID:21586284

  20. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1: evidence for involvement of cell adhesion molecules in HTLV-1 biology.

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, J E; Subramanium, A; Hampton, R A

    1997-01-01

    While studying the potential role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in infection of endothelial cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we found that VCAM-1 can mediate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation. Both expression-vector-encoded and endogenously expressed VCAM-1 supported fusion of uninfected cells with HTLV-1-infected cells. Fusion was obtained with cell lines carrying the HTLV-1 genome and expressing viral proteins but not with an HTLV-1-transformed cell line that does not express viral proteins. In clones of VCAM-1-transfected cells, the degree of syncytium formation observed directly reflected the level of VCAM-1 expression. Syncytium formation between HTLV-1-expressing cells and VCAM-1+ cells could be blocked with antiserum against HTLV-1 gp46 and with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VCAM-1. Fusion was not blocked by antiserum against HIV or a MAb against VLA-4, the physiological counter-receptor for VCAM-1. The results indicate that VCAM-1 can serve as an accessory molecule or potential coreceptor for HTLV-1-induced cell fusion and provide direct evidence of a role for cell adhesion molecules in the biology of HTLV-1. PMID:8995639

  1. Mediation of macrophage cytolytic and phagocytic activities by antibodies of different classes and class-specific Fc-receptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S

    1977-08-01

    The classes of antibodies that mediate the phagocytosis and cytolysis of 51Cr-labeled chicken erythrocytes by IC-21 macrophages, an established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages, were identified. The phagocytic activity of IC-21 macrophages, as determined by a functional inhibition assay with mouse myeloma proteins, depended mainly on IgM and IgG2a antibodies and to a lesser extent on IgG2b antibodies. Extracellular cytolysis of target cells was mediated solely by IgG2b antibodies. These results correlate with the previously documented specificities of discrete Fc-receptors for IgG2a and IgG2b immunoglobulins on IC-21 cells. Thus, phagocytosis and cytolysis appear to be mediated by antibodies of different classes operating through separate and distinct sites on the surface of IC-21 macrophages. PMID:886183

  2. Hydrogen peroxide mediates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression from interleukin-18-activated hepatic sinusoidal endothelium: implications for circulating cancer cell arrest in the murine liver.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, L; Carrascal, T; De Luca, M; Fuentes, A M; Salado, C; Blanco, J; Vidal-Vanaclocha, F

    2001-08-01

    cells with nontoxic concentrations of H(2)O(2) directly enhanced VCAM-1-dependent B16M cell adhesion in vitro without proinflammatory cytokine mediation, which emphasizes the key role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of liver inflammation and metastasis. PMID:11481615

  3. Modulation of integrin and E-cadherin-mediated adhesions to spatially control heterogeneity in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Toh, Yi-Chin; Xing, Jiangwa; Yu, Hanry

    2015-05-01

    Heterogeneity in human pluripotent stem cell (PSC) fates is partially caused by mechanical asymmetry arising from spatial polarization of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Independent studies have shown that integrin and E-cadherin adhesions promote opposing differentiation and pluripotent fates respectively although their crosstalk mechanism in modulating cell fate heterogeneity remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that spatial polarization of integrin and E-cadherin adhesions in a human PSC colony compete to recruit Rho-ROCK activated myosin II to different localities to pattern pluripotent-differentiation decisions, resulting in spatially heterogeneous colonies. Cell micropatterning was used to modulate the spatial polarization of cell adhesions, which enabled us to prospectively determine localization patterns of activated myosin II and mesoendoderm differentiation. Direct inhibition of Rho-ROCK-myosin II activation phenocopied E-cadherin rather than integrin inhibition to form uniformly differentiated colonies. This indicated that E-cadherin was the primary gatekeeper to differentiation progression. This insight allows for biomaterials to be tailored for human PSC maintenance or differentiation with minimal heterogeneity. PMID:25736499

  4. Multiscale approaches to protein-mediated interactions between membranes—relating microscopic and macroscopic dynamics in radially growing adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihr, Timo; Seifert, Udo; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-08-01

    Macromolecular complexation leading to coupling of two or more cellular membranes is a crucial step in a number of biological functions of the cell. While other mechanisms may also play a role, adhesion always involves the fluctuations of deformable membranes, the diffusion of proteins and the molecular binding and unbinding. Because these stochastic processes couple over a multitude of time and length scales, theoretical modeling of membrane adhesion has been a major challenge. Here we present an effective Monte Carlo scheme within which the effects of the membrane are integrated into local rates for molecular recognition. The latter step in the Monte Carlo approach enables us to simulate the nucleation and growth of adhesion domains within a system of the size of a cell for tens of seconds without loss of accuracy, as shown by comparison to 106 times more expensive Langevin simulations. To perform this validation, the Langevin approach was augmented to simulate diffusion of proteins explicitly, together with reaction kinetics and membrane dynamics. We use the Monte Carlo scheme to gain deeper insight to the experimentally observed radial growth of micron sized adhesion domains, and connect the effective rate with which the domain is growing to the underlying microscopic events. We thus demonstrate that our technique yields detailed information about protein transport and complexation in membranes, which is a fundamental step toward understanding even more complex membrane interactions in the cellular context.

  5. Flavobacterium columnare: Chemotaxis and adhesion to channel catfish mucus is mediated by lectin-like capsular substances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is an important Gram-negative pathogen of fresh water fish that may cause chronic skin lesions and severe mortality. Isolates of F. columnare belong to either the virulent genomovar II or the less virulent genomovar I. Chemotaxis and adhesion assays were conducted in vitro...

  6. Integrin-mediated osteoblastic adhesion on a porous manganese-incorporated TiO2 coating prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHENXIANG; GU, BEIBEI; ZHU, WEI; ZHU, LIXIAN

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the bioactivity of manganese-incorporated TiO2 (Mn-TiO2) coating prepared on titanium (Ti) plate by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique in Ca-, P- and Mn-containing electrolytes. The surface topography, phase and element compositions of the coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), respectively. The adhesion of osteoblast-like MG63 cells onto Ti, TiO2 and Mn-TiO2 surfaces was evaluated, and the signal transduction pathway involved was confirmed by the sequential expression of the genes for integrins β1, β3, α1 and α3, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), including ERK1 and ERK2. The results obtained indicated that Mn was successfully incorporated into the porous nanostructured TiO2 coating, and did not alter the surface topography or the phase composition of the coating. The adhesion of the MG63 cells onto the Mn-incorporated TiO2 coating was significantly enhanced compared with that on the Mn-free TiO2 coating and the pure Ti plates. In addition, the enhanced cell adhesion on the Mn-TiO2 coatings may have been mediated by the binding of the integrin subunits, β1 and α1, and the subsequent signal transduction pathway, involving FAK and ERK2. The study indicated that the novel Mn-TiO2 coating has potential for orthopedic implant applications, and that further investigations are required. PMID:24137252

  7. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  8. Benzo[a]pyrene induces intercellular adhesion molecule-1 through a caveolae and aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterling, Elizabeth; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2008-10-15

    Toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have linked benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure with cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of action leading to these diseases have not been fully understood. One key step in the development of atherosclerosis is vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by increased adhesiveness. To determine if B[a]P could lead to increased endothelial adhesiveness, the effects of B[a]P on human endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was investigated. B[a]P was able to increase ICAM-1 protein only after pretreatment with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF). Knockdown of AhR by siRNA or treatment with AhR antagonist {alpha}-naphthoflavone ({alpha}-NF) eliminated the induction of ICAM-1 from B[a]P, confirming the necessity of AhR in this process. Likewise, B[a]P only increased monocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium when cells were pretreated with {beta}-NF. Experiments were done to define a signaling mechanism. B[a]P increased phosphorylation of MEK and p38-MAPK, and inhibitors to these proteins blunted the ICAM-1 induction. B[a]P was also able to increase AP-1 DNA binding and phosphorylation of cJun. Phosphorylation of cJun was disrupted by MEK and p38-MAPK inhibitors linking the signaling cascade. Finally, the importance of membrane microdomains, caveolae, was demonstrated by knockdown of the structural protein caveolin-1. Disruption of caveolae eliminated the B[a]P-induced ICAM-1 expression. These data suggest a possible pro-inflammatory mechanism of action of B[a]P involving caveolae, leading to increased vascular endothelial adhesiveness, and this inflammation may be a critical step in the development of B[a]P-induced atherosclerosis.

  9. Role of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophil-mediated destruction of cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S J; Young, J; LoBuglio, A F; Slivka, A; Nimeh, N F

    1981-01-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate were able to destroy suspensions or monolayers of cultured human endothelial cells. Neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity was related to phorbol myristate acetate concentration, time of incubation and neutrophil number. Cytolysis was prevented by the addition of catalase, while superoxide dismutase had no effect on cytotoxicity. The addition of the heme-enzyme inhibitors, azide or cyanide, markedly stimulated neutrophil-mediated damage while exogenous myeloperoxidase failed to stimulate cytolysis. Neutrophils isolated from patients with chronic granulomatous disease did not destroy the endothelial cell targets while myeloperoxidase-deficient neutrophils successfully mediated cytotoxicity. Endothelial cell damage mediated by the myeloperoxidase deficient cells was also inhibited by catalase but not superoxide dismutase. The addition of purified myeloperoxidase to the deficient cells did not stimulate cytotoxicity. Glucose-glucose oxidase, an enzyme system capable of generating hydrogen peroxide, could replace the neutrophil as the cytotoxic mediator. The addition of myeloperoxidase at low concentrations of glucose oxidase did not increase cytolysis, but at the higher concentrations of glucose oxidase it stimulated cytotoxicity. The destruction of endothelial cells by the glucose oxidase-myeloperoxidase system was inhibited by the addition of hypochlorous acid scavengers. In contrast, neutrophil-mediated cytolysis was not effectively inhibited by the hypochlorous acid scavengers. Based on these observations, we propose that human neutrophils can destroy cultured human endothelial cells by generating cytotoxic quantities of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:6268662

  10. Diminished lymphocyte adhesion and alleviation of allergic responses by small-molecule- or antibody-mediated inhibition of L-selectin functions.

    PubMed

    Oostingh, Gertie J; Ludwig, Ralf J; Enders, Sven; Grüner, Sabine; Harms, Gesche; Boehncke, W Henning; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Tauber, Rudolf; Schön, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Selectins are attractive targets for specific anti-inflammatory therapies. Using human lymphocytes as well as an L-selectin-transfected pre-B-cell line in dynamic flow chamber experiments, we could demonstrate that the small-molecule compound efomycine M blocks L-selectin-mediated lymphocyte rolling on sialylated Lewis(X), an action that was confirmed by plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Recruitment of naive lymphocytes to peripheral lymph nodes depends on L-selectin-mediated adhesion to high endothelial venules. We performed intravital microscopy studying lymphocyte rolling in peripheral lymph nodes and showed a 53% reduction (P=0.0006) of lymphocyte rolling in mice treated with efomycine M or a function-blocking antibody against L-selectin. In addition, the number of lymph node-homing T cells was reduced by >60% using either efomycine M or L-selectin-blocking antibodies. As recruitment of naive lymphocytes is a prerequisite for sensitization in T-cell-mediated immune reactions and allergic responses, mice were treated with efomycine M or an L-selectin-specific antibody during contact sensitization with DNFB. After adoptive transfer of corresponding T cells into non-sensitized recipient mice, the capacity of these cells to induce contact hypersensitivity was significantly reduced (P=0.0002 and P=0.0001, respectively). Our data demonstrate that it is possible, in principle, to diminish T-cell-mediated allergic reactions through interference with L-selectin functions during the early sensitization phase. PMID:16902419

  11. Src and FAK mediate cell-matrix adhesion-dependent activation of Met during transformation of breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Angela Y; Meens, Jalna A; Schick, Colleen; Organ, Shawna L; Qiao, Hui; Tremblay, Eric A; Schaeffer, Erik; Uniyal, Shashi; Chan, Bosco M C; Elliott, Bruce E

    2009-08-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion has been shown to promote activation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, Met, in a ligand-independent manner. This process has been linked to transformation and tumorigenesis in a variety of cancer types. In the present report, we describe a key role of integrin signaling via the Src/FAK axis in the activation of Met in breast epithelial and carcinoma cells. Expression of an activated Src mutant in non-neoplastic breast epithelial cells or in carcinoma cells was found to increase phosphorylation of Met at regulatory tyrosines in the auto-activation loop domain, correlating with increased cell spreading and filopodia extensions. Furthermore, phosphorylated Met is complexed with beta1 integrins and is co-localized with vinculin and FAK at focal adhesions in epithelial cells expressing activated Src. Conversely, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Src abrogates constitutive Met phosphorylation in carcinoma cells or epithelial cells expressing activated Src, and inhibits filopodia formation. Interestingly, Src-dependent phosphorylation of Met requires cell-matrix adhesion, as well as actin stress fiber assembly. Phosphorylation of FAK by Src is also required for Src-induced Met phosphorylation, emphasizing the importance of the Src/FAK signaling pathway. However, stimulation of Met phosphorylation by addition of exogenous HGF in epithelial cells is refractory to inhibition of Src family kinases, indicating that HGF-dependent and Src/integrin-dependent Met activation occur via distinct mechanisms. Together these findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which the Src/FAK axis links signals from the integrin adhesion complex to promote Met activation in breast epithelial cells. PMID:19533669

  12. Evidence that the primary binding site of von Willebrand factor that mediates platelet adhesion on subendothelium is not collagen.

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, P G; Ottenhof-Rovers, M; van Mourik, J A; Sixma, J J

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the binding of von Willebrand factor to extracellular matrices of endothelial cells and to the vessel wall of human umbilical arteries in relation to its function in supporting platelet adhesion. CLB-RAg 201, an MAb against von Willebrand factor, completely inhibits the binding of von Willebrand factor to collagen type I and type III. CLB-RAg 201 does not inhibit the binding of 125I-von Willebrand factor to extracellular matrices of endothelial cells, to smooth muscle cells, or to the subendothelium. CLB-RAg 201 partly inhibits platelet adhesion to these surfaces, but this directly affects the interaction between von Willebrand factor and platelets and is not due to inhibition of binding of von Willebrand factor to these surfaces. Another MAb, CLB-RAg 38, does not inhibit the binding of von Willebrand factor to collagen. CLB-RAg 38 completely inhibits the binding of von Willebrand factor to extracellular matrices. CLB-RAg 38 inhibits platelet adhesion to cellular matrices completely insofar as it is dependent on plasma von Willebrand factor. CLB-RAg 38 does not inhibit the total binding of von Willebrand factor to subendothelium, as there are too many different binding sites, but it completely inhibits the functional binding sites for von Willebrand factor that support platelet adhesion. The epitopes for CLB-RAg 38 and 201 on the von Willebrand factor molecule are located on different fragments of the molecule. These results indicate that von Willebrand factor binds to subendothelium and matrices of cultured cells by a mechanism that is different from that by which it binds to collagen. Images PMID:2839553

  13. Attenuation of adhesion, quorum sensing and biofilm mediated virulence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli by selected natural plant products.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Tanwar, Ankit; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria) against third line antibiotics can be attributed towards its ability to develop biofilm. Such process involves adhesion and quorum-sensing induced colonization leading to biomass development. The present study explored the anti-adhesion, anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm potential of 05 pre-standardized potent herbals. Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) exhibited maximum potential in all these activities i.e. 91.3% ± 0.05% (Anti-adhesion), 96.06% ± 0.05% (Anti-Quorum sensing) and 51.3% ± 0.07% (Anti-Biofilm formation) respectively. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) showed both anti-adhesion (84.1% ± 0.03%) and anti-quorum sensing (90.0%) potential while Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) showed only anti-quorum sensing potential as compared to standards/antibiotics. These findings were in line with the molecular docking analysis of phytoligands against Lux S and Pilin receptors. Furthermore, the pairwise correlation analysis of the tested activities with qualitative, quantitative and bioactivity functional descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid, moderate content of flavonoids and decreased content of tannins supported all the three activities. In addition, nitric oxide and superoxide scavenging activity were found to be correlated with anti-quorum sensing activity. The findings indicated clearly that B. aristata (Family: Berberidaceae) and C. sinensis (Family: Theaceae) were potent herbal leads with significant therapeutic potential which further needs to be explored at pre-clinical level in the future. PMID:26792674

  14. Copy number variation of a gene cluster encoding endopolygalacturonase mediates flesh texture and stone adhesion in peach.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Ma, Baiquan; Zheng, Hongyu; Fang, Ting; Ogutu, Collins; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-03-01

    Texture is an important attribute affecting consumer perception of fruit quality. Peach melting flesh and flesh adhesion to stone (endocarp) are simply inherited and controlled by the F-M locus on linkage group (LG) 4. Here, we report that two genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) in the F-M locus, designated PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM, are associated with the melting flesh and stone adhesion traits. PpendoPGM controls melting flesh while PpendoPGF has pleiotropic effects on both melting flesh and stone adhesion. The F-M locus has three allelic copy number variants of endoPG, H1 (PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM), H2 (PpendoPGM), and H3 (null). The H2 haplotype represents the ancestral one while the H1 and H3 haplotypes are two variants due to duplication and deletion of PpendoPGM, respectively. Accessions with H1H1, H1H2, or H1H3 genotypes show the freestone or semi-freestone and melting flesh phenotype, while both H2H2 and H2H3 accessions have the clingstone and melting flesh phenotype. The H3H3 accessions have the clingstone and non-melting flesh phenotype. Our study not only demonstrates a driving role of gene copy number variations in flesh texture diversification in fruit trees, but also provides a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programmes. PMID:26850878

  15. Granulocyte-endothelium initial adhesion. Analysis of transient binding events mediated by E-selectin in a laminar shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanski, G; Farnarier, C; Tissot, O; Pierres, A; Benoliel, A M; Alessi, M C; Kaplanski, S; Bongrand, P

    1993-01-01

    The adhesion of moving cells to receptor-bearing surfaces is a key step to many important biological processes. Attachment was subjected to extensive modeling. However, the numerical values of kinetic bonding parameters relevant to realistic models of cell adhesion remain poorly known. In this report, we describe the motion of human granulocytes to interleukin-1-activated endothelial cells in presence of a low hydrodynamic drag (a few piconewtons) estimated to be much weaker than a standard ligand-receptor bond. It was thus expected to visualize the formation and rupture of individual bonds. We observed multiple short-time cell arrests with a median duration of 2.43 s. Stop frequency, not duration, was significantly inhibited by anti-E-selectin antibodies. Binding efficiency exhibited an almost linear relationship with the inverse of cell velocity. The distribution of arrest duration was determined: results were consistent with the view that these arrests reflected the formation/dissociation of single ligand-receptor bonds with a spontaneous dissociation rate of 0.5 s-1. The rate of bond formation was on the order of 0.04 s-1 when cells were freely rolling (mean velocity: 19 microns/s) and it exhibited an approximately 10-fold increase after the formation of a first adhesion. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:7690258

  16. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Wei, Bo; Shao, Chunkui; Li, Jialin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, and these platelets were fully associated with tumor development. We further report the robust adhesion of platelet aggregates to tumor cells within intestinal tumors, which occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on P-selectin (CD62P), a cell adhesion molecule that is abundantly expressed on activated platelets. Using spontaneous intestinal tumor mouse models, we determined that the genetic deletion of P-selectin suppressed intestinal tumor growth, which was rescued by the infusion of wild-type platelets but not P-selectin(-/-) platelets. Mechanistically, platelet adhesion to tumor cells induced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis and accelerate intestinal tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the adherence of platelets to tumor cells could promote tumor growth and metastasis. By targeting this platelet-tumor cell interaction, recombinant soluble P-selectin may have therapeutic value for the treatment of intestinal tumors. PMID:25999791

  17. Copy number variation of a gene cluster encoding endopolygalacturonase mediates flesh texture and stone adhesion in peach

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Ma, Baiquan; Zheng, Hongyu; Fang, Ting; Ogutu, Collins; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Texture is an important attribute affecting consumer perception of fruit quality. Peach melting flesh and flesh adhesion to stone (endocarp) are simply inherited and controlled by the F-M locus on linkage group (LG) 4. Here, we report that two genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) in the F-M locus, designated PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM, are associated with the melting flesh and stone adhesion traits. PpendoPGM controls melting flesh while PpendoPGF has pleiotropic effects on both melting flesh and stone adhesion. The F-M locus has three allelic copy number variants of endoPG, H1 (PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM), H2 (PpendoPGM), and H3 (null). The H2 haplotype represents the ancestral one while the H1 and H3 haplotypes are two variants due to duplication and deletion of PpendoPGM, respectively. Accessions with H1H1, H1H2, or H1H3 genotypes show the freestone or semi-freestone and melting flesh phenotype, while both H2H2 and H2H3 accessions have the clingstone and melting flesh phenotype. The H3H3 accessions have the clingstone and non-melting flesh phenotype. Our study not only demonstrates a driving role of gene copy number variations in flesh texture diversification in fruit trees, but also provides a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programmes. PMID:26850878

  18. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell motility in Drosophila trachea regulated by the transcription factor Escargot.

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Matakatsu, M; Uemura, T; Oda, H; Takeichi, M; Hayashi, S

    1996-12-01

    Coordination of cell motility and adhesion is essential for concerted movement of tissues during animal morphogenesis. The Drosophila tracheal network is formed by branching, migration and fusion of tubular ectodermal epithelia. Tracheal tip cells, located at the end of each branch that is going to fuse, extend filopodia to search for targets and later change their cell shape to a seamless ring to allow passage of lumen. The cell adhesion molecule DE-cadherin accumulates at the site of contact to form a ring that marks the site of lumen entry and is essential for the fusion. DE-cadherin expression in tip cells of a subset of branches is dependent on escargot, a zinc finger gene expressed in all tip cells. Such escargot mutant tip cells failed to adhere to each other and continued to search for alternative targets by extending long filopodia. We present evidence indicating escargot positively regulates transcription of the DE-cadherin gene, shotgun. Overexpression of DE-cadherin rescued the defect in one of the fusion points in escargot mutants, demonstrating an essential role of DE-cadherin in target recognition and identifying escargot as a key regulator of cell adhesion and motility in tracheal morphogenesis. PMID:9012491

  19. Jun‐Mediated Changes in Cell Adhesion Contribute to Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Exit from Ground State Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Veluscek, Giulia; Li, Yaoyong; Yang, Shen‐Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are able to give rise to any somatic cell type. A lot is known about how ESC pluripotency is maintained, but comparatively less is known about how differentiation is promoted. Cell fate decisions are regulated by interactions between signaling and transcriptional networks. Recent studies have shown that the overexpression or downregulation of the transcription factor Jun can affect the ESC fate. Here we have focussed on the role of the Jun in the exit of mouse ESCs from ground state pluripotency and the onset of early differentiation. Transcriptomic analysis of differentiating ESCs reveals that Jun is required to upregulate a programme of genes associated with cell adhesion as ESCs exit the pluripotent ground state. Several of these Jun‐regulated genes are shown to be required for efficient adhesion. Importantly this adhesion is required for the timely regulated exit of ESCs from ground state pluripotency and the onset of early differentiation events. Stem Cells 2016;34:1213–1224 PMID:26850660

  20. Noninvasive and Reversible Cell Adhesion and Detachment via Single-Wavelength Near-Infrared Laser Mediated Photoisomerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Zhaowei; Zhou, Li; Li, Zhenhua; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-07-01

    Dynamically regulating cell-molecule interactions is fundamental to a variety of biological and biomedical applications. Herein, for the first time, by utilizing spiropyran conjugated multishell upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as a new generation of single-wavelength near-infrared (NIR)-controlled photoswitch, we report a simple yet versatile strategy for controlling cell adhesion/detachment reversibly and noninvasively. Specifically, the two-way isomerization of the photoswitch was merely dependent on the excitation power density of the 980 nm laser. At high power density, the ring-opening was prominent, whereas its reverse ring-closing process occurred upon irradiation by the same laser but with the lower power density. Such transformations made the interactions between spiropyran and cell surface protein fibronectin switchable, thus leading to reversible cell adhesion and detachment. Moreover, efficient adhesion-and-detachment of cells could be realized even after 10 cycles. Most importantly, the utilization of NIR not only showed little damage toward cells, but also improved penetration depth. Our work showed promising potential for in vivo dynamically manipulating cell-molecule interactions and biological process. PMID:26020685

  1. Non-metastatic 2 (NME2)-mediated suppression of lung cancer metastasis involves transcriptional regulation of key cell adhesion factor vinculin

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ram Krishna; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Singh, Ankita; Pal, Krishnendu; Hoeppner, Luke; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Purohit, Gunjan; Basundra, Richa; Kar, Anirban; Halder, Rashi; Kumar, Pankaj; Baral, Aradhita; Kumar, MJ Mahesh; Baldi, Alfonso; Vincenzi, Bruno; Lorenzon, Laura; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Kumar, Praveen; Shridhar, Viji; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Tumor metastasis refers to spread of a tumor from site of its origin to distant organs and causes majority of cancer deaths. Although >30 metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that negatively regulate metastasis have been identified so far, two issues are poorly understood: first, which MSGs oppose metastasis in a tumor type, and second, which molecular function of MSG controls metastasis. Herein, integrative analyses of tumor-transcriptomes (n = 382), survival data (n = 530) and lymph node metastases (n = 100) in lung cancer patients identified non-metastatic 2 (NME2) as a key MSG from a pool of >30 metastasis suppressors. Subsequently, we generated a promoter-wide binding map for NME2 using chromatin immunoprecipitation with promoter microarrays (ChIP-chip), and transcriptome profiling. We discovered novel targets of NME2 which are involved in focal adhesion signaling. Importantly, we detected binding of NME2 in promoter of focal adhesion factor, vinculin. Reduced expression of NME2 led to enhanced transcription of vinculin. In comparison, NME1, a close homolog of NME2, did not bind to vinculin promoter nor regulate its expression. In line, enhanced metastasis of NME2-depleted lung cancer cells was found in zebrafish and nude mice tumor models. The metastatic potential of NME2-depleted cells was remarkably diminished upon selective RNA-i-mediated silencing of vinculin. Together, we demonstrate that reduced NME2 levels lead to transcriptional de-repression of vinculin and regulate lung cancer metastasis. PMID:25249619

  2. The adaptor protein SAP directly associates with PECAM-1 and regulates PECAM-1-mediated-cell adhesion in T-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Proust, Richard; Crouin, Catherine; Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2014-04-01

    SAP is a small cytosolic adaptor protein expressed in hematopoietic lineages whose main function is to regulate intracellular signaling pathways induced by the triggering of members of the SLAM receptor family. In this paper, we have identified the adhesion molecule PECAM-1 as a new partner for SAP in a conditional yeast two-hybrid screen. PECAM-1 is an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes, which possesses both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about PECAM-1 functions in T cells. We show that SAP directly and specifically interacts with the cytosolic tyrosine 686 of PECAM-1. We generated different T-like cell lines in which SAP or PECAM-1 are expressed or down modulated and we demonstrate that a diminished SAP expression correlates with a diminished PECAM-1-mediated adhesion. Although SAP has mainly been shown to associate with SLAM receptors, we evidence here that SAP is a new actor downstream of PECAM-1. PMID:24388971

  3. Hyaluronan-Mediated Leukocyte Adhesion and Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis Are Attenuated in the Absence of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sudip K.; de la Motte, Carol A.; Kessler, Sean P.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Hill, David R.; Strong, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the intestinal mucosa whose etiology is unclear but is likely to be multifactorial. We have shown previously that an increased amount of hyaluronan (HA) is present both in the inflamed mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in isolated human cells after polyI:C treatment. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 protein plays an important role in many signaling pathways that are associated with inflammation. We therefore investigated the role of STAT1 in adhesive interactions that occur between leukocytes and polyI:C-induced mucosal smooth muscle cells (M-SMCs). Activation of STAT1 was observed after the polyI:C treatment of M-SMCs. Specific phosphorylation of tyrosine and serine residues of STAT1 was observed in polyI:C-treated, but not untreated, M-SMC cultures. To evaluate further the role of STAT1, a corresponding STAT-1-null mouse was used. PolyI:C-induced, HA-mediated leukocyte adhesion to colon SMCs from STAT1-null mice was significantly decreased compared with that from wild-type control mice. In vivo, using the dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of colon inflammation, both tissue damage and HA deposition were attenuated in STAT1-null mice compared with that in wild-type control mice. Additionally, the inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI), a proteoglycan essential for facilitating leukocyte binding to the HA matrix, was reduced in STAT1-null mice. Together, these results demonstrate that STAT1 plays an important role in HA-mediated inflammatory processes. PMID:18818378

  4. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  5. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  6. Role of stress fibers and focal adhesions as a mediator for mechano-signal transduction in endothelial cells in situ

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazuo; Kano, Yumiko; Ookawara, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    Fluid shear stress is the mechanical force generated by the blood flow which is applied over the apical surface of endothelial cells in situ. The findings of a recent study suggest that stress fibers and its associated focal adhesions play roles in mechano-signal transduction mechanism. Stress fibers are present along the apical and the basal portion of the endothelial cells. Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress and change their morphological characteristics in both their cell shape and cytoskeletal organization. Atherosclerosis is a common disease of the arteries and it occurs in areas around the branching site of blood vessels where the cells are exposed to low fluid shear stress. The organization of stress fibers and focal adhesions are strongly influenced by shear stress, and therefore the generation of atherosclerotic lesions seem to be associated with the cytoskeletal components of endothelial cells. This review describes the possible role of the cytoskeleton as a mechano-transducer in endothelial cells in situ. PMID:19337541

  7. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  8. Understanding the Mechanism of Solvent-Mediated Adhesion of Vacuum Deposited Au and Pt Thin Films onto PMMA Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Alan K; Brown, Victoria L.; Rugg, Brandon K.; Devore, Prof. Thomas C.; Meyer III, Harry M; Hu, Dr. Xiaofeng; Hughes, Prof. W. Christopher; Augustine, Prof. Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of 100 nm thick electron-beam deposited Au and Pt and magnetron sputtered Au thin films onto poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates can be significantly enhanced to over 90% adhesion by either spin-casting or vapor-exposure to hydrohalocarbon solvents prior to metal deposition compared to samples that are either cleaned in isopropyl alcohol or pre-treated with a remote O2 plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and evolved gas Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (EGA-FTIR) reveal the presence of residual halogenated solvent molecules at the PMMA surface which chemically activates the surface to produce a stable chemical interaction between the noble metal film and the PMMA. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the halogenated solvent molecules preferentially form a Lewis acid-base adduct with the oxygen atoms in the ester group in PMMA which is consistent with the measured enthalpy of desorption of chloroform (CHCl3) on PMMA determined by EGA-FTIR to be 36 kJ mol-1. The DFT model also supports the experimentally observed change in the high resolution XPS O 1s peak at 533.77 eV after metallization attributed to a change in the local bonding environment of the bridging O in the PMMA ester group. DFT also predicts that the deposited metal atom (M) inserts into the C-X bond where X is the halogen atom on either CHCl3 or bromoform (CHBr3) to form a O M X interaction that is observed by a M-X bond in the high resolution XPS Cl 2p3/2 peak at 198.03 eV and Br 3p3/2 peak at 182.06 eV. A range of solvents with differing polarities for PMMA pre-treatment have been used and it is proposed that non-complexing solvents result in significant metal adhesion improvement. The Gutmann acceptor number can be used to predict the effectiveness of solvent treatment for noble metal adhesion. A model is proposed in which the bond energy of the C-X bond of the solvent must be sufficiently low so that the C-X bond can be cleaved to form the M

  9. 17β-Estradiol Protects Rat Annulus Fibrosus Cells Against Apoptosis via α1 Integrin-Mediated Adhesion to Type I Collagen: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Ming; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Huang, Ai-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background 17β-Estradiol (E2) has been reported to protect annulus fibrosus (AF) cells in vitro against interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. However, its time-response effect remains unexplored. In addition, integrin α2/collagen II interaction has been reported to influence the apoptosis of nucleus pulposus cells in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that integrin α1/collagen II might play a role in exerting the anti-apoptosis effect by E2. The aim of the current study was to further investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of E2 and determine the role of integrin α1/collagen II interaction. Material/Methods Rat AF cells were primary cultured and used for the following experiments. AF cells were identified by immunocytochemistry of type I collagen. Cell apoptosis was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. The activity of active caspase-3 was determined by use of a caspase-3 detection kit. AF cell adhesion to type I collagen was determined by cell adhesion assay. Protein level of integrin subunit α1 was quantified by Western blot and mRNA expression was determined by real-time qPCR. Results The immunocytochemistry of type I collagen revealed that cell purity was eligible for the following experiments with 98% of purity. FACS analysis indicated time-dependent anti-apoptosis effect of E2 at time points of 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h, which was confirmed by Caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, cell adhesion assay showed that E2 significantly increased cell binding to 95% of control, and qPCR and Western blot analysis showed that E2 effectively upregulated integrin α1. However, estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182780 prohibited the effect of E2. Conclusions This study shows that E2 protects against apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, and α1 integrin-mediated adhesion to collagen II is essential for estrogen-dependent anti-apoptosis in rat annulus fibrosus cells in vitro. PMID:27108411

  10. TNF-α Mediates PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun-Dependent Monocyte Adhesion via ICAM-1 Induction in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ta; Liu, Shiau-Wen; Chi, Pei-Ling; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Retinal inflammatory diseases induced by cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are associated with an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPECs). Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a monolayer of epithelial cells that forms the outer blood-retinal barrier in the posterior segment of the eye, and is also implicated in the pathology of, such as neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the detailed mechanisms of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression are largely unclear in human RPECs. We demonstrated that in RPECs, TNF-α could induce ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity, and monocyte adhesion. TNF-α-mediated responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of PKCs (Ro318220), PKCδ (Rottlerin), MEK1/2 (U0126), JNK1/2 (SP600125), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) and transfection with siRNA of TNFR1, TRAF2, JNK2, p42, or c-Jun. We showed that TNF-α could stimulate the TNFR1 and TRAF2 complex formation. TNF-α-stimulated JNK1/2 was also reduced by Rottlerin or SP600125. However, Rottlerin had no effect on TNF-α-induced p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. We observed that TNF-α induced c-Jun phosphorylation which was inhibited by Rottlerin or SP600125. On the other hand, TNF-α-stimulated ICAM-1 promoter activity was prominently lost in RPECs transfected with the point-mutated AP-1 ICAM-1 promoter plasmid. These results suggest that TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion is mediated through a TNFR1/TRAF2/PKCδ/JNK1/2/c-Jun pathway in RPECs. These findings concerning TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression in RPECs imply that TNF-α might play an important role in ocular inflammation and diseases. PMID:25675437

  11. Epithelial Adhesion Mediated by Pilin SpaC Is Required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-Induced Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ardita, Courtney S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Kwon, Young Man; Luo, Liping; Crawford, Madelyn E.; Powell, Domonica N.; Jones, Rheinallt M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely used probiotic, and the strain's salutary effects on the intestine have been extensively documented. We previously reported that strain GG can modulate inflammatory signaling, as well as epithelial migration and proliferation, by activating NADPH oxidase 1-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, how strain GG induces these responses is unknown. Here, we report that strain GG's probiotic benefits are dependent on the bacterial-epithelial interaction mediated by the SpaC pilin subunit. By comparing strain GG to an isogenic mutant that lacks SpaC (strain GGΩspaC), we establish that SpaC is necessary for strain GG to adhere to gut mucosa, that SpaC contributes to strain GG-induced epithelial generation of ROS, and that SpaC plays a role in strain GG's capacity to stimulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling in enterocytes. In addition, we show that SpaC is required for strain GG-mediated stimulation of cell proliferation and protection against radiologically inflicted intestinal injury. The identification of a critical surface protein required for strain GG to mediate its probiotic influence advances our understanding of the molecular basis for the symbiotic relationship between some commensal bacteria of the gut lumen and enterocytes. Further insights into this relationship are critical for the development of novel approaches to treat intestinal diseases. PMID:24928883

  12. Neutrophils lacking platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 exhibit loss of directionality and motility in CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Stabach, Paul; Michaud, Michael; Madri, Joseph A

    2005-09-15

    Time-lapsed videomicroscopy was used to study the migration of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1-deficient (PECAM-1(-/-)) murine neutrophils undergoing chemotaxis in Zigmond chambers containing IL-8, KC, or fMLP gradients. PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils failed to translocate up the IL-8, KC, and fMLP gradients. Significant reductions in cell motility and cell spreading were also observed in IL-8 or KC gradients. In wild-type neutrophils, PECAM-1 and F-actin were colocalized at the leading fronts of polarized cells toward the gradient. In contrast, in PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils, although F-actin also localized to the leading front of migrating cells, F-actin polymerization was unstable, and cycling was remarkably increased compared with that of wild-type neutrophils. This may be due to the decreased cytokine-induced mobilization of the actin-binding protein, moesin, into the cytoskeleton of PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils. PECAM-1(-/-) neutrophils also exhibited intracellularly dislocalized Src homology 2 domain containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and had less IL-8-induced SHP-1 phosphatase activity. These results suggest that PECAM-1 regulates neutrophil chemotaxis by modulating cell motility and directionality, in part through its effects on SHP-1 localization and activation. PMID:16148090

  13. ApuA, a multifunctional alpha-glucan-degrading enzyme of Streptococcus suis, mediates adhesion to porcine epithelium and mucus.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; Fuentes, Susana; de Greeff, Astrid; Smith, Hilde; Wells, Jerry M

    2010-09-01

    We have identified apuA in Streptococcus suis, which encodes a bifunctional amylopullulanase with conserved alpha-amylase and pullulanase substrate-binding domains and catalytic motifs. ApuA exhibited properties typical of a Gram-positive surface protein, with a putative signal sequence and LPKTGE cell-wall-anchoring motif. A recombinant protein containing the predicted N-terminal alpha-amylase domain of ApuA was shown to have alpha-(1,4) glycosidic activity. Additionally, an apuA mutant of S. suis lacked the pullulanase alpha-(1,6) glycosidic activity detected in a cell-surface protein extract of wild-type S. suis. ApuA was required for normal growth in complex medium containing pullulan as the major carbon source, suggesting that this enzyme plays a role in nutrient acquisition in vivo via the degradation of glycogen and food-derived starch in the nasopharyngeal and oral cavities. ApuA was shown to promote adhesion to porcine epithelium and mucus in vitro, highlighting a link between carbohydrate utilization and the ability of S. suis to colonize and infect the host. PMID:20522493

  14. Aβ-dependent reduction of NCAM2-mediated synaptic adhesion contributes to synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Liew, Heng Tai; Shepherd, Claire; Halliday, Glenda M.; Stevens, Claire H.; Ke, Yazi D.; Ittner, Lars M.; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synapse loss due to mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We show that the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2) is enriched in synapses in the human hippocampus. This enrichment is abolished in the hippocampus of AD patients and in brains of mice overexpressing the human amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein carrying the pathogenic Swedish mutation. Aβ binds to NCAM2 at the cell surface of cultured hippocampal neurons and induces removal of NCAM2 from synapses. In AD hippocampus, cleavage of the membrane proximal external region of NCAM2 is increased and soluble extracellular fragments of NCAM2 (NCAM2-ED) accumulate. Knockdown of NCAM2 expression or incubation with NCAM2-ED induces disassembly of GluR1-containing glutamatergic synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons. Aβ-dependent disassembly of GluR1-containing synapses is inhibited in neurons overexpressing a cleavage-resistant mutant of NCAM2. Our data indicate that Aβ-dependent disruption of NCAM2 functions in AD hippocampus contributes to synapse loss. PMID:26611261

  15. Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 mediates antigen-induced acute airway inflammation and late-phase airway obstruction in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, R H; Wegner, C D; Torcellini, C A; Clarke, C C; Haynes, N; Rothlein, R; Smith, C W; Letts, L G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the role of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) in the development of the acute airway inflammation (cell influx) and late-phase airway obstruction in a primate model of extrinsic asthma. In animals sensitive to antigen, a single inhalation exposure induced the rapid expression of ELAM-1 (6 h) exclusively on vascular endothelium that correlated with the influx of neutrophils into the lungs and the onset of late-phase airway obstruction. In contrast, basal levels of ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on vascular endothelium and airway epithelium before antigen challenge. After the single antigen exposure, changes in ICAM-1 expression did not correlate with neutrophil influx or the change in airway caliber. This was confirmed by showing that pretreatment with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1 did not inhibit the acute influx of neutrophils associated with late-phase airway obstruction, whereas a monoclonal antibody to ELAM-1 blocked both the influx of neutrophils and the late-phase airway obstruction. This study demonstrates a functional role for ELAM-1 in the development of acute airway inflammation in vivo. We conclude that, in primates, the late-phase response is the result of an ELAM-1 dependent influx of neutrophils. Therefore, the regulation of ELAM-1 expression may provide a novel approach to controlling the acute inflammatory response, and thereby, affecting airway function associated with inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Images PMID:1717514

  16. Stonin1 mediates endocytosis of the proteoglycan NG2 and regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Feutlinske, Fabian; Browarski, Marietta; Ku, Min-Chi; Trnka, Philipp; Waiczies, Sonia; Niendorf, Thoralf; Stallcup, William B.; Glass, Rainer; Krause, Eberhard; Maritzen, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular functions, ranging from focal adhesion (FA) dynamics and cell motility to tumour growth, are orchestrated by signals cells receive from outside via cell surface receptors. Signalling is fine-tuned by the exo–endocytic cycling of these receptors to control cellular responses such as FA dynamics, which determine cell motility. How precisely endocytosis regulates turnover of the various cell surface receptors remains unclear. Here we identify Stonin1, an endocytic adaptor of unknown function, as a regulator of FA dynamics and cell motility, and demonstrate that it facilitates the internalization of the oncogenic proteoglycan NG2, a co-receptor of integrins and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Embryonic fibroblasts obtained from Stonin1-deficient mice display a marked surface accumulation of NG2, increased cellular signalling and defective FA disassembly as well as altered cellular motility. These data establish Stonin1 as a specific adaptor for the endocytosis of NG2 and as an important factor for FA dynamics and cell migration. PMID:26437238

  17. Enteral n-3 fatty acids and micronutrients enhance percentage of positive neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion molecules: a potential mediator of pressure ulcer healing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Theilla, Miriam; Schwartz, Betty; Zimra, Yael; Shapiro, Haim; Anbar, Ronit; Rabizadeh, Esther; Cohen, Jonathan; Singer, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    n-3 Fatty acids are recognised as influencing both wound healing and immunity. We assessed the impact of a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula (study formula) on the healing of pressure ulcers and on immune function in critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. A total of forty patients with pressure ulcers and receiving nutritional support were enrolled (intervention group, n 20, received study formula; and a control group, n 20, received an isoenergetic formula). Total and differential leucocyte count and percentage of adhesion molecule positive granulocyte and lymphocyte cells (CD11a, CD11b, CD18 and CD49b) were measured on days 0, 7 and 14. Percentage of positive lymphocytes for CD54, CD49b, CD49d and CD8 were also measured on days 0, 7 and 14. The state of pressure ulcers was assessed by using the pressure ulcer scale for healing tool score on days 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. No between-group differences in patient demographics, anthropometry or diagnostic class were observed. Patients who received the study formula showed significant increases in the percentage of positive CD18 and CD11a lymphocytes and of CD49b granulocytes as compared to controls (P < 0·05). While the severity of pressure ulcers was not significantly different between the two groups on admission, severity increased significantly over time for the control group (P < 0·05), but not for the study group. The present study suggests that a fish oil- and micronutrient-enriched formula may prevent worsening of pressure ulcers and that this effect may be mediated by an effect on adhesion molecule expression. PMID:22040465

  18. Nrk2b-mediated NAD+ production regulates cell adhesion and is required for muscle morphogenesis in vivo: Nrk2b and NAD+ in muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Lessard, Kevin N; Khalil, Andre; Henry, Clarissa A

    2010-08-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) play fundamental roles during morphogenesis. Given the ubiquitous nature of CMACs and their roles in many cellular processes, one question is how specificity of CMAC function is modulated. The clearly defined cell behaviors that generate segmentally reiterated axial skeletal muscle during zebrafish development comprise an ideal system with which to investigate CMAC function during morphogenesis. We found that Nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b (Nrk2b) cell autonomously modulates the molecular composition of CMACs in vivo. Nrk2b is required for normal Laminin polymerization at the myotendinous junction (MTJ). In Nrk2b-deficient embryos, at MTJ loci where Laminin is not properly polymerized, muscle fibers elongate into adjacent myotomes and are abnormally long. In yeast and human cells, Nrk2 phosphorylates Nicotinamide Riboside and generates NAD+ through an alternative salvage pathway. Exogenous NAD+ treatment rescues MTJ development in Nrk2b-deficient embryos, but not in laminin mutant embryos. Both Nrk2b and Laminin are required for localization of Paxillin, but not beta-Dystroglycan, to CMACs at the MTJ. Overexpression of Paxillin in Nrk2b-deficient embryos is sufficient to rescue MTJ integrity. Taken together, these data show that Nrk2b plays a specific role in modulating subcellular localization of discrete CMAC components that in turn plays roles in musculoskeletal development. Furthermore, these data suggest that Nrk2b-mediated synthesis of NAD+ is functionally upstream of Laminin adhesion and Paxillin subcellular localization during MTJ development. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity to CMAC assembly in vivo and also elucidate a novel role for NAD+ during morphogenesis. PMID:20566368

  19. Ling Zhi-8 reduces lung cancer mobility and metastasis through disruption of focal adhesion and induction of MDM2-mediated Slug degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that recombinant Ling Zhi-8 (rLZ-8), a medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum recombinant protein, effectively prevents lung cancer cells proliferation in vivo mice model. In our current study, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 suppressed tumor metastasis and increased the survival rate in Lewis lung carcinoma cell-bearing mice. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is regarded as the critical event in tumor metastasis. Herein, we showed that rLZ-8 effectively induced changes in EMT by interfering with cell adhesion and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions in lung cancer cells. Slug, a transcription factor, represses E-cadherin transcription and is regarded as a critical event in EMT and tumor metastasis. Functional studies revealed that downregulation of Slug as a result of rLZ-8-induced FAK inactivation enhanced E-cadherin expression and repressed cancer cell mobility. Moreover, we found that rLZ-8 enhanced the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of Slug in CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 promoted the interaction between MDM2 and Slug, resulting in Slug degradation; however, MDM2-shRNA abolished rLZ-8-enhanced Slug degradation. This study is the first to determine anti-metastatic activity of rLZ-8 and its potential mechanism, with how the regulation of EMT and cell mobility is via the negative modulation of FAK, and thereby leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of Slug. Our findings suggest that the targets of FAK play a key role in metastasis. Moreover, rLZ-8 may be useful as a chemotherapeutic agent for treating lung cancer. PMID:26992741

  20. Vitronectin expression in differentiating neuroblastic tumors: integrin alpha v beta 5 mediates vitronectin-dependent adhesion of retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gladson, C. L.; Dennis, C.; Rotolo, T. C.; Kelly, D. R.; Grammer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The metastatic potential of undifferentiated neuroblastomas is typically lost when differentiation into ganglioneuroblastomas occurs spontaneously or is induced. Cell adhesion may play a role in metastasis, and we have shown recently that expression of integrin alpha v beta 5 protein and mRNA is up-regulated in ganglioneuroblastomas in vivo. To investigate whether interactions of alpha v beta 5 with matrix components play a role in the loss of metastatic potential, we used immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization to analyze neuroblastic tumors at various stages of differentiation for expression of the alpha v beta 5 ligands, vitronectin and osteopontin, and determined the ability of vitronectin to promote attachment and neurite outgrowth in vitro in a retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cell model. We found that vitronectin, but not osteopontin, was expressed in 5 of 5 ganglioneuroblastomas but was absent or weakly expressed in 6 of 6 undifferentiated neuroblastomas. Neuronal cell vitronectin was detected in 7 of 9 ganglioneuromas, 5 of 8 peripheral ganglia, and 14 of 21 adrenal gland medullae, confirming expression of vitronectin in mature peripheral neurons. In vitro, vitronectin promoted attachment of both undifferentiated and retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells, which was inhibited 20 and 60%, respectively, by monoclonal antibody anti-integrin alpha v beta 5. Vitronectin-promoted neurite outgrowth of retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells was not inhibited by monoclonal antibody anti-alpha v beta 5. These data suggest that the synthesis of vitronectin and the ability of integrin alpha v beta 5 to mediate vitronectin adhesion on retinoic-acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells may promote differentiation of neuroblastoma cells in vivo. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 8 PMID:9137089

  1. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  2. Silencing α1,3-Fucosyltransferases in Human Leukocytes Reveals a Role for FUT9 Enzyme during E-selectin-mediated Cell Adhesion*

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Alexander; Mondal, Nandini; Gupta, Rohitesh; McHugh, Kyle P.; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion during inflammation is initiated by the binding of sialofucosylated carbohydrates expressed on leukocytes to endothelial E/P-selectin. Although the glycosyltransferases (glycoTs) constructing selectin-ligands have largely been identified using knock-out mice, important differences may exist between humans and mice. To address this, we developed a systematic lentivirus-based shRNA delivery workflow to create human leukocytic HL-60 cell lines that lack up to three glycoTs. Using this, the contributions of all three myeloid α1,3-fucosyltransferases (FUT4, FUT7, and FUT9) to selectin-ligand biosynthesis were evaluated. The cell adhesion properties of these modified cells to L-, E-, and P-selectin under hydrodynamic shear were compared with bone marrow-derived neutrophils from Fut4−/−Fut7−/− dual knock-out mice. Results demonstrate that predominantly FUT7, and to a lesser extent FUT4, forms the selectin-ligand at the N terminus of leukocyte P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) in humans and mice. Here, 85% reduction in leukocyte interaction was observed in human FUT4−7− dual knockdowns on P/L-selectin substrates. Unlike Fut4−/−Fut7−/− mouse neutrophils, however, human knockdowns lacking FUT4 and FUT7 only exhibited partial reduction in rolling interaction on E-selectin. In this case, the third α1,3-fucosyltransferase FUT9 played an important role because leukocyte adhesion was reduced by 50–60% in FUT9-HL-60, 70–80% in dual knockdown FUT7−9− cells, and ∼85% in FUT4−7−9− triple knockdowns. Gene silencing results are in agreement with gain-of-function experiments where all three fucosyltransferases conferred E-selectin-mediated rolling in HEK293T cells. This study advances new tools to study human glycoT function. It suggests a species-specific role for FUT9 during the biosynthesis of human E-selectin ligands. PMID:23192350

  3. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  4. Adhesive fiber stratification in uropathogenic Escherichia coli biofilms unveils oxygen-mediated control of type 1 pili.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Kyle A; Moore, Jessica L; Eberly, Allison R; Good, James A D; Shaffer, Carrie L; Zaver, Himesh; Almqvist, Fredrik; Skaar, Eric P; Caprioli, Richard M; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms account for a significant number of hospital-acquired infections and complicate treatment options, because bacteria within biofilms are generally more tolerant to antibiotic treatment. This resilience is attributed to transient bacterial subpopulations that arise in response to variations in the microenvironment surrounding the biofilm. Here, we probed the spatial proteome of surface-associated single-species biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major causative agent of community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to analyze the spatial proteome of intact biofilms in situ. MALDI-TOF IMS revealed protein species exhibiting distinct localizations within surface-associated UPEC biofilms, including two adhesive fibers critical for UPEC biofilm formation and virulence: type 1 pili (Fim) localized exclusively to the air-exposed region, while curli amyloid fibers localized to the air-liquid interface. Comparison of cells grown aerobically, fermentatively, or utilizing an alternative terminal electron acceptor showed that the phase-variable fim promoter switched to the "OFF" orientation under oxygen-deplete conditions, leading to marked reduction of type 1 pili on the bacterial cell surface. Conversely, S pili whose expression is inversely related to fim expression were up-regulated under anoxic conditions. Tethering the fim promoter in the "ON" orientation in anaerobically grown cells only restored type 1 pili production in the presence of an alternative terminal electron acceptor beyond oxygen. Together these data support the presence of at least two regulatory mechanisms controlling fim expression in response to oxygen availability and may contribute to the stratification of extracellular matrix components within the biofilm. MALDI IMS facilitated the discovery of these mechanisms, and we

  5. Adhesive Fiber Stratification in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Biofilms Unveils Oxygen-Mediated Control of Type 1 Pili

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Kyle A.; Moore, Jessica L.; Eberly, Allison R.; Good, James A. D.; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Zaver, Himesh; Almqvist, Fredrik; Skaar, Eric P.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms account for a significant number of hospital-acquired infections and complicate treatment options, because bacteria within biofilms are generally more tolerant to antibiotic treatment. This resilience is attributed to transient bacterial subpopulations that arise in response to variations in the microenvironment surrounding the biofilm. Here, we probed the spatial proteome of surface-associated single-species biofilms formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major causative agent of community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to analyze the spatial proteome of intact biofilms in situ. MALDI-TOF IMS revealed protein species exhibiting distinct localizations within surface-associated UPEC biofilms, including two adhesive fibers critical for UPEC biofilm formation and virulence: type 1 pili (Fim) localized exclusively to the air-exposed region, while curli amyloid fibers localized to the air-liquid interface. Comparison of cells grown aerobically, fermentatively, or utilizing an alternative terminal electron acceptor showed that the phase-variable fim promoter switched to the “OFF” orientation under oxygen-deplete conditions, leading to marked reduction of type 1 pili on the bacterial cell surface. Conversely, S pili whose expression is inversely related to fim expression were up-regulated under anoxic conditions. Tethering the fim promoter in the “ON” orientation in anaerobically grown cells only restored type 1 pili production in the presence of an alternative terminal electron acceptor beyond oxygen. Together these data support the presence of at least two regulatory mechanisms controlling fim expression in response to oxygen availability and may contribute to the stratification of extracellular matrix components within the biofilm. MALDI IMS facilitated the discovery of these mechanisms

  6. Preferential phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 861 is critical for mediating an anti-apoptotic response to hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Adrian; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-04-01

    The results presented here demonstrate that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) Tyr-861 is the predominant tyrosine phosphorylation site stimulated by hyperosmotic stress in a variety of cell types, including epithelial cell lines (ileum-derived IEC-18, colon-derived Caco2, and stomach-derived NCI-N87), FAK null fibroblasts re-expressing FAK, and Src family kinase triple null fibroblasts (SYF cells) in which c-Src has been restored (YF cells). We show that hyperosmotic stress-stimulated FAK phosphorylation in epithelial cells is inhibited by Src family kinase inhibitors PP2 and SU6656 and that it does not occur in SYF cells. Unexpectedly, hyperosmotic stress-induced phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397, Tyr-576, and most dramatically at Tyr-861 was completely insensitive to the F-actin-disrupting agents, latrunculin A and cytochalasin D. Finally, we show that in FAK null cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress or growth factor withdrawal, re-expression of wild type FAK restored cell survival, whereas re-expression of FAK mutated from tyrosine to phenylalanine at position 861 (FAKY861F) did not. Our results indicate that FAK Tyr-861 phosphorylation is required for mammalian cell survival of hyperosmotic stress. Furthermore, the results suggest that FAK is an upstream regulator (rather than downstream effector) of F-actin reorganization in response to hyperosmotic stress. We propose that FAK/c-Src bipartite enzyme is a sensor of cytoplasmic shrinkage, and that the phosphorylation on FAK Tyr-861 by Src and subsequent reorganization of F-actin can initiate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway that protects cells from hyperosmotic stress. PMID:17289681

  7. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Regulation of Adhesive Force Involves Vinculin Recruitment to Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Steven K.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    Background information Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an essential non-receptor tyrosine kinase, plays pivotal roles in migratory responses, adhesive signaling, and mechanotransduction. FAK-dependent regulation of cell migration involves focal adhesion turnover dynamics as well as actin cytoskeleton polymerization and lamellipodia protrusion. Whereas roles for FAK in migratory and mechanosensing responses have been established, the contributions of FAK to the generation of adhesive forces are not well understood. Results Using FAK-null cells expressing wild-type and mutant FAK under an inducible tetracycline promoter, we analyzed the role of FAK in the generation of steady-state adhesive forces using micropatterned substrates and a hydrodynamic adhesion assay. FAK expression reduced steady-state strength by 30% compared to FAK-null cells. FAK expression reduced vinculin localization to focal adhesions by 35% independently from changes in integrin binding and localization of talin and paxillin. RNAi knockdown of vinculin abrogated the FAK-dependent differences in adhesive force. FAK-dependent changes in vinculin localization and adhesive force were confirmed in human primary fibroblasts with FAK knocked down by RNAi. The autophosphorylation Y397 and kinase domain Y576/Y577 sites were differentially required for FAK-mediated adhesive responses. Conclusions We demonstrate that FAK reduces steady-state adhesion strength by modulating vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions. These findings provide insights into the role of FAK in mechanical interactions between a cell and the extracellular matrix. PMID:19883375

  8. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sophie Y; Sullivan, Matthew J; Ipe, Deepak S; Smith, Joshua P; Cripps, Allan W; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  9. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  10. T cell-mediated modulation of mast cell function: heterotypic adhesion-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells (Treg) on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by Treg on mast cell function. PMID:22566892

  11. Sequential binding of αvβ3 and ICAM-1 determines fibrin-mediated melanoma capture and stable adhesion to CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pu; Ozdemir, Tugba; Chung, Chin-Ying; Robertson, Gavin P.; Dong, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Fibrin (Fn) deposition defines several type 1 immune responses, including delayed-type hypersensitivity and autoimmunity in which PMNs are involved. Fn monomer and fibrinogen (Fg) are multivalent ligands for a variety of cell receptors during cell adhesion. These cell receptors provide critical linkage between thrombosis, inflammation and cancer metastasis under venous flow conditions. However, the mechanisms of Fn-mediated interactions among immune cells and circulating tumor cells remain elusive. By using a cone-plate viscometer shear assay and dual-color flow cytometry, we demonstrated that soluble Fg and Fn had different abilities to enhance heterotypic aggregation between polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and Lu1205 melanoma cells in a shear flow, regulated by thrombin levels. In addition, the involvement of integrin αvβ3, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) in fibrin(ogen)-mediated melanoma-PMN aggregations was explored. Kinetic studies provided evidences that ICAM-1 mediated initial capture of melanoma cells by PMNs, while αvβ3 played a role in sustained adhesion of the two cell types at a shear rate of 62.5 s-1. Quantitative analysis of the melanoma-PMN interactions conducted by a parallel-plate flow chamber assay further revealed that at a shear rate of 20 s-1, αvβ3 had enough contact time to form bonds with Mac-1 via Fn, which could not otherwise occur at a shear rate higher than 62.5 s-1. Our studies have captured a novel finding that leukocytes could be recruited to tumor cells via thrombin-mediated Fn formation within a tumor microenvironment, and αvβ3 and ICAM-1 may participate in multi-step fibrin(ogen)-mediated melanoma cell adhesion within the circulation. PMID:21135163

  12. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Inhibits Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Impairs Bio-Scaffold-Mediated Bone Regeneration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fen-Fen; Li, Xi-Mei; Yang, Fei; Chen, Ji-De; Tang, Bo; Sun, Hong-Guang; Chu, Ya-Nan; Zheng, Rong-Xiu; Liu, Yuan-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) loaded bio-scaffold transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for bone regeneration and repair. However, growing evidence shows that pro-inflammatory mediators from injured tissues suppress osteogenic differentiation and impair bone formation. To improve MSC-based bone regeneration, it is important to understand the mechanism of inflammation mediated osteogenic suppression. In the present study, we found that synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis patients and pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1α, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α, stimulated intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) expression and impaired osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Interestingly, overexpression of ICAM-1 in MSCs using a genetic approach also inhibited osteogenesis. In contrast, ICAM-1 knockdown significantly reversed the osteogenic suppression. In addition, after transplanting a traceable MSC-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) construct in rat calvarial defects, we found that ICAM-1 suppressed MSC osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that ICAM-1 enhances MSC proliferation but causes stem cell marker loss. Furthermore, overexpression of ICAM-1 stably activated the MAPK and NF-κB pathways but suppressed the PI3K/AKT pathway in MSCs. More importantly, specific inhibition of the ERK/MAPK and NF-κB pathways or activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway partially rescued osteogenic differentiation, while inhibition of the p38/MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway caused more serious osteogenic suppression. In summary, our findings reveal a novel function of ICAM-1 in osteogenesis and suggest a new molecular target to improve bone regeneration and repair in inflammatory microenvironments. PMID:24702024

  13. Concentrated growth factor promotes Schwann cell migration partly through the integrin β1-mediated activation of the focal adhesion kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yidi; Yang, Tingting; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-05-01

    Nerve injury is a serious complication associated with dental implant surgery. Following nerve injury, the migration of Schwann cells (SCs) supports nerve regeneration. Concentrated growth factor (CGF) belongs to a new generation of biomaterials that contain fibrin matrix, as well as a number of growth factors that affect the migration of various types of cells, including endothelial cells and cancer cells. To the very best of our knowledge, there are no available studies to date on the promoting effect of CGF on the migration of SCs. Thus, the aim of the present study was to characterize the structure of CGF and growth factor release, examine the effects of CGF on the migration of SCs, and to examine the role of integrin β1 and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway in the CGF-induced migration of SCs. For this purpose, CGF was prepared by centrifuging rat venous blood, which produced a fiber-like matrix capable of releasing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) over a sustained period of time (at least 13 days). The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media to treat the SC cells in culture. The results demonstrated that CGF promoted the migration of SCs and increased the expression of integrin β1. These effects appeared to involve FAK phosphorylation, which occurred downstream of integrin β1 activation. The short-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated downregulation of integrin β1 expression did not block the ability of CGF to promote the migration of SCs. These data suggest that CGF promotes the migration of SCs partly through the integrin β1-mediated activation of the FAK pathway. PMID:26986804

  14. Neutrophil transmigration mediated by the neutrophil-specific antigen CD177 is influenced by the endothelial S536N dimorphism of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Behnaz; Werth, Silke; Sachs, Ulrich J H; Newman, Debra K; Newman, Peter J; Santoso, Sentot

    2010-04-01

    The human neutrophil-specific adhesion molecule CD177 (also known as the NB1 alloantigen) becomes upregulated on the cell surface in a number of inflammatory settings. We recently showed that CD177 functions as a novel heterophilic counterreceptor for the endothelial junctional protein PECAM-1 (CD31), an interaction that is mediated by membrane-proximal PECAM-1 IgD 6, which is known to harbor an S(536)N single nucleotide polymorphism of two major isoforms V(98)N(536)G(643) and L(98)S(536)R(643) and a yet-to-be-determined region on CD177. In vitro transendothelial migration experiments revealed that CD177(+) neutrophils migrated significantly faster through HUVECs expressing the LSR, compared with the VNG, allelic variant of PECAM-1 and that this correlated with the decreased ability of anti-PECAM-1 Ab of ITIM tyrosine phosphorylation in HUVECs expressing the LSR allelic variant relative to the VNG allelic variant. Moreover, engagement of PECAM-1 with rCD177-Fc (to mimic heterophilic CD177 binding) suppressed Ab-induced tyrosine phosphorylation to a greater extent in cells expressing the LSR isoform compared with the VNG isoform, with a corresponding increased higher level of beta-catenin phosphorylation. These data suggest that heterophilic PECAM-1/CD177 interactions affect the phosphorylation state of PECAM-1 and endothelial cell junctional integrity in such a way as to facilitate neutrophil transmigration in a previously unrecognized allele-specific manner. PMID:20194726

  15. Activation of transcription factor AP-2 mediates UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-induced expression of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grether-Beck, S.; Olaizola-Horn, S.; Schmitt, H.; Grewe, M.

    1996-12-10

    UVA radiation is the major component of the UV solar spectrum that reaches the earth, and the therapeutic application of UVA radiation is increasing in medicine. Analysis of the cellular effects of UVA radiation has revealed that exposure of human cells to UVA radiation at physiological doses leads to increased gene expression and that this UVA response is primarily mediated through the generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, the mechanisms by which UVA radiation induces transcriptional activation of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined. UVA radiation was capable of inducing activation of the human ICAM-1 promoter and increasing OCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. These UVA radiation effects were inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers, augmented by enhancement of singlet oxygen life-time, and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. UVA radiation as well as singlet oxygen-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation required activation of the transcription factor AP-2. Accordingly, both stimuli activated AP-2, and deletion of the putative AP-2-binding site abrogated ICAM-1 promoter activation in this system. This study identified the AP-2 site as the UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-responsive element of the human ICAM-1 gene. The capacity of UVA radiation and/or singlet oxygen to induce human gene expression through activation of AP-2 indicates a previously unrecognized role of this transcription factor in the mammalian stress response. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The adhesion GPCR GPR126 has distinct, domain-dependent functions in Schwann cell development mediated by interaction with Laminin-211

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Sarah C.; Luo, Rong; Liebscher, Ines; Giera, Stefanie; Jeong, Sung-jin; Mogha, Amit; Ghidinelli, Monica; Feltri, M. Laura; Schöneberg, Torsten; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Myelin ensheathes axons to allow rapid propagation of action potentials and proper nervous system function. In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SCs) radially sort axons into a 1:1 relationship before wrapping an axonal segment to form myelin. SC myelination requires the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126, which undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage into an N-terminal fragment (NTF) and a 7-transmembrane-containing C-terminal fragment (CTF). Here, we show that GPR126 has domain-specific functions in SC development whereby the NTF is necessary and sufficient for axon sorting while the CTF promotes wrapping through cAMP elevation. These biphasic roles of GPR126 are governed by interactions with Laminin-211, which we define as a novel ligand for GPR126 that modulates receptor signaling via a tethered agonist. Our work suggests a model in which Laminin-211 mediates GPR126-induced cAMP levels to control early and late stages of SC development. PMID:25695270

  17. Cocaine-associated retiform purpura: a C5b-9-mediated microangiopathy syndrome associated with enhanced apoptosis and high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia M; Wang, Xuan

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine-associated retiform purpura is a recently described entity characterized by striking hemorrhagic necrosis involving areas of skin associated with administration of cocaine. Levamisole, an adulterant in cocaine, has been suggested as the main culprit pathogenetically. Four cases of cocaine-associated retiform purpura were encountered in the dermatopathology practice of C. M. Magro. The light microscopic findings were correlated with immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence studies. All 4 cases showed a very striking thrombotic diathesis associated with intravascular macrophage accumulation. Necrotizing vasculitis was noted in 1 case. Striking intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/CD54 expression in vessel wall along with endothelial expression of caspase 3 and extensive vascular C5b-9 deposition was observed in all biopsies examined. Cocaine-induced retiform purpura is a C5b-9-mediated microvascular injury associated with enhanced apoptosis and prominent vascular expression of ICAM-1, all of which have been shown in prior in vitro and in vivo murine models to be a direct effect of cocaine metabolic products. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody and antiphospholipid antibodies are likely the direct sequelae of the proapoptotic microenvironment. The inflammatory vasculitic lesion could reflect the downstream end point reflective of enhanced ICAM-1 expression and the development of antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody. Levamisole likely works synergistically with cocaine in the propagation of this syndromic complex. PMID:23392134

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of an inflammatory chemokine: CCL2 inhibits lymphocyte homing by modulation of CCL21-triggered integrin-mediated adhesions.

    PubMed

    Flaishon, Liat; Hart, Gili; Zelman, Einat; Moussion, Christine; Grabovsky, Valentin; Lapidot Tal, Guy; Feigelson, Sara; Margalit, Raanan; Harmelin, Alon; Avin-Wittenberg, Tamar; Shoseyov, David; Alon, Ronen; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Shachar, Idit

    2008-12-15

    Our studies focus on the pathways that restrict homing of specific subsets of immune cells, and thereby fine-tune the immune response at specific lymphoid and peripheral tissues. Here, we report that CCL2 (at picomolar [pM] levels) renders both murine and human T cells defective in their ability to develop CCR7-triggered activation of LFA-1- and LFA-1-mediated adhesion strengthening to endothelial ICAM-1 both in vitro and in vivo. CCL2 also attenuated lymphocyte chemotaxis toward lymph node chemokines. Consequently, low-dose CCL2 inhibited lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymph nodes but did not affect lymphocyte trafficking through the spleen. Impaired homing of lymphocytes to peripheral lymph nodes resulted in attenuated progression of both asthma and adjuvant arthritis. Thus, pM levels of circulating CCL2 can exert global suppressive effects on T-cell trafficking and differentiation within peripheral lymph nodes, and may be clinically beneficial as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:18802011

  19. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity properties in the mediation of in vitro adhesion by the rabbit enteric pathogen Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1.

    PubMed Central

    Drumm, B; Neumann, A W; Policova, Z; Sherman, P M

    1989-01-01

    The role of hydrophobicity in the attachment of enteropathogens to gastrointestinal mucosa is controversial. In vitro binding of Escherichia coli RDEC-1 to rabbit intestine is dependent on the expression of pili. We examined in vitro adherence of piliated RDEC-1 after altering either the hydrophobicity of the organisms, the hydrophobicity of the substrate for attachment, or the surface tension of the suspending liquid. Hydrophobicity of RDEC-1 was determined using four complementary methods. In each assay piliated RDEC-1 demonstrated relatively more hydrophobic properties compared with both organisms grown to suppress pilus expression and a mutant that cannot express mannose-resistant pili. When piliated RDEC-1 were pretreated with tetramethyl urea to disrupt hydrophobic bonds surface hydrophobicity decreased. Concurrently, bacterial adherence to rabbit ileal microvillus membranes, mucus and mucin was reduced. Binding of piliated organisms to hydrophobic surfaces was significantly higher compared to both nonpiliated bacteria and the adherence of piliated RDEC-1 to relatively hydrophilic surfaces. Addition of propanol reduced the surface tension of the suspending liquid, and decreased adhesion of piliated RDEC-1 to polystyrene by 80%. Conversely, adherence of piliated organisms to a hydrophilic surface increased 12-fold after lowering the surface tension of the suspending liquid. We conclude that hydrophobic properties have a role in mediating in vitro adherence of this E. coli enteric pathogen. Images PMID:2572606

  20. The Pmt2p-Mediated Protein O-Mannosylation Is Required for Morphogenesis, Adhesive Properties, Cell Wall Integrity and Full Virulence of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Tan, Leyong; Nie, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Pan, Yuemin; Gao, Zhimou

    2016-01-01

    Protein O-mannosylation is a type of O-glycosylation that is characterized by the addition of mannose residues to target proteins, and is initially catalyzed by evolutionarily conserved protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs). In this study, three members of PMT were identified in Magnaporthe oryzae, and the pathogenic roles of MoPmt2, a member of PMT2 subfamily, were analyzed. We found that MoPmt2 is a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pmt2 and could complement yeast Pmt2 function in resistance to CFW. Quantitative RT–PCR revealed that MoPmt2 is highly expressed during conidiation, and targeted disruption of MoPmt2 resulted in defects in conidiation and conidia morphology. The MoPmt2 mutants also showed a distinct reduction in fungal growth, which was associated with severe alterations in hyphal polarity. In addition, we found that the MoPmt2 mutants severely reduced virulence on both rice plants and barley leaves. The subsequent examination revealed that the fungal adhesion, conidial germination, CWI and invasive hyphae growth in host cells are responsible for defects on appressorium mediated penetration, and thus attenuated the pathogenicity of MoPmt2 mutants. Taken together, our results suggest that protein O-mannosyltransferase MoPmt2 plays essential roles in fungal growth and development, and is required for the full pathogenicity of M. oryzae. PMID:27199956

  1. The Pmt2p-Mediated Protein O-Mannosylation Is Required for Morphogenesis, Adhesive Properties, Cell Wall Integrity and Full Virulence of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Tan, Leyong; Nie, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Pan, Yuemin; Gao, Zhimou

    2016-01-01

    Protein O-mannosylation is a type of O-glycosylation that is characterized by the addition of mannose residues to target proteins, and is initially catalyzed by evolutionarily conserved protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs). In this study, three members of PMT were identified in Magnaporthe oryzae, and the pathogenic roles of MoPmt2, a member of PMT2 subfamily, were analyzed. We found that MoPmt2 is a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pmt2 and could complement yeast Pmt2 function in resistance to CFW. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that MoPmt2 is highly expressed during conidiation, and targeted disruption of MoPmt2 resulted in defects in conidiation and conidia morphology. The MoPmt2 mutants also showed a distinct reduction in fungal growth, which was associated with severe alterations in hyphal polarity. In addition, we found that the MoPmt2 mutants severely reduced virulence on both rice plants and barley leaves. The subsequent examination revealed that the fungal adhesion, conidial germination, CWI and invasive hyphae growth in host cells are responsible for defects on appressorium mediated penetration, and thus attenuated the pathogenicity of MoPmt2 mutants. Taken together, our results suggest that protein O-mannosyltransferase MoPmt2 plays essential roles in fungal growth and development, and is required for the full pathogenicity of M. oryzae. PMID:27199956

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins. PMID:26863924

  3. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins.

  4. Physical properties of the specific PapG-galabiose binding in E. coli P pili-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Björnham, Oscar; Nilsson, Håkan; Andersson, Magnus; Schedin, Staffan

    2009-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the mechanisms that mediate binding of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli to host cells are essential, as attachment is a prerequisite for the subsequent infection process. We explore, by means of force measuring optical tweezers, the interaction between the galabiose receptor and the adhesin PapG expressed by P pili on single bacterial cells. Two variants of dynamic force spectroscopy were applied based on constant and non-linear loading force. The specific PapG-galabiose binding showed typical slip-bond behaviour in the force interval (30-100 pN) set by the pilus intrinsic biomechanical properties. Moreover, it was found that the bond has a thermodynamic off-rate and a bond length of 2.6 x 10(-3) s(-1) and 5.0 A, respectively. Consequently, the PapG-galabiose complex is significantly stronger than the internal bonds in the P pilus structure that stabilizes the helical chain-like macromolecule. This finding suggests that the specific binding is strong enough to enable the P pili rod to unfold when subjected to strong shear forces in the urinary tract. The unfolding process of the P pili rod promotes the formation of strong multipili interaction, which is important for the bacterium to maintain attachment to the host cells. PMID:18923826

  5. A ternary complex comprising FAK, PTPα and IP3 receptor 1 functionally engages focal adhesions and the endoplasmic reticulum to mediate IL-1-induced Ca2+ signalling in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yongqiang; Downey, Gregory P; Plotnikov, Sergey; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2016-02-15

    Ca(2+) release is tightly sequestered in eukaryotic cells to enable fine spatio-temporal control of signalling but how Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is linked to cell adhesions is not defined. We examined the spatial restriction of Ca(2+) release through the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1) in response to interleukin-1 (IL-1) and the functions of the adhesion-associated proteins, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and protein tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTPα). In cultured fibroblasts IL-1 treatment promoted co-localization of PTPα and FAK with the ER and increased association of IP3R1 with PTPα and FAK at focal adhesions (FAs). GST pull-down assays of purified proteins demonstrated that PTPα and FAK directly interacted with IP3R1. These interactions depended on the focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) and band4.1-ezrin-radixin-moesin (FERM) domains of FAK. PTPα was required for the association of IP3R1 with Src, which mediated IP3R1 phosphorylation and consequently ER Ca(2+) release. Collectively, these data indicate that PTPα and FAK, which are enriched in FAs, interact with IP3R1 at adjacent ER sites to spatially sequester IL-1-induced Ca(2+) signalling. PMID:26611753

  6. Escherichia coli Common Pilus (ECP) Targets Arabinosyl Residues in Plant Cell Walls to Mediate Adhesion to Fresh Produce Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G. T.; Toth, Ian K.; Holden, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR–GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells. PMID:25320086

  7. Protein-mediated adhesion of Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 on human enterocyte and mucus-secreting cell lines in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Coconnier, M H; Klaenhammer, T R; Kernéis, S; Bernet, M F; Servin, A L

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion of Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4, a human stool isolate, to two human enterocytelike cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29) and to the mucus secreted by a subpopulation of mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria interacted with the well-defined apical microvilli of Caco-2 cells without cell damage and with the mucus secreted by the subpopulation of HT29-MTX cells. The adhesion to Caco-2 cells did not require calcium and involved an adhesion-promoting factor that was present in the spent supernatant of L. acidophilus cultures. This factor promoted adhesion of poorly adhering human Lactobacillus casei GG but did not promote adhesion of L. casei CNRZ 387, a strain of dairy origin. The adherence components on the bacterial cells and in the spent supernatant were partially characterized. Carbohydrates on the bacterial cell wall appeared to be partly responsible for the interaction between the bacteria and the extracellular adhesion-promoting factor. The adhesion-promoting factor was proteinaceous, since trypsin treatment dramatically decreased the adhesion of the L. acidophilus strain. The adhesion-promoting factor may be an important component of Lactobacillus species that colonize the gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:1622282

  8. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  9. Apoptosis as a mechanism of cytolysis of tumor cells by a pathogenic free-living amoeba.

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, H; Pidherney, M S; McCulley, J P; Niederkorn, J Y

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that trophozoites of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii rapidly lysed a variety of tumor cells in vitro. Tumor cells undergoing parasite-mediated lysis displayed characteristic cell membrane blebbing reminiscent of apoptosis. The present investigation examined the role of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in Acanthamoeba-mediated tumor cell lysis. The results showed that more than 70% of tumor cell DNA was fragmented following exposure to Acanthamoeba cell extracts. By contrast, only 7% of untreated control cells underwent DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation increased significantly in a dose-dependent fashion following concentration of the parasite extract. Apoptosis was also confirmed by DNA ladder formation. Characteristic DNA ladders, consisting of multimers of approximately 180 to 200 bp, were produced by tumor cells exposed to Acanthamoeba cell extracts. The morphology of tumor cell lysis was examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. Tumor cells exposed to parasite extract displayed morphological features characteristic of apoptosis including cell shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, formation of apoptotic bodies, and nuclear condensation. By contrast, similar effects were not found in tumor cells exposed to extract similarly prepared from normal mammalian cells (i.e., human keratocytes). The results suggest that at least one species of pathogenic free-living amoeba is able to lyse tumor cells by a process that culminates in apoptosis. Images PMID:8132336

  10. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  11. Focal adhesion kinase is required for IGF-I-mediated growth of skeletal muscle cells via a TSC2/mTOR/S6K1-associated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Hannah; Kazi, Abid A.; Lang, Charles H.; Timmons, James A.; Pierre, Philippe; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Smith, Kenneth; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an attachment complex protein associated with the regulation of muscle mass through as-of-yet unclear mechanisms. We tested whether FAK is functionally important for muscle hypertrophy, with the hypothesis that FAK knockdown (FAK-KD) would impede cell growth associated with a trophic stimulus. C2C12 skeletal muscle cells harboring FAK-targeted (FAK-KD) or scrambled (SCR) shRNA were created using lentiviral transfection techniques. Both FAK-KD and SCR myotubes were incubated for 24 h with IGF-I (10 ng/ml), and additional SCR cells (±IGF-1) were incubated with a FAK kinase inhibitor before assay of cell growth. Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and putative FAK signaling mechanisms (immunoblotting and coimmunoprecipitation) were assessed. IGF-I-induced increases in myotube width (+41 ± 7% vs. non-IGF-I-treated) and total protein (+44 ± 6%) were, after 24 h, attenuated in FAK-KD cells, whereas MPS was suppressed in FAK-KD vs. SCR after 4 h. These blunted responses were associated with attenuated IGF-I-induced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and markedly suppressed phosphorylation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and critical downstream mTOR signaling (ribosomal S6 kinase, eIF4F assembly) in FAK shRNA cells (all P < 0.05 vs. IGF-I-treated SCR cells). However, binding of FAK to TSC2 or its phosphatase Shp-2 was not affected by IGF-I or cell phenotype. Finally, FAK-KD-mediated suppression of cell growth was recapitulated by direct inhibition of FAK kinase activity in SCR cells. We conclude that FAK is required for IGF-I-induced muscle hypertrophy, signaling through a TSC2/mTOR/S6K1-dependent pathway via means requiring the kinase activity of FAK but not altered FAK-TSC2 or FAK-Shp-2 binding. PMID:23695213

  12. Interaction between Endothelial Protein C Receptor and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 to Mediate Binding of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avril, Marion; Bernabeu, Maria; Benjamin, Maxwell; Brazier, Andrew Jay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) are candidate receptors for the deadly complication cerebral malaria. However, it remains unclear if Plasmodium falciparum parasites with dual binding specificity are involved in cytoadhesion or different parasite subpopulations bind in brain microvessels. Here, we investigated this issue by studying different subtypes of ICAM-1-binding parasite lines. We show that two parasite lines expressing domain cassette 13 (DC13) of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family have dual binding specificity for EPCR and ICAM-1 and further mapped ICAM-1 binding to the first DBLβ domain following the PfEMP1 head structure in both proteins. As PfEMP1 head structures have diverged between group A (EPCR binders) and groups B and C (CD36 binders), we also investigated how ICAM-1-binding parasites with different coreceptor binding traits influence P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte binding to endothelial cells. Whereas levels of binding to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated endothelial cells from the lung and brain by all ICAM-1-binding parasite lines increased, group A (EPCR and ICAM-1) was less dependent than group B (CD36 and ICAM-1) on ICAM-1 upregulation. Furthermore, both group A DC13 parasite lines had higher binding levels to brain endothelial cells (a microvascular niche with limited CD36 expression). This study shows that ICAM-1 is a coreceptor for a subset of EPCR-binding parasites and provides the first evidence of how EPCR and ICAM-1 interact to mediate parasite binding to both resting and TNF-α-activated primary brain and lung endothelial cells. PMID:27406562

  13. Heparan Sulfates Mediate the Interaction between Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and the Gαq/11 Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    dela Paz, Nathaniel G.; Melchior, Benoît; Shayo, Francisca Y.; Frangos, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell-cell junction has emerged as a major cell signaling structure that responds to shear stress by eliciting the activation of signaling pathways. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and heterotrimeric G protein subunits Gαq and 11 (Gαq/11) are junctional proteins that have been independently proposed as mechanosensors. Our previous findings suggest that they form a mechanosensitive junctional complex that discriminates between different flow profiles. The nature of the PECAM-1·Gαq/11 interaction is still unclear although it is likely an indirect association. Here, we investigated the role of heparan sulfates (HS) in mediating this interaction and in regulating downstream signaling in response to flow. Co-immunoprecipitation studies show that PECAM-1·Gαq/11 binding is dramatically decreased by competitive inhibition with heparin, pharmacological inhibition with the HS antagonist surfen, and enzymatic removal of HS chains with heparinase III treatment as well as by site-directed mutagenesis of basic residues within the extracellular domain of PECAM-1. Using an in situ proximity ligation assay, we show that endogenous PECAM-1·Gαq/11 interactions in endothelial cells are disrupted by both competitive inhibition and HS degradation. Furthermore, we identified the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 in complexes with PECAM-1 that are rapidly decreased in response to flow. Finally, we demonstrate that flow-induced Akt activation is attenuated in endothelial cells in which PECAM-1 was knocked down and reconstituted with a binding mutant. Taken together, our results indicate that the PECAM-1·Gαq/11 mechanosensitive complex contains an endogenous heparan sulfate proteoglycan with HS chains that is critical for junctional complex assembly and regulating the flow response. PMID:24497640

  14. Caspase-1-independent IL-1 release mediates blister formation in autoantibody-induced tissue injury through modulation of endothelial adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Hengameh; Lockmann, Anike; Hund, Anna-Carina; Samavedam, Unni K S R L; Pipi, Elena; Vafia, Katerina; Hauenschild, Eva; Kalies, Kathrin; Pas, Hendri H; Jonkman, Marcel F; Iwata, Hiroaki; Recke, Andreas; Schön, Michael P; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Enno; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2015-04-15

    Although reports documented aberrant cytokine expression in autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBDs), cytokine-targeting therapies have not been established in these disorders. We showed previously that IL-6 treatment protected against tissue destruction in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an AIBD caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen (COL7). The anti-inflammatory effects of IL-6 were mediated by induction of IL-1ra, and prophylactic IL-1ra administration prevented blistering. In this article, we demonstrate elevated serum concentrations of IL-1β in both mice with experimental EBA induced by injection of anti-COL7 IgG and in EBA patients. Increased IL-1α and IL-1β expression also was observed in the skin of anti-COL7 IgG-injected wild-type mice compared with the significantly less diseased IL-1R-deficient or wild-type mice treated with the IL-1R antagonist anakinra or anti-IL-1β. These findings suggested that IL-1 contributed to recruitment of inflammatory cells into the skin. Accordingly, the expression of ICAM-1 was decreased in IL-1R-deficient and anakinra-treated mice injected with anti-COL7. This effect appeared to be specifically attributable to IL-1 because anakinra blocked the upregulation of different endothelial adhesion molecules on IL-1-stimulated, but not on TNF-α-stimulated, cultured endothelial cells. Interestingly, injection of caspase-1/11-deficient mice with anti-COL7 IgG led to the same extent of skin lesions as in wild-type mice. Collectively, our data suggest that IL-1, independently of caspase-1, contributes to the pathogenesis of EBA. Because anti-IL-1β in a prophylactic setting and anakinra in a quasi-therapeutic setting (i.e., when skin lesions had already developed) improved experimental EBA, IL-1 appears to be a potential therapeutic target for EBA and related AIBDs. PMID:25795756

  15. Involvement of NF-κB-mediated expression of galectin-3-binding protein in TNF-α-induced breast cancer cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Noma, Naruto; Simizu, Siro; Kambayashi, Yusuke; Kabe, Yasuaki; Suematsu, Makoto; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2012-06-01

    Galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) is highly expressed in various types of cancer and is thought to be involved in cancer malignancy; however, the role of G3BP in breast cancer cells is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of NF-κB in the adhesion of breast cancer cells to a substrate by using (-)-DHMEQ, a specific inhibitor of NF-κB. (-)-DHMEQ inhibited both TNF-α-induced G3BP expression and cell adhesion in human breast cancer cell lines. We also found that knockdown of G3BP suppressed the adhesion, while its overexpression increased the adhesion. These data reveal that (-)-DHMEQ suppresses breast cancer cell adhesion by inhibiting NF-κB-regulated G3BP expression. PMID:22447108

  16. Surface Zn-proteinase as a molecule for defense of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis promastigotes against cytolysis inside macrophage phagolysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Seay, M B; Heard, P L; Chaudhuri, G

    1996-01-01

    The role of the surface membrane Zn-proteinase in protecting the cellular integrity of the macrophage parasite Leishmania mexicana amazonensis from intraphagolysosomal cytolysis was studied. These cells lose their infectivity to host macrophages after prolonged cultivation in axenic growth medium. The virulent and attenuated variants of the parasite cells were cloned. Failure of these attenuated parasite cells to survive inside macrophage phagolysosomes is associated with 20- to 50-fold reduction in the expression of surface gp63 protein. In situ inhibition of gp63 proteinase activity inside Leishmania-infected macrophage phagolysosomes with targeted delivery of an inhibitor of gp63 proteinase activity, 1,10-phenanthroline, selectively eliminated intracellular Leishmania amastigotes, further suggesting the importance of this proteinase in phagolysosomal survival of the parasite. An upstream sequence (US) of the gp63 gene was cloned in front of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene in plasmid pCATbasic. Transfection of L. mexicana amazonensis cells with this recombinant plasmid showed that expression of the CAT gene from this US is 15- to 20-fold higher in virulent clones than in avirulent clones of the parasite. Band shift analysis with the cloned US also showed that binding of protein(s) was 15- to 20-fold higher in virulent cell extract than in avirulent cell extract. Coating of attenuated cells or liposomes with proteolytically active gp63 protects them from degradation inside macrophage phagolysosomes. These results suggest a novel mechanism of survival of this phagolysosomal parasite with the help of its surface Zn-proteinase. PMID:8945556

  17. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  18. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  19. Platelet Adhesion to Podoplanin Under Flow is Mediated by the Receptor CLEC-2 and Stabilised by Src/Syk-Dependent Platelet Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Alice Y.; Lowe, Kate; Latif, Arusa; Nash, Gerard B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet-specific deletion of CLEC-2, which signals through Src and Syk kinases, or global deletion of its ligand podoplanin results in blood-filled lymphatics during mouse development. Platelet-specific Syk deficiency phenocopies this defect, indicating that platelet activation is required for lymphatic development. In the present study, we investigated whether CLEC-2-podoplanin interactions could support platelet arrest from blood flow and whether platelet signalling is required for stable platelet adhesion to lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and recombinant podoplanin under flow. Perfusion of human or mouse blood over human LEC monolayers led to platelet adhesion and aggregation. Following αIIbβ3 blockade, individual platelets still adhered. Platelet binding occurred at venous but not arterial shear rates. There was no adhesion using CLEC-2-deficient blood or to vascular endothelial cells (which lack podoplanin). Perfusion of human blood over human Fc-podoplanin (hFcPDPN) in the presence of monoclonal antibody IV.3 to block FcγRIIA receptors led to platelet arrest at similar shear rates to those used on LECs. Src and Syk inhibitors significantly reduced global adhesion of human or mouse platelets to LECs and hFcPDPN. A similar result was seen using Syk-deficient mouse platelets. Reduced platelet adhesion was due to a decrease in the stability of binding. In conclusion, our data reveal that CLEC-2 is an adhesive receptor that supports platelet arrest to podoplanin under venous shear. Src/Syk-dependent signalling stabilises platelet adhesion to podoplanin, providing a possible molecular mechanism contributing to the lymphatic defects of Syk-deficient mice. PMID:25694214

  20. Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C Virus Infection Is a Risk Factor for Severe Hepatic Cytolysis after Initiation of a Protease Inhibitor-Containing Antiretroviral Regimen in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Savès, Marianne; Raffi, François; Clevenbergh, Philippe; Marchou, Bruno; Waldner-Combernoux, Anne; Morlat, Philippe; Le Moing, Vincent; Rivière, Catherine; Chêne, Geneviève; Leport, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    In a cohort of 1,047 human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients started on protease inhibitors (PIs), the incidence of severe hepatic cytolysis (alanine aminotransferase concentration five times or more above the upper limit of the normal level ≥ 5N) was 5% patient-years after a mean follow-up of 5 months. Only positivity for hepatitis C virus antibodies (hazard ratio [HR], 7.95; P < 10−3) or hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HR, 6.67; P < 10−3) was associated with severe cytolysis. Before starting patients on PIs, assessment of liver enzyme levels and viral coinfections is necessary. PMID:11083658

  1. The role of ROS in ionizing radiation-induced VLA-4 mediated adhesion of RAW264.7 cells to VCAM-1 under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Lee, Shin Hee; Wu, Shiyong

    2013-01-01

    Alteration of adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells has a direct connection with ionizing radiation-induced atherosclerosis, which is an adverse effect observed after radiotherapy. However, minimal attention has been given to monocytes/macrophages role in atherosclerosis development, which are exposed to the radiation at the same time. Under flow conditions using a parallel plate flow chamber to mimic physiological shear stress, we demonstrate here that the avidity between very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) of RAW264.7 cells and its ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), was increased after low dose (0.5 Gy) irradiation, but was reduced after higher dose (5 Gy) treatment of ionizing radiation despite the fact that the surface expression of VLA-4 was up-regulated at 5 Gy of ionizing radiation. Treating the cells with free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine had no effect on VLA-4 expression, but did reduce the avidity between RAW264.7 cells and VCAM-1 to a similar level, independent of ionizing radiation dose. The effect of H(2)O(2) treatment (from 1-100 μM) on RAW264.7 cell adhesion to VCAM-1 generated a similar bell-shaped graph as ionizing radiation. These results suggest that ionizing radiation regulates adhesive interactions between VLA-4 and VCAM-1, and that reactive oxygen species might function as a regulator, for this increased adhesiveness but with altered expression of integrin not play a major role. PMID:23181590

  2. Polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; Bell, V. L.; Saintclair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of preparing aromatic polyamide-acids for use as adhesives is described. An equimolar quantity of an aromatic dianhydride is added to a stirred solution of an aromatic diamine in a water or alcohol-miscible ether solvent to obtain a viscous polymer solution. The polymeric-acid intermediate polymer does not become insoluble but directly forms a smooth viscous polymer solution. These polyamic-acid polymers are converted, by heating in the range of 200-300 C and with pressure, to form polyimides with excellent adhesive properties.

  3. Increased erythrocyte adhesion to VCAM-1 during pulsatile flow: Application of a microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennell; Lancelot, Moira; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hines, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microvascular occlusion mediated by adhesive interactions of sickle erythrocytes (SSRBCs) to the endothelium. Most in vitro flow adhesion assays measure SSRBC adhesion during continuous flow, although in vivo SSRBC adhesive interactions occur during pulsatile flow. Using a well-plate microfluidic flow adhesion system, we demonstrate that isolated SSRBCs adhere to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) at greater levels during pulsatile versus continuous flow. A significant increase in adhesive interactions was observed between all pulse frequencies 1 Hz to 2 Hz (60–120 beats/min) when compared to non-pulsatile flow. Adhesion of isolated SSRBCs and whole blood during pulsatile flow was unaffected by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and exposure of SSRBCs to pulsatile flow did not affect the intrinsic adhesive properties of SSRBCs. The cell type responsible for increased adhesion of whole blood varied from patient to patient. We conclude that low flow periods of the pulse cycle allow more adhesive interactions between sickle erythrocytes and VCAM-1, and sickle erythrocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood may better reflect physiologic cellular interactions. The microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay used in this study may have applications for clinical assessment of sickle erythrocyte adhesion during pulsatile flow. PMID:24898561

  4. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications. PMID:25841348

  5. Host Selection of Microbiota via Differential Adhesion.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Kirstie; Schluter, Jonas; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Smith, Adrian L; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-04-13

    The host epithelium is the critical interface with microbial communities, but the mechanisms by which the host regulates these communities are poorly understood. Here we develop the hypothesis that hosts use differential adhesion to select for and against particular members of their microbiota. We use an established computational, individual-based model to study the impact of host factors that regulate adhesion at the epithelial surface. Our simulations predict that host-mediated adhesion can increase the competitive advantage of microbes and create ecological refugia for slow-growing species. We show how positive selection via adhesion can be transformed into negative selection if the host secretes large quantities of a matrix such as mucus. Our work predicts that adhesion is a powerful mechanism for both positive and negative selection within the microbiota. We discuss molecules-mucus glycans and IgA-that affect microbe adhesion and identify testable predictions of the adhesion-as-selection model. PMID:27053168

  6. Fibroblast surface-associated FGF-2 promotes contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion through FGFR-SRC signaling and integrin αvβ5-mediated adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Knuchel, Sarah; Anderle, Pascale; Werfelli, Patricia; Diamantis, Eva; Rüegg, Curzio

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts were reported to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion by secreting motility factors and extracellular matrix processing enzymes. Less is known whether fibroblasts may induce CRC cancer cell motility by contact-dependent mechanisms. To address this question we characterized the interaction between fibroblasts and SW620 and HT29 colorectal cancer cells in 2D and 3D co-culture models in vitro. Here we show that fibroblasts induce contact-dependent cancer cell elongation, motility and invasiveness independently of deposited matrix or secreted factors. These effects depend on fibroblast cell surface-associated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) -2. Inhibition of FGF-2 or FGF receptors (FGFRs) signaling abolishes these effects. FGFRs activate SRC in cancer cells and inhibition or silencing of SRC in cancer cells, but not in fibroblasts, prevents fibroblasts-mediated effects. Using an RGD-based integrin antagonist and function-blocking antibodies we demonstrate that cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts requires integrin αvβ5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fibroblasts induce cell-contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D and 3D conditions in vitro through fibroblast cell surface-associated FGF-2, FGF receptor-mediated SRC activation and αvβ5 integrin-dependent cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts. The FGF-2-FGFRs-SRC-αvβ5 integrin loop might be explored as candidate therapeutic target to block colorectal cancer invasion. PMID:25973543

  7. The soluble form of LR11 protein is a regulator of hypoxia-induced, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-mediated adhesion of immature hematological cells.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Keigo; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shimizu, Naomi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Bujo, Hideaki

    2013-04-26

    A key property of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) regarding differentiation from the self-renewing quiescent to the proliferating stage is their adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) niche. An important molecule involved in proliferation and pool size of HSPCs in the BM is the hypoxia-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Here, we show that the soluble form (sLR11) of LR11 (also called SorLA or SORL1) modulates the uPAR-mediated attachment of HSPCs under hypoxic conditions. Immunohistochemical and mRNA expression analyses revealed that hypoxia increased LR11 expression in hematological c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells. In U937 cells, hypoxia induced a transient rise in LR11 transcription, production of cellular protein, and release of sLR11. Attachment to stromal cells of c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells of lr11(-/-) mice was reduced by hypoxia much more than of lr11(+/+) animals. sLR11 induced the adhesion of U937 and c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells to stromal cells. Cell attachment was increased by sLR11 and reduced in the presence of anti-uPAR antibodies. Furthermore, the fraction of uPAR co-immunoprecipitated with LR11 in membrane extracts of U937 cells was increased by hypoxia. CoCl2, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, enhanced the levels of LR11 and sLR11 in U937 cells. The decrease in hypoxia-induced attachment of HIF-1α-knockdown cells was largely prevented by exogenously added sLR11. Finally, hypoxia induced HIF-1α binding to a consensus binding site in the LR11 promoter. Thus, we conclude that sLR11 regulates the hypoxia-enhanced adhesion of HSPCs via an uPAR-mediated pathway that stabilizes the hematological pool size by controlling cell attachment to the BM niche. PMID:23486467

  8. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CD49e (α5 integrin chain) in human thymic epithelial cells modulates the expression of multiple genes and decreases thymocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The thymus is a central lymphoid organ, in which bone marrow-derived T cell precursors undergo a complex process of maturation. Developing thymocytes interact with thymic microenvironment in a defined spatial order. A component of thymic microenvironment, the thymic epithelial cells, is crucial for the maturation of T-lymphocytes through cell-cell contact, cell matrix interactions and secretory of cytokines/chemokines. There is evidence that extracellular matrix molecules play a fundamental role in guiding differentiating thymocytes in both cortical and medullary regions of the thymic lobules. The interaction between the integrin α5β1 (CD49e/CD29; VLA-5) and fibronectin is relevant for thymocyte adhesion and migration within the thymic tissue. Our previous results have shown that adhesion of thymocytes to cultured TEC line is enhanced in the presence of fibronectin, and can be blocked with anti-VLA-5 antibody. Results Herein, we studied the role of CD49e expressed by the human thymic epithelium. For this purpose we knocked down the CD49e by means of RNA interference. This procedure resulted in the modulation of more than 100 genes, some of them coding for other proteins also involved in adhesion of thymocytes; others related to signaling pathways triggered after integrin activation, or even involved in the control of F-actin stress fiber formation. Functionally, we demonstrated that disruption of VLA-5 in human TEC by CD49e-siRNA-induced gene knockdown decreased the ability of TEC to promote thymocyte adhesion. Such a decrease comprised all CD4/CD8-defined thymocyte subsets. Conclusion Conceptually, our findings unravel the complexity of gene regulation, as regards key genes involved in the heterocellular cell adhesion between developing thymocytes and the major component of the thymic microenvironment, an interaction that is a mandatory event for proper intrathymic T cell differentiation. PMID:21210968

  9. Adeno-associated virus-2-mediated TGF-β1 microRNA transfection inhibits adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y F; Mao, W F; Zhou, Y L; Wang, X T; Liu, P Y; Tang, J B

    2016-02-01

    Adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury greatly affects gliding function of the tendon, which is a major clinical complication after hand surgery. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has a critical role in adhesion formation during tendon healing. Persistent regulation of TGF-β1 through application of microRNA (miRNA) specifically inhibiting the function of TGF-β1 (TGF-β1-miRNA) holds promise for treatment of such a complication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) was used to transfer TGF-β1-miRNA to the chicken digital flexor tendons, which had been injured and surgically repaired. Four doses of AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA (2 × 10(11), 2 × 10(10), 2 × 10(9) and 2 × 10(8) vector genomes (vg)) were used to determine the transfection efficiency. At postoperative 3 weeks, we found a positive correlation between the administered AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA doses and transfection efficiency. The transfection rate ranged from 10% to 77% as the doses increased. Production of TGF-β1 protein in the tendons decreased on increasing vector dosage. When 2 × 10(11) and 2 × 10(10) vg were injected into the tendon, gliding excursion of the repaired tendon and work of flexion of chicken toes were significantly increased and adhesion score decreased 6 and 8 weeks later, indicating the improvement of tendon gliding and decreases in adhesion formations. However, the ultimate strength of the tendons transfected at the dose of 2 × 10(10) vg was 12-24% lower than that of the control tendons. The results of this study demonstrate that application of TGF-β1-miRNA had a mixed impact on tendon healing: adhesion around the tendon is reduced but strength of the tendon healing is adversely affected. Future studies should aim at maintaining the beneficial effects of reducing tendon adhesions, while eliminating the adverse effects of decreasing the healing strength. PMID:26381218

  10. Regulation of local and metastatic host-mediated anti-tumour mechanisms by l-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, M; Yanaba, K; Hasegawa, M; Matsushita, Y; Horikawa, M; Komura, K; Matsushita, T; Kawasuji, A; Fujita, T; Takehara, K; Steeber, D A; Tedder, T F; Sato, S

    2006-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is often accompanied by a host response of inflammatory cell infiltration that is highly regulated by multiple adhesion molecules. To assess the role of adhesion molecules, including l-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), in this process, subcutaneous primary growth and metastasis to the lung of B16 melanoma cells not expressing l-selectin, ICAM-1 or their ligands were examined in mice lacking l-selectin, ICAM-1 or both. Primary subcutaneous growth of B16 melanoma was augmented by loss of l-selectin, ICAM-1 or both, while pulmonary metastasis was enhanced by the loss of l-selectin or combined loss of l-selectin and ICAM-1. In both situations, the combined loss of l-selectin and ICAM-1 exhibited the greatest effect. This enhancement was associated generally with a reduced accumulation of natural killer (NK) cells, CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells and also with a diminished release of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α but not interleukin (IL)-6. Cytotoxicity against melanoma was not defective by the absence of ICAM-1, l-selectin or both, suggesting that the enhancement of tumour growth and metastasis caused by the loss of adhesion molecules results from an impaired migration of effector cells into the tissue rather than from a suppression of the cytotoxic response. The results indicate that l-selectin and ICAM-1 contribute co-operatively to the anti-tumour reaction by regulating lymphocyte infiltration to the tumour. PMID:16412045

  11. Targeting JNK by a New Curcumin Analog to Inhibit NF-kB-Mediated Expression of Cell Adhesion Molecules Attenuates Renal Macrophage Infiltration and Injury in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lu; Ren, Luqing; Tang, Longguang; Wang, Jingying; Zhao, Yunjie; Wang, Yonggang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic renal injury. However, the regulatory mechanisms between macrophage infiltration and epithelial cell activation are still unclear. Our previous study found that C66, a novel curcumin analog, was able to inhibit inflammatory cytokine expression in vitro and in vivo. This study further elucidated whether C66 can prevent glucose-induced renal epithelial activation and inflammatory macrophage infiltration by a MAPK/NF-κB medicated mechanism. Our data show that pretreatment with C66 not only significantly reduced high glucose (HG)-induced over-expressions of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and MCP-1, but also remarkably inhibited NF-κB activation, MAPKs phosphorylation, and subsequently macrophage adhesion in renal epithelial NRK-52E cells. Furthermore, we find that MAPKs, especially JNK, play important roles in HG-induced NF-κB activation, which regulates the over-expression of adhesion molecules in HG-stimulated NRK-52E cells. A molecular docking predicted that C66 may target JNK2, which leads to its anti-inflammatory actions. In vivo, administration of C66 or JNK special inhibitor SP600125 at 5 mg/kg markedly decreased diabetes-induced renal adhesion molecule expression, NF-κB activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pathological indexes in the kidneys of diabetic mice. These findings provide a perspective on the renoprotective effects of C66 in diabetes, and outline a novel therapeutic strategy of JNK inhibition for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24260158

  12. Significance of thermal fluctuations and hydrodynamic interactions in receptor-ligand-mediated adhesive dynamics of a spherical particle in wall-bound shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, K V; Thaokar, R; Prakash, J Ravi; Prabhakar, R

    2015-02-01

    The dynamics of adhesion of a spherical microparticle to a ligand-coated wall, in shear flow, is studied using a Langevin equation that accounts for thermal fluctuations, hydrodynamic interactions, and adhesive interactions. Contrary to the conventional assumption that thermal fluctuations play a negligible role at high Péclet numbers, we find that for particles with low surface densities of receptors, rotational diffusion caused by fluctuations about the flow and gradient directions aids in bond formation, leading to significantly greater adhesion on average, compared to simulations where thermal fluctuations are completely ignored. The role of wall hydrodynamic interactions on the steady-state motion of a particle, when the particle is close to the wall, has also been explored. At high Péclet numbers, the shear induced force that arises due to the stresslet part of the Stokes dipole plays a dominant role, reducing the particle velocity significantly and affecting the states of motion of the particle. The coupling between the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the particle, brought about by the presence of hydrodynamic interactions, is found to have no influence on the binding dynamics. On the other hand, the drag coefficient, which depends on the distance of the particle from the wall, plays a crucial role at low rates of bond formation. A significant difference in the effect of both the shear force and the position-dependent drag force on the states of motion of the particle is observed when the Péclet number is small. PMID:25768500

  13. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  14. Outer Membrane Protein U (OmpU) Mediates Adhesion of Vibrio mimicus to Host Cells via Two Novel N-Terminal Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueqin; Gao, Huihui; Xiao, Nin; Liu, Yan; Li, Jinnian; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus (V.mimicus) is a causative agent of ascites disease in aquatic animals. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the outer membrane protein U (OmpU) from V.mimicus is an immunoprotective antigen with six immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes. Although the N-terminus of OmpU contains potential binding motifs, it remained unclear whether OmpU possesses adhesion function. Here, the adhesive capacity of recombinant OmpU and V.mimicus to epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells was determined by immunofluorescence and adherence assay. The results showed that after co-incubated with rOmpU, an obvious visible green fluorescence could be observed on the EPC cell surface and the nuclei exhibited blue fluorescence; while the control cell surface did not show any signal, only nuclei exhibited blue fluorescence. The average number of wild-type strain adhered to each cell was 32.3 ± 4.5. The average adhesion number of OmpU gene deletion mutant was significantly reduced to 10.8 ± 0.5 (P < 0.01) and restored to 31.3 ± 2.8 by complement strain (P >0.05). Pretreatment of cells with rOmpU reduced the average adhesion number of wild-type strain to 9.7 ± 2.9 (P < 0.01). Likewise, binding was significantly decreased to 8.8 ± 3.2 (P < 0.01) due to blocking role of OmpU antibodies. To determine binding motifs of OmpU, six immunodominant B-cell epitope peptides labeled with FITC were employed in flow cytometry-based binding assay. Two FITC-labeled epitope peptides (aa90-101 and aa173-192) showed strong binding to EPC cells (the fluorescence positive cell rate was 99 ± 0.6% and 98 ± 0.3%, respectively), which could be specifically competed by excess corresponding unlabeled peptides, whereas the remaining four showed a low level of background binding. This is the first demonstration that OmpU possesses adhesion function and its N terminal 90–101 and 173–192 amino acid regions are critical sites for cell surface binding. PMID:25742659

  15. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    PubMed

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  16. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G.; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J.R.; Santos, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives. PMID:27182547

  17. Reduced Mechanical Stretch Induces Enhanced Endothelin B Receptor-Mediated Contractility via Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Extracellular Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Cerebral Arteries from Rat.

    PubMed

    Spray, Stine; Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Skovsted, Gry F; Warfvinge, Karin; Sheykhzade, Majid; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral ischaemia results in enhanced endothelin B (ETB ) receptor-mediated contraction and receptor protein expression in the affected cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Organ culture of cerebral arteries is a method to induce similar alterations in ETB receptor expression. We suggest that rapid and sustained reduction in wall tension/stretch is a possible trigger mechanism for this vascular remodelling. Isolated rat middle cerebral artery (MCA) segments were incubated in a wire myograph with or without mechanical stretch, prior to assessment of their contractile response to the selective ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c. The involvement of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was studied by their specific inhibitors U0126 and PF-228, respectively. Compared with their stretched counterparts, unstretched MCA segments showed a significantly increased ETB receptor-mediated contractile response after 12 hr of incubation, which was attenuated by either U0126 or PF-228. The functionally increased ETB -mediated contractility could be attributed to two different mechanisms: (i) a difference in ETB receptor localization from primarily endothelial expression to SMC expression and (ii) an increased calcium sensitivity of the SMCs due to an increased expression of the calcium channel transient receptor potential canonical 1. Collectively, our results present a possible mechanism linking lack of vessel wall stretch/tension to changes in ETB receptor-mediated contractility via triggering of an early mechanosensitive signalling pathway involving ERK1/2 and FAK signalling. A mechanism likely to be an initiating factor for the increased ETB receptor-mediated contractility found after cerebral ischaemia. PMID:26781487

  18. MiR-9-5p, miR-675-5p and miR-138-5p Damages the Strontium and LRP5-Mediated Skeletal Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianhao; Leung, Frankie; Lu, William W

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of strontium on the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to explore their effects on skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and apoptosis. The targets of these miRNAs were also studied. Molecular cloning, cell proliferation assay, cell apoptosis assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay were used. Strontium altered the expression levels of miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p impaired skeletal cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell adhesion. miR-9-5p and miR-675-5p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis more specifically than miR-138-5p. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p targeted glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), ATPase Aminophospholipid Transporter Class I Type 8A Member 2 (ATP8A2), and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Binding Protein 1 (EIF4EBP1), respectively. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) played a positive role in skeletal development. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p damage strontium and LRP5-mediated skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion, and induce cell apoptosis by targeting GSK3β, ATP8A2, and EIF4EBP1, respectively. PMID:26891291

  19. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p and miR-138-5p Damages the Strontium and LRP5-Mediated Skeletal Cell Proliferation, Differentiation, and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tianhao; Leung, Frankie; Lu, William W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of strontium on the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) and to explore their effects on skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and apoptosis. The targets of these miRNAs were also studied. Molecular cloning, cell proliferation assay, cell apoptosis assay, quantitative real-time PCR, and luciferase reporter assay were used. Strontium altered the expression levels of miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p impaired skeletal cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell adhesion. miR-9-5p and miR-675-5p induced MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis more specifically than miR-138-5p. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p targeted glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), ATPase Aminophospholipid Transporter Class I Type 8A Member 2 (ATP8A2), and Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Binding Protein 1 (EIF4EBP1), respectively. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) played a positive role in skeletal development. miR-9-5p, miR-675-5p, and miR-138-5p damage strontium and LRP5-mediated skeletal cell proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion, and induce cell apoptosis by targeting GSK3β, ATP8A2, and EIF4EBP1, respectively. PMID:26891291

  20. Soma influences GSC progeny differentiation via the cell adhesion-mediated steroid-let-7-Wingless signaling cascade that regulates chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    König, Annekatrin; Shcherbata, Halyna R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is known that signaling from the germline stem cell niche is required to maintain germline stem cell identity in Drosophila. However, it is not clear whether the germline stem-cell daughters differentiate by default (because they are physically distant from the niche) or whether additional signaling is necessary to initiate the differentiation program. Previously, we showed that ecdysteroid signaling cell non-autonomously regulates early germline differentiation via its soma-specific co-activator and co-repressor, Taiman and Abrupt. Now, we demonstrate that this regulation is modulated by the miRNA let-7, which acts in a positive feedback loop to confer ecdysone signaling robustness via targeting its repressor, the transcription factor Abrupt. This feedback loop adjusts ecdysteroid signaling in response to some stressful alterations in the external and internal conditions, which include temperature stress and aging, but not nutritional deprivation. Upon let-7 deficit, escort cells fail to properly differentiate: their shape, division, and cell adhesive characteristics are perturbed. These cells have confused cellular identity and form columnar-like rather than squamous epithelium and fail to send protrusions in between differentiating germline cysts, affecting soma-germline communication. Particularly, levels of the homophilic cell adhesion protein Cadherin, which recruits Wg signaling transducer β-catenin, are increased in mutant escort cells and, correspondingly, in the adjacent germline cells. Readjustment of heterotypic (soma-germline) cell adhesion modulates Wg signaling intensity in the germline, which in turn regulates histone modifications that promote expression of the genes necessary to trigger early germline differentiation. Thus, our data first show the intrinsic role for Wg signaling in the germline and support a model where the soma influences the tempo of germline differentiation in response to external conditions. PMID:25661868

  1. Magnetic Beads Enhance Adhesion of NIH 3T3 Fibroblasts: A Proof-of-Principle In Vitro Study for Implant-Mediated Long-Term Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Aliuos, Pooyan; Schulze, Jennifer; Schomaker, Markus; Reuter, Günter; Stolle, Stefan R. O.; Werner, Darja; Ripken, Tammo; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Long-term drug delivery to the inner ear may be achieved by functionalizing cochlear implant (CI) electrodes with cells providing neuroprotective factors. However, effective strategies in order to coat implant surfaces with cells need to be developed. Our vision is to make benefit of electromagnetic field attracting forces generated by CI electrodes to bind BDNF-secreting cells that are labelled with magnetic beads (MB) onto the electrode surfaces. Thus, the effect of MB-labelling on cell viability and BDNF production were investigated. Materials and Methods Murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts—genetically modified to produce BDNF—were labelled with MB. Results Atomic force and bright field microscopy illustrated the internalization of MB by fibroblasts after 24 h of cultivation. Labelling cells with MB did not expose cytotoxic effects on fibroblasts and allowed adhesion on magnetic surfaces with sufficient BDNF release. Discussion Our data demonstrate a novel approach for mediating enhanced long-term adhesion of BDNF-secreting fibroblasts on model electrode surfaces for cell-based drug delivery applications in vitro and in vivo. This therapeutic strategy, once transferred to cells suitable for clinical application, may allow the biological modifications of CI surfaces with cells releasing neurotrophic or other factors of interest. PMID:26918945

  2. beta 1-Integrin-mediated glioma cell adhesion and free radical-induced apoptosis are regulated by binding to a C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaojiong; Chen, Liwen; Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Yang, Burton B

    2002-04-01

    Integrins are cell-surface glycoproteins that mediate cell activities, including tissue morphogenesis, development, immune response, and cancer, through interaction with extracellular proteins. Here we report a novel means by which integrin signaling and functions are regulated. In pull-down assays and immunoprecipitation, beta(1)-integrin bound to the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican, an extracellular chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. This was confirmed by cell-surface binding assays. Binding was calcium- and manganese-dependent. Upon native gel electrophoresis, beta(1)-integrin comigrated with the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican. The interaction of beta(1)-integrin with the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican activated focal adhesion kinase, enhanced integrin expression, and promoted cell adhesion. As a result, cells expressing the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican were resistant to free radical-induced apoptosis. As the PG-M/versican peptide used in this study does not contain the RGD consensus-binding motif for integrins, the mechanism of the observed binding represents an entirely new function. PMID:11805102

  3. Antcin K, an Active Triterpenoid from the Fruiting Bodies of Basswood-Cultivated Antrodia cinnamomea, Inhibits Metastasis via Suppression of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lai, Chiao-I; Su, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-05-13

    Previous research demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract from Antrodia cinnamomea suppresses the invasive potential of human breast and hepatoma cells, but the effective compounds are not identified. The main bioactive compounds of A. cinnamomea are ergostane-type triterpenoids, and the content of antcin K is the highest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimetastatic activity and mechanisms of antcin K purified from the fruiting body of basswood-cultivated A. cinnamomea on human liver cancer Hep 3B cells. The results showed that adhesion, migration, and invasion of Hep 3B cells were effectively inhibited by antcin K within 24 h of treatment. Antcin K not only reduced the protein expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 but also down-regulated vimentin and up-regulated E-cadherin in Hep 3B cells. In depth investigation for the molecular mechanism revealed that antcin K could reduce the protein expression of integrin β1, β3, α5, and αv and suppress phosphorylation of FAK, Src, PI3K, AKT, MEK, ERK, and JNK. These results suggested that antcin K was able to inhibit the metastasis of human hepatoma cells through suppression of integrin-mediated adhesion, migration, and invasion. Coupled with these findings, antcin K has a good potential to reduce the risk of liver cancer metastasis. PMID:25911944

  4. Adhesion to and invasion of HeLa cells by pathogenic Escherichia coli carrying the afa-3 gene cluster are mediated by the AfaE and AfaD proteins, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Jouve, M; Garcia, M I; Courcoux, P; Labigne, A; Gounon, P; Le Bouguénec, C

    1997-01-01

    The afa-3 gene cluster, expressed by uropathogenic and diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli strains, determines the formation of an afimbrial adhesive sheath composed of the AfaD and AfaE-III adhesins. The adherence to HeLa cells by recombinant HB101 strains producing both or only one of these two adhesins was investigated. Ultrastructural analyses of the interaction and gentamicin protection assays showed adherence to HeLa cells by HB101 producing both the AfaD and AfaE-III proteins and internalization of a subpopulation of the bacteria into the cells. The interactions of HeLa cells either with HB101 mutants producing AfaD or AfaE-III or with polystyrene beads coated with purified His6-tagged AfaD or His6-tagged AfaE-III proteins were studied. These experiments demonstrated that AfaE-III allows binding to HeLa cells and that AfaD mediates the internalization of the adherent bacteria. Ultrastructural analyses of the interaction of His6-AfaD-gold complexes with HeLa cells confirmed that AfaD is able to bind to the HeLa cell surface and indicated that it penetrates the cells via clathrin vesicles. These data demonstrate that the afa gene cluster is unique among bacteria, as alone it encodes both adhesion to and invasion of epithelial cells. PMID:9317011

  5. Syk and Src Family Kinases Regulate C-type Lectin Receptor 2 (CLEC-2)-mediated Clustering of Podoplanin and Platelet Adhesion to Lymphatic Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Alice Y.; Poulter, Natalie S.; Gitz, Eelo; Navarro-Nuñez, Leyre; Wang, Ying-Jie; Hughes, Craig E.; Thomas, Steven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Douglas, Michael R.; Owen, Dylan M.; Jackson, David G.; Dustin, Michael L.; Watson, Steve P.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of C-type lectin receptor 2 (CLEC-2) on platelets with Podoplanin on lymphatic endothelial cells initiates platelet signaling events that are necessary for prevention of blood-lymph mixing during development. In the present study, we show that CLEC-2 signaling via Src family and Syk tyrosine kinases promotes platelet adhesion to primary mouse lymphatic endothelial cells at low shear. Using supported lipid bilayers containing mobile Podoplanin, we further show that activation of Src and Syk in platelets promotes clustering of CLEC-2 and Podoplanin. Clusters of CLEC-2-bound Podoplanin migrate rapidly to the center of the platelet to form a single structure. Fluorescence lifetime imaging demonstrates that molecules within these clusters are within 10 nm of one another and that the clusters are disrupted by inhibition of Src and Syk family kinases. CLEC-2 clusters are also seen in platelets adhered to immobilized Podoplanin using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. These findings provide mechanistic insight by which CLEC-2 signaling promotes adhesion to Podoplanin and regulation of Podoplanin signaling, thereby contributing to lymphatic vasculature development. PMID:25368330

  6. Integrated Proteomics Identified Up-Regulated Focal Adhesion-Mediated Proteins in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Daniela C.; Zanetti, Mariana R.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R.; Aragão, Annelize Z.; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Flores, Isadora L.; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Silva, Alan R. S.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Leme, Adriana F. Paes

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules. PMID:24858105

  7. Deregulation of focal adhesion pathway mediated by miR-659-3p is implicated in bone marrow infiltration of stage M neuroblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lagazio, Corrado; Persico, Luca; Carlini, Barbara; Varesio, Luigi; Morandi, Fabio; Morini, Martina; Gigliotti, Anna Rita; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Viscardi, Elisabetta; Cecinati, Valerio; Conte, Massimo; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2015-01-01

    To get insights on the metastatic process of human neuroblastoma (NB), the miRNA expression profile of bone marrow (BM)-infiltrating cells has been determined and compared to that of primary tumors. Twenty-two BM-infiltrating cells, 22 primary tumors, and 4 paired samples from patients with metastatic NB aged > 12 months were analyzed for the expression of 670 miRNAs by stem-loop RT-qPCR. The miRNAs whose expression was significantly different were subjected to selection criteria, and 20 selected miRNAs were tested in 10 additional BM-infiltrating cells and primary tumors. Among the miRNAs confirmed to be differentially expressed, miR-659-3p was further analyzed. Transfection of miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor demonstrated the specific suppression and over-expression, respectively, of the miR-659-3p target gene CNOT1, a regulator of transcription of genes containing AU-rich element (ARE) sequence. Among the ARE-containing genes, miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor specifically modified the expression of AKT3, BCL2, CYR61 and THSB2, belonging to the focal adhesion pathway. Most importantly, in BM-infiltrating cells CNOT1 expression was significantly higher, and that of AKT3, BCL2, THSB2 and CYR61 was significantly lower than in primary tumors. Thus, our study suggests a role of the focal adhesion pathway, regulated by miR-659-3p through CNOT1, in the human NB metastatic process. PMID:25980492

  8. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  9. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  10. Small GTPase Rho signaling is involved in {beta}1 integrin-mediated up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand on osteoblasts and osteoclast maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Fumihiko; Nakayamada, Shingo; Okada, Yosuke; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Kurose, Hitoshi; Mogami, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiya . E-mail: tanaka@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-27

    We assessed the characteristics of human osteoblasts, focusing on small GTPase Rho signaling. {beta}1 Integrin were highly expressed on osteoblasts. Engagement of {beta}1 integrins by type I collagen augmented expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) on osteoblasts. Rho was activated by {beta}1 stimulation in osteoblasts. {beta}1 Integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL was inhibited by transfection with adenoviruses encoding C3 transferase or pretreated with Y-27632, specific Rho and Rho-kinase inhibitors. Engagement of {beta}1 integrin on osteoblasts induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNC) in a coculture system of osteoblasts and peripheral monocytes, but this action was completely abrogated by transfection of C3 transferase. Our results indicate the direct involvement of Rho-mediated signaling in {beta}1 integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL and RANKL-dependent osteoclast maturation. Thus, Rho-mediated signaling in osteoblasts seems to introduce major biases to bone resorption.

  11. FHA-Mediated Cell-Substrate and Cell-Cell Adhesions Are Critical for Bordetella pertussis Biofilm Formation on Abiotic Surfaces and in the Mouse Nose and the Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Diego O.; Conover, Matt S.; Arnal, Laura; Sloan, Gina Parise; Rodriguez, María E.; Yantorno, Osvaldo M.; Deora, Rajendar

    2011-01-01

    Bordetella spp. form biofilms in the mouse nasopharynx, thereby providing a potential mechanism for establishing chronic infections in humans and animals. Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a major virulence factor of B. pertussis, the causative agent of the highly transmissible and infectious disease, pertussis. In this study, we dissected the role of FHA in the distinct biofilm developmental stages of B. pertussis on abiotic substrates and in the respiratory tract by employing a murine model of respiratory biofilms. Our results show that the lack of FHA reduced attachment and decreased accumulation of biofilm biomass on artificial surfaces. FHA contributes to biofilm development by promoting the formation of microcolonies. Absence of FHA from B. pertussis or antibody-mediated blockade of surface-associated FHA impaired the attachment of bacteria to the biofilm community. Exogenous addition of FHA resulted in a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on bacterial association with the biofilms. Furthermore, we show that FHA is important for the structural integrity of biofilms formed on the mouse nose and trachea. Together, these results strongly support the hypothesis that FHA promotes the formation and maintenance of biofilms by mediating cell-substrate and inter-bacterial adhesions. These discoveries highlight FHA as a key factor in establishing structured biofilm communities in the respiratory tract. PMID:22216115

  12. Effect of water absorption on pollen adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Carson Meredith, J

    2015-03-15

    Pollens possess a thin liquid coating, pollenkitt, which plays a major role in adhesion by forming capillary menisci at interfaces. Unfortunately, the influence of humidity on pollenkitt properties and capillary adhesion is unknown. Because humidity varies widely in the environment, the answers have important implications for better understanding plant reproduction, allergy and asthma, and pollen as atmospheric condensation nuclei. Here, pollenkitt-mediated adhesion of sunflower pollen to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of humidity. The results quantify for the first time the significant water absorption of pollenkitt and the resulting complex dependence of adhesion on humidity. On hydrophilic Si, adhesion increased with increasing RH for pollens with or without pollenkitt, up to 200nN at 70% RH. In contrast, on hydrophobic PS, adhesion of pollenkitt-free pollen is independent of RH. Surprisingly, when pollenkitt was present adhesion forces on hydrophobic PS first increased with RH up to a maximum value at 35% RH (∼160nN), and then decreased with further increases in RH. Independent measurement of pollenkitt properties is used with models of capillary adhesion to show that humidity-dependent changes in pollenkitt wetting and viscosity are responsible for this complex adhesion behavior. PMID:25524008

  13. A novel O-linked glycan modulates Campylobacter jejuni major outer membrane protein-mediated adhesion to human histo-blood group antigens and chicken colonization

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Jafar; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Oldfield, Neil J.; Carlsohn, Elisabet; Stoof, Jeroen; Aslam, Akhmed; Self, Tim; Cawthraw, Shaun A.; Petrovska, Liljana; Colborne, Natalie; Sihlbom, Carina; Borén, Thomas; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important cause of human foodborne gastroenteritis; strategies to prevent infection are hampered by a poor understanding of the complex interactions between host and pathogen. Previous work showed that C. jejuni could bind human histo-blood group antigens (BgAgs) in vitro and that BgAgs could inhibit the binding of C. jejuni to human intestinal mucosa ex vivo. Here, the major flagella subunit protein (FlaA) and the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were identified as BgAg-binding adhesins in C. jejuni NCTC11168. Significantly, the MOMP was shown to be O-glycosylated at Thr268; previously only flagellin proteins were known to be O-glycosylated in C. jejuni. Substitution of MOMP Thr268 led to significantly reduced binding to BgAgs. The O-glycan moiety was characterized as Gal(β1–3)-GalNAc(β1–4)-GalNAc(β1–4)-GalNAcα1-Thr268; modelling suggested that O-glycosylation has a notable effect on the conformation of MOMP and this modulates BgAg-binding capacity. Glycosylation of MOMP at Thr268 promoted cell-to-cell binding, biofilm formation and adhesion to Caco-2 cells, and was required for the optimal colonization of chickens by C. jejuni, confirming the significance of this O-glycosylation in pathogenesis. PMID:24451549

  14. A Small Physiological Electric Field Mediated Responses of Extravillous Trophoblasts Derived from HTR8/SVneo Cells: Involvement of Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Ren, Rongmei; Luo, Xuefeng; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Lei; Yu, Ping; Bai, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF)-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF) on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo) were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells. PMID:24643246

  15. The roles of Akt and NOSs in regulation of VLA-4-mediated melanoma cell adhesion to endothelial VCAM-1 after UVB-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Shiyong

    2011-04-15

    UVB-reduced avidity between M624 melanoma and HUVEC cells is dependent on the interaction of VLA-4 with its endothelial ligand VCAM-1. Our previous studies suggested that a spatial organization of α4 integrin, one of the two subunits of VLA-4, on the melanoma cell surface contributed to the changes in avidity for VCAM-1 upon UVB-irradiation. In this study, we demonstrate that Akt plays an important role in regulation of the expression and surface level of α4 integrin on melanoma cells upon UVB-irradiation. While the cell surface level of α4 integrin is not significantly affected by UVB-irradiation or Akt inhibitor alone, it is dynamically altered after UVB-irradiation when Akt is inhibited. Inhibition of Akt also reverses the reduction of avidity of cells after the irradiation. Our data also shows that UVB reduces the level of Akt. The inhibition of Akt activity correlates with a reduced amount of coupled cNOS and reduced amount of iNOS after UVB-irradiation. However, the effect of NOSs on melanoma cell adhesion appears due to their roles in regulation of apoptosis after UVB-irradiation. Base on these results, we propose that the UVB-induced reduction of avidity of melanoma cells is coordinatively regulated by NOSs and Akt through two differential mechanisms. PMID:21129359

  16. Focal adhesion kinase-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β regulates IL-33 receptor internalization and IL-33 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Traister, Russell S; Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhao, Yutong

    2014-01-01

    IL-33, a relatively new member of the IL-1 cytokine family, plays a crucial role in allergic inflammation and acute lung injury. ST2L, the receptor for IL-33, is expressed on immune effector cells and lung epithelia, and plays a critical role in triggering inflammation. We have previously shown that ST2L stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, however its upstream internalization has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates ST2L internalization and IL-33 signaling. IL-33 treatment induced ST2L internalization, an effect was attenuated by inhibition or downregulation of GSK3β. GSK3β was found to interact with ST2L on serine residue 446 in response to IL-33 treatment. GSK3β binding site mutant (ST2LS446A) and phosphorylation site mutant (ST2LS442A) are resistant to IL-33-induced ST2L internalization. We also found that IL-33 activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK impaired IL-33-induced GSK3β activation and ST2L internalization. Further, inhibition of ST2L internalization enhanced IL-33-induced cytokine release in lung epithelial cells. These results suggest that modulation of the ST2L internalization by FAK/GSK3β might serve as a unique strategy to lessen pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25472995

  17. NKG2D Signaling Leads to NK Cell Mediated Lysis of Childhood AML

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Patrick; Ditthard, Kerstin; Lang, Peter; Mezger, Markus; Michaelis, Sebastian; Handgretinger, Rupert; Pfeiffer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells have been shown to be relevant in the recognition and lysis of acute myeloid leukemia. In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it was shown that HLA I expression and KIR receptor-ligand mismatch significantly impact ALL cytolysis. We characterized 14 different primary childhood AML blasts by flow cytometry including NKG2D ligands. Further HLA I typing of blasts was performed and HLA I on the AML blasts was quantified. In two healthy volunteer NK cell donors HLA I typing and KIR genotyping were done. Blasts with high NKG2D ligand expression had significantly higher lysis by isolated NK cells. Grouping the blasts by NKG2D ligand expression led to a significant inverse correlation of HLA I expression and cytolysis in NKG2D low blasts. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation of NKG2D ligand expression and blast cytolysis was shown. No impact of KIR ligand-ligand mismatch was found but a significantly increased lysis of homozygous C2 blasts by KIR2DL1 negative NK cells (donor B) was revealed. In conclusion, NKG2D signaling leads to NK cell mediated lysis of childhood AML despite high HLA I expression. PMID:26236752

  18. Pseudoelastic deformation during nanoscale adhesive contact formation.

    PubMed

    Mordehai, Dan; Rabkin, Eugen; Srolovitz, David J

    2011-08-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to demonstrate that adhesive contact formation through classical jump to contact is mediated by extensive dislocation activity in metallic nanoparticles. The dislocations generated during jump to contact are completely annihilated by the completion of the adhesive contact, leaving the nanoparticles dislocation-free. This rapid and efficient jump to contact process is pseudoelastic, rather than purely elastic or plastic. PMID:21929255

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β sustains invasion of glioblastoma via the focal adhesion kinase, Rac1, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Chikano, Yuri; Domoto, Takahiro; Furuta, Takuya; Sabit, Hemragul; Kitano-Tamura, Ayako; Pyko, Ilya V; Takino, Takahisa; Sai, Yoshimichi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Sato, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2015-02-01

    The failure of current treatment options for glioblastoma stems from their inability to control tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Biologically targeted therapies offer great hope and one promising target is glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), implicated in various diseases, including cancer. We previously reported that inhibition of GSK3β compromises the survival and proliferation of glioblastoma cells, induces their apoptosis, and sensitizes them to temozolomide and radiation. Here, we explore whether GSK3β also contributes to the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma. The effects of GSK3β inhibition on migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells were examined by wound-healing and Transwell assays, as well as in a mouse model of glioblastoma. We also investigated changes in cellular microarchitectures, cytoskeletal components, and proteins responsible for cell motility and invasion. Inhibition of GSK3β attenuated the migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells in vitro and that of tumor cells in a mouse model of glioblastoma. These effects were associated with suppression of the molecular axis involving focal adhesion kinase, guanine nucleotide exchange factors/Rac1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Changes in cellular phenotypes responsible for cell motility and invasion were also observed, including decreased formation of lamellipodia and invadopodium-like microstructures and alterations in the subcellular localization, and activity of Rac1 and F-actin. These changes coincided with decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our results confirm the potential of GSK3β as an attractive therapeutic target against glioblastoma invasion, thus highlighting a second role in this tumor type in addition to its involvement in chemo- and radioresistance. PMID:25504636

  20. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  1. P2Y2 receptor-mediated lymphotoxin-α secretion regulates intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Seye, Cheikh I; Agca, Yuksel; Agca, Cansu; Derbigny, Wilbert

    2012-03-23

    The proinflammatory cytokine lymphotoxin-α (LTA) is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanisms that regulate its expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are poorly understood. The ability of exogenous nucleotides to stimulate LTA production was evaluated in VSMC by ELISA. The P2Y(2) nucleotide receptor (P2Y(2)R) agonist UTP stimulates a strong and sustained release of LTA from WT but not P2Y(2)R(-/-) SMC. Assessment of LTA gene transcription by LTA promoter-luciferase construct indicated that LTA levels are controlled at the level of transcription. We show using RNAi techniques that knockdown of the actin-binding protein filamin-A (FLNa) severely impaired nucleotide-induced Rho activation and consequent Rho-mediated LTA secretion. Reintroduction of FLNa in FLNa RNAi SMC rescued UTP-induced LTA expression. In addition, we found that UTP-stimulated LTA secretion is not sensitive to brefeldin A, which blocks the formation of vesicles involved in protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that P2Y(2)R/filamin-mediated secretion of LTA is independent of the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi secretory vesicle route. Furthermore, UTP selectively induces ICAM-1 expression in WT but not SMC expressing a truncated P2Y(2)R deficient in LTA secretion. These data suggest that P2Y(2)R recruits FLNa to provide a cytoskeletal scaffold necessary for Rho signaling pathway upstream of LTA release and subsequent stimulation of ICAM-1 expression on vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:22298782

  2. Molecular Adhesion between Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen network, in simulated physiological conditions. Colloidal force spectroscopy was applied to measure the maximum adhesion force and total adhesion energy between aggrecan end-attached spherical tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) and trypsin-treated cartilage disks with undamaged collagen networks. Studies were carried out in various aqueous solutions to reveal the physical factors that govern aggrecan–collagen adhesion. Increasing both ionic strength and [Ca2+] significantly increased adhesion, highlighting the importance of electrostatic repulsion and Ca2+-mediated ion bridging effects. In addition, we probed how partial enzymatic degradation of the collagen network, which simulates osteoarthritic conditions, affects the aggrecan–collagen interactions. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in aggrecan–collagen adhesion even when there were no detectable changes at the macro- or microscales. It is hypothesized that the aggrecan–collagen adhesion, together with aggrecan–aggrecan self-adhesion, works synergistically to determine the local molecular deformability and energy dissipation of the cartilage matrix, in turn, affecting its macroscopic tissue properties. PMID:24491174

  3. ISOLATION OF INTEGRIN-BASED ADHESION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew C.; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angelique; Robertson, Joseph; Paul, Nikki R.; Ng, Daniel H. J.; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of cells with their extracellular environment is facilitated by cell surface adhesion receptors, such as integrins, which play important roles in both normal development and the onset of pathologies. Engagement of integrins with their ligands in the extracellular matrix, or counter receptors on other cells, initiates the intracellular assembly of a wide variety of proteins into adhesion complexes such as focal contacts, focal adhesions and fibrillar adhesions. The proteins recruited to these complexes mediate bidirectional signalling across the plasma membrane and as such help to coordinate and / or modulate the multitude of physical or chemical signals to which the cell is subjected. The protocols in this unit describe two approaches for the isolation or enrichment of proteins contained within integrin-associated adhesion complexes together with their local plasma membrane / cytosolic environments from cells in culture. In the first protocol integrin-associated adhesion structures are affinity isolated using microbeads coated with extracellular ligands or antibodies. The second protocol describes the isolation of ventral membrane preparations that are enriched for adhesion complex structures. The protocols permit the determination of adhesion complex components by subsequent downstream analysis by Western blotting or mass spectrometry. PMID:25727331

  4. Mussel-mimetic protein-based adhesive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Jin; Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Hwang, Dong Soo; Masic, Admir; Han, Dong Keun; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2014-05-12

    Hydrogel systems based on cross-linked polymeric materials which could provide both adhesion and cohesion in wet environment have been considered as a promising formulation of tissue adhesives. Inspired by marine mussel adhesion, many researchers have tried to exploit the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) molecule as a cross-linking mediator of synthetic polymer-based hydrogels which is known to be able to achieve cohesive hardening as well as adhesive bonding with diverse surfaces. Beside DOPA residue, composition of other amino acid residues and structure of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) have also been considered important elements for mussel adhesion. Herein, we represent a novel protein-based hydrogel system using DOPA-containing recombinant MAP. Gelation can be achieved using both oxdiation-induced DOPA quinone-mediated covalent and Fe(3+)-mediated coordinative noncovalent cross-linking. Fe(3+)-mediated hydrogels show deformable and self-healing viscoelastic behavior in rheological analysis, which is also well-reflected in bulk adhesion strength measurement. Quinone-mediated hydrogel has higher cohesive strength and can provide sufficient gelation time for easier handling. Collectively, our newly developed MAP hydrogel can potentially be used as tissue adhesive and sealant for future applications. PMID:24650082

  5. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  6. Understanding marine mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Heather G; Roberto, Francisco F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  7. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  8. Acidic pH changes receptor binding specificity of Helicobacter pylori: a binary adhesion model in which surface heat shock (stress) proteins mediate sulfatide recognition in gastric colonization.

    PubMed Central

    Huesca, M; Borgia, S; Hoffman, P; Lingwood, C A

    1996-01-01

    The gastric pathogen helicobacter pylori is one of a number of bacteria which bind specifically to gangliotetraosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, and phosphatidylethanolamine in vitro at neutral pH. Since this organism encounters an acid pH during initial infection of the stomach, we have monitored the effect of pH on receptor binding specificity and found induction of specific binding to sulfoglycolipids (sulfatide) following brief treatment at low pH. We have previously shown that heat shock proteins (hsps) bind to sulfatide, and the suspicion that this was a stress-induced response is supported by the fact that a similar change in H. pylori binding specificity was observed if the organisms were briefly exposed to heat shock treatment. Following the stress stimulus, the change in glycolipid binding specificity was prevented by the inclusion of inhibitors of protein synthesis or by incubation with anti-hsp antibodies. Expression of hsps in the surface extract and surface reactivity with anti-hsp antibodies correlated with the change in glycolipid binding specificity. Despite the presence of high levels of H. pylori cell surface urease activity which may neutralize the microenvironmental pH, the acid-induced change in binding specificity was enhanced in the presence of urea. These studies suggest that cell surface hsps mediate sulfatide recognition by this organism under stress conditions. A binary receptor model is proposed for gastric colonization by H. pylori. PMID:8698490

  9. A rhamnose-rich O-antigen mediates adhesion, virulence, and host colonization for the xylem-limited phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Jennifer C; Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Roper, M Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium that causes a lethal disease of grapevine called Pierce's disease. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composes approximately 75% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and, because it is largely displayed on the cell surface, it mediates interactions between the bacterial cell and its surrounding environment. LPS is composed of a conserved lipid A-core oligosaccharide component and a variable O-antigen portion. By targeting a key O-antigen biosynthetic gene, we demonstrate the contribution of the rhamnose-rich O-antigen to surface attachment, cell-cell aggregation, and biofilm maturation: critical steps for successful infection of the host xylem tissue. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a fully formed O-antigen moiety is an important virulence factor for Pierce's disease development in grape and that depletion of the O-antigen compromises its ability to colonize the host. It has long been speculated that cell-surface polysaccharides play a role in X. fastidiosa virulence and this study confirms that LPS is a major virulence factor for this important agricultural pathogen. PMID:23441576

  10. Adhesion molecules in antibacterial defenses: effects of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Marchant, A; Duchow, J; Goldman, M

    1992-01-01

    Adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to vascular endothelium is one of the first events in their response against local bacterial infection. Different adhesion molecules sequentially mediate PMN adherence to endothelium and extravasation into inflamed tissues. We show that bacterial extracts OM-85 BV and OM-89 increase the expression of adhesion molecules at the surface of PMN and we suggest that this upregulation could be linked to the beneficial effect of bacterial extracts in the prevention of respiratory tract infections. PMID:1439236

  11. Exogenously delivered heat shock protein 70 displaces its endogenous analogue and sensitizes cancer cells to lymphocytes-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bychkova, Natalia V.; Aksenov, Nikolai D.; Abkin, Sergey V.; Margulis, Boris A.; Guzhova, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperone is known to stimulate anti-tumour immunity in a variety of cancer models. Here we demonstrated that the addition of purified recombinant Hsp70 to the culture medium facilitated cancer cell cytolysis by lymphocytes. Importantly, exogenous Hsp70 triggered secretion of the intracellular Hsp70 to a cell surface and extracellular milieu, which played a role in cytolysis because down-regulation of the endogenous Hsp70 reduced both its presence at the cell surface and the lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis. Inhibitors that target both the ATPase and the peptide-binding domains of Hsp70 molecule potently decreased its anti-tumor effect. Using a variety of cell transport markers and inhibitors, we showed that the exchange of exogenous and intracellular Hsp70 is supported by classical and non-classical transport pathways, with a particular role of lipid rafts in the chaperone's intracellular transport. In conclusion, exogenous Hsp70 can eject endogenous Hsp70, thus exerting anticancer activity. PMID:24797019

  12. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules. PMID:24689803

  13. Monoclonal LYM-1 antibody-dependent cytolysis by human neutrophils exposed to GM-CSF: auto-regulation of target cell attack by cathepsin G.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, Luciano; Epstein, Alan L; Mancini, Marina; Dapino, Patrizia; Dallegri, Franco

    2004-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) Lym-1 is an immunoglobulin G2a specific for certain human leukocyte antigen-DR variants expressed on the surface of malignant B cells. It has been proposed for serotherapy in patients with B lymphomas. We have previously shown that mAb Lym-1 synergizes with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor to promote Raji B-lymphoid cell lysis by human neutrophils via the intervention of neutrophil Fc receptors type II and D-mannose-inhibitable interactions between CD11b-CD18 integrins and CD66b glycoproteins. Here, we provide evidence that the process is oxygen-independent by inference related to the release of primary granules and is regulated by cathepsin G activity. The lysis was indeed reproduced by replacing normal neutrophils with cells from three patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease, i.e., neutrophils genetically incapable of generating oxidants. Moreover, the lysis was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin and by Z-glycyl-leucyl-phenyl-chloromethyl ketone (Z-Gly-Leu-Phe-CMK), which blocks cathepsin G. Conversely, the lysis was unaffected by N-methoxysuccinyl-alanyl-alanyl-prolyl-alanyl-CMK (MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala-CMK; elastase inhibitor) and MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-valine (Val)-CMK, which inhibits elastase and proteinase 3. The ability of neutrophils, engaged in cytolysis, to release cathepsin G was proved by detecting this enzymatic activity spectrophotometrically and immunocytochemically. Moreover, inhibition of cathepsin G activity by concentrations of Z-Gly-Leu-Phe-CMK, incapable of affecting elastase activity, was found to reduce the release of elastase and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils under conditions similar to those used for cytolytic assays. These findings suggest that neutrophils auto-regulate their lytic efficiency by controlling the exocytosis of primary granules via their cathepsin G activity. PMID:14525961

  14. Polymer nanocarriers for dentin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Osorio, R; Osorio, E; Medina-Castillo, A L; Toledano, M

    2014-12-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP- N : Active nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days' immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  15. Polymer Nanocarriers for Dentin Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, R.; Osorio, E.; Medina-Castillo, A.L.; Toledano, M.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain more durable adhesion to dentin, and to protect collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix from degradation, calcium- and phosphate-releasing particles have been incorporated into the dental adhesive procedure. The aim of the present study was to incorporate zinc-loaded polymeric nanocarriers into a dental adhesive system to facilitate inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-mediated collagen degradation and to provide calcium ions for mineral deposition within the resin-dentin bonded interface. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles (nanoMyP) were zinc-loaded through 30-minute ZnCl2 immersion and tested for bioactivity by means of 7 days’ immersion in simulated body fluid solution (the Kokubo test). Zinc-loading and calcium phosphate depositions were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles in ethanol solution infiltrated into phosphoric-acid-etched human dentin and Single Bond (3M/ESPE) were applied to determine whether the nanoparticles interfered with bonding. Debonded sticks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. A metalloproteinase collagen degradation assay was also performed in resin-infiltrated dentin with and without nanoparticles, measuring C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) concentration in supernatants, after 4 wk of immersion in artificial saliva. Numerical data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests (p < .05). Nanoparticles were effectively zinc-loaded and were shown to have a chelating effect, retaining calcium regardless of zinc incorporation. Nanoparticles failed to infiltrate demineralized intertubular dentin and remained on top of the hybrid layer, without altering bond strength. Calcium and phosphorus were found covering nanoparticles at the hybrid layer, after 24 h. Nanoparticle application in etched dentin also reduced MMP-mediated collagen degradation. Tested nanoparticles may be

  16. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  17. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  18. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  19. Force transmission during adhesion-independent migration.

    PubMed

    Bergert, Martin; Erzberger, Anna; Desai, Ravi A; Aspalter, Irene M; Oates, Andrew C; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2015-04-01

    When cells move using integrin-based focal adhesions, they pull in the direction of motion with large, ∼100 Pa, stresses that contract the substrate. Integrin-mediated adhesions, however, are not required for in vivo confined migration. During focal adhesion-free migration, the transmission of propelling forces, and their magnitude and orientation, are not understood. Here, we combine theory and experiments to investigate the forces involved in adhesion-free migration. Using a non-adherent blebbing cell line as a model, we show that actin cortex flows drive cell movement through nonspecific substrate friction. Strikingly, the forces propelling the cell forward are several orders of magnitude lower than during focal-adhesion-based motility. Moreover, the force distribution in adhesion-free migration is inverted: it acts to expand, rather than contract, the substrate in the direction of motion. This fundamentally different mode of force transmission may have implications for cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions during migration in vivo. PMID:25774834

  20. Monocyte and granulocyte-mediated tumor cell destruction. A role for the hydrogen peroxide-myeloperoxidase-chloride system.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S J; Slivka, A

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate were able to destroy a T lymphoblast cell target (CEM). Stimulated human granulocytes were also capable of mediating CEM cytotoxicity to a comparable degree as the monocyte. CEM destruction was dependent on the pH and the effector cell number. Both monocyte or granulocyte mediated cytotoxicity were inhibited by the addition of catalase, whereas superoxide dismutase had no inhibitory effect. In addition, CEM were protected from cytolysis by the effector cells by the myeloperoxidase inhibitors, azide and cyanide, or by performing the experiment under halide-free conditions. Glucose oxidase, an enzyme system capable of generating hydrogen peroxide, did not mediate CEM cytotoxicity, while the addition of purified myeloperoxidase dramatically enhanced cytolysis. Hypochlorous acid scavengers prevented CEM destruction by the glucose oxidase-myeloperoxidase-chloride system but neither hydroxyl radical nor singlet oxygen scavengers had any protective effect. These hypochlorous acid scavengers were also successful in inhibiting monocyte or granulocyte-mediated CEM cytotoxicity. Based on these observations we propose that human monocytes or granulocytes can utilize the hydrogen peroxide-myeloperoxidase-chloride system to generate hypochlorous acid or species of similar reactivity as a potential mediator of CEM destruction. PMID:6276438

  1. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  2. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  3. A bioinspired wet/dry microfluidic adhesive for aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Abhijit; Sharma, Ashutosh; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2010-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive, nonreacting and nonfouling adhesive which can perform well both in air and underwater is very desirable because of its potential applications in various settings such as biomedical, marine, and automobile. Taking a clue from nature that many natural adhesive pads have complex structures underneath the outer adhesive layer, we have prepared thin elastic adhesive films with subsurface microstructures using PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) and investigated their performance underwater. The presence of embedded structure enhances the energy of adhesion considerably both in air and underwater. Furthermore, filling the channels with liquid of suitable surface tension modifies the internal stress profile, resulting into significant enhancement in adhesive performance. As this increase in adhesion is mediated by mechanics and not by surface chemistry, the presence of water does not alter its performance much. For the same reason, this adhesion mechanism works with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The adhesive can be reused because of its elastic surface. Moreover, unlike many other present-day adhesives, its performance does not decrease with time. PMID:20038181

  4. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  5. Cytotoxicity of denture adhesives.

    PubMed

    de Gomes, Pedro Sousa; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Fernandes, Maria Helena R; Scully, Crispian

    2011-12-01

    Ten commercially available denture adhesives, nine soluble formulations (six creams, three powders) and one insoluble product (pad), were analyzed regarding the cytotoxicity profile in direct and indirect assays using L929 fibroblast cells. In the direct assay, fibroblasts were seeded over the surface of a thick adhesive gel (5%, creams; 2.5%, powders and pad). In the indirect assay, cells were cultured in the presence of adhesive extracts prepared in static and dynamic conditions (0.5-2%, creams; 0.25-1%, powders and pad). Cell toxicity was assessed for cell viability/proliferation (MTT assay) and cell morphology (observation of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization by confocal laser scanning microscopy). Direct contact of the L929 fibroblasts with the thick adhesive gels caused no, or only a slight, decrease in cell viability/proliferation. The adhesive extracts (especially those prepared in dynamic conditions) caused significantly higher growth inhibition of fibroblasts and, in addition, caused dose- and time-dependent effects, throughout the 6-72 h exposure time. Also, dose-dependent effects on cell morphology, with evident disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton organization, were seen in the presence of most adhesives. In conclusion, the adhesives possessed different degrees of cytotoxicity, but similar dose- and time-dependent biological profiles. PMID:20844908

  6. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  7. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  8. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  9. GRP78 inhibits macrophage adhesion via SR-A

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hui; Li, Nan; Zhou, Xiaodan; Wang, Chenchen; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Xudong; Huang, Min; Chen, Yaoyu; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qing; Li, Chaojun; Ben, Jingjing; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) plays an important role in macrophage adhesion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We previously found that 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) inhibited SR-A-mediated ligand internalization into macrophage by binding to SR-A. The aim of the study was to investigate whether GRP78 could regulate SR-A-mediated cell adhesion. We demonstrated that GRP78 bound directly to SR-A by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. Overexpression of GRP78 inhibited macrophage adhesion via SR-A. These results suggest that GRP78 may act as an inhibitor of macrophage adhesion via SR-A. PMID:25050110

  10. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  11. Adhesives for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The industry is hereby challenged to integrate adhesive technology with the total structure requirements in light of today's drive into automation/mechanization. The state of the art of adhesive technology is fairly well meeting the needs of the structural designers, the processing engineer, and the inspector, each on an individual basis. The total integration of these needs into the factory of the future is the next collective hurdle to be achieved. Improved processing parameters to fit the needs of automation/mechanization will necessitate some changes in the adhesive forms, formulations, and chemistries. Adhesives have, for the most part, kept up with the needs of the aerospace industry, normally leading the rest of the industry in developments. The wants of the aerospace industry still present a challenge to encompass all elements, achieving a totally integrated joined and sealed structural system. Better toughness with hot-wet strength improvements is desired. Lower cure temperatures, longer out times, and improved corrosion inhibition are desired.

  12. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  13. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  14. Glycoconjugates and Glycomimetics as Microbial Anti-Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sattin, Sara; Bernardi, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Microbial adhesion is an essential step in infection and is mediated primarily by protein-carbohydrate interactions. Antagonists of such interactions have become a promising target for anti-adhesive therapy in several infective diseases. Monovalent protein-sugar interactions are often weak, and most successful anti-adhesive materials consist of multivalent glycoconjugates. Although often very effective in hampering microbial adhesion, natural epitopes often show limited resistance to enzymatic degradation. The use of carbohydrate mimics (glycomimetics) as a replacement for natural sugars potentially allows higher metabolic stability and also higher selectivity towards the desired protein target. In this review we describe the state of the art in the design and synthesis of glycoconjugates and glycomimetics employed for the construction of anti-adhesive biomaterials. PMID:26875976

  15. Intrinsic Surface-Drying Properties of Bio-adhesive Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Yasar; Wei, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Ying; Kageyama, Yoshiyuki; Danner, Eric W.; Miller, Dusty R.; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Herbert Waite, J.

    2014-01-01

    Sessile marine mussels must “dry” underwater surfaces before adhering to them. Synthetic adhesives have yet to overcome this fundamental challenge. Previous studies of bio-inspired adhesion have largely been performed under applied compressive forces but these are poor predictors of an adhesive’s ability to spontaneously penetrate surface hydration layers. In a force-free approach to measuring molecular-level interaction via the surface water diffusivity, different mussel foot proteins were found to have differential abilities to evict hydration layers from the surfaces—a necessary step for adsorption and adhesion. It was anticipated that Dopa would mediate dehydration given its efficacy forbio-inspired wet adhesion. Instead, hydrophobic side-chains are found to be a critical component in bringing about protein-surface intimacy. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial water dynamics during force-free adsorptive interactions at solid surfaces, and offers guidance for engineering wet adhesives and coatings. PMID:25168789

  16. The amino-terminal portion of CD1 of the adenovirus E1A proteins is required to induce susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor cytolysis in adenovirus-infected mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Duerksen-Hughes, P J; Hermiston, T W; Wold, W S; Gooding, L R

    1991-03-01

    Previous work by our laboratory and others has shown that mouse cells normally resistant to tumor necrosis factor can be made sensitive to the cytokine by the expression of adenovirus E1A. The E1A gene can be introduced by either infection or transfection, and either of the two major E1A proteins, 289R or 243R, can induce this sensitivity. The E1A proteins are multifunctional and modular, with specific domains associated with specific functions. Here, we report that the CD1 domain of E1A is required to induce susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor cytolysis in adenovirus-infected mouse C3HA fibroblasts. Amino acids C terminal to residue 60 and N terminal to residue 36 are not necessary for this function. This conclusion is based on 51Cr-release assays for cytolysis in cells infected with adenovirus mutants with deletions in various portions of E1A. These E1A mutants are all in an H5dl309 background and therefore they lack the tumor necrosis factor protection function provided by the 14.7-kilodalton (14.7K) protein encoded by region E3. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that most of the mutant E1A proteins were stable in infected C3HA cells, although with certain large deletions the E1A proteins were unstable. The region between residues 36 and 60 is included within but does not precisely correlate with domains in E1A that have been implicated in nuclear localization, enhancer repression, cellular immortalization, cell transformation in cooperation with ras, induction of cellular DNA synthesis and proliferation, induction of DNA degradation, and binding to the 300K protein and the 105K retinoblastoma protein. PMID:1825340

  17. High temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace and electronics industries have an ever increasing need for higher performance materials. In recent years, linear aromatic polyimides have been proven to be a superior class of materials for various applications in these industries. The use of this class of polymers as adhesives is continuing to increase. Several NASA Langley developed polyimides show considerable promise as adhesives because of their high glass transition temperatures, thermal stability, resistance to solvents/water, and their potential for cost effective manufacture.

  18. Flexibilized copolyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    Two copolyimides, LARC-STPI and STPI-LARC-2, with flexible backbones were processed and characterized as adhesives. The processability and adhesive properties were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the three polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to water-boil and to thermal aging at 204 C for up to 1000 hours. The three adhesive systems possess exceptional lap shear strengths at room temperature and elevated temperatures both before and after thermal exposure. LARC-STPI, because of its high glass transition temperature provided high lap shear strengths up to 260 C. After water-boil, LARC-TPI exhibited the highest lap shear strengths at room temperature and 177 C, whereas the LARC-STPI retained a higher percentage of its original strength when tested at 204 C. These flexible thermoplastic copolyimides show considerable potential as adhesives based on this study and because of the ease of preparation with low cost, commercially available materials.

  19. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  20. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  1. Natural Underwater Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Russell J.; Ransom, Todd C.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The general topic of this review is protein-based underwater adhesives produced by aquatic organisms. The focus is on mechanisms of interfacial adhesion to native surfaces and controlled underwater solidification of natural water-borne adhesives. Four genera that exemplify the broad range of function, general mechanistic features, and unique adaptations are discussed in detail: blue mussels, acorn barnacles, sandcastle worms, and freshwater caddisfly larva. Aquatic surfaces in nature are charged and in equilibrium with their environment, populated by an electrical double layer of ions as well as adsorbed natural polyelectrolytes and microbial biofilms. Surface adsorption of underwater bioadhesives likely occurs by exchange of surface bound ligands by amino acid sidechains, driven primarily by relative affinities and effective concentrations of polymeric functional groups. Most aquatic organisms exploit modified amino acid sidechains, in particular phosphorylated serines and hydroxylated tyrosines (dopa), with high-surface affinity that form coordinative surface complexes. After delivery to the surfaces as a fluid, permanent natural adhesives solidify to bear sustained loads. Mussel plaques are assembled in a manner superficially reminiscent of in vitro layer-by-layer strategies, with sequentially delivered layers associated through Fe(dopa)3 coordination bonds. The adhesives of sandcastle worms, caddisfly larva, and barnacles may be delivered in a form somewhat similar to in vitro complex coacervation. Marine adhesives are secreted, or excreted, into seawater that has a significantly higher pH and ionic strength than the internal environment. Empirical evidence suggests these environment triggers could provide minimalistic, fail-safe timing mechanisms to prevent premature solidification (insolubilization) of the glue within the secretory system, yet allow rapid solidification after secretion. Underwater bioadhesives are further strengthened by secondary covalent

  2. Enhanced cell adhesion and mature intracellular structure promoted by squaramide-based RGD mimics on bioinert surfaces.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sri Kamesh; Sejwal, Preeti; Zhu, Shifa; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2013-04-15

    Highly selective molecular binding and the subsequent dynamic protein assemblies control the adhesion of mammalian cells. Molecules that inhibit cell adhesion have the therapeutic potential for a wide range of diseases. Here, we report an efficient synthesis (2-4 steps) of a class of squaramide molecules that mimics the natural tripeptide ligand Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) that mediates mammalian cell adhesion through binding with membrane protein integrin. In solution, this class of squaramides exhibits a higher potency at inhibiting mammalian cell adhesion than RGD tripeptides. When immobilized on a bio-inert background formed by self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on gold films, squaramide ligands mediate vastly different intracellular structures than RGD ligands. Immunostaining revealed that the focal adhesions are smaller, but with a larger quantity, for cells adhered on squaramides than that on RGD ligands. Furthermore, the actin filaments are also more fibrous and well distributed for cell adhesion mediated by squaramide than that by RGD ligands. Quantification reveal that squaramide ligands mediate about 1.5 times more total focal adhesion (measured by the summation of the area of all focal adhesions) than that by natural RGD ligands. This result suggests that cell adhesion inhibitors, while blocking the attachment of cells to surfaces, may induce more focal adhesion proteins. Finally, this work demonstrates that immobilizing new ligands on bioinert surfaces provide a powerful tool to study mammalian cell adhesion. PMID:23490157

  3. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  4. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  5. Timer cover adhesive optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Carleton, J.J. II.

    1992-03-17

    The implementation of PROCODE as the data acquisition system for processing timers has required some modifications to the method of identifying timer assemblies. PROCODE requires machine-readable labelling of the assemblies. This report describes a series of experiments to find an adhesive that would keep labels attached to timers regardless of the condition of their surface when the label was applied and regardless of the heat, vibration, and shock they endured afterwards. The effect of the variation of these experimental factors on the performance of the adhesive was determined by using a Taguchi experimental design.

  6. The focal adhesion protein PINCH-1 associates with EPLIN at integrin adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Karaköse, Esra; Geiger, Tamar; Flynn, Kevin; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Zent, Roy; Mann, Matthias; Fässler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PINCH-1 is a LIM-only domain protein that forms a ternary complex with integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and parvin (to form the IPP complex) downstream of integrins. Here, we demonstrate that PINCH-1 (also known as Lims1) gene ablation in the epidermis of mice caused epidermal detachment from the basement membrane, epidermal hyperthickening and progressive hair loss. PINCH-1-deficient keratinocytes also displayed profound adhesion, spreading and migration defects in vitro that were substantially more severe than those of ILK-deficient keratinocytes indicating that PINCH-1 also exerts functions in an ILK-independent manner. By isolating the PINCH-1 interactome, the LIM-domain-containing and actin-binding protein epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN, also known as LIMA1) was identified as a new PINCH-1-associated protein. EPLIN localized, in a PINCH-1-dependent manner, to integrin adhesion sites of keratinocytes in vivo and in vitro and its depletion severely attenuated keratinocyte spreading and migration on collagen and fibronectin without affecting PINCH-1 levels in focal adhesions. Given that the low PINCH-1 levels in ILK-deficient keratinocytes were sufficient to recruit EPLIN to integrin adhesions, our findings suggest that PINCH-1 regulates integrin-mediated adhesion of keratinocytes through the interactions with ILK as well as EPLIN. PMID:25609703

  7. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  8. WNK1 kinase balances T cell adhesion versus migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Köchl, Robert; Thelen, Flavian; Vanes, Lesley; Brazão, Tiago F; Fountain, Kathryn; Xie, Jian; Huang, Chou-Long; Lyck, Ruth; Stein, Jens V; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and migration of T cells are controlled by chemokines and by adhesion molecules, especially integrins, and have critical roles in the normal physiological function of T lymphocytes. Using an RNA-mediated interference screen, we identified the WNK1 kinase as a regulator of both integrin-mediated adhesion and T cell migration. We found that WNK1 is a negative regulator of integrin-mediated adhesion, whereas it acts as a positive regulator of migration via the kinases OXSR1 and STK39 and the ion co-transporter SLC12A2. WNK1-deficient T cells home less efficiently to lymphoid organs and migrate more slowly through them. Our results reveal that a pathway previously known only to regulate salt homeostasis in the kidney functions to balance T cell adhesion and migration. PMID:27400149

  9. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  10. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm2 provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects. PMID:26457864

  11. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) heparin binding domain binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, S G; Akeson, R A

    1992-12-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been strongly implicated in several aspects of neural development. NCAM mediated adhesion has been proposed to involve a homophilic interaction between NCAMs on adjacent cells. The heparin binding domain (HBD) is an amino acid sequence within NCAM and has been shown to be involved in NCAM mediated adhesion but the relationship of this domain to NCAM segments mediating homophilic adhesion has not been defined. In the present study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HBD has been used as a substrate to determine its role in NCAM mediated adhesion. A neural cell line expressing NCAM (B35) and its derived clone which does not express NCAM (B35 clone 3) adhered similarly to plates coated with HBD peptide. A polyclonal antiserum to NCAM inhibited B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion by only 10%, a value not statistically different from inhibition caused by preimmune serum. Both these experiments suggested no direct NCAM-HBD interactions. To test whether the HBD peptide bound to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), HSPG synthesis was inhibited using beta-D-xyloside. After treatment, B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide, but not to control substrates, was significantly decreased. B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide could be inhibited by 10(-7) M heparin but not chondroitin sulfate. Preincubation of the substrate (HBD peptide) with heparin caused dramatic reduction of B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion whereas preincubation of B35 cells with heparin caused only modest reductions in cell-HBD adhesion. Furthermore, inhibition of HSPG sulfation with sodium chlorate also decreased the adhesion of B35 cells to the HBD peptide. These results strongly suggest that, within the assay system, the NCAM HBD does not participate in homophilic interactions but binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. This interaction potentially represents an important mechanism of NCAM adhesion and further supports the view that NCAM has

  12. Wood Composite Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  13. Adept Adhesion Reduction Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... icodextrin. The fluid is used during or after laparoscopic gynecological surgery to separate and protect tissues and decrease the number of new adhesions after surgery. Adept® is supplied sterile, in a single-use bag. How does it work? During surgery, ...

  14. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  15. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  16. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  17. Resistance heating releases structural adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glemser, N. N.

    1967-01-01

    Composite adhesive package bonds components together for testing and enables separation when testing is completed. The composite of adhesives, insulation and a heating element separate easily when an electrical current is applied.

  18. Adhesion testing of aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobo, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    Adhesion testing appeared to offer a less burdensome alternative to replace some of the dynamometer tests. Accordingly, test results and data were requested from retreaders who had used adhesion testing.

  19. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  20. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  1. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  2. Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) induces differential leukocyte accumulation in mice genetically selected for acute inflammatory reaction: the role of host genetic background on expression of adhesion molecules and release of endogenous mediators.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Adriana S; Ribeiro, Orlando G; Cabrera, Wafa H K; Vorraro, Francisca; De Franco, Marcelo; Ibañez, Olga M; Starobinas, Nancy

    2008-10-01

    The dynamics of the local inflammatory events induced by Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) inoculation in footpad of mice genetically selected for maximal (AIRmax) and minimal (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) was investigated. The BjV injection induced a marked inflammatory cell infiltrate with predominance of neutrophils, with increased blood cell numbers before its accumulation, suggesting a stimulatory action of BjV on mechanisms of cell mobilization from bone marrow. The process of cell migration is regulated by different cell-adhesion molecules (CAM). Our results showed that neutrophil cells from both lines had the same pattern of response concerning CAMs expression, presenting the involvement of l-selectin, Mac-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation. The effect of BjV on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines related with cellular migration was also studied and IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and MIP-2 levels could be detected after venom injection. The AIRmax mice were shown to be more responsive than AIRmin with respect to leukocyte influx, expression of MIP-2 and release of IL-1beta and IL-6. These results demonstrate the importance of host genetic background in the local response and the involvement of alleles accumulated in AIRmax mice in the inflammatory events induced by BjV. PMID:18723041

  3. Synapses: Sites of Cell Recognition, Adhesion, and Functional Specification

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Soichiro; Nelson, W. James

    2012-01-01

    Synapses are specialized adhesive contacts characteristic of many types of cell-cell interactions involving neurons, immune cells, epithelial cells, and even pathogens and host cells. Cell-cell adhesion is mediated by structurally diverse classes of cell-surface glycoproteins, which form homophilic or heterophilic interactions across the intercellular space. Adhesion proteins bind to a cytoplasmic network of scaffolding proteins, regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, and signal transduction pathways that control the structural and functional organization of synapses. The themes of this review are to compare the organization of synapses in different cell types and to understand how different classes of cell adhesion proteins and cytoplasmic protein networks specify the assembly of functionally distinct synapses in different cell contexts. PMID:17506641

  4. Tenomodulin expression in the periodontal ligament enhances cellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yuske; Ohba, Shinsuke; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Hojo, Hironori; Yano, Fumiko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Docheva, Denitsa; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Chung, Ung-Il

    2013-01-01

    Tenomodulin (Tnmd) is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL) has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain. PMID:23593173

  5. Tenomodulin Expression in the Periodontal Ligament Enhances Cellular Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, Yuske; Ohba, Shinsuke; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Hojo, Hironori; Yano, Fumiko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Docheva, Denitsa; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Chung, Ung-il

    2013-01-01

    Tenomodulin (Tnmd) is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL) has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain. PMID:23593173

  6. The Role of Glottal Surface Adhesion on Vocal Folds Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The airway surface liquid (ASL) is a very thin mucus layer and covers the vocal fold (VF) surface. Adhesion mediated by the ASL occurs during phonation as the VFs separate after collision. Such adhesion is hypothesized to determine voice quality and health. However, biomechanical insights into the adhesive processes during VF oscillation are lacking. Here, a computational study is reported on self-sustained VF vibration involving contact and adhesion. The VF structural model and the glottal airflow are considered fully three-dimensional. The mechanical behavior of the ASL is described through a constitutive traction–separation law where mucosal cohesive strength, cohesive energy and rupture length enter. Cohesive energy values considered are bound below by the cohesive energy of water at standard temperature and pressure. Cohesive strength values considered are bound above by prior reported data on the adhesive strength of mucosal surface of rat small intestine. This model introduces a mechanical length scale into the analysis. The sensitivity of various aspects of VF dynamics such as flow-declination rate, VF separation under adhesive condition and formation of multiple local fluid bridges is determined in relation to specific ASL adhesive properties. It is found that for the ASL considered here, the characteristics of the VF separation process are of debond type. Instabilities lead to the breakup of the bond area into several smaller bond patches. Such finding is consistent with in-vivo observations. PMID:25034504

  7. Sticky Matrix: Adhesion Mechanism of the Staphylococcal Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin.

    PubMed

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Feuillie, Cécile; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Kucharíková, Soňa; Lasa, Iñigo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The development of bacterial biofilms on surfaces leads to hospital-acquired infections that are difficult to fight. In Staphylococci, the cationic polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) forms an extracellular matrix that connects the cells together during biofilm formation, but the molecular forces involved are unknown. Here, we use advanced force nanoscopy techniques to unravel the mechanism of PIA-mediated adhesion in a clinically relevant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of the structure, adhesion, and elasticity of bacteria expressing PIA shows that the cells are surrounded by a soft and adhesive matrix of extracellular polymers. Cell surface softness and adhesion are dramatically reduced in mutant cells deficient for the synthesis of PIA or under unfavorable growth conditions. Single-cell force spectroscopy demonstrates that PIA promotes cell-cell adhesion via the multivalent electrostatic interaction with polyanionic teichoic acids on the S. aureus cell surface. This binding mechanism rationalizes, at the nanoscale, the well-known ability of PIA to strengthen intercellular adhesion in staphylococcal biofilms. Force nanoscopy offers promising prospects for understanding the fundamental forces in antibiotic-resistant biofilms and for designing anti-adhesion compounds targeting matrix polymers. PMID:26908275

  8. Extracellular electron transfer of a highly adhesive and metabolically versatile bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Ishikawa, Masahito; Matsuda, Shoichi; Kimoto, Yuki; Hori, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial adhesion to a solid plays a predominant role in mediating the extracellular electron transfer for genus Acinetobactor, a metabolically versatile bacterium that can couple toluene degradation and electricity generation. PMID:23813865

  9. Anchoring stem cells in the niche by cell adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Adult stem cells generally reside in supporting local micro environments or niches, and intimate stem cell and niche association is critical for their long-term maintenance and function. Recent studies in model organisms especially Drosophila have started to unveil the underlying mechanisms of stem anchorage in the niche at the molecular and cellular level. Two types of cell adhesion molecules are emerging as essential players: cadherin-mediated cell adhesion for keeping stem cells within stromal niches, whereas integrin-mediated cell adhesion for keeping stem cells within epidermal niches. Further understanding stem cell anchorage and release in coupling with environmental changes should provide further insights into homeostasis control in tissues that harbor stem cells. PMID:19421010

  10. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  11. HLA-E upregulation on IFN-gamma-activated AML blasts impairs CD94/NKG2A-dependent NK cytolysis after haplo-mismatched hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, S; Beziat, V; Dhedin, N; Kuentz, M; Vernant, J P; Debre, P; Vieillard, V

    2009-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells generated after haploidentical hematopoietic SCT in patients with AML are characterized by specific phenotypic features and impaired functioning that may affect transplantation outcome. We show that IFN-gamma produced by immature CD56(bright) NK cells upregulates cell surface expression of HLA-E on AML blasts and that this upregulation protects leukemic cells from NK-mediated cell lysis through the mediation of CD94/NKG2A, an inhibitory receptor overexpressed on NK cells after haploidentical SCT. Two years after transplantation, however, maturing NK cells were functionally active, as evidenced by high cytotoxicity and poor IFN-gamma production. This implies that maturation of NK cells is the key to improved immune responses and transplantation outcome. PMID:19011664

  12. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24575424

  13. Clinical Recommendation: Labial Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Janice L; Romano, Mary E; Quint, Elisabeth H

    2015-10-01

    Labial adhesions, also known as labial agglutination, are a common finding in prepubertal adolescents. They are defined as fusion of the labia minora in the midline or are termed vulvar adhesions when they occur below the labia minora (inner labia). Patients are often asymptomatic but might present with genitourinary complaints. The decision for treatment is based on symptoms. The mainstay of treatment in asymptomatic patients is conservative, with careful attention to vulvar hygiene and reassurance to parents. In symptomatic patients, topical treatment with estrogen and/or steroid cream is often curative. Less often, corrective surgery is necessary. Recurrence is common until a patient goes through puberty. These recommendations are intended for pediatric and gynecologic health care providers who care for pediatric and adolescent girls to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26162697

  14. Environmentally compliant adhesive joining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tira, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Adhesive joining offers one method of assembling products. Advantages of adhesive joining/assembly include distribution of applied forces, lighter weight, appealing appearance, etc. Selecting environmentally safe adhesive materials and accompanying processes is paramount in today`s business climate if a company wants to be environmentally conscious and stay in business. Four areas of adhesive joining (adhesive formulation and selection, surface preparation, adhesive bonding process, waste and pollution generation/cleanup/management) all need to be carefully evaluated before adhesive joining is selected for commercial as well as military products. Designing for six sigma quality must also be addressed in today`s global economy. This requires material suppliers and product manufacturers to work even closer together.

  15. Ceramic microstructure and adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with a ceramic, a polymer, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. The bonding forces will depend upon the state of the surfaces, cleanliness and the fundamental properties of the two solids, both surface and bulk. Adhesion between a ceramic and another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to interface resulting from solid state contact. Surface properties of ceramics correlated with adhesion include, orientation, reconstruction and diffusion as well as the chemistry of the surface specie. Where a ceramic is in contact with a metal their interactive chemistry and bond strength is considered. Bulk properties examined include elastic and plastic behavior in the surficial regions, cohesive binding energies, crystal structures and crystallographic orientation. Materials examined with respect to interfacial adhesive interactions include silicon carbide, nickel zinc ferrite, manganese zinc ferrite, and aluminum oxide. The surfaces of the contacting solids are studied both in the atomic or molecularly clean state and in the presence of selected surface contaminants.

  16. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  17. The adenovirus E3 10.4K and 14.5K proteins, which function to prevent cytolysis by tumor necrosis factor and to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor, are localized in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A R; Tollefson, A E; Krajcsi, P; Yei, S P; Wold, W S

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2 and 5 E3 10,400- and 14,500-molecular-weight (10.4K and 14.5K) proteins are both required to protect some cell lines from lysis by tumor necrosis factor and to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor. We have shown previously that both 10.4K and 14.5K are integral membrane proteins and that 14.5K is phosphorylated and O glycosylated. The 10.4K protein coimmunoprecipitates with 14.5K, indicating that the two proteins function as a complex. Here we show, using immunofluorescence and two different cell surface-labeling techniques, that both proteins are localized in the plasma membrane. In addition, we show that trafficking of each protein to the plasma membrane depends on concomitant expression of the other protein. Finally, neither protein could be immunoprecipitated from conditioned media, indicating that neither is secreted. Taken together, these results suggest that the plasma membrane is the site at which 10.4K and 14.5K function to inhibit cytolysis by tumor necrosis factor and to down-regulate the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:7983708

  18. A kinetic model for RNA-interference of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal adhesions are integrin-based cell-matrix contacts that transduce and integrate mechanical and biochemical cues from the environment. They develop from smaller and more numerous focal complexes under the influence of mechanical force and are key elements for many physiological and disease-related processes, including wound healing and metastasis. More than 150 different proteins localize to focal adhesions and have been systematically classified in the adhesome project (http://www.adhesome.org). First RNAi-screens have been performed for focal adhesions and the effect of knockdown of many of these components on the number, size, shape and location of focal adhesions has been reported. Results We have developed a kinetic model for RNA interference of focal adhesions which represents some of its main elements: a spatially layered structure, signaling through the small GTPases Rac and Rho, and maturation from focal complexes to focal adhesions under force. The response to force is described by two complementary scenarios corresponding to slip and catch bond behavior, respectively. Using estimated and literature values for the model parameters, three time scales of the dynamics of RNAi-influenced focal adhesions are identified: a sub-minute time scale for the assembly of focal complexes, a sub-hour time scale for the maturation to focal adhesions, and a time scale of days that controls the siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our model shows bistability between states dominated by focal complexes and focal adhesions, respectively. Catch bonding strongly extends the range of stability of the state dominated by focal adhesions. A sensitivity analysis predicts that knockdown of focal adhesion components is more efficient for focal adhesions with slip bonds or if the system is in a state dominated by focal complexes. Knockdown of Rho leads to an increase of focal complexes. Conclusions The suggested model provides a kinetic description of the effect of RNA

  19. Static Adhesion Assay for the Study of Integrin Activation in T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Strazza, Marianne; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Pedoeem, Ariel; Mor, Adam

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocyte adhesion is required for multiple T cell functions, including migration to sites of inflammation and formation of immunological synapses with antigen presenting cells. T cells accomplish regulated adhesion by controlling the adhesive properties of integrins, a class of cell adhesion molecules consisting of heterodimeric pairs of transmembrane proteins that interact with target molecules on partner cells or extracellular matrix. The most prominent T cell integrin is lymphocyte function associated antigen (LFA)-1, composed of subunits αL and β2, whose target is the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. The ability of a T cell to control adhesion derives from the ability to regulate the affinity states of individual integrins. Inside-out signaling describes the process whereby signals inside a cell cause the external domains of integrins to assume an activated state. Much of our knowledge of these complex phenomena is based on mechanistic studies performed in simplified in vitro model systems. The T lymphocyte adhesion assay described here is an excellent tool that allows T cells to adhere to target molecules, under static conditions, and then utilizes a fluorescent plate reader to quantify adhesiveness. This assay has been useful in defining adhesion-stimulatory or inhibitory substances that act on lymphocytes, as well as characterizing the signaling events involved. Although described here for LFA-1 - ICAM-1 mediated adhesion; this assay can be readily adapted to allow for the study of other adhesive interactions (e.g. VLA-4 - fibronectin). PMID:24961998

  20. CADM1 Controls Actin Cytoskeleton Assembly and Regulates Extracellular Matrix Adhesion in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Straatman, Kees R.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs) to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion. PMID:24465823

  1. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J.; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K.; Hilenski, Lula L.; Terada, Lance S.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Lassègue, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  2. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization.

    PubMed

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P; Lyle, Alicia N; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K; Hilenski, Lula L; Terada, Lance S; Dawson, Michelle R; Lassègue, Bernard; Griendling, Kathy K

    2014-10-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  3. Control cell adhesion with dynamic bilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2012-02-01

    Interfacially-directed assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers was employed to create ultrathin films having the potential to correlate the dynamics of ECM cues with cell adhesion and cytoskeletally-generated forces. The mobility of the polymeric bilayer films were tuned by the incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer chains, which are thought to reduce interlayer friction. Labeling of the block copolymer chains with an adhesive peptide ligand (RGD) provided a specific means to study integrin-mediated cellular processes and the corresponding mechanotransduction. By seeding anchorage-dependent cells on ``dynamic'' (laterally mobile) and ``static'' films that display the same amount of RGD, we have found that cells recognize the difference in RGD diffusivity and develop distinct responses over time. We intend to examine changes in cell response by controlling the extent of cytoskeletally-generated forces and the assembly dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. Such films provide a unique platform to unveil the biomechanical signals related with ECM dynamics, and may ultimately facilitate a deeper understanding of cellular processes.

  4. Polyurethane adhesive ingestion.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane adhesives are found in a large number of household products in the United States and are used for a variety of purposes. Several brands of these expanding wood glues (those containing diphenylmethane diisocyanate [MDI]) have the potential to form gastrointestinal (GI) foreign bodies if ingested. The ingested adhesive forms an expanding ball of glue in the esophagus and gastric lumen. This expansion is caused by a polymerization reaction using the heat, water, and gastric acids of the stomach. A firm mass is created that can be 4-8 times its original volume. As little as 2 oz of glue have been reported to develop gastric foreign bodies. The obstructive mass is reported to form within minutes of ingestion of the adhesive. The foreign body can lead to esophageal impaction and obstruction, airway obstruction, gastric outflow obstruction, mucosal hemorrhage, ulceration, laceration, perforation of the esophageal and gastric linings, and death. Clinical signs following ingestion include anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, tachypnea, and abdominal distention and pain, and typically develop within 12 hours. Clinical signs may depend upon the size of the mass. If left untreated, perforation and rupture of the esophagus or stomach can occur. The glue mass does not stick to the GI mucosa and is not always detectable on abdominal palpation. Radiographs are recommended to confirm the presence of the "glue-ball" foreign body, and radiographic evidence of the obstruction may be seen as early as 4-6 hours following ingestion. Emesis is contraindicated owing to the risk of aspiration of the glue into the respiratory tree or the subsequent lodging of the expanding glue mass in the esophagus. Likewise, efforts to dilute the glue and prevent the formation of the foreign body through administration of liquids, activated charcoal, or bulk-forming products to push the foreign body through the GI tract have proven ineffective. Even endoscopy performed to remove the foreign body has

  5. Fluorescence Fluctuation Approaches to the Study of Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesions are large, multimolecular complexes through which cells sense and respond to their environment. They also mediate migration by serving as traction points and signaling centers and allow the cell to modify the surroucnding tissue. Due to their fundamental role in cell behavior, adhesions are germane to nearly all major human health pathologies. However, adhesions are extremely complex and dynamic structures that include over 100 known interacting proteins and operate over multiple space (nm–µm) and time (ms–min) regimes. Fluorescence fluctuation techniques are well suited for studying adhesions. These methods are sensitive over a large spatiotemporal range and provide a wealth of information including molecular transport dynamics, interactions, and stoichiometry from a single time series. Earlier chapters in this volume have provided the theoretical background, instrumentation, and analysis algorithms for these techniques. In this chapter, we discuss their implementation in living cells to study adhesions in migrating cells. Although each technique and application has its own unique instrumentation and analysis requirements, we provide general guidelines for sample preparation, selection of imaging instrumentation, and optimization of data acquisition and analysis parameters. Finally, we review several recent studies that implement these techniques in the study of adhesions. PMID:23280111

  6. Mechanosensitive components of integrin adhesions: Role of vinculin

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Paul; Stutchbury, Ben; Jethwa, Devina; Ballestrem, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    External forces play a key role in shaping development and normal physiology. Aberrant responses to forces, or changes in the nature of such forces, are implicated in a variety of diseases. Cells contain several types of adhesions, linking them to their external environment. It is through these adhesions that forces are both sensed (from the outside inwards) and applied (from inside to out). Furthermore, several adhesion-based proteins are sensitive to changes in intracellular forces, utilising them for activation and regulation. Here, we outline how vinculin, a key component of integrin-mediated adhesions linking the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix (ECM), is regulated by force and acts as force transducing protein. We discuss the role of vinculin in vivo and its place in health and disease; summarise the proposed mechanisms by which vinculin is recruited to and activated at integrin-ECM adhesions; and discuss recent findings that place vinculin as the major force sensing and transmitting component of cell–matrix adhesion complexes. Finally, we discuss the role of vinculin in regulating the cellular responses to both the physical properties of the external environment and to externally applied physical stimuli. PMID:26607713

  7. Autosomal Mutations Affecting Adhesion between Wing Surfaces in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Prout, M.; Damania, Z.; Soong, J.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins are evolutionarily conserved transmembrane α,β heterodimeric receptors involved in cell-to-matrix and cell-to-cell adhesions. In Drosophila the position-specific (PS) integrins mediate the formation and maintenance of junctions between muscle and epidermis and between the two epidermal wing surfaces. Besides integrins, other proteins are implicated in integrin-dependent adhesion. In Drosophila, somatic clones of mutations in PS integrin genes disrupt adhesion between wing surfaces to produce wing blisters. To identify other genes whose products function in adhesion between wing surfaces, we conducted a screen for autosomal mutations that produce blisters in somatic wing clones. We isolated 76 independent mutations in 25 complementation groups, 15 of which contain more than one allele. Chromosomal sites were determined by deficiency mapping, and genetic interactions with mutations in the β(PS) integrin gene myospheroid were investigated. Mutations in four known genes (blistered, Delta, dumpy and mastermind) were isolated. Mutations were isolated in three new genes (piopio, rhea and steamer duck) that affect myo-epidermal junctions or muscle function in embryos. Mutations in three other genes (kakapo, kiwi and moa) may also affect cell adhesion or muscle function at hatching. These new mutants provide valuable material for the study of integrin-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion. PMID:9136017

  8. Pathogenic Actions of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 in Pulmonary Emphysema and Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoneshige, Azusa; Hagiyama, Man; Fujita, Mitsugu; Ito, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion mediated by adhesion molecules is of central importance in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Therefore, altered expression of adhesion molecules leads to the development of various tissue disorders involving cell activation, degeneration, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear what initiates the altered expression of adhesion molecules and how the subsequent pathological cascades proceed. In this regard, cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is one of the candidates that is involved in the development of pathological lesions; it is an intercellular adhesion molecule that is expressed in various types of cells such as pulmonary cells, neurons, and mast cells. Recent studies have revealed that alterations in the transcriptional or post-transcriptional expressions of CADM1 correlate with the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases and allergic diseases. In this review, we specifically focus on how CADM1 is involved in the development of pathological lesions in pulmonary emphysema and atopic dermatitis. PMID:26636084

  9. Focal adhesion kinase-dependent focal adhesion recruitment of SH2 domains directs SRC into focal adhesions to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Chung; Chen, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Wenshin Yu, Helen; Chen, Yin-Quan; Chiou, Arthur; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration requires dynamical control of the protein complex within focal adhesions (FAs) and this control is regulated by signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation. We screened the SH2 domains present in tyrosine-specific kinases and phosphatases found within FAs, including SRC, SHP1 and SHP2, and examined whether these enzymes transiently target FAs via their SH2 domains. We found that the SRC_SH2 domain and the SHP2_N-SH2 domain are associated with FAs, but only the SRC_SH2 domain is able to be regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The FAK-dependent association of the SRC_SH2 domain is necessary and sufficient for SRC FA targeting. When the targeting of SRC into FAs is inhibited, there is significant suppression of SRC-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK; this results in an inhibition of FA formation and maturation and a reduction in cell migration. This study reveals an association between FAs and the SRC_SH2 domain as well as between FAs and the SHP2_N-SH2 domains. This supports the hypothesis that the FAK-regulated SRC_SH2 domain plays an important role in directing SRC into FAs and that this SRC-mediated FA signaling drives cell migration. PMID:26681405

  10. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  11. Generation and preclinical characterization of an NKp80-Fc fusion protein for redirected cytolysis of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jing; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-09-11

    The capacity of natural killer (NK) cells to mediate Fc receptor-dependent effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), largely contributes to their clinical application. Given that activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL), an identified ligand for the NK-activating receptor NKp80, is frequently highly expressed on leukemia cells, the lack of therapeutic AICL-specific antibodies limits clinical application. Here we explore a strategy to reinforce NK anti-leukemia reactivity by combining targeting AICL-expressing leukemia cells with the induction of NK cell ADCC using NKp80-Fc fusion proteins. The NKp80-Fc fusion protein we generated bound specifically to leukemia cells in an AICL-specific manner. Cell binding assays between NK and leukemia cells showed that NKp80-Fc significantly increased NK target cell conjugation. In functional analyses, treatment with NKp80-Fc clearly induced the ADCC effect of NK cells. NKp80-Fc not only promoted NK-mediated leukemia cell apoptosis in the early stage of cell conjugation but also enhanced NK cell degranulation and cytotoxicity activity in the late stage. The bifunctional NKp80-Fc could redirect NK cells toward leukemia cells and triggered NK cell killing in vitro. Moreover, NKp80-Fc enhanced the lysis of NK cells against tumors in leukemia xenograft non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NKp80-Fc potently amplifies NK cell anti-leukemia effects in vitro and in vivo through induction of the NK cell ADCC effect. This method could potentially be useful for molecular targeted therapy, and the fusion proteins may be a promising drug for immunotherapy of leukemia. PMID:26198633

  12. Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yukiko M.

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells inevitably communicate with their cellular neighbors within the tissues they sustain. Indeed, such communication, particularly with components of the stem cell niche, is essential for many aspects of stem cell behavior, including the maintenance of stem cell identity and asymmetric cell division. Cell adhesion mediates this communication by placing stem cells in close proximity to the signaling source and by providing a polarity cue that orients stem cells. Here, I review the recent discovery that cell adhesion molecules govern the behavior of stem cells. PMID:20724132

  13. Plasticizers Increase Adhesion of the Deteriogenic Fungus Aureobasidium pullulans to Polyvinyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jeremy S.; Van der Mei, Henny C.; Nixon, Marianne; Eastwood, Ian M.; Greenhalgh, Malcolm; Read, Simon J.; Robson, Geoffrey D.; Handley, Pauline S.

    1999-01-01

    Initial adhesion of fungi to plasticized polyvinyl chloride (pPVC) may determine subsequent colonization and biodeterioration processes. The deteriogenic fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was used to investigate the physicochemical nature of adhesion to both unplasticized PVC (uPVC) and pPVC containing the plasticizers dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and dioctyl adipate (DOA). A quantitative adhesion assay using image analysis identified fundamental differences in the mechanism of adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to these substrata. Adhesion to pPVC was greater than that to uPVC by a maximum of 280% after a 4-h incubation with 108 blastospores ml−1. That plasticizers enhance adhesion to PVC was confirmed by incorporating a dispersion of both DOA and DOP into the blastospore suspension. Adhesion to uPVC was increased by up to 308% in the presence of the dispersed plasticizers. Hydrophobic interactions were found to dominate adhesion to uPVC because (i) a strong positive correlation was observed between substratum hydrophobicity (measured by using a dynamic contact angle analyzer) and adhesion to a range of unplasticized polymers including uPVC, and (ii) neither the pH nor the electrolyte concentration of the suspension buffer, both of which influence electrostatic interactions, affected adhesion to uPVC. In contrast, adhesion to pPVC is principally controlled by electrostatic interactions. Enhanced adhesion to pPVC occurred despite a relative reduction of 13° in the water contact angle of pPVC compared to that of uPVC. Furthermore, adhesion to pPVC was strongly dependent on both the pH and electrolyte concentration of the suspension medium, reaching maximum levels at pH 8 and with an electrolyte concentration of 10 mM NaCl. Plasticization with DOP and DOA therefore increases adhesion of A. pullulans blastospores to pPVC through an interaction mediated by electrostatic forces. PMID:10427051

  14. Inhibition of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase at cell-matrix adhesions.

    PubMed

    Takino, Takahisa; Saeki, Hiromi; Miyamori, Hisashi; Kudo, Tomoya; Sato, Hiroshi

    2007-12-15

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) has been implicated in tumor invasion and metastasis. We previously reported that extracellular matrix degradation by MT1-MMP regulates cell migration via modulating sustained integrin-mediated signals. In this study, MT1-MMP-expressing cells were plated onto fibronectin-coated plates and monitored for cell-matrix adhesion formation and fibronectin degradation. The fibronectin was degraded and removed in line with the cell migration track. The migrating cells showed a polarized morphology and were in contact with the edge of fibronectin through the leading edge, in which cell-matrix adhesions are concentrated. Expression of MT1-MMP targeted to cell-matrix adhesions by fusing with the focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) promoted the initial fibronectin lysis at the cell periphery immediately after adhesion. These results suggest that fibronectin is degraded by MT1-MMP located at cell-matrix adhesions, which are concentrated at the leading edge of the migrating cells. To inhibit MT1-MMP at cell-matrix adhesion, the dominant negative form of MT1-MMP (MT1-Pex) was targeted to the cell-matrix adhesion by fusing with the FAT domain (MT1-Pex-FAT). MT1-Pex-FAT accumulated at cell-matrix adhesions and inhibited fibronectin degradation as well as FAK phosphorylation more effectively than parental MT1-Pex. MT1-Pex-FAT was also shown to suppress the invasion of tumor cells into three-dimensional collagen gel more strongly than MT1-Pex. These results suggest that MT1-MMP-mediated extracellular matrix lysis at cell-matrix adhesions induces the establishment of cell polarity, which facilitates cell-matrix adhesion turnover and subsequent cell migration. This model highlights the role of MT1-MMP at the leading edge of migrating cells. PMID:18089791

  15. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  16. Stickiness--some fundamentals of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cyprien

    2002-12-01

    We review some adhesion mechanisms that have been understood in the field of synthetic adhesives, and more precisely for adhesives that adhere instantaneously (a property named tackiness) and whose adhesive strength usually depends on the applied pressure (pressure-sensitive adhesives). The discussion includes effects of surface roughness, elasticity, cavitation, viscous and elastic fingering, substrate flexibility. PMID:21680396

  17. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved. PMID:22087741

  18. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  19. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  20. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  1. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  2. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that...

  7. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  8. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, Ray A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

  9. Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, R.A.

    1983-06-14

    Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

  10. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  11. Epidural lysis of adhesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E; Hurley, Robert W; Cohen, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  12. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  13. [Retention of adhesive bridges].

    PubMed

    Raes, F; De Boever, J

    1994-04-01

    Since the development of adhesive bridges in the early seventies, the retention and therefore the durability of these bridges has been tremendously improved. Conditioning of the non-precious metal by silanisation, careful acid etching of the enamel and the use of the appropriate composite resin are of prime importance. Furthermore, the meticulous preparation with enough interproximal embrace, occlusal rests, interocclusal clearance and cingulum stops is equally important. Including more teeth in the design does not necessarily lead to an improved retention. Besides the material and technical aspects, the whole clinical procedure needs much attention. The retention does not depend on one single factor, but on the precision of all the necessary clinical steps and on a well-defined selection of the material. In this way a five-year survival rate of close to 80% can be obtained. PMID:11830965

  14. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  15. Cell adhesion molecules involved in intrathymic T cell development.

    PubMed

    Patel, D D; Haynes, B F

    1993-08-01

    During stem cell migration to the thymus, intrathymic maturation of T cells, and emigration of mature T cells out of the thymus, intercellular interactions of developing T cells with a myriad of cell types are required for normal T cell development. Intercellular interactions of T cell precursors with endothelial cells, thymic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, thymic macrophages and dendritic cells are all mediated by adhesion molecules on immature T cells binding to ligands on thymic microenvironment cells. While many receptor-ligand interactions that are important in intrathymic T cell development are known, the adhesion molecules that are important for migration of T cell precursors to the thymus and for emigration of mature thymocytes from the thymus are poorly understood. An emerging concept is that select adhesion molecules at discrete stages of T cell maturation participate in and regulate the complex processes of T cell development. PMID:7693023

  16. Nanotopographical modification: a regulator of cellular function through focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Manus Jonathan Paul; Richards, R. Geoff; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of biomedical engineering advances, the role of cellular mechanisms, in particular adhesive interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device design has evolved from the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to topographical features or chemical stimuli, a process that has led to the development of next-generation biomaterials for a wide variety of clinical disorders. In vitro studies have identified nanoscale features as potent modulators of cellular behavior through the onset of focal adhesion formation. The focus of this review is on the recent developments concerning the role of nanoscale structures on integrin-mediated adhesion and cellular function with an emphasis on the generation of medical constructs with regenerative applications. PMID:20138244

  17. Adhesive hierarchy involving the cell adhesion molecules L1, CD24, and alpha 6 integrin in murine neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Kadmon, G; Imhof, B A; Altevogt, P; Schachner, M

    1995-09-01

    The aggregation rate of resuspended neuroblastoma N2A cells depends on the density of the cells in culture prior to their resuspension: isolated, fast growing cells have a weak tendency to aggregate whereas confluent, slowly growing cells reaggregate very strongly. L1 antibody 557 strongly inhibited the slow aggregation of isolated, fast growing cells but not the reaggregation of confluent cells. CD24 (nectadrin) antibodies did not affect the aggregation of isolated or confluent cells but stimulated the aggregation of subconfluent cells. In all stages aggregation was not inhibited when antibody 557 was used together with CD24 antibodies at 37 degrees C in the presence of divalent cations. EA-1 antibody to alpha 6 integrin chain stimulated the aggregation of subconfluent cells but inhibited the reaggregation of confluent cells. Therefore, L1 appears to be an early recognition molecule mediating weak primary adhesion. CD24 appears to participate in activating secondary adhesion mechanisms during primary adhesion, possibly in cooperation with L1, and alpha 6 integrin seems to serve as a secondary, strong adhesion molecule that in early adhesion phases also mediates the activation of itself or of other adhesion mechanisms. These results indicate that neural cells might employ a strategy of adhesion cascade in establishing stable contacts. PMID:7669058

  18. Lipid Raft Is Required for PSGL-1 Ligation Induced HL-60 Cell Adhesion on ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Luo, Jixian; Li, Chunfeng; Ba, Xueqing; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation) to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion. PMID:24312591

  19. Bridging Adhesion of Mussel-Inspired Peptides: Role of Charge, Chain Length, and Surface Type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of marine mussels provide attractive design paradigms for engineering synthetic polymers that can serve as high performance wet adhesives and coatings. Although the role of Dopa in promoting adhesion between mussels and various substrates has been carefully studied, the context by which Dopa mediates a bridging or nonbridging macromolecular adhesion to surfaces is not understood. The distinction is an important one both for a mechanistic appreciation of bioadhesion and for an intelligent translation of bioadhesive concepts to engineered systems. On the basis of mussel foot protein-5 (Mfp-5; length 75 res), we designed three short, simplified peptides (15–17 res) and one relatively long peptide (30 res) into which Dopa was enzymatically incorporated. Peptide adhesion was tested using a surface forces apparatus. Our results show that the short peptides are capable of weak bridging adhesion between two mica surfaces, but this adhesion contrasts with that of full length Mfp-5, in that (1) while still dependent on Dopa, electrostatic contributions are much more prominent, and (2) whereas Dopa surface density remains similar in both, peptide adhesion is an order of magnitude weaker (adhesion energy Ead ∼ −0.5 mJ/m2) than full length Mfp-5 adhesion. Between two mica surfaces, the magnitude of bridging adhesion was approximately doubled (Ead ∼ −1 mJ/m2) upon doubling the peptide length. Notably, the short peptides mediate much stronger adhesion (Ead ∼ −3.0 mJ/m2) between mica and gold surfaces, indicating that a long chain length is less important when different interactions are involved on each of the two surfaces. PMID:25540823

  20. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  1. Adhesive Performance of Biomimetic Adhesive-Coated Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John L.; Vollenweider, Laura; Xu, Fangmin; Lee, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical repair of a discontinuity in traumatized or degenerated soft tissues is traditionally accomplished using sutures. A current trend is to reinforce this primary repair with surgical grafts, meshes, or patches secured with perforating mechanical devices (i.e., sutures, staples, or tacks). These fixation methods frequently lead to chronic pain and mesh detachment. We developed a series of biodegradable adhesive polymers that are synthetic mimics of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs), composed of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-derivatives, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polycaprolactone (PCL). These polymers can be cast into films, and their mechanical properties, extent of swelling, and degradation rate can be tailored through the composition of the polymers as well as blending with additives. When coated onto a biologic mesh used for hernia repair, these adhesive constructs demonstrated adhesive strengths significantly higher than fibrin glue. With further development, a pre-coated bioadhesive mesh may represent a new surgical option for soft tissue repair. PMID:20919699

  2. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  3. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  4. Adhesion and friction in gecko toe attachment and detachment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Rosenberg, Kenny; Zhao, Boxin; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-12-19

    Geckos can run rapidly on walls and ceilings, requiring high friction forces (on walls) and adhesion forces (on ceilings), with typical step intervals of approximately 20 ms. The rapid switching between gecko foot attachment and detachment is analyzed theoretically based on a tape model that incorporates the adhesion and friction forces originating from the van der Waals forces between the submicron-sized spatulae and the substrate, which are controlled by the (macroscopic) actions of the gecko toes. The pulling force of a spatula along its shaft with an angle between theta 0 and 90 degrees to the substrate, has a "normal adhesion force" contribution, produced at the spatula-substrate bifurcation zone, and a "lateral friction force" contribution from the part of spatula still in contact with the substrate. High net friction and adhesion forces on the whole gecko are obtained by rolling down and gripping the toes inward to realize small pulling angles between the large number of spatulae in contact with the substrate. To detach, the high adhesion/friction is rapidly reduced to a very low value by rolling the toes upward and backward, which,