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1

Marketing Program: Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to develop the initial framework upon which to build an effective marketing program for improving patient satisfaction with outpatient care at Tripler Army Medical Center. The market research instrument for this study was a P...

M. R. Williams

1990-01-01

2

Hospitalist programs in academic medical centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of hospitalists in the care of in-patients is a relatively new phenomenon in the USA – hospitalists are delivering medical care to patients in private practice, public hospitals, and academic medical centers. Several obstacles hinder understanding of the characteristics of academic medical center-based hospitalists. These include differences in definitions and nomenclature, differences in job descriptions, roles and administration

Wally R. Smith; Mindy E. Wyttenbach; Warren Austin; Shantaram Rangappa

2004-01-01

3

The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

1998-01-01

4

Claretian Medical Center Task Analysis. Worker Education Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This task analysis for positions at the Claretian Medical Center in southeast Chicago was developed to improve communication and customer service in the workplace. The task analysis was prepared through clinic tours, employee interviews, and supervisor questionnaires. It is used for the purpose of curriculum development for onsite instruction in…

Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees.

5

An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

Griest, Christa

2010-01-01

6

Characteristics of Patient Fall Prevention Programs in Level 1 Veterans Administration Medical Centers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study describes the incidence and characteristics of Patient Fall Prevention Programs in Level I Veterans Administration Medical Centers using the nursing process conceptual framework. The program was defined as a structural series of activities usual...

D. R. Hines

1986-01-01

7

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Francis Medical Center, Grand Island, Nebraska  

Cancer.gov

Founded more than 115 years ago, Saint Francis Medical Center, Grand Island is a 198-bed healthcare provider serving as the regional referral center for 26-counties and approximately 78,000 residents in Central Nebraska. St. Francis Medical Center offers a wide array of specialty services including a cancer treatment center, joint replacement, diagnostic and interventional cardiology, a birthing center, dialysis, comprehensive surgical services, and interventional and diagnostic radiology services. The St.

8

Combined Assessment Program Review of the Martinsburg VA Medical Center Martinsburg, West Virginia, July 28, 2010.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the week of April 12-15, 2010, the OIG conducted a Combined Assessment Program (CAP) review of the Martinsburg VA Medical Center (the medical center), Martinsburg, WV. The purpose of the review was to evaluate selected operations, focusing on patie...

2010-01-01

9

Combined Assessment Program Review of the Fayetteville VA Medical Center Fayetteville, North Carolina, February 19, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the week of September 22-26, 2008, the OIG conducted a Combined Assessment Program (CAP) review of the Fayetteville VA Medical Center (the medical center), Fayetteville, NC. The purpose of the review was to evaluate selected operations, focusing on...

2009-01-01

10

The impact of an intensive antimicrobial control program in a Taiwanese medical center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The study evaluates the short term impacts of an intensive control program for the appropriate us of antimicrobials, and to provide a novel strategy for antimicrobial control in inpatient wards in Taiwan.Method  In September 2002, a dual intensive antimicrobial control program was implemented within a 921-bed medical center in Taiwan. The study sample included all patients admitted to the medical center

Ming-Tsung Chang; Tzu-Hua Wu; Chun-Yu Wang; Tsrang-Neng Jang; Chien-Yu Huang

2006-01-01

11

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland  

Cancer.gov

More than 40% of the medical center's patients come from outside the primary service area, defined as a 12-mile radius of the hospital. 78% of the Cancer Institute's patients are adults over 55, and 12% are African American.

12

A Podiatric Medical Residency Program in an Academic Health Science Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The podiatric medical residency program in the Health Science Center at San Antonio provides an intensive exposure for the newly graduated podiatrist to practice in a multidisciplinary environment. Residents become more familiar with general medical and surgical diseases and disorders as well as podiatric pathology. (LBH)

Bogy, Louis T.; And Others

1977-01-01

13

Labors of love: the transformation of care in the Non-Medical Attendant program at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  

PubMed

In this paper, we explore the Non-Medical Attendant program at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, which subsidizes the presence of war-injured soldiers' family members as they live for months or even years at Walter Reed during treatment and rehabilitation. We elaborate the ambiguities of the program and draw on ethnographic research to demonstrate how the program's vagaries combine with the context of an overburdened military medical system and the more familiar strains of family caregiving to place family members in a gray zone of care where the line between labors of love and institutionally compensated work is blurred. PMID:22574390

Wool, Zoë H; Messinger, Seth D

2012-03-01

14

Implementing a medication safety and poison prevention program at a senior center.  

PubMed

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices encourages pharmacists to assist in preventing medication misuse. The purpose of this article is to discuss a medication-safety education session conducted by a pharmacy professor, the faculty advisor to the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists university student chapter and students in a pharmacovigilance rotation, which was conducted at a local senior center. The author attended a train-the-trainer Webinar and then educated the pharmacy students. Participants at the senior center were taught about poison prevention, drug interactions, and appropriate drug disposal through an interactive format. We plan to continue the medication safety program at the senior center as a longitudinal project to promote patient safety. Pharmacists should be encouraged to play an active role in community outreach programs. PMID:24129222

Gershman, Jennifer A

2013-10-01

15

A VA medical center's PTSD residential recovery program.  

PubMed

With the influx of military veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) increasingly affecting all healthcare facilities, including acute care and long term, learning from the experience of VA hospitals in treating those with PTSD may prove valuable. In this article, Tripler/VA Provost Marshal Donald E. Delaney describes a program that has been in operation since 1994. He may be contacted for further in formation at (808) 433-4465 or Donald.devaney@amedd.army .mil PMID:20873499

Devaney, Donald E

2010-01-01

16

Gibbs Regional Medical Center  

Cancer.gov

Gibbs Regional Medical Center Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg, SC Why GRCC Is Interested In Being Part Of The Pilot Program? To build on our 24 years of experience as a CCOP to increase accrual to Phase I/II trials To expand access

17

Clinical and Administrative Issues in the Suicide Prevention Program Alexandria VA Medical Center Pineville, Louisiana. Healthcare Inspection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General Office of Healthcare Inspections evaluated alleged mismanagement of clinical and administrative aspects of several Social Work Service (SWS) programs at the Alexandria VA Medical Center (the facility), Pineville, Louisia...

2011-01-01

18

A cyber medical center.  

PubMed

This paper describes the design and implementation of a Cyber Medical Center (CMC) using web technology. The intention is to overcome the inefficiency of the traditional filing system for patients' medical records, which are considered to be time and space consuming. Another objective is to enhance the interaction between the user - the patient in this case - and the medical center personnel - the doctors and staff. This task is achieved by developing a cyber medical center interfaced with the Internet to provide direct public access. The traditional filing system is replaced by a database system for maintaining the electronic medical records of all patients in the medical center. The doctors or staff can either view the medical records or update them through the Intranet/Internet. This system has been successfully developed, implemented and tested on the Intranet platform. It will be available in a university medical center for practical use. PMID:16520147

Al-Ali, A R; Abdul Salam, A O; Al-Zohlof, L; Manna, M; Zakaria, R

2005-12-01

19

Asthma Management Program as a Predictor of Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations at David Grant USAF Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this non-randomized retrospective study of the population (0-30 years of age) was to see the impact of the David Grant Medical Center asthma management program on the number of ER visits and hospitalizations for asthma and asthma related ca...

P. Hughes

1998-01-01

20

Medical Research Center's (NMRC) Malaria Vaccine ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... Enter Search terms. Vaccines, Blood & Biologics. ... Medical Research Center's (NMRC) Malaria Vaccine Development Program. -. Presentation. ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/newsevents/workshopsmeetingsconferences

21

Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

2005-01-01

22

Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program Upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

2005-01-01

23

Medical Centers in Trouble.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rising costs, changes in the health-care system, reduced research money, and proposed cutbacks in funds for treating the poor are forcing academic medical centers to consider new ways to remain viable. Resulting actions being considered or implemented include administrative restructuring, worker layoffs, mergers, reduced physician hiring,…

Mercer, Joye

1995-01-01

24

Dittrick Medical History Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Currently operating as an interdisciplinary study center within the College of Arts and Sciences of Case Western Reserve University, the Dittrick Medical History Center was established as part of the Cleveland Medical Library Association in 1894. First-time visitors will definitely want to begin by looking through the museum's history, and then examine the museum artifacts and galleries, which represent a small sample of their holdings. The artifacts are divided into time periods and include such fascinating medical equipment as bloodletting devices, a phrenology bust, and a defribrillator from 1950. The galleries section allows visitors to take a virtual tour of the rooms within the museum, such as a doctor's office from the 1930s and a replica of a pharmacy from the 1880s. Several online exhibits are also available for perusal, such as one dedicated to Cleveland's brush with a smallpox epidemic in 1902. Utterly fascinating, though not for the squeamish, is the exhibit that details medical school photographs, many of them class photographs around dissection tables, and postcards featuring medical students and cadavers. The site is rounded out with a host of online guides and finding aids that help in using the Center's extensive collections dealing with the history of medicine.

2003-01-01

25

Implementation plan for a hospital-wide recycling program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, Texas. Master's thesis, July 1992July 1993 (Final)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research project is to establish an implementation plan for a recycling program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, implement and evaluate a pilot program, and provide a restatement of the hospital-wide recycling program plan based on the pilot study. The program will be composed of three essential components: a recycling team, data collection, and program design.

1993-01-01

26

A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.  

PubMed

The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs. PMID:10511751

Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

1999-01-01

27

The Residency Program in Social Medicine of Montefiore Medical Center: 37 Years of Mission-Driven, Interdisciplinary Training in Primary Care, Population Health, and Social Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Founded in 1970 to train physicians to practice in community health centers and underserved areas, the Residency Program in Social Medicine (RPSM) of Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, has graduated 562 board-eligible family physicians, general internists, and pediatricians whose careers fulfill this mission. The RPSM was a model for federal funding for primary care residency programs and has received

A. H. Strelnick; Debbie Swiderski; Alice Fornari; Victoria Gorski; Eliana Korin; Philip Ozuah; Janet M. Townsend; Peter A. Selwyn

2008-01-01

28

The University of Pennsylvania/Walter Reed Army Medical Center proton therapy program.  

PubMed

The design of the proton therapy center being constructed at the University of Pennsylvania is based on several principles that distinguish it from other proton facilities. Among these principles is the recognition that advances in imaging, and particularly in functional imaging, will have a large impact on radiotherapy in the near future and that the conformation of proton dose distributions can utilize that information to a larger degree than other treatment techniques. The facility will contain four-dimensional CT-simulators, an MR-simulator capable of spectroscopy, and a PET-CT scanner. A second principle applied to the facility design is to incorporate into proton radiotherapy the recent progress in conventional radiotherapy; including imaging and monitoring of patients during treatment, imaging of soft tissue, accounting for respiratory motion, and expanding the use of intensity-modulated treatments. A third principle is to understand that the facility must be operated efficiently. To that end the specifications for the equipment have included requirements for high beam intensity, fast switching times between treatment rooms, a multileaf collimator to permit multiple fields to be treated quickly, and plans for an intelligent beam scheduler to determine where the beam can be best used at any given time. We expect to use "universal" nozzles, which can switch rapidly from scattering mode to scanning mode, and there will be a set-up room used for the first day of treatment to verify alignment rather than spend valuable time in a gantry room. Many of these ideas require development, including the applications of existing radiotherapy techniques to proton gantries, so a series of research and development projects have started to address these issues. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, which will provide a portal through which military personnel and their dependants can receive proton radiotherapy, is involved in several of these development projects as well as the creation of process to remotely perform treatment planning for the military patients under treatment at the proton facility. PMID:17668956

McDonough, James; Tinnel, Brent

2007-08-01

29

Evaluation of the Navy Family Advocacy Program at Naval Regional Medical Center, Camp Pendleton, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study examines the development, implementation, and results of a Family Advocacy Program to determine if the program meets standards imposed by the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED). Programs for identification, intervention, treatment, and...

A. J. Rawley

1982-01-01

30

Satellite medical centers project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub , manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlled capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC.- thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world , thus creating a virtual hub. the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to the doctors in central hub and SMC and thus continued medical education, and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the SMC located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful self-employment with better earnings , flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients . The whole system is self financed, self sustaining and a social cause with commercial sense and will set up country wide quality healthcare infrastructure, upgrade and standardize the existing infrastructure, lighten the weight of the Government, system can be implemented and customized to the socioeconomic Environment of any country.

Aggarwal, Arvind

2002-08-01

31

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Data Tables Benchmark Home > Cancer Centers > Region Map Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State Map | Region Map Click on geographical region

32

Patient Outcomes in Academic Medical Centers Influence of Fellowship Programs and In-house On-Call Attending Surgeon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There are very few data on characteris- tics or policies that improve patient outcomes in aca- demic medical institutions. We were interested in 2 such policies or characteristics that are commonly imple- mented in academic centers: an in-house on-call attend- ing physician policy and the existence of postgraduate medical education. Hypothesis: An in-house attending surgeon on-call policy and the

Saman Arbabi; Gregory J. Jurkovich; Frederick P. Rivara; Avery B. Nathens; Maria Moore; Gerald B. Demarest; Ronald V. Maier

33

Patient Outcomes in Academic Medical Centers: Influence of Fellowship Programs and In-house On-Call Attending Surgeon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There are very few data on characteris- tics or policies that improve patient outcomes in aca- demic medical institutions. We were interested in 2 such policies or characteristics that are commonly imple- mented in academic centers: an in-house on-call attend- ing physician policy and the existence of postgraduate medical education. Hypothesis: An in-house attending surgeon on-call policy and the

Saman Arbabi; Gregory J. Jurkovich; Frederick P. Rivara; Avery B. Nathens; Maria Moore; Gerald B. Demarest; Ronald V. Maier

2003-01-01

34

Language Resource Centers Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate resource centers that serve to improve the nation's capacity to teach and learn foreign languages. Eligible applicants are institutions of higher education. Duration of the grant is four years. Center activities…

Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

35

National Resource Centers Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Resource Centers Program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate comprehensive and undergraduate centers that are national resources for: (1) Teaching modern foreign languages, especially the less and least commonly taught languages; (2) Disciplinary instruction to provide a thorough…

Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

36

Person-centered medical interview  

PubMed Central

Abstract We are witnessing an unprecedented development of medical science and personalized medicine. However, technological superiority must not make us lose sight of the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual totality of the patient. The core of the medical profession has always been and will be the relationship between the health professional and the person seeking assistance. However, the traditional relationship between the physician and the patient has changed and is greatly impacted by huge social, philosophical, economic, and scientific developments. It is important to develop and promote the culture of health instead of the culture of illness through a patient-doctor collaborative partnership, as well as partnership among professionals. Person-centered medical interview is an important bridge between personalized and person-centered medicine.

?or?evic, Veljko; Bras, Marijana; Brajkovic, Lovorka

2012-01-01

37

Emergence of serine carbapenemases (KPC and SME) among clinical strains of Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the United States Medical Centers: Report from the MYSTIC Program (1999–2005)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among 8885 Enterobacteriaceae tested in the 1999 to 2005 period as part of the USA Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program, 51 strains with increased imipenem and meropenem MIC values (?2 ?g\\/mL) were detected. blaKPC was identified from 28 Klebsiella pneumoniae from 3 medical centers in the New York City area (8 ribotypes), 2 Klebsiella oxytoca from Arkansas

Lalitagauri M. Deshpande; Paul R. Rhomberg; Helio S. Sader; Ronald N. Jones

2006-01-01

38

Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.  

PubMed

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

2013-03-01

39

Rideout v. Hershey Medical Center.  

PubMed

The Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas for Dauphin County allowed the parents of Brianne Rideout to sue the Hershey Medical Center under the common law for taking their daughter off assisted breathing without their consent. In this case the parents were acting as if they were the state in an attempt to preserve life while the hospital acted as if it were the patient by unilaterally usurping Brianne's right to refuse treatment. Brianne, age 2, suffered from a malignant brain tumor and her condition was terminal. Three days before she was taken off life support, her pupils had become fixed and dilated. Upon removal of the ventilator, she breathed on her own for the next two days prior to her death from lack of oxygen and subsequent cardiopulmonary failure. Under common law the hospital had committed battery, defined as unauthorized touching, when its doctors disconnected Brianne's ventilator because Brianne's surrogate decision makers, her parents, did not consent. The parents were also deprived of the parental right to make medical decisions for their child. They did not have a right to insist on medical treatment nor did the hospital need to require parental approval for all medical treatment. But where the treatment was life-sustaining and thus involved the child's own right to life, their parental right to make those medical decisions for Brianne was violated. However, neither the state privacy interest nor the federal liberty interest had been violated, because, as the court reasoned, the decision to withdraw treatment has always been defined as a right to refuse treatment, not as a right to demand or to continue treatment. PMID:12041091

1995-12-29

40

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program NCCCP Program Advisory Committee 1 Maureen Johnson, PhD Norman Coleman, MD NCCCP Project Officer Special Advisor Special Assistant to the Director Radiation Oncology Branch, NIH 31 Center Drive

41

Gynecologic evaluation of the first female soldiers enrolled in the Gulf War Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program at Tripler Army Medical Center.  

PubMed

Tripler Army Medical Center initiated the Department of Defense's Persian Gulf Illness Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program (CCEP) on June 15, 1994. In the first 5 months, 100 patients enrolled in this program. Sixteen (16%) were women who served in the Persian Gulf during Desert Shield/ Desert Storm, and 1 (1%) was the dependent wife of a Gulf War veteran who is experiencing illness that may be related to the Persian Gulf War. All 17 women enrolled in the CCEP were evaluated in the Tripler Army Medical Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic between June 17 and November 10, 1994. Each patient underwent gynecologic history, pelvic exam, Pap smear, and screen for fecal occult blood. Ten patients underwent baseline mammograms and 13 patients underwent urogenital and cervical cultures for aerobic bacteria, chlamydia and herpes simplex. The 1 patient with an abnormal Pap smear underwent cervical and endocervical biopsies and colposcopy (histology demonstrated no dysplasia or neoplasia). Half of the 16 Gulf War veterans experienced gynecologic problems while serving in the Gulf and 43% admitted gynecologic problems since returning in 1991. Of 6 patients who became pregnant after returning, 5 had normal pregnancies and 1 suffered four miscarriages. PMID:8961714

Wittich, A C

1996-11-01

42

Observations on a Medical Teacher Training Program  

PubMed Central

An increasing interest in educational science as applied to medical education is apparent in the past decade. Recently, a six-week teacher training program was held at the Center for the Study of Medical Education at the University of Illinois. Fifteen medical faculty members, including five Canadians, participated. During this period there was an opportunity to engage in discussions and independent study of several aspects of medical education, using the personnel from the Center's four major divisions as resource people. Training in educational science is important for all teachers, and a centre to provide this type of instruction should be available in Canada.

Kinley, C. E.; Langley, G. R.

1966-01-01

43

Industrial Assessment Center Program  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

Dr. Dereje Agonafer

2007-11-30

44

American Overseas Research Centers Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

45

Malpractice Issues in the Academic Medical Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of legal issues in the academic medical center focuses on standards of care applicable to practitioners, special problems of patient care delivery, and the special status of public academic medical centers. Informed consent to care, relations with affiliated institutions, and private/non-private patient status are also considered.…

Rich, Ben A.

1986-01-01

46

Yale-New Haven Medical Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Yale-New Haven Medical Center Web site contains information about the Medical Center and its constituent organizations, Yale-New Haven Hospital, the Yale University School of Medicine, and the Yale University School of Nursing. You will also find links to valuable external biomedical Internet resources.

1997-01-01

47

Day Care Center Enrichment Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

48

Day Care Center Enrichment Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

49

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program  

MedlinePLUS

... found at USA.gov . The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) is a public-private ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) and a network of community hospital-based cancer centers from around the United ...

50

New Hanover Regional Medical Center  

Cancer.gov

ROCOG sites 5 Hospital, 3 Health Systems UPMC McKeesport, McKeesport, PA (lead) Jameson Hospital, New Castle, PA Somerset Cancer Center, Somerset, PA UPMC Murtha Cancer Center, Johnstown, PA Mercy Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA National Mentors Roswell Park, Buffalo, NY Washington University, St.

51

Activity of meropenem as serine carbapenemases evolve in US Medical Centers: monitoring report from the MYSTIC Program (2006)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Surveillance Program was designed to monitor the antimicrobial potency and spectrum of meropenem, and selected broad-spectrum comparison agents against pathogens from hospitalized patients. In the 2006 (year 8 of the study) United States sample, a total of 2841 isolates (94.7% compliance) including 641 Escherichia coli, 619 Klebsiella spp., 606 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 456

Paul R. Rhomberg; Lalitagauri M. Deshpande; Jeffrey T. Kirby; Ronald N. Jones

2007-01-01

52

Combined Assessment Program Review of the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center Indianapolis, Indiana, March 23, 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Combined Assessment Program (CAP) reviews are part of the Office of Inspector General's (OIG's) efforts to ensure that high quality health care is provided to our Nation's veterans. CAP reviews combine the knowledge and skills of the OIG's Offices of Heal...

2011-01-01

53

Comparative activity of meropenem in US medical centers (2007): initiating the 2nd decade of MYSTIC program surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1997, the Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program has monitored the antimicrobial activity of broad-spectrum agents against pathogens from hospitalized patients. In the United States, 2894 isolates were submitted in 2007 from 15 sites, including 1392 Enterobacteriaceae, 643 nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli, and 829 Gram-positive cocci. All isolates were tested by broth microdilution methods. Meropenem (MIC90 range, 0.12–2

Ronald N. Jones; Jeffrey T. Kirby; Paul R. Rhomberg

2008-01-01

54

Medical surveillance program evaluation. Successful program.  

PubMed

1. This program evaluation case example describes changes made to a medical/health surveillance program that resulted in cost savings while increasing services to employees. 2. An integrated computerized recordkeeping system provided immediate feedback to nurse and employee when testing was conducted at distant locations. 3. By offering voluntary health promotion activities simultaneously with a regulatory mandated health/medical surveillance program, employees were able to do "one stop shopping" for programs that had previously been offered separately. PMID:10025250

Lukes, E

1998-12-01

55

Business Case Analysis of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Medical/Surgical Prime Vendor Generation III Service Level Electron Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the business case analysis was to determine what combination of Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) staffing and medical/surgical services offered under the Prime Vendor (PV) Generation III contract would provide the best supply chain management sol...

P. B. Markot

2007-01-01

56

Emergency Medical Services Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This program guide contains the standard emergency medical services curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the emergency medical services field, and includes job skills in six emergency medical services divisions outlined in the national curriculum:…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

57

THE REGIONAL MEDICAL LIBRARY PROGRAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1980, the Regional Medical Library Program celebrated the fifteenth birthday of the legislation that authorized it. Since its birth with the passage of the Medical Library Assistance Act in 1965, the Program has grown from one with activities localized by region into a truly national network. With coordination by the National Library of Medicine, the RML Network moves into

Lynn Kasner

1981-01-01

58

The Communication Center Program Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This program manual describes the Communication Center at Joseph Kerr Junior High School in Sacramento County, California, which was established in 1975 to prevent student high risk behavior and to encourage positive attitudes in the school community. The philosophy of the Center, which is based on the theories of Rudolf Dreikurs, is described,…

Medcalf, Ann Wachob

59

A Telemedicine Program for Diabetic Retinopathy in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center—the Joslin Vision Network Eye Health Care Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

? PURPOSE: To extend access to diabetic eye care and characterize the extent of diabetic retinopathy {DR) and other ocular findings using the Joslin Vision Network (JVN). ? DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort study. ? METHODS: Outpatients at the Togus VA Medical Center with diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glu- cose, or impaired glucose tolerance underwent JVN protocol imaging. Images were transmitted

ANTHONY A. CAVALLERANO; JERRY D. CAVALLERANO; PAULA KATALINIC; BEATRICE BLAKE; MICHAEL RYNNE; PAUL R. CONLIN; KRISTEN HOCK; PAUL AIELLO; LLOYD M. AIELLO

60

A History of Health Informatics in the Texas Medical Center  

PubMed Central

The TMC History project documents the history of informatics in the Texas Medical Center (TMC) and present it as a Web-based information resource that can be an adjunct to the education of graduate students in the health informatics program.

Walker, Kirt; Sagaram, Deepak; Turley, James P.

2002-01-01

61

Memorial Medical Center Nursing Clinical Simulation Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research is to develop a program of systematic, brief training in role appropriate team behaviors covering key communication, leadership, and team member behaviors for ad hoc emergency medical care teams and to determine whether traini...

R. G. Williams

2012-01-01

62

Industrial Assessment Center Program  

SciTech Connect

Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain proficiency in using the combustion analyzer, IR camera, logging equipment, light metering equipment, and other equipment. Instruction included usage and basic maintenance. While undergraduate students worked with the coursework and on-the-job training, graduate students were expected to do more. A typical MS student was required to complete a 3-hour independent study in some interesting facet of energy management under the supervision of a director. PhD students were expected to complete from three to six hours of independent study work in the energy management field, as well as center their dissertation research in the general area of energy/productivity/quality management. During the project period, two PhDs were completed, with several more near completion.

Kolarik, William J.

2007-02-26

63

75 FR 39622 - Proposed Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment Form) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment...VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235...0505).'' Title: Health Resource Center Medical Center...

2010-07-09

64

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview Search NCCCP For General Information Frank Blanchard (Contractor) Director, Public Affairs SAIC-Frederick, Inc. National Cancer Institute at Frederick

65

The Six Sigma initiative at Mount Sinai Medical Center.  

PubMed

Lean Six Sigma, in various forms, has been used widely in many Fortune 500 companies. Motorola, General Electric, Sony, American Express, and Bechtel all use Six Sigma to improve quality and performance. While the impact of this methodology has been documented extensively by the press in manufacturing and transactional settings, less evidence is available regarding its utility in health care environments. Mount Sinai Medical Center initiated a Six Sigma program in 2000 to determine its applicability and value in a large academic medical center. This article discusses Mount Sinai Medical Center's experience adapting this methodology to improve both patient care and business processes and outcomes. We present an overview of Six Sigma, and offer examples of projects undertaken using this data-driven approach to performance improvement. Lastly, the article provides insights and lessons learned regarding this organization-wide experience. PMID:18306249

Chassin, Robert

66

Prototype State Medical Review Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Currently the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has the responsibility and regulatory authority for the administration of the medical fitness program for drivers engaged in interstate commerce under 49 CFR Section 391, of the Federal Motor Carrier Saf...

1995-01-01

67

The future of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.  

PubMed Central

In the past four years, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has experienced unprecedented changes in the ways it provides medical care, trains medical residents, and supports its clinical research program. For the most part, these changes have improved the quality and efficiency of care provided to veterans, and they have improved the chances that the VA will survive in an increasingly competitive medical market place. While the changes in priorities for training medical residents and funding clinical research have been designed to be more consistent with the overall mission of the VA, these changes have been stressful for many of the VA/medical school affiliations. Our challenge is to understand and manage these changes so that the many benefits that have derived from more than fifty years of VA/medical school affiliations can be retained.

Smith, C B

1997-01-01

68

Financial Performance of Academic Medical Center Hospitals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of major academic medical center hospitals analyzed their financial performance for a five-year period. Results indicate the hospitals have stabilized their short-term financial performance in recent years. However, in general, their financial position is not strong and is threatened by the growing percentage of Medicaid discharges.…

Whitcomb, Michael E.; Cleverly, William O.

1993-01-01

69

Development of a Patient-Centered Preprocedure Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staff members at Blodgett Memorial Medical Center, Grand Rapids, Mich, developed and implemented a prototype for a new patient-centered preadmission testing (PAT) program. Using continuous improvement principles, an implementation team improved the existing PAT program by increasing patient satisfaction, reducing duplication of care and services, and avoiding delayed or canceled surgical procedures in the OR. The implementation team then designed

Janice Hoeksema; Joann Munski

1997-01-01

70

Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

1975-01-01

71

Geriatric education centers address medication issues affecting older adults.  

PubMed Central

Serious problems have been identified in the prescribing of medications for elderly patients and use of prescription and nonprescription drugs by older persons. Overuse, underuse, and inappropriate use of drugs by the elderly have been widely documented, and the harmful consequences have been described. This paper reviews information concerning the need for action to improve health professionals' knowledge and skills with respect to drugs and the elderly and activities being undertaken by geriatric education centers (GECs) to enhance these capacities. Grant support for the centers from the Health Resources and Services Administration, a Public Health Service component agency, began in 1983. In fiscal year 1992 there are 31 centers operating in 26 States. The centers are multi-institutional and conduct four types of educational activities. These include review of pharmacological issues for multidisciplinary groups, specialized training for pharmacists, discipline-specific programs focusing on medication issues, and activities aimed at educating the public. Examples of the GECs' educational activities are given.

Kahl, A; Blandford, D H; Krueger, K; Zwick, D I

1992-01-01

72

The Medical Library Center of New York: a progress report.  

PubMed Central

An article published in the Bulletin in 1963 outlined the proposed program of the Medical Library Center of New York. This progress report describes actual functions of the Center and attempts to evaluate them after four years of experience. Details of adapting a building intended for other use, financing this cooperative enterprise, applying standard library techniques and equipment to an atypical library, and acquiring materials that complement, rather than duplicate, the collections of member libraries are given. New services, not envisioned in detail in the initial program, but initiated during this period of operation, are mentioned. The report ends with a tentative look into the future.

Felter, J W

1968-01-01

73

Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

74

4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

75

2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING SW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

76

3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

77

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact Contact For General Information Frank Blanchard (Contractor) Director,

78

Medical waste management in Jordan: A study at the King Hussein Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

As in many other developing countries, the generation of regulated medical waste (RMW) in Jordan has increased significantly over the last few decades. Despite the serious impacts of RMW on humans and the environment, only minor attention has been directed to its proper handling and disposal. This study was conducted in the form of a case study at one of Jordan's leading medical centers, namely, the King Hussein Medical Center (KHMC). Its purpose was to report on the current status of medical waste management at KHMC and propose possible measures to improve it. In general, it was found that the center's administration was reasonably aware of the importance of medical waste management and practiced some of the measures to adequately handle waste generated at the center. However, it was also found that significant voids were present that need to be addressed in the future including efficient segregation, the use of coded and colored bags, better handling and transfer means, and better monitoring and tracking techniques, as well as the need for training and awareness programs for the personnel.

Oweis, Rami [Biomedical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo; Al-Widyan, Mohamad [Biosystems Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: widyan@just.edu.jo; Al-Limoon, Ohood [Biomedical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo

2005-07-01

79

Filmless radiology at Brooke Army Medical Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hospital at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas has an essentially filmless radiology department. Mammography is one of the few services still using film. The radiology department at Brooke takes advantage of a very capable Lockheed Martin PACS to achieve the filmless operation. The old hospital has been replaced by a new hospital, the new Brooke Army Medical Center. As a basis for predictions of activity at new Brooke, the activities at the old Brooke Army Medical Center were examined. The heart of the PACS at Brooke is the image server with an associated database. The image server has the performance required to keep the radiologist from returning to film for diagnosis. A directly connected workstation can present a full screen of images in less than two seconds, even during the busiest hour of the day for this large hospital. In addition the database is used to organize the workflow for the radiology examinations through the hospital. Information about the activity at the new Brooke hospital is used to predict the utilization of the short term storage and the long term storage. In particular, the time that an examination will be retained on the new Brooke short term storage is measured. The Brooke medical complex generates 384.8 exams per day on a typical weekday. The number of exams on a weekend is 40 percent of the exams on the weekday. The storage required is 18.3 gigabytes per day in the short term storage of the Image Storage Unit (ISU) and 9.7 gigabytes per day in the archive. The 256 gigabytes of the ISU will hold 11.7 weeks or about 2.5 months of exams. The archive will hold four years of exams in tow jukeboxes. A working year will have an effective 300 days of equivalent weekday radiology load. By ten years from now the hospital complex can be expected to handle to load that is estimated to be about 160 percent of the current load. With the changes in the storage of disks and archive media that will have occurred by that time, the number of weeks of storage will be greater than that held now.

Wilson, Dennis L.

1997-05-01

80

Medical Image Resource Center 2002: An Update on the RSNA's Medical Image Resource Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radiological Society of North America has launched a project called the Medical Image Resource Center (MIRC) to establish a community of Web-based libraries of imaging information, including teaching files, other educational materials, and research data. This system would enable radiologic professionals to create and publish such materials more easily and to gain more convenient access to new and existing

Eliot L. Siegel; David S. Channin; John Perry; Chris Carr; Bruce I. Reiner

2002-01-01

81

Medical Physics Graduate Program At An HBCU  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Physics Department at Hampton University houses the first Medical Physics graduate program at a minority institution, and the first in the state of Virginia. Jointly established with the Eastern Virginia Medical School, the program requires students to take standard physics courses in addition to medical physics classes and clinical rotations performed at local hospitals. The associated medical physics research

Paul Gueye

2006-01-01

82

Stanford University Medical Center: Ovarian Kaleidoscope Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ovarian Kaleidoscope Database (OKDB) was developed by the Hsueh Lab in the Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics at Stanford University Medical Center. The OKDB "provides information regarding the biological function, expression pattern and regulation of genes expressed in the ovary. It also contains information on gene sequences, chromosomal localization, human and murine mutation phenotypes and biomedical publication links." Database users can conduct a Gene Search, or browse an extensive Alphabetical List of Ovarian Genes. After registering with OKDB, site users can access Submit and Update options as well. The site also contains an interactive diagram of Ovarian Gene Mutations Associated with Infertility or Sub-Fertility, information about Ovarian Gene Maps, and a selection of Useful Links.

83

Implementing a national program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a quality improvement collaboration of state hospital associations, academic medical centers, professional societies, and governmental agencies.  

PubMed

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents a significant proportion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The US Department of Health and Human Services issued a plan to reduce HAIs with a target 25% reduction of CAUTI by 2013. Michigan's successful collaborative to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters and CAUTI was based on a partnership between diverse hospitals, the state hospital association (SHA), and academic medical centers. Taking the lessons learned from Michigan, we are now spreading this work throughout the 50 states. This national spread leverages the expertise of different groups and organizations for the unified goal of reducing catheter-related harm. The key components of the project are (1) centralized coordination of the effort and dissemination of information to SHAs and hospitals, (2) data collection based on established definitions and approaches, (3) focused guidance on the technical practices that will prevent CAUTI, (4) emphasis on understanding the socioadaptive aspects (both the general, unit-wide issues and CAUTI-specific challenges), and (5) partnering with specialty organizations and governmental agencies who have expertise in the relevant subject area. The work may serve in the future as a model for other large improvement efforts to address other hospital-acquired conditions, such as venous thromboembolism and falls. PMID:24018921

Fakih, Mohamad G; George, Christine; Edson, Barbara S; Goeschel, Christine A; Saint, Sanjay

2013-08-29

84

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - NCCCP Homepage  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - NCCCP Homepage Media Center Overview Contact information Quick Links Note from the NCI Director Participating Pilot Sites FAQ Contact Information Contact Information Contacts - NCI Office

85

75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Community Health Center (CHC), Increased Demand for Services (IDS), and Capital...

2010-06-09

86

Conference on the 'Crisis' of Academic Medical Centers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Academic medical centers link three critical functions: training physicians and other health professionals; delivering state-of-the-art medical care; and carrying out laboratory and clinical research. The linkage of these three functions has enhanced each...

H. J. Aaron

2001-01-01

87

United States Army Medical Materiel Center Europe: Organizational Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Army relies on the United States Army Medical Materiel Center Europe (USAMMCE) to support units stationed and deployed overseas. To provide the best medical materiel support possible, USAMMCE must develop an organizational plan that considers current ...

H. I. Ritchey J. B. Schamburg

2004-01-01

88

Planning Medical Center Facilities for Education, Research, and Public Service.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Architectural, administrative, and educational aspects of the design of medical centers are explored. Based on the historical evolution of health care as a university responsibility, academic health science centers are expected to foster the team approach...

G. T. Harrell

1974-01-01

89

77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY: Research...The United States Department of Transportation (the Department) is...

2012-10-01

90

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP)  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) Pilot Program Summary January 2007 1 of 5 Cancer Care in the United States: • The pace of research in understanding cancer has accelerated in recent years, raising the need for more effective

91

Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

1985-01-01

92

Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

1985-01-01

93

Sustainability at UCSF Medical Center, Challenges and Achievements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical centers pose unique challenges to sustainability. Hospitals have a large ecological footprint as well as strict regulations and compliance mandates. Learn how the UCSF Medical Center team is working towards a more sustainable hospital with green cleaners, purchasing, materials management, nursing and operations while continuing to provide superior patient care. Jack Henderson will join the panel to address how

Robert Hunn

2008-01-01

94

Children's Medications: A Guide for Schools and Day Care Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting the lack of reference sources available on the use of medications in schools and day care centers, this book was created to help school and day care center personnel become more aware of the medicine being given to children at home and at school. Using detailed medication charts, the book answers questions about how to administer medicines…

Bates, Richard D.; Nahata, Milap C.

95

Teaching in a patient-centered medical home.  

PubMed

Teaching Lamaze International classes in a patient-centered medical home allows the childbirth educator the best environment for giving evidence-based information and empowering parents to give birth their way. Patient-centered medical home facilities and providers practice evidence-based care and adhere to the principles of family-centered maternity care. In patient-centered medical homes, women can expect to give birth using the Lamaze Healthy Birth Practices and to fully participate in their care with appropriate interventions and the right to informed consent and informed refusal. PMID:22654465

Hotelling, Barbara A

2011-01-01

96

Teaching in a Patient-Centered Medical Home  

PubMed Central

Teaching Lamaze International classes in a patient-centered medical home allows the childbirth educator the best environment for giving evidence-based information and empowering parents to give birth their way. Patient-centered medical home facilities and providers practice evidence-based care and adhere to the principles of family-centered maternity care. In patient-centered medical homes, women can expect to give birth using the Lamaze Healthy Birth Practices and to fully participate in their care with appropriate interventions and the right to informed consent and informed refusal.

Hotelling, Barbara A.

2011-01-01

97

Goddard Space Flight Center Education Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Goddard Space Flight Center Education Programs provide teachers and students with a wide variety of curriculum enhancement materials geared for Earth science classroom use. These collections support the Earth system science curriculum developed by NASA scientists from the Earth Science Enterprise, a team of teachers from Anne Arundel County Public Schools, and the Education Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Site materials include a listing of featured programs, information on educational programs for the public, public schools-based programs, and programs for higher education. The Educator Resource Center (ERC) provides access to educational publications, teaching materials, educator workshops, video duplication and many other resources. There are also links to other NASA research and space flight centers, the Goddard media center, and state-specific listservs for educators.

98

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs Overview  

Cancer.gov

One or more of the NCCCP’s four focus areas is shared by several NCI programs – including the NCI Cancer Centers Program, Community Clinical Oncology Program, Community Network Program, and others. The NCCCP will incorporate best practices from other NCI community cancer programs in delivering services to these communities.

99

The Effect of Obesity Management on Body Image in Patients Seeking Treatment at Medical Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Body image dissatisfaction is common in treatment-seeking patients with obesity. We aimed to investigate the effects of obesity management on body image in patients with obesity attending Italian medical centers for weight loss programs.Research Methods and Procedures: A total of 473 obese patients seeking treatment in 13 Italian medical centers (80% females; age, 45.9 ± standard deviation 11.0 years;

Riccardo Dalle Grave; Massimo Cuzzolaro; Simona Calugi; Franco Tomasi; Flavia Temperilli; Giulio Marchesini

2007-01-01

100

'Pals'. A medical student public service program.  

PubMed Central

We designed a public service and educational program to aid children and families coping with chronic illness and to augment medical student education. Medical students developed relationships with chronically ill children and families based on the Big Brother-Big Sister program model. In addition, students attended bimonthly seminars on childhood chronic illness and family dynamics. Medical students learned about the psychosocial aspects of illness through these relationships and reported that the program contributed to their sense of worth as caregivers. By fostering students' innate altruism, medical schools may succeed in cultivating caring and humanism in their student physicians. We propose a model that encourages medical students to relate personally with patients and their families. A program such as this has the potential to nurture compassion in medical students, contribute to medical education, and provide support to patients and families.

Schaechter, J L; Canning, E H

1994-01-01

101

61 FR 13197 - Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Inc.; Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Inc.; Memorial...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...TRADE COMMISSION [File No. 922-3308] Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Inc...Inc.; Memorial Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Inc.; Consent Agreement...regarding the success or efficacy of their cancer treatments and to ensure that...

1996-03-26

102

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Participating Program Sites  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Participating Program Sites Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools NCCCP Hospitals

103

Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

1993-03-01

104

Measuring cultural climate in a uniformed services medical center.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the employee perceptions of the cultural climate at a large uniformed service medical center in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The analyses are based on the responses of 1,751 medical center employees, whose demographic characteristics were representative of the medical center population. Analyses indicate the existence of systematic perceptual differences between: (1) the medical center and Department of Defense personnel, and (2) the following cultural groups: (a) male and female personnel, (b) military and civilian personnel, and (c) majority and minority personnel. Recommendations are provided for future areas of research that need to be conducted with respect to the phenomenon of cultural diversity and the development of positive cultural climates within both the military and civilian medical settings. PMID:10091494

Brannen, S J; Brannen, K R; Colligan, T W

1999-03-01

105

Latino Faculty Development in U.S. Medical Schools: A Hispanic Center of Excellence Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally, faculty development programs and fellowships have been shown to successfully address the developmental needs of individual faculty members. Despite positive results, there are very few programs targeted specifically toward career development for Latino and other minority faculty. The Hispanic Center of Excellence, as a Bureau of Health Professions grant, provides New Jersey Medical School a unique opportunity to focus

Maria L. Soto-Greene; Jorge Sanchez; Jose Churrango; Debbie Salas-Lopez

2005-01-01

106

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC,

E. E. Richman; R. K. Hoshide; A. L. Dittmer

1993-01-01

107

Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit: Launch of a Program Elaine Camarillo, RN, CCRN Brooke Army Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strategy: Working with the assistance of the ISR CRRT team to implement this program at BAMC, training materials as well as policies and procedures were updated and revised to develop the CRRT program for the BAMC ICU patients. Practice Change: The patients in the BAMC ICUs would be provided CRRT jointly by the BAMC ICU and hemodialysis staff. Evaluation: The

Darlene Deters; Mario A. Rivera; Harcourt P. Edgecomb; Patty Violet; Marita S. Thies; Russell A. Decker; Gerald P. Campbell; Jon R. Shepherd; Kellie J. Miller

108

Accreditation of Allied Medical Education Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Prepared by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association with the cooperation of collaborating organizations, this document is a collection of guidelines for accredited programs for medical assistants, nuclear medicine technology, orthopedic assistants, radiation therapy technology, and radiologic technologists. The…

American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

109

Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.  

PubMed

The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

2013-05-01

110

Effectiveness of a graduate medical education program for improving medical event reporting attitude and behavior  

PubMed Central

??Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational program for improving medical event reporting attitude and behavior in the ambulatory care setting among graduate medical trainees. Design: One group pre- and post-test study. Setting: The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Family Medicine Residency Program. Participants: All family practice residents (n = 30). Intervention: Patient safety educational program implemented through an introductory lecture and 6 monthly conferences, June to December 2002, involving medical events that occurred in the ambulatory care setting. Outcome measures: Medical event reporting attitude and behavior at baseline and at 6 month follow up, and barriers to medical event reporting at the 6 month follow up. Results: Program attendance was significantly correlated with medical event reporting attitude and behavior change (rho = 0.525, p = 0.003). The median change in medical event reporting attitude and behavior was zero and not statistically significant (p = 0.566). Major barriers to medical event reporting were lack of time, extra paper work, and concern about career and personal reputation. Conclusions: Attending the patient safety educational program was key for promoting a positive medical event reporting attitude and behavior change among graduate trainees. Major barriers to medical event reporting were lack of time, extra paper work, and concern about career and personal reputation. Future research will need to focus on reducing these barriers and to evaluate the effectiveness of such a program over longer periods of time, since making a positive change in medical event reporting attitude and behavior must be made at the individual and organizational levels.

Coyle, Y; Mercer, S; Murphy-Cullen, C; Schneider, G; Hynan, L

2005-01-01

111

A Major Role for Social Work Input during Development of an Innovative Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program in a Medical Center Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine targets participants from groups that are underrepresented in biomedical research careers. During its first 5 years, Mount Sinai PREP has sent over 70% of the PREP scholars to an excellent array of PhD or MD\\/PhD programs. Over 90% of those students are progressing well in their doctoral studies

Terry Ann Krulwich

2009-01-01

112

[The results of treating stomach cancer at a medical center].  

PubMed

Results of diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer according to the program of screening in permanently followed-up population group during 1980-1995 years, developed and introduced into practice of Medical Center of the President of Russia Administration, are analysed. According to the Cancer Register data through this period, total number of cases of this disease comprised 896 patients. Active revealing of cancer of the stomach made up 61%. The causes of advanced disease in patients with stage IV cancer have been thoroughly analysed, their share being high enough--23.5%. Due to achieved level of early diagnosis (I stage) the possibility of only radical surgical treatment rises up to 83.5%, allowing to receive a high percent of corrected 5-year (92-93%) and 10-year (83-88%) survival. Every third patient with cancer of the stomach succumbs due to causes unconnected with the progression of the disease. PMID:9680808

Malinovski?, N N; Denisov, L E; Nikolaev, A P; Savchuk, B D; Vinogradova, N N; Luk'ianov, V M; Ushakova, T I

1998-01-01

113

Evaluation of Patient Centered Medical Home Practice Transformation Initiatives  

PubMed Central

Background The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has become a widely cited solution to the deficiencies in primary care delivery in the United States. To achieve the magnitude of change being called for in primary care, quality improvement interventions must focus on whole-system redesign, and not just isolated parts of medical practices. Methods Investigators participating in 9 different evaluations of Patient Centered Medical Home implementation shared experiences, methodological strategies, and evaluation challenges for evaluating primary care practice redesign. Results A year-long iterative process of sharing and reflecting on experiences produced consensus on 7 recommendations for future PCMH evaluations: (1) look critically at models being implemented and identify aspects requiring modification; (2) include embedded qualitative and quantitative data collection to detail the implementation process; (3) capture details concerning how different PCMH components interact with one another over time; (4) understand and describe how and why physician and staff roles do, or do not evolve; (5) identify the effectiveness of individual PCMH components and how they are used; (6) capture how primary care practices interface with other entities such as specialists, hospitals, and referral services; and (7) measure resources required for initiating and sustaining innovations. Conclusions Broad-based longitudinal, mixed-methods designs that provide for shared learning among practice participants, program implementers, and evaluators are necessary to evaluate the novelty and promise of the PCMH model. All PCMH evaluations should as comprehensive as possible, and at a minimum should include a combination of brief observations and targeted qualitative interviews along with quantitative measures.

Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Chase, Sabrina M.; Wise, Christopher G.; Schiff, Gordon D.; Schmidt, Laura A.; Goyzueta, Jeanette R.; Malouin, Rebecca A.; Payne, Susan M. C.; Quinn, Michael T.; Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; Jaen, Carlos Roberto

2011-01-01

114

75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...will be transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) New Access...391,306 (NAP), $101,000 (IDS) and $250...Authority: Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act, 42...

2010-04-22

115

Office of Cancer Centers - About the Program  

Cancer.gov

Office of Cancer Centers - About the Program Our History Staff Directory Contact Us Mail Delivery and Driving Directions Home > About Us > Staff Directory Staff Directory Linda K. Weiss, Ph.D. | Director weissl@mail.nih.gov

116

78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...has requested that HRSA transfer a Health Center Program section 330 grant to Genesee Health System to implement and carry out grant...330 grant application. Genesee County Community Mental Health (GCCMH)--now Genesee Health...

2013-04-26

117

Application Center of Excellence (ACE) Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Application Center of Excellence (ACE) program increases the effectiveness of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Production and Logistics) OASD (P and L) by exploiting the capabilities of installed computing equipment and augmenting tho...

D. J. O'Connor

1991-01-01

118

75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Health Center Program (Section 330(h) of the Public Health Service Act) funds originally awarded to Saint Vincent's...2010. Authority: Section 330(h) of the Public Health Service Act, 42 U.S.C. 245b. CDFA Number:...

2010-09-01

119

75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...transfer Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Increased Demand for Services (IDS) and Capital...CIP). Authority: Section 330(h) of the Public Health Service Act, 42 U.S.C. 245b. CDFA Number:...

2010-11-29

120

Establishing a Medical Library Technology Program-- The SUNY Experience *  

PubMed Central

A two-year program in Medical Library Technology leading to the Associate in Applied Science degree was developed and approved by the State University of New York and the New York State Board of Regents as a joint endeavor of the Upstate Medical Center and the Onondaga Community College, with classes scheduled to begin in September 1969. The curriculum is designed to allow continuation of study towards the Bachelor of Science degree and includes a summer internship at one of several participating medical libraries. An increasing number of library technology programs are being offered by junior colleges in the U. S. and Canada. However, this represents a first attempt at a technician education program designed specifically for medical libraries.

Hoey, Evelyn L.

1969-01-01

121

Snapshot of air force psychiatry: wilford Hall medical center.  

PubMed

In line with Psychiatry 2009's mission to strengthen its global presence as a leading source of evidence-based information for practicing clinicians, we are pleased to launch the new column, "Psychiatric Clinics from Around the World." This series will enable readers to become familiar with facilities around the world that provide psychiatric care. We hope you find the column interesting. We start the series with a column featuring Wilford Hall Medical Center, the flagship psychiatric facility of the United States Air Force.United States Air Force psychiatry plays a vital role in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan). Outside of the military, little is known about US Air Force psychiatry and the Wilford Hall Medical Center. Wilford Hall Medical Center is the US Air Force's flagship hospital and premiere psychiatric hospital. This article briefly discusses the history of Wilford Hall Medical Center and its psychiatric contributions to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. PMID:19724763

Azad, Alvi; McKinnon, Nicholas D; Joshi, Kaustubh G; Faubion, Matthew D

2009-06-01

122

5 strategies for improving performance of academic medical centers.  

PubMed

Academic medical centers should consider five strategies for becoming more cost-efficient and profitable as reforms are implemented: Make faculty responsible for cost and quality. Explore opportunities to collaborate with community hospitals. Extend care and education beyond the walls of the organization, employing technology and innovative teaching practices. Maximize healthcare IT investment by sharing data-rich patient records with other medical centers and research institutes. Align research with business strategy. PMID:23795389

Valletta, Robert M; Harkness, Alicia

2013-06-01

123

The Effects Of A Behavioral Contingency Management Approach On Treatment Success In A Veterans Administration Medical Center Methadone Maintenance Outpatient Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a behavioral contingency management approach on patients in an outpatient methadone maintenance program. Successful rehabilitation was determined by the evaluation of scores derived from the Evaluation Point System. The Evaluation Point System measured behavior in four specific areas: (a) incidence of drug abuse, (b) attendance at counseling sessions,

Arnold Lester Feiner

1979-01-01

124

Serving Medically Frail Individuals: Five Case Studies of Deaths of Residents of the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The deaths of five resident clients at the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center (New York), a residential program for profoundly impaired and medically fragile individuals with developmental disabilities, in March and April of 1989 were investigated. Methods of study included examination of medical records from the Cooke Center and other…

Sundram, Clarence J.

125

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-01-01

126

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-01

127

Experimental Medical Care Review Organization (EMCRO) Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Experimental Medical Care Review Organization (EMCRO) program was initiated in 1971 for developing objective and systematic methods for evaluating the quality of personal health services provided by physicians and other health professionals in all set...

1973-01-01

128

Medical Team Training Programs in Health Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Numerous medical team training programs have been developed and implemented in response to the patient safety crisis highlighted by the Institute of Medicine. The role of effective teamwork in accomplishing complex tasks is well accepted in many domains. ...

D. P. Baker S. Gustafson J. M. Beaubien E. Salas P. Barach

2005-01-01

129

OFF-CENTER CONTROL ROD PROGRAM (DIGITAL COMPUTER PROGRAM K)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Digital computer Program K constructs the two energy-group analysis of a ; cylindrical reactor core with an off-center control red. Solutions are ; constructed for the fast and slow neutron flux in terms of red-centered ; cylindrical coordinates and also in terms of corecentered cylindrtcal coordinates. ; The effect of the control rod is expressed in terms of fast and

1959-01-01

130

Patient-centered care in a medical home.  

PubMed

There is general consensus that our current healthcare delivery system will not be able to supply an adequate workforce, contain costs, and meet the ever-increasing chronic-care needs of the growing and aging population in the United States (US). Some of the major challenges to the U.S. healthcare system are faced by those on the front lines, namely the healthcare workers in primary care. Part of the emerging solution for primary care is the adoption of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model. The intent of this model is to provide coordinated and comprehensive care rooted in a strong collaborative relationship. Carilion Clinic in Southwestern Virginia is implementing this patient-centered model in which a proactive, multidisciplinary care team collectively takes responsibility for each patient. In this article we will elaborate on the concepts of patient-centered care and patient-centered medical homes, after which we will offer an exemplar describing the process that Carilion Clinic is using to establish patient-centered medical homes throughout their primary care departments. Limitations of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model will also be discussed. PMID:22088153

Carver, Colette; Jessie, Anne T

2011-05-31

131

Pharmaceutical representatives in academic medical centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To determine the nature, frequency and effects of internal medicine bousestaff and faculty contacts with pharmaceutical representatives\\u000a (PRs).\\u000a \\u000a Design and setting:The authors surveyed internal medicine faculty at seven midwest teaching hospitals and housestaff from two of the teaching\\u000a programs. The survey asked about type and frequency of contacts with PRs and behavior that might be related to these contacts.\\u000a T-tests

Nicole Lurie; Eugene C. Rich; Deborah E. Simpson; Jeff Meyer; David L. Schiedermayer; Jesse L. Goodman; W. Paul McKinney

1990-01-01

132

Routine Collection of Medication Side Effect Data Using Computer Terminals Located in a Senior Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes placement of computer in senior center to obtain information from older adults regarding medication side effects and other physical problems. Discusses how participants were enthusiastic about program and how detection of symptoms sometimes led to specific intervention actions on part of elderly. (Author/NB)

Holmes, Douglas; And Others

1988-01-01

133

Miami-Dade Community College 1984 Institutional Self-Study. Volume VIII: Medical Center Campus Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Part of a systematic, in-depth assessment of Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) educational programs, student support systems, and selected campus-level activities, this volume of the college's institutional self-study report examines the impact and effectiveness of the Medical Center Campus. The report contains the results of a campus study…

Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

134

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC,

E. E. Richman; R. K. Hoshide; A. L. Dittmer

1993-01-01

135

Communications and Collaboration Keep San Francisco VA Medical Center Project on Track  

SciTech Connect

This case study about energy saving performance contacts (ESPCs) presents an overview of how the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco established an ESPC contract and the benefits derived from it. The Federal Energy Management Program instituted these special contracts to help federal agencies finance energy-saving projects at their facilities.

Federal Energy Management Program

2001-05-16

136

FEMP: Communication and collaboration keep San Francisco VA Medical Center project on track  

SciTech Connect

The Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco is saving almost 3 million kilowatt-hours of electricity, more than 70,000 therms of natural gas, and more than $500,000 annually by taking advantage of the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCS).

Epstein, K.

1999-09-07

137

WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. At the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated ...

138

WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. t the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated i...

139

Regional Medical Program; Guidelines for Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This set of guidelines was written to provide a systematic explanation of the process of evaluation applied to Regional Medical Programs, as required by Public Law 89-239. Goals of the programs are the improvement of health care of patients suffering from heart disease, cancer, stroke and related diseases and improvement in the practice of health…

Dean, Gary S., And Others

140

Medical Emergency Education in Dental Hygiene Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 169 dental hygiene training programs investigated the curriculum content and instruction concerning medical emergency treatment, related clinical practice, and program policy. Several trends are noted: increased curriculum hours devoted to emergency care; shift in course content to more than life-support care; and increased emergency…

Stach, Donna J.; And Others

1995-01-01

141

67 FR 41766 - Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERC) Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERC) Program...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERC) Program AGENCY...priorities for up to five Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs). The...

2002-06-19

142

Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.  

PubMed

Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care. PMID:17824263

Ozmon, Jeff

143

Operations improvement and reengineering at Ohio State University Medical Center.  

PubMed

Rising costs and increasing competition have forced hospitals to respond to the needs of their customers. At Ohio State University Medical Center, operations improvement and reengineering are being used to redesign processes and to position the medical center competitively in today's changing environment. An operations improvement team identified business processes with the greatest opportunity for positive impact based on the goals of the medical center. Next, these areas were prioritized and teams appointed to begin the reengineering process. Reengineering methods focused on specific outcomes, including improved patient satisfaction, reduced cost, and improved clinical and service quality. Throughout the process, the goals and successes of reengineering were communicated to the organization and community. PMID:10144373

Marsh, G; Guanciale, T; Simon, M

1995-08-01

144

Medical Natural Sciences: a new academic program to train biomedical researchers  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Here we describe the academic program Medical Natural Sciences that was started as a bachelor program in 2001 by several departments\\u000a of VU University Amsterdam and the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam. In this program students receive training in\\u000a exact sciences (physics, chemistry and mathematics) in a strong medical context, combined with basic courses in biomedical\\u000a sciences and a

J. P. Dekker; J. H. Meijer

2009-01-01

145

State funding of comprehensive primary medical care service programs for medically underserved populations.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the availability of state funding for comprehensive primary care programs and the need for primary care subsidies for medically underserved communities. METHODS: A brief questionnaire was used to ask health agencies in all 50 states whether their state funded a program that met our definition of comprehensive primary medical care practice programs. An in-depth written survey instrument was then administered to the states with programs. RESULTS: Almost half of all states provide some funds for the development and/or operation of comprehensive primary medical care practices. Expenditures in most states were found to be relatively modest in comparison with both federal funding and the total level of unmet need for primary care. States that subsidize primary care practices tend to follow the model established under the federal health centers program. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest the continued viability of the health center model of care, as well as the presence of some state support for such a program. However, in light of limited state resources for the development and operation of comprehensive practices, a continued and significant federal effort is imperative.

Rosenbaum, S; Hawkins, D R; Rosenbaum, E; Blake, S

1998-01-01

146

A Longitudinal Medical Spanish Program at One US Medical School  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Policymakers have recommended recruiting or training (or both) more US physicians who can provide care in Spanish. Few longitudinal medical Spanish programs have been described and evaluated. OBJECTIVE This study aims to describe development and evaluation of the preclinical phase of a 4-y program designed to graduate physicians who can provide language-concordant care in Spanish. SETTING Study was done in one public medical school in southeastern USA. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program targeted intermediate/advanced Spanish speakers. Standardized fluency assessments were used to determine eligibility and evaluate participants’ progress. Curriculum included didactic coursework, simulated patients, socio-cultural seminars, clinical skills rotations at sites serving Latinos, service-learning, and international immersion. PROGRAM EVALUATION For the first two cohorts (n?=?45) qualitative evaluation identified program improvement opportunities and found participants believed the program helped them maintain their Spanish skills. Mean interim (2-y) speaking proficiency scores were unchanged from baseline: 9.0 versus 8.7 at baseline on 12-point scale (p?=?0.15). Mean interim listening comprehension scores (second cohort only, n?=?25) increased from a baseline of 77 to 86% (p?=?0.003). Proportions “passing” the listening comprehension test increased from 72 to 92% (p?=?0.06). DISCUSSION We describe development of a longitudinal Spanish program within a medical school. Participation was associated with improved Spanish listening comprehension and no change in speaking proficiency. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0598-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Frasier, Pamela Y.; Slatt, Lisa M.; Aleman, Marco A.

2008-01-01

147

Surgical-site infections at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A five-month prospective survey of surgical-site infections (SSI) was conducted in the department of general surgery at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Tanzania. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. This study showed that 77 (19.4%) of the patients developed SSI. Twenty-eight (36.4%) of these infections were

H. M Eriksen; S Chugulu; S Kondo; E Lingaas

2003-01-01

148

Alcohol Medical Scholars Program--A Mentorship Program for Improving Medical Education regarding Substance Use Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Alcohol Medical Scholars Program (AMSP) is designed to improve medical education related to substance use disorders (SUDs) through mentorship of junior, full-time academic faculty from medical schools across the United States. Scholarship focuses on literature review and synthesis, lecture development and delivery, increasing SUD education in…

Neufeld, Karin J.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hernandez-Avila, Carlos A.

2011-01-01

149

The Medical Library Association's international fellowship programs.  

PubMed Central

This article describes the two international fellowship programs administered by the International Cooperation Committee of the Medical Library Association: (1) the program supported by the Rockfeller Foundation from 1948 to 1963; (2) the Eileen R. Cunningham program, supported by Mrs. Cunningham's bequest to the association, from 1971 to date. Comments and suggestions received from Cunningham Fellows in response to a letter sent to each by the author in the summer of 1977 are listed. The cost of the fellowship program, not only in terms of financial support but also in terms of human resources, is documented. While the program receives enthusiastic support from the International Cooperation Committee and many members of MLA, the membership needs to examine its mission with regard to the training of medical librarians from other countries, to determine whether future funding is to be sought.

Poland, U H

1978-01-01

150

Geriatric medicine and geriatric psychiatry clinical services affiliated with U.S. academic medical centers.  

PubMed

U.S. academic medical centers are providing many geriatric medicine (GM) and geriatric psychiatry (GP) clinical services at Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and non-VHA sites. This article describes the distribution and scope of GM and GP clinical services being provided. Academic GM leaders of the 146 U.S. allopathic and osteopathic medical schools were surveyed online in the spring of 2004. One hundred four program directors (71.2%) responded. These medical schools provided 1,325 GM and 376 GP clinical services, which included 654 VHA and 1,014 non-VHA GM and GP services, affiliation with 21 Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, and 12 other specialized services. The mean number+/-standard deviation of distinct clinical services at each medical center was 16.4+/-8.2. More geriatrics faculty full-time equivalents, more time spent on training fellows, and designation as a GM Center of Excellence were associated with providing a wider range of geriatric clinical services. Using data from the survey, the first directory of GM and GP clinical services at academic medical centers was created (http://www.ADGAPSTUDY.uc.edu). PMID:16686884

Warshaw, Gregg A; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Freyberg, Ron W

2006-04-01

151

77 FR 35917 - Medicare Program; Medicare Secondary Payer and “Future Medicals  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 405 and 411 [CMS-6047-ANPRM] RIN 0938-AR43 Medicare Program; Medicare Secondary Payer and ``Future Medicals''...

2012-06-15

152

Using CLSI at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Library  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Texas Southwesern Medical Center at Dallas Library has followed an evolutionary approach in its implementation of an integrated library system. In 1980 the library purchased the CLSI system and has implemented circulation, MARC-database maintenance, public access catalog, authority control, serials management, and the MedLine citation system. A sophisticated campus telecommunications network provides access to the library systems

Patti Armes

1989-01-01

153

Smoking Survey at a Midwestern U.S. Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. In an effort to learn more about the smoking behavior of hospital employees, a study was conducted at the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) regarding tobacco usage and secondhand smoke exposure.Methods. An anonymous voluntary survey was distributed to 4177 full-time employees in Kansas City and Wichita during June and July of 1998. Questions included tobacco usage and exposure

Bruce F. Landeck; Dennis D. Wallace; John S. Neuberger

2000-01-01

154

Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

155

Osteosarcoma of the jaw. The Chaim Sheba Medical Center experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this article is to present 14 cases of osteosarcoma of the jaw treated at our medical center from 1989 to 1998. These cases are discussed in the light of a comprehensive review of 774 cases reported in the English literature over the past 3 decades. Differences between osteosarcoma of the jaws and osteosarcoma of the long

Ofer Mardinger; Navot Givol; Yoav P. Talmi; Shlomo Taicher

2001-01-01

156

USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A bibliography of publications from the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology. Cataloged by year and searchable by peer-reviewed journal publications only or all publications. Links to each publication give reference details along with an interpretive summary as well as the technical abstract.

0002-11-30

157

Academic medical centers: A framework for strategic repositioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to understand the elements affecting the success or failure of strategic repositioning efforts by academic medical centers (AMC). The research question was: What specific elements in the process appear to be most important in determining the success or failure of an AMC.s strategic repositioning? Where success is based on the longterm sustainability of the new position.^ \\

Leon J Leach

2011-01-01

158

Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in Veterans Affairs medical centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study was performed to define outcomes after abdominal ortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers during fiscal years 1991 through 1993.Methods: With VA patient treatment file data, patients were selected from diagnosis-related groups 110 and 111 and were then classified in a patient management category. In the categories of repair of nonruptured and ruptured AAA,

Andris Kazmers; Lloyd Jacobs; Anthony Perkins; S. Martin Lindenauer; Elizabeth Bates

1996-01-01

159

THE FREQUENCY OF RHESUS PHENOTYPES AT KING HUSSEIN MEDICAL CENTER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of Rh-hr phenotypes and the most probable genotypes in Jordan. Methods: The study group consisted of 1000 Jordanians of both sexes (593 males & 407 females), from different age groups, who were selected from blood donors at King Hussein Medical Center. Rh-hr phenotype reactivity was determined using the tube

Ali Abou-Jabal; Taisir Shubeilat

160

Humanities for medical students? A qualitative study of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Today, there is a trend towards establishing the medical humanities as a component of medical education. However, medical humanities programs that exist within the context of a medical school can be problematic. The aim of this study was to explore problems that can arise with the establishment of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program. METHODS: Our

Caroline Wachtler; Susanne Lundin; Margareta Troein

2006-01-01

161

78 FR 18990 - Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Health Service Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs Announcement...support for medical professionals' recruitment and continuing education programs...agreement is to enhance medical professional recruitment and continuing education...

2013-03-28

162

A Longitudinal Medical Spanish Program at One US Medical School  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION  Policymakers have recommended recruiting or training (or both) more US physicians who can provide care in Spanish. Few longitudinal\\u000a medical Spanish programs have been described and evaluated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE  This study aims to describe development and evaluation of the preclinical phase of a 4-y program designed to graduate physicians\\u000a who can provide language-concordant care in Spanish.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING  Study was done in one public

Daniel S. Reuland; Pamela Y. Frasier; Lisa M. Slatt; Marco A. Alemán

2008-01-01

163

Automating Veterans Administration libraries: II. Implementation at the Kansas City Medical Center Library.  

PubMed

In 1985, the Kansas City Veterans Administration Medical Center began implementation of the Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). An integrated library system, a subset of that program, was started by the medical library for acquisitions and an outline catalog. To test the system, staff of the Neurology Service were trained to use the outline catalog and electronic mail to request interlibrary loans and literature searches. In implementing the project with the Neurology Service, the library is paving the way for many types of electronic access and interaction with the library. PMID:3594023

Smith, V K; Ting, S C

1987-04-01

164

Community Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Challenges and Opportunities to Reduce Health Care Disparities in America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care disparities pose an ongoing challenge to the nation. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model presents a unique opportunity for community health centers (CHCs) to improve the health of medically underserved communities and reduce health care disparities. Community health centers face ongoing financial and operational challenges, but are well positioned to adopt the PCMH. Health centers have experience collaborating

Daren R. Anderson; J. Nwando Olayiwola

2012-01-01

165

Evolution of Pediatric Thyroid Surgery at a Tertiary Medical Center  

PubMed Central

Background Thyroidectomy in the pediatric population is often avoided due to perceived risks in children. With growing subspecialization and establishment of high volume endocrine surgery centers, the indications for thyroid surgery and extent of resection continue to change. We examined the evolution of pediatric thyroid surgery at a high volume tertiary medical center. Methods From our prospectively collected database, we reviewed medical records of individuals younger than 19 years who underwent thyroidectomy at our institution from 1994 to 2009. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) before establishment of our endocrine surgery center (1994–2001) and 2) since establishment of the center (2002–2009). Results We identified 78 operations performed on 74 patients with a median age of 15 (range 3–18) years. We found that the number of patients doubled in the later time period, with 26 operations in Group 1 and 52 in Group 2. The age of patients and percentage of females were similar between groups. After establishment of the endocrine surgery center, there was a significant increase in total thyroidectomies for all indications, including significantly more for benign disease. Overall, 9% of the patient population experienced transient complications, with no permanent complications or long-term sequelae. Conclusions Pediatric thyroid surgery is extremely safe, especially when performed at a high volume endocrine surgery center. We more often select surgical treatment for benign disease and choose total thyroidectomy over limited resection. This may reflect increasing confidence in the safety and efficacy of surgery and reliability of thyroid hormone replacement.

Burke, Jocelyn F.; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Chen, Herbert

2012-01-01

166

Central Valley Emergency Medical Services System Development Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Central Valley Emergency Medical Services System Development Program was established via a grant from Regional Medical Programs. Initially, research was undertaken by program staff to gather information - educational and operational - concerning pre-h...

L. H. Grayson L. B. Burnett M. A. Collins

1975-01-01

167

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program  

SciTech Connect

The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

Dennis, R.A.

1995-12-01

168

Treatment of urge incontinence in Veterans Affairs medical centers.  

PubMed

Urinary incontinence has far-reaching medical, psychological, social, and economic effects. The objectives of this descriptive study were to examine utilization patterns and discontinuation rates of various pharmacologic agents used to treat symptoms of overactive bladder, primarily urge incontinence (UI), and to estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence in the study population. Patient-level data regarding specific drugs used to treat UI and the use of diapers or pads over a 9-month period from October 1995 to May 1996 were retrospectively extracted from the medication databases of 9 Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers. A total of 2233 male patients were included in the analyses. Most patients were receiving oxybutynin chloride (39.8%), dicyclomine hydrochloride (16.0%), or imipramine hydrochloride (13.9%), and the remaining 30.3% were using flavoxate hydrochloride, propantheline bromide, hyoscyamine sulfate, and adult diapers or pads. Overall, 72.1% of patients had been prescribed daily dosages within the recommended dosing ranges for these medications. The majority (91.3%) of patients had not switched to another UI medication during the study period. Based on a chronic disease index, 47.6% of patients had 2 or fewer chronic diseases. Using pooled prevalence estimates, the estimated percentage of patients who had ever experienced UI in this population ranged from 7.4% to 20.8%; however, a considerably smaller percentage were taking medications for the treatment of UI. The results of this study suggest that oxybutynin, dicyclomine, and imipramine are the agents most commonly used to treat urinary incontinence within Veterans Affairs medical centers. The majority of patients who received a prescription for one of these drugs did not routinely refill the medication over the course of the study. There are many reasons for patients not to refill a prescription (eg, ineffectiveness, side effects, complications, obtaining the drug from another source), but the present study did not address the causes. PMID:10397381

Malone, D C; Okano, G J

1999-05-01

169

The impact of the IRB on medical centers.  

PubMed

The role of the IRB in a Medical Center is presented with respect to investigations of medical device safety and effectiveness involving human subjects. The prime points presented and discussed are: the reasons (governmental, social, economic, legal-liability, scientific and moral) for the existence of an IRB; the analytical and descriptive documentation which should always precede experimentation; the concepts governing an application to a "typical" IRB; a practical, detailed outline of some special facts and circumstances typically most important to an IRB; and, the question of confidentiality of trade secrets. PMID:10251107

Lee, A S; Thompson, J H

170

Fiscal Year 1986 Program Report: Indiana Water Resources Research Center,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1986 program of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center, located at Purdue University, has revolved around 4 research projects and a technology transfer program. In addition to the research and technology transfer activities, the Center has propos...

J. H. Cushman

1987-01-01

171

Preemployment drug screening in a large metropolitan medical center  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the prevalence of illicit drug use among job applicants, a large metropolitan medical center conducted preemployment\\u000a drug screening of all applicants during January 1988. Urine samples from 172 preinformed applicants were screened using Enzyme\\u000a Multiplied Immunoassay Technique (Emit d.a.u.™) followed by confirmatory gas chromatography\\/mass spectrophotometry. 4.1%\\u000a of tests were positive for marijuana and\\/or cocaine and none was positive

Donald Angehr Smith; Raymond Hanbury

1991-01-01

172

Succession planning in an academic medical center nursing service.  

PubMed

Succession planning is of strategic importance in any industry. It ensures the smooth transition from leader to leader and the ability of the organization to maintain the forward momentum as well as meet its operational and financial goals. Health care and nursing are no exception. In the complex and challenging world of health care today, leadership is critical to an organization's success and leadership succession is a key strategy used to ensure continuity of leadership and development of talent from within the organization. At Rush University Medical Center, a 667-bed academic medical center providing tertiary care to adults and children, the need for a focus on succession planning for the nursing leadership team is apparent as key leaders come to the end of their careers and consider retirement. It has become apparent that to secure the legacy and continue the extraordinary history of nursing excellence, care must be taken to grow talent from within and take the opportunity to leverage the mentoring opportunities before the retirement of many key leaders. To ensure a smooth leadership transition, nursing leadership and human resources partner at Rush University Medical Center to implement a systematic approach to leadership succession planning. PMID:23222756

Barginere, Cynthia; Franco, Samantha; Wallace, Lynne

173

Positron program at the Idaho Accelerator Center  

SciTech Connect

Positron physics is an important part of the research activities at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). With positron annihilation spectroscopy, maps of nanodefects in materials have been obtained. For this purpose, positrons are generated by radioactive decay, photoactivation, or pair production. Preliminary tests of positron sources in the MeV range based on electron linacs have also been carried out at the IAC, and an expansion of this program is planned. A similar positron beam at Jefferson Lab would greatly improve our knowledge of the inner structure of the proton. In this paper, research with positrons at the IAC is reviewed. After a description of the Center's facilities, results from positron annihilation spectroscopy are discussed, together with future plans for testing a prototype positron source for CEBAF.

Stancari, Giulio [Idaho State University, Department of Physics, Pocatello, Idaho 83209 (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2009-09-02

174

An academic medical center under prolonged rocket attack--organizational, medical, and financial considerations.  

PubMed

The Rambam Medical Center, the major academic health center in northern Israel, serving a population of two million and providing specialized tertiary care, was exposed to an unprecedented experience during the Second Lebanon War in the summer of 2006. For more than one month, it was subjected to continuous rocket attacks, but it continued to provide emergency and routine medical services to the civilian population and also served the military personnel who were evacuated from the battlefront. To accomplish the goals of serving the population while itself being under fire, the Rambam Medical Center had to undertake major organizational decisions, which included maximizing safety within the hospital by shifting patients and departments, ensuring that the hospital was properly fortified, managing the health professional teams' work schedules, and providing needed services for the families of employees. The Rambam Medical Center's Level I trauma center expertise included multidisciplinary teams and extensive collaborations; modern imaging modalities usually reserved for peacetime medical practice were frequently used. The function of the hospital teams during the war was efficient and smooth, based on the long-term actions taken to prepare for disasters and wartime conditions. Routine hospital services continued, although at 60% of normal occupancy. Financial losses incurred were primarily due to the decrease in revenue-generating activity. The two most important components of managing the hospital under these conditions are (1) the ability to arrive at prompt and meaningful decisions with respect to the organizational and medical hospital operations and (2) the leadership and management of the professional staff and teams. PMID:19707058

Bar-El, Yaron; Michaelson, Moshe; Hyames, Gila; Skorecki, Karl; Reisner, Shimon A; Beyar, Rafael

2009-09-01

175

Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University's College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor's assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

Not Available

1992-01-01

176

Impact of a Wellness Clinic Visit on Cardiovascular Risk Biomarkers in Employees of a VA Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Worksite screening programs are increasingly being provided by employers as a means to reduce cardiovascular risk in employees. A screening program that consists of fasting serum analysis of glucose plus a lipid panel is offered yearly to employees at the VA medical center in Tampa. A retrospective study was conducted to determine if a wellness clinic exposure resulted in

Margaret Asomaning

2011-01-01

177

Nuclear Medical Technology. Curriculum for a Two Year Program. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives of the project briefly described here were (1) to develop curriculum for a two-year nuclear medical technology program based on a working relationship between three institutions (community college, university health center, and hospital) and (2) to develop procedures for the operation of a medical imaging and radiation technology core…

Buatti, A.; Rich, D.

178

Healthcare Inspection: Alleged Quality of Care Issues Huntington VA Medical Center Huntington, West Virginia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG), Office of Healthcare Inspections received allegations regarding quality of care issues provided by a surgeon at the Huntington VA Medical Center (medical center). The allegations concerned infection control issues...

2010-01-01

179

78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...will increase utilization of the direct care system by selected beneficiaries....

2013-02-14

180

Challenger Center's Window on the Universe Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Each year, Challenger Center's Window on the Universe launches thousands of everyday people---teachers and students, parents---on a fantastic journey through our universe. Recently, for example, we visited Nogales, Arizona, where we trained 350 teachers, talked to 6000 students in classrooms, and 1500 more students and their families as part of ``Family Science Night'' presentations. Window aims to increase community involvement in science education within underserved communities throughout the United States. Challenger Center's national team works with a local team in the participating community to provide training for teachers, classroom talks, and Family Science Night presentations for the community. The national team includes at least one astronomer and one educator from Challenger Center, as well as at least two Visiting Researchers (VRs) from other institutions. (However, in Washington, D.C., there were 40 VRs from 12 different institutions who, along with the national team, visited every 6th grade classroom in the city! Window materials have become an essential part of the 6th grade curriculum in Washington, D.C.) VRs are scientists or engineers in the fields of astronomy, space science, or human space flight who are gifted at communicating their passion about research to audiences of all ages. Their research is related to the topics covered in the Window educational modules, which provide the core content for Window on the Universe programming. VRs travel to Window communities during one of the Window weeks, where they visit classrooms and sometimes conduct Family Science Night presentations. Researchers from any institution are invited to participate as VRs in Window programs and showcase their research and their institution. If you or someone from your institution is interested in participating, please visit http://challenger.org/wotu/ and click on ``Find Out More.'' Window on the Universe is funded by grants from NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space Enterprise and Office of Space Science.

Bobrowsky, M.; Goldstein, J.; Livengood, T.; Offringa, K.; Richards, S.; Riddle, B.

2001-05-01

181

Toward a human-centered voluntary medical incident reporting system.  

PubMed

Voluntary medical incident reports are a valuable source for studying adverse events and near misses. Underreporting and low quality of reports in local organizations, however, have become the impediments in identifying trends and patterns relating at the local, regional and national level. Human factors on usefulness and ease of use have shown their important role in acceptance of voluntary reporting systems. To understand and identify the obstacles of quality reporting, we employed a set of human-centered analysis methods to examine one-year voluntary medical incident reports of a University Hospital. We found about 30% of the reports labeled as "miscellaneous" and "other", and their real incident types or error descriptions were identified through an in-depth recoding. Human-centered analyses show that the pre-defined reporting categories could serve well for the voluntary reporting need if reporters' tasks were better represented on user-friendly interfaces. We suggest that a human-centered, ontology based system design for voluntary reporting is feasible which could help improve completeness, accuracy, and interoperability among national and international standards. PMID:20841782

Gong, Yang

2010-01-01

182

Medical student education program in Alzheimer's disease: The PAIRS Program  

PubMed Central

Background As life expectancy increases, dementia incidence will also increase, creating a greater need for physicians well-trained to provide integrated geriatric care. However, research suggests medical students have limited knowledge or interest in pursuing geriatric or dementia care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the PAIRS Program and its effectiveness in enhancing medical education as a service-learning activity and replication model for the Buddy ProgramTM. Methods Between 2007 and 2011, four consecutive classes of first year Boston University School of Medicine students (n?=?45; 24?±?3 years, 58% female, 53% White) participated in a year-long program in which they were paired with a patient with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Assessments included pre- and post-program dementia knowledge tests and a post-program reflective essay. Results Program completion was 100% (n?=?45). A paired-sample t-test revealed a modest improvement in dementia knowledge post-program (p?program that will impact future clinical practice, and obtaining a greater understanding of AD. Conclusions Quantitative and qualitative findings suggest that the PAIRS Program can enhance the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes regarding geriatric healthcare in future generations of physicians, a skill set that is becoming increasingly relevant in light of the rapidly aging population. Furthermore, results suggest that The Buddy ProgramTM model can be successfully replicated.

2012-01-01

183

Basic Training Program in Medical Pedagogy: a 1-year program for medical faculty.  

PubMed Central

In 1979 université de Montréal developed the Basic Training Program in Medical Pedagogy; the program has since been offered at two other Canadian medical schools. The learning activities are spread over an academic year so that the teachers are able to continue their clinical or research duties. The program, which follows a model of systematic instruction, comprises 17 self-instructional modules on basic educational topics adapted to medical teaching. The topics are related to four components of an integrated system: student needs and learning objectives, instructional methods, student evaluation and program evaluation. The instructional format is aimed at three levels--understanding, analysis and application--to which assignments and assessments are related. In addition to the modules, the program offers 15 half-day sessions for small groups (five participants and one instructor) to discuss aspects of the program, especially home assignments and the application of personal educational projects. A minimum of 100 hours of personal time is requested. The program's main goal is that students be placed at the centre of the educational process. Of 215 participants since 1979, 171 (80%) have completed the program and reported high satisfaction. Issues related to any faculty development program are discussed.

Des Marchais, J E; Jean, P; Delorme, P

1990-01-01

184

National Energy Software Center: compilation of program abstracts  

SciTech Connect

A complete collection of abstracts of programs in the National Energy Software Center is presented. This edition includes history and acknowledgements, abstract format, recommended program package contents, subject classification guide and the thesaurus used to index the programs. (GHT)

Birgersson, M.; Butler, M.K.; De Bruler, M.M.

1982-09-01

185

Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 11: Emergency Medical Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Volume 11 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) concentrates on emergency medical services. The purpose of the program, Federal authority in the area of medical services, and policies related to an emergency medical services (EMS) program are…

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

186

A cryptologic based trust center for medical images.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To investigate practical solutions that can integrate cryptographic techniques and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to improve the security of medical images. DESIGN: The PACS at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center consolidate images and associated data from various scanners into a centralized data archive and transmit them to remote display stations for review and consultation purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the model of a digital trust center that integrates cryptographic algorithms and protocols seamlessly into such a digital radiology environment to improve the security of medical images. MEASUREMENTS: The timing performance of encryption, decryption, and transmission of the cryptographic protocols over 81 volumetric PACS datasets has been measured. Lossless data compression is also applied before the encryption. The transmission performance is measured against three types of networks of different bandwidths: narrow-band Integrated Services Digital Network, Ethernet, and OC-3c Asynchronous Transfer Mode. RESULTS: The proposed digital trust center provides a cryptosystem solution to protect the confidentiality and to determine the authenticity of digital images in hospitals. The results of this study indicate that diagnostic images such as x-rays and magnetic resonance images could be routinely encrypted in PACS. However, applying encryption in teleradiology and PACS is a tradeoff between communications performance and security measures. CONCLUSION: Many people are uncertain about how to integrate cryptographic algorithms coherently into existing operations of the clinical enterprise. This paper describes a centralized cryptosystem architecture to ensure image data authenticity in a digital radiology department. The system performance has been evaluated in a hospital-integrated PACS environment.

Wong, S T

1996-01-01

187

A Training Program in Medical Communications for Foreign Native Medical Graduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An intensive 3-week training program in medical communications skills for foreign native medical graduates (FNMG) is described. The program incorporates language and acculturation training via medically relevant, situational dialogues and role playing; training in medical interviewing skills with patient simulations; instruction in…

Newbold, Richard C., III; And Others

188

One approach to care for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in an academic medical center.  

PubMed Central

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic poses unprecedented challenges to the health-care system. Caregivers must contend both with the complicated clinical syndromes associated with HIV infection and with issues that are central to the epidemic, such as discrimination, isolation, poverty, and substance abuse. Our HIV treatment program combines and enhances the resources of an academic medical center in a multidisciplinary care model. All patients, regardless of payor class, are offered services from 10 different disciplines. The same team of clinicians follows patients in the clinic and hospital. The program is flexible, non-hierarchical, and open to community participation. This approach may be a useful model for other institutions.

Jacobs, J. L.; Damson, L. C.; Rogers, D. E.

1996-01-01

189

Commentary: teaching health centers and the path to graduate medical education reform.  

PubMed

The primary-care-oriented Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program funded by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 offers opportunities to explore alternative solutions to such graduate medical education (GME) policy issues as institutional indirect educational costs, variations in trainee-related productivity gains, and the program costs of GME innovations. THCGME reporting requirements may also provide data on the impact of various educational innovations on career choice and clinical care as well as other information that could be useful in devising a more transparent and equitable system of support for GME.THCGME program advocates should, however, be cautious in applying any lessons learned to broader GME policy reform. Unlike the THCGME funding, Medicare GME payments are part of the Medicare entitlement, tied to provision of clinical services and financed outside the annual congressional appropriations process. Pressure on domestic discretionary spending makes substantially expanded appropriations for the THCGME program an unlikely path for widespread reform. Absent secure "all-payer financing" of GME, residency program sponsors lack sufficient Medicare funds to cover all GME costs and must favor investments in specialties that meet local concerns, not long-term national workforce priorities. Nonetheless, the THCGME program provides an exciting opportunity to improve and to study primary care GME. Furthermore, the organizational infrastructures established, program leaders developed, data collected, and lessons learned from the program can inform more fundamental change in U.S. GME payment policy. PMID:23187911

Rich, Eugene C

2012-12-01

190

Characteristics of medical students completing an honors program in pathology.  

PubMed

The Honors Program in pathology at Jefferson Medical College provides a voluntary enrichment opportunity for students who have demonstrated a superior ability to cope with the pathology curriculum and who rank in the upper fifth of their class. This study was performed to determine whether honor students possess cognitive and psychosocial attributes that distinguish them from their classmates. Students from five academic years (entering classes 1991 to 1995) were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who completed the Honors Program (n = 85), (2) those in the top 20% of the class who were offered the option but chose not to participate in the Honors Program (n = 128), and (3) students who did not qualify for the program (n = 953). Comparisons between these three groups were made on the basis of selected measures of academic achievement retrieved from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study database and psychosocial data obtained from a questionnaire completed during the first-year orientation. Students who completed the Honors Program in pathology had scored higher on the physical science section of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and had obtained higher first-year grade point averages than students in both of the other groups. Subsequently, they attained higher second-year grade point averages and scored higher on Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), compared with their peers in the other groups. There were no significant differences in psychosocial measures between honor students and the rest of the cohort (group 3). However, students in the top 20% of the class who declined the invitation to participate in the Honors Program (group 2) showed higher scores on the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Emotional Instability (Neuroticism) Scale than did their classmates. Despite these differences, students who completed the Honors Program (group 1) and eligible students who declined participation (group 2) selected similar pathways of postgraduate residency training: both groups preferred internal medicine to family practice, and both were more likely than the rest of the cohort to begin residency training at a top-ranked academic/research medical center. Voluntary participation in an Honors Program is a self-selection system that identifies students who are most likely to succeed academically at the highest levels. Residency selection committees may wish to pay dose attention to student involvement in similar programs, because this information may provide insights into student personality and general aptitude. PMID:10571508

Fenderson, B A; Hojat, M; Damjanov, I; Rubin, E

1999-11-01

191

Pathology service line: a model for accountable care organizations at an academic medical center.  

PubMed

Accountable care is designed to manage the health of patients using a capitated cost model rather than fee for service. Pay for performance is an attempt to use quality and not service reduction as the way to decrease costs. Pathologists will have to demonstrate value to the system. This value will include (1) working with clinical colleagues to optimize testing protocols, (2) reducing unnecessary testing in both clinical and anatomic pathology, (3) guiding treatment by helping to personalize therapy, (4) designing laboratory information technology solutions that will promote and facilitate accurate, complete data mining, and (5) administering efficient cost-effective laboratories. The pathology service line was established to improve the efficiency of delivering pathology services and to provide more effective support of medical center programs. We have used this model effectively at the Montefiore Medical Center for the past 14 years. PMID:22333926

Sussman, Ira; Prystowsky, Michael B

2012-02-13

192

IAIMS at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center: accomplishments and challenges.  

PubMed Central

The concept of "one-stop information shopping" is becoming a reality at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Our goal is to provide access from a single workstation to clinical, research, and library resources; university and hospital administrative systems; and utility functions such as word processing and mail. We have created new organizational units and installed a network of workstations that can access a variety of resources and systems on any of seventy-two different host computers/servers. In November 1991, 2,600 different individuals used the clinical information system, 700 different individuals used the library resources, and 900 different individuals used hospital administrative systems via the network. Over the past four years, our efforts have cost the equivalent of $23 million or approximately 0.5% of the total medical center budget. Even small improvements in productivity and in the quality of work of individuals who use the system could justify these expenditures. The challenges we still face include the provision of additional easy-to-use applications and development of equitable methods for financial support.

Roderer, N K; Clayton, P D

1992-01-01

193

IAIMS at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center: accomplishments and challenges.  

PubMed

The concept of "one-stop information shopping" is becoming a reality at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Our goal is to provide access from a single workstation to clinical, research, and library resources; university and hospital administrative systems; and utility functions such as word processing and mail. We have created new organizational units and installed a network of workstations that can access a variety of resources and systems on any of seventy-two different host computers/servers. In November 1991, 2,600 different individuals used the clinical information system, 700 different individuals used the library resources, and 900 different individuals used hospital administrative systems via the network. Over the past four years, our efforts have cost the equivalent of $23 million or approximately 0.5% of the total medical center budget. Even small improvements in productivity and in the quality of work of individuals who use the system could justify these expenditures. The challenges we still face include the provision of additional easy-to-use applications and development of equitable methods for financial support. PMID:1326368

Roderer, N K; Clayton, P D

1992-07-01

194

Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson's strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program's point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include

Tetyana Antimirova

2006-01-01

195

State regulation of medical discount programs: a new frontier.  

PubMed

Over the past several years, discount medical programs have flourished as a result of double digit increases in health insurance premiums. Given the rapid growth and sometimes questionable practices of such programs, several states have taken notice and have begun to regulate discount medical programs. This article summarizes the laws of several states that have chosen to oversee these programs. PMID:17590969

Rich, J Peter

2006-01-01

196

Assessment Center Technology: Implications for Administrator Training Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the operation of assessment centers for determining administrators' strengths and weaknesses, identifies managerial competencies, and discusses the implications of using assessment center technology in university programs for preparing educational administrators. (PGD)

DeMont, Roger A.; Hughes, Larry W.

1984-01-01

197

Activities of an ethics consultation service in a Tertiary Military Medical Center.  

PubMed

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations requires hospitals to have a mechanism to address issues of medical ethics. Most hospitals, especially those in the military, have an ethics committee composed solely of members who serve as an additional duty. To enhance the ethics consultation service, the 59th Medical Wing created a position under the chief of the medical staff for a full-time, fellowship-trained, medical ethicist. After establishment of this position, the number of consultations increased, a systematic program for caregiver education was developed and delivered, and an organizational presence was achieved by instituting positions on the institutional review board, the executive committee of the medical staff, and the credentials committee. Issues in medical care are becoming increasingly complicated, due in large part to financial stresses and technological advancements. Ethics consultation can help prevent and resolve many of these problems. This report discusses the activities of the first year of a full-time ethicist in a tertiary military medical center. PMID:10920652

Waisel, D B; Vanscoy, S E; Tice, L H; Bulger, K L; Schmelz, J O; Perucca, P J

2000-07-01

198

United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.  

PubMed

United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation. PMID:23484431

Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

2012-01-01

199

Occupational chemical exposures in an academic medical center.  

PubMed

Although the risks of certain chemical agents in the hospital environment are well known, problems associated with the entire spectrum of chemicals are not. To address this issue, we analyzed incident reports generated in response to chemical exposures in an academic medical center. We also reviewed workers' compensation clinic logs and the OSHA 200 log to obtain information on medical follow-up and severity. A total of 253 exposures occurred during the 3 years from 1988 to 1990. The overall incidence rate was 8.0 per 1000 person-years. Exposure rates by job title were highest for housekeepers (60.1 per 1000 person-years), followed by maintenance workers (18.6), and laboratory technicians (13.1). The most frequently involved chemical groups were disinfectants (25.9%), solvents (16.8%), and cleaning compounds (12.1%). Exposure by the dermal route was most common (37.9%). Thirteen percent of the exposures resulted in lost time and a similar percentage was reported on the OSHA log. Medical treatment was obtained by 53%. Implications for hazard communication, recordkeeping, and prevention are discussed. PMID:8366394

Weaver, V M; McDiarmid, M A; Guidera, J A; Humphrey, F E; Schaefer, J A

1993-07-01

200

Hysterectomy in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers 2 1 The authors acknowledge the invaluable input of their expert panel: Drs. Kavita Nanda, Dee Fenner, and Ramona Slupik, programming support of Bharat Thakkar, MS, and project management support of Dolores Ippolito, MPH. 2 2 The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the indications and surgical morbidity for women veterans who underwent hysterectomies in Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAs).Methods: Data on hysterectomies performed in VAs from 1991 to 1997 were abstracted from a surgical quality improvement program.Results: Records of 1722 women who had hysterectomies in VAs over 6 years were examined. Women were predominately white (62%) and

Frances Weaver; Denise Hynes; Jeffrey M Goldberg; Shukri Khuri; Jennifer Daley; William Henderson

2001-01-01

201

Dialysis overnight: in-center nocturnal hemodialysis programs showing growth.  

PubMed

Toxin and fluid removal are the main goals of dialysis therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease. Recent data indicate that the BUN-centered delivery of dialysis therapy with high efficiency, conventional, thrice-weekly hemodialysis therapy may fall short on the likewise critically important fluid control. Extended hour, in-center nocturnal HD (INHD) emerges as one of the alternative therapies for patients whose clinical needs are not met with conventional HD or who are seeking a dialysis therapy less interfering with daytime activities. We report the logistic requirements for a nocturnal program evaluated in a pilot at a midsize non-profit dialysis provider. In-center nocturnal hemodialysis provides longer dialysis sessions similar to the thrice-weekly 8-10 hour dialysis treatments originally prescribed in the early days of dialysis. INHD allows for a more flexible lifestyle-oriented dialysis schedule and enables patients to maintain routine daytime activities. It also offers an alternative schedule for patients who require extended-hour dialysis for various medical reasons. PMID:21877620

Doss, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte

2011-07-01

202

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Advocacy  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Advocacy Search NCCCP Pilot Goals Overview Pilot Subcommittees Pilot Executive Subcommittee Disparities Clinical Trials Information Technology Biospecimens

203

Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code developme...

T. L. Holst

1989-01-01

204

Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.

Ortiz, Gabriel; Fromer, Len

2011-01-01

205

Medical practice in the peripheral health centers in Nepal.  

PubMed

The Ministry of Health and Population has implemented a compulsory two year service contract in government health facilities for all the scholarship holders of the Ministry of Education. Doctors are now being deployed to all hospitals and primary health centers of the country. Prior to 2005 it was very difficult to send doctors to the peripheral part, and now they wish to go more remote area due to the privilege given to the National Academy of Medical Sciences Post Graduate Entrance Examination, which help them get MD/MS seat. However, there are more challenges due to weak health system and failure to implement established rule and regulation. This paper highlights the outcry of a doctor working in the remote part of the country. PMID:22929855

Sitaula, S; Magar, A

2011-10-01

206

Focus on: Biomedical Technology Department, Lutheran Medical Center.  

PubMed

The Biomedical Technology Department (BTD) at Lutheran Medical Center, (LMC), Wheat Ridge, CO was started in an attempt to meet the challenges of advancing technology and the new requirements of accrediting agencies. LMC treats 92,000 inpatients and 50,000 outpatients per year. The role of the department technicians has changed since the inception of the BTD, in 1976. The most significant impact, on this role, has been the effective utilization of technical skills to generate income for the hospital. Eight technicians service over 4,200 pieces of equipment for 62 departments. The BTD, at present, has eight clinics under Quality Assurance Testing (QAT) contracts. The department is laying ground work for increase service responsibility to become as cost-effective as possible. Obtaining additional service contracts is essential in utilizing department expertise to generate income for the hospital. PMID:10282303

Richardson, J E

207

USGS Alaska Science Center, Biological Science Office: Research Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information about the research programs of the USGS Alaska Science Center - Biological Science Office (ASC-BSO). The programs are divided into several categories including Ecosystems & Habitats, Mammals, Technical Programs, Fish and Fisheries, and Birds. Links connect to research information about numerous program subcategories like Coastal and Marine, Sea Otters, Loons, Fisheries Projects, and more. The site also links to background information about the ASC-BSO, job listings, staff contact information, and the Alaska Science Center Publications Database.

2006-01-11

208

USGS Alaska Science Center, Biological Science Office: Research Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information about the research programs of the USGS Alaska Science Center - Biological Science Office (ASC-BSO). The programs are divided into several categories including Ecosystems & Habitats, Mammals, Technical Programs, Fish and Fisheries, and Birds. Links connect to research information about numerous program subcategories like Coastal and Marine, Sea Otters, Loons, Fisheries Projects, and more. The site also links to background information about the ASC-BSO, job listings, staff contact information, and the Alaska Science Center Publications Database.

209

Psychology’s Adaptation to Medical Schools, Teaching Hospitals, and Academic Medical Centers: The Role of Academic Medicine Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychologists in medical schools, teaching hospitals, and academic medical centers are comparatively small in number, and are often undervalued and denied full practice privileges. As a profession, psychologists must therefore adapt to the realities of a physician-driven, physician-controlled environment. Psychologists’ adaptation to academic medical settings has been considered from several vantage points. An overlooked aspect of adaptation is psychologists’ knowledge

Linda Garcia-Shelton; Gerald Leventhal

2005-01-01

210

Relationship between news media coverage of medical research and academic medical centers and people volunteering for clinical trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

In academic medical centers an untested assumption is that positive media attention aids recruitment of patients into a medical study while negative news reporting is damaging. In this study we examine associations between the amount of newspaper coverage concerning medical research and the number of people who volunteer, and the positive or negative content of the reporting. We find evidence

Gary Mans; Christopher Stream

2006-01-01

211

Analysis of Medication Errors at the Military Medical Center: Implications for a Systems Approach for Error Reduction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An analysis was accomplished of all inpatient medication errors at a military academic medical center during the year 2000, based on the causes of medication errors as described by current research in the field. The results of this analysis, which showed ...

K. Scheirman

2001-01-01

212

Australian medical students' perceptions of professionalism and ethics in medical television programs  

PubMed Central

Background Medical television programs offer students fictional representations of their chosen career. This study aimed to discover undergraduate medical students' viewing of medical television programs and students' perceptions of professionalism, ethics, realism and role models in the programs. The purpose was to consider implications for teaching strategies. Methods A medical television survey was administered to 386 undergraduate medical students across Years 1 to 4 at a university in New South Wales, Australia. The survey collected data on demographics, year of course, viewing of medical television programs, perception of programs' realism, depiction of ethics, professionalism and role models. Results The shows watched by most students were House, Scrubs, and Grey's Anatomy, and students nominated watching 30 different medical programs in total. There was no statistical association between year of enrolment and perceptions of accuracy. The majority of students reported that friends or family members had asked them for their opinion on an ethical or medical issue presented on a program, and that they discussed ethical and medical matters with their friends. Students had high recall of ethical topics portrayed on the shows, and most believed that medical programs generally portrayed ideals of professionalism well. Conclusions Medical programs offer considerable currency and relevance with students and may be useful in teaching strategies that engage students in ethical lessons about practising medicine.

2011-01-01

213

Impact of a Patient Safety Program on Medical Error Reporting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Background: In response to the occurrence of a sentinel event a medical error with serious consequences Eglin U.S. Air Force (USAF) Regional Hospital developed and implemented a patient safety program called Medical Team Management (MTM) that was modeled ...

D. R. Woolever

2005-01-01

214

Study to Develop an Assessment Tool and Evaluate the Social Work Service Quality Assurance Plan at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Brooke Army Medical Center, and Fitzsimons Army Medical Center. (Final Report).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The intent of this study was to develop an assessment tool to evaluate Continental United States Army Medical Center Hospital Social Work Service Quality Assurance Plans. In today's litigious and rapidly changing health care environment, quality assurance...

B. J. Nystrom

1987-01-01

215

Lessons Learned from Implementing the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

PubMed Central

The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a primary care model that provides coordinated and comprehensive care to patients to improve health outcomes. This paper addresses practical issues that arise when transitioning a traditional primary care practice into a PCMH recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Individual organizations' experiences with this transition were gathered at a PCMH workshop in Alexandria, Virginia in June 2010. An analysis of their experiences has been used along with a literature review to reveal common challenges that must be addressed in ways that are responsive to the practice and patients' needs. These are: NCQA guidance, promoting provider buy-in, leveraging electronic medical records, changing office culture, and realigning workspace in the practice to accommodate services needed to carry out the intent of PCMH. The NCQA provides a set of standards for implementing the PCMH model, but these standards lack many specifics that will be relied on in location situations. While many researchers and providers have made critiques, we see this vagueness as allowing for greater flexibility in how a practice implements PCMH.

Green, Ellen P.; Wendland, John; Carver, M. Colette; Hughes Rinker, Cortney; Mun, Seong K.

2012-01-01

216

Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

217

Ft. Sam 91 Whiskey Combat Medic Medical Simulation Training Quantitative Integration Enhancement Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The training of the combat field medic is a critical need of the United States Army. The 91W program at Fort Sam Houston, Army Medical Department (AMEDD), Department of Combat Medic Training (DCMT), trains over 7, 000 Combat Field Medics per year. Increas...

K. Love P. Phrampus

2007-01-01

218

Higher Education: A Worldwide Inventory of Centers and Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This inventory is a guide to higher education programs, centers, and related agencies. It opens with an essay that gives an overview of higher education research and training, providing a context for the programs and centers listed in the inventory. The chapters are: (1) "Research and Training in Higher Education: The State of the Art" (Philip G.…

Altbach, Philip G.; Engberg, David

219

How to Create a Learning-Centered ESL Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reviews the major features of learning-centered community colleges that offer educational programs and experiences for learners, based on individual need. By citing some exemplary learning colleges, the author examines the concepts and ideas of learning-centered colleges in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. An…

Bista, Krishna

2011-01-01

220

Advanced Training Program for Emergency Medical Technicians: Ambulance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guidelines and recommendatons are presented for advanced training programs for ambulance emergency medical technicians. Certification of proficiency as determined by examination upon completion of the basic-level training program or its equivalent is requ...

1974-01-01

221

A Nationwide Survey of Patient Centered Medical Home Demonstration Projects  

PubMed Central

Background The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Design Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Participants Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. Measurements We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. Results A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified—consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Conclusion Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1262-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina

2010-01-01

222

Challenges and opportunities in the care of international patients: clinical and health services issues for academic medical centers.  

PubMed

International visitors who travel to the United States for the express purpose of receiving medical care constitute a small, but unique and important, subset of patients in this country. These visitors have traditionally sought care at what are widely regarded as the premier U.S. academic medical centers. Their care may prove challenging due to logistical, medical, language, and cross-cultural issues, and has the potential to distract from the educational and research missions of these medical centers. The author reflects on how one academic medical center, the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, has experienced and responded to these challenges. Specific issues include scheduling and evaluation challenges, language and cultural differences, and arranging continuity care. The author concludes that when an institution invests the resources necessary to address these issues, and enlists physicians stimulated by this challenging group of patients, the arrangement is mutually beneficial to the international patients and the institution. Scholarly evaluation of this phenomenon has been virtually nonexistent, due to both the unique niche occupied by these programs and institutional competition for this group of patients. However, collaborative evaluation of international patient programs will provide the opportunity to assess similarities, differences, and effectiveness, benefiting both those providing and those receiving care by improving the appropriateness and quality of care. PMID:16436585

Martin, Don R

2006-02-01

223

School-based health centers. Statewide quality improvement program.  

PubMed

School-based health centers have been proposed as an avenue to provide health care for vulnerable youth. Colorado has 45 school-based health centers that provided 50,000 visits to 18,600 vulnerable youth in the 1998-1999 school year. Sustainability of the centers, however, depends on the ability to obtain an ongoing stream of revenue including managed care contracts, which in turn depend on the center's ability to meet the standard of care in the community. School-based health centers should meet standards of care similar to those of community health centers including certification, credentialing of providers, and a systematic evaluation of the outcomes of services. This article reports on a statewide quality improvement program that established certification standards for school-based health centers, verified the credentials of providers at the centers, and measured quality of care in centers across the state. PMID:14556586

Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Costin, Deborah K; Degenstein, Julie A

224

Proposed finding of no significant impact for the Sakakawea Medical Center coal-fired heating plant  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (the Department) has prepared an environmental assessment (Assessment) (DOE/EA-0949) to identify and evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposed action at the Sakakawea Medical Center (the Center) in Hazen, North Dakota. The proposed action would replace the existing No. 2 fuel oil-fired boilers supplemented by electric reheat with a new coal-fired hot water heating plant, using funds provided from a grant under the Institutional Conservation Program. Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-0949, the Department has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (Finding).

Not Available

1994-07-01

225

Medical Services Program for the 1988 Winter Olympics  

PubMed Central

The Medical Services Program for the 1988 winter Olympic games in Calgary involved detailed planning to co-ordinate facilities, equipment, supplies, transportaion, staff, and auxiliary support. The successful delivery of health care to athletes, Olympic officials, and spectators depended upon the efforts of medical volunteers, who enabled the Medical staff to provide adequate, timely service as required.

Challis, E. Bruce; Casement, L.A.

1989-01-01

226

Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

2010-01-01

227

Introduction to the medical professions through an innovative medical student-run pipeline program.  

PubMed

Underrepresented minorities (URMs) make up a disproportionately small percentage of medical school applicants, matriculants, and physicians relative to the general US population. Preprofessional pipeline programs may help introduce URMs to careers in the medical field. MiniMeds was developed as a paracurricular enrichment program that targeted URM students. The curriculum was designed and administered by medical students, and 2 trials of this program were conducted. Data were collected pre and post program through a survey that assessed knowledge of medical concepts and knowledge of and interest in careers in medicine. Attendance at program sessions correlated with baseline knowledge about medical professions. Knowledge about medical concepts increased significantly from baseline to follow-up for boys, a group significantly represented by URMs in our cohort. Median scores for knowledge of medical careers increased significantly from baseline to followup for URMs as well as for boys and girls. Preprofessional pipeline programs such as MiniMeds are able to engage and develop medical knowledge in URM students at a critical developmental age. Further evaluation and implementation of programs that incorporate medical students to actively develop and lead pipeline programs are warranted. PMID:22364050

Nair, Navya; Marciscano, Ariel E; Vivar, Karina L; Schaeffer, Sarah; LaMont, Elizabeth; Francois, Fritz

228

Teaching Hypothesis-Oriented Thinking to Medical Students: The University of Florida's Clinical Investigation Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes student-led research projects conducted at the University of Florida's General Clinical Research Center. First-year medical and M.D.-Ph.D. students collaborate on a hypothesis-driven experiment involving students as volunteer subjects and investigators. Feedback indicates students find the program useful and that it encourages pursuit…

Stacpoole, Peter W.; Fisher, Waldo R.; Flotte, Terence R.; Geiser, Edward A.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Hutson, Alan D.

2001-01-01

229

The patient-centered medical home and the nephrologist.  

PubMed

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model of practice that has been proposed to address the many ills of our current health care delivery and financing systems. At its heart is a primary care practice that provides comprehensive, coordinated, high-quality, personalized care. Integral to the success of the PCMH model is a "neighborhood" of specialists who subscribe to the principles of the PCMH. Nephrologists will have an opportunity to practice within this framework, either as the PCMH itself or, more likely, as "neighbors" to the "home." The effective and enthusiastic participation of nephrologists and other specialists will depend on the details of the model, not the least important of which is the financial structure. Dozens of demonstration projects around the country are currently testing the model. If the PCMH model proves to be workable and is widely adopted, nephrologists could be uniquely positioned to participate, given our long experience providing coordinated care for complex patients in a quality-conscious environment. PMID:22098665

Weisberg, Lawrence S

2011-11-01

230

Malignancy in renal transplant recipients at king hussein medical center.  

PubMed

The files of 181 patients who underwent kidney transplantation at King Hussein Medical Center between 1983 and 1992 were reviewed to study the incidence and pattern of malignancy in them. Of them, 149 patients (82.3%) were recipients of live related donor allografts while 32 (17.7%) had received cadaveric allografts. Three patients (1.7%) developed malignancy giving an estimated annual incidence for post-transplant malignancy of 17/10,000 kidney transplanted patients. The first patient had squamous cell carcinoma of the nose, the second, Kaposi's sarcoma and the third, Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. All these patients were on triple immunosuppressive drug protocol. The malignancies were diagnosed after a mean of 25.6 months following transplantation. The patient with squamous cell carcinoma responded to local excision of the tumor without altering the immunosuppressive therapy. The Kaposi's sarcoma regressed after discontinuation of cyclosporine without any adverse effects on the graft function while the patient with lymphoma died two months after the diagnosis was made. Our study shows that the incidence of malignancy after transplantation in Jordan is similar to what is reported in the literature. PMID:18583747

Al-Akash, N; Gneimat, M; Hadidi, M; El Lozi, M

231

National Energy Software Center: compilation of program abstracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the third complete revision of program abstracts undertaken by the Center. Programs of the IBM 7040, 7090, and CDC 3600 vintage have been removed. Historical data and information on abstract format, program package contents, and subject classification are given. The following subject areas are included in the library: cross section and resonance integral calculations; spectrum calculations, generation of

J. M. Brown; M. K. Butler; M. M. De Bruler

1979-01-01

232

Medical School Leadership in CME: A UCLA Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The need for medical school leadership in continuing medical education is discussed and a program at the University of California at Los Angeles is described. Designed to provide community primary care physicians with a dependable source of high quality courses, the program provides a total review of medicine if regularly attended over a…

Sayre, Simon A.

1980-01-01

233

MEDICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANT, A SUGGESTED GUIDE FOR A TRAINING PROGRAM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|INFORMATION IS GIVEN TO ASSIST IN ORGANIZING AND ADMINISTERING A TRAINING PROGRAM FOR MEDICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANTS IN A VARIETY OF SETTINGS AND TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE IN ESTABLISHING NEW PROGRAMS AND IN EVALUATING EXISTING ONES. THE MATERIAL WAS PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR CAREERS IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY. PATHOLOGISTS…

Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

234

Solid Medical Waste Management in Healthcare Centers in Palestine  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter discusses the current situation of solid waste management in healthcare centers in Palestine. The monthly estimated\\u000a quantity of solid waste produced by the healthcare centers in Palestine was 472.9 tons. There is very little separation of\\u000a solid waste in primary healthcare centers (38.1%) as compared to secondary healthcare centers (71%). Only 17.3% of the healthcare\\u000a centers in Palestine

Issam A. Al-Khatib; Mohamed Abu-Dayah; Hussein Hajjeh; Tayseer Al-Shanbleh

235

Center takes hard line with press. The missing infant incident at Columbia Trident Medical Center.  

PubMed

When the body of a stillborn infant went missing from the Columbia Trident morgue, the press pounced. The hospital was accused of everything from neglect to a police-protected cover-up. Reporters stopped patients in the parking lot to ask them if they felt safe. Others used the incident to question Columbia's proposed merger with the local university medical center. In response, Columbia Trident initiated a strict policy that prohibits the press from showing up unannounced and stridently protects the rights of patients and employees. The case provokes questions about the role of public relations professionals in an age of sensationalism. When is withholding information justified and when is it an obstruction of justified inquiry? How far is too far for the press? PMID:10165816

Moore, P L

236

Secretarial Administration: Medical Terminology: Building Block of the Medical Secretary Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the growing number of employment opportunities available in the medical field, business educators need to reevaluate existing medical secretary programs. Areas that need special attention are medical terminology (anatomy, laboratory language, etc.), report formats, and the importance of confidentiality of patient information. (CT)

Sormunen, Carolee

1980-01-01

237

Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders…

Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

2011-01-01

238

Graduate medical education costs in nonacademic health center teaching hospitals: evidence from Maryland.  

PubMed

As managed care has grown, much concern has been expressed about the potential plight of the nation's 125 academic health centers (AHCs). Less concern has focused on non-AHC teaching hospitals, although most studies of graduate medical education (GME) costs include these hospitals in their estimates. While most studies have found that costs increase positively with various measures of "teaching intensity," some have concluded that hospitals with smaller programs have costs that are the same or less than comparable nonteaching hospitals. However, few studies have tested whether AHCs' cost structures are sufficiently similar to those of other hospitals to reliably include them in the same estimation. This article tests that assumption for Maryland hospitals, finds it violated, and presents results for non-AHC teaching hospitals. The results reveal that, at least in Maryland, even small teaching programs add to hospital costs. PMID:10705699

Duffy, S Q; Ruseski, J E; Cavanaugh, S

2000-03-01

239

WTC medical monitoring and treatment program: comprehensive health care response in aftermath of disaster.  

PubMed

The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11th, 2001 exposed thousands of individuals to an unprecedented mix of chemicals, combustion products and micronized building materials. Clinicians at the Mount Sinai Irving Selikoff Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, in partnership with affected stakeholder organizations, developed a medical screening program to evaluate the health status of workers and volunteers who spent time at the WTC site and thus sustained exposure in the aftermath of September 11th. Standardized questionnaires were adapted for use in this unique population and all clinicians underwent training to ensure comparability. The WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program (MSP) received federal funding in April 2002 and examinations began in July 2002. The MSP and the follow up medical monitoring program has successfully recruited nearly 22,000 responders, and serves as a model for the rapid development of a medical screening program to assess the health of populations exposed to environmental hazards as a result of natural and man-made disasters. The MSP constitutes a successful screening program for WTC responders. We discuss the challenges that confronted the program; the absence of a prior model for the rapid development of a program to evaluate results from mixed chemical exposures; little documentation of the size of the exposed population or of who might have been exposed; and uncertainty about both the nature and potential severity of immediate and long-term health effects. PMID:18500708

Moline, Jacqueline M; Herbert, Robin; Levin, Stephen; Stein, Diane; Luft, Benjamin J; Udasin, Iris G; Landrigan, Philip J

240

Review of Quality of Care at a VA Medical Center. Healthcare Inspection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a congressional request, the VA Office of Inspector General, Office of Healthcare Inspections conducted an inspection to assess the quality of a veterans care at a VA Medical Center (the medical center) and to determine if the events leadin...

2010-01-01

241

A comparison of laboratory data in perinatal transfers at Baystate Medical Center and transferring hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Perinatal transfers come to Baystate Medical Center (BMC), a tertiary hospital with level III nursery, for treatment of pregnancy-related complications such as preterm labor, PPROM, PIH, diabetes, and bleeding problems. We postulated that Baystate Medical Center, a teaching hospital, must repeat most of the laboratory tests ordered by the community hospitals transferring these pregnant patients.Methods: A comparison of laboratory

Cecelia Yu; Gabriel Cohn

1998-01-01

242

Medical Specialties Assuming the Role of Trauma Team Leader in Canadian Trauma Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The use of medical staff from various medical specialties as trauma team leaders (TTL) is a subject of debate and varies from one region to another. This survey reports the current situation among Canadian trauma centers. Methods: Trauma centers were identified on the Internet through the provincial health ministry and regional health authority websites and the Trauma Association of

André Lavoie; Eva Tsakonas; John S. Sampalis; Pierre Fréchette

2003-01-01

243

Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program  

SciTech Connect

The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

Lenards, Nishele, E-mail: lenards.nish@uwlax.ed [Department of Health Professions/College of Science and Health, Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI (United States)

2011-07-01

244

A human-centered approach to medical informatics for medical students, residents, and practicing clinicians.  

PubMed

The authors have developed a curriculum in medical informatics that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine, rather than on the details of informatics technologies. Their development of this human-centered curriculum was guided by the identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by an examination of the failures of past informatics efforts to make a significant difference in the everyday practice of clinical medicine. Principles of human factors engineering--the body of knowledge about those human abilities, limitations, and characteristics that are relevant to design--are an essential part of this curriculum. Human factors engineering also provides the necessary perspective, as well as the concrete knowledge and methods, that can enable practitioners to properly evaluate their clinical information needs, weight the merits of proposed technology-based solutions, and understand their own inherent performance limitations. PMID:9347710

Stahlhut, R W; Gosbee, J W; Gardner-Bonneau, D J

1997-10-01

245

Engaging Adults in Literacy Programs at Neighborhood Networks Centers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of Contents: Engaging Adults in Literacy Programs at Neighborhood Networks Centers: (Chapter 1) About Adult Learners; (Chapter 2) Getting Started and Finding the Right Methods and Tools; (Chapter 3) Resources; (Appendix A) Skills Checklist; (Appendi...

1999-01-01

246

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Vermont Water Resources Research Center,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Both surface and groundwater issues were addressed in the FY87 Vermont Water Resources Research Center program. Two projects focused on groundwater, with one assessing techniques for reducing nitrate contamination in agricultural areas and a second compar...

A. W. McIntosh

1988-01-01

247

Fiscal Year 1988 Program Report: Vermont Water Resources Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Both surface and groundwater issues were addressed in the FY88 Vermont Water Resources Research Center program. Two projects focused on ground water, with one assessing techniques for reducing nitrate contamination in agricultural areas and a second compa...

A. W. McIntosh

1989-01-01

248

University Transportation Centers Program, Progress Report 2005-2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Th e University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program is a strategic investment in the Nations transportation knowledge base. This investment produces a superior national capacity in the men and women who are educated and conduct research in transportation...

2007-01-01

249

Humanities for medical students? A qualitative study of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program  

PubMed Central

Background Today, there is a trend towards establishing the medical humanities as a component of medical education. However, medical humanities programs that exist within the context of a medical school can be problematic. The aim of this study was to explore problems that can arise with the establishment of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program. Methods Our theoretical approach in this study is informed by derridean deconstruction and by post-structuralist analysis. We examined the ideology of the Humanities and Medicine program at Lund University, Sweden, the practical implementation of the program, and how ideology and practice corresponded. Examination of the ideology driving the humanities and medicine program was based on a critical reading of all available written material concerning the Humanities and Medicine project. The practice of the program was examined by means of a participatory observation study of one course, and by in-depth interviews with five students who participated in the course. Data was analysed using a hermeneutic editing approach. Results The ideological language used to describe the program calls it an interdisciplinary learning environment but at the same time shows that the conditions of the program are established by the medical faculty's agenda. In practice, the "humanities" are constructed, defined and used within a medical frame of reference. Medical students have interesting discussions, acquire concepts and enjoy the program. But they come away lacking theoretical structure to understand what they have learned. There is no place for humanities students in the program. Conclusion A challenge facing cross-disciplinary programs is creating an environment where the disciplines have equal standing and contribution.

Wachtler, Caroline; Lundin, Susanne; Troein, Margareta

2006-01-01

250

Advising in Undergraduate Honors Programs: A Learner-Centered Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Findings from a study of undergraduate honors education introduce a new perspective into the debate over approaches to academic advising. Learner-centered advising emerged as a key attribute of high-quality honors programs. The learner-centered approach is consistent with a range of advising approaches and styles because through it advisors…

Huggett, Kathryn Dey

2004-01-01

251

The Converging Literacies Center: An Integrated Model for Writing Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Converging Literacies Center (CLiC) is a deeply integrated model for writing programs, bringing together the writing center, first-year writing, basic writing, professional development activities, graduate coursework, and research activities to re-imagine and support twenty-first-century literacies. What is unique about CLiC is not merely the…

Carter, Shannon; Dunbar-Odom, Donna

2009-01-01

252

Alternative Learning Centers: Another Option for Discipline Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the operation and effectiveness of the Alternative Learning Center program administered by James Madison Memorial High School in Madison (Wisconsin). The center permits the school to remove students committing breaches of school discipline from their classes without removing them from the educational environment altogether. (PGD)|

Pare, John A.

1983-01-01

253

Medication reconciliation: developing and implementing a program.  

PubMed

During the past 5 years since the medication reconciliation process was formalized and automated, it has become an independent redundancy. The patient intervention rates are maintained at 30% to 35%, with ADE rates related to medication reconciliation at zero. The medication process takes into account the accuracy and appropriateness of restarting prehospital medications and current ICU medications. It includes the omission of important home medications along with inaccuracies of dosages and frequencies. This form assures that the patient is receiving continuity of care ad decreases complications of the patients health related to the changing of medications. Until recently this concept was disseminated by the staff without consistent administrative support. It was a process developed by nurses and perpetuated by nurses. Recently the administration has mandated that the process be implemented throughout the institution. A Hopkins health care-based collaborative is working to implement medication reconciliation hospital wide. The challenge exists in standardizing a process that is now specific to each functional unit. Multidisciplinary monthly meetings provided a forum for working through the barriers to incorporate these changes. This low-cost, high-impact safely initiative, if planned and performed strategically, can have a significant effect on patient safety. PMID:17118304

Schwarz, Mandalyn; Wyskiel, Rhonda

2006-12-01

254

Leveraging Benefits Attributable to Centers within the Industrial Assessment Center Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program provides financial support to many universities to establish IACs to train students in conducting free energy, waste, and productivity assessments for industrial firms. Cur...

M. Martin B. Tonn S. Schexnayder

2002-01-01

255

Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): A Quality Improvement Collaborative for Weight Management Programs  

PubMed Central

Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians’ Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians’ Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs.

Wilkes, Abigail E.; John, Priya M.; Vable, Anusha M.; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L.; Chin, Marshall H.; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

2013-01-01

256

78 FR 40152 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory...Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory...the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical...

2013-07-03

257

NCI Launches a Pilot of Its Community Cancer Centers Program to Bring Quality Cancer Care to All  

Cancer.gov

NCI today launched the three year pilot phase of a new program that will help bring state-of-the-art cancer care to patients in community hospitals across the United States. The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) is designed to encourage the collaboration of private-practice medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists - with close links to NCI research and to the network of 63 NCI-designated Cancer Centers principally based at large research universities.

258

Marshall Space Flight Center head development program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report summarizes the results of the candidate head evaluation for the new long-life magnetic head per the SOW of Contract No. NAS8-39407, MSFC Head Development Program. The original program plans were to test a candidate head, fabricate a new head, then qualify the new head. These activities were scheduled to be carried out between March 1993 and March 1994. The program was halted after the evaluation of the candidate head by NAS8-39407 Amendment No. 4. MSFC has provided and authorized the use the MARS-2000 SRB QUAL Recorder PN 10400-0677-801 - Serial Number 200004 (Datatape PN 591000 - Serial Number 1004), Reproduce Amplifier Module (RAM) Datatape PN 533040 - Serial Number 2006, associated cables, and magnetic tape on special SRB/DFI tapered reels to Datatape for this program. All the testing that has been done for the candidate head evaluation was done at Datatape's facility in Pasadena,CA. The testing was performed in a Class 100,000 particle counts clean room at ambient temperature, except for the thermal testing which was conducted in a different area at Datatape. The Performance Verification Test Procedure PVT-11004-4 (PVT) and Acceptance Test Procedure ATP-11004-09 (ATP) procedures were used when tests were conducted on the recorder.

Harrer, Jim

1994-02-01

259

Ontario pharmacists practicing in family health teams and the patient-centered medical home.  

PubMed

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) approach continues to gather momentum in the United States and Canada as a broad approach to reform the delivery of the complete primary care system. The family health team (FHT) model implemented in Ontario, Canada, best mirrors the PCMH approach of the United States. The integration of pharmacists as key members of the health care team providing on-site, in-office coordinated care to FHT patients was included from the start of planning the FHT model and represents a substantial opportunity for pharmacists to realize their professional vision. Several research projects in Canada and elsewhere have contributed to providing evidence to support the integration of pharmacists into primary care practice sites. Two major research programs, the Seniors Medication Assessment Research Trial (SMART) cluster randomized controlled trial and the Integrating Family Medicine and Pharmacy to Advance Primary Care Therapeutics (IMPACT) multipronged demonstration project made substantial contributions to evidence-informed policy decisions supporting the integration of pharmacists into FHTs. These projects can provide useful information to support the integration of pharmacists into the PCMH and to encourage further research to better measure the effect of the pharmacist from the holistic patient-centered perspective. PMID:22499739

Dolovich, Lisa

2012-04-01

260

Engineering and Design: Corps-Wide Centers of Expertise Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This regulation defines the policy and process for establishing and maintaining expert designations under the Corps-Wide Centers of Expertise (CX) Program. The program provides an inventory of specialized knowledge and skills within the U.S. Army Corps of...

1998-01-01

261

Model Program: Southern Lehigh High School, Center Valley, PA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author describes the technology education program at Southern Lehigh High School, Center Valley, Pennsylvania. The school district is presently providing an educational program known for its excellence and forward-looking perspective, which is sensitive to the changing needs of its students. Within the technology education…

Colelli, Richard

2009-01-01

262

SCIENCE INTERPRETIVE PROGRAM--SPERMACETI COVE INTERPRETIVE CENTER.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|DESCRIBED IS THE OUTDOOR EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR THE MIDDLETOWN, NEW JERSEY ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS AT THE SPERMACETI COVE INTERPRETIVE CENTER IN SANDY HOOK STATE PARK. THE PROGRAM IS FUNDED UNDER PL89-10 OF THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT (ESEA). PHASE 1 (MARCH, 1966-JUNE, 1966) INVOLVED THE SELECTION OF NINE PUBLIC AND THREE PAROCHIAL…

COLE, RICHARD C.

263

Global health: the Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health: vision and mission, programs, and accomplishments.  

PubMed

The Fogarty International Center (FIC) of the US National Institutes of Health has supported long-term training and research for more than 3600 future leaders in science and public health from low-income and middle-income countries; tens of thousands more persons have received short-term training. More than 23 extramural training and research programs plus an intramural program are now operating. Newer FIC training programs are addressing chronic, noncommunicable diseases and strengthening the quality of medical schools and health care provider training. Most FIC trainees return to their countries of origin, where they mentor and train thousands of individuals in their home countries. PMID:21896356

Breman, Joel G; Bridbord, Kenneth; Kupfer, Linda E; Glass, Roger I

2011-09-01

264

Evaluation of Two Relaxation Training Programs under Medication and No-Medication Conditions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluated two different taped relaxation training programs with 39 psychiatric inpatients, half of whom received minor tranquilizers in conjunction with relaxation training. The enhanced relaxation program produced slightly more therapeutic effects than the standard training program. Significant differences were found between the medicated and the…

Hoshmand, Lisa T.; And Others

1985-01-01

265

Emergency Medical Service System Development: Results of the Statewide Emergency Medical Service Technical Assessment Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration developed the EMS (emergency medical services) Technical Assessment Program to assist states in developing and improving their EMS systems. The main goals of this evaluation were to document the level of improvement in EMS system development following completion of the Technical Assessment Program and to identify necessary program improvements at the National

Joan A Snyder; Jill M Baren; Susan D Ryan; John L Chew; James S Seidel

1995-01-01

266

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in

My K. Ton; Eric E. Richman; Theresa L. Gilbride

2008-01-01

267

Crozer-Chester Medical Center Burn Research Projects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Nathan Speare Regional Burn Treatment Center is under contract with the U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research in conjunction with the Army Burn Center to carry out two studies under protocols established by Army researchers. Study 1 is Automated F...

J. L. Haith

2012-01-01

268

TRANSFERENCE TO A MEDICAL CENTER--A Cultural Dimension in Healing  

PubMed Central

The phenomenon of transference to a medical center is similar to the transference given to an individual physician, the feelings being invested in The Center rather than in a person. The reputation and the image of The Center can give therapeutic sustenance. There are common features to each healing organization from primitive times to the journeys to the Oracles at the shrine of Zeus at Dodona and Apollo at Delphi, to Mecca and St. Bartholomew's Hospital, to Lourdes and Gheel, and to the present-day medical center. A phenomenon which we have identified as Transference to a Center has previously been known to physicians, theologians, historians, sociologists and anthropologists, by different names. In a social sense, transference to a medical center is akin to an Edifice complex.

Wilmer, Harry A.

1962-01-01

269

[The application and programming of digital potentiometers in medical instruments].  

PubMed

Digital potentiometers have been used in medical instruments. This paper describes the structure and principle of a digital potentiometer, especially its interfacing with a single chip processor and its programming. PMID:16104330

Yang, Shao-zhou; Wang, Sheng-jun; Chen, Hong-wen

2002-11-01

270

The four horsemen of the apocalypse. Study of academic medical center governance.  

PubMed

Governance of academic medical centers is in a process of change. This essay reviews some of the historical factors that have affected the present status of academic medical center governance and describes the functions of the four individuals who are most involved in the operation of academic medical centers: vice-presidents for health affairs, deans of relationships between these four individuals are analyzed, and points of conflict are identified. Some suggestion about how these individuals can work together more effectively are made. PMID:7035708

Petersdorf, R G; Wilson, M P

1982-02-26

271

Participation in the Qualified Medical Beneficiary Program.  

PubMed

This article has three objectives: to estimate how many eligible elderly beneficiaries are participating in the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) program; to determine the characteristics of participating and non participating eligibles; and to identify the most significant barriers to program participation. We used data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) and the Medicare Buy-In file. We found that 41 percent of QMB eligibles are enrolled in the program; participation is higher for poor and less educated beneficiaries, those in poorer health, rural residents, African Americans, and Hispanics. Finally, we found that, in general, eligible beneficiaries are ill informed about the program. PMID:10157373

Neumann, P J; Bernardin, M D; Evans, W N; Bayer, E J

1995-01-01

272

Court strikes down restriction in Ottawa's medical marijuana program.  

PubMed

On 10 January 2008, the Federal Court struck down a key restriction in Ottawa's medical marijuana program.1 The ruling grants approved medical marijuana users more freedom in picking their own grower, and allows growers to supply the drug to more than one patient. PMID:18754124

2008-07-01

273

Evaluation of the Arizona Medical Student Exchange Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This program affiliated with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, defrays costs faced by an Arizona student in attending an out-of-state medical school by paying the difference between the resident and nonresident tuition at the out-of-state school. It has failed to increase the numbers of medicals students and physicians…

Navin, Thomas R.; Nichols, Andrew W.

1977-01-01

274

Case Study of the Implementation of Radio Frequency Identification Asset Visibility Tracking at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This case study analyzes the decision to implement radio frequency identification (RFID) asset tracking at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC). The study examines the existing RFID asset tracking systems at Womack Army Medical Center (WAMC) and the La...

J. A. Morrison

2007-01-01

275

The NHTSA emergency medical services communications program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expansion of emergency medical services is limited by residual problems of inadequacy of communications systems developed using insufficient and inadequate VHF frequency channels. The promise of correcting these inadequacies by making available a block of UHF channels for use with a common frequency allocation structure is being diluted by short-sighted planning permitted by inadequacies in applicable FCC rules. There

C. J. Glass

1979-01-01

276

CH medical home program for special needs children. A new medical era...  

PubMed

The ACH Medical Home Program serves as a comprehensive, multi-discipline clinic and program designed to facilitate comprehensive, coordinated care to the most medically complex and fragile children in Arkansas. In partnership with the family, the PCP and the subspecialty physicians, the program strives to ensure that the ideals of providing the "medical home" are accomplished, both in the community and at Arkansas Children's Hospital. An ongoing evaluation process has been implemented and it is the hope and mission of this program to evolve to provide the highest quality of care and highest quality of life for these children with complex medical conditions and for their families. Referrals and inquiries are welcomed and encouraged and can be made at (501) 364-3030. PMID:19170334

Tanios, Aline T; Lyle, Robert E; Casey, Patrick H

2009-01-01

277

Medical Student and Senior Participants' Perceptions of a Mentoring Program Designed to Enhance Geriatric Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second-year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards…

Corwin, Sara J.; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A.; Rheaume, Carol E.; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G. Paul

2006-01-01

278

Regional Program for Acquisition of Medical Experiments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A U.S. company was contracted to covering different regions of the country. A moderately detailed description of the highlights of the company activities along with some conclusions and recommendations are reported. In summary, the regional program effect...

P. C. Vannordstrand

1978-01-01

279

Robert A. Adler, MD McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Center ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Richmond ... y Institutionalized elders: HR [0.73 (0.56-0.940 ... control analysis within a UK primary care cohort ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

280

Marketing Study of the Inpatient Pharmacy Branch Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study developed a plan for marketing the Inpatient Pharmacy Branch, Pharmacy Service, Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center. The plan was developed through the use of both a marketing audit and interviews of representatives of the major publics...

B. Hammel

1984-01-01

281

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2000-0169-2854, Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Riverside, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In March 2000, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) local 1997 to conduct a health hazard evaluation (HHE) at Riverside County Regional Medical Center in...

C. K. Cook R. Malkin

2001-01-01

282

Healthcare Inspection: Quality of Care Issues Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center, Clarksburg, West Virginia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the review was to determine the validity of allegations regarding quality of care at the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center, Clarksburg, West Virginia. We concluded that there were deficiencies in this patient's care that warranted consider...

2010-01-01

283

Study to Determine Patient Waiting Time at the Outpatient Pharmacy at Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was designed to determine if the implementation of satellite outpatient pharmacies at Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center significantly reduced the patient wait time at the main outpatient pharmacy. Satellite pharmacies have been placed in the Ped...

C. A. Cyr

1988-01-01

284

Perspective of the Staff Regarding Facility Revitalization at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate and measure the attitudes of the staff of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) regarding the organization's Master Facility Plan, renovation plans and the physical condition of the facility Data was collecte...

J. G. Baker

2004-01-01

285

Storage Study of Frozen Entree Items Developed for Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains results of storage studies in frozen entree products developed for the new Walter Reed Army Medical Center food service system. The products were prepared in accordance with production guides already developed for Walter Reed. General...

G. Darsch C. Shaw J. Tuomy

1978-01-01

286

Improving the Brooke Army Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine Admissions Process.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study determined, evaluated, and proposed ways to mitigate factors contributing to overcrowding and wait times experienced by patients admitted through the Brooke Army Medical Center Emergency Department. Data was collected on 343 patients admitted b...

J. R. Fuda

2006-01-01

287

Health Hazard Evaluation/Toxicity Determination. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a health hazard survey to evaluate exposure to sulfamic acid in CSCO Ice Machine Cleaner used to clean ice machines at Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. Based upon ob...

M. T. Okawa

1973-01-01

288

Study to Restructure the Marketing Plan at Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Graduate Management Project studies the current Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center (EAMC) Marketing Plan and determines its status. Since it is apparent that a marketing plan does not exist, the goal is to restructure data and information th...

S. D. Franco

1993-01-01

289

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 93-0582-2359, HCA Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the respiratory therapist educator of HCA Wesley Medical Center in Wichita, Kansas, an evaluation was conducted of the effectiveness of revised procedures for administering ribavirin (36791045) via hood. The containment syste...

S. W. Lenhart

1993-01-01

290

Strategic Plan: Initiating an Orthopaedic Residency at Womack Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Graduate Management Project delineates strategic planning necessary to implement an orthopaedic residency at Womack Army Medical Center (WAMC). Ginter, Swaney, and Duncan's strategic planning process as outlined in 'Strategic Management of Healthcare...

D. Mangelsdorff J. W. Harrington

2006-01-01

291

Our Experience with Integrated Patient Care Audit at Kansas City General Hospital and Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The experience of the Kansas City (Mo.) General Hospital and Medical Center in developing and implementing an integrated patient care audit is documented. The prerequisites for successful implementation of an integrated patient care audit are outlined, as...

1974-01-01

292

Physicians for Rural America: The Role of Institutional Commitment within Academic Medical Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Prior study suggests that contextual characteristics of medical schools (e.g., state demographics, public vs private, NIH research effort) predict output of rural physicians without also considering the effects of the medical schools' own policies and programs. Purpose: This study examines medical school commitment to rural policies and…

Wheat, John R.; Higginbotham, John C.; Yu, Jing; Leeper, James D.

2005-01-01

293

Physicians for Rural America: The Role of Institutional Commitment Within Academic Medical Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Prior study suggests that contextual characteristics of medical schools (eg, state demographics, public vs private, NIH research effort) predict output of rural physicians without also considering the effects of the medical schools? own policies and programs. Purpose: This study examines medical school commitment to rural policies and…

Wheat, John R.; Higginbotham, John C.; Yu, Jing; Leeper, James D.

2005-01-01

294

3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...that may be offered by the medical homes approach. In general...point of contact for care. The medical homes approach also emphasizes...Demonstration programs establishing the medical homes approach have been recommended...statutory authority to conduct experiments and demonstrations on...

2010-01-01

295

The grant portfolio of the national center for medical rehabilitation research: The first five years  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To relate grant funding activities of the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) with the Center's mission, priorities, and terminology for disability classification.Study Design: Retrospective review by the National Advisory Board on Medical Rehabilitation Research (NABMRR).Data: Abstracts of 153 research proposals and one contract funded by the NCMRR from 1992 through 1996.Method: A six-member research group participated in

Jean Deitz; Lou Quatrano; P. Hunter Peckham; Paul Bach-Y-Rita; Laura D. Cooper; Jennie Joe

1999-01-01

296

Comfort\\/Palliative Care Guidelines for Neonatal Practice: Development and Implementation in an Academic Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To report the multidisciplinary developmental process of a comfort care guideline for the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) addressing palliative care measures in a tertiary academic medical center. The guideline was developed to be (1) practical, (2) family-centered, (3) respectful of the infant patient, and (4) educational.METHODS: A consensus-building process involving medical, nursing, administrative, and ancillary professional staff integral

Brian S Carter; Jatinder Bhatia

2001-01-01

297

University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers develop new radiation therapy for gynecologic cancers  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center have developed a more effective way to treat gynecologic cancers, shortening radiation treatment time from five weeks to three days. The method was published in the Journal of Visualized Experiments on April 17. The new method, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used on other types of cancer, but University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the first treatment facility to apply it to gynecologic cancers.

298

Evaluation of Medical Nurse Practitioner Program: Participant Instrument No. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This instrument was designed to provide a goal-free evaluation of a pilot training program for Medical Nurse Practitioners. With minor modification, the instrument can be applied to programs at several educational levels: secondary, college, adult, and continuing. The instrument uses 5-point Likert-type scales (with positive and negative…

Rott, Robert K.

299

Evaluation of a Program to Teach Medical Students about Alcoholism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Week-end Intervention Program (WIP) used by Wright State University School of Medicine, which assesses the alcohol problems of those convicted of offenses such as drunk driving and then assists in finding treatment, is described. The impact of the program in educating medical students about alcoholism is discussed. (MLW)|

Siegal, Harvey A.; And Others

1986-01-01

300

State-Funded Comprehensive Primary Medical Care Service Programs for Medically Underserved Populations: 1995 vs 2000  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We analyzed responses to the 2000 Comprehensive Primary Medical Care programs for Medically Underserved Populations Survey and compared them with the 1995 survey results to identify trends. Methods. Surveys were mailed to all primary care program offices. State primary care program associations reviewed primary care program offices’ responses and completed surveys for offices that did not respond. Results. We identified 30 qualified primary care programs in 24 states that had an overall funding level of $215 million. Most states allowed funds to be spent on expanding service areas, buying equipment, and hiring and training staff. Conclusions. Although state funding has increased overall, many states do not have comprehensive primary care programs, and an increasing number of states are experiencing budget deficits that may lead to reductions in existing programs.

Wilensky, Sara; Rosenbaum, Sara; Hawkins, Dan; Mizeur, Heather

2005-01-01

301

Senior Medical Consultants Project: A Continuing Medical Education Program Utilizing Recently or Near-Retired Medical School Faculty Members. Final Report, August 1, 1971 - January 31, 1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document reviews the Senior Medical Consultant Program; a program designed to utilize recently or near-retired medical school faculty members in a continuing medical education program. Evaluation of the program by physician teachers, physicians attending the sessions, both attending staff and house staff, and by physicians scheduling the…

National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Physician Manpower.

302

DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

Jacques, S.L.

1998-01-01

303

Medical respite programs for homeless patients: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Medical respite programs provide care to homeless patients who are too sick to be on the streets or in a traditional shelter, but not sick enough to warrant inpatient hospitalization. They are designed to improve the health of homeless patients while also decreasing costly hospital use. Although there is increasing interest in implementing respite programs, there has been no prior systematic review of their effectiveness. We conducted a comprehensive search for studies of medical respite program outcomes in multiple biomedical and sociological databases, and the grey literature. Thirteen articles met inclusion criteria. The articles were heterogeneous in methods, study quality, inclusion of a comparison group, and outcomes examined. Available evidence showed that medical respite programs reduced future hospital admissions, inpatient days, and hospital readmissions. They also resulted in improved housing outcomes. Results for emergency department use and costs were mixed but promising. Future research utilizing adequate comparison groups is needed. PMID:23728025

Doran, Kelly M; Ragins, Kyle T; Gross, Cary P; Zerger, Suzanne

2013-05-01

304

Discontinuation of diabetes and lipid-lowering medications after bariatric surgery at Veterans Affairs medical centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundBariatric surgery has largely been performed on middle-age female populations and been associated with significant medication discontinuation; however, it is unknown whether similar medication discontinuation rates could be achieved in men. The purpose of the present analysis was to examine the discontinuation rate of diabetes or lipid-lowering medications and the patient factors associated with medication discontinuation among veterans undergoing bariatric

Matthew L. Maciejewski; Edward H. Livingston; Leila C. Kahwati; William G. Henderson; Andrew L. Kavee; David E. Arterburn

2010-01-01

305

Problem-Oriented Assessment of the Lakes Area Regional Medical Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information Support System (ISS) project activities in the Lakes Area Regional Medical Program (LARMP) in western New York are reported. ISS is a short-term program evaluation technique designed to assist regional medical programs (RMPs) in their program ...

1973-01-01

306

Liability for Personal Injury Caused by Defective Medical Computer Programs  

PubMed Central

Defective medical computer programs can cause personal injury. Financial responsibility for the injury under tort law will turn on several factors: whether the program is a product or a service, what types of defect exist in the product, and who produced the program. The factors involved in making these decisions are complex, but knowledge of the relevant issues can assist computer personnel in avoiding liability.

Brannigan, Vincent M.

1980-01-01

307

EVALUATION OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENRICHMENT CENTER PROGRAM (EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM 94).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED TO FIND THE VALUE OF AN ENRICHED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR A HOMOGENEOUS GROUPING OF MENTALLY SUPERIOR STUDENTS. STUDIES WERE CARRIED OUT WITH AN EXPERIMENTAL AND A CONTROL GROUP TO FIND DEVELOPMENT IN LEADERSHIP CAPACITY, INTERESTS, ABILITY TO DRAW CONCLUSIONS, ARTISTIC ABILITY, AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT. OBJECTIVE…

HOFFMAN, RUTH B.

308

34 CFR 644.1 - What is the Educational Opportunity Centers program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false What is the Educational Opportunity Centers program? 644.1 Section...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY CENTERS General § 644.1 What is the Educational Opportunity Centers program? The...

2013-07-01

309

Access To Specialty Care And Medical Services In Community Health Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although community health centers (CHCs) provide primary health services to the medically underserved and poor, limited access to off-site specialty services may lead to poorer outcomes among underinsured CHC patients. This study evaluates access to spe- cialty health services for patients receiving care in CHCs, using a survey of medical direc- tors of all federally qualified CHCs in the United

Nakela L. Cook; LeRoi S. Hicks; A. James O'Malley; Thomas Keegan; Edward Guadagnoli; Bruce E. Landon

2007-01-01

310

The Volume and Mix of Inpatient Services Provided by Academic Medical Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined trends in the volume and type of inpatient clinical diagnoses, common medical services, and specialized services in academic medical centers (AMCs)--integrated and independent, other teaching hospitals, and nonteaching hospitals. Results indicate that despite rapid change in the health care environment, little change has occurred…

Moy, Ernest; And Others

1996-01-01

311

Medical direction of wilderness and other operational emergency medical services programs.  

PubMed

Within a healthcare system, operational emergency medical services (EMS) programs provide prehospital emergency care to patients in austere and resource-limited settings. Some of these programs are additionally considered to be wilderness EMS programs, a specialized type of operational EMS program, as they primarily function in a wilderness setting (eg, wilderness search and rescue, ski patrols, water rescue, beach patrols, and cave rescue). Other operational EMS programs include urban search and rescue, air medical support, and tactical law enforcement response. The medical director will help to ensure that the care provided follows protocols that are in accordance with local and state prehospital standards, while accounting for the unique demands and needs of the environment. The operational EMS medical director should be as qualified as possible for the specific team that is being supervised. The medical director should train and operate with the team frequently to be effective. Adequate provision for compensation, liability, and equipment needs to be addressed for an optimal relationship between the medical director and the team. PMID:22441087

Warden, Craig R; Millin, Michael G; Hawkins, Seth C; Bradley, Richard N

2012-03-01

312

Changing Economics of Health Care Are Devastating Academic Medical Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Once a financially healthy part of American universities, many academic health centers are struggling to survive. Many are merging with for-profit chains or declaring bankruptcy. The advance of managed care and insurance companies focusing on reducing costs appears to be affecting teaching hospitals more than community hospitals. (MSE)

van der Werf, Martin

1999-01-01

313

A new methodology to design distributed medical diagnostic centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a distributed diagnostic center (DDC), patients' examinations (exams) are performed in remote units (RUs) and the collected data (images, lab exams, etc.) are sent to expertise diagnostic units (DUs) for evaluation. The DDC's quality of service per exam is considered through several factors, such as patient's waiting time, RU-DU communicating load, expert's occupancy, priority, administrative cost, etc. This paper

P. A. Baziana; E. I. Karavatselou; D. K. Lymberopoulos; D. N. Serpanos

2001-01-01

314

Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Laboratory Technology Programs (CIP: 51.1004--Medical Laboratory Technology). Postsecondary Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the medical laboratory technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

315

Assessment of reproducibility of cancer survival risk predictions across medical centers  

PubMed Central

Background Two most important considerations in evaluation of survival prediction models are 1) predictability - ability to predict survival risks accurately and 2) reproducibility - ability to generalize to predict samples generated from different studies. We present approaches for assessment of reproducibility of survival risk score predictions across medical centers. Methods Reproducibility was evaluated in terms of consistency and transferability. Consistency is the agreement of risk scores predicted between two centers. Transferability from one center to another center is the agreement of the risk scores of the second center predicted by each of the two centers. The transferability can be: 1) model transferability - whether a predictive model developed from one center can be applied to predict the samples generated from other centers and 2) signature transferability - whether signature markers of a predictive model developed from one center can be applied to predict the samples from other centers. We considered eight prediction models, including two clinical models, two gene expression models, and their combinations. Predictive performance of the eight models was evaluated by several common measures. Correlation coefficients between predicted risk scores of different centers were computed to assess reproducibility - consistency and transferability. Results Two public datasets, the lung cancer data generated from four medical centers and colon cancer data generated from two medical centers, were analyzed. The risk score estimates for lung cancer patients predicted by three of four centers agree reasonably well. In general, a good prediction model showed better cross-center consistency and transferability. The risk scores for the colon cancer patients from one (Moffitt) medical center that were predicted by the clinical models developed from the another (Vanderbilt) medical center were shown to have excellent model transferability and signature transferability. Conclusions This study illustrates an analytical approach to assessing reproducibility of predictive models and signatures. Based on the analyses of the two cancer datasets, we conclude that the models with clinical variables appear to perform reasonable well with high degree of consistency and transferability. There should have more investigations on the reproducibility of prediction models including gene expression data across studies.

2013-01-01

316

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs - Cancer Information Service  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute�s (NCI) Cancer Information Service (CIS) educates the public about cancer prevention, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and research . CIS information specialists provide the latest, most accurate information about cancer by telephone, TTY, instant messaging, and e-mail and operates the NCI�s Smoking Quitline. Through its Partnership Program, the CIS works with established national, regional, and state organizations to reach those most in need of cancer information.

317

Fiscal Year 1984 Program Report: Indiana Water Resources Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Indiana Water Resources Research Center program (1984), Dr. Allan Konopka studied sulfate reduction by microbes as a means of neutralizing acid in lakes. His principal finding was that sulfate-reducing bacteria can metabolize at acidic pH at rates ...

J. H. Cushman

1985-01-01

318

The Center for Talented Youth Talent Search and Academic Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through annual talent searches based on the model developed by Julian Stanley, the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) seeks to identify, assess and recognize students with advanced academic abilities. CTY has also developed extensive programs and services to meet the needs of these students. Having grown steadily in response to…

Barnett, Linda B.; Albert, Mary Elizabeth; Brody, Linda E.

2005-01-01

319

A Behaviorally Oriented Weight Loss Program for Counseling Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The effectiveness of several weight loss programs offered through a university counseling center was compared. Although subjects met for only two treatment sessions, the behavior therapy group had lost significantly more weight at follow-up than the rational therapy, self-directed, and no-treatment control groups. (Author)|

Thorn, Myron E.; Boudewyns, Patrick A.

1976-01-01

320

Fiscal Year 1987 program report: Vermont Water Resources Research Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both surface and groundwater issues were addressed in the FY87 Vermont Water Resources Research Center program. Two projects focused on ground water, with one assessing techniques for reducing nitrate contamination in agricultural areas and a second comparing techniques for monitoring microbial contamination. A third project considered the role of acid deposition in the fate of aluminum in soils and water,

1988-01-01

321

The Center for Talented Youth Talent Search and Academic Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Through annual talent searches based on the model developed by Julian Stanley, the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) seeks to identify, assess and recognize students with advanced academic abilities. CTY has also developed extensive programs and services to meet the needs of these students. Having grown steadily in response to…

Barnett, Linda B.; Albert, Mary Elizabeth; Brody, Linda E.

2005-01-01

322

Help Neighborhood Center Program, School Year 1975-1976.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report evaluated the impact of the Help-Neighborhood Center Program which was designed to inform parents of fifth through eighth grade students about health problems and community concerns. Four thousand elementary and junior high school students and 100 parents participated in workshops on venereal disease, drug abuse, welfare rights,…

Siperstein, Gary N.

323

Environmental Monitoring Program at the Feed Materials Production Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environmental monitoring program at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) consists of monitoring and surveillance activities which support facility regulatory compliance. These activities include environmental sampling, data management and analysis, and data reporting to support air compliance, water compliance, and solid waste compliance at the FMPC. The Environmental Compliance subsection of the Environment, Safety and Health Department is responsible

Malone

1988-01-01

324

Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder

Steven M. Stevenson

1997-01-01

325

DAILY PROGRAM 1, FOR A CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER. PROJECT HEADSTART.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THE OBJECTIVES OF THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER PROGRAMS ARE TO HELP DISADVANTAGED PRESCHOOL CHILDREN LEARN TO WORK AND PLAY INDEPENDENTLY, TO RELATE WELL TO OTHER CHILDREN, TO DEVELOP SELF-IDENTITY, TO REALIZE OPPORTUNITIES TO STRIVE AND TO SUCCEED, TO BROADEN LANGUAGE SKILLS, TO BE CURIOUS, TO STRENGTHEN PHYSICAL SKILLS, TO DEVELOP CREATIVITY,…

Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

326

The Center for Talented Youth talent search and academic programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through annual talent searches based on the model developed by Julian Stanley, the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) seeks to identify, assess and recognize students with advanced academic abilities. CTY has also developed extensive programs and services to meet the needs of these students. Having grown steadily in response to students' needs since its inception, CTY now serves

Linda B. Barnett; Mary Elizabeth Albert; Linda E. Brody

2005-01-01

327

ASSESSMENT CENTER SIMULATION: A University Training Program for Business Graduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes Assessment Center (AC) programs that are used in Germany to prepare university business graduates making job applications to large companies. The simulation of real-life application procedures is explained, problems associated with the validity of the AC are addressed, and the roles and attitudes of students and experts are discussed.…

Steuer, Eckhard

1992-01-01

328

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - UMB/DFHCC Comprehensive Cancer Center Partnership Program  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - UMB/DFHCC Comprehensive Cancer Center Partnership Program Home Disparities Research Programs CRCHD Ongoing Research PACHE PACHE Partnership Listing UMB/DFHCC Comprehensive Cancer Center Partnership Program

329

34 CFR 669.1 - What is the Language Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...PROGRAM General § 669.1 What is the Language Resource Centers Program? The Language Resource Centers Program makes awards...the nation's capacity for teaching and learning foreign languages effectively. (Authority: 20...

2013-07-01

330

Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.  

PubMed

At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities. PMID:23108741

Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

2013-11-01

331

What are the pathology education requirements for all nonpathology ACGME-accredited programs in an academic center?  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine institution-wide graduate medical education (GME) requirements in pathology (exclusive of pathology residency and fellowships) at an academic center. All documents related to residency review committee (RRC) program requirements were searched for the key words "pathology," "laboratory," "autopsy," and "morbidity." For each occurrence, it was determined whether a pathology education requirement had been identified. Requirements were categorized and tabulated. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) lists 135 nonpathology programs; 66 programs exist at Duke University Medical Center, of which 54 (82%) had pathology education requirement(s). Twelve education categories were identified. Teaching/conferences were the most common (52%). Thirty-nine percent required consultation/support. Sixteen programs were required to perform gross/microscopic examination. Trainees in medical genetics are required to have a pathology rotation. Elective rotations should be available for trainees in 6 programs. Pathology departments at academic centers face significant institution-wide pathology education requirements for clinical ACGME programs. Didactic teaching/conferences and consultation/support are common requirements. Opportunities exist for innovative teaching strategies. PMID:22912348

Bean, Sarah M; Nagler, Alisa; Buckley, Patrick J

2012-09-01

332

Science Communication Fellowship Program at the Pacific Science Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With funding from an NSF Informal Science Education grant, the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington began the Science Communication Fellowship program in 2009 as part of the Portal to the Public initiative. The purpose of the Science Communication Fellowship program is to train scientists and engineers to communicate more effectively with the general public regarding their research and to assist with the development of hands-on activities that can be used by the scientists and engineers for outreach activities. The program came out of a collaboration to develop a model for effectively communicating current science research at informal science education organizations. The program model has undergone in-depth research and evaluation to assess its effectiveness and impact. To become Science Communication Fellows, researchers participate in four three-hour professional development sessions, where they learn communication techniques through role-playing and hands-on activities. The workshops are supplemented with additional one-on-one meetings with Science Center staff to help the new Fellows develop activities for use at outreach events. These activities are then used by the Fellows at public events that highlight current research taking place in the region. To date over 80 scientists and engineers have gone through the training sessions to become Science Communication Fellows. The Pacific Science Center holds approximately 12 events a year in which Fellows can facilitate their activity. Public programs range from small, monthly programs to large, annual Research Weekends. Funding for this program continues through support from NIH, IMLS, NSF, and NASA grants. For more information, please contact the current program administrator Dana Vukajlovich at DVukajlovich@pacsci.org.

Harnett, E. M.; Vukajlovich, D.; Fitzwater, S.; Selvakumar, M.

2011-12-01

333

Evaluation of the Experimental Medical Care Review Organization Program: Protocol for Evaluation of EMCRO. Third Edition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Experimental Medical Care Review Organization (EMCRO) program was initiated in order to study the ability of regional medical appraisal programs to both improve the quality of medical care and moderate its cost. Grants were provided to selected local ...

P. A. Bonner

1973-01-01

334

77 FR 45716 - Proposed Information Collection (Foreign Medical Program); Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection (Foreign Medical Program); Comment Request...reimburse healthcare providers for medical services provided to veterans...other forms of information technology. Titles: a. Foreign Medical Program Registration...

2012-08-01

335

75 FR 77647 - Medical Device User Fee Program; Meetings on Reauthorization; Request for Notification of Patient...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0389] Medical Device User Fee Program; Meetings on...meetings on reauthorization of the Medical Device User Fee Amendments of 2007...continue collecting user fees for the medical device program. The Federal Food,...

2010-12-13

336

Medical student research: a program of self-education.  

PubMed

Student participation in research has traditionally been part of the academic program in American medical schools. A survey of student research in 115 U.S. medical schools showed that 74 percent had M.D./Ph.D. programs but that only about 0.6 percent of the students participated in them. Eighty percent had research programs not directed toward a Ph.D.; and although these involved only 6 percent of the students, the enthusiasm of the students for their research experience was very high. The University of Florida has long fostered medical student research. A survey of 1969--1978 participants in the Florida programs yielded a 74 percent endorsement of research as an important, positive educational experience, and nearly all agreed that a research option should be part of the medical school curriculum. Since research provides the students with an intellectually challenging, self-learning experience that they endorse enthusiastically and since there is small student participation, it seems timely to reassess the role of student research in the medical school curriculum. PMID:7299797

Fisher, W R

1981-11-01

337

SLE: serving the underserved in an academic medical center.  

PubMed

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystemic autoimmune disorder that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. SLE typically affects women during their childbearing years, and can disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minorities. Because this disease afflicts them at the height of their youth, patients often carry a large psychosocial burden. This is especially the case in groups that may have to grapple with other issues such as poverty, work disability, and lack of insurance. In this review we look at these issues, and how they affect patients at one major academic center in the Bronx, NY. PMID:22905975

Blanco, Irene

2012-01-01

338

Physicians' fees and public medical care programs.  

PubMed Central

In this article we develop and estimate a model of physicians' pricing that explicitly incorporates the effects of Medicare and Medicaid demand subsidies. Our analysis is based on a multiperiod model in which physicians are monopolistic competitors supplying services to several markets. The implications of the model are tested using data derived from claims submitted by a cohort of 1,200 California physicians during the years 1972-1975. We conclude that the demand for physician's services is relatively elastic; that increases in the local supply of physicians reduce prices somewhat; that physicians respond strategically to attempts to control prices through the customary-prevailing-reasonable system; and that price controls limit the rate of increase in physicians' prices. The analysis identifies a family of policies that recognize the monopsony power of public programs and may change the cost-access trade-off.

Lee, R H; Hadley, J

1981-01-01

339

Descriptive analysis of patients undergoing shoulder surgery at a tertiary care military medical center.  

PubMed

Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Patients with shoulder pain who are seeking care in a military tertiary setting in the United States have not been previously described. This study describes the clinical features of 55 patients (47 men, 8 women) undergoing shoulder surgery at a tertiary care military medical center. Patients presenting to a military medical center are different than other previously described samples in the literature. Specifically, the patients in this study had a known mechanism of injury (n = 42; 76%), multiple structures involved (n = 46; 84%) and a high prevalence of glenoid labral involvement (n = 44; 80%). Further research is needed to determine if these patient characteristics identified in this study warrant different management strategies and resource utilization in both the tertiary care center, and in the primary care center where these patients are typically seen before referral to a tertiary care center. PMID:19585780

Walsworth, Matthew K; Doukas, William C; Murphy, Kevin P; Bimson, William; Mielcarek, Billie J; Michener, Lori A

2009-06-01

340

Caregiver Burden at McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate a Veterans Administration Respite Care Program's effectiveness in reducing caregiver burden. Sixteen caregivers, who had used respite care, comprised the experimental group. Fourteen caregivers, who had not received respite care, comprised the control group. A multidimensional perspective considering veterans' ADL impairment, veterans' memory and behavior problems, and the caregivers' perception of the situation

Margaret C. Skelly; Carolyn M. McAdoo; Susan M. Ostergard

1992-01-01

341

Assessment and Measurement of Patient-Centered Medical Home Implementation: The BCBSM Experience  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Our goal was to describe an approach to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) measurement based on delineating the desired properties of the measurement relative to assumptions about the PCMH and the uses of the measure by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) and health services researchers. METHODS We developed and validated an approach to assess 13 functional domains of PCMHs and 128 capabilities within those domains. A measure of PCMH implementation was constructed using data from the validated self-assessment and then tested on a large sample of primary care practices in Michigan. RESULTS Our results suggest that the measure adequately addresses the specific requirements and assumptions underlying the BCBSM PCMH program—ability to assess change in level of implementation; ability to compare across practices regardless of size, affiliation, or payer mix; and ability to assess implementation of the PCMH through different sequencing of capabilities and domains. CONCLUSIONS Our experience illustrates that approaches to measuring PCMH should be driven by the measures’ intended use(s) and users, and that a one-size-fits-all approach may not be appropriate. Rather than promoting the BCBSM PCMH measure as the gold standard, our study highlights the challenges, strengths, and limitations of developing a standardized approach to PCMH measurement.

Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Paustian, Michael; Wise, Christopher G.; Green, Lee A.; Fetters, Michael D.; Mason, Margaret; El Reda, Darline K.

2013-01-01

342

Teaching while learning while practicing: reframing faculty development for the patient-centered medical home.  

PubMed

Soaring costs of health care, patients living longer with chronic illnesses, and continued attrition of interest in primary care contribute to the urgency of developing an improved model of health care delivery. Out of this need, the concept of the team-based, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has developed. Amidst implementation in academic settings, clinical teachers face complex challenges not previously encountered: teaching while simultaneously learning about the PCMH model, redesigning clinical delivery systems while simultaneously delivering care within them, and working more closely in expanded interprofessional teams.To address these challenges, the authors reviewed three existing faculty development models and recommended four important adaptations for preparing clinical teachers for their roles as system change agents and facilitators of learning in these new settings. First, many faculty find themselves in the awkward position of teaching concepts they have yet to master themselves. Professional development programs must recognize that, at least initially, health professions learners and faculty will be learning system redesign content and skills together while practicing in the evolving workplace. Second, all care delivery team members influence learning in the workplace. Thus, the definition of faculty must expand to include nurses, pharmacists, social workers, medical assistants, patients, and others. These team members will need to accept their roles as educators. Third, learning to deliver health care in teams will require support of both interprofessional collaboration and intraprofessional identity development. Fourth, learning to manage change and uncertainty should be part of the core content of any faculty development program within the PCMH. PMID:23887006

Clay, Michael A; Sikon, Andrea L; Lypson, Monica L; Gomez, Arthur; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Bowen, Judith L

2013-09-01

343

A baseline study of medication error rates at Baylor University Medical Center in preparation for implementation of a computerized physician order entry system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To determine baseline levels of medication errors and their root causes so as to highlight areas of potential process improvements and serve as a ruler against which to measure future improvements. Design: A prospective pharmacist intervention study determining errors in 1014 medication orders at Baylor University Medical Center. Only errors in the process of medication ordering were documented; errors

CHRISTINA E. SEELEY; DAVID NICEWANDER; ROBERT PAGE; PETER A. DYSERT II

344

Süleymaniye Külliyesi: a historically important medical, scientific, and cultural center.  

PubMed

SCIENCE HAS MANY Western and Eastern historical roots. All of these contributed to the body of academic literature. One of the most important aspects of scientific progress is educational institutions, including hospitals, schools, and libraries. Some of these institutions may offer an identity for a city, as well as contribute to its development. Süleymaniye Külliyesi is one such institution. Süleymaniye Külliyesi, established in the 16th century, contains many centers, including a mosque, surrounded by a hospital, school of medicine, central pharmacy, and library. It once served both the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic. The school of medicine of this complex was the first school of medicine in the Ottoman period that functioned in coordination with the hospital and central pharmacy. The library contains many rare books and manuscripts. Currently, it is one of the richest centers in the field of oriental studies. We conclude that Süleymaniye Külliyesi, with its health-related elements and library, contributed to the development and progress of science and deserves to be cited in the literature of the Western world. PMID:16883182

Dinç, Gülten; Naderi, Sait; Kanpolat, Yücel

2006-08-01

345

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center  

Cancer.gov

The University of California Davis Cancer Center (UCDCC) was founded in 1991 and received its NCI designation in 2002. In 2011, it attained comprehensive status. The Center is a program of the UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center.

346

Expanding the National Naval Medical Center's Patient Appointment Call Center: An Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The new TRICARE contracts will shift the burden of providing outpatient appointing services from the contractors to Military Treatment Facilities (MTF). Through the Patient Appointment Call Center (PACC), the MTEs at Bethesda and Annapolis are ready for t...

D. C. Tolentino

2004-01-01

347

Conflict of interest issues pertinent to Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.  

PubMed

Conflicts of interest exist when an arrangement potentially exerts inappropriate influence on decision making or professional judgment, or is perceived to do so, and can thus damage the public trust and undermine the integrity of those decisions. Concerns regarding financial conflicts of interest in the medical arena have reached their height as of late, given that physicians now function in a milieu of complex and delicate relationships with pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. Even when such relationships do not correlate with actual compromise of judgment or patient care, it threatens the credibility of both the health care professional and the institution because of the social perception of the effect of these relationships. Although most institutions in the Western world set forth a code of ethics and conflict-of-interest policies to be followed under threat of termination, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) presents itself as a unique environment in which conflicts of interest are subject to governmental laws, violation of which may not only result in employment-related discipline, but may be sanctioned by civil and criminal penalties. Moreover, these provisions are developed by a national authoritative organization rather than being institution-specific guidelines. Given that many academic physicians working within the VHA may also have a component of their practice in a University setting, it becomes important to understand the differences in policy between these contexts so as not to threaten the public trust in the veracity of decisions made and, therefore, maintain the integrity of the relationship between physician and patient. This article will review aspects of conflict-of-interest policies in the realm of research, financial relationships, foreign travel, and vendor contracting that are particular to the VHA and make it a unique environment to function in as a physician and scientist. PMID:21872117

Hanna, Jennifer; Simiele, Ernest; Lawson, D Curtis; Tyler, Douglas

2011-09-01

348

Development of a medical-psychiatric program within the private sector. Potential problems and strategies for their resolution.  

PubMed

Recent reports regarding the development of combined medical-psychiatric units have primarily involved units operated under the auspices of academic medical centers. Almost no published information is available regarding the fiscal, administrative, or clinical feasibility of operating such programs within the context of the private community hospital setting. This article outlines the organization and development of such a private unit and discusses the various medical, administrative, political, and financial considerations that must be evaluated in planning for the successful operation of medical-psychiatric units within the private sector. PMID:2110542

Bruns, W; Stoudemire, A

1990-05-01

349

Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

Antimirova, Tetyana

2006-12-01

350

38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of...equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist...facilities of the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, which the Secretary...grants will be subject, will be advance approval by the U.S....

2013-07-01

351

Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

2005-01-01

352

E-learning program for medical students in dermatology  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop an e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning). Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning) had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0±0.8) than those who only participated in classes (7.75±1.8, p <0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that an associated online course might improve the learning of medical students in dermatology.

Silva, Cristiana Silveira; Souza, Murilo Barreto; Filho, Roberto Silveira Silva; de Medeiros, Luciana Molina; Criado, Paulo Ricardo

2011-01-01

353

LAN: A strategy for managing medical data and programs  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Occupational Medicine Center has primary responsibility for industrial medicine services, applied epidemiology, workers' compensation and sickness absence benefit management, Human Studies Board, employee assistance and health promotion. Each discipline has unique needs for data management, standard and ad hoc reporting and data analysis. The Medical Organization has established a local area network as the preferred computing environment to meet these diverse needs. Numerous applications have been implemented on the LAN supporting some 80 users.

Not Available

1993-02-10

354

LAN: A strategy for managing medical data and programs  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories Occupational Medicine Center has primary responsibility for industrial medicine services, applied epidemiology, workers` compensation and sickness absence benefit management, Human Studies Board, employee assistance and health promotion. Each discipline has unique needs for data management, standard and ad hoc reporting and data analysis. The Medical Organization has established a local area network as the preferred computing environment to meet these diverse needs. Numerous applications have been implemented on the LAN supporting some 80 users.

Not Available

1993-02-10

355

Reliability-centered maintenance program at Clinton Power Station  

SciTech Connect

Illinois Power Company is implementing a reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) program at its 984-MW(electric) Clinton Power Station (CPS). The RCM program as defined at CPS is broader and more encompassing than the classical RCM program that is now being introduced to the nuclear industry from the commercial airline industry. At CPS, all of the major elements of the classical RCM approach are being used, but in conjunction with other reliability engineering techniques (e.g., traditional system analysis, review of CPS-specific and industry operating experience). The following are the fundamental objectives of the CPS RCM program: (1) ensure safe and reliable operation of CPS; (2) maintain equipment at inherent levels of safety and reliability and restore these whenever they become degraded; (3) develop design improvements when inherent equipment reliability is inadequate; and (4) accomplish the above objectives at a minimum of total cost, including maintenance costs and the costs of residual failures.

Kripps, L.J.; Rees, D.C.; Smith, A.M.; Vaughan, E.B.; Dwyer, M.J.; Falkenheim, D.R.

1987-01-01

356

Center for Medical and Materials Science Research with Free Electron Lasers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this program was to develop an integrated laboratory dedicated to the exploration of the medical applications and materials of free-electron lasers with the capability to: (a) develop and apply advanced FEL and medical technologies and te...

J. M. Madey

1994-01-01

357

Integrating Extreme Programming and User-Centered Design ?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The success of a software development project is associated not only with tools and technologies, but it also depends on how much the development process helps to be user-centered and developer-oriented. Involving customers in the process and being people-oriented, Extreme Programming (XP)- One of the popular agile methods - can be a choice for developing a usable system. The project

Zahid Hussain; Martin Lechner; Harald Milchrahm; Sara Shahzad; Wolfgang Slany; Martin Umgeher; Peter Wolkerstorfer

358

Program Assessments: Success Strategies for Three Canadian Teaching Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Program assessments are an essential part of the ongoing survival of teaching centers performed by faculty development personnel\\u000a at institutions of higher education. Little research is available to guide developers in performing these assessments. In\\u000a this article we describe assessments conducted at three Canadian universities and highlight the theoretical models used to\\u000a guide the process. Reflections on the strengths and

Dieter J. Schönwetter; Debra L. Dawson; Judy Britnell

2009-01-01

359

A family-centered educational program to promote independence in pediatric heart transplant recipients.  

PubMed

CONTEXT: Characteristic adolescent risk-taking behavior, including nonadherence with prescribed medications, can be life-threatening for transplant recipients. Suggestions for managing nonadherence in teen recipients include providing them and their parents with adequate information about medications, talking with and listening to pediatric recipients about problems with the comprehensive regimen, and encouraging age-appropriate responsibility for maintaining health. OBJECTIVE: The clinical goal of this project was to develop a structured age-appropriate educational program to prepare pediatric transplant recipients and their families for the patient's life as a responsible, independent individual. Our primary research goal was to assess patients' and parents' knowledge about critical aspects of heart transplantation and the treatment regimen with brief questionnaires before and after they received the educational materials from their primary nurse coordinator. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: This descriptive pre-post test study was done to assess the effectiveness of an innovative family-centered educational program among 20 pediatric heart transplant recipients and their parents at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE, RESULTS: Percentage change in children's scores on questionnaires given before and after the educational intervention ranged from -8% to 300% (mean, 64.1%). Percentage change in scores from before to after for parents ranged from -19% to 53.8% (mean, 7.2%). PMID:21485944

Lawrence, Kathy S; Stilley, Carol S; Pollock, John A; Webber, Steven A; Quivers, Eric S

2011-03-01

360

Hurricane Katrina: Medical Response at the Houston Astrodome\\/Reliant Center Complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

On September 1, 2005, with only 12 hours notice, various collaborators established a medical facility—the Katrina Clinic—at the Astrodome\\/Reliant Center Complex in Houston. By the time the facility closed roughly two weeks later, the Katrina Clinic medical staff had seen over 11,000 of the estimated 27,000 Hurricane Kat- rina evacuees who sought shelter in the Complex. Herein, we de- scribe

Thomas F. Gavagan; Kieran Smart; Herminia Palacio; Carmel Dyer; Stephen Greenberg; Paul Sirbaugh; Avrim Fishkind; Douglas Hamilton; Umair Shah; George Masi; R Todd Ivey; Julie Jones; Faye Y. Chiou-Tan; Donna Bloodworth; David Hyman; Cliff Whigham; Valory Pavlik; Ralph D. Feigin; Kenneth Mattox

2006-01-01

361

A 5-year evaluation of a methadone medical maintenance program  

PubMed Central

Methadone medical maintenance (MMM) is a model for the treatment of opioid dependence in which a monthly supply of methadone is distributed in an office setting, in contrast to more highly regulated settings where daily observed dosing is the norm. We assessed patient characteristics and treatment outcomes of an MMM program initiated in the Bronx, New York, in 1999 by conducting a retrospective chart review. Participant characteristics were compared with those of patients enrolled in affiliated conventional methadone maintenance treatment programs. Patients had diverse ethnicities, occupations, educational backgrounds, and income levels. Urine toxicology testing detected illicit opiate and cocaine use in 0.8% and 0.4% of aggregate samples, respectively. The retention rate was 98%, which compares favorably with the four other MMM programs that have been reported in the medical literature. This study demonstrates that selected patients from a socioeconomically disadvantaged population remained clinically stable and engaged in treatment in a far less intensive setting than traditional methadone maintenance.

Harris, Kenneth A.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Joseph, Herman; Hecht, Joe; Marion, Ira; Juliana, Patti; Gourevitch, Marc N.

2009-01-01

362

[The activity of a specialized city medical-and-social center for schoolchildren].  

PubMed

Described in the paper is a concept of an alternative educational facility (City center for medical, psychological and social follow-up, diagnosis and consultation of schoolchildren in Yaroslavl) popularizing the healthy mode of life among pupils of general schools. The center's experts developed and tested comprehensive approaches to teaching the motivation and skills of the healthy mode of life through the comprehensive training of pupils, teachers and parents. PMID:15606044

Gogolev, Iu V; Nikolaeva, T N

363

Access to patient-centered medical home among Ohio's Children with Special Health Care Needs.  

PubMed

Medical homes deliver primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family centered, coordinated, compassionate and culturally effective. Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) require a wide range of support to maintain health, making medical home access particularly important. We sought to understand independent risk factors for lacking access. We analyzed Ohio, USA data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2005-2006). Among CSHCN, 55.6% had medical home access. The proportion achieving each medical home component was highest for having a personal doctor/nurse and lowest for receiving coordinated care, family-centered care and referrals. Specific subsets of CSHCN were significantly and independently more likely to lack medical home access: Hispanic (AOR=3.08), moderate/high severity of difficulty (AOR=2.84), and any public insurance (AOR=1.60). Efforts to advance medical home access must give special attention to these CSHCN populations and improvements must be made to referral access, family-centered care, and care coordination. PMID:23242811

Conrey, Elizabeth J; Seidu, Dazar; Ryan, Norma J; Chapman, Dj Sam

2012-12-12

364

Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program: The Prevalence of Asthma Medication Use During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Background Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in women of reproductive age, occurring in up to 8% of pregnancies. Objective Assess the prevalence of asthma medication use during pregnancy in a large diverse cohort. Methods We identified women aged 15 to 45 years who delivered a live born infant between 2001 and 2007 across 11 U.S. health plans within the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). Using health plans’ administrative and claims data, and birth certificate data, we identified deliveries for which women filled asthma medications from 90 days before pregnancy through delivery. Prevalence (%) was calculated for asthma diagnosis and medication dispensing. Results There were 586,276 infants from 575,632 eligible deliveries in the MEPREP cohort. Asthma prevalence among mothers was 6.7%, increasing from 5.5% in 2001 to 7.8% in 2007. A total of 9.7% (n=55,914) of women were dispensed asthma medications during pregnancy. The overall prevalence of maintenance-only medication, rescue-only medication, and combined maintenance and rescue medication was 0.6%, 6.7%, and 2.4% respectively. The prevalence of maintenance-only use doubled during the study period from 0.4% to 0.8%, while rescue-only use decreased from 7.4% to 5.8%. Conclusions In this large population-based pregnancy cohort, the prevalence of asthma diagnoses increased over time. The dispensing of maintenance-only medication increased over time, while rescue-only medication dispensing decreased over time.

Hansen, Craig; Joski, Peter; Freiman, Heather C.; Andrade, Susan; Toh, Sengwee; Dublin, Sascha; Cheetham, T. Craig; Cooper, William O.; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Li, De-Kun; Beaton, Sarah J.; Scott, Pamela E.; Hammad, Tarek; Davis, Robert

2013-01-01

365

The programs and context of medical education in Argentina.  

PubMed

There are 29 medical schools in Argentina (this number has increased rapidly in the last decade) offering a 6-year curriculum that usually consists of 3 years of basic science, 2 years of clinical sciences, and one internship year. Annually, 5,000 physicians graduate from these programs. Admission requirements vary depending on each university's policy. Some do not have entry requirements; others require a course, usually on the basics of mathematics, biology, chemistry or physics, and some introduction to social and humanistic studies. Each year, there are approximately 12,000 first-year medical students attending the 29 schools, which suffer a high dropout rate during the first years because of vocational problems or inability to adapt to university life. Some schools have massive classes (over 2,000 students), which makes it difficult for the schools to perfect their teaching. The number of full-time faculty members is low, and some of them have appointments at more than one medical school. Residency programs offer an insufficient number of places, and fewer than 50% of the graduates can obtain a residency position because of strict admission requirements. Coordination between the Ministry of Health, representing the health care system, and the Ministry of Education, representing the medical education system, needs to be improved. Despite the problems of medical education in Argentina, the movement to improve the education of health care workers is growing. The author offers two recommendations to help accomplish this goal. PMID:17122474

Centeno, Angel M

2006-12-01

366

Alternative medical school curriculum design: the independent study program.  

PubMed

The University of Wisconsin Medical School established an alternative Independent Study Program (ISP) in the basic medical sciences in 1972. This program enabled class size to be increased without increasing laboratory teaching space, provided better education for students with diverse educational backgrounds, permitted individual progress, and promoted independent study. When compared to the most receptive oriented regular curriculum students (RCR) and those most discovery oriented (RCD), the preferred learning style of self-selected ISP students was more discovery or self-directed. They retained that style after graduation, while RCD students frequently became less discovery oriented. The ISP group was older, had more females, and had more advanced degrees. Although they had lower undergraduate grade point averages, they did well on the Verbal, General Information, Problem-Solving, and Quantitative sections of the MCAT. They also did well scholastically in Medical School, scored well on the National Boards Medical Examination, had the same distribution of residencies, and obtained the same quality of residency placement for medicine, surgery, and pediatrics. They have been very supportive of the program and feel that it was valuable in developing their abilities for continued self education. PMID:1749346

Stone, H L; Meyer, T C; Schilling, R

1991-01-01

367

Evaluating family-centered programs in neonatal intensive care.  

PubMed

With the passage of P.L. 99-457 in October of 1986, the field of early intervention has been faced with the challenge of broadening its scope (Silber, 1989). This legislation expanded early intervention from a child-centered service to a service offered to families within a variety of contexts; from a service for children with special needs to a service available to families as soon as risks are identified. New programs are being designed and developed with an interagency focus which serve not only children with developmental disabilities but also their families in health, education and social services (Cornwell and Thurman, 1990). Current legislation suggests that services should be available to families as soon as their children are identified as being at-risk (Smith, 1987). In response to the legislation, states are developing definitions of "at-risk" based on criteria other than the child's test scores. Therefore, in many cases, early intervention services are being offered to families while their at-risk infants are still hospitalized and receiving intensive care. Evaluation of these innovative and complex service delivery programs is being addressed as these services are developed. With the broadening of the scope of early intervention comes the need to rethink the traditional methods of evaluating these programs. This paper will address some of the issues involved in evaluating family-centered programs which are based in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). PMID:10109768

Korteland, C; Cornwell, J R

1991-01-01

368

Increasing access to medical education for students from medically underserved communities: one program's success.  

PubMed

The Premedical Honors College (PHC) is an eight-year, BS-MD program created in 1994 by Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and The University of Texas-Pan American (UT-PA) to increase the number of physicians addressing the health care needs of underserved populations in Texas. The PHC targets South Texas, a 13-county, medically underserved area with a population that is 82% Hispanic. To date, the PHC has had 159 matriculants and 71 graduates, of whom 60 (84.5%) have matriculated into medical school. These results are significant considering that in 1996, only four students from all five South Texas colleges (combined enrollment of 30000 students) were accepted to medical school. An outcomes study comparing PHC matriculants with students of similar academic ability, ethnicity, and interest in medicine revealed that the odds of medical school matriculation were seven times higher for PHC students than for non-PHC students. The PHC's initial success has been acknowledged by the Texas legislature, which recently passed a bill to promote the PHC's replication. In addition, the number of PHC students-of whom 95% are Mexican American-who matriculate into medical school annually is significant nationally. In 2001, only 386 U.S. medical school matriculants (2.3% of all matriculants) were Mexican American; 17 of these students (4.4%) were PHC graduates. If current trends continue, the PHC could significantly expand the number of physicians serving minority and medically underserved populations in Texas and the nation. Also, the PHC provides an opportunity for research on programs designed to create pathways from high school to medical school. PMID:12742779

Thomson, William A; Ferry, Pamela G; King, Jason E; Martinez-Wedig, Cindy; Michael, Lloyd H

2003-05-01

369

A case study: the evolution of a "facilitator model" liaison program in an academic medical library*  

PubMed Central

Question: What type of liaison program would best utilize both librarians and other library staff to effectively promote library services and resources to campus departments? Setting: The case is an academic medical center library serving a large, diverse campus. Methods: The library implemented a “facilitator model” program to provide personalized service to targeted clients that allowed for maximum staff participation with limited subject familiarity. To determine success, details of liaison-contact interactions and results of liaison and department surveys were reviewed. Results: Liaisons successfully recorded 595 interactions during the program's first 10 months of existence. A significant majority of departmental contact persons (82.5%) indicated they were aware of the liaison program, and 75% indicated they preferred email communication. Conclusion: The “facilitator model” provides a well-defined structure for assigning liaisons to departments or groups; however, training is essential to ensure that liaisons are able to communicate effectively with their clients.

DeShay, Claudia H.; Huslig, Mary Ann; Mayo, Helen G.; Patridge, Emily F.

2012-01-01

370

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Benefits for Patients and Participating Institutions  

Cancer.gov

The community cancer centers that are part of the NCCCP pilot already provide comprehensive cancer screening and prevention services, and medical, surgical, and radiation oncology services for patients with cancer. Through the pilot program, patients can expect to have their care coordinated through a multidisciplinary planning group, receive assistance from �patient navigators�, and have more opportunities to join clinical trials for cancer prevention and treatment. Special focus will be placed on the psychosocial needs of patients and on enhancing services for cancer survivors.

371

Impact of 5 years of lean six sigma in a University Medical Center.  

PubMed

Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherlands, with LSS. It was introduced in 2007 to create the financial possibility to develop innovations. In this article, we describe how LSS was introduced, and how it developed in the following years. We zoom in at the traumatology department, where all main processes have been analyzed and improved. An evaluation after 5 years shows that LSS helped indeed reducing cost and improving quality. Moreover, it aided the transition of the organization from purely problem oriented to more process oriented, which in turn is helpful in eliminating waste and finding solutions for difficult problems. A major benefit of the program is that own employees are trained to become project leaders for improvement. Several people from the primary process were thus stimulated and equipped to become role models for continuous improvement. PMID:23011073

Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; de Jong, Laura J; Wendt, Klaus W; Does, Ronald J M M

372

75 FR 21207 - Medicare Program; Ambulatory Surgical Centers, Conditions for Coverage  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0938-AP93 Medicare Program; Ambulatory Surgical Centers, Conditions for Coverage AGENCY...for coverage (CfC) that ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) must meet in order to...Regulatory Authority for the Ambulatory Surgical Centers, Conditions for Coverage...

2010-04-23

373

Weight and Inch Changes in Subjects Enrolled in a Medical Weight Loss Management Program With and Without Medical Nutrition Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: There is a trend for Medical Nutrition Therapy to increase weight and inch loss as well as maintenance of loss under Medical Weight Loss ManagementProgram is discontinued.One hundred twenty-six subjects enrolled in a Medical Weight Loss Management program using fenfluramine and phentermine were followed for 12 months. Subjects were divided into three groups based on frequency of Medical

K. McMahon; H. Wengreen; N. Schvaneveldt

1997-01-01

374

Undergoing Transformation to the Patient Centered Medical Home in Safety Net Health Centers: Perspectives from the Front Lines  

PubMed Central

Objectives Safety Net Health Centers (SNHCs), which include Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) provide primary care for underserved, minority and low income patients. SNHCs across the country are in the process of adopting the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, based on promising early implementation data from demonstration projects. However, previous demonstration projects have not focused on the safety net and we know little about PCMH transformation in SNHCs. Design This qualitative study characterizes early PCMH adoption experiences at SNHCs. Setting and Participants We interviewed 98 staff,(administrators, providers, and clinical staff) at 20 of 65 SNHCs, from five states, who were participating in the first of a five-year PCMH collaborative, the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Main Measures We conducted 30-45 minute, semi-structured telephone interviews. Interview questions addressed benefits anticipated, obstacles encountered, and lessons learned in transition to PCMH. Results Anticipated benefits for participating in the PCMH included improved staff satisfaction and patient care and outcomes. Obstacles included staff resistance and lack of financial support for PCMH functions. Lessons learned included involving a range of staff, anticipating resistance, and using data as frequent feedback. Conclusions SNHCs encounter unique challenges to PCMH implementation, including staff turnover and providing care for patients with complex needs. Staff resistance and turnover may be ameliorated through improved healthcare delivery strategies associated with the PCMH. Creating predictable and continuous funding streams may be more fundamental challenges to PCMH transformation.

Quinn, Michael T.; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Nocon, Robert S.; Lewis, Sarah E.; Vable, Anusha M.; Tang, Hui; Park, Seo-Young; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Huang, Elbert S.; Birnberg, Jonathan; Burnet, Deborah L.; Summerfelt, W. Thomas; Chin, Marshall H.

2013-01-01

375

78 FR 38983 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory...should read World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory...Information: Paul Middendorf, Senior Health Scientist, 1600 Clifton...

2013-06-28

376

34 CFR 669.1 - What is the Language Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... General § 669.1 What is the Language Resource Centers Program? The Language Resource Centers Program makes...improving the nation's capacity for teaching and learning foreign languages effectively. (Authority:...

2009-07-01

377

34 CFR 669.1 - What is the Language Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... General § 669.1 What is the Language Resource Centers Program? The Language Resource Centers Program makes...improving the nation's capacity for teaching and learning foreign languages effectively. (Authority:...

2010-07-01

378

78 FR 45231 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality's (CIHQ's) Hospital Accreditation Program AGENCY...announces our decision to approve the Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality (CIHQ) as a national accrediting organization...

2013-07-26

379

[Current aspects of war surgery. From the trauma center to precarious medical care].  

PubMed

War, said Carl von Clausewitz, is a cameleon. In this century, each armed conflict has proved to be unique, particularly in its medical aspects, with its own features and teaching its won lessons. As recent events show, no conflict is a fact of the past. Medical care delivered to war casualties depend on the circumstances of the war, on the medical resources available, but also on the price that cultures or circumstances place on it. Everything separates these two paradigms; on the one hand the "precious" casualty of western armies whose medical support is organized in a concept (forward medical and surgical care, ultra-rapid medical evacuation) tailored to each case, and as close as possible to the medical care of a civilian trauma patient whose models remains the North-American ballistic wound managed in trauma centers; on the other hand, civilian victims, in large numbers, in poor and disorganized countries, often abandoned to their own fate or sorted by "epidemiological" triage, which guarantees a distribution, as efficient as possible, of limited medical care. In war, advanced medical care and precarious medicine may work side by side according to two logics which do not exclude one another and constantly improve. PMID:9297902

Houdelette, P

1997-01-01

380

Outcomes of a pharmacist-managed medication refill program.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To compare the completeness of medication and blood pressure monitoring among patients requesting medication refills through the pharmacist-managed medication refill and laboratory monitoring program (MRLMP) versus usual care. DESIGN Quasiexperimental study. SETTING Kaiser Permanente Colorado between November 2011 and June 2012. PATIENTS Patients requesting chronic medication prescription refills. INTERVENTION Community pharmacists managed the refill authorization request (RAR) process at the intervention site. For each RAR, the pharmacist reviewed patient medication monitoring needs and ordered laboratory test(s) or a clinic visit, as needed, before approval. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES For medications due for laboratory or blood pressure monitoring at the time of the RAR, the 1-month rate of attaining complete monitoring was compared between groups. Pharmacist, primary care physician (PCP), and patient satisfaction and PCP time saved also were compared. RESULTS 3,797 RARs for MRLMP-eligible medications were approved in the month following MRLMP implementation in the intervention and control clinics. The intervention and control groups converted 49% and 29% of medications due for laboratory monitoring ( P < 0.001) and 56% and 33% of those due for blood pressure monitoring, respectively ( P = 0.020). The intervention group PCPs were more likely than control group PCPs to report being "very satisfied" with the RAR process (80% vs. 27%, P = 0.015) and spent fewer minutes per day on refill requests (mean 17 vs. 23, P = 0.049). The intervention group pharmacists reported higher job satisfaction (mean index score 22 vs. 18, P = 0.024), and intervention group patients reported higher satisfaction with the "readiness" of their prescription when they came to pick it up (91% vs. 80%, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION A pharmacist-managed MRLMP resulted in improved process-related outcomes. Future studies should assess clinical outcomes. PMID:24030128

Billups, Sarah J; Delate, Thomas; Newlon, Carey; Schwiesow, Sarah; Jahnke, Renee; Nadrash, Ann

2013-09-01

381

Which Sexual Abuse Victims Receive a Forensic Medical Examination?: The Impact of Children's Advocacy Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This study examines the impact of Children's Advocacy Centers (CAC) and other factors, such as the child's age, alleged penetration, and injury on the use of forensic medical examinations as part of the response to reported child sexual abuse. Methods: This analysis is part of a quasi-experimental study, the Multi-Site Evaluation of…

Walsh, Wendy A.; Cross, Theodore P.; Jones, Lisa M.; Simone, Monique; Kolko, David J.

2007-01-01

382

False Alarm Study of Smoke Detectors in Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCS),  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of 133 VA Medical Centers (VAMC) out of a total of 172 throughout the U.S. coupled with visits to 20 facilities was conducted to gather data on false alarms of smoke detectors. Data collected included name of the detector manufacturer and model nu...

P. M. Dubivsky R. W. Bukowski

1989-01-01

383

Impact on Seniors of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Evidence from a Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: To assess the impact on health care cost and quality among seniors of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) pilot at Group Health Cooperative, an integrated health care system in Washington State. Design and Methods: A prospective before-and-after evaluation of the experience of seniors receiving primary care services at 1 pilot clinic…

Fishman, Paul A.; Johnson, Eric A.; Coleman, Kathryn; Larson, Eric B.; Hsu, Clarissa; Ross, Tyler R.; Liss, David; Tufano, James; Reid, Robert J.

2012-01-01

384

Care of patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in academic medical centers: A community-based comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND & AIMS: A common perception among purchasers is that academic medical centers are inefficient and overutilize technology; however, little empirical information exists. The aim of this study was to compare treatment and outcomes of patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage admitted to major teaching hospitals and other hospitals in a large metropolitan area. METHODS: Data on 3801 consecutive eligible patients

GS Cooper; A Chak; DL Harper; M Pine; GE Rosenthal

1996-01-01

385

Study to Determine Patient Preferences for Primary Care at Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was done to determine patient preferences for primary care at Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, GA. The author concluded by stating several facts to improve the operation; Patients would like a choice in their primary ca...

K. J. Johnson

1986-01-01

386

Healthcare Inspection: Quality of Care Review, Bob Stump VA Medical Center, Prescott, Arizona. Redacted.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the review was to evaluate allegations related to quality of care in several services and the rating change of a peer review at the Bob Stump VA Medical Center (Prescott), Prescott, AZ. Allegations of untimely consultation services; denial ...

2009-01-01

387

Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

2007-01-01

388

Healthcare Inspection: Quality of Care, Documentation, and Courtesy Issues Hampton VA Medical Center, Hampton, Virginia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the review was to evaluate allegations related to an Emergency Department (ED) visit at the Hampton VA Medical Center in Hampton, VA. We substantiated the allegation that the treating physician did not conduct an adequate work-up of the pat...

2011-01-01

389

Which Sexual Abuse Victims Receive a Forensic Medical Examination?: The Impact of Children's Advocacy Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines the impact of Children's Advocacy Centers (CAC) and other factors, such as the child's age, alleged penetration, and injury on the use of forensic medical examinations as part of the response to reported child sexual abuse. Methods: This analysis is part of a quasi-experimental study, the Multi-Site Evaluation of…

Walsh, Wendy A.; Cross, Theodore P.; Jones, Lisa M.; Simone, Monique; Kolko, David J.

2007-01-01

390

Antibacterial susceptibility of a vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusstrain isolated at the Hershey Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staphylococcus aureus strain HMC3 isolated at the Hershey Medical Center, was resistant to vancomycin (VRSA) through the presence of the vanA resistance gene; it also contained mecA, erm(A), erm(B), tet(K) and aac(6')-aph(2\\

Bülent Bozdogan; Duygu Esel; Cynthia Whitener; Frederick A. Browne; Peter C. Appelbaum

391

Review of Medicare Outpatient Billing for Selected Drugs at Eisenhower Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Eisenhower Medical Center (Eisenhower) is an acute-care hospital located in Rancho Mirage, California. Based on data analysis, we reviewed $119,288 in Medicare payments to Eisenhower for 18 line items for injections of selected drugs that Eisenhower bille...

2011-01-01

392

Feasibility Study for the Establishment of a Nurse Administered Unit at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the study was to explore the possibility of establishing a Nurse Administered Unit (NAU) at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC), Washington, D.C. The rationale for a NAU is to improve the quality of care for selected patients while simu...

S. McMarlin J. D. Vail J. Larkin

1986-01-01

393

Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

2009-01-01

394

Psychology Can Be Indispensable to Health Care Reform and the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was passed into legislation in March 2010, making health care reform a reality. Perhaps the most well-developed model of primary care that aligns with the PPACA's agenda is the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Integrated care, as defined by collaborative care between mental health and primary care providers and systems, will undoubtedly play

Christine N. Runyan

2011-01-01

395

Area health education center libraries and medical school libraries: establishing an interface.  

PubMed Central

Establishing an interface between area health education center (AHEC) libraries and medical school libraries requires careful planning, including: the overall plan, needs assessment, resource evaluation, a developmental plan, monitoring and evaluation, institutional agreements, and publicity. This paper reports on the development of AHEC libraries in North Dakota.

Bandy, C R

1978-01-01

396

Impact of Outpatient Professional Coding on Third-Party Collections at Wilford Hall Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to determine if a dedicated coding staff improves outpatient third-party collections at Wilford Hall Medical Center. To accomplish this, a review of the current procedures was undertaken in three key areas: identification of ...

P. W. Garden

2000-01-01

397

Midbrain infarction: associations and aetiologies in the New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Registry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most reports of midbrain infarction have described clinicoanatomical correlations rather than associations and aetiologies. Thirty nine patients with midbrain infarction (9.4%) are described out of a series of 415 patients with vertebrobasilar ischaemic lesions in the New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Registry. Patients were categorised according to the rostral-caudal extent of infarction. The “proximal” vertebrobasilar territory includes the medulla

P J Martin; H M Chang; R Wityk; L R Caplan

1998-01-01

398

Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

2009-01-01

399

Rural Medical Service Funding: Issues and Alternatives. Rural Information Center Publication Series, No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By almost any definition, rural America has been medically underserved. This bibliography includes materials available from the National Agricultural Library's (NAL) Rural Information Center. The listed materials include approximately 36 books and monographs, 106 articles, and the names and addresses of 17 related associations. Certain local…

Kane, John D. H., III, Comp.; Leuci, Mary Simon, Comp.

400

Review of Medicare Outpatient Billing for Selected Drugs at Catskill Regional Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Catskill Regional Medical Center (Catskill) is an acute-care hospital located in Harris, New York. Based on data analysis, we reviewed $93,657 in Medicare payments to Catskill for nine line items for injections of selected drugs that Catskill billed to Me...

2012-01-01

401

A User-Centered Cooperative Information System for Medical Imaging Diagnosis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents a cooperative information system for remote medical imaging diagnosis. General computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) problems addressed are definition of a procedure for the design of user-centered cooperative systems (conceptual level); and improvement of user feedback and optimization of the communication bandwidth in highly…

Gomez, Enrique J.; Quiles, Jose A.; Sanz, Marcos F.; del Pozo, Francisco

1998-01-01

402

Periodical Utilization Study: Saint Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center, School of Nursing Library, Youngstown, Ohio.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Saint Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center School of Nursing Library has a strong collection of nursing and nursing management journals. With the rising subscription costs of periodicals, it was necessary to evaluate the collection of periodicals. This study was done to evaluate the periodicals that the library has in paper form. The study…

Ryan, Holly

403

Preparing for the Downsizing and Closure of Letterman Army Medical Center: A Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Letterman Army Medical Center (LAMC) is scheduled for a phased downsizing beginning in July 1991 leading to closure by 30 June 1994. An analysis of the information gathered during downsizing and closure activities can serve as an invaluable resource for m...

J. D. Bales

1991-01-01

404

The medical information needs of internists and pediatricians at an academic medical center.  

PubMed Central

Medical information needs were examined in a survey of sixty-seven physicians selected from the faculty and housestaff at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A standardized questionnaire was administered personally by a medical informatics physician to collect data on information needs, attitudes, and previous experience with computers. The types of information most frequently required by both faculty and housestaff were treatment recommendations and differential diagnosis. The sources of reference information most commonly used were textbooks and colleagues. The information needs of housestaff differed significantly in several categories from those of faculty physicians. Housestaff more frequently needed information for patient care (P less than 0.05), and preferred the use of textbooks (P less than 0.01) and handbooks (P less than 0.001) as information sources. Faculty more frequently needed information for activities unrelated to patient care (P less than 0.01) and placed greater importance on basic science information (P less than 0.01). When asked to suggest references for online access, the respondents named 143 journals and textbooks, with journals overwhelmingly preferred over textbooks. Only one reference, the New England Journal of Medicine, was requested by a majority of the respondents. The importance of a broad understanding of physician information needs through improved data-collection techniques is discussed as a means of increasing the use of medical information systems.

Woolf, S H; Benson, D A

1989-01-01

405

Managing knowledge and technology to foster innovation at the Ohio State University Medical Center.  

PubMed

Biomedical knowledge is expanding at an unprecedented rate-one that is unlikely to slow anytime in the future. While the volume and scope of this new knowledge poses significant organizational challenges, it creates tremendous opportunities to release and direct its power to the service of significant goals. The authors explain how the Center for Knowledge Management at The Ohio State University Medical Center, created during the academic year 2003-04, is doing just that by integrating numerous resource-intensive, technology-based initiatives-including personnel, services and infrastructure, digital repositories, data sets, mobile computing devices, high-tech patient simulators, computerized testing, and interactive multimedia-in a way that enables the center to provide information tailored to the needs of students, faculty and staff on the medical center campus and its surrounding health sciences colleges. The authors discuss how discovering, applying, and sharing new knowledge, information assets, and technologies in this way is a collaborative process. This process creates open-ended opportunities for innovation and a roadmap for working toward seamless integration, synergy, and substantial enhancement of the academic medical center's research, educational, and clinical mission areas. PMID:16249301

Cain, Timothy J; Rodman, Ruey L; Sanfilippo, Fred; Kroll, Susan M

2005-11-01

406

From poor farm to medical center: a century of library services to the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center.  

PubMed Central

As its centennial approaches, the history and development of library services to the patients and professional staff of the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center is traced from the early days when the library was housed in the cafeteria of the dispensary to its present position of being first point of access to library service for one of the largest teaching hospitals in the country. Its recent affiliation with the Norris Medical Library of the University of Southern California School of Medicine is explained. The change in emphasis from patients' library to health sciences library is illustrated, and the contribution of the library to the Cumulative Index to Nursing Literature is detailed. Images

Olechno, G

1975-01-01

407

Design considerations of a cable wiring system for a new medical center to support a future medical imaging system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our Medical Center is faced with the problem to design a cable wiring system today, install it by the middle 1990's, and allow for upgrades and enhancements for the next ten to fifteen years. The cable plant must be able to support functions and activities which are poorly defined today, but will include the hospital information system (HIS), a future picture archiving and communication system (PACS), and possibly an electronic patient chart with integrated image data. The cable plant must also connect to a future campus wide Medical Network of the Indiana University Medical center with the first component being a positron emission tomography system (PET) located approximately one mile away. To meet these goals the proposed cable plant will be a structured wire cabling system following existing and proposed standards for building wiring architectures including the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) and the Telecommunications Industries Association (TIA) 568 Commercial Building Wiring Standard and the proposed Federal Telecommunication Standard 1090. The structured wiring system approached has been evaluated with emphasis on the present and future network topologies that can be implemented, the type and size of fiber optic cable to install, and the need to install fiber optic cable to individual workstations.

Witt, Robert M.; Emrich, Jack

1992-07-01

408

Progress of Ontario's Family Health Team Model: A Patient-Centered Medical Home  

PubMed Central

Ontario’s Family Health Team (FHT) model, implemented in 2005, may be North America’s largest example of a patient-centered medical home. The model, based on multidisciplinary teams and an innovative incentive-based funding system, has been developed primarily from fee-for-service primary care practices. Nearly 2 million Ontarians are served by 170 FHTs. Preliminary observations suggest high satisfaction among patients, higher income and more gratification for family physicians, and trends for more medical students to select careers in family medicine. Popular demand is resulting in expansion to 200 FHTs. We describe the development, implementation, reimbursement plan, and current status of this multidisciplinary model, relating it to the principles of the patient-centered medical home. We also identify its potential to provide an understanding of many aspects of primary care.

Rosser, Walter W.; Colwill, Jack M.; Kasperski, Jan; Wilson, Lynn

2011-01-01

409

Rape Crisis Centers and Programs: “Doing Amazing, Wonderful Things on Peanuts”  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though the anti-rape movement began more than 30 years ago and there is greater awareness of sexual violence, are rape crisis centers or programs financially secure? Data from interviews with 63 rape crisis workers and volunteers from 6 rape crisis centers or programs located in 4 East Coast states indicate not only that rape crisis centers\\/programs continue to struggle

Shana L. Maier

2011-01-01

410

Informatics integration in a medical residency program: early experiences.  

PubMed Central

In 1992, Informatics training was integrated into the medical residency program at Norwalk Hospital. The program objective was to familiarize the residents with clinical applications of information technology that could enhance their productivity in clinical practice. In its first year, the curriculum was theory oriented. Evaluation of the program at the end of the first year led to a significant restructuring of the program format and curriculum. The trainees did not find theory to be of immediate clinical value, in the second year the program emphasis was redirected toward the development of practical skills. Next year, in 1993, 'Informatics Clinics' were initiated to develop practical Informatics skills that would be useful in a clinical setting. This approach was more successful but did not offer a complete solution. The degree to which the concepts and methods learned are clinically utilized by residents will depend upon the degree of reinforcement provided in the clinical residency years. In addition, there is a need for the development of assessment standards for the evaluation of Informatics literacy levels. In the absence of assessment standards the level of Informatics literacy in medical graduates remains undetermined Consequently, it is difficult to determine whether the training received has transformed expectations into reality.

Moidu, K.; Leehy, M. A.; Steinberg, I.; Einreinhofer, S.; Falsone, J. J.; Cleary, J.; Nair, S.; Mazur, E.

1996-01-01

411

The proton treatment center at Loma Linda University Medical Center: rationale for and description of its development.  

PubMed

Proton radiation, a continuation of radiation oncology's historic search for an optimum dose distribution, offers superior characteristics for clinical radiation therapy. A complete facility for clinical proton radiation therapy has been designed for and constructed at Loma Linda University Medical Center. To bring about this achievement, a consortium of engineers, physicists, and physicians interested in the clinical applications of protons was necessary. The accelerator, the beam transport and delivery systems, the building, and the personnel who operate the system were all brought together to fully exploit the properties of protons for patient treatments, which are now underway. PMID:1740396

Slater, J M; Archambeau, J O; Miller, D W; Notarus, M I; Preston, W; Slater, J D

1992-01-01

412

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center occupational safety and health program manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual sets forth the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) policy regarding the health and safety of its workers and provides for the implementation of the PETC occupational health and safety program. It is to be used in conjunction with the PETC Safety and Health Technical Directives, which provide detailed health and safety instructions to employees for specific operations, to create a complete occupational health and safety program. The manual was developed from guidelines contained in 29 CFR 1960, DOE Order 3790.1, and DOE Order 5480.1, and defines programs that meet both the intent and the specific requirements of those documents. Specific chemical and physical hazards associated with coal liquefaction processes may affect the skin, eyes, liver, kidneys, respiratory system, and central nervous system. Fire and explosion are also significant hazards. Other hazards include silica and coal dusts; noise; radiation; asphyxiating or highly toxic gases, particularly hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen cyanide; acids and caustics; peroxides; and corrosive materials. This manual is organized into five sections covering the areas of general information, hazard recognition and abatement, preventive programs, reports and recordkeeping, and planning and budgeting occupational safety and health (OSH) program activities.

Not Available

1982-02-26

413

OSHA lead in construction compliance directive: Medical surveillance program  

SciTech Connect

This article is part of a series that reviews the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Instruction CPL 2-2.58, a compliance directive for 29 CFR 1926.62, Lead Exposure in Construction. The OSHA document is intended to provide guidance to those charged with field enforcement of the lead regulation; however, it also provides vital information to those in industry who must comply with the regulation. This month, the requirements for employer medical surveillance programs are discussed.

Vernon, L.S.

1994-11-01

414

Fiscal Year 1990 program report: California Water Resources Center  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a synopsis of the results of research projects sponsored under Grant No. 14-08-00001-G1550, the 1990 Water Research Institute Program (WRIP) for the University of California Water Resources Center. Five projects investigating the following topic areas are: Mixing in Bay/Delta Flows, Dynamics of Selenium and Arsenic Oxidation in Water-Sediment Systems, Adaptive Grid Refinement for Groundwater Contaminant Transport Simulation, Salinity and Fish Effects on the Plankton and Benthos of the Salton Sea: Microcosm Experiment, and Effects of Global Climate Change and Increased Atmospheric CO2 on Water Use.

Not Available

1991-07-01

415

Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

Not Available

1992-12-31

416

Center for Global Health Short-Term Scientist Exchange Program  

Cancer.gov

The Center for Global Health (CGH) Short-Term Scientist Exchange Program (STSEP) promotes collaborative research between established U.S. and foreign scientists from low, middle, and upper-middle income countries by supporting, in part, exchange visits of cancer researchers between U.S. and foreign laboratories.The visits vary in duration. Applications are accepted throughout the year, with application deadlines of June 1, September 1, December 1, and March 1. Candidates are notified of the funding decision within one month of these deadlines.

417

76 FR 10825 - Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) Medical Malpractice Program Regulations: Clarification of FTCA...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) Medical Malpractice Program Regulations: Clarification...resulting from the performance of medical, surgical, dental or related...be deemed for the purposes of medical malpractice liability to be...

2011-02-28

418

78 FR 58202 - Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) Medical Malpractice Program Regulations: Clarification of FTCA...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) Medical Malpractice Program Regulations: Clarification...resulting from the performance of medical, surgical, dental, or related...PHS for the purposes of this medical malpractice liability protection. A...

2013-09-23

419

Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Emergency Medical Technology--Basic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Emergency Medical Technology--Paramedic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Postsecondary Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the emergency medical technology (EMT) programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline…

Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

420

78 FR 50119 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2014  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2014...Medically Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for calendar year 2014....

2013-08-16

421

77 FR 64384 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Foreign Medical Program) Under OMB Review  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-0648...Collection Activities (Foreign Medical Program) Under...Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice...Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue...INFORMATION: Titles: a. Foreign Medical Program...

2012-10-19

422

Getting past the accident: explosive devices, limb loss, and refashioning a life in a military medical center.  

PubMed

I describe the refashioning of a sense of self and identity of a junior officer in the U.S. Army who was injured in Iraq. Ethnographic data for this article were collected between July 2006 and January 2008. The setting for this article is the U.S. Armed Forces Amputee Patient Care Program at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Two models of rehabilitation are contrasted in the rehabilitation program. The first focuses on the refashioning of identity through a sports model of rehabilitation emphasizing physical functioning. The second approaches rehabilitation by emphasizing individual interests and the concern of a person who has a future life to develop. I conclude by arguing that understanding the process of rehabilitation from traumatic injury would benefit from a perspective that melds multiple dimensions, taking into account both the physical body and the social world that patients have inhabited and will inhabit. PMID:20949837

Messinger, Seth D

2010-09-01

423

Quality and Cost Evaluation of a Medical Financial Assistance Program  

PubMed Central

Background: Kaiser Permanente Colorado has been responding to the financial challenges of its members by providing a medical financial assistance (MFA) program since 1992. However, there have been no evaluations of the effect of this program on members’ use of health services or their health outcomes. Methods: A prospective cohort study of 308 MFA program members who were enrolled between May 16, 2008, and May 16, 2009, examined changes in their use of health services, costs, and self-reported physical and mental health after enrollment in the MFA program. Use of services was analyzed with multiple regression, and costs of services with generalized linear models. Results: MFA increased members’ access to health services. There were no changes in physical or mental health status. For each health care visit before the MFA award, patients used the health care system 0.23 visits less. The MFA amount was not associated with an increase or decrease in use. There was no significant difference in total overall cost. Hospital costs were lower, but costs for clinic visits, pharmacy services, phone calls, and radiology services were significantly higher, resulting in service cost neutrality, possibly because financial barriers before MFA award led to accumulated demand for services. Conclusions: Use of services decreased after MFA was received. There was no significant change in total service cost. MFA improved members’ ability to pay for medical services and increased their satisfaction with health services.

Conner, Douglas A; Beck, Arne; Clarke, Christina; Wright, Leslie; Narwaney, Komal; Bermingham, Neysa W

2013-01-01

424

The Effects of Corporatization on Academic Medical Centers. How Will the Corporatization of Health Care Influence Health Professions Education?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Areas of agreement/conflict between academic medical centers and investor owned corporations are considered. Academic medical centers are part of the university system, which is responsible for education, research, and the related public good (e.g., nurturing of professions). Major areas for a potential confluence of interest between the academic…

Dunn, Marvin R.

425

Qualitative and Political Issues Impacting Academic Medical Center Strategic Planning--A Methodological Approach. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A simulation model of an academic medical center that was developed to aid in strategic planning and policy analysis is described. The model, designated MCM for Medical Center Model, was implemented at the School of Medicine, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the private practices of the faculty in the clinical departments at University…

Kutina, Kenneth L.; And Others

426

Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.  

PubMed

Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

2005-03-01

427

Graduate Medical Education Leadership Development Curriculum for Program Directors  

PubMed Central

Objective Program director (PD) orientation to roles and responsibilities takes on many forms and processes. This article describes one institution's innovative arm of faculty development directed specifically toward PDs and associate PDs to provide institutional resources and information for those in graduate medical education leadership roles. Methods The designated institutional official created a separate faculty development curriculum for leadership development of PDs and associate PDs, modeled on the Association of American Medical Colleges-GRA (Group on Resident Affairs) graduate medical education leadership development course for designated institutional officials. It consists of monthly 90-minute sessions at the end of a working day, for new and experienced PDs alike, with mentoring provided by experienced PDs. We describe 2 iterations of the curriculum. To provide ongoing support a longitudinal curriculum of special topics has followed in the interval between core curriculum offerings. Results Communication between PDs across disciplines has improved. The broad, inclusive nature allowed for experienced PDs to take advantage of the learning opportunity while providing exchange and mentorship through sharing of lessons learned. The participants rated the course highly and education process and outcome measures for the programs have been positive, including increased accreditation cycle lengths. Conclusion It is important and valuable to provide PDs and associate PDs with administrative leadership development and resources, separate from general faculty development, to meet their role-specific needs for orientation and development and to better equip them to meet graduate medical education leadership challenges. This endeavor provides a foundational platform for designated institutional official and PD interactions to work on program building and improvement.

Haan, Constance K.; Zenni, Elisa A.; West, Denise T.; Genuardi, Frank J.

2011-01-01

428

MiPLAN: a learner-centered model for bedside teaching in today's academic medical centers.  

PubMed

Clinician educators and medical trainees face intense pressure to complete numerous patient care and teaching activities in a limited amount of time. To address the need for effective and efficient teaching methods for use in the inpatient setting, the authors used constructivist learning theory, the principles of adult learning, and their expertise as clinician educators to develop the MiPLAN model for bedside teaching. This three-part model is designed to enable clinical teachers to simultaneously provide care to patients while assessing learners, determining high-yield teaching topics, and providing feedback to learners.The "M" refers to a preparatory meeting between teacher and learners before engaging in patient care or educational activities. During this meeting, team members should become acquainted and the teacher should set goals and clarify expectations. The "i" refers to five behaviors for the teacher to adopt during learners' bedside presentations: introduction, in the moment, inspection, interruptions, and independent thought. "PLAN" is an algorithm to establish priorities for teaching subsequent to a learner's presentation: patient care, learners' questions, attending's agenda, and next steps.The authors suggest that the MiPLAN model can help clinical teachers gain more confidence in their ability to teach at the bedside and increase the frequency and quality of bedside teaching. They propose further research to assess the generalizability of this model to other institutions, settings, and specialties and to evaluate educational and patient outcomes. PMID:23348088

Stickrath, Chad; Aagaard, Eva; Anderson, Mel

2013-03-01

429

Revolutionizing Volunteer Interpreter Services: An Evaluation of an Innovative Medical Interpreter Education Program.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: In our ever-increasingly multicultural, multilingual society, medical interpreters serve an important role in the provision of care. Though it is known that using untrained interpreters leads to decreased quality of care for limited English proficiency patients, because of a short supply of professionals and a lack of formalized, feasible education programs for volunteers, community health centers and internal medicine practices continue to rely on untrained interpreters. OBJECTIVE: To develop and formally evaluate a novel medical interpreter education program that encompasses major tenets of interpretation, tailored to the needs of volunteer medical interpreters. DESIGN: One-armed, quasi-experimental retro-pre-post study using survey ratings and feedback correlated by assessment scores to determine educational intervention effects. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight students; 24 Spanish, nine Mandarin, and five Vietnamese. The majority had prior interpreting experience but no formal medical interpreter training. OUTCOME MEASURES: Students completed retrospective pre-test and post-test surveys measuring confidence in and perceived knowledge of key skills of interpretation. Primary outcome measures were a 10-point Likert scale for survey questions of knowledge, skills, and confidence, written and oral assessments of interpreter skills, and qualitative evidence of newfound knowledge in written reflections. RESULTS: Analyses showed a statistically significant (P <0.001) change of about two points in mean self-ratings on knowledge, skills, and confidence, with large effect sizes (d?>?0.8). The second half of the program was also quantitatively and qualitatively shown to be a vital learning experience, resulting in 18 % more students passing the oral assessments; a 19 % increase in mean scores for written assessments; and a newfound understanding of interpreter roles and ways to navigate them. CONCLUSIONS: This innovative program was successful in increasing volunteer interpreters' skills and knowledge of interpretation, as well as confidence in own abilities. Additionally, the program effectively taught how to navigate the roles of the interpreter to maintain clear communication. PMID:23739810

Hasbún Avalos, Oswaldo; Pennington, Kaylin; Osterberg, Lars

2013-06-01

430

Computer Training Programs for Health Center Personnel: A Program that Works  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systems analysis, determination of needs, and the purchase of a computer system are the beginning steps in utilizing a computer productively. Computer competency programs must be personalized for a variety of individuals that have been trained extensively in a medical profession.It is an integral part of purchasing a computer that the staff understand what the computer is, of what the

Janis J. Borski

1986-01-01

431

A hospital as victim and responder: the Sepulveda VA Medical Center and the Northridge earthquake.  

PubMed

Many hospital emergency plans focus on the hospital as a disaster responder, with a fully operational medical facility, able to receive and treat mass casualties from a clearly defined accident scene. However, hospitals need to prepare a response for extreme casualty events such as earthquakes, tornadoes, or hurricanes. This article describes the planning, mitigation, response, and recovery of a major medical--surgical center thrust into a victim responder role following the devastating Northridge earthquake. The subsequent evacuation and care of patients, treatment of casualties, incident command, prior education and training, and recovery issues are addressed. PMID:8842918

Chavez, C W; Binder, B

432

Smartphone app use among medical providers in ACGME training programs.  

PubMed

The past decade has witnessed the advent of the smartphone, a device armed with computing power, mobility and downloadable "apps," that has become commonplace within the medical field as both a personal and professional tool. The popularity of medically-related apps suggests that physicians use mobile technology to assist with clinical decision making, yet usage patterns have never been quantified. A digital survey examining smartphone and associated app usage was administered via email to all ACGME training programs. Data regarding respondent specialty, level of training, use of smartphones, use of smartphone apps, desired apps, and commonly used apps were collected and analyzed. Greater than 85% of respondents used a smartphone, of which the iPhone was the most popular (56%). Over half of the respondents reported using apps in their clinical practice; the most commonly used app types were drug guides (79%), medical calculators (18%), coding and billing apps (4%) and pregnancy wheels (4%). The most frequently requested app types were textbook/reference materials (average response: 55%), classification/treatment algorithms (46%) and general medical knowledge (43%). The clinical use of smartphones and apps will likely continue to increase, and we have demonstrated an absence of high-quality and popular apps despite a strong desire among physicians and trainees. This information should be used to guide the development of future healthcare delivery systems; expanded app functionality is almost certain but reliability and ease of use will likely remain major factors in determining the successful integration of apps into clinical practice. PMID:22052129

Franko, Orrin I; Tirrell, Timothy F

2011-11-04

433

77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY...entitled ``eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions.'' The purpose...electronic copy (eCopy) program for medical device submissions. The draft...

2012-10-17

434

78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY...entitled ``eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions.'' The purpose...electronic copy (eCopy) Program for medical device submissions, which is...

2013-01-02

435

Reorganizing departments of psychiatry, hospitals, and medical centers for the 21st century.  

PubMed

Market forces are reshaping health care, transforming it from a public service into a product that is sold in a highly competitive marketplace. This transformation has been particularly disruptive for hospital departments of psychiatry and medical centers that were the early targets for managed care efforts at cost containment. To survive, health care institutions have embarked on a clinical and administrative re-engineering process. The author describes a series of steps for reconfiguring departments, hospitals, and medical centers as they enter the 21st century. The steps include identifying the leadership team, formulating a mission statement and strategic plan, creating a legal entity capable of achieving the organization's goals, drawing up an organizational chart, and developing the provider network. Other steps in the process include enhancing the continuum of services offered, developing administrative capability, dealing with managed care, paying attention to fundamental business practices, integrating psychiatric services into the health care system, and marketing psychiatric services. PMID:9826243

Schreter, R K

1998-11-01

436

Technology complementing military behavioral health efforts at tripler army medical center.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide a short narrative on the ways that behavioral health professionals and their patients are currently benefitting from the use of technology. Examples stem from applications of technology to patients/research participants at the Tripler Army Medical Center. The paper also discusses how current use of this technology has made it possible to serve individuals in their own cultural environment, providing a cost-effective means of providing mental health services. PMID:21643963

Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Yamanuha, Bronson K

2011-06-01

437

MRSA USA300 at Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, 2000-2006  

PubMed Central

To determine whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA300 commonly caused infections among Alaska Natives, we examined clinical MRSA isolates from the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, during 2000–2006. Among Anchorage-region residents, USA300 was a minor constituent among MRSA isolates in 2000–2003 (11/68, 16%); by 2006, USA300 was the exclusive genotype identified (10/10).

Rudolph, Karen M.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Zychowski, Diana L.; Asthi, Karthik; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

2012-01-01

438

Technology Complementing Military Behavioral Health Efforts at Tripler Army Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to provide a short narrative on the ways that behavioral health professionals and their patients\\u000a are currently benefitting from the use of technology. Examples stem from applications of technology to patients\\/research participants\\u000a at the Tripler Army Medical Center. The paper also discusses how current use of this technology has made it possible to serve

Melba C. StetzRaymond; Raymond A. Folen; Bronson K. Yamanuha

2011-01-01

439

Colorectal cancer: Differences between community and geographically distant patients seen at an urban medical center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies in clinical oncology rely on hospital-derived patients. Hospitals vary in the proportions of patients from the local catchment areavs.those from more distant places, of whom a larger proportion are presumably referrals. To study the differences between these two types of patients, we analyzed 1,245 colorectal cancer patients seen at a large urban medical center over a seven-year period.

Alfred I. Neugut; Dennis Timony; Todd Murray

1991-01-01

440

Preliminary results of VISX excimer-laser myopic photorefractive keratectomy at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixty-two eyes underwent excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for the correction of myopia at Cedars-Sinai-Medical-Center. The first group of 12 patients are presented with follow up data of ten months postoperatively. The second group of 50 patients are presented with follow up data of three months postoperatively. An in-depth comparison of pre and postoperative refractive data is presented. Comparisons between

Ezra I. Maguen; Michael S. Berlin; John Hofbauer; Jonathan I. Macy; Anthony B. Nesburn; Thanassis Papaioannou; James J. Salz

1992-01-01

441

Community Health Centers: The Untapped Resource for Public Health and Medical Preparedness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last few years of our political history have witnessed the emergence of a national preparedness architecture boasting numerous plans, strategies, directives, legislation, and even more novel programs to address those issues identified therein. One of the more recent entrants to this collection includes Homeland Security Presidential Directive-21 (HSPD-21) also known as the Public Health and Medical Preparedness Strategy. On

Karen M. Wood

442

Improving communication skill training in patient centered medical practice for enhancing rational use of laboratory tests: The core of bioinformation for leveraging stakeholder engagement in regulatory science  

PubMed Central

Requests for laboratory tests are among the most relevant additional tools used by physicians as part of patient's health problemsolving. However, the overestimation of complementary investigation may be linked to less reflective medical practice as a consequence of a poor physician-patient communication, and may impair patient-centered care. This scenario is likely to result from reduced consultation time, and a clinical model focused on the disease. We propose a new medical intervention program that specifically targets improving the patient-centered communication of laboratory tests results, the core of bioinformation in health care. Expectations are that medical students training in communication skills significantly improve physicians-patient relationship, reduce inappropriate use of laboratorial tests, and raise stakeholder engagement.

Moura, Josemar de Almeida; Costa, Bruna Carvalho; de Faria, Rosa Malena Delbone; Soares, Taciana Figueiredo; Moura, Eliane Perlatto; Chiappelli, Francesco

2013-01-01

443

Filmless radiology at the Baltimore VA Medical Center: a 9 year retrospective.  

PubMed

The transition from conventional film based to filmless operation at the Baltimore VA Medical Center in 1993 was successful and has resulted in a number of clinical and economic benefits. The subsequent integration of the Department of VA hospitals in Maryland into a single network, the VA Maryland Health Care System, resulted in the opportunity to establish a 'virtual' radiology and nuclear medicine department. This integrated department is based upon a wide area network in which outlying medical centers utilize a central HIS/RIS and a central commercial Picture archival and communication system (PACS) as well as a VA 'home grown' image management and communication system, the VISTA imaging system. The creation of this virtual radiology/nuclear medicine department has resulted in additional savings and improvements in clinical care. The benefits of the PACS were made possible, to a large extent, by the high level of integration of the PACS and medical modalities with the hospital information and transcription systems. Our experience suggests that it is absolutely essential to integrate the PACS into the patient's electronic medical record in order to maximize efficiency and clinical effectiveness of the system. PMID:12620300

Siegel, Eliot L; Reiner, Bruce I

2003-01-01

444

Key Elements of Clinical Physician Leadership at an Academic Medical Center  

PubMed Central

Background A considerable body of literature in the management sciences has defined leadership and how leadership skills can be attained. There is considerably less literature about leadership within medical settings. Physicians-in-training are frequently placed in leadership positions ranging from running a clinical team or overseeing a resuscitation effort. However, physicians-in-training rarely receive such training. The objective of this study was to discover characteristics associated with effective physician leadership at an academic medical center for future development of such training. Methods We conducted focus groups with medical professionals (attending physicians, residents, and nurses) at an academic medical center. The focus group discussion script was designed to elicit participants' perceptions of qualities necessary for physician leadership. The lead question asked participants to imagine a scenario in which they either acted as or observed a physician leader. Two independent reviewers reviewed transcripts to identify key domains of physician leadership. Results Although the context was not specified, the focus group participants discussed leadership in the context of a clinical team. They identified 4 important themes: management of the team, establishing a vision, communication, and personal attributes. Conclusions Physician leadership exists in clinical settings. This study highlights the elements essential to that leadership. Understanding the physician attributes and behaviors that result in effective leadership and teamwork can lay the groundwork for more formal leadership education for physicians-in-training.

Dine, C. Jessica; Kahn, Jeremy M; Abella, Benjamin S; Asch, David A; Shea, Judy A

2011-01-01

445

Mentoring programs for medical students - a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although mentoring is acknowledged as a key to successful and satisfying careers in medicine, formal mentoring programs for medical students are lacking in most countries. Within the framework of planning a mentoring program for medical students at Zurich University, an investigation was carried out into what types of programs exist, what the objectives pursued by such programs are, and

Esther Frei; Martina Stamm; Barbara Buddeberg-Fischer

2010-01-01

446

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01

447

Expanding Programs in an Early Childhood Center To Meet the Community's Needs and To Improve Center Fiscal Stability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This practicum addressed the issues of declining enrollment and the anticipated problems resulting from the loss of a kindergarten program in an early childhood center. (Enrollment is expected to decline as the public schools moved to all-day kindergarten.) Goals of the practicum were to increase enrollment in the early childhood center, expand…

Rothschild, Theresa

448

Peer-to-Peer JXTA Architecture for Continuing Mobile Medical Education Incorporated in Rural Public Health Centers  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Mobile technology helps to improve continuing medical education; this includes all aspects of public health care as well as keeping one’s knowledge up-to-date. The program of continuing medical and health education is intertwined with mobile health technology, which forms an imperative component of national strategies in health. Continuing mobile medical education (CMME) programs are designed to ensure that all medical and health-care professionals stay up-to-date with the knowledge required through mobile JXTA to appraise modernized strategies so as to achieve national goals of health-care information distribution. Methods: In this study, a 20-item questionnaire was distributed to 280 health professionals practicing traditional training learning methodologies (180 nurses, 60 doctors, and 40 health inspectors) in 25 rural hospitals. Among the 83% respondents, 56% are eager to take new learning methodologies as part of their evaluation, which is considered for promotion to higher grades, increments, or as part of their work-related activities. Results: The proposed model was executed in five public health centers in which nurses and health inspectors registered in the JXTA network were referred to the record peer group by administrators. A mobile training program on immunization was conducted through the ADVT, with the lectures delivered on their mobiles. Credits are given after taking the course and completing an evaluation test. The system is faster compared with traditional learning. Conclusion: Medical knowledge management and mobile-streaming application support the CMME system through JXTA. The mobile system includes online lectures and practice quizzes, as well as assignments and interactions with health professionals. Evaluation and assessments are done online and credits certificates are provided based on the score the student obtains. The acceptance of mobile JXTA peer-to-peer learning has created a drastic change in learning methods among rural health professionals. The professionals undergo training and should pass an exam in order to obtain the credits. The system is controlled and monitored by the administrator peer group, which makes it more flexible and structured. Compared with traditional learning system, enhanced study improves cloud-based mobile medical education technology.

Rajasekaran, Rajkumar; Iyengar, Nallani Chackravatula Sriman Narayana

2013-01-01

449

Adherence to Preventive Medications: Predictors and outcomes in the Diabetes Prevention Program  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate barriers to and strategies for medication adherence and predictors of adherence and the primary outcome in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Within a randomized, controlled primary prevention study for type 2 diabetes, we collected data on study medication adherence, its predictors, and health outcomes in 27 clinical centers across mainland U.S. and Hawaii. Medication arm participants included 2,155 adults with impaired glucose tolerance randomly assigned to either metformin or matched placebo treatment arms. Structured interviews were used to promote medication adherence and to collect data regarding adherence. Adherence was measured by pill count. The primary DPP outcome of type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS Older age-groups were more adherent than the youngest group (P = 0.01) in the metformin group. The most frequently reported barrier to adherence was “forgetting” (22%). Women reported more adverse effects of metformin (15 vs. 10%, P = 0.002) in the metformin group. Odds of nonadherence increased as participants reported more than one barrier (odds ratio 19.1, P < 0.001). Odds of adherence increased as participants reported multiple strategies to take medication (2.69, P < 0.0001). There was a 38.2% risk reduction for developing diabetes for those adherent to metformin compared with those adherent to placebo (P < 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS DPP medication adherence results are unique in primary prevention for a chronic disease in a large multiethnic sample. Our finding that adherence was associated with risk reduction for diabetes supports the development of brief interventions in clinical settings where medication adherence is a challenge.

Walker, Elizabeth A.; Molitch, Mark; Kramer, M. Kaye; Kahn, Steven; Ma, Yong; Edelstein, Sharon; Smith, Kellie; Johnson, Mariana Kiefer; Kitabchi, Abbas; Crandall, Jill

2006-01-01

450

Proceedings of the National Association of Regional Medical Programs (NARMP) National Conference on Arthritis Programming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proceedings of a national conference on the prevention of arthritis are reported. As an outgrowth of a planning committee formed by the National Association of Regional Medical Programs, the 1976 conference was held to address five major issues: (1) t...

J. Hutchins

1976-01-01

451

The Computational Physics Program of the national MFE Computer Center  

SciTech Connect

Since June 1974, the MFE Computer Center has been engaged in a significant computational physics effort. The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generations of supercomputers. The Computational Physics Group has been involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to tokamaks and compact toroids. A third area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code; this work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence have been under examination, with the hope of being able to explain anomalous transport. Also, we are collaborating in an international effort to evaluate fully three-dimensional linear stability of toroidal devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers. A summary of these programs are included in this paper. 6 tabs.

Mirin, A.A.

1989-01-01

452

Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs

Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

2012-01-01

453

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - UMB/DFHCC Comprehensive Cancer Center Partnership Program  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - UMB/DFHCC Comprehensive Cancer Center Partnership Program Home Health Disparities Research CRCHD Research Ongoing Research PACHE PACHE Partnership Listing UMB/DFHCC Comprehensive Cancer Center Partnership

454

Report of the Health Economics Resource Center to the VA Cooperative Studies Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Health Economics Resource Center (HERC) is a national resource center for Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health economics research, providing support for the Cooperative Studies Programs (CSP) and the Health Services Research and Development Serv...

2004-01-01

455

The medical evaluation of living kidney donors: a survey of US transplant centers.  

PubMed

The use of living donors for kidney transplantation in the United States is common, and long-term studies have demonstrated the safety of donation by young, healthy individuals. However, transplant programs have little data to guide them in deciding which donors are unacceptable, and which characteristics are associated with kidney disease or poor psychosocial outcomes after donation. To document current practices in evaluating potential donors, we surveyed all US kidney transplant programs. Compared to a survey 12 years ago, medical criteria for donation are more inclusive in several areas. All responding programs now accept living unrelated donors. Most programs no longer have an upper age limit to be eligible. Programs are now more likely to accept donors with treated hypertension, or a history of kidney stones, provided that certain additional criteria are met. In contrast, medical criteria for donation are more restrictive in other areas, such as younger donor age and low creatinine clearance. Overall, significant variability remains among transplant programs in the criteria used to evaluate donors. These findings highlight the need for more data on long-term outcomes in various types of donors with potential morbidities related to donation. PMID:17845567

Mandelbrot, D A; Pavlakis, M; Danovitch, G M; Johnson, S R; Karp, S J; Khwaja, K; Hanto, D W; Rodrigue, J R

2007-10-01

456

77 FR 14017 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program...that the public comment period ends at the time indicated above...make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC) Program...Human Services (HHS), the World Trade Center (WTC)...

2012-03-08

457

77 FR 4820 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program...that the public comment periods end at the times indicated above...make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC) Program...Human Services (HHS), the World Trade Center (WTC)...

2012-01-31

458

Nurse-midwives in federally funded health centers: understanding federal program requirements and benefits.  

PubMed

Midwives are working in federally funded health centers in increasing numbers. Health centers provide primary and preventive health care to almost 20 million people and are located in every US state and territory. While health centers serve the entire community, they also serve as a safety net for low-income and uninsured individuals. In 2010, 93% of health center patients had incomes below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 38% were uninsured. Health centers, including community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless programs, and public housing primary care programs, receive grant funding and enjoy other benefits due to status as federal grantees and designation as federally qualified health centers. Clinicians working in health centers are also eligible for financial and professional benefits because of their willingness to serve vulnerable populations and work in underserved areas. Midwives, midwifery students, and faculty working in, or interacting with, health centers need to be aware of the regulations that health centers must comply with in order to qualify for and maintain federal funding. This article provides an overview of health center regulations and policies affecting midwives, including health center program requirements, scope of project policy, provider credentialing and privileging, Federal Tort Claims Act malpractice coverage, the 340B Drug Pricing Program, and National Health Service Corps scholarship and loan repayment programs. PMID:22758358

Carter, Martha

459

The patient-centered medical home: an ethical analysis of principles and practice.  

PubMed

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), with its focus on patient-centered care, holds promise as a way to reinvigorate the primary care of patients and as a necessary component of health care reform. While its tenets have been the subject of review, the ethical dimensions of the PCMH have not been fully explored. Consideration of the ethical foundations for the core principles of the PCMH can and should be part of the debate concerning its merits. The PCMH can align with the principles of medical ethics and potentially strengthen the patient-physician relationship and aspects of health care that patients value. Patient choice and these ethical considerations are central and at least as important as the economic and practical arguments in support of the PCMH, if not more so. Further, the ethical principles that support key concepts of the PCMH have implications for the design and implementation of the PCMH. This paper explores the PCMH in light of core principles of ethics and professionalism, with an emphasis both on how the concept of the PCMH may reinforce core ethical principles of medical practice and on further implications of these principles. PMID:22829295

Braddock, Clarence H; Snyder, Lois; Neubauer, Richard L; Fischer, Gary S

2012-07-25

460

Assessment of junior doctors’ perceptions of difficulty of medical specialty training programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The demands placed on medical trainees by the different specialty training programs are important considerations when choosing a medical specialty. To understand these demands, 193 junior doctors completed a web-based survey, and: (a) ranked medical specialties according to perceived level of training difficulty (incorporating entry difficulty, course difficulty, and length of training); (b) nominated their preferred medical specialty; and (c)

Mary E. Rogers; Peter A. Creed; Judy Searle

2012-01-01

461

Can Medical Students Teach? A Near-Peer-Led Teaching Program for "Year 1" Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The General Medical Council states that United Kingdom graduates must function effectively as educators. There is a growing body of evidence showing that medical students can be included as teachers within a medical curriculum. Our aim was to design and implement a near-peer-led teaching program in an undergraduate medical curriculum and assess…

Jackson, T. A.; Evans, D. J. R.

2012-01-01

462

Evaluation of an Early Medical School Selection Program for Underrepresented Minority Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Correlated medical school performance of underrepresented minority students participating in Boston University's Early Medical School Selection Program with their Scholastic Aptitude Test and Medical College Admission Test scores. Found that students with higher scores had more success completing their first two years of medical school and…

Edelin, Kenneth C.; Ugbolue, Augustine

2001-01-01

463

Implementation of a Patient Medication Assistance Program in a Community Pharmacy Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the establishment of a community pharmacy-based patient medication assistance program to improve access to medications by indigent patients, lessen the burden placed on physicians in obtaining such medications, reduce the amount of money spent on such medications by area charitable organizations, and improve therapeutic outcomes by improving patient adherence with therapy. Setting: Supermarket-based pharmacy in Ashland, Ohio.

Verne Mounts; Daniel G. Ringenberg; Kim Rhees; Christina Partridge

2005-01-01

464

Can Medical Students Teach? A Near-Peer-Led Teaching Program for "Year 1" Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The General Medical Council states that United Kingdom graduates must function effectively as educators. There is a growing body of evidence showing that medical students can be included as teachers within a medical curriculum. Our aim was to design and implement a near-peer-led teaching program in an undergraduate medical curriculum and assess…

Jackson, T. A.; Evans, D. J. R.

2012-01-01

465

77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for Under-Represented...

2012-02-09

466

A survey of medical quality assurance programs in Ontario hospitals.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and types of medical quality assurance practices in Ontario hospitals. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: All teaching, community, chronic care, rehabilitation and psychiatric hospitals that were members of the Ontario Hospital Association as of May 1990. PARTICIPANTS: The person deemed by the chief executive officer of each hospital to be most responsible for medical administration. INTERVENTION: A questionnaire to obtain information on each hospital's use of criteria audit, indicators inventory, occurrence screening and reporting, and utilization review and management (URM) activities. OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of the use of the quality assurance activities, the people responsible for the activities and the relative success of the URM program in modifying physicians' performance. RESULTS: Of the 245 member hospitals participants from 179 (73%) responded. Criteria audits were performed in 136 (76%), indicators inventory in 43 (24%), occurrence screening in 44 (25%), occurrence reporting in 61 (34%) and URM in 123 (69%). In-hospital deaths were reviewed in 157 (88%) of the hospitals. In all, 87 (55%) of the respondents from hospitals that had a URM program or were developing one indicated that their program was successful in modifying physicians' practices, and 29 (18%) reported that it was not successful; 26 (16%) stated that the effect was still unknown, and 16 (10%) did not respond. Seventy (40%) stated that results of tissue reviews were reported at least 10 times per year and 94 (83%) that medical record reviews were reported at least as often. The differences in the prevalence of the quality assurance activities between the hospitals were not found to be significant. CONCLUSIONS: Many Ontario hospitals are conducting a wide variety of quality assurance activities. Further study is required to determine whether the differences in prevalence of these activities between hospitals would be significant in a larger, perhaps national, sample. Strategies are needed to ensure universal involvement and participation in the improvement of the quality of care and the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of health care treatments. Recommendations to achieve these objectives are suggested.

Barrable, B

1992-01-01

467

Total pelvic exenteration: The Albert Einstein College of Medicine\\/Montefiore Medical Center Experience (1987 to 2003)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective.To review the trends, modifications and results of 103 consecutive total pelvic exenterations (TPE) performed at the Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine from 1987 to 2003.

Gary L. Goldberg; Paniti Sukumvanich; Mark H. Einstein; Harriet O. Smith; Patrick S. Anderson; Abbie L. Fields

2006-01-01

468

Study of Marketing Strategies for the Enhanced Utilization of Partnership Cardiovascular Services at USAF Medical Center Wright-Patterson.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This graduate management project has attempted to initiate the design of a marketing strategy that will increase utilization of civilian partnership cardiovascular surgical services at a large Air Force medical center. This study was an expansion of a pre...

F. W. Palmisano

1992-01-01

469

Application of Strategic Planning Tools for Enhanced Palliative Care Services at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study examined the current level of palliative care services at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center (MVAMC). The findings of the study suggest that current palliative care services do not fully meet the palliative care needs of the existi...

M. M. Mylan

2005-01-01

470

Cost Effectiveness of Statin Drug Therapy in the Lowering of Cholesterol in Patients at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Selecting efficient treatment strategies requires the careful consideration of both the effectiveness and cost of therapy. With over $1,150, 000 expended on statin drugs at Eisenhower Army Medical Center, the utilization of a cost- effectiveness analysis ...

D. H. Jimenez

2000-01-01

471

Study to Determine the Most Effective Method Providing Computer Literacy Training to New Employees at Tripler Army Medical Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study identifies the need for computer literacy training in general, determines the specific training requirement at Tripler Army Medical Center, HI, and analyzes various alternatives available for accomplishing the training requirement. In-house trai...

M. D. Daley

1989-01-01

472

Healthcare Inspection: Alleged Radiology and Cardiology Quality of Care Issues Malcom Randall VA Medical Center Gainesville, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this review was to determine the validity of allegations regarding timeliness of care, quality of care and staff certification at the Malcom Randall VA Medical Center Gainesville, FL. The complaint alleged: Biopsies in the radiology departm...

2010-01-01

473

Healthcare Inspection: Review of a Patient with Pulmonary Embolism Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections reviewed allegations of misdiagnosis by providers at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, (facility) in Oklahoma City, OK. The purpose of the inspection was to determine if the alle...

2011-01-01

474

Healthcare Inspection: Mental Health Safety Issues and Credentialing and Privileging Irregularities Alexandria VA Medical Center, Pineville, Louisiana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This review evaluated allegations regarding mental health (MH) safety issues and credentialing and privileging (C&P) irregularities at the Alexandria VA Medical Center in Pineville, LA. We substantiated that MH inpatients were put at risk because staff di...

2010-01-01

475

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 87-130-1790, Primary Childrens Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An evaluation of exposures to halothane (151677) and isoflurane (26675467) in the operating rooms at Primary Childrens Medical Center (SIC-8070), Salt Lake City, Utah, was conducted in response to a request from management. Operating rooms and the recover...

B. J. Gunter W. J. Daniels

1987-01-01

476

Patient-centered medical homes: will health care reform provide new options for rural communities and providers?  

PubMed

Many are calling for the expansion of the patient-centered medical home model into rural and underserved populations as a transformative strategy to address issues of access, efficiency, quality, and sustainability in the delivery of health care. Patient-centered medical homes have been touted as a promising cost-saving model for comprehensive management of persons with chronic diseases and disabilities, but it is unclear how rural practitioners in medically underserved areas will implement the patient-centered medical home. This article examines how the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act of 2010 will enhance rural providers' ability to provide patient-centered care and services contemplated under the Act in a comprehensive, coordinated, cost-effective way despite leaner budgets and health workforce shortages. PMID:21378505

Bolin, Jane N; Gamm, Larry; Vest, Joshua R; Edwardson, Nick; Miller, Thomas R

477

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01

478

Accountable care organizations, the patient-centered medical home, and health care reform: what does it all mean?  

PubMed

Medical care in the United States is plagued by extremely high costs, poor quality, and fragmented delivery. In response, new concepts of integrated health care delivery have developed, including patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations (ACOs). This article reviews these concepts and includes a detailed discussion of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' ACO and Shared Savings Proposed Rule. PMID:21885689

Longworth, David L

2011-09-01

479

National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

NONE

1996-10-01

480

Medical Association Rule Mining Using Genetic Network Programming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An efficient algorithm for building a classifier is proposed based on an important association rule mining using Genetic Network Programming (GNP). The proposed method measures the significance of the association via the chi-squared test. Users can define the conditions of important association rules for building a classifier flexibly. The definition can include not only the minimum threshold chi-squared value, but also the number of attributes in the association rules. Therefore, all the extracted important rules can be used for classification directly. GNP is one of the evolutionary optimization techniques, which uses the directed graph structure as genes. Instead of generating a large number of candidate rules, our method can obtain a sufficient number of important association rules for classification. In addition, our method suits association rule mining from dense databases such as medical datasets, where many frequently occurring items are found in each tuple. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for classification using important association rules extracted by GNP with acquisition mechanisms and present some experimental results of medical datasets.

Shimada, Kaoru; Wang, Rouchen; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Furuzuki, Takayuki

481

Prototyping an institutional IAIMS/UMLS information environment for an academic medical center.  

PubMed

The paper describes a prototype information environment designed to link network-based information resources in an integrated fashion and thus enhance the information capabilities of an academic medical center. The prototype was implemented on a single Macintosh computer to permit exploration of the overall "information architecture" and to demonstrate the various desired capabilities prior to full-scale network-based implementation. At the heart of the prototype are two components: a diverse set of information resources available over an institutional computer network and an information sources map designed to assist users in finding and accessing information resources relevant to their needs. The paper describes these and other components of the prototype and presents a scenario illustrating its use. The prototype illustrates the link between the goals of two National Library of Medicine initiatives, the Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). PMID:1326371

Miller, P L; Paton, J A; Clyman, J I; Powsner, S M

1992-07-01

482

The Medical College of Wisconsin Senior Mentor Program: Experience of a Lifetime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Senior Mentor Program (SMP) has been offered to a small group of first and second year medical students as a course alternative to the traditional physician mentor program. The program links students with healthy older adult mentors and includes mentor/student visits, didactic sessions, written assignments,…

Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Bedinghaus, Joan

2006-01-01

483

The Medical College of Wisconsin Senior Mentor Program: Experience of a Lifetime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Senior Mentor Program (SMP) has been offered to a small group of first and second year medical students as a course alternative to the traditional physician mentor program. The program links students with healthy older adult mentors and includes mentor/student visits, didactic sessions, written assignments,…

Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Bedinghaus, Joan