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1

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska  

Cancer.gov

St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center is a 257-bed hospital that serves a 17-county area, including the state capital of Lincoln. The St. Elizabeth Cancer Center treated 679 new cancer patients in 2005 and 682 in 2006.

2

Educational Program for Pediatric Inpatients at the Geisinger Medical Center. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is the educational program for pediatric inpatients at Geisinger Medical Center (Pennsylvania). It is explained that the program involves a full time special education teacher, permission from parents, and close coordination with the students' home schools. Covered in outline form are such program aspects as purpose, needs, attainable…

Stern, Sheldon B.

3

76 FR 3209 - West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Veterans Programs Enhancement Act of 1998; Draft Master Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...well-being. VHA implements VA's medical care, research, and education programs. The...campus provides a variety of medical services including inpatient...it serves as a center for medical research and education. The WLA...

2011-01-19

4

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland  

Cancer.gov

More than 40% of the medical center's patients come from outside the primary service area, defined as a 12-mile radius of the hospital. 78% of the Cancer Institute's patients are adults over 55, and 12% are African American.

5

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana  

Cancer.gov

Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center is the largest private medical center in Louisiana. With 740 licensed beds, Our Lady of the Lake provides services to more than 33,000 hospital patients and 350,000 outpatients. The hospital occupies 100 acres in the heart of Baton Rouge, including the cancer center. The cancer program includes Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, a nonprofit, comprehensive radiation therapy facility, which joined with Our Lady of the Lake in 1988 to offer multispecialty cancer care.

6

Physical Therapy Program 5173 Medical Sciences Center 1300 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706-1532  

E-print Network

Physical Therapy Program 5173 Medical Sciences Center 1300 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706-1532 Healthy Baby Lab: PT 635 - Fall, 2013 A Call for Babies and Toddlers: The Physical Therapy Program in the healthy baby lab for the Physical Therapy Students at the University of Wisconsin. I understand

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

7

Physical Therapy Program 5173 Medical Sciences Center 1300 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706-1532  

E-print Network

Physical Therapy Program 5173 Medical Sciences Center 1300 University Avenue Madison, WI 53706-1532 Children's Gait Lab: PT 635 - Fall, 2013 A Call for Preschoolers: The Physical Therapy Program is looking permission to allow ___________________ to participate in the children's gait lab for the Physical Therapy

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

8

Implementing a medication safety and poison prevention program at a senior center.  

PubMed

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices encourages pharmacists to assist in preventing medication misuse. The purpose of this article is to discuss a medication-safety education session conducted by a pharmacy professor, the faculty advisor to the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists university student chapter and students in a pharmacovigilance rotation, which was conducted at a local senior center. The author attended a train-the-trainer Webinar and then educated the pharmacy students. Participants at the senior center were taught about poison prevention, drug interactions, and appropriate drug disposal through an interactive format. We plan to continue the medication safety program at the senior center as a longitudinal project to promote patient safety. Pharmacists should be encouraged to play an active role in community outreach programs. PMID:24129222

Gershman, Jennifer A

2013-10-01

9

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Electronic Medical Records  

Cancer.gov

Develop a national database of voluntarily-provided electronic medical records. Expanding the information available on people who have been screened for cancer, are at high risk, are actively being treated, and are cancer survivors will greatly contribute to the knowledge and treatment of cancer.

10

The Crystal Charity Ball Autism Project is a collaborative program of Children's Medical Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center and The University of Texas at Dallas  

E-print Network

The Crystal Charity Ball Autism Project is a collaborative program of Children's Medical Center, UT program Children up to 5 years old with a diagnosis of autism Minimum of 2 sessions per week 3 hrs each) Interested families please contact 214- 456- 7700 6300 Harry Hines Chase Bank Building, 1st floor Autism

O'Toole, Alice J.

11

Gibbs Regional Medical Center  

Cancer.gov

Gibbs Regional Medical Center Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg, SC Why GRCC Is Interested In Being Part Of The Pilot Program? To build on our 24 years of experience as a CCOP to increase accrual to Phase I/II trials To expand access

12

Program Evaluation of Remote Heart Failure Monitoring: Healthcare Utilization Analysis in a Rural Regional Medical Center.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Materials and Methods: Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. Results: HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. Conclusions: The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems. PMID:25025239

Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

2014-07-15

13

Health Insurance & Patient-Centered Medical Homes  

E-print Network

Health Insurance & Patient- Centered Medical Homes Office of Rural Health Area Health Education the groundwork for a patient-centered medical home program in Montana. · Cancer Clinical Trials- clarifying Initiatives The CSI is studying the following state-based reforms: · Patient-Centered Medical Homes- laying

Maxwell, Bruce D.

14

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT Student: Program: Immunology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: PLEASE RETURN TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Immunology Program Administrator Modell Center Harvard Medical

Mekalanos, John

15

Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

2005-01-01

16

Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program Upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

2005-01-01

17

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers Map of Cancer Centers Data Tables Benchmark Home > Cancer Centers Cancer Centers NCI-designated cancer centers are characterized by scientific excellence and the capability to integrate a diversity of

18

Dittrick Medical History Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Currently operating as an interdisciplinary study center within the College of Arts and Sciences of Case Western Reserve University, the Dittrick Medical History Center was established as part of the Cleveland Medical Library Association in 1894. First-time visitors will definitely want to begin by looking through the museum's history, and then examine the museum artifacts and galleries, which represent a small sample of their holdings. The artifacts are divided into time periods and include such fascinating medical equipment as bloodletting devices, a phrenology bust, and a defribrillator from 1950. The galleries section allows visitors to take a virtual tour of the rooms within the museum, such as a doctor's office from the 1930s and a replica of a pharmacy from the 1880s. Several online exhibits are also available for perusal, such as one dedicated to Cleveland's brush with a smallpox epidemic in 1902. Utterly fascinating, though not for the squeamish, is the exhibit that details medical school photographs, many of them class photographs around dissection tables, and postcards featuring medical students and cadavers. The site is rounded out with a host of online guides and finding aids that help in using the Center's extensive collections dealing with the history of medicine.

2003-01-01

19

Medical Centers in Trouble.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rising costs, changes in the health-care system, reduced research money, and proposed cutbacks in funds for treating the poor are forcing academic medical centers to consider new ways to remain viable. Resulting actions being considered or implemented include administrative restructuring, worker layoffs, mergers, reduced physician hiring,…

Mercer, Joye

1995-01-01

20

H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM  

E-print Network

H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 165 H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM BACKGROUND UCSF established a regional medical education program in Fresno in 1975 to provide training for doctors Medical Center, Fresno County Hospital, Fresno Community Hospital, Valley Medical Center and Kaiser

Mullins, Dyche

21

Medicine and Medical Center  

E-print Network

Jaffa Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies and Interdisciplinary Programs Ramzi Sabra Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education Huda Abu-Saad Huijer Director of Hariri School of Nursing Zeina Kanafani Organizations (JCAHO) from 1965 until 1983, when the civil war in Lebanon prevented review teams from continuing

22

General Medical Surveillance Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

1993-01-01

23

University of Rochester Medical Center Advancement Major Gifts  

E-print Network

University of Rochester Medical Center Advancement Major Gifts Major Gift Officer, Neuromedicine Grade 56 Overview: Reporting to the Sr. Director, the Major Gift Officer, Neuromedicine (MGO fundraiser for the medical center's private gifts to support strategic capital, program, and endowment

Portman, Douglas

24

New Program: NIH Medical  

E-print Network

+ New Program: NIH Medical Research ©2010 Howard Hughes Medical Institute + Research Scholars RESEARCH? ©2010 Howard Hughes Medical Institute translational or clinical research project. · HHMI Medical Fellows work at any academic or nonprofit research institution in the U.S., except the NIH

Bushman, Frederic

25

The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

1974-01-01

26

The World Trade Center Disaster and the Health of Workers: Five-Year Assessment of a Unique Medical Screening Program  

PubMed Central

Background Approximately 40,000 rescue and recovery workers were exposed to caustic dust and toxic pollutants following the 11 September 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC). These workers included traditional first responders, such as firefighters and police, and a diverse population of construction, utility, and public sector workers. Methods To characterize WTC-related health effects, the WTC Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program was established. This multicenter clinical program provides free standardized examinations to responders. Examinations include medical, mental health, and exposure assessment questionnaires; physical examinations; spirometry; and chest X rays. Results Of 9,442 responders examined between July 2002 and April 2004, 69% reported new or worsened respiratory symptoms while performing WTC work. Symptoms persisted to the time of examination in 59% of these workers. Among those who had been asymptomatic before September 11, 61% developed respiratory symptoms while performing WTC work. Twenty-eight percent had abnormal spirometry; forced vital capacity (FVC) was low in 21%; and obstruction was present in 5%. Among nonsmokers, 27% had abnormal spirometry compared with 13% in the general U.S. population. Prevalence of low FVC among nonsmokers was 5-fold greater than in the U.S. population (20% vs. 4%). Respiratory symptoms and spirometry abnormalities were significantly associated with early arrival at the site. Conclusion WTC responders had exposure-related increases in respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function test abnormalities that persisted up to 2.5 years after the attacks. Long-term medical monitoring is required to track persistence of these abnormalities and identify late effects, including possible malignancies. Lessons learned should guide future responses to civil disasters. PMID:17185275

Herbert, Robin; Moline, Jacqueline; Skloot, Gwen; Metzger, Kristina; Baron, Sherry; Luft, Benjamin; Markowitz, Steven; Udasin, Iris; Harrison, Denise; Stein, Diane; Todd, Andrew; Enright, Paul; Stellman, Jeanne Mager; Landrigan, Philip J.; Levin, Stephen M.

2006-01-01

27

University of Mississippi Medical Center  

E-print Network

University of Mississippi Medical Center University of Mississippi Health Care Student Orientation incoming faculty and students receive prior to beginning clinical rotations at University of Mississippi Background Check / Fingerprinting at UMMC Mississippi law requires verification of background check

Correia, John J.

28

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Center Addresses(text file) Cancer Center Profiles Benchmark Data Home > Cancer Centers > Cancer Centers List Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State Map

29

Anatomical Gift Program Harvard Medical School  

E-print Network

Anatomical Gift Program Harvard Medical School Tosteson Medical Education Center Suite 158 260://agp.hms.harvard.edu Anatomical Gift Program at Harvard Medical School We thank you for your interest in this most generous gift the disposition of the remains as elected on the Instrument of Anatomical Gift, to the extent consistent

Goodrich, Lisa V.

30

Alameda County Medical Center Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA  

E-print Network

Alameda County Medical Center Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco Cedar Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles Children's Hospital Orange Co. City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte CA Community Regional Medical Center, Fresno Desert Regional

Gleeson, Joseph G.

31

Preemptive Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation: Current Programs in Five US Medical Centers.  

PubMed

Although the field of pharmacogenetics has existed for decades, practioners have been slow to implement pharmacogenetic testing in clinical care. Numerous publications describe the barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. Recently, several freely available resources have been developed to help address these barriers. In this review, we discuss current programs that use preemptive genotyping to optimize the pharmacotherapy of patients. Array-based preemptive testing includes a large number of relevant pharmacogenes that impact multiple high-risk drugs. Using a preemptive approach allows genotyping results to be available prior to any prescribing decision so that genomic variation may be considered as an inherent patient characteristic in the planning of therapy. This review describes the common elements among programs that have implemented preemptive genotyping and highlights key processes for implementation, including clinical decision support. PMID:25292429

Dunnenberger, Henry M; Crews, Kristine R; Hoffman, James M; Caudle, Kelly E; Broeckel, Ulrich; Howard, Scott C; Hunkler, Robert J; Klein, Teri E; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

2015-01-01

32

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Center Addresses(text file) Cancer Center Profiles Benchmark Data Home > Cancer Centers > Region Map Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State

33

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM TO BE SUBMITTED PRIOR OR PRINT LEGIBLY. STUDENT: DMS PROGRAM AFFILIATION: Immunology Program CURRENT PHONE: CURRENT EMAIL ON IMMUNOLOGY, MODELL CENTER, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL Grades and credit for rotations will not be assigned unless

Mekalanos, John

34

Columbia University Medical Center Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

Columbia University Medical Center Environmental Health & Safety Radiation Safety Program New York - Title 24 Department of Health and Mental Hygiene ARTICLE 175 RADIATION CONTROL General Provisions for diagnostic radiation machines. §175.55 Compliance with federal standards and precedence thereof. §175

Grishok, Alla

35

Kennedy Space Center exercise program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

Hoffman, Cristy

1993-01-01

36

The model of District Medical Data Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the infrastructure for the healthcare system, The District Medical Data Center need to be built at first. The model of architecture of District Medical Data Center is proposed in the paper. Both the advantages and disadvantages of the model are set forth while the view is presented. The District Medical Data Center is “patient-centered” instead of “accounting-centered” in the

Zhang Jiemin; Lu Jinsheng

2010-01-01

37

Medical Center Farmers Markets: A Strategic Partner in the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

PubMed Central

Background The number of medical center–based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. Community Context In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution’s commitment to the medical home. Methods We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market’s Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance’s report on the medical home. Outcome During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Interpretation Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:23906327

Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Morrison, Kathy J.; Dillon, Judith F.; Bates, Beth Y.

2013-01-01

38

University Medical Center New Orleans, Louisiana  

E-print Network

1 University Medical Center New Orleans, Louisiana FEBRUARY 6, 2014 #12;22 UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Director Facility Planning & Control SPECIALIZATIONS Healthcare Education #12;33 UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER Project Team #12;44 UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 4 SEPTEMBER 5, 2005 Katrina did not make the decision

39

Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List  

Cancer.gov

 Cancer Centers Program - Cancer Centers List Map of Cancer Centers Data Tables Benchmark Home > Cancer Centers > Region Map Cancer Centers List View By: Name | State | State Map | Region Map Click on geographical

40

Establishing a minority-based community clinical oncology program: the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-university Hospital Cancer Center experience.  

PubMed

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School-University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J

2013-03-01

41

Establishing a Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program: The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center Experience  

PubMed Central

The Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP) at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center was established to serve an unmet need in a medically, educationally, and socioeconomically underserved community of primarily African American and Latino patients in Newark and Essex County, New Jersey. The MB-CCOP was built on an existing infrastructure of multidisciplinary teams of cancer specialists who collaborated in patient care and an existing clinical research program, which included multilingual staff and a breast cancer navigator. This article highlights some of the unique opportunities and challenges involved in the startup of an MB-CCOP specifically relevant to an academic setting. We present a guide to the necessary infrastructure and institutional support that must be in place before considering such a program and some of the steps an institution can take to overcome barriers preventing successful enrollment of patients onto clinical trials. PMID:23814524

Wieder, Robert; Teal, Randall; Saunders, Tracie; Weiner, Bryan J.

2013-01-01

42

Cogeneration at Iowa Methodist Medical Center  

E-print Network

COGENERATION AT IOWA METHODIST MEDICAL CENTER Cabot B. Thunem, P.E. Steve J. Schebler, P.E. Stanley Consultants, Inc. Muscatine, Iowa Glenn I. Love, P.E. Iowa Methodist Medical Center Des Moines, Iowa ABSTRACT The Iowa Methodist...

Thunem, C. B.; Schebler, S. J.; Love, G. I.

43

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program  

E-print Network

1 NIH Medical Research Scholars Program · A comprehensive, year-long residential research enrichment program for medical, dental, and veterinary students · NIH Intramural Research Program in Bethesda' personal interests and career goals NIH Medical Research Scholars Program -1 · Blends elements of two

Bushman, Frederic

44

Johnson Space Center Health and Medical Technical Authority  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

1.HMTA responsibilities: a) Assure program/project compliance with Agency health and medical requirements at identified key decision points. b) Certify that programs/projects comply with Agency health and medical requirements prior to spaceflight missions. c) Assure technical excellence. 2. Designation of applicable NASA Centers for HMTA implementation and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) appointment. 3. Center CMO responsible for HMTA implementation for programs and projects at the center. JSC HMTA captured in "JSC HMTA Implementation Plan". 4. Establishes specifics of dissenting opinion process consistent with NASA procedural requirements.

Fogarty, Jennifer A.

2010-01-01

45

UCSD Medical Center Ergonomic Funding Assistance Form Purpose: The UCSD Medical Center Workers' Compensation Unit (WCU) currently has funds  

E-print Network

UCSD Medical Center Ergonomic Funding Assistance Form Purpose: The UCSD Medical Center Workers' Compensation Unit (WCU) currently has funds available to assist departments implement ergonomic recommendations identified during an ergonomic assessment. This program will match up to 50% of the cost of identified

Gleeson, Joseph G.

46

Introduction to Medical Terminology for Claretian Medical Center Worker Education Program of Northeastern Illinois University's Chicago Teachers' Center in Partnership with the Union of Needletrades, Industrial, Textile Employers (UNITE).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual consists of glossaries and descriptions of medical terminology for use in a workplace literacy program for hospital workers. The sections are as follows: hospital patient care areas; hospital departments; medical specialists; word elements (root, prefix, suffix, combining vowel, compound word); surgical procedures; diseases and…

Essex Community Coll., MD.

47

Effect of a Comprehensive Health Care Program by Korean Medicine Doctors on Medical Care Utilization for Common Infectious Diseases in Child-Care Centers  

PubMed Central

As the role of traditional medicine in community health improvement increases, a comprehensive health care program for infectious diseases management in child-care centers by Korean medicine doctors was developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the program intervention on infection-related medical care utilization among children. The study used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group, comparing pre- and post-intervention data of the same children. The program implemented interventions in terms of management, education, and medical examination for the teachers, parents, and children in 12-week period. The frequency of utilization, cost, and prescription days of drugs and antibiotics due to infectious diseases prior to the intervention were compared with those during the 3-month intervention, using health insurance claim data. A panel analysis was also conducted to support the findings. A significant reduction (12%) in infection-related visit days of hospitals was observed with the intervention (incident rate ratio = 0.88, P = 0.01). And medical cost, drug prescription days, and antibiotics prescription days were decreased, although not statistically significant. A further cost-effectiveness analysis in terms of social perspectives, considering the opportunity costs for guardians to take children to medical institutions, would be needed. PMID:25302066

Kwon, Soonman

2014-01-01

48

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program  

E-print Network

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medical Research creative, research-oriented medical, dental, and veterinary students to the intramural campus of the NIH and provides the opportunity for future clinician-scientists and medical researchers to carry out research

Bushman, Frederic

49

Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: The University of Michigan-Coulter Translational Research Partnership Program.  

PubMed Central

Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the “valley of death”. The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: Scientific, Intellectual Property, Market, and Regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers. PMID:21167009

Pienta, Kenneth J.

2010-01-01

50

Yale-New Haven Medical Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Yale-New Haven Medical Center Web site contains information about the Medical Center and its constituent organizations, Yale-New Haven Hospital, the Yale University School of Medicine, and the Yale University School of Nursing. You will also find links to valuable external biomedical Internet resources.

51

Medical Devices and Systems PRECISE Center  

E-print Network

12/16/2008 1 Medical Devices and Systems Insup Lee PRECISE Center Department Computer and Information Science University of Pennsylvania 12/15/08 CPS Information Day Medical Devices Containing recognizes that the rapidly increasing software complexity of medical devices makes the development of high

Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

52

Meharry Medical College-Community Health Centers Network  

Cancer.gov

The Meharry Medical College Community Health Centers (CHCs) Community Networks Program (CNP) is a component of the Meharry Center for Optimal Health. Its purpose is to reduce cancer health disparities among African Americans by conducting community-based participatory research, education, and training in three urban communities in Tennessee (Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis).

53

Global Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Raufman, MS, MPH Program Manager, Global Health Center Albert Einstein College of Medicine of YeshivaGlobal Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM Request for Applications The Einstein Global Health Center-3518 jill.raufman@einstein.yu.edu #12;

Yates, Andrew

54

Delinquency Prevention Center Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Huntsville (Alabama) City School System has proposed continuance of a separate facility, the Delinquency Prevention Center, to which students may be transferred when their conduct indicates that they cannot be maintained in the normal school environment. Objectives of such a program include providing the assigned child with individual…

Caylor, Mary Jane

55

New Hanover Regional Medical Center  

Cancer.gov

ROCOG sites 5 Hospital, 3 Health Systems UPMC McKeesport, McKeesport, PA (lead) Jameson Hospital, New Castle, PA Somerset Cancer Center, Somerset, PA UPMC Murtha Cancer Center, Johnstown, PA Mercy Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA National Mentors Roswell Park, Buffalo, NY Washington University, St.

56

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program NCCCP Program Advisory Committee 1 Maureen Johnson, PhD Norman Coleman, MD NCCCP Project Officer Special Advisor Special Assistant to the Director Radiation Oncology Branch, NIH 31 Center Drive

57

Student perceptions of a patient- centered medical training curriculum  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate a patient-centered medical training curriculum, the SELECT program, through perceptions of the inaugural student cohort. Methods Data were collected from two focus groups conducted in the university setting, comprised of fifteen first-year medical students who participated in the SELECT program during its inaugural year. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion, which was transcribed and hand-coded through thematic analyses. Results Various themes related to patient-centered care were identified. Students noted changes in their attitudes towards interacting with patients in an empowering and educative manner as a result of communication and motivational interviewing exercises. Additionally, they recognized certain external, structural barriers as well as internal conflict between pragmatism and emotional intelligence that could potentially hinder patient-centered care. The impact of family dynamics and social support on quality of life and health outcomes was acknowledged. Students also emphasized the value of collaborating with multiple health professionals. Lastly, students provided suggestions for program improvement, namely additional simulations, more education regarding other healthcare professionals’ roles, more standardized experiences, and application of principles to acute and primary care. Conclusions Upon completion of the first year of the SELECT program, students gained an appreciation for patient-centered care and various factors and skills that facilitate such care. Additionally, they experienced a dissonance between didactic concepts from the curriculum and observed medical practices. This study highlights the educational benefits of a patient-centered medical curriculum and provides suggestions for future improvement. PMID:25341218

Gallentine, Ashley; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily; Hinojosa, Sara; Monroe, Alicia

2014-01-01

58

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-31

59

CDRP - Funded Institutions - Laredo Medical Center  

Cancer.gov

Laredo Medical Center, formerly known as Mercy Health Center, was a non-profit institution established by the Sisters of Mercy, a group of Catholic nuns. Mercy Health Center was sold to Community Health Systems (CHS) in 2003. CHS is based in Brentwood, Tennessee and is the leading operator of general acute care hospitals in non-urban markets throughout the United States. CHS owns 72 hospitals located in 22 states across the country. The present facility was completed in September 1999.

60

Establishing a Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program: The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center Experience. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This academic medical center case study demonstrates the challenges encountered and lessons learned in establishing a NCI-supported Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP). Despite programmatic strengths, successful accrual of sufficient numbers of minority patients was a challenge.

61

76 FR 36955 - West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Veterans Programs Enhancement Act of 1998; Master Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers) in the same year that the...for Separate Facilities for Female Veterans One commenter expressed...housing was not available for female veterans and their children...The program serves male and female veterans with mental...

2011-06-23

62

INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

ASFAW BEYENE

2008-09-29

63

Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center,  

Cancer.gov

Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins 5000 Hennessey Blvd Baton Rouge, LA 70808 www.ololrmc.com www.marybird.org • Robert Davidge, CEO, Our

64

Graduate Appointee Medical/Dental/Vision Insurance Program 2013-2014 2013 2014 Medical Plan Summary for Academic Student Employees  

E-print Network

Graduate Appointee Medical/Dental/Vision Insurance Program 2013-2014 2013 ­ 2014 Medical Plan Medical/Dental/Vision Insurance Program 2013-2014 Student Benefits Hall Health Center/ Rubenstein Pharmacy rescue or bone marrow transplant) Facility/clinic charges are not a covered medical expense. Services

Kaminsky, Werner

65

Overview of Mosquito Research Programs at the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural & Veterinary Entomology  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE), a U.S. Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service laboratory, was established in World War II to produce products to protect military personnel against insect vector of disease. Currently the mission of CMAVE is ...

66

American Overseas Research Centers Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

67

Industrial Assessment Center Program  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

Dr. Dereje Agonafer

2007-11-30

68

Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

Cancer.gov

Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota Sanford Cancer Center 1305 W. 18th Street Sioux Falls, SD 57105 www.sanfordhealth.org • Pat O’Brien, MD, President, Sanford USD Medical Center • Dan Blue, MD, President, Sanford Clinic •

69

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) is a public-private partnership of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and a network of community hospital-based cancer centers from around the United States.

70

Evaluative Follow-Up of Former Medical Students, Resident Physicians, and Other Health Professional Students Participating in 1972-80 Minnesota Area Health Education Center Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Minnesota Area Health Education Center programs (AHEC) from 1972-81 improved health care in rural Minnesota areas by providing 2,200 health-professional students and resident physicians with off-campus courses and clinical training. Other programs provided continuing education, patient education, quality assurance, and minority career…

Higgins, Paul S.; Lawrenz, Frances P.

71

Teaching Health Centers: A New Paradigm in Graduate Medical Education  

PubMed Central

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 created the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program to provide graduate medical education (GME) funding directly to community-based health centers that expand or establish new primary care residency programs. The THCGME program was the legislation’s only new investment in GME, and it represents a significant departure from the Medicare GME funding system. It provides payments to ambulatory care centers for both direct and indirect GME expenses and mandates a level of reporting from recipients that is not required for Medicare GME support. This initial look at the 11 inaugural teaching health centers (THCs) shows they are training primary care residents in relevant delivery models (e.g., interprofessional teams, patient-centered medical homes), developing educational initiatives that address primary care practice in underserved areas, and transforming organizational and funding structures to support community-based training. The THCs plan to evaluate and report resident performance, patient quality of care, and graduate outcomes. The work of the first THCs has implications for primary care training, the GME system, and future policies and legislation aimed at strengthening the health care workforce. PMID:23095929

Chen, Candice; Chen, Frederick; Mullan, Fitzhugh

2013-01-01

72

Cancer Centers Program - About the Program  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Centers Program - About the Program Our History Staff Directory Contact Us Driving Directions Home > About Us > Staff Directory Staff Directory Linda K. Weiss, Ph.D. | Chief weissl@mail.nih.gov Jaswant S. Bhorjee, Ph.D.

73

Television documentaries lifting hospital, medical center profiles.  

PubMed

The nation's hospitals and medical centers are enjoying the legacy of TV audiences' addiction to medical dramas. Cable television has met the challenge with documentary coverage of real live hospitals. The medium offers many benefits and few disadvantages for those marketing managers with the courage to welcome camera crews. Lynn Hopkins Cantwell is director of public relations and marketing for Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C., which was covered in a seven-instrument "Lifeline" documentary for the Discovery Channel. James G. Gosky is director of communications for The MetroHealth System, Cleveland, which was the subject of two installments of "Trauma: Life in th ER," produced for the Learning Channel. These marketing pros describe the myriad details they faced when their respective hospitals went "on camera." Among the key factors were good communications with all constituents, attention to detail, and follow-up. PMID:11209289

Rees, T

2001-01-01

74

Postgraduate Medical Education Clinician Investigator Program (CIP)  

E-print Network

1 Postgraduate Medical Education Clinician Investigator Program (CIP .................................................4 1.2.1 Medical Research Expert.6 ACADEMIC SESSIONS AND ETHICS TRAINING ..................................................................10

Hitchcock, Adam P.

75

The medical story. [Skylab program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the Skylab medical program is given. All medical subsystems provided in the orbital workshop functioned satisfactorily. Major systems included the food system, the waste management system, and provisions per personal hygiene. A series of lockers in the wardroom was used to stow the inflight medical support system. Cardiovascular counter pressure garments were launched in the orbital workshop for all three crews. Life services experiments were carried out. Two experiments were conducted in the Skylab missions to study the performance of the cardiovascular system during weightless flight and return to earth and the one g environment. A series of experiments was conducted to study mineral balance and the bioassay of body fluids.

Johnston, R. S.; Dietlein, L. F.; Michel, E. L.

1974-01-01

76

Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

1992-04-01

77

2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING SW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

78

3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

79

4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

80

American Medical Education: Institutions, Programs, and Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents information about the academic medical centers belonging to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and profiles American medical education generally. Following a brief introduction, a section on institutions and resources offers information on medical schools' financial support, faculties, and faculty practice…

Jones, Robert F.

81

Cancer Centers Program - Recent Communications  

Cancer.gov

The CCSG program announcement includes explicit language recognizing the importance of center participation in trials of this nature and of providing accrual exceptions in both PRMS and CCSG peer review processes.

82

The Communication Center Program Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program manual describes the Communication Center at Joseph Kerr Junior High School in Sacramento County, California, which was established in 1975 to prevent student high risk behavior and to encourage positive attitudes in the school community. The philosophy of the Center, which is based on the theories of Rudolf Dreikurs, is described,…

Medcalf, Ann Wachob

83

The Carlson School Medical Industry Leadership Programs  

E-print Network

industry--from insurance, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology to the delivery of care in Minnesota, which maintains one of the nation's largest concentrations of health care and medical deviceThe Carlson School Medical Industry Leadership Programs Shaping the future of the medical industry

Minnesota, University of

84

Cancer Centers Program - Downloads  

Cancer.gov

Comparative Oncology Program - For the Public Cancer, in the pet population, is a spontaneous disease. Pet owners, motivated by the desire to prolong their animals’ quality of life, frequently seek out the specialized care and treatment of veterinary oncologists at private referral veterinary hospitals and veterinary teaching hospitals across the country. Therapeutic modalities for veterinary cancer patients are similar to those for humans, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and biotherapy.

85

Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

1985-01-01

86

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview Search NCCCP For General Information Frank Blanchard (Contractor) Director, Public Affairs SAIC-Frederick, Inc. National Cancer Institute at Frederick

87

Harvard University Respiratory Protection Program Medical Evaluation Questionnaire  

E-print Network

Harvard University Respiratory Protection Program Medical Evaluation Questionnaire Medical No Instructions: All employees must be medically evaluated prior to use of respiratory protection. Employees may University Respiratory Protection Program Medical Evaluation Questionnaire Medical Evaluation Questionnaire

Heller, Eric

88

Evaluating community engagement in an academic medical center.  

PubMed

From the perspective of academic medical centers (AMCs), community engagement is a collaborative process of working toward mutually defined goals to improve the community's health, and involves partnerships between AMCs, individuals, and entities representing the surrounding community. AMCs increasingly recognize the importance of community engagement, and recent programs such as Prevention Research Centers and Clinical and Translational Science Awards have highlighted community engagement activities. However, there is no standard or accepted metric for evaluating AMCs' performance and impact of community engagement activities.In this article, the authors present a framework for evaluating AMCs' community engagement activities. The framework includes broad goals and specific activities within each goal, wherein goals and activities are evaluated using a health services research framework consisting of structure, process, and outcome criteria. To illustrate how to use this community engagement evaluation framework, the authors present specific community engagement goals and activities of the University of Rochester Medical Center to (1) improve the health of the community served by the AMC; (2) increase the AMC's capacity for community engagement; and (3) increase generalizable knowledge and practices in community engagement and public health.Using a structure-process-outcomes framework, a multidisciplinary team should regularly evaluate an AMC's community engagement program with the purpose of measurably improving the performance of the AMC and the health of its surrounding community. PMID:24556768

Szilagyi, Peter G; Shone, Laura P; Dozier, Ann M; Newton, Gail L; Green, Theresa; Bennett, Nancy M

2014-04-01

89

Stanford University Medical Center: Ovarian Kaleidoscope Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ovarian Kaleidoscope Database (OKDB) was developed by the Hsueh Lab in the Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics at Stanford University Medical Center. The OKDB "provides information regarding the biological function, expression pattern and regulation of genes expressed in the ovary. It also contains information on gene sequences, chromosomal localization, human and murine mutation phenotypes and biomedical publication links." Database users can conduct a Gene Search, or browse an extensive Alphabetical List of Ovarian Genes. After registering with OKDB, site users can access Submit and Update options as well. The site also contains an interactive diagram of Ovarian Gene Mutations Associated with Infertility or Sub-Fertility, information about Ovarian Gene Maps, and a selection of Useful Links.

90

Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC)  

Cancer.gov

Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC) are partnerships on a large regional- and national-partnership scale. CNPCs continue the work of the Community Networks Program (CNP), which ended in 2010. A CNPC is headquartered at an academic institution or community-based organization and works closely with the local community to identify its cancer disparity problems and cancer prevention and control needs, and to develop culturally sensitive interventions specific to that community.

91

Replacing the academic medical center's teaching hospital.  

PubMed

Addressing the need for updated teaching hospital facilities is one of the most significant issues that an academic medical center faces. The authors describe the process they underwent in deciding to build a new facility at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Initial issues included whether or not the teaching hospital would continue to play a role in clinical education and whether to replace or renovate the existing facility. Once the decision to build was reached, MUSC had to choose between an on-campus or distant site for the new hospital and determine what the function of the old hospital would be. The authors examine these questions and discuss the factors involved in different stages of decision making, in order to provide the academic medicine community guidance in negotiating similar situations. Open communication within MUSC and with the greater community was a key component of the success of the enterprise to date. The authors argue that decisions concerning site, size, and focus of the hospital must be made by developing university-wide and community consensus among many different constituencies. The most important elements in the success at MUSC were having unified leadership, incorporating constituent input, engaging an external consultant, remaining unfazed by unanticipated challenges, and adhering to a realistic, aggressive timetable. The authors share their strategies for identifying and successfully managing these complex and potentially divisive aspects of building a new teaching hospital. PMID:16249296

Reves, J G; Smith, Stuart; Greenberg, Ray; Johnson, Donald

2005-11-01

92

Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center  

PubMed Central

There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

2011-01-01

93

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER ADVANCED PRACTICE PROVIDER COUNCIL  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER ADVANCED PRACTICE PROVIDER COUNCIL BYLAWS PURPOSE the University of Mississippi Health Care and all entities, for networking, support, professional development

Raucher, Drazen

94

Durable medical equipment recycling: a pilot program.  

PubMed

Our unfunded trauma patients often lack the access to adequate health care services and equipment after hospital discharge. We have developed and implemented a pilot program to provide reclaimed durable medical equipment to medically indigent trauma patients. Our program includes the reuse of items such as front-wheeled walkers, bedside commodes, shower chairs, crutches, and canes. PMID:22415511

Wright, Aaron J

2012-01-01

95

1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' WITH HILLMAN HOSPITAL, THE FIVE-STORY BUILDING (CENTER RIGHT AT 20TH STREET AND SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH), JEFFERSON TOWER (CENTER LEFT AT 20TH STREET AND SEVENTH AVENUE SOUTH, AND THE MANY HOSPITALS AND TEACHING FACILITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER. - Hillman Hospital, 600 Block Westside Twentieth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

96

What is ASAP? ASAP, or the Academic & Staff Assistance Program, is the University of California Medical  

E-print Network

What is ASAP? ASAP, or the Academic & Staff Assistance Program, is the University of California Medical Center, Davis employee assistance program ­ providing mental health and support services across campus. We offer confidential, free assessment, intervention, consultation, and referral services

Leistikow, Bruce N.

97

Faculty and Staff Handbook The University of Mississippi Medical Center  

E-print Network

#12;Faculty and Staff Handbook The University of Mississippi Medical Center © The University of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson, Mississippi _________________ First Edition, September, 1971 Second urself with th f Mississippi uidelines an operty right act, compen nt in regard . ealth Affairs Medicine

Raucher, Drazen

98

Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

Gannon, Sam C.

2011-01-01

99

Inflight Medical Events in the Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the first launch of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the astronauts and their flight surgeons have dealt with a variety of inflight medical issues. A review will be provided of these issues as well as medications used in the treatment of these medical problems. Detailed medical debriefs are conducted by the flight ,surgeon with the individual crewmembers three days after landing. These debriefs were review for Shuttle flights from 1988 through 1999 to determine the frequency of inflight medical events. Medical events were grouped by ICD category and the frequency of medical events within those categories were reviewed. The ICD category of Symptoms, Signs and Ill-defined Conditions had the most medical events. Facial fullness and headache were the most common complaints within this category. The ICD category of Respiratory System had the next most common medical events with sinus congestion being the most common complaint. This was followed by Digestive System complaints and Nervous System/Sense Organ complaints. A variety of inflight medical events have occurred throughout the Shuttle program. Fortunately, the majority of these problems have been minor and have been well within the capability of the medical equipment flown and the skills of the Crew Medical Officers. Medical ,problems/procedures that are routine on the ground often present unique problems in the space flight environment. It is important that the flight surgeon understand the common medical problems encountered.

Baisden, Denise L.; Effenhauser, R. K.; Wear, Mary L.

1999-01-01

100

TITLE: RESEARCH AND HIPAA CLINICAL AND MEDICAL RECORDS Columbia University Medical Center will administer and conduct medical records research  

E-print Network

TITLE: RESEARCH AND HIPAA CLINICAL AND MEDICAL RECORDS POLICY: Columbia University Medical Center will administer and conduct medical records research activities in accordance with city, state, and federal laws Individuals conducting or assisting with research activities will follow existing Columbia University Medical

Columbia University

101

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs - Community-Clinical Oncology Program  

Cancer.gov

The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) is a network for conducting cancer prevention and treatment clinical trials by community medical practitioners. This network connects academic centers (Research Bases who design and conduct the trials) with community physicians who accrue patients to those trials.

102

Implementation of a High-Alert Medication Program  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Greater than 500,000 doses of high-alert medications are administered throughout the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Program on an annual basis. High-alert medications (HAM) carry a higher risk of harm than other medications and errors in the administration of HAM can have catastrophic clinical outcomes. The purpose of this project is to ensure safe medication practices and to eliminate medication errors that cause harm to our patients. The Program: KPNC leadership, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, quality leaders, and labor unions worked with regional and local medication safety committees to: 1) standardize high-alert medication-handling practices; 2) enhance education programs related to medication practices, embedding these into annual core competencies of all staff who handle high-alert medications; 3) develop monitoring functions at both the regional and local levels to ensure sustainability and ongoing systems improvements. Begun in December 2005, this program covers the delivery of high-alert medications across the continuum of care and affects all patients receiving HAM. Measures: The initial phase of the monitoring process was put in place to measure compliance with implementation. Over the first few months of the program the 90% minimal threshold was surpassed with regional overall compliance of 95%. Following this initial process, the Regional Medication Safety Committee developed monitoring tools. Department managers carry out these concurrent observational audits at the medical centers with oversight by the Assistant Administrators for Quality and Service. These audits are designed to measure whether or not all medications on the HAM list are handled specifically to policy requirements, eg, independent double-checks, HAM stickers, etc. Audit specifications are provided for each audit tool. Medical Center audit results from the third quarter of 2006 through the third quarter of 2007 have shown a regional aggregate of 97.7% compliance. As the high percentages of compliance have held constant over time, more actionable metrics are being put in place for 2008. To determine whether or not the program is reducing HAM errors, data from the regional Quality and Risk database (MIDAS) related to all high-alert medication errors was reviewed. Two interventions were of note: in July of 2005, there was a renewed effort to educate leaders, managers, physicians, and staff on responsible reporting in a “just culture” and the introduction of the new Responsible Reporting Form. An increase in reporting was noted at this time. In December 2005, the HAM program was introduced. There is a statistically significant drop in errors reported for 23 consecutive months following this program. These findings were similar for all phases of the delivery process. A powerful indicator of improvement is the average days between major injury and death. As of November 30, 2007, it has been 232 days since the last significant negative event was reported due to a HAM. Conclusion: This program has been implemented in all of the KPNC Medical Centers and is in the process of being implemented in all KP regions. This spread has been endorsed by the Medical Directors Quality Committee and by the KP Boards of Directors. The Interregional Medication Safety Committee is overseeing the spread process. A toolkit containing all of the required tools plus additional materials and information has been developed and made available throughout KP. The program is the recipient of the 2007 Lawrence Patient Safety Award. PMID:21364807

Graham, Suzanne; Clopp, Molly P; Kostek, Nicholas E; Crawford, Barbara

2008-01-01

103

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program  

E-print Network

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2011 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

Martinez, Tony R.

104

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program  

E-print Network

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2013 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

Olsen Jr., Dan R.

105

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program  

E-print Network

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2012 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

Hart, Gus

106

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program  

E-print Network

BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2014 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

Hart, Gus

107

PROGRAM MANAGER CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY  

E-print Network

PROGRAM MANAGER CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) seeks a Program Manager to organize and coordinate activities, programs, and projects for the Center for Nanotechnology in Society (CNS) at Arizona

Colorado at Boulder, University of

108

Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

1993-03-01

109

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

110

Designing for Energy Conservation - The Cypress Fairbanks Medical Center Hospital  

E-print Network

efficient and economically constructed has the winning combination. This paper details the design concepts of a 1984 Grand Award winner, the Cypress Fairbanks Medical Center Hospital, in the Fourth Annual Energy Conservation Design Award Competition....

Wiernik, L. B.; Ranzau, P. A.

1984-01-01

111

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

112

Alcohol Medical Scholars Program--A Mentorship Program for Improving Medical Education regarding Substance Use Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alcohol Medical Scholars Program (AMSP) is designed to improve medical education related to substance use disorders (SUDs) through mentorship of junior, full-time academic faculty from medical schools across the United States. Scholarship focuses on literature review and synthesis, lecture development and delivery, increasing SUD education in…

Neufeld, Karin J.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hernandez-Avila, Carlos A.

2011-01-01

113

5 strategies for improving performance of academic medical centers.  

PubMed

Academic medical centers should consider five strategies for becoming more cost-efficient and profitable as reforms are implemented: Make faculty responsible for cost and quality. Explore opportunities to collaborate with community hospitals. Extend care and education beyond the walls of the organization, employing technology and innovative teaching practices. Maximize healthcare IT investment by sharing data-rich patient records with other medical centers and research institutes. Align research with business strategy. PMID:23795389

Valletta, Robert M; Harkness, Alicia

2013-06-01

114

Ohio Supercomputer Center Parallel Programming with MPI  

E-print Network

Ohio Supercomputer Center Parallel Programming with MPI Science & Technology Support High Performance Computing Ohio Supercomputer Center 1224 Kinnear Road Columbus, OH 43212-1163 #12;Parallel Programming with MPI 2Ohio Supercomputer Center Table of Contents · Setting the Stage · Brief History of MPI

Adler, Joan

115

Obstacles facing translational research in academic medical centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last quarter of the 20th century, there has been a boom in biomedical research discov- eries that, for the most part, has not been successfully exploited for improving medical therapy or diagnosis. This lack of success is surprising because there is a broad consensus within academic medical centers (AMCs) that a primary mission is to move scientific discoveries

JORDAN S. POBER; CRYSTAL S. NEUHAUSER; JEREMY M. POBER

2001-01-01

116

49 CFR 390.105 - Medical examiner training programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical examiner training programs. 390.105 Section...REGULATIONS; GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.105 Medical examiner training programs. An applicant...

2013-10-01

117

Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform -Involve -Enable  

E-print Network

#12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform - Involve - Enable revised 6/04/13 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Please click _______________________________ Date: ____________ Department Chair Signature: ______________________ Date: _____________ #12;Medical

Finley Jr., Russell L.

118

49 CFR 390.105 - Medical examiner training programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical examiner training programs. 390.105 Section...REGULATIONS; GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.105 Medical examiner training programs. An applicant...

2012-10-01

119

Miller Center: Presidential Recordings Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since 1940, six American presidents have secretly recorded close to 5,000 hours of conversations, many of which have been of great interest to presidential historians, the press, and the general public. This remarkable site provides access to a wide range of those conversations, and is hosted and maintained by the Presidential Recordings Program at the University of Virginia's Miller Center of Public Affairs. From the site's homepage, visitors can browse a list of highlighted audio clips (complete with full transcripts) and also access educational resource materials for use in the classroom. The site also has some additional virtual exhibits on a number of topics, including Vietnam and the civil rights movement. Finally, the site also contains a search engine so that visitors can quickly locate the audio clip or conversation they are looking for.

120

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

121

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-01-01

122

Scientific Supply Center Medical Education Building 1901 Perdido Street  

E-print Network

daily to the Eye Center, Allied Health, Medical Education and Clinical Sciences Buildings. OUTSIDE to provide our customers with non-stock items at discounted prices as our contracts allow with one of our-end, so allow for this delay when ordering. RETURN POLICY The Scientific Supply Center will be able

123

Integrating team resource management program into staff training improves staff’s perception and patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation: the experience in a university-affiliated medical center in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Background The process involved in organ procurement and transplantation is very complex that requires multidisciplinary coordination and teamwork. To prevent error during the processes, teamwork education and training might play an important role. We wished to evaluate the efficacy of implementing a Team Resource Management (TRM) program on patient safety and the behaviors of the team members involving in the process. Methods We implemented a TRM training program for the organ procurement and transplantation team members of the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), a teaching medical center in Taiwan. This 15-month intervention included TRM education and training courses for the healthcare workers, focused group skill training for the procurement and transplantation team members, video demonstration and training, and case reviews with feedbacks. Teamwork culture was evaluated and all procurement and transplantation cases were reviewed to evaluate the application of TRM skills during the actual processes. Results During the intervention period, a total of 34 staff members participated the program, and 67 cases of transplantations were performed. Teamwork framework concept was the most prominent dimension that showed improvement from the participants for training. The team members showed a variety of teamwork behaviors during the process of procurement and transplantation during the intervention period. Of note, there were two potential donors with a positive HIV result, for which the procurement processed was timely and successfully terminated by the team. None of the recipients was transplanted with an infected organ. No error in communication or patient identification was noted during review of the case records. Conclusion Implementation of a Team Resource Management program improves the teamwork culture as well as patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation. PMID:25115403

2014-01-01

124

Odyssey: A Program to Access Medical Knowledge  

PubMed Central

Odyssey is part of a software package of computing tools designed to aid the third year medical students at the University of Utah while they are on the Internal Medicine clerkship. The Odyssey program is designed to facilitate student access to select knowledge bases of high clinical relevance. Access to the Odyssey program is from Macintosh computers located on the medical wards. The knowledge bases available to the students at the present time include a literature reference database and the HELP system's collection of decision-making frames.

Fan, ChinLi; Lincoln, Michael J.; Haug, Peter J.; Turner, Charles W.; Warner, Homer R.

1987-01-01

125

A Major Role for Social Work Input during Development of an Innovative Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program in a Medical Center Environment  

PubMed Central

The Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine targets participants from groups that are underrepresented in biomedical research careers. During its first 5 years, Mount Sinai PREP has sent over 70% of the PREP scholars to an excellent array of PhD or MD/PhD programs. Over 90% of those students are progressing well in their doctoral studies and report important contributions of PREP to their success. Social work and educational psychology principles inform strategies used to identify and address gaps or impediments that would otherwise diminish the potential of Mount Sinai PREP scholars to succeed in cutting-edge research careers. PMID:20182980

Krulwich, Terry Ann

2010-01-01

126

78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY: Research...The United States Department of Transportation is publishing this notice...

2013-11-18

127

77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY: Research...The United States Department of Transportation (the Department) is...

2012-10-01

128

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-01

129

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP)  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) Pilot Program Summary January 2007 1 of 5 Cancer Care in the United States: • The pace of research in understanding cancer has accelerated in recent years, raising the need for more effective

130

Medical Physics Graduate Program At An HBCU  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Physics Department at Hampton University houses the first Medical Physics graduate program at a minority institution, and the first in the state of Virginia. Jointly established with the Eastern Virginia Medical School, the program requires students to take standard physics courses in addition to medical physics classes and clinical rotations performed at local hospitals. The associated medical physics research primarily focuses on detectors development for absolute 3D dose distribution measurements (with accuracy better than ±100 microns), characterization of the uniformity or non-uniformity of Brachytherapy sources, and extraction of the 2D and 3D in-vivo dose maps for real time dose monitoring. Recent novel fundamental studies on the energy dependence of cancer cells to address, among others, mono-energetic Brachytherapy source treatments, reaction mechanisms associated with cancer cell destruction, and cancer genome identification have been launched. Each of the research conducted is strongly coupled to dedicated Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. After presenting this unique medical physics program, we will review results obtained from its research group.

Gueye, Paul

2006-03-01

131

Government Cuts and Rise of Managed Care Force a Medical Center To Shift Gears.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The New York University Medical Center faces program cuts and major changes in research, teaching and patient care due to declining patient profits and federal grants. Patients are spending less time in hospitals, reducing teaching potential. However, reduced services also cause more student involvement in patient care. Data on funding and revenue…

Walker, Paulette V.

1996-01-01

132

Formal Peer-Teaching in Medical School Improves Academic Performance: The MUSC Supplemental Instructor Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Formal systems of peer teaching are common in many advanced-degree graduate school programs but are less prevalent in medical schools. In 1997, The Medical University of South Carolina's Center for Academic Excellence created a Supplemental Instructor (SI) program in which interested upper-level medical students are hired to teach a small group of junior peers, primarily in basic science topics.Purpose:

Jeffrey G. Wong; Thomas D. Waldrep; Thomas G. Smith

2007-01-01

133

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs Overview  

Cancer.gov

One or more of the NCCCP's four focus areas is shared by several NCI programs including the NCI Cancer Centers Program, Community Clinical Oncology Program, Community Network Program, and others. The NCCCP will incorporate best practices from other NCI community cancer programs in delivering services to these communities.

134

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs Overview  

Cancer.gov

One or more of the NCCCP’s four focus areas is shared by several NCI programs – including the NCI Cancer Centers Program, Community Clinical Oncology Program, Community Network Program, and others. The NCCCP will incorporate best practices from other NCI community cancer programs in delivering services to these communities.

135

Center for Power Electronics Systems CENTER PROGRAM SNAPSHOT  

E-print Network

a huge impact on U.S. industrial competi- tiveness. Environmental benefits Power electronics can also State of the industry ­ 1998 I n 1998, U.S. power electronics systems were typi- cally customCenter for Power Electronics Systems CENTER PROGRAM SNAPSHOT FRED C. LEE DIRECTOR DUSHAN BOROYEVICH

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

136

Resident Program Guide: Hillside Outdoor Education Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Founded in 1972 as part of the private, non-profit Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers, the Hillside Outdoor Education Center offers services to various educational groups by providing residential experiences for students and faculty, day-visit programs, school-site outdoor education programs, teacher workshops, college courses in outdoor…

Sommer, Bonnie

137

Innovative Approach to Chiller Replacement at Lafayette General Medical Center Located in Lafayette, Louisiana  

E-print Network

/DNR program once again, to determine if it was possible to fund the change out of major pieces of plant equipment. Figure 1. LGMC Recap of Completed ICP Grants The TA also identified sewera1 Maintenam and Operation (%&On) procedures, all with a simple... the Hospital's capital budget process, the Maintenance & Operation Department After research and due to the prior success with the ICP funding program, Lafayette General Medical Center decided to pursue a 5th grant to possibly finance a portion...

Poche', J. M.; Broussard, J. P.

1998-01-01

138

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Participating Program Sites  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Participating Program Sites Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools NCCCP Hospitals

139

Surgical-site infections at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

A five-month prospective survey of surgical-site infections (SSI) was conducted in the department of general surgery at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Tanzania. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. This study showed that 77 (19.4%) of the patients developed SSI. Twenty-eight (36.4%) of these infections were

H. M Eriksen; S Chugulu; S Kondo; E Lingaas

2003-01-01

140

Automating Veterans Administration libraries: II. Implementation at the Kansas City Medical Center Library.  

PubMed

In 1985, the Kansas City Veterans Administration Medical Center began implementation of the Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). An integrated library system, a subset of that program, was started by the medical library for acquisitions and an outline catalog. To test the system, staff of the Neurology Service were trained to use the outline catalog and electronic mail to request interlibrary loans and literature searches. In implementing the project with the Neurology Service, the library is paving the way for many types of electronic access and interaction with the library. PMID:3594023

Smith, V K; Ting, S C

1987-04-01

141

Cancer Centers Program - About the Program  

Cancer.gov

Although there is no separate section of the CCSG application dedicated to comprehensiveness per se, the determination of whether a cancer center will be designated as “comprehensive” by the NCI is a two-step process.

142

HISTORY of the UMH Medical Library The medical library of Cedars Medical Center was initially housed in a remove and relatively  

E-print Network

HISTORY of the UMH Medical Library 1 The medical library of Cedars Medical Center was initially subscriptions were purchased through dues of the Medical Staff. Selections of material were based and Journals for the Small Medical Library. Requests from medical staff members were incorporated

Miami, University of

143

Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs  

E-print Network

Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs presented to WSU SOM PAD January 10, 2012 presented by Sandra A. Rempel, Ph.D. Associate Director of Research, JFCC #12;JFCC Cancer Research Programs Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program Members: Gwen Alexander, Andrea Cassidy

Berdichevsky, Victor

144

[Patient-centered medicine for tuberculosis medical services].  

PubMed

The 2011 edition of Specific Guiding Principles for Tuberculosis Prevention calls for a streamlined medical services system capable of providing medical care that is customized to the patient's needs. The new 21st Century Japanese version of the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) expands the indication of DOTS to all tuberculosis (TB) patients in need of treatment. Hospital DOTS consists of comprehensive, patient-centered support provided by a DOTS care team. For DOTS in the field, health care providers should select optimal administration support based on patient profiles and local circumstances. In accordance with medical fee revisions for 2012, basic inpatient fees have been raised and new standards for TB hospitals have been established, the result of efforts made by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis and other associated groups. It is important that the medical care system be improved so that patients can actively engage themselves as a member of the team, for the ultimate goal of practicing patient-centered medicine. We have organized this symposium to explore the best ways for practicing patient-centered medicine in treating TB. It is our sincere hope that this symposium will lead to improved medical treatment for TB patients. 1. Providing patient-centered TB service via utilization of collaborative care pathway: Akiko MATSUOKA (Hiroshima Prefectural Tobu Public Health Center) We have been using two types of collaborative care pathway as one of the means of providing patient-centered TB services since 2008. The first is the clinical pathway, which is mainly used by TB specialist doctors to communicate with local practitioners on future treatment plan (e.g. medication and treatment duration) of patients. The clinical pathway was first piloted in Onomichi district and its use was later expanded to the whole of Hiroshima prefecture. The second is the regional care pathway, which is used to share treatment progress, test results and other necessary patient information among the relevant parties. The regional care pathway was developed by the Tobu Public Health Center. It is currently being used by several other public health centers in Hiroshima. Utilization of these two pathways has resulted in improved adherence, treatment being offered at local clinics, shorter hospitalization and better treatment outcomes. 2. Patient-centered DOTS in Funabashi-city: Akiko UOZUMI (Funabashi-city Public Health Center) In Funabashi-city, all TB patients, including those with LTBI, are treated under DOTS which recognizes and tries to accommodate the various different needs of each individual patient. For example, various types of DOTS are offered, such as pharmacy-based DOTS and DOTS supported by caregivers of nursing homes. This enables public health nurses to take into consideration both the results of risk assessment and convenience for the patient, and choose DOTS which most effectively support the patient. Furthermore, DOTS in principle is offered face-to-face, so that DOTS providers may not only build relationship of trust with the patient, but also to collect and analyze the necessary information regarding the patient and respond timely when problems arise. Such effort has directly contributed to improved default and treatment rate. 3. Hospital DOTS and clinical path for the treatment of tuberculosis: Kentaro SAKASHITA, Akira FUJITA (Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center) We introduced a version of hospital DOTS at Tama Medical Center (formerly Fuchu Hospital) in 2004. As part of this three-stage version, patients are allowed to progress to the next stage if they meet the step-up criteria. Following the introduction of this hospital DOTS, the occurrence of drug administration-related incidents decreased and support for patient adherence became easier for health care workers than before. In 2006, we developed a clinical path based on this hospital DOTS with consistent eligibility criteria for patients. This clinical path helped increase the efficiency of medical services in the TB ward. In conclusion, a patient'

Fujita, Akira; Narita, Tomoyo

2012-12-01

145

5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and Medical Qualifications § 339.205 Medical evaluation programs. Agencies may establish periodic examination or immunization programs by written policies or directives to safeguard the health of employees whose work may subject them or others to...

2012-01-01

146

5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and Medical Qualifications § 339.205 Medical evaluation programs. Agencies may establish periodic examination or immunization programs by written policies or directives to safeguard the health of employees whose work may subject them or others to...

2013-01-01

147

5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Medical Qualifications § 339.205 Medical evaluation programs. Agencies may establish periodic examination or immunization programs by written policies or directives to safeguard the health of employees whose work may subject them or others to...

2010-01-01

148

Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools  

PubMed Central

Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

2014-01-01

149

Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology (Medical Sciences Graduate Program)  

E-print Network

Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology (Medical Sciences Graduate Program) GRADUATE PROGRAM Coordinator - Responsibilities .....................................................12 3.6 Medical Sciences ..............................................................................18 4.5 Ethics and Academic Integrity Training Requirement

MacMillan, Andrew

150

Terry A. Belmont, CEO, UC Irvine Medical Center  

E-print Network

Terry A. Belmont, CEO, UC Irvine Medical Center University of California, Irvine September 17, 2009 Dear Colleagues: As some of you may know, the California Department of Public Health visited UC Irvine Services that UC Irvine is out of compliance with three Medicare Conditions of Participation related

George, Steven C.

151

USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A bibliography of publications from the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology. Cataloged by year and searchable by peer-reviewed journal publications only or all publications. Links to each publication give reference details along with an interpretive summary as well as the technical abstract.

0000-00-00

152

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

153

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

154

Family Medicine Faculty Medical Center Line (MCL) open rank  

E-print Network

of and applications from women and members of minority groups, as well as others who would bring additional dimensions experience in Family Medicine and clinical teaching, and either an established track record of funded for appointment in the Medical Center Line is excellence in the overall mix of clinical care, clinical teaching

Quake, Stephen R.

155

The Biomedical Libraries Dartmouth College/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center  

E-print Network

The Biomedical Libraries Dartmouth College/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center 2000/2001 Annual Report William F. Garrity Director of Biomedical Libraries September 2001 The Biomedical Libraries are the Dana Biomedical Library on the Dartmouth College campus in Hanover, New Hampshire, and the Matthews

Myers, Lawrence C.

156

Nurses' attitudes toward nursing research at a metropolitan medical center  

Microsoft Academic Search

To support the implementation of a nursing research initiative in a large medical center, we collected baseline data on nurses' attitudes toward nursing research, perception of the institution as a research environment, and personal involvement in research activities. This study replicates that conducted by Rizzuto, Bostrom, Suter, and Chenitz [Predictors of nurses' involvement in research activities. Western Journal of Nursing

Meg Smirnoff; Marjorie Ramirez; Linda Kooplimae; Michael Gibney; Mary Dee McEvoy

2007-01-01

157

Nuclear Medical Technology. Curriculum for a Two Year Program. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives of the project briefly described here were (1) to develop curriculum for a two-year nuclear medical technology program based on a working relationship between three institutions (community college, university health center, and hospital) and (2) to develop procedures for the operation of a medical imaging and radiation technology core…

Buatti, A.; Rich, D.

158

Cancer Centers Program - Indiana University Cancer Cente  

Cancer.gov

Indiana University (IU) Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center advances the understanding, prevention and treatment of cancer throughout Indiana and the world with patient-centered care, acceleration of promising science and collaborative educational programs. Established in 1992 as the IU Cancer Center, it has been an NCI-designated Cancer Center since 1999 and is the only center with such distinction in Indiana that provides patient care. It changed its name in 2006 to reflect the philanthropic support of the Melvin and Bren Simon family.

159

Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform -Involve -Enable  

E-print Network

Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform - Involve - Enable Revised 3/14/14 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Name (Last, First, M________________________ Date:________ ResetPrint Save #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform

Finley Jr., Russell L.

160

Office of Cancer Centers - About the Program  

Cancer.gov

 Office of Cancer Centers - About the Program Our History Staff Directory Contact Us Mail Delivery and Driving Directions Home > About Us > Staff Directory Staff Directory Linda K. Weiss, Ph.D. | Director weissl@mail.nih.gov

161

Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program  

Cancer.gov

The NCI Technology Transfer Center offers two tracks of technology transfer fellowships under the Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) program. These fellowships provide scientists with training and mentored work experience in technology transfer.

162

75 FR 32169 - Comprehensive Centers Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Federal funds; and (b) The entities that are eligible for an award under the Comprehensive Centers program (i.e., research organizations, institutions, agencies, institutions of higher education, partnerships among such entities,...

2010-06-07

163

CAMPUS CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTER, OUTLINE PROGRAM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

LIMITED FACILITIES HAVE BEEN RESTRICTING EXISTING AND PROPOSED PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON. THIS REPORT DESCRIBES A CAMPUS CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTER, WHICH WOULD AID IN THE EFFECTIVE PRESENTATION OF SHORT COURSES, CONFERENCES, INSTITUTES, AND SEMINARS. SUCH A CENTER SHOULD BE ABLE TO MEET 85 PERCENT OF THE SHORT…

SCHRAM, LLOYD W.; AND OTHERS

164

LSU Eye Center Corneal Fellowship Program Demographics  

E-print Network

to consider a career in academic/institution medicine. Program Certifications or recognitions in examination, diagnosis, treatment, and surgical procedures. Facilities: Fellows rotate through the LSU Eye Center, Charity Hospital and University Hospital. The LSU Eye Center is a modern and spacious

165

A midwifery-led in-hospital birth center within an academic medical center: successes and challenges.  

PubMed

The University of California San Diego Community Women's Health Program (CWHP) has emerged as a successful and sustainable coexistence model of women's healthcare. The cornerstone of this midwifery practice is California's only in-hospital birth center. Located within the medical center, this unique and physically separate birth center has been the site for more than 4000 births. With 10% cesarean delivery and 98% breast-feeding rates, it is an exceptional example of low-intervention care. Integrating this previously freestanding birth center into an academic center has brought trials of mistrust and ineffectual communication. Education, consistent leadership, and development of multidisciplinary guidelines aided in overcoming these challenges. This collaborative model provides a structure in which residents learn to be respectful consultants and appreciate differences in medical practice. The CWHP and its Birth Center illustrates that through persistence and flexibility a collaborative model of maternity services can flourish and not only positively influence new families but also future generations of providers. PMID:24096338

Perdion, Karen; Lesser, Rebecca; Hirsch, Jennifer; Barger, Mary; Kelly, Thomas F; Moore, Thomas R; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

2013-01-01

166

The Child Study Center Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the Child Study Center (CSC) of the Pinellas County, Florida, Pupil Services Demonstration Project, an Elementary Secondary Education Act Title III project. The purpose of the CSC is to provide the diagnostic, prescriptive, and consultative intervention necessary to assist referred students with serious learning problems in…

Bailey, Ralph E.; Bryant, Diana G.

167

NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

Krishen, Kumar

2007-01-01

168

Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program (JCVA).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides information on the Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program of the Granite School District (Utah), the purpose of which is to maintain or reintegrate students who are potential high school dropouts or dropouts into appropriate educational alternatives. Its mission statement is followed by a list of program components,…

Rydalch, Jeff

169

Glenn Research Center Human Research Program: Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA-Glenn Research Centers Human Research Program office supports a wide range of technology development efforts aimed at enabling extended human presence in space. This presentation provides a brief overview of the historical successes, current 2013 activities and future projects of NASA-GRCs Human Research Program.

Nall, Marsha M.; Myers, Jerry G.

2013-01-01

170

The Goddard Space Flight Center ergonomics program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Screening Program started in 1984, we have made many changes to accommodate the growing number of participants. As a result of these changes, screening of KSC employees has become more efficient and productive. Various aspects of the program are covered.

Batson, Eileen; Unite, Theodore

1993-01-01

171

Health Care Savings with the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Community Care of North Carolina's Experience  

PubMed Central

Abstract This study evaluated the financial impact of integrating a systemic care management intervention program (Community Care of North Carolina) with person-centered medical homes throughout North Carolina for non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities during almost 5 years of program history. It examined Medicaid claims for 169,676 non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities from January 2007 through third quarter 2011. Two models were used to estimate the program's impact on cost, within each year. The first employed a mixed model comparing member experiences in enrolled versus unenrolled months, accounting for regional differences as fixed effects and within physician group experience as random effects. The second was a pre-post, intervention/comparison group, difference-in-differences mixed model, which directly matched cohort samples of enrolled and unenrolled members on strata of preenrollment pharmacy use, race, age, year, months in pre-post periods, health status, and behavioral health history. The study team found significant cost avoidance associated with program enrollment for the non-elderly disabled population after the first years, savings that increased with length of time in the program. The impact of the program was greater in persons with multiple chronic disease conditions. By providing targeted care management interventions, aligned with person-centered medical homes, the Community Care of North Carolina program achieved significant savings for a high-risk population in the North Carolina Medicaid program. (Population Health Management 2013;17:141–148) PMID:24053757

DuBard, C. Annette; Ritter, Grant A.; Jackson, Carlos T.

2014-01-01

172

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MEDICAL CENTER The Strategic Map for the University of Kansas Medical Center summarizes KUMC's strategy for 2011 through 2016. This  

E-print Network

#12;UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MEDICAL CENTER The Strategic Map for the University of Kansas Medical engagement to serve the needs of Kansas I. Create and implement a comprehensive facilities master plan II;STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE | 3 The University of Kansas Medical Center's Strategic Plan for 2011

173

Regional program for acquisition of medical experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A U.S. company was contracted to cover different regions of the country. A moderately detailed description of the highlights of the company activities along with some conclusions and recommendations are reported. In summary, the regional program effectively: (1) informed segments of the medical community of research opportunities; (2) validated formats for regional workshops; (3) assisted potential investigators with follow-up consultations and proposal preparations; and (4) identified a latent intersect requiring continual dialog at the scientist/engineer interface for successful cultivation and integration.

Vannordstrand, P. C.

1978-01-01

174

Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.  

PubMed

As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices. PMID:24979282

Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

2014-09-01

175

New to Java Programming Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site offers a large collection of articles and tutorials on the Java programming language. The material is presented in a series of four basic steps, beginning with an overview of the Java platform and common terminology. Several lessons comprise the following section, leading the user through the necessary system setup and some introductory application development issues. The third section marks the transition to more in-depth programming techniques, and the series concludes with a few interactive quizzes as a review. A particularly useful tool built into this site allows users to create a customized list of articles that match their needs.

176

Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

177

Meharry Medical College-Community Health Centers Network  

Cancer.gov

The goal of the Meharry Medical College-Community Health Centers Network is to reduce cancer health disparities among African Americans through community-based participatory research, education, and training in three urban communities in Tennessee (Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis). In the project's first year, an umbrella coalition of organizations and individuals will create plans for collaborative community networking activities and develop an infrastructure to facilitate research in the target population.

178

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

179

Community Networks Program Centers (CNP)  

Cancer.gov

The Community Networks Program (CNP) was established in 2005 to reduce cancer health disparities through community-based participatory education, training, and research among underserved populations. NCI was awarded $95 million in five-year grants to fund 25 CNP cooperative agreement projects across the United States and in American Samoa.

180

A Comparison of Assertive Community Treatment Fidelity Measures and Patient-Centered Medical Home Standards  

PubMed Central

Objective This study compared program measures of assertive community treatment (ACT) with standards of accreditation for the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) to determine whether there were similarities in the infrastructure of the two methods of service delivery and whether high-fidelity ACT teams would qualify for medical home accreditation. Methods The authors compared National Committee for Quality Assurance PCMH standards with two ACT fidelity measures (the Dartmouth Assertive Community Treatment Scale and the Tool for Measurement of Assertive Community Treatment [TMACT]) and with national ACT program standards. Results PCMH standards pertaining to enhanced access and continuity, management of care, and self-care support demonstrated strong overlap across ACT measures. Standards for identification and management of populations, care coordination and follow-up, and quality improvement demonstrated less overlap. The TMACT and the program standards had sufficient overlap to score in the range of a level 1 PCMH, but no ACT measure sufficiently detailed methods of population-based screening and tracking of referrals to satisfy “must-pass” elements of the standards. Conclusions ACT measures and medical home standards had significant overlap in innate infrastructure. ACT teams following the program standards or undergoing TMACT fidelity review could have the necessary infrastructure to serve as medical homes if they were properly equipped to supervise general medical care and administer activities to improve management of chronic diseases. PMID:23820753

Vanderlip, Erik R.; Cerimele, Joseph M.; Monroe-DeVita, Maria

2014-01-01

181

Medical Scholars (BS/MD) Program Expectations and Requirements  

E-print Network

Medical Scholars (BS/MD) Program Expectations and Requirements Undergraduate portion semester GPAs lower than 3.5 will trigger an automatic review by the Medical Scholars Committee of the Medical Scholars Committee, to delay their entry to medical school by one year to broaden their education

Fernandez, Eduardo

182

Division of Medical Sciences Ph.D. Programs at Harvard Medical School  

E-print Network

Division of Medical Sciences Ph.D. Programs at Harvard Medical School Quarter Courses Spring Visualization with Maya Catalog Number: 61072 Enrollment: Limited to 18. Gael McGill (Medical School) and David Lopes Cardozo (Medical School) *BCMP 307qc. Approaches to Drug Action, Discovery, and Design Catalog

Mekalanos, John

183

Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

184

78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...will increase utilization of the direct care system by selected beneficiaries....

2013-02-14

185

Australian medical students' perceptions of professionalism and ethics in medical television programs  

PubMed Central

Background Medical television programs offer students fictional representations of their chosen career. This study aimed to discover undergraduate medical students' viewing of medical television programs and students' perceptions of professionalism, ethics, realism and role models in the programs. The purpose was to consider implications for teaching strategies. Methods A medical television survey was administered to 386 undergraduate medical students across Years 1 to 4 at a university in New South Wales, Australia. The survey collected data on demographics, year of course, viewing of medical television programs, perception of programs' realism, depiction of ethics, professionalism and role models. Results The shows watched by most students were House, Scrubs, and Grey's Anatomy, and students nominated watching 30 different medical programs in total. There was no statistical association between year of enrolment and perceptions of accuracy. The majority of students reported that friends or family members had asked them for their opinion on an ethical or medical issue presented on a program, and that they discussed ethical and medical matters with their friends. Students had high recall of ethical topics portrayed on the shows, and most believed that medical programs generally portrayed ideals of professionalism well. Conclusions Medical programs offer considerable currency and relevance with students and may be useful in teaching strategies that engage students in ethical lessons about practising medicine. PMID:21798068

2011-01-01

186

Evaluation of Intravenous Medication Errors with Smart Infusion Pumps in an Academic Medical Center  

PubMed Central

While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted. PMID:24551395

Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W.

2013-01-01

187

Evolution of Pediatric Thyroid Surgery at a Tertiary Medical Center  

PubMed Central

Background Thyroidectomy in the pediatric population is often avoided due to perceived risks in children. With growing subspecialization and establishment of high volume endocrine surgery centers, the indications for thyroid surgery and extent of resection continue to change. We examined the evolution of pediatric thyroid surgery at a high volume tertiary medical center. Methods From our prospectively collected database, we reviewed medical records of individuals younger than 19 years who underwent thyroidectomy at our institution from 1994 to 2009. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) before establishment of our endocrine surgery center (1994–2001) and 2) since establishment of the center (2002–2009). Results We identified 78 operations performed on 74 patients with a median age of 15 (range 3–18) years. We found that the number of patients doubled in the later time period, with 26 operations in Group 1 and 52 in Group 2. The age of patients and percentage of females were similar between groups. After establishment of the endocrine surgery center, there was a significant increase in total thyroidectomies for all indications, including significantly more for benign disease. Overall, 9% of the patient population experienced transient complications, with no permanent complications or long-term sequelae. Conclusions Pediatric thyroid surgery is extremely safe, especially when performed at a high volume endocrine surgery center. We more often select surgical treatment for benign disease and choose total thyroidectomy over limited resection. This may reflect increasing confidence in the safety and efficacy of surgery and reliability of thyroid hormone replacement. PMID:22795270

Burke, Jocelyn F.; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Chen, Herbert

2012-01-01

188

Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience  

PubMed Central

Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents’ self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents—12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents—began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA’s) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents.

Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J.; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P.; Meade, Lauren

2015-01-01

189

Developing a Practical and Sustainable Faculty Development Program With a Focus on Teaching Quality Improvement and Patient Safety: An Alliance for Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative III Project  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching the next generation of physicians requires more than traditional teaching models. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System places considerable emphasis on developing a learning environment that fosters resident education in quality improvement and patient safety. The goal of this project was to develop a comprehensive and sustainable faculty development program with a focus on teaching quality improvement and patient safety. Methods A multidisciplinary team representing all stakeholders in graduate medical education developed a validated survey to assess faculty and house officer baseline perceptions of their experience with faculty development opportunities, quality improvement tools and training, and resident participation in quality improvement and patient safety programs at our institution. We then developed a curriculum to address these 3 areas. Results Our pilot survey revealed a need for a comprehensive program to teach faculty and residents the art of teaching. Two other areas of need are (1) regular resident participation in quality improvement and patient safety efforts and (2) effective tools for developing skills and habits to analyze practices using quality improvement methods. Resident and faculty pairs in 17 Ochsner training programs developed and began quality improvement projects while completing the first learning module. Resident and faculty teams also have been working on the patient safety modules and incorporating aspects of patient safety into their individual work environments. Conclusion Our team's goal is to develop a sustainable and manageable faculty development program that includes modules addressing quality improvement and patient safety in accordance with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation requirements. PMID:23267260

Rodrigue, Christopher; Seoane, Leonardo; Gala, Rajiv B.; Piazza, Janice; Amedee, Ronald G.

2012-01-01

190

School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

2010-01-01

191

Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Allied Medical Disciplines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in the allied medical disciplines in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals and terminology of accreditation of allied medical programs in Canada,…

Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

192

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

SciTech Connect

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G.M.; Cardinale, M.A.; Summerfield, B.R.; Tipton, D.A. (Medical and Environmental Health Office, John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, FL (United States))

1992-08-01

193

Kennedy Space Center environmental health program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

1992-01-01

194

Development of a medical humanities and ethics certificate program in Texas.  

PubMed

Education in the medical humanities and ethics is an integral part of the formation of future physicians. This article reports on an innovative approach to incorporating the medical humanities and ethics into the four-year curriculum in a Certificate Program spanning all four years of the medical school experience. The faculty of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston conceived and implemented this program to teach medical students a range of scholarly topics in the medical humanities and to engage the full human experience into the process of becoming a physician. This study follows six years of experience, and we report student experiences and learning in their own words. PMID:25283183

Erwin, Cheryl J

2014-12-01

195

CRCHD PNP Project: Moffitt Cancer Center Patient Navigator Program  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD PNP Project: Moffitt Cancer Center Patient Navigator Program  Back to CRCHD Ongoing Research PNP Project Listing Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) Participating Research Sites Moffitt Cancer Center Patient Navigator Program

196

The UNAM M. Sc. program in Medical Physics enters its teen years  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The M.Sc. (Medical Physics) program at the National Autonomous University of Mexico UNAM, created in 1997, has graduated a substantial number of medical physicists who constitute today about 30% of the medical physics clinical workforce in the country. Up to present date (May 2010) more than 60 students have graduated, 60% of them hold clinical jobs, 20% have completed or study a Ph.D., and 15% perform activities related to this specialization. In addition to strengthening the clinical practice of medical physics, the program has served as an incentive for medical physics research in UNAM and other centers. We report the circumstances of the program origin, the evolution of its curriculum, the main achievements, and the next challenges.

Brandan, María-Ester

2010-12-01

197

Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship at an academic medical center.  

PubMed

In 2005, medical educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), began developing the Parnassus Integrated Student Clinical Experiences (PISCES) program, a year-long longitudinal integrated clerkship at its academic medical center. The principles guiding this new clerkship were continuity with faculty preceptors, patients, and peers; a developmentally progressive curriculum with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaching; and exposure to undiagnosed illness in acute and chronic care settings. Innovative elements included quarterly student evaluation sessions with all preceptors together, peer-to-peer evaluation, and oversight advising with an assigned faculty member. PISCES launched with eight medical students for the 2007/2008 academic year and expanded to 15 students for 2008/2009. Compared to UCSF's traditional core clerkships, evaluations from PISCES indicated significantly higher student satisfaction with faculty teaching, formal didactics, direct observation of clinical skills, and feedback. Student performance on discipline-specific examinations and United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 CK was equivalent to and on standardized patient examinations was slightly superior to that of traditional peers. Participants' career interests ranged from primary care to surgical subspecialties. These results demonstrate that a longitudinal integrated clerkship can be implemented successfully at a tertiary care academic medical center. PMID:21475642

Poncelet, Ann; Bokser, Seth; Calton, Brook; Hauer, Karen E; Kirsch, Heidi; Jones, Tracey; Lai, Cindy J; Mazotti, Lindsay; Shore, William; Teherani, Arianne; Tong, Lowell; Wamsley, Maria; Robertson, Patricia

2011-01-01

198

Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship at an academic medical center  

PubMed Central

In 2005, medical educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), began developing the Parnassus Integrated Student Clinical Experiences (PISCES) program, a year-long longitudinal integrated clerkship at its academic medical center. The principles guiding this new clerkship were continuity with faculty preceptors, patients, and peers; a developmentally progressive curriculum with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaching; and exposure to undiagnosed illness in acute and chronic care settings. Innovative elements included quarterly student evaluation sessions with all preceptors together, peer-to-peer evaluation, and oversight advising with an assigned faculty member. PISCES launched with eight medical students for the 2007/2008 academic year and expanded to 15 students for 2008/2009. Compared to UCSF's traditional core clerkships, evaluations from PISCES indicated significantly higher student satisfaction with faculty teaching, formal didactics, direct observation of clinical skills, and feedback. Student performance on discipline-specific examinations and United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 CK was equivalent to and on standardized patient examinations was slightly superior to that of traditional peers. Participants' career interests ranged from primary care to surgical subspecialties. These results demonstrate that a longitudinal integrated clerkship can be implemented successfully at a tertiary care academic medical center. PMID:21475642

Poncelet, Ann; Bokser, Seth; Calton, Brook; Hauer, Karen E.; Kirsch, Heidi; Jones, Tracey; Lai, Cindy J.; Mazotti, Lindsay; Shore, William; Teherani, Arianne; Tong, Lowell; Wamsley, Maria; Robertson, Patricia

2011-01-01

199

Pathology service line: a model for accountable care organizations at an academic medical center.  

PubMed

Accountable care is designed to manage the health of patients using a capitated cost model rather than fee for service. Pay for performance is an attempt to use quality and not service reduction as the way to decrease costs. Pathologists will have to demonstrate value to the system. This value will include (1) working with clinical colleagues to optimize testing protocols, (2) reducing unnecessary testing in both clinical and anatomic pathology, (3) guiding treatment by helping to personalize therapy, (4) designing laboratory information technology solutions that will promote and facilitate accurate, complete data mining, and (5) administering efficient cost-effective laboratories. The pathology service line was established to improve the efficiency of delivering pathology services and to provide more effective support of medical center programs. We have used this model effectively at the Montefiore Medical Center for the past 14 years. PMID:22333926

Sussman, Ira; Prystowsky, Michael B

2012-05-01

200

The electronic medical record and Patient-centered care  

PubMed Central

Background: One goal in EMR development should be to facilitate a patient-centered clinical encounter. Much prior EMR development has focused on capturing objective data, such as laboratory values and medication lists. Less attention has been devoted to the more complex task of capturing and analyzing data that incorporates the patient’s concerns and preferences. Methods: A literature search supplemented the author’s own various experiences with one EMR (that used nationally by the Department of Veterans Affairs) from his various perspectives of a physician, an educator, and a Chief of Staff. This data was used to identify both opportunities and obstacles to promoting patient-centered care in an integrated care setting that relies heavily on an EMR. Qualitative analysis and suggestions are offered for how the EMR can individualize patient care, in support of a patient-centered approach. Result: Three promising target areas in efforts to develop a patient-centered EMR are: elicitation of the chief complaint, conduct of health screening activities, and evaluation of health literacy. A range of strategies were identified, some of which may require information technology development, such as to facilitate patient direct entry of data into their own EMR. Conclusion: EMR design can facilitate a more patient-centered clinical encounter. Beyond the benefits to the individual patient, patient-centric modifications to the EMR architecture may also facilitate quality improvement and research activities on patient centered care. In light of the widespread current discussions of a movement toward Accountable Care Organizations that use EMR, it will be especially important to ensure that the resulting care systems maintain a focus on the patient and not just on the system of care. PMID:23569603

Nusbaum, Neil J

2011-01-01

201

Medical Schedule of Benefits Johns Hopkins Student Health Program  

E-print Network

Medical Schedule of Benefits Johns Hopkins Student Health Program Effective July 1, 2014 Revised:6 and Serum 80% 80% of R&C Ambulance Transportation Medically Necessary Transport 80% 80% of R&C Chemotherapy Medical Equipment Breast Pumps and Related Supplies 100% (deductible waived) 70% of R&C (1) Contraceptive

Ghosh, Somnath

202

Energy survey of Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. Volume 2. Appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

1.1 Perform a complete energy audit of the entire Army Medical Center`s (AMC) heating and cooling systems, lighting system, and other systems and areas as indicated in Annex A. 1.2 Perform a comprehensive analysis of all data collected during the audit. 1.3 Identify all Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s) including low cost/no cost ECO`s and perform complete evaluations of each. Energy equipment replacement projects already underway, approved, or planned by the Medical Center staff will be factored into the evaluations. 1.4 Prepare programming documentation for all Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and/or Energy Conservation Improvement Program (ECIP) projects. 1.5 Prepare implementation documentation and instructions for those projects recommended for accomplishment by local forces. 1.6 List and prioritize all recommended ECO`s. 1.7 Prepare a comprehensive report which will docwnent the work accomplished, the results of the field investigation and engineering analysis, the conclusions, and recommendations.

NONE

1996-12-23

203

Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders in…

Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

2011-01-01

204

Measuring physicians' productivity in a Veterans' Affairs Medical Center.  

PubMed

The mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs includes patient care, education, research, and backup to the Department of Defense. Because the measurement of physicians' productivity must reflect both institutional goals and market forces, the authors designed a productivity model that uses measures of clinical workload and academic activities commensurate with the VA's investments in these activities. The productivity model evaluates four domains of physicians' activity: clinical work, education, research, and administration. Examples of the application of the productivity model in the evaluation of VA-paid physician-staff and in the composition of contracts for clinical services are provided. The proposed model is a relatively simple strategy for measuring a broad range of the work of academic physicians in VA medical centers. The model provides incentives for documentation of resident supervision and participation in administrative activities required for effective and efficient clinical care. In addition, the model can aid in determining resource distribution among clinical services and permits comparison with non-VA health care systems. A strategy for modifying the model to incorporate measures of quality of clinical care, research, education, and administration is proposed. The model has been a useful part of the process to ensure the optimum use of resources and to meet clinical and academic institutional goals. The activities and accomplishments used to define physician productivity will have a substantial influence on the character of the medical profession, the vitality of medical education and research, and the cost and quality of health care. PMID:12857686

Coleman, David L; Moran, Eileen; Serfilippi, Delchi; Mulinski, Paul; Rosenthal, Ronnie; Gordon, Bruce; Mogielnicki, R Peter

2003-07-01

205

Telemedicine and the patient-centered medical home.  

PubMed

Imagine an environment where health care coordination is seamless; where the pediatricians and their care teams could significantly reduce the time it takes to communicate and transfer the information between physicians, patients, and their families. Imagine a situation where unnecessary referrals and investigations are avoided, saving costs and anxieties for the patients. Welcome to the world of telemedicine and a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Comprehensive health care delivered in the most efficient manner with the least expense is the cornerstone of these concepts. The concept of PCMH was first introduced in 1967 by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Pediatric Practice in the book, Standards of Child Health Care. The medical home concept originally referred to one central source of medical records for children with special health care needs. During the past 4 decades, this concept has transformed beyond data entry to methods of delivering the best quality of care for all children. In 2007, a joint statement by the AAP, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Physicians, and the American Osteopathic Association endorsed the PCMH concept. PMID:24512158

Herendeen, Neil; Deshpande, Prashant

2014-02-01

206

Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.  

PubMed

Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed. PMID:24667517

Berner, Eta S

2014-05-01

207

Program in Health and Medical Sciences, University of California, Berkeley.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1972, the development of a health sciences education program, oriented to health rather than medicine alone, was initiated at UCB. Summarized in this report are the major activities of the first three years in the areas of: an M.S. degree in health and medical sciences; a "medical option" program designed to prepare students for advanced…

Rovnanek, Agnes

208

Sources of Information on Postgraduate Medical Training Programs-2004 Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most current and complete source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update goes beyond postgraduate training resources to include

Lillian R. Brazin

2004-01-01

209

MEDICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANT, A SUGGESTED GUIDE FOR A TRAINING PROGRAM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

INFORMATION IS GIVEN TO ASSIST IN ORGANIZING AND ADMINISTERING A TRAINING PROGRAM FOR MEDICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANTS IN A VARIETY OF SETTINGS AND TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE IN ESTABLISHING NEW PROGRAMS AND IN EVALUATING EXISTING ONES. THE MATERIAL WAS PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR CAREERS IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY. PATHOLOGISTS…

Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

210

Sources of Information on Postgraduate Medical Training Programs and Medical Specialty Career Resources 2006 Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the final biennial1 update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most complete and up-to-date source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update continues to go beyond postgraduate training

Lillian R. Brazin

2006-01-01

211

Taking care of the "good guys:" a trauma center-based model of medical support for tactical law enforcement.  

PubMed

The potential need for rapid medical intervention and access to a trauma center after major injury is crucial to the safety and success of SWAT team operations. This manuscript describes the genesis and development of a unique model for which advanced medical care is rendered by trained health care professionals within a regional trauma system in the support of a SWAT team. The model was developed jointly by the Newark, New Jersey, Division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and The New Jersey Trauma Center-University Hospital, an academic, urban Level I trauma center. After the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between the two agencies in 1995, the program became operational. The medical team is composed of physicians, nurses, and paramedics. Since inception, the medical team has provided medical support for 33 tactical missions and 99 training days. Ten patients were treated: 7 agents (syncope, fractured foot, blunt head/neck trauma, lacerations), 2 bystanders (chest pain, asthma), and 1 suspect (chest pain). The advantages of the Newark model in contrast to other programs of tactical medical support, are the operational activities of the team and the cost of the program was outlined. PMID:10647577

Lavery, R F; Adis, M D; Doran, J V; Corrice, M A; Tortella, B J; Livingston, D H

2000-01-01

212

What do clinicians want? Interest in integrative health services at a North Carolina academic medical center  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in

Kathi J Kemper; Deborah Dirkse; Dee Eadie; Melissa Pennington

2007-01-01

213

NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Propulsion Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), as NASA's lead center for aeropropulsion, is responding to the challenge of reducing the cost of space transportation through the integration of air-breathing propulsion into launch vehicles. Air- breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) propulsion requires a marked departure from traditional propulsion applications. and stretches the technology of both rocket and air-breathing propulsion. In addition, the demands of the space launch mission require an unprecedented level of integration of propulsion and vehicle systems. GRC is responding with a program with rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion technology as its main focus. RBCC offers the potential for simplicity, robustness, and performance that may enable low-cost single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) transportation. Other technologies, notably turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion, offer benefits such as increased robustness and greater mission flexibility, and are being advanced, at a slower pace, as part of GRC's program in hypersonics.

Palac, Donald T.

1999-01-01

214

Luxury Primary Care, Academic Medical Centers, and the Erosion of Science and Professional Ethics  

PubMed Central

Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed. PMID:14748866

Donohoe, Martin

2004-01-01

215

About half of the states are implementing patient-centered medical homes for their Medicaid populations.  

PubMed

Public and private payers are testing the patient-centered medical home model by shifting resources to enhance primary care as an important component of improving the quality and cost-effectiveness of the US health care delivery system. Medicaid has been at the forefront of this movement. Since 2006 twenty-five states have implemented new payment systems or revised existing ones so that primary care providers can function as patient-centered medical homes. State Medicaid programs are taking a variety of approaches. For example, Minnesota's reforms focus on chronically ill populations, while in Missouri a 90 percent federal match under the Affordable Care Act is helping integrate primary and behavioral health care and address issues of long-term services and supports. These reforms have led to better alignment of payments with performance metrics that emphasize health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost containment. This article focuses on trends in Medicaid patient-centered medical home payment that can inform public and private payment strategies more broadly. PMID:23129673

Takach, Mary

2012-11-01

216

78 FR 16614 - Medicare Program; Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) and Medicare Supplementary Medical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part B) AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...policy that revises the current policy on Part B billing following the denial of a Part A...rule entitled, ``Medicare Program; Part B Inpatient Billing in Hospitals,'' to...

2013-03-18

217

Student Perceptions of an Online Medical Dosimetry Program  

SciTech Connect

The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse offers the first online medical dosimetry program in the nation. There is no data to research a program of this type. This research consisted of the evaluation of other distance education programs including health profession programs in addition to face-to-face medical dosimetry programs. There was a need to collect and analyze student perceptions of online learning in medical dosimetry. This research provided a guide for future implementation by other programs as well as validated the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse program. Methodology used consisted of an electronic survey sent to all previous and currently enrolled students in the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse medical dosimetry program. The survey was both quantitative and qualitative in demonstrating attitudinal perceptions of students in the program. Quantitative data was collected and analyzed using a 5-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was gathered based on the open-ended responses and the identifying themes from the responses. The results demonstrated an overall satisfaction with this program, the instructor, and the online courses. Students felt a sense of belonging to the courses and the program. Considering that a majority of the students had never taken an online course previously, the students felt there were no technology issues. Future research should include an evaluation of board exam statistics for students enrolled in the online and face-to-face medical dosimetry programs.

Lenards, Nishele, E-mail: lenards.nish@uwlax.ed [Department of Health Professions/College of Science and Health, Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI (United States)

2011-07-01

218

The Logistics Of Installing Pacs In An Existing Medical Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A largely overlooked issue in the Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) area is the tremendous amount of site planning activity required to install such a system in an existing medical center. Present PACS equipment requires significant hospital real estate, specialized electrical power, cabling, and environmental controls to operate properly. Marshaling the hospital resources necessary to install PACS equipment requires many different players. The site preparation costs are nontrivial and usually include a number of hidden expenses. This paper summarizes the experience of the University of Washington Department of Radiology in installing an extensive digital imaging network (DIN) and PACS throughout the Department and several clinics in the hospital. The major logistical problems encountered at the University are discussed, a few recommendations are made, and the installation costs are documented. Overall, the University's site preparation costs equalled about seven percent (7%) of the total PACS equipment expenditure at the site.

Saarinen, Allan O.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Loop, John W.

1989-05-01

219

An academic medical center's response to widespread computer failure.  

PubMed

As hospitals incorporate information technology (IT), their operations become increasingly vulnerable to technological breakdowns and attacks. Proper emergency management and business continuity planning require an approach to identify, mitigate, and work through IT downtime. Hospitals can prepare for these disasters by reviewing case studies. This case study details the disruption of computer operations at Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC), an urban academic teaching hospital. The events, and MSMC's response, are narrated and the impact on hospital operations is analyzed. MSMC's disaster management strategy prevented computer failure from compromising patient care, although walkouts and time-to-disposition in the emergency department (ED) notably increased. This incident highlights the importance of disaster preparedness and mitigation. It also demonstrates the value of using operational data to evaluate hospital responses to disasters. Quantifying normal hospital functions, just as with a patient's vital signs, may help quantitatively evaluate and improve disaster management and business continuity planning. PMID:24352930

Genes, Nicholas; Chary, Michael; Chason, Kevin W

2013-01-01

220

Program Director for the Industry University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) Program, ENG/EEC (Open Until Filled)  

NSF Publications Database

... Education and Centers (EEC), Industry University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) Program ... a Program Director position for the Industry University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) Program ...

221

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Frequently Asked Questions  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Frequently Asked Questions Search NCCCP Contact Us Overview Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions NCI Community Cancer Centers Program Pilot: 2007-2010 Key Points The NCI Community

222

University of Maryland Medical Center Shadow day experience with a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA)  

E-print Network

University of Maryland Medical Center Shadow day experience with a Certified Registered Nurse information via e-mail to: Linda Goetz, MHS, CRNA Director, Nurse Anesthetists University of Maryland Medical

Weber, David J.

223

Resuscitating the physician-patient relationship: emergency department communication in an academic medical center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objectiveWe characterize communication in an urban, academic medical center emergency department (ED) with regard to the timing and nature of the medical history survey and physical examination and discharge instructions.

Karin V. Rhodes; Teri Vieth; Theresa He; Annette Miller; David S. Howes; Olivia Bailey; James Walter; Richard Frankel; Wendy Levinson

2004-01-01

224

An assessment of suicide in an urban VA Medical Center.  

PubMed

This study characterizes those patients of an urban VA Medical Center (VAMC) who had committed suicide. A cause-of-death search of the 1,075 veterans from the VAMC's case rolls who died during 1998 was conducted. For confirmed and suspected suicides, a chart review was conducted, noting psychiatric history and recent contact with the VAMC. Nineteen patients were either confirmed or suspected suicides. Few of these patients had made recent contact with the VAMC, although the majority of them had received psychiatric services from the VA at some time. The proportion of deaths due to suicide was similar in African American and White patients. Rates of suicide were elevated, primarily because of the high proportion of patients receiving psychiatric treatment. Elderly suicides were less likely to have had psychiatric services or previous psychiatric diagnoses than were younger suicides. Patients with past contact with psychiatric services may be especially at risk of suicide, particularly as contact with these services diminishes. Elderly patients in medical settings with undiagnosed or undertreated psychiatric disorders are also likely to have elevated risk for suicide. These findings demonstrate the importance of acknowledging that risk factors for suicide are specific to sites or populations; this information can be used in allocating resources for developing site-specific strategies for prevention. PMID:12530336

Thompson, Richard; Kane, Vincent R; Sayers, Steven L; Brown, Gregory K; Coyne, James C; Katz, Ira R

2002-01-01

225

Lessons Learned from Implementing the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

PubMed Central

The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a primary care model that provides coordinated and comprehensive care to patients to improve health outcomes. This paper addresses practical issues that arise when transitioning a traditional primary care practice into a PCMH recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Individual organizations' experiences with this transition were gathered at a PCMH workshop in Alexandria, Virginia in June 2010. An analysis of their experiences has been used along with a literature review to reveal common challenges that must be addressed in ways that are responsive to the practice and patients' needs. These are: NCQA guidance, promoting provider buy-in, leveraging electronic medical records, changing office culture, and realigning workspace in the practice to accommodate services needed to carry out the intent of PCMH. The NCQA provides a set of standards for implementing the PCMH model, but these standards lack many specifics that will be relied on in location situations. While many researchers and providers have made critiques, we see this vagueness as allowing for greater flexibility in how a practice implements PCMH. PMID:22969797

Green, Ellen P.; Wendland, John; Carver, M. Colette; Hughes Rinker, Cortney; Mun, Seong K.

2012-01-01

226

Obtaining the Patient's Voice from within Three Patient-Centered Medical Homes.  

PubMed

The purpose of this qualitative program was to determine if a trend exists across three LSU medical homes according to patient feedback concerning their experiences within the medical home for ongoing disease management and quality healthcare; and to obtain recommendations for the most effective way to involve patients in shaping system policies, procedures, and practices consistent with patient and family-centered care principles. A total of 94 adult patients participated in either cognitive interviews (n = 45) or structured focus groups (n = 49) using the Nominal Group Technique (NGT). Exit surveys collected demographic information and feedback from patients about opportunities for their involvement in shaping medical homes. Cognitive interviews and NGT sessions both revealed some patient-perceived gratifications (i.e., friendliness and helpfulness of the clinic staff), and deficiencies (i.e., improving scheduling of appointments and reducing wait time in the clinic) within these medical homes. However, the perceived gratifications far exceeded the deficiencies found within each of three LSU medical homes. Clin Trans Sci 2014; Volume #: 1-9. PMID:25066616

Kennedy, Betty M; Cerise, Frederick; Horswell, Ronald; Griffin, Willene P; Willis, Kathleen H; Moody-Thomas, Sarah; Besse, Jay A; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

2014-07-25

227

BBS Program -Division of Medical Sciences DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT  

E-print Network

BBS Program - Division of Medical Sciences DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT THIS FORM "box-check" to defense is 6 mos. Student: Program: BBS Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY at least every 6 months or more frequently. MUST COMPLETE REVERSE SIDE #12;BBS Program - Division

Yellen, Gary

228

Developing a BI Program for Medical Resources on Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes a bibliographic instruction (BI) course on accessing medical resources on the Internet through discussion lists and Gopher that consisted of short sessions taught biweekly each semester at the University of Vermont medical library. The introduction lists the rationale for starting the program; principles for teaching the…

Wang, Hongjie

229

Medical Scientist Training Program Roy J. and Lucille A.  

E-print Network

Medical Scientist Training Program Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine 2206 Medical Education and Research Facility Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1181 319-335-8303 Tel 319-335-6634 Fax www by an MSTP student for transportation to Iowa City. Return transportation from the hotel to the airport

230

479Program of Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate Catalogue 201314  

E-print Network

, antigens, antibodies, and complement system, as well as basic principles in blood banking and transfusion medicine. First semester. #12;480 Program of Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate Catalogue 2013

Shihadeh, Alan

231

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-print Network

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

232

A Nationwide Survey of Patient Centered Medical Home Demonstration Projects  

PubMed Central

Background The patient centered medical home has received considerable attention as a potential way to improve primary care quality and limit cost growth. Little information exists that systematically compares PCMH pilot projects across the country. Design Cross-sectional key-informant interviews. Participants Leaders from existing PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform. Measurements We used a semi-structured interview tool with the following domains: project history, organization and participants, practice requirements and selection process, medical home recognition, payment structure, practice transformation, and evaluation design. Results A total of 26 demonstrations in 18 states were interviewed. Current demonstrations include over 14,000 physicians caring for nearly 5 million patients. A majority of demonstrations are single payer, and most utilize a three component payment model (traditional fee for service, per person per month fixed payments, and bonus performance payments). The median incremental revenue per physician per year was $22,834 (range $720 to $91,146). Two major practice transformation models were identified—consultative and implementation of the chronic care model. A majority of demonstrations did not have well-developed evaluation plans. Conclusion Current PCMH demonstration projects with external payment reform include large numbers of patients and physicians as well as a wide spectrum of implementation models. Key questions exist around the adequacy of current payment mechanisms and evaluation plans as public and policy interest in the PCMH model grows. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1262-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20467907

Bitton, Asaf; Martin, Carina

2010-01-01

233

Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center  

SciTech Connect

The following is a synopsis of the major achievements attributed to the operation of the Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center (WAPTAC) by the National Association for State Community Services Programs (NASCSP). During the past five years, the WAPTAC has developed into the premier source for information related to operating the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) at the state and local levels. The services provide through WAPTAC include both virtual technical support as well as hands-on training and instruction in classroom and in the field. The WAPTAC achieved several important milestones during its operation including the establishment of a national Weatherization Day now celebrated in most states, the implementation of a comprehensive Public Information Campaign (PIC) to raise the awareness of the Program among policy makers and the public, the training of more than 150 new state managers and staff as they assume their duties in state offices around the country, and the creation and support of a major virtual information source on the Internet being accessed by thousands of staff each month. The Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center serves the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program as a valuable training and technical assistance resource for the network of 54 direct state grantees (50 states, District of Columbia and three Native American tribes) and the network of 900 local subgrantees (comprised of community action agencies, units of local government, and other non-profit organizations). The services provided through WAPTAC focus on standardizing and improving the daily management of the WAP. Staff continually identify policies changes and best practices to help the network improve its effectiveness and enhance the benefits of the Program for the customers who receive service and the federal and private investors. The operations of WAPTAC are separated into six distinct areas: (1) Orientation for New WAP State Directors and Staff; (2) Pollution Occurrence Insurance Project; (3) Public Information Campaign; (4) State Management Training Project; (5) System for Integrating and Reviewing Technologies and Techniques; and (6) WAPTAC Services.

Robert Adams

2009-01-07

234

Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have conducted work terms in the fields of experimental  

E-print Network

Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have, cancer centres, private industry and government ministries and agencies. Coop Jobs have Included: Medical Safety Student Assistant in Medical Imaging Examples of Medical & Health Physics Coop Work Term Duties

Hitchcock, Adam P.

235

Respiratory Protection Program medical clearance for respirator use  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background on occupational exposure to various inhalents is discussed including on-site hazard control measures, procedures, physiological effects, and interpretation of results for the medical clearance of employee for use of personal respiratory protection devices. The purpose of the Respiratory Protection Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Respiratory Protection at LeRC are discussed.

1993-01-01

236

Effect of primary medical care on addiction and medical severity in substance abuse treatment programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the availability of primary medical care on-site at addiction treatment programs or off-site by referral\\u000a improves patients’ addiction severity and medical outcomes, compared to programs that offer no primary care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of patients admitted to a purposive national sample of substance abuse treatment\\u000a programs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Substance abuse treatment programs

Peter D. Friedmann; Zhiwei Zhang; James Hendrickson; Michael D. Stein; Dean R. Gerstein

2003-01-01

237

Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) conducts and coordinates research projects that provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Program is divided into 6 major elements, which a) Provide the Program s knowledge and capabilities to conduct research, addressing the human health and performance risks. b) Advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures to the point of transfer to the customer programs and organizations. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is a partner with the HRP in developing a successful research program. 3

Barsten, Kristina

2010-01-01

238

Medical surveillance programs for construction workers.  

PubMed

In summary, the basic medical examination and carefully documented work and medical history are essential parts of the health examinations of construction workers. To achieve their best potential in preventing occupational and chronic diseases, the examinations should be conducted by professionals who know the working conditions in construction and have a positive attitude toward preventive medicine. One important aspect of these examinations is the opportunity to trigger workplace investigations, followed by exposure reduction. Simultaneously, such examinations provide an opportunity for health education of the worker and an education about work-related health problems for the health care provider. PMID:7667750

Welch, L; Roto, P

1995-01-01

239

[Merkel cell carcinoma experience in a reference medical center.  

PubMed

Background: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that occurs on areas exposed to ultraviolet light. It is usually asymptomatic and it is diagnosed late often. The treatment is surgical, associated with adjuvant radiotherapy. The objective was to present the experience in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma in a reference medical center. Methods: all patients with Merkel cell carcinoma treated at the Instituto de Investigaciones Médico-Biológicas of the Universidad Veracruzana during the period 2008 to 2011 were studied. Sex, age, evolution time, tumor localization, size, metastases and treatment were analyzed. Results: of 3217 patients treated, three cases were Merkel cell carcinoma (0.09 %), their age was 52.1 ± 14.17, male predominance of 66.67 %; the evolution time was of 29.66 ± 35.36 months; the tumour localization was on inguinal region, anterior chest and left arm; the noodle size was of 6.0 ± 5.19 cm; two patients had lymph node metastases. In two cases, resection and lymphadenectomy were performed. They all received radiation therapy and chemotherapy in one case. Histologically the medium variant predominated; immunohistochemistry was positive in the three cases. One patient died ten months after the study was done. Conclusions: our experience is similar with others authors, Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumor, usually diagnosed late, and it has poor survival. PMID:24290025

Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Devezé-Bocardi, Raúl; Ruiz-Juárez, Isabel; Grube-Pagola, Peter; Romero-Sierra, Graciela; Remes-Troche, José María; Silva-Cañetas, Carmen Sofía; Lozoya-López Escalera, Hilda

2013-01-01

240

The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Patient Experience  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the relationship between practices' reported use of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) processes and patients' perceptions of their care experience. Data Source Primary survey data from 393 physician practices and 1,304 patients receiving care in those practices. Study Design This is an observational, cross-sectional study. Using standard ordinary least-squares and a sample selection model, we estimated the association between patients' care experience and the use of PCMH processes in the practices where they receive care. Data Collection We linked data from a nationally representative survey of individuals with chronic disease and two nationally representative surveys of physician practices. Principal Findings We found that practices' use of PCMH processes was not associated with patient experience after controlling for sample selection as well as practice and patient characteristics. Conclusions In our study, which was large, but somewhat limited in its measures of the PCMH and of patient experience, we found no association between PCMH processes and patient experience. The continued accumulation of evidence related to the possibilities of the PCMH, how PCMH is measured, and how the impact of PCMH is gauged provides important information for health care decision makers. PMID:22670806

Martsolf, Grant R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shi, Yunfeng; Casalino, Lawrence P; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Scanlon, Dennis P; Shortell, Stephen M

2012-01-01

241

TITLE: NON-RETALIATION Columbia University Medical Center will refrain from intimidating, threatening, coercing,  

E-print Network

University Medical Center workforce member or with the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human that relates to the patient's past, present or future physical or mental health or condition, related healthTITLE: NON-RETALIATION POLICY: Columbia University Medical Center will refrain from intimidating

Columbia University

242

["Other study programs" at university medical schools in Germany].  

PubMed

Traditionally medical and dental study programs in Germany are carried out by the medical schools of the universities. In the context of the specialization of medicine and the academization of the other health professions, additional study programs have been developed. The dynamics of the development and the federal structure of Germany have led to the current situation, which is difficult to understand. Based on a survey published in November 2007 ("Landkarte Hochschulmedizin") and the analysis of the Internet websites of the 36 medical schools (2008/2009), a summary of the currently offered "other study programs" could be created. The result is that 28 medical schools offer a total of 27 undergraduate programs (B.Sc.), 55 graduate programs (M.Sc.), and about 15 MD (PhD) degree programs. These are not only designed for doctors, but also for other health professionals (for example biologists, nurses). Special attention should be paid to courses carried out in cooperation with other departments from the same or other institutions (universities, colleges and polytechnics), as well as to the integration of specialization opportunities in the second part of the medical studies. The study programs and training courses offered are also predicted to expand and to increasingly involve other health professionals. PMID:19633822

von Troschke, J; Epe, H

2009-08-01

243

Job Title Medical Case Manager (LBSW/LMSW) Employer/ Agency St. Hope Health Center  

E-print Network

's compliance to medical regimen; coordinating linkages to other services; mental health counseling for personsJob Title Medical Case Manager (LBSW/LMSW) Employer/ Agency St. Hope Health Center Job Description The Medical Social Worker position consists of conducting bio-psychosocial assessments; monitoring patient

Azevedo, Ricardo

244

Evaluation of a Program to Teach Medical Students about Alcoholism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Week-end Intervention Program (WIP) used by Wright State University School of Medicine, which assesses the alcohol problems of those convicted of offenses such as drunk driving and then assists in finding treatment, is described. The impact of the program in educating medical students about alcoholism is discussed. (MLW)

Siegal, Harvey A.; And Others

1986-01-01

245

Computer program and user documentation medical data tape retrieval system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume provides several levels of documentation for the program module of the NASA medical directorate mini-computer storage and retrieval system. A biomedical information system overview describes some of the reasons for the development of the mini-computer storage and retrieval system. It briefly outlines all of the program modules which constitute the system.

Anderson, J.

1971-01-01

246

Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at The Ohio State University Libraries, the Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program (BPRCAP) collects, preserves, and provides "access to historical documents concerned with polar regions." Their collection contains papers, records, photographs, and other forms of documentation concerning explorers, scientists, and other figures. Along the top of their page, visitors will find sections that profile select explorers (Byrd and Cook, among others), along with "Oral History" and "Online Resources". The Byrd area contains photographs of the man and his explorations, along with artifacts from his expeditions. Moving on, the "Oral History" area offers visitors the ability to view dozens of oral histories with people like Captain William Anderson and Chester Segers, who was one of the cooks at the South Pole Station.

247

Sponsored by Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center The Essentials of Running a Global Health Center  

E-print Network

1 Sponsored by Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center The Essentials, 2012 Albert Einstein College of Medicine Price Center/Block Research Pavilion LeFrak Auditorium on the morning of November 5th from the Radisson Hotel to the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Accreditation

Emmons, Scott

248

Labor Archives and Research Center Invites You to Attend the Center's 26th Anniversary Program  

E-print Network

Labor Archives and Research Center Invites You to Attend the Center's 26th Anniversary Program and Open to the Public MCSVoiceApril23,1945 #12;Labor Archives and Research Center, SFSU 480 Winston Drive. Celebrate the Labor Archives and Research Center's 26th Anniversary! Friday, February 24, 2012 ~ 6:30 p

249

Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Laboratory Technology Programs (CIP: 51.1004--Medical Laboratory Technology). Postsecondary Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the medical laboratory technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

250

75 FR 77647 - Medical Device User Fee Program; Meetings on Reauthorization; Request for Notification of Patient...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0389] Medical Device User Fee Program; Meetings on...meetings on reauthorization of the Medical Device User Fee Amendments of 2007...continue collecting user fees for the medical device program. The Federal Food,...

2010-12-13

251

77 FR 45716 - Proposed Information Collection (Foreign Medical Program); Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection (Foreign Medical Program); Comment Request...reimburse healthcare providers for medical services provided to veterans...other forms of information technology. Titles: a. Foreign Medical Program Registration...

2012-08-01

252

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Pilot Executive Subcommittee  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Pilot Executive Subcommittee Search NCCCP Pilot Goals Overview Pilot Subcommittees Pilot Executive Subcommittee Disparities Clinical Trials Information Technology

253

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Advocacy  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Advocacy Search NCCCP Pilot Goals Overview Pilot Subcommittees Pilot Executive Subcommittee Disparities Clinical Trials Information Technology Biospecimens

254

Family-centered maternity care for deaf refugees: the patient-centered medical home in action.  

PubMed

The intersection of 2 underserved populations-refugees and deaf individuals-presents novel challenges to health care systems and has not been described previously. A patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is uniquely equipped to provide outstanding primary care to disadvantaged groups. As an illustrative case study, we present our experience applying principles of the PCMH to address an extremely challenging clinical situation: providing high-quality maternity care to a recently immigrated Vietnamese refugee couple lacking formal language skills. We describe how enhanced access, continuity, coordination, and cultural appropriateness can facilitate favorable outcomes in even daunting circumstances. By collaborating with multiple interpreters, the health center staff, and the extended family, we effectively mobilized an expanded system of care to ensure informed consent and shared decision making, ultimately culminating in a successful labor and vaginal delivery. Through organizational and individual commitment to the tenets of the PCMH, we demonstrate the particular strengths of family medicine training sites in caring for similar patients and families with complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care. PMID:20047358

Balachandra, Shirish K; Carroll, Jennifer K; Fogarty, Colleen T; Finigan, Elizabeth G

2009-12-01

255

Medical Microbiology and Immunology Graduate Program Guidelines  

E-print Network

Guidelines for the Thesis and Thesis Defense 7.1 Approval to Write the Thesis 7.2 Thesis Document 7.2.1 MMI Form Candidacy Exam Report Thesis Acceptability Thesis Defense Report MMI Student Information Web Page, 2013 Table of Contents 1. General Information 1.1 Areas of Research and Resources 1.2 Program

MacMillan, Andrew

256

University of Rochester University of Rochester Medical Center  

E-print Network

Orthodontics Orofacial Pain/TMJD Please Note: Periodontology Prosthodontics · Interviews for the Ph.D. program Orthodontics · These graduate programs are not required for acceptance into the postdoctoral programs

Goldman, Steven A.

257

USGS Alaska Science Center, Biological Science Office: Research Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information about the research programs of the USGS Alaska Science Center - Biological Science Office (ASC-BSO). The programs are divided into several categories including Ecosystems & Habitats, Mammals, Technical Programs, Fish and Fisheries, and Birds. Links connect to research information about numerous program subcategories like Coastal and Marine, Sea Otters, Loons, Fisheries Projects, and more. The site also links to background information about the ASC-BSO, job listings, staff contact information, and the Alaska Science Center Publications Database.

2006-01-11

258

USGS Alaska Science Center, Biological Science Office: Research Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information about the research programs of the USGS Alaska Science Center - Biological Science Office (ASC-BSO). The programs are divided into several categories including Ecosystems & Habitats, Mammals, Technical Programs, Fish and Fisheries, and Birds. Links connect to research information about numerous program subcategories like Coastal and Marine, Sea Otters, Loons, Fisheries Projects, and more. The site also links to background information about the ASC-BSO, job listings, staff contact information, and the Alaska Science Center Publications Database.

259

Computer Program and User Documentation Medical Data Input System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several levels of documentation are presented for the program module of the NASA medical directorate minicomputer storage and retrieval system. The biomedical information system overview gives reasons for the development of the minicomputer storage and retrieval system. It briefly describes all of the program modules which constitute the system. A technical discussion oriented to the programmer is given. Each subroutine is described in enough detail to permit in-depth understanding of the routines and to facilitate program modifications. The program utilization section may be used as a users guide.

Anderson, J.

1971-01-01

260

Cancers in Eastern Libya: First results from Benghazi Medical Center  

PubMed Central

AIM: To study the pattern of cancer incidence and determine the incidence rates in Eastern Libya (for the first time in a decade). METHODS: A hospital-based registry of cancer patients was formed using records from the primary oncology center in eastern Libya - focusing on those diagnosed in the year 2012. RESULTS: The most common malignancies in men were cancers of the colon (22.3%, n = 90), lung (20.3%, n = 82), prostate (16.1%, n = 65), pancreas (4.2%, n = 17) and liver (4.2%, n = 17). For women, they were found to be cancers of the breast (41.5%, n = 213), colon (16.4%, n = 84), uterus (8%, n = 41), ovary (5.5%, n = 28) and pancreas (3.1%, n = 16). Additionally age-standardized rates (ASR) were determined for Libya. The different cities and towns in eastern Libya were compared for any variation. The city of Beida in particular was found to have a remarkably high incidence of gastric cancer. The different findings were discussed and comparisons were made with past literature as well as the incidence rates for neighbouring countries. The incidence rates given for the eastern region showed differences from previously reported values (i.e., the rate of colon cancer was the highest in North Africa whereas other malignancies occurred less frequently). Potential explanations for the urban-rural difference as well as the difference in incidence rates were put forth. The significance of this study is that it establishes a baseline of cancer incidence which should be the backbone for any future national cancer plan in Libya. CONCLUSION: Proper surveillance programs need to be in place and healthcare policy should be adjusted to take into account the more prevalent and pressing cancers in society. PMID:24876750

Bodalal, Zuhir; Azzuz, Raouf; Bendardaf, Riyad

2014-01-01

261

A burn center cost-reduction program.  

PubMed

A concerted effort to decrease resource usage and length of stay without sacrificing quality of care was undertaken over a 2-year period in a high-census Burn Center. Through a series of changes in practice, substantial decreases in the costs of several high-usage items were tracked. During this period the average length of stay also was decreased. The average hospital charge decreased from $46,628 per patient in fiscal year 1993 to $33,159 per patient in fiscal year 1994. During this period there was no significant change in the patient population as measured by total body surface area percentage burn and acuity level. With the exception of significant improvement in the infection rate, there was no substantial change in indicators of quality care as measured by readmission, morbidity, and posthospital would healing progression. This cost-reduction program showed that costs can be reduced without diminishing quality of care; in some respects quality of care improved due to the practice changes that were implemented. PMID:9261705

Mathews, J J; Supple, K; Calistro, A; Gamelli, R L

1997-01-01

262

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay: Facts & Figures  

E-print Network

surgeries for first year: 5,380 Anticipated number of inpatient surgeries for first year: 4,274 Anticipated of tireless robots works around the clock to remove and deliver food and linens, medications and lab specimens

Derisi, Joseph

263

Dear Colleague Letter-Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC), Engineering Research Centers (ERC), Program Director (Closes: 05/02/2005)  

NSF Publications Database

... Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC), Engineering Research Centers (ERC) Program ... Research Centers (ERC) Program team, within the Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC ...

264

Dear Colleague Letter-Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC), Engineering Research Centers (ERC), Program Director (Closes: 10/15/2005)  

NSF Publications Database

... Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC), Engineering Research Centers (ERC) Program ... Research Centers (ERC) Program team, within the Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC ...

265

San Antonio Military Medical Center integration: a case study in organizational leadership design.  

PubMed

The Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission law of 2005 established a combined Army-Air Force medical center in San Antonio, Texas. The new facility is named the San Antonio Military Medical Center. This planned integration of two facilities would result in the downsizing of Wilford Hall Medical Center to a clinic and expansion of the nearby Brooke Army Medical Center to encompass all inpatient care. As part of the integration, the emergency services of both hospitals, to include the emergency departments, would merge under single leadership. As part of this case study, the proposed future organizational design is examined. Real and potential barriers to change are also indentified and possible solutions are explored. PMID:18333499

De Lorenzo, Robert A

2008-02-01

266

Designing for Humidity Control in the Operating Rooms: Desiccant Dehumidification Case Study for HEALTHSOUTH Medical Center  

E-print Network

Battling for control of the humidity within the operating rooms, this HEALTHSOUTH retrofitted the existing chilled water-based Air Handling Unit with a desiccant-based Air Handler in their flagship medical center. This case study shows results...

Nunnelly, R. M.

2004-01-01

267

75 FR 6401 - Medical Devices Regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research; Availability of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...No. FDA-2009-M-0513] Medical Devices Regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research; Availability of Summaries...for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). This list is intended...for Biologics Evaluation and Research (HFM-17), Food and...

2010-02-09

268

UC Davis Medical Center Community Health Needs Assessment Implementation Plan Page 2 Introduction  

E-print Network

, the region's only National Cancer Institute- designated comprehensive cancer center, and innovative stem cell, an 800-member physician's practice group and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. UC Davis Medical

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

269

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities Program in Biomedical Ethics  

E-print Network

Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities Program in Biomedical Ethics School of Medicine University of Virginia 2015 Summer Biomedical Ethics Internship The Program in Biomedical Ethics at the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities at the University of Virginia School of Medicine invites

Acton, Scott

270

Higher Education: A Worldwide Inventory of Centers and Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This inventory is a guide to higher education programs, centers, and related agencies. It opens with an essay that gives an overview of higher education research and training, providing a context for the programs and centers listed in the inventory. The chapters are: (1) "Research and Training in Higher Education: The State of the Art" (Philip G.…

Altbach, Philip G.; Engberg, David

271

Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM Research the original application, in the order listed above, to the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research, Hood House? undergrad.research@unh.edu Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research Hood House 209 · (603) 862

New Hampshire, University of

272

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research  

E-print Network

SURF USA Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) Hamel Center for Undergraduate; and give it to the applicant for submission to the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research. Questions? undergrad.research@unh.edu Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research Hood House 209 · (603) 862-4323 #12;

New Hampshire, University of

273

University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers develop new radiation therapy for gynecologic cancers  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center have developed a more effective way to treat gynecologic cancers, shortening radiation treatment time from five weeks to three days. The method was published in the Journal of Visualized Experiments on April 17. The new method, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used on other types of cancer, but University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the first treatment facility to apply it to gynecologic cancers.

274

Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program: The Prevalence of Asthma Medication Use During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Background Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in women of reproductive age, occurring in up to 8% of pregnancies. Objective Assess the prevalence of asthma medication use during pregnancy in a large diverse cohort. Methods We identified women aged 15 to 45 years who delivered a live born infant between 2001 and 2007 across 11 U.S. health plans within the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). Using health plans’ administrative and claims data, and birth certificate data, we identified deliveries for which women filled asthma medications from 90 days before pregnancy through delivery. Prevalence (%) was calculated for asthma diagnosis and medication dispensing. Results There were 586,276 infants from 575,632 eligible deliveries in the MEPREP cohort. Asthma prevalence among mothers was 6.7%, increasing from 5.5% in 2001 to 7.8% in 2007. A total of 9.7% (n=55,914) of women were dispensed asthma medications during pregnancy. The overall prevalence of maintenance-only medication, rescue-only medication, and combined maintenance and rescue medication was 0.6%, 6.7%, and 2.4% respectively. The prevalence of maintenance-only use doubled during the study period from 0.4% to 0.8%, while rescue-only use decreased from 7.4% to 5.8%. Conclusions In this large population-based pregnancy cohort, the prevalence of asthma diagnoses increased over time. The dispensing of maintenance-only medication increased over time, while rescue-only medication dispensing decreased over time. PMID:23108737

Hansen, Craig; Joski, Peter; Freiman, Heather C.; Andrade, Susan; Toh, Sengwee; Dublin, Sascha; Cheetham, T. Craig; Cooper, William O.; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Li, De-Kun; Beaton, Sarah J.; Scott, Pamela E.; Hammad, Tarek; Davis, Robert

2013-01-01

275

Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

Antimirova, Tetyana

2006-12-01

276

EDA University Center Program Center for Industrial Research and Service  

E-print Network

's micropolitan areas are important employment, trade, and service delivery centers. Between 1998 and 2008 as the locations of regional retail trade, business services, and health and education services. Many into their locations. The evolving nature of these RTCs will lead to changes in which communities market themselves

Lin, Zhiqun

277

New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.  

PubMed

Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates. PMID:24743088

Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simi?, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

2014-01-01

278

The Program for Professional Values and Ethics in Medical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Program for Professional Values and Ethics in Medical Education (PPVEME) at Tulane University School of Medicine. It brings together students, residents, and faculty into learning teams that teach the other teams about one of five themes: integrity, communication, teamwork, leadership, and service. It emphasizes learner-driven self…

Lazarus, Cathy J.; Chauvin, Sheila W.; Rodenhauser, Paul; Whitlock, Robin

2000-01-01

279

Emergency Medical Services Program Administration Prototype Curriculum: Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The curriculum guide was developed for training administrators (new entrants and incumbents), at the college level, in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) program administration. It is designed to be comprehensive and to include all knowledge and skills needed to perform the functions and tasks involved in EMS administration and management. The brief…

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

280

Predictors of Success: Medical Laboratory Associate in Science Degree Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospitals and healthcare facilities in the United States are facing serious shortages of medical laboratory personnel, which, if not addressed, stand to negatively impact patient care. The problem is compounded by a reduction in the numbers of academic programs and resulting decrease in the number of graduates to keep up with the increase in industry demands. Given these challenges, the

Nilia M Madan

2012-01-01

281

Analysis and optimization of the Emergency Department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center via simulation  

E-print Network

We develop a simulation model based on patient data from 2/1/05 to 1/31/06 that represents the operations of the Emergency Department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a Harvard teaching hospital and a leading medical ...

Noyes, Clay W

2008-01-01

282

PROJECT HEAD START MEDICAL--A GUIDE FOR DIRECTION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

HEALTH SERVICES OF PROJECT HEAD START CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS PROVIDE--A MEDICAL EVALUATION OF EACH CHILD INCLUDING MEDICAL HISTORY, DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION, SCREENING TESTS FOR VISION, HEARING, SPEECH, AND TUBERCULOSIS, LABORATORY TESTS OF URINE FOR ALBUMIN AND TESTS OF SUGAR AND BLOOD FOR ANEMIA, DENTAL ASSESSMENT,…

Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

283

Discharge/Home Care Plan for Childhood Asthma Children's Medical Center, University of Virginia  

E-print Network

Discharge/Home Care Plan for Childhood Asthma Children's Medical Center, University of Virginia _____________________________________________________________________. Eliminate from your child's environment the following triggers that make his/her asthma worse: House Dust medications is required. Your child's asthma is: Mild intermittent Mild persistent Moderate Severe ROUTINE

Acton, Scott

284

Patient-centered instructions for medications prescribed for the treatment of heart failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with reduced functional capacity and quality of life, particularly among older adults. Complex medication regimens for CHF challenge older patients' ability to adhere to them, in part because of age-related cognitive decline and poor communication about medications.Objective: This article describes patient-centered instructions for taking CHF medications that were developed as part of a

Daniel G Morrow; Michael Weiner; Melissa M Deer; James M Young; Sarah Dunn; Patricia McGuire; Michael D Murray

2004-01-01

285

RECEPTIONIST The certificate in medical dental/reception is a one year program  

E-print Network

, medical law and ethics, and computer applications. Students are also required to complete a medical Applications · Medical Terminology · Professional Skills in the Workplace · Medical Law and EthicsMEDICAL/ DENTAL RECEPTIONIST The certificate in medical dental/reception is a one year program

Hartman, Chris

286

[Guidelines for an Expired Medication Collection Program in Brazil].  

PubMed

The scope of this paper is to outline and discuss fundamental guidelines for an expired medication collection program for Brazil and to provide evidence supporting campaigns to raise the population's awareness for the program's success. It is a document-based descriptive review that analyzes official, technical and regulatory documents from Portugal, Canada and Colombia, where there are expired medication collection programs in different stages of implementation. Some of them are already fully implemented, while others are in the preliminary stages, but all of them are achieving good results. The countries listed above were chosen in order to represent Europe, North America and Latin America. Six common guidelines were outlined: co-responsibility in the drug's manufacturing and distribution chain; a strategy of minimization of waste; setting up pilot programs; investigation and classification of waste generated; inter-sectorial communication between different government bodies; and campaigns to raise the community's awareness. These guidelines represent the ground rules for an Expired Medication Collection Program in Brazil. PMID:23546215

Falqueto, Elda; Kligerman, Débora Cynamon

2013-03-01

287

Serving underserved transplant recipients: experience of the Medication Access Program  

PubMed Central

Objective Programs have been established to help underserved, solid-organ transplant recipients and other patient populations address the burden of medication regimen costs. The purpose of this study was to describe one such program, the Medication Access Program (MAP), and the population of solid-organ transplant recipients it serves. An additional objective was to compare characteristics of recipients whose MAP enrollment was continued versus those who were discontinued during the annual re-enrollment period. Methods Enrollment into MAP is based on referral from a pharmacist or another health care professional/transplant team member. To enroll, a recipient must complete an application which includes information about demographics, health care coverage, income, and medication regimen. To maintain enrollment, patients must complete a renewal application on an annual basis. Data were collected from renewal applications for 2012 and 2011 (for those who did not return the 2012 renewal applications). Chi-square analyses and Student’s t-test for independent samples were conducted to compare the characteristics of those who renewed their MAP enrollment in 2012 and those who were discontinued because they did not return the renewal application. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression was conducted to determine variables predictive of MAP continuation status. Results In total, 246 recipients were included. The majority qualified for Medicare (67.9%), did not qualify for Medicaid (69.9%), and did not have private health care coverage (63.8%). Significantly more continued recipients qualified for Medicare compared to discontinued recipients (P=0.002). Discontinued recipients had a greater number of past discontinuations than continued recipients (P=0.01). In the logistic regression analysis, qualifying for Medicare was significantly associated with continuation status (P=0.001). Conclusion MAP is designed to increase medication access for low-income solid-organ transplant recipients through enrollment into medication assistance programs, education regarding medication therapy, and availability of medication assistance programs. Health care providers should use historical monitoring to identify high risk patients and implement programs that will facilitate continuity of care. PMID:24833895

Spivey, Christina A; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Garrett, Charlene; Duke, Kenneth M

2014-01-01

288

Modeling time in medical decision-support programs.  

PubMed

To derive meaningful conclusions in a changing medical setting, medical decision-support systems must represent and reason about the temporal nature of the clinical environments they attempt to model. Because all difficult medical problems have significant temporal features, designers of medical decision support systems must recognize the unique problems caused by representing and reasoning with temporal concepts. This report has three goals: 1) to describe a set of fundamental issues in creating and reasoning with computer models of a changing clinical environment, 2) to present a taxonomy for characterizing the temporal characteristics of computer models of temporal reasoning, and 3) to use this taxonomy to compare the models of time used in some implemented medical decision-support programs. From this examination, it is argued that computational models of time based on a single uniform representational or inferential method are limited by the expressive power of that method. Multiple modeling formalisms that express different temporal properties of the domain task and that work cooperatively are required to capture the subtlety and diversity of temporal features used in expert clinical problem solving. As an example of this approach, the author describes a program called TOPAZ that contains two temporal models that represent different temporal features of the clinical domain. PMID:1766328

Kahn, M G

1991-01-01

289

NCI Launches a Pilot of Its Community Cancer Centers Program to Bring Quality Cancer Care to All  

Cancer.gov

NCI today launched the three year pilot phase of a new program that will help bring state-of-the-art cancer care to patients in community hospitals across the United States. The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) is designed to encourage the collaboration of private-practice medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists - with close links to NCI research and to the network of 63 NCI-designated Cancer Centers principally based at large research universities.

290

Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

2014-01-01

291

Friday, November 8, 2013 Columbia University Medical Center  

E-print Network

. Dr. Acharya is a key member of the American Dental Association's Standard Committee on Dental). He has held several leadership positions including Chair of the American Dental Education Association's Dental Informatics Section and Co-Chair of the American Medical Informatics Association's Dental

Grishok, Alla

292

Smartphones in medicine: emerging practices in an academic medical center.  

PubMed

Advances in mobile phone technology now provide a myriad of resources to physicians' fingertips. However, the medical profession continues to struggle with potential for misuse of these devices. There is a need for better understanding of physicians' uses of smartphones in order to establish guidelines for appropriate and professional behavior. The purpose of the current study was to survey physicians' and medical students' practices concerning smartphone use in the healthcare setting. Physicians and medical students were asked to complete anonymous surveys regarding uses of smartphones within the past month in various healthcare settings. Overall, the participants reported distinctly different patterns in the uses they made of their phones in different settings (P?medical students make decisions about using their smartphones according to some combination of three considerations: degree of relevance to patient care, the appropriateness of the behavior in front of patients, and the issue of how disruptive that behavior may be. PMID:25526706

Johnson, Angela C; El Hajj, Stephanie C; Perret, J Nelson; Caffery, Terrell S; Jones, Glenn N; Musso, Mandi W

2015-01-01

293

Medical care delivery in the US space program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stated goal of this meeting is to examine the use of telemedicine in disaster management, public health, and remote health care. NASA has a vested interest in providing health care to crews in remote environments. NASA has unique requirements for telemedicine support, in that our flight crews conduct their job in the most remote of all work environments. Compounding the degree of remoteness are other environmental concerns, including confinement, lack of atmosphere, spaceflight physiological deconditioning, and radiation exposure, to name a few. In-flight medical care is a key component in the overall support for missions, which also includes extensive medical screening during selection, preventive medical programs for astronauts, and in-flight medical monitoring and consultation. This latter element constitutes the telemedicine aspect of crew health care. The level of in-flight resources dedicated to medical care is determined by the perceived risk of a given mission, which in turn is related to mission duration, planned crew activities, and length of time required for return to definitive medical care facilities.

Stewart, Donald F.

1991-01-01

294

Daily Program 1 for a Child Development Center: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents a brief overview of the components of a center-based Head Start child development program, including its general philosophy as well as guidelines for specific daily planning. Headings are: (1) What is a Child Development Program? (2) The Staff Designs Its Own Program; (3) The Children Themselves--What Are They Like? (4) Goals…

Stone, Jeannette Galambos; Janis, Marjorie Graham

295

Scheduled telephone visits in the veterans health administration patient-centered medical home  

PubMed Central

Background The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient-centered medical home model, Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT), includes telephone visits to improve care access and efficiency. Scheduled telephone visits can replace in-person care for some focused issues, and more information is needed to understand how this mode can best work for primary care. We conducted a study at the beginning of PACT implementation to elicit stakeholder views on this mode of healthcare delivery, including potential facilitators and barriers. Methods We conducted focus groups with primary care patients (n?=?3 groups), providers (n?=?2 groups) and staff (n?=?2 groups). Questions were informed by Donabedian’s framework to evaluate and improve healthcare quality. Content analysis and theme matrix techniques were used to explore themes. Content was assigned a positive or negative valuation to indicate whether it was a facilitator or barrier. PACT principles were used as an organizing framework to present stakeholder responses within the context of the VHA patient-centered medical home program. Results Scheduled telephone visits could potentially improve care quality and efficiency, but stakeholders were cautious. Themes were identified relating to the following PACT principles: comprehensiveness, patient-centeredness, and continuity of care. In sum, scheduled telephone visits were viewed as potentially beneficial for routine care not requiring physical examination, and patients and providers suggested using them to evaluate need for in-person care; however, visits would need to be individualized, with patients able to discontinue if not satisfied. Patients and staff asserted that providers would need to be kept in the loop for continuity of care. Additionally, providers and staff emphasized needing protected time for these calls. Conclusion These findings inform development of scheduled telephone visits as part of patient-centered medical homes by providing evidence about areas that may be leveraged to most effectively implement this mode of care. Presenting this service as enhanced care, with ability to triage need for in-person clinic visits and consequently provide more frequent contact, may most adequately meet different stakeholder expectations. In this way, scheduled telephone visits may serve as both a substitute for in-person care for certain situations and a supplement to in-person interaction. PMID:24690086

2014-01-01

296

Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.  

PubMed

We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) that are participating in Medicare. We are establishing requirements for the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. PMID:22937544

2012-08-31

297

Development of a medical image capture, formatting, and display system in support of a medical diagnostic center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today's concern over rising medical costs demands that medical diagnostic systems have cost effective life cycles. The design of a Medical Image Capture, Formatting, and Display (MICFD) system must be based on an architectural approach utilizing new technologies for upgrades and modifications. The need to maintain a cost effective operation dictates flexible, easily upgradeable architectures. In the past, Image Capture, Formatting, and Display capabilities have been contained within a single medical diagnostic system and embodied an architectural approach that limited significant performance upgrades due to tight coupling between software and a specific vendor's hardware. Significant capability enhancements to these systems could in the past only be accomplished by replacement of the entire system. The MICFD system described in this paper was specifically tailored to meet the needs of a Medical Diagnostic Center to monitor and analyze a diagnostic procedure through the use of state-of- the-art image capture, formatting, and display technologies. Further, the architecture is such that incremental enhancements can be made to strengthen budget profiles. A review of the requirements for a MICFD system that will support multiple diagnostic systems and provide a method for minimizing life cycle cost is presented in this paper. To fulfill these requirements, SPARTAC (SPArta Real Time Analysis, Computation and Control Center) architecture and design concepts have been used.

Keyes, John A.; Bretz, James F.; Moore, Archie L.

1993-06-01

298

The Medical Education Evaluation Program of the state of Ohio.  

PubMed

In October 1988, seven foreign medical graduates participated in the first administration of the examination devised by the Medical Education Evaluation Program (MEEP) mandated by the State Medical Board of Ohio. The MEEP was established to provide an objective evaluation of an applicant's clinical competencies; passing the MEEP examination was intended to certify that the applicant's clinical skills were comparable to those of a medical student graduating from a school accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. An applicant who successfully passed the MEEP examination and fulfilled the other Ohio licensure requirements would be eligible to take the Federation Licensing Examination (FLEX) and apply for an unrestricted license to practice medicine in Ohio. The paper describes the origin and development of the MEEP examination and the testing modalities selected (multiple-choice examinations and the use of standardized patients). Four fundamental areas were tested; these are named and described, along with the method for calculating scores for each area and the criteria for passing the different components of the examination. Although the small sample size prohibited meaningful data analysis for the performance of the first group of MEEP candidates, the MEEP examination appears to meet psychometric standards of certifying and licensing examinations, based on data from comparable tests taken by beginning fourth-year medical students in New England and NBME Part III examination examinees. Some potential pitfalls of the MEEP examination are mentioned, as well as the fact that it presents a challenge to boards of medical examiners of other states to implement performance-based assessments of physicians who graduate from non-accredited medical schools. PMID:2751784

Stillman, P L; Madigan, H S; Thompson, D K; Swanson, D B; Julian, E; Regan, M B; Nelson, D V; Philbin, M

1989-08-01

299

Health Services Management Education On-Site at a Military Medical Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cooperative educational program with the U.S. military is described to illustrate a unique opportunity that confronted a graduate healthcare management program. The resulting degree program supported the military's operational medical mission but also presented interesting and unexpected challenges resulting from the wars in Iraq and…

Williams, Stephen J.; Poss, W. Bradley; Cupp, Craig L.

2014-01-01

300

Program Overview Information for Launch Binders  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program Program Overview – Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center 1 A. Name and location of hospital: Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, 5000 Hennessey Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA 70808 B. Name

301

A Survey of Family-Violence Curricula in Virginia Medical Schools and Residencies at University Medical Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of Virginia's three medical schools and their affiliated residencies found considerable variation in curricula concerning family violence. About one-fourth of residency programs had some curriculum content on specific domestic violence topics (child abuse, battered women, elder abuse). Faculty (n=27) with expertise in family violence were…

Hendricks-Matthews, Marybeth K.

1997-01-01

302

Center for Nanoscale Materials User Access Program Overview CNM User Access Program Overview  

E-print Network

Center for Nanoscale Materials User Access Program Overview CNM User Access Program Overview 1 of the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) user program is to provide the user community with access to equipment, facilities, and personnel that support CNM's overall focus on nanoscale materials. The CNM makes

Kemner, Ken

303

Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

2005-01-01

304

Beam Optics for a Scanned Proton Beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beam scanning in proton therapy is a medical technique to lower the dose to healthy tissue while irradiating a tumor volume. Scanned proton beams for proton radiation therapy require small beam sizes at the tumor location. In beam scanning, a small beam usually less than 1 cm diameter is swept across the tumor volume with two magnets located several meters upstream of the patient. In general, all proton beams in a therapy facility must be transported from the accelerator to the treatment rooms where the scanning systems are located. This paper addresses the problem of transporting the beam without losses to the patient and achieving a small beam at the tumor location in the patient. The strengths of the beam line quadrupoles were allowed to vary to produce the desired beam sizes along the beam lines. Quadrupole strengths were obtained using the beam simulation program TRANSPORT originally from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Palo Alto, CA. An enhanced version of the original program by Accel Soft Inc. in San Diego, CA has been used for these studies. Beam size measurements were used for comparison with TRANSPORT to verify the predictions of TRANSPORT calculations.

Coutrakon, George; Hubbard, Jeff; Koss, Peter; Sanders, Ed; Panchal, Mona

2003-08-01

305

Assessment and Measurement of Patient-Centered Medical Home Implementation: The BCBSM Experience  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Our goal was to describe an approach to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) measurement based on delineating the desired properties of the measurement relative to assumptions about the PCMH and the uses of the measure by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) and health services researchers. METHODS We developed and validated an approach to assess 13 functional domains of PCMHs and 128 capabilities within those domains. A measure of PCMH implementation was constructed using data from the validated self-assessment and then tested on a large sample of primary care practices in Michigan. RESULTS Our results suggest that the measure adequately addresses the specific requirements and assumptions underlying the BCBSM PCMH program—ability to assess change in level of implementation; ability to compare across practices regardless of size, affiliation, or payer mix; and ability to assess implementation of the PCMH through different sequencing of capabilities and domains. CONCLUSIONS Our experience illustrates that approaches to measuring PCMH should be driven by the measures’ intended use(s) and users, and that a one-size-fits-all approach may not be appropriate. Rather than promoting the BCBSM PCMH measure as the gold standard, our study highlights the challenges, strengths, and limitations of developing a standardized approach to PCMH measurement. PMID:23690390

Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Paustian, Michael; Wise, Christopher G.; Green, Lee A.; Fetters, Michael D.; Mason, Margaret; El Reda, Darline K.

2013-01-01

306

Beam Optics for a Scanned Proton Beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

Beam scanning in proton therapy is a medical technique to lower the dose to healthy tissue while irradiating a tumor volume. Scanned proton beams for proton radiation therapy require small beam sizes at the tumor location. In beam scanning, a small beam usually less than 1 cm diameter is swept across the tumor volume with two magnets located several meters upstream of the patient. In general, all proton beams in a therapy facility must be transported from the accelerator to the treatment rooms where the scanning systems are located. This paper addresses the problem of transporting the beam without losses to the patient and achieving a small beam at the tumor location in the patient. The strengths of the beam line quadrupoles were allowed to vary to produce the desired beam sizes along the beam lines. Quadrupole strengths were obtained using the beam simulation program TRANSPORT originally from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Palo Alto, CA. An enhanced version of the original program by Accel Soft Inc. in San Diego, CA has been used for these studies. Beam size measurements were used for comparison with TRANSPORT to verify the predictions of TRANSPORT calculations.

Coutrakon, George; Hubbard, Jeff; Koss, Peter; Sanders, Ed; Panchal, Mona [Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)

2003-08-26

307

Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs  

PubMed Central

Background Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research. PMID:24646440

Ellaway, Rachel H.; Cooper, Gerry; Al-Idrissi, Tracy; Dubé, Tim; Graves, Lisa

2014-01-01

308

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Goals Overview  

Cancer.gov

The NCCCP cancer centers have dedicated greater resources to reducing inequalities of care. Sites are increasing programs to more effectively reach the underserved in their communities to improve access to cancer screening, treatment, and research.

309

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 171 An outline of an LES imaging (Wang et al. 2006, 2008) and ballistic imaging (Paciaroni et al. 2006), however the data available

Prinz, Friedrich B.

310

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools NCCCP Hospitals

311

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public For Researchers NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools

312

Alternate Learning Center. Abstracts of Inservice Training Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is a collection of abstracts describing the 18 programs offered at the Alternate Learning Center of the Rhode Island Teacher Center which has as its Primary function school based inservice training for local teachers and administrators. Each project is described in detail, including course goals, specific objectives, training…

Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Div. of Development and Operations.

313

JAMESTOWN 4-H EDUCATIONAL CENTER 2015 Specialty Camping Programs  

E-print Network

JAMESTOWN 4-H EDUCATIONAL CENTER 2015 Specialty Camping Programs Williamsburg, Virginia www-8) April 7-9 Marine Science Camp (youth 9-13) April 11 Jamestown 10K (4K for 4H) (anyone) May 2-3 Teen of these camps please contact: Jamestown 4-H Educational Center 3751 4-H Club Road Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757

Liskiewicz, Maciej

314

Percent for Art Program Highlighted in New Autism Center  

E-print Network

Percent for Art Program Highlighted in New Autism Center DECEMBER 2012 NT Daily/Erika Lambreton original works of art. Grant Manier is a 17-year- old artist with autism. Ma- nier's art, "Poof Butterfly and will be placed inside the Kristin Farmer Autism Center, which officially opened its doors on Sept. 19. Manier has

Mohanty, Saraju P.

315

34 CFR 669.1 - What is the Language Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false What is the Language Resource Centers Program? 669.1...EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 669.1 What is the Language Resource Centers Program?...

2011-07-01

316

34 CFR 669.1 - What is the Language Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false What is the Language Resource Centers Program? 669.1...EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 669.1 What is the Language Resource Centers Program?...

2010-07-01

317

34 CFR 464.1 - What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? 464...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464.1 What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? The...

2010-07-01

318

34 CFR 464.1 - What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? 464...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464.1 What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? The...

2011-07-01

319

34 CFR 464.1 - What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? 464...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464.1 What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? The...

2012-07-01

320

34 CFR 464.1 - What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? 464...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464.1 What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? The...

2013-07-01

321

34 CFR 464.1 - What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program?  

...2014-07-01 false What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? 464...DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE LITERACY RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM General § 464.1 What is the State Literacy Resource Centers Program? The...

2014-07-01

322

34 CFR 350.1 - What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program? 350...EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM General...What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?...

2010-07-01

323

34 CFR 350.1 - What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program? 350...EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM General...What is the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program?...

2011-07-01

324

MIT Space Engineering Research Center testbed programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at M.I.T., started in July 1988, has completed two and one-half years of research. This Semi-Annual Report presents annotated viewgraph material presented at the January 1991 Steering Committee and Technical Representative Review. The objective of the Space Engineering Research Center is to develop and disseminate a unified technology of controlled structures. There has been continued evolution of the concept of intelligent structures (including in this past year the first successful embedding of a microelectronic component into a structural element).

Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

1991-01-01

325

Challenger Center's Window on the Universe Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year, Challenger Center's Window on the Universe launches thousands of everyday people---teachers and students, parents---on a fantastic journey through our universe. Recently, for example, we visited Nogales, Arizona, where we trained 350 teachers, talked to 6000 students in classrooms, and 1500 more students and their families as part of ``Family Science Night'' presentations. Window aims to increase community involvement

M. Bobrowsky; J. Goldstein; T. Livengood; K. Offringa; S. Richards; B. Riddle

2001-01-01

326

State Alcoholism Treatment Centers. Program Audit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report presents the results of an evaluation of New York's 13 Alcoholism Treatment Centers (ATCs). The goals of the evaluation were to review the role of the ATCs in relation to other alcoholism treatment facilities, to assess their effectiveness and efficiency, and to determine how much money is collected for service provided to patients.…

Geizer, Bernard P., Ed.

327

The role of the Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in patient care, surgical education, research and faculty development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Veterans Administration (VA) medical centers have had a long history of providing medical care to those who have served their country. Over time, the VA has evolved into a facility that has had a major role in graduate medical education. In surgery, this had provided experience in the medical and surgical management of complex surgical disease involving the head and

Walter E. Longo; William Cheadle; Aaron Fink; Robert Kozol; Ralph DePalma; Robert Rege; Leigh Neumayer; John Tarpley; Margaret Tarpley; Ray Joehl; Thomas A. Miller; Douglas Rosendale; Kamal Itani

2005-01-01

328

Predictors of early faculty attrition at one Academic Medical Center  

PubMed Central

Background Faculty turnover threatens the research, teaching and clinical missions of medical schools. We measured early attrition among newly-hired medical school faculty and identified personal and institutional factors associated with early attrition. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified faculty hired during the 2005–2006 academic year at one school. Three-year attrition rates were measured. A 40-question electronic survey measured demographics, career satisfaction, faculty responsibilities, institutional/departmental support, and reasons for resignation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) identified variables associated with early attrition. Results Of 139 faculty, 34% (95% CI?=?26-42%) resigned within three years of hire. Attrition was associated with: perceived failure of the Department Chair to foster a climate of teaching, research, and service (OR?=?6.03; 95% CI: 1.84, 19.69), inclusiveness, respect, and open communication (OR?=?3.21; 95% CI: 1.04, 9.98). Lack of professional development of the faculty member (OR?=?3.84; 95% CI: 1.25, 11.81); institutional recognition and support for excellence in teaching (OR?=?2.96; 95% CI: 0.78, 11.19) and clinical care (OR?=?3.87; 95% CI: 1.04, 14.41); and >50% of professional time devoted to patient care (OR?=?3.93; 95% CI: 1.29, 11.93) predicted attrition. Gender, race, ethnicity, academic degree, department type and tenure status did not predict early attrition. Of still-active faculty, an additional 27 (48.2%, 95% CI: 35.8, 61.0) reported considering resignation within the 5 years. Conclusions In this pilot study, one-third of new faculty resigned within 3 years of hire. Greater awareness of predictors of early attrition may help schools identify threats to faculty career satisfaction and retention. PMID:24512629

2014-01-01

329

Small and medium-size physician practices use few patient-centered medical home processes.  

PubMed

The patient-centered medical home has become a prominent model for reforming the way health care is delivered to patients. The model offers a robust system of primary care combined with practice innovations and new payment methods. But scant information exists about the extent to which typical US physician practices have implemented this model and its processes of care, or about the factors associated with implementation. In this article we provide the first national data on the use of medical home processes such as chronic disease registries, nurse care managers, and systems to incorporate patient feedback, among 1,344 small and medium-size physician practices. We found that on average, practices used just one-fifth of the patient-centered medical home processes measured as part of this study. We also identify internal capabilities and external incentives associated with the greater use of medical home processes. PMID:21719447

Rittenhouse, Diane R; Casalino, Lawrence P; Shortell, Stephen M; McClellan, Sean R; Gillies, Robin R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Drum, Melinda L

2011-08-01

330

77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY...entitled ``eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions.'' The purpose...electronic copy (eCopy) program for medical device submissions. The draft...

2012-10-17

331

47 CFR 5.79 - Transfer and assignment of station authorization for conventional, program, medical testing, and...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for conventional, program, medical testing...testing experimental radio licenses. 5...for conventional, program, medical testing...testing experimental radio licenses. (a...authorization for a program, medical testing...testing experimental radio license,...

2013-10-01

332

Hurricane Katrina: Medical Response at the Houston Astrodome\\/Reliant Center Complex  

Microsoft Academic Search

On September 1, 2005, with only 12 hours notice, various collaborators established a medical facility—the Katrina Clinic—at the Astrodome\\/Reliant Center Complex in Houston. By the time the facility closed roughly two weeks later, the Katrina Clinic medical staff had seen over 11,000 of the estimated 27,000 Hurricane Kat- rina evacuees who sought shelter in the Complex. Herein, we de- scribe

Thomas F. Gavagan; Kieran Smart; Herminia Palacio; Carmel Dyer; Stephen Greenberg; Paul Sirbaugh; Avrim Fishkind; Douglas Hamilton; Umair Shah; George Masi; R Todd Ivey; Julie Jones; Faye Y. Chiou-Tan; Donna Bloodworth; David Hyman; Cliff Whigham; Valory Pavlik; Ralph D. Feigin; Kenneth Mattox

2006-01-01

333

A Human-Centered Approach to Medical Informatics for Medical Students, Residents, and Practicing Clinicians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development of a curriculum in medical information science that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine rather than details of information technology. Design was guided by identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by examination of past failures of informatics…

Stahlhut, Richard W.; Gosbee, John W.; Gardner-Bonneau, Daryle J.

1997-01-01

334

Management plan for Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Medical Course (Re)Design  

SciTech Connect

Under the Interagency Agreement between the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been tasked with the preparation of a chemical-agent-specific course (and a complementary train-the trainer'' program) for civilian emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics in Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP)-impacted communities in the 10 CSEPP states. This course is to be based on the Centers for Disease Control course Medical Management of Chemical Exposures'' and the US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (MRICD) course entitled Medical Management of Chemical Casualties.'' Though the course materials will be based strongly on the above courses that have already undergone review and approval from the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Army, they will have to be redeveloped to a significant degree. The redevelopment will change the orientation from on-site conditions to potential off-site conditions and will allow the courses or course modules to be used in the variety of instructional conditions outlined, the most difficult condition being the ability to be used by an individual without an instructor present. This necessitates the development of self-study guides for each module as well as instructional materials geared to group interactions and instructor-controlled presentation. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Copenhaver, E.D.

1991-05-01

335

75 FR 22438 - Proposed Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment Form) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Form 10-0505 will be used to allow claimants with medical care copayment debts to pay online with a credit card or Automated Clearing House transaction. Affected Public: Individuals or households. Estimated Total Annual Burden: 48,000....

2010-04-28

336

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

Not Available

1980-08-01

337

The Delta Program and the Center for Limnology Present  

E-print Network

The Delta Program and the Center for Limnology Present University of Wisconsin­Madison Science House 1645 Linden Drive 608-262-9304 info@delta.wisc.edu www.delta.wisc.edu Learn more about the Delta in climate, all of which can alter the current wetland ecosystem infrastructure. The Delta Program promotes

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

338

[Innovative Programs at the Federal Youth Correctional Center, Pleasanton, California].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new Federal Youth Center in Pleasanton, California is attempting to pioneer in successful ways of correcting offenders. Constructed at a cost of five and one half million dollars, the correctional institution offers many innovative programs. As part of the Federal Bureau of Prisons building program, three objectives are to be kept in mind: (1)…

Carlson, Norman A.

339

Model Program: Southern Lehigh High School, Center Valley, PA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes the technology education program at Southern Lehigh High School, Center Valley, Pennsylvania. The school district is presently providing an educational program known for its excellence and forward-looking perspective, which is sensitive to the changing needs of its students. Within the technology education…

Colelli, Richard

2009-01-01

340

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

Kelly, Michael P.

2011-01-01

341

Improving Medication Knowledge Among Older Adults With Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the same medications from a chain pharmacy (standard pharmacy instructions). Thirty-two adults (age, M ¼ 63.8) read and answered

Daniel G. Morrow; Michael Weiner; James Young; Douglas Steinley; Melissa Deer; Michael D. Murray

2005-01-01

342

A historical perspective on the University of Nebraska Medical Center's College of Dentistry Class of 1961.  

PubMed

We conducted a retrospective analysis of the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) College of Dentistry (COD) Class of 1961 to glean information that might be useful in the design of dental education programs in Nebraska and elsewhere. We scanned annual class newsletters, demographic statistics for students entering the UNMC dental program for each decade from 1961 to 2001, and UNMC COD alumni data for patterns and themes among thirty-two dental professionals. Eighty-four percent of those contacted provided responses to a survey. We found that, like current dental cohorts nationwide, the UNMC COD Class of 1961 is mostly of European ancestry (non-Hispanic) and male. But in contrast to current dental college graduates, the UNMC Class of '61 were able to rely upon self-employment and spousal and/or military support (GI Bill) to cover the costs of their dental education. They also were more likely to enter dental school before completion of an undergraduate degree and have a substantial work history before entering the UNMC dental program. Although the most common reason for attending dental school related to independence and financial security, "time with family" and "family vacations" were the next most important reasons cited for becoming dental professionals. Among '61 graduates, the average number of years spent in the dental profession is thirty-seven years. Despite the notable changes in dental technology and the continual need for updating knowledge and skill, eight members of the UNMC COD Class of 1961 continue to practice dentistry. Most maintain contact with other class members, providing support to former classmates and maintaining an identity with their alma mater, the University of Nebraska. PMID:16741135

Willis, Mary S; Badakhsh, Roshan A

2006-06-01

343

The health enhancement program at monash university medical school.  

PubMed

Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine is being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches in new models of education and practice. This column spotlights such innovations in integrative healthcare and CAM education and presents readers with specific educational interventions they can adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or programs. We invite readers to submit brief descriptions of efforts in their institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to Dr Sierpina at vssierpi@utmb.edu or Dr Kreitzer at kreit003@umn.edu. Submissions should be no more than 500 to1,500 words. Please include any Web site or other resource that is relevant, as well as contact information. PMID:18984555

Hassed, Craig; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

2008-01-01

344

[Appeal of French specialized training programs for foreign medical students].  

PubMed

Despite a good reputation abroad, specialized medical training programs in France fail to attract a sufficient number of high-level foreign students. This report examines ways of improving the situation. If French universities are to increase their international renown, they must always be referred to by the same name in scientific papers. Students following channels of excellence must be distinguished from other students. They must have a level of medical knowledge equivalent to that of a 6th-year French medical student, together with a good knowledge of French and a letter from their dean stating that their training in France is compatible with their career in their country of origin. For full medical specialist training (up to five years) the only access requirement should be the equivalent of entrance examinations for French residents. Thereafter, the theoretical and practical training should be similar to that received by French residents. Complementary specialist training courses (one year) should take place in selected university hospitals. Intensive training courses (six months) should be open to physicians who have already specialized. Diplomas should be delivered after testing knowledge and skills. PMID:17140104

Huguier, Michel; Bruhat, Maurice; Launois, Bernard

2006-03-01

345

[Medical fault or professional negligence? Case studies in two recovery nutrition centers in Niger].  

PubMed

In developing countries such as Niger, the risk of medical malpractice is ubiquitous in health, jeopardizing patient safety. The aim of this work was to contribute to patients' safety and respect of code of ethics and conduct in the exercise of the medical profession. The reported cases involved two children under 5 years who were admitted to nutrition rehabilitation centers, died as a result of medical malpractice. In Niger, there are no statistics on this phenomenon and a few cases found have always been considered "accident" or "fate." The establishment of an observatory collections of such information should improve their frequency, consequences and propose a prevention plan. PMID:25449444

Halidou Doudou, M; Manzo, M L; Guero, D

2014-12-01

346

Medical Readiness. Efforts Are Underway for DOD Training in Civilian Trauma Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report evaluates a Department of Defense (DOD) demonstration program that would provide trauma care training for military medical personnel through one or more public or nonprofit hospitals. Specifically, it examines DOD's actions to meet legislative requirements of the demonstration program; identifies other initiatives aimed at training…

General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

347

Surgical teaching program for our senior medical students: room for improvement  

PubMed Central

Background To ensure the quality of surgical teaching within our graduate entry medical program, a distinctive surgical teaching program has been developed at Sydney Medical School-Central. Spanning 2 years, the program includes lectures, small group surgical clinical tutorials, and formal student surgical grand rounds presentations, plus clinical placements and attendance in operating theaters. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Methods In 2013, at the completion of year 4, all graduating students (n=54) were asked to complete an open and closed-ended questionnaire regarding their experience of the surgical program. Results A total of 44/54 (81%) students completed the questionnaire. Students reported a high level of engagement with their experience in clinical tutorials, and a moderate level of engagement in surgical lectures. Students found the clinical attachment to be the least useful method of teaching, with the surgical grand rounds presentation also eliciting a poor response from students. Conclusion While both large group lectures and small group learner-centered teaching methods were highly valued by students, changes are needed to enhance clinical attachments for students in surgical wards. The benefits of students being made to feel part of a team during their surgical clinical attachments, along with adequate inpatient contact and formative feedback, should not be underestimated. PMID:25337002

Burgess, Annette; Wright, Caroline; Qasabian, Raffi; O’Mara, Deborah; Mellis, Craig

2014-01-01

348

Medical/Repatriation/Evacuation Program (ACE Insurance) Under the exchange visitor program, the United States Department of State  

E-print Network

Medical/Repatriation/Evacuation Program (ACE Insurance) Under the exchange visitor program, the United States Department of State requires exchange visitors to have coverage for medical benefits, repatriation of remains in the case of death, and expenses associated with medical evacuation. Coverage by ACE

349

Comprehensive quality of discharge summaries at an academic medical center  

PubMed Central

Background Discharge summaries are essential to safe transitions from hospital to home. Objective To conduct a comprehensive quality assessment of discharge summaries. Design Prospective cohort study. Subjects 377 patients discharged home after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome, heart failure or pneumonia. Measures Discharge summaries were assessed for timeliness of dictation, transmission of the summary to appropriate outpatient clinicians and presence of key content, including elements required by The Joint Commission and elements endorsed by six medical societies in the Transitions of Care Consensus Conference (TOCCC). Results A total of 376 of 377 patients had completed discharge summaries. A total of 174 (46.3%) summaries were dictated on the day of discharge; 93 (24.7%) were completed more than a week after discharge. A total of 144 (38.3%) discharge summaries were not sent to any outpatient physician. On average, summaries included 5.6 of 6 Joint Commission elements and 4.0 of 7 TOCCC elements. Summaries dictated by hospitalists were more likely to be timely and to include key content than summaries dictated by house staff or advanced practice nurses. Summaries dictated on the day of discharge were more likely to be sent to outside physicians and to include key content. No summary met all three quality criteria of timeliness, transmission and content. Conclusions Discharge summary quality is inadequate in many domains. This may explain why individual aspects of summary quality such as timeliness or content have not been associated with improved patient outcomes. However, improving discharge summary timeliness may also improve content and transmission. PMID:23526813

Horwitz, Leora I.; Jenq, Grace Y.; Brewster, Ursula C.; Chen, Christine; Kanade, Sandhya; Van Ness, Peter H.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Ziaeian, Boback; Moriarty, John P.; Fogerty, Robert; Krumholz, Harlan M.

2013-01-01

350

Design considerations of a cable wiring system for a new medical center to support a future medical imaging system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our Medical Center is faced with the problem to design a cable wiring system today, install it by the middle 1990''s, and allow for upgrades and enhancements for the next ten to fifteen years. The cable plant must be able to support functions and activities which are poorly defined today, but will include the hospital information system (HIS), a future picture archiving and communication system (PACS), and possibly an electronic patient chart with integrated image data. The cable plant must also connect to a future campus wide Medical Network of the Indiana University Medical center with the first component being a positron emission tomography system (PET) located approximately one mile away. To meet these goals the proposed cable plant will be a structured wire cabling system following existing and proposed standards for building wiring architectures including the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) and the Telecommunications Industries Association (TIA) 568 Commercial Building Wiring Standard and the proposed Federal Telecommunication Standard 1090. The structured wiring system approached has been evaluated with emphasis on the present and future network topologies that can be implemented, the type and size of fiber optic cable to install, and the need to install fiber optic cable to individual workstations.

Witt, Robert M.; Emrich, Jack

1992-07-01

351

Impact of 5 years of lean six sigma in a University Medical Center.  

PubMed

Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherlands, with LSS. It was introduced in 2007 to create the financial possibility to develop innovations. In this article, we describe how LSS was introduced, and how it developed in the following years. We zoom in at the traumatology department, where all main processes have been analyzed and improved. An evaluation after 5 years shows that LSS helped indeed reducing cost and improving quality. Moreover, it aided the transition of the organization from purely problem oriented to more process oriented, which in turn is helpful in eliminating waste and finding solutions for difficult problems. A major benefit of the program is that own employees are trained to become project leaders for improvement. Several people from the primary process were thus stimulated and equipped to become role models for continuous improvement. PMID:23011073

Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; de Jong, Laura J; Wendt, Klaus W; Does, Ronald J M M

2012-01-01

352

Seroepidemiology of Varicella Zoster Virus among children, adolescents and medical students in a referral children medical center, Tehran, Iran  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective Varicella is a benign childhood infection with considerable complication in none immune adults. The aim of this study was to survey Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) seroepidemiology in children, adolescents and medical students in Children Medical Center, Tehran, Iran. Material and Methods In this cross sectional study, serum sample of children, adolescents 10 to 18 years old and medical students 18 to 25 years old were tested for VZV IgG with a commercial ELISA kit. Results A total of 412 individuals who were 10 to 25 years of age participated in this study. Overall 269 individuals (65.3%) were seropositive for VZV IgG. Seroprevalence of VZV antibody increased with age of participants, from 59% in 10-11years children to 80% in 20-21 years old young adult students, except in 22-23 and 24-25 years old, whom the frequency of positive results decreased interestingly to 41.7 and 52.8%, respectively. Prevalence of positive VZV antibody between two genders was not statistically different. Conclusion On-going monitoring of the seroepidemilogy of VZV is necessary to assess trends of infection in the community. A considerable proportion of young medical students in this study were still susceptible to VZV and consequent complications. PMID:23066488

Pourakbari, B; Shahbaznezhad, L; Parvaneh, N; Nikkhah, S; Mahmoudi, S; Teymuri, M; Alyari, AE; Mamishi, S

2012-01-01

353

Mentoring programs for medical students - a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although mentoring is acknowledged as a key to successful and satisfying careers in medicine, formal mentoring programs for medical students are lacking in most countries. Within the framework of planning a mentoring program for medical students at Zurich University, an investigation was carried out into what types of programs exist, what the objectives pursued by such programs are, and

Esther Frei; Martina Stamm; Barbara Buddeberg-Fischer

2010-01-01

354

A research program in medical physics for remote students.  

PubMed

The University of Adelaide in co-operation with the Royal Adelaide Hospital offers a degree of Master of Science (Medical Physics) which is available both to students resident in Adelaide and to remote students employed in hospitals in Australia or New Zealand. The program comprises research carried out in the work place, and courses delivered from Adelaide. The courses Radiation Biology, Protection and Epidemiology and Radiotherapy Physics are currently delivered on-line. A project has commenced to modify the presentation of all courses so that remote students can interact with their fellow students in weekly tutorials and engage in informal discussions through a discussion forum. PMID:16055365

Pollard, Judith

2005-09-01

355

Waste minimization in the Los Alamos Medical Radioisotope Program  

SciTech Connect

Since the mid-1970s the Los Alamos Medical Radioisotope Program has been irradiating target materials to produce and recover radioisotopes for applications in medicine, environmental science, biology, physics, materials research, and other disciplines where radiotracers find utility. By necessity, the chemical processing of targets and the isolation of radioisotopes generates radioactive waste materials. Recent years have brought pressure to discontinue the use of hazardous materials and to minimize radioactive waste volumes. Substantial waste reduction measures have been introduced at the irradiation facility, in processing approaches, and even in the ways the product isotopes are supplied to users.

Taylor, W.A.; Jamriska, D.J.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Phillips, D.R.; Staroski, R.C.; Garcia, J.B.; Garcia, J.G.; Ott, M.A.

1994-04-01

356

76 FR 81947 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP...of the Advisory Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations...making public comments are aware of the fact that their comments (including...

2011-12-29

357

77 FR 4820 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP...of the Advisory Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations...making public comments are aware of the fact that their comments (including...

2012-01-31

358

77 FR 14017 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP...of the Advisory Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations...making public comments are aware of the fact that their comments (including...

2012-03-08

359

76 FR 64088 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NIOSH-248] World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP...of the Advisory Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations...making public comments are aware of the fact that their comments (including...

2011-10-17

360

Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

Kevin Kostelnik

2005-09-01

361

View of Medical Support Room in Mission Control Center during Apollo 16  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. J.F. Zieglschmid, M.D., Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) White Team Surgeon, is seated in the Medical Support Room in the Mission Control Center as he monitors crew biomedical data being received from the Apollo 16 spacecraft on the third day of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission.

1972-01-01

362

Fifteen-year experience with pediatric renal transplantation at the Montefiore Medical Center.  

PubMed

At Montefiore Medical Center, 140 pediatric recipients have received 155 renal allografts over a 16-year period with an overall 6% mortality. Graft survival was not significantly different based upon race or sex of recipient. Graft survival was significantly better for first time transplants and the youngest recipients. Graft survival was significantly improved using Tacrolimus immunosuppression. PMID:11512310

Greenstein, S; Sloane, J; Denny, J; Prowse, O; Harvey, J; Feuerstein, D; Schechner, R; Principe, A; Tellis, V

2000-01-01

363

The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

2008-01-01

364

HAWAII MEDICAL JOURNAL, VOL 64, MARCH 2005 Cancer Research Center Hotline  

E-print Network

HAWAII MEDICAL JOURNAL, VOL 64, MARCH 2005 77 Cancer Research Center Hotline Joe W. Ramos Ph with type II diabetes4 . In this work they report that PEA-15 expression inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose, and breast cancers. Indeed PEA-15 is reported to be overexpressed in some gliomas and breast cancer cell

Ramos, Joe W.

365

Gondishapur School of Medicine: The Most Important Medical Center in Antiquity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Iran has a rich civilization and a long history during which medical science flourished at specific periods. For instance, medicine blossomed in Sassanids era (226 - 652 AD). One of the most remarkable cultural and scientific centers of Sassanids era was the city of Gondishapur located in the south-west Iran in Shah-Abad near Susa in Khuzestan Province. The city was

Mohammad-Hossein Azizi

366

Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

2009-01-01

367

STANFORD PATHOLOGY RESIDENT/FELLOW HANDBOOK 2011-12 Stanford University Medical Center  

E-print Network

STANFORD PATHOLOGY RESIDENT/FELLOW HANDBOOK 2011-12 1 Stanford University Medical Center Department of Pathology Resident and Clinical Fellow Handbook 2012-2013 300 Pasteur Drive Lane Bldg., Room L-235 Stanford, CA 93205-5324 Ph (650) 725-8383 Fx (650) 725-6902 #12;STANFORD PATHOLOGY RESIDENT/FELLOW HANDBOOK

Bogyo, Matthew

368

An Information-Centric Framework for Designing Patient-Centered Medical Decision Aids and Risk Communication  

E-print Network

An Information-Centric Framework for Designing Patient-Centered Medical Decision Aids and Risk decision aids have met with success. Such decision aids typically have been designed for a general population and evaluated based on whether or not users of the decision aid can accurately report the data

Shneiderman, Ben

369

Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

Behkami, Nima A.

2012-01-01

370

TITLE: HIPAA PRIVACY AND INFORMATION SECURITY TRAINING FOR COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER WORKFORCE  

E-print Network

"Compliance") and select training module TC0019 (HIPAA: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act or mental health or condition, related health care services or payment for health care servicesTITLE: HIPAA PRIVACY AND INFORMATION SECURITY TRAINING FOR COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

Grishok, Alla

371

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) HIPAA Compliance/Columbia University Medical Center  

E-print Network

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) HIPAA Compliance/Columbia University Medical Center 601 West 168th Street, Apt. #22, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10032/ T(212) 342-0059 F(212 sustancias controladas o de bebidas alcohólicas, salud mental o psiquiatría pueden tener requisitos de

Grishok, Alla

372

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) HIPAA Compliance/Columbia University Medical Center  

E-print Network

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) HIPAA Compliance/Columbia University information for will be requested. · Alcohol or substance abuse, mental health or psychiatry notes may have Medical Center 601 West 168th Street, Apt. #22, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10032/ T(212) 342-0059 F(212

Champagne, Frances A.

373

Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

2007-01-01

374

Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence  

E-print Network

University, Sweden Medical Education Building, Seminar Room 10, 4:00 p.m. Neural Transplantation in Parkinson in Brain Development, Plasticity, and Disease November 24-25, 1997 Satellite Symposium for the Society and Other Diffusible Signals in Brain Development, Plasticity, and Disease," is being organized by Drs. R

375

75 FR 39622 - Proposed Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment Form) Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Form 10-0505 will be used to allow claimants with medical care copayment debts to pay online with a credit card or Automated Clearing House transaction. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a...

2010-07-09

376

Managing knowledge and technology to foster innovation at the Ohio State University Medical Center.  

PubMed

Biomedical knowledge is expanding at an unprecedented rate-one that is unlikely to slow anytime in the future. While the volume and scope of this new knowledge poses significant organizational challenges, it creates tremendous opportunities to release and direct its power to the service of significant goals. The authors explain how the Center for Knowledge Management at The Ohio State University Medical Center, created during the academic year 2003-04, is doing just that by integrating numerous resource-intensive, technology-based initiatives-including personnel, services and infrastructure, digital repositories, data sets, mobile computing devices, high-tech patient simulators, computerized testing, and interactive multimedia-in a way that enables the center to provide information tailored to the needs of students, faculty and staff on the medical center campus and its surrounding health sciences colleges. The authors discuss how discovering, applying, and sharing new knowledge, information assets, and technologies in this way is a collaborative process. This process creates open-ended opportunities for innovation and a roadmap for working toward seamless integration, synergy, and substantial enhancement of the academic medical center's research, educational, and clinical mission areas. PMID:16249301

Cain, Timothy J; Rodman, Ruey L; Sanfilippo, Fred; Kroll, Susan M

2005-11-01

377

Challenges and Opportunities to Improve Cervical Cancer Screening Rates in US Health Centers through Patient-Centered Medical Home Transformation  

PubMed Central

Over the last 50 years, the incidence of cervical cancer has dramatically decreased. However, health disparities in cervical cancer screening (CCS) persist for women from racial and ethnic minorities and those residing in rural and poor communities. For more than 45 years, federally funded health centers (HCs) have been providing comprehensive, culturally competent, and quality primary health care services to medically underserved communities and vulnerable populations. To enhance the quality of care and to ensure more women served at HCs are screened for cervical cancer, over eight HCs received funding to support patient-centered medical home (PCMH) transformation with goals to increase CCS rates. The study conducted a qualitative analysis using Atlas.ti software to describe the barriers and challenges to CCS and PCMH transformation, to identify potential solutions and opportunities, and to examine patterns in barriers and solutions proposed by HCs. Interrater reliability was assessed using Cohen's Kappa. The findings indicated that HCs more frequently described patient-level barriers to CCS, including demographic, cultural, and health belief/behavior factors. System-level barriers were the next commonly cited, particularly failure to use the full capability of electronic medical records (EMRs) and problems coordinating with external labs or providers. Provider-level barriers were least frequently cited. PMID:25685561

Makaroff, Laura; Chung, Michelle; Lin, Sue C.

2015-01-01

378

IU HEALTH ARNETT ONCOLOGICAL SCIENCES CENTER MEDICAL RESEARCH ADVOCATE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

a cure for cancer is the goal of cancer researchers everywhere. The participation of cancer patients in clinical trials is essential to advancing cancer research; however, the decision to participate is not always easy. Former cancer patients can be indispensable advocates and translators for patients

Ginzel, Matthew

379

University of Washington Medical Center Living Donor Program  

E-print Network

with important information to help evaluate your potential as living kidney donor also to help and support you of your kidneys? 2. How long have you been contemplating this decision? 3. What do you know at this time about being a living kidney donor? Where did you obtain this information? #12;University of Washington

Borenstein, Elhanan

380

The Effects of Corporatization on Academic Medical Centers. How Will the Corporatization of Health Care Influence Health Professions Education?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Areas of agreement/conflict between academic medical centers and investor owned corporations are considered. Academic medical centers are part of the university system, which is responsible for education, research, and the related public good (e.g., nurturing of professions). Major areas for a potential confluence of interest between the academic…

Dunn, Marvin R.

381

Qualitative and Political Issues Impacting Academic Medical Center Strategic Planning--A Methodological Approach. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simulation model of an academic medical center that was developed to aid in strategic planning and policy analysis is described. The model, designated MCM for Medical Center Model, was implemented at the School of Medicine, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the private practices of the faculty in the clinical departments at University…

Kutina, Kenneth L.; And Others

382

Developing the role of the preceptor in clinical pastoral education at Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project-dissertation, Developing the Role of the Preceptor in Clinical Pastoral Education at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center Fort Gordon, Georgia, as an act of ministry, was to advance the role of the Preceptor in Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) in the Department of Ministry and Pastoral Care (DMPC), at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center (DDEAMC), Fort Gordon, Georgia.

Matthew Serge Wysocki

2004-01-01

383

Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

384

Comparing medical knowledge of osteopathic medical trainees in DO and MD programs: a random effect meta-analysis.  

PubMed

The authors used random effect meta-analysis to synthesize eight mean score differences of the Part III/Level 3 examinations of the national Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) between osteopathic medical trainees in DO residency programs and osteopathic medical trainees in MD programs. The analysis involved 6001 trainees and all Part III or Level 3 examinations since 1992. The average mean score difference was not significantly different from zero; however, the estimates of true effect sizes of each examination varied substantially. The findings indicate that, overall, medical knowledge of osteopathic trainees in MD and DO residency programs is compatible at the time they took the examinations. However, a large variation of effect size suggests the need for further investigation of the factors other than difference between osteopathic and allopathic training programs. PMID:9232947

Shen, L; Cavalieri, T; Clearfield, M; Smoley, J

1997-06-01

385

Clinical Research Fellowship in Joint Reconstruction at Rush University Medical Center -Orthogate Written by Rush Joints Research Fellowship  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Fellowship in Joint Reconstruction at Rush University Medical Center - Orthogate 2013 Dr. Craig Della Valle invites 3rd year medical students to apply for a Clinical Research with Rush orthopaedic residents and faculty. This research position is unique in that the medical student

Bushman, Frederic

386

Community health centers employ diverse staffing patterns, which can provide productivity lessons for medical practices.  

PubMed

Community health centers are at the forefront of ambulatory care practices in their use of nonphysician clinicians and team-based primary care. We examined medical staffing patterns, the contributions of different types of staff to productivity, and the factors associated with staffing at community health centers across the United States. We identified four different staffing patterns: typical, high advanced-practice staff, high nursing staff, and high other medical staff. Overall, productivity per staff person was similar across the four staffing patterns. We found that physicians make the greatest contributions to productivity, but advanced-practice staff, nurses, and other medical staff also contribute. Patterns of community health center staffing are driven by numerous factors, including the concentration of clinicians in communities, nurse practitioner scope-of-practice laws, and patient characteristics such as insurance status. Our findings suggest that other group medical practices could incorporate more nonphysician staff without sacrificing productivity and thus profitability. However, the new staffing patterns that evolve may be affected by characteristics of the practice location or the types of patients served. PMID:25561649

Ku, Leighton; Frogner, Bianca K; Steinmetz, Erika; Pittman, Patricia

2015-01-01

387

75 FR 10225 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Language Resource Centers Program...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Language Resource Centers Program; Notice Inviting...Description Purpose of Program: The Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides...capacity for teaching and learning foreign languages. Priorities: This notice contains...

2010-03-05

388

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs - Cancer Information Service  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute�s (NCI) Cancer Information Service (CIS) educates the public about cancer prevention, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and research . CIS information specialists provide the latest, most accurate information about cancer by telephone, TTY, instant messaging, and e-mail and operates the NCI�s Smoking Quitline. Through its Partnership Program, the CIS works with established national, regional, and state organizations to reach those most in need of cancer information.

389

The Medical College of Wisconsin Senior Mentor Program: Experience of a Lifetime  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Senior Mentor Program (SMP) has been offered to a small group of first and second year medical students as a course alternative to the traditional physician mentor program. The program links students with healthy older adult mentors and includes mentor/student visits, didactic sessions, written assignments,…

Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Bedinghaus, Joan

2006-01-01

390

Residential Environmental Education Center Program Evaluation: An Ongoing Challenge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Residential environmental education centers (REECs) have been criticized for their lack of quality program evaluation. However, the last national study done on the practices of REECs was Chenery and Hammerman's (1985) research. This article presents the results of a national survey of directors of REECs (n = 114) that gives insight into the…

Bourke, Nicholas; Buskist, Connie; Herron, Julie

2014-01-01

391

Polylog: Are Writing Center Directors Writing Program Administrators?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As Composition Studies has grown as a discipline over the last quarter century, the field has wrestled with defining and naming disciplinary expertise and professional positions. At first glance, issues of naming may not appear worthy of debate, and so whether an individual writing center director identifies as a writing program administrator…

Ianetta, Melissa; Bergman, Linda; Fitzgerald, Lauren; Haviland, Carol Peterson; Lebduska, Lisa; Wislocki, Mary

2006-01-01

392

Maryland Summer Scholars Program Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research,  

E-print Network

Maryland Summer Scholars Program Maryland Center for Undergraduate Research, 2100D McKeldin Library;www.ugresearch.umd.edu www.ugresearch.umd.edu Maryland Summer Scholars supports UMD undergraduates who will be enrolled for fall semester 2015. · Must plan to be enrolled at Maryland for fall semester 2015 · All

Lathrop, Daniel P.

393

Help Neighborhood Center Program, School Year 1975-1976.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report evaluated the impact of the Help-Neighborhood Center Program which was designed to inform parents of fifth through eighth grade students about health problems and community concerns. Four thousand elementary and junior high school students and 100 parents participated in workshops on venereal disease, drug abuse, welfare rights, mental…

Siperstein, Gary N.

394

Water Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs  

E-print Network

Water Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs Vol. 26 No.1 February 1994 UWIN offers forum for water information Register now for conference Sixth annual festival set for March J/Ogallala. Water for a Dry Land" reviewed- Page 3 Calendar of water-related events - Page 4

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

395

Water Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs  

E-print Network

Water Current University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs wASTEmanagement problem focus of '95 seminars Vol. 26 No.6 December 1994 Inside Water Glossary Page 3 ·1995 Water Conference challenge Page 7 "Water Quality and the Waste Management Hierarchy" is the topic for the 1995 Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

396

TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS PROGRAM OF THE MID-AMERICA EARTHQUAKE CENTER  

E-print Network

in the central United States. Damage to river, port, and waterfront structures due to liquefaction, lateral, could cripple the transport of goods across the central United States and impact shipping1 TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS PROGRAM OF THE MID-AMERICA EARTHQUAKE CENTER By: Timothy D. Stark

397

Asia Society Hong Kong Center March 2010 Program  

E-print Network

from social media platforms such as blogs, wikis, emails, instant messages and tags. For example intelligence and social computing. Dr. King received his B.Sc. degree from the California InstituteAsia Society Hong Kong Center March 2010 Program How Social Computing Impacts Society A Luncheon

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

398

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 303 Acoustics - overview was a quantitative comparison of the flow predictions, including on-blade pressure spectra and wake velocity data (Fluent LES or CDP). Neither flow solution was found to be in very good agreement in wake and spectral

Prinz, Friedrich B.

399

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 3 Hypersonics - overview Six and transition to turbulence in hypersonic boundary layers, to schemes for studying the effects of detailed. Their method is applied to a study of instability modes in the wake of a bump. Results for the cold flow

Prinz, Friedrich B.

400

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 251 LES of two-phase reacting, a mesoscopic Eulerian approach for the dispersed droplet phase and a thickened flame model for turbulence, wall bouncing of droplets and droplet-wake combustion. However, the EE approach is sometimes pre

Prinz, Friedrich B.

401

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 55 Bi-global secondary streaks lead to strong convective shear-layer instabilities in the wake of the roughness element. The 2-D for investigating the first stage of laminar-turbulent transition in incompressible as well as compressible shear

Prinz, Friedrich B.

402

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 331 LES of the trailing-wire in the wake. The LES predicts the wake thickness and deficit much better than the RANS and is the only one of Siegen is first sum- marized in the next section. The collected data so far involve lift and wake

Prinz, Friedrich B.

403

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012 107 Prediction of unsteady on local mesh refinement in the near wake of the cylinder using an estimate of subgrid scale (SGS. Introduction The dynamics of a passive scalar transported by a background turbulent flow are of- ten used

Wang, Wei

404

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2000  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2000 75 Optimization of trailing model the wake of airplanes in landing configuration. For the case of two pairs, the evolution strategy model aircraft wakes in landing configuration (Spalart 1998, see Fig. 1). Some of these vortices quickly

Cottet, Georges-Henri

405

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012  

E-print Network

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012 157 Large eddy simulation. In the case of downwind turbines, the presence of the tower wake alters the angle of attack as the rotor blades move in and out of the wake. In a wind farm, wakes from upstream turbines can affect the angle

Wang, Wei

406

3rd Annual Program Retreat Center for Molecular Genetics Auditorium  

E-print Network

3rd Annual Program Retreat Center for Molecular Genetics Auditorium June 3, 2010 9:00 am ­ 5:15 pm Adler Chair for Research on Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases, Laboratory of Genetics, The Salk (Gleeson Lab) "Ciliopathies: Molecular and Genetic Basis for AHI1 in Retinal Degeneration" 2:45 pm Faculty

Krstic, Miroslav

407

Learning Together: A Family-Centered Literacy Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock, North Carolina serves a rapidly growing Hispanic population through its Family-Centered Literacy Program. The Hispanic population in the region has been increasing at a staggering rate of 50% per year, most of which is in-migration. These newcomers frequently face challenges adjusting to their jobs,…

Sink, David W.; Parkhill, Molly A.; Marshall, Rick; Norwood, Steve

2005-01-01

408

Interviewing Child Care Providers: Centers and Daycares Program Setup  

E-print Network

or on vacation? How does the center cover their absence? Parent Involvement 1) Is parent participation required involved? 3) Are parents welcome to drop in unannounced at any time? 4) Does the program offer parent priority when they apply? 10) What is the holiday or vacation schedule? 11) Are parents charged when

Ohta, Shigemi

409

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

condition is found to have an extraneous sound source at low frequencies on top of the trailing-edge noiseCenter for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 317 LES of the trailing-edge flow and noise of a NACA0012 airfoil near stall By S. Moreau, J. Christophe AND M. Roger¶ Reynolds

Prinz, Friedrich B.

410

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-print Network

was previously shown to provide a reasonably accurate trailing-edge flow for noise predictions at a lower to experiment. 1. Introduction Trailing-edge noise or broadband self-noise, caused by the scattering of boundaryCenter for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008 305 LES of the trailing-edge

Prinz, Friedrich B.

411

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012  

E-print Network

)). Wan and Karniadakis introduced an adaptive class of methods for solving the discontinuity issuesCenter for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012 209 Adaptive strategy, this method allows an adaptive refinement/derefinement in both physical and stochastic space for time

Wang, Wei

412

Lessons learned and two years clinical experience in implementing the Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support (MDIS) System at Madigan Army Medical Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support System at Madigan Army Medical Center has been operational in a phase approach since March 1992. Since then, nearly all image acquisition has been digital with progressively increasing primary soft copy diagnosis utilized. Nearly four terabytes of data will have been archived in compressed form by the two year anniversary including more than 300,000 Computed Radiography images.

Smith, Donald V.; Smith, Suzy; Bender, Gregory N.; Carter, Jon R.; Cawthon, Michael A.; Leckie, Robert G.; Weiser, John C.; Romlein, John R.; Goeringer, Fred

1994-05-01

413

The AI:MS (Addiction Illness : Medical Solutions) office at Columbia University Medical Center is committed to preventing and addressing addictive behaviors, promoting healthy communities  

E-print Network

AI:MS The AI:MS (Addiction Illness : Medical Solutions) office at Columbia University Medical Center is committed to preventing and addressing addictive behaviors, promoting healthy communities intervention services, and build coalitions to address health issues associated with the spectrum of addictive

Grishok, Alla

414

Langley Research Center Metrology Program status for fiscal year 1987  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The status of the Langley Research Center's metrology program for fiscal year 1987 is presented. The NASA Metrology Information System, which was operational for the entire year, provided the majority of performance data describing work analysis, turnaround time, out-of-tolerance instrument data, and other instrument service data. Calibration system development, equipment replacing and updating, status of last year's planned objectives, and Reference Standard certification requirements are described. The status of the LaRC voltage and resistance measurement assurance program and the agency-wide resistance program are reviewed. Progress on fiscal year 1987 objectives is discussed and fiscal year 1988 objectives are stated.

Kern, Frederick A.

1988-01-01

415

Peer-to-Peer JXTA Architecture for Continuing Mobile Medical Education Incorporated in Rural Public Health Centers  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Mobile technology helps to improve continuing medical education; this includes all aspects of public health care as well as keeping one’s knowledge up-to-date. The program of continuing medical and health education is intertwined with mobile health technology, which forms an imperative component of national strategies in health. Continuing mobile medical education (CMME) programs are designed to ensure that all medical and health-care professionals stay up-to-date with the knowledge required through mobile JXTA to appraise modernized strategies so as to achieve national goals of health-care information distribution. Methods: In this study, a 20-item questionnaire was distributed to 280 health professionals practicing traditional training learning methodologies (180 nurses, 60 doctors, and 40 health inspectors) in 25 rural hospitals. Among the 83% respondents, 56% are eager to take new learning methodologies as part of their evaluation, which is considered for promotion to higher grades, increments, or as part of their work-related activities. Results: The proposed model was executed in five public health centers in which nurses and health inspectors registered in the JXTA network were referred to the record peer group by administrators. A mobile training program on immunization was conducted through the ADVT, with the lectures delivered on their mobiles. Credits are given after taking the course and completing an evaluation test. The system is faster compared with traditional learning. Conclusion: Medical knowledge management and mobile-streaming application support the CMME system through JXTA. The mobile system includes online lectures and practice quizzes, as well as assignments and interactions with health professionals. Evaluation and assessments are done online and credits certificates are provided based on the score the student obtains. The acceptance of mobile JXTA peer-to-peer learning has created a drastic change in learning methods among rural health professionals. The professionals undergo training and should pass an exam in order to obtain the credits. The system is controlled and monitored by the administrator peer group, which makes it more flexible and structured. Compared with traditional learning system, enhanced study improves cloud-based mobile medical education technology. PMID:24159539

Rajasekaran, Rajkumar; Iyengar, Nallani Chackravatula Sriman Narayana

2013-01-01

416

MRSA USA300 at Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, 2000–2006  

PubMed Central

To determine whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA300 commonly caused infections among Alaska Natives, we examined clinical MRSA isolates from the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, during 2000–2006. Among Anchorage-region residents, USA300 was a minor constituent among MRSA isolates in 2000–2003 (11/68, 16%); by 2006, USA300 was the exclusive genotype identified (10/10). PMID:22264651

Rudolph, Karen M.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Zychowski, Diana L.; Asthi, Karthik; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

2012-01-01

417

Prospects for rebuilding primary care using the patient-centered medical home.  

PubMed

Existing research suggests that models of enhanced primary care lead to health care systems with better performance. What the research does not show is whether such an approach is feasible or likely to be effective within the U.S. health care system. Many commentators have adopted the model of the patient-centered medical home as policy shorthand to address the reinvention of primary care in the United States. We analyze potential barriers to implementing the medical home model for policy makers and practitioners. Among others, these include developing new payment models, as well as the need for up-front funding to assemble the personnel and infrastructure required by an enhanced non-visit-based primary care practice and methods to facilitate transformation of existing practices to functioning medical homes. PMID:20439868

Landon, Bruce E; Gill, James M; Antonelli, Richard C; Rich, Eugene C

2010-05-01

418

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Benefits for Patients and Participating Institutions  

Cancer.gov

The community cancer centers that are part of the NCCCP pilot already provide comprehensive cancer screening and prevention services, and medical, surgical, and radiation oncology services for patients with cancer. Through the pilot program, patients can expect to have their care coordinated through a multidisciplinary planning group, receive assistance from �patient navigators�, and have more opportunities to join clinical trials for cancer prevention and treatment. Special focus will be placed on the psychosocial needs of patients and on enhancing services for cancer survivors.

419

History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

2010-01-01

420

[Bioethics in medical institutions--new custom or help? The example of clinical ethics consultation at a University Medical Center].  

PubMed

Although ethics committees are well established in the medical sciences for human clinical trials, animal research and scientific integrity, the development of clinical ethics in German hospitals started much later during the first decade of the twenty-first century. Clinical ethics consultation should be pragmatic and problem-centered and can be defined as an ethically qualified and informed conflict management within a given legal framework to deal with and resolve value-driven, normative problems in the care of patients. Clinical ethics consultations enable shared clinical decision-making of all parties (e.g. clinicians, patients, family and surrogates) involved in a particular patient's care. The clinical ethicist does not act as an ethics expert by making independent recommendations or decisions; therefore, the focus is different from other medical consultants. Ethics consultation was first established by healthcare ethics committees (HEC) or clinical ethics consultation (CEC) groups which were called in to respond to an ethically problematic situation. To avoid ethical dilemmas or crises and to act preventively with regard to ethical issues in individual patients, an ethics liaison service is an additional option to ethics case consultations which take place on a regular basis by scheduled ethics rounds during the normal ward rounds. The presence of the ethicist offers some unique advantages: it allows early recognition of even minor ethical problems and accommodates the dynamics of ethical and clinical goal-setting in the course of patient care. Most importantly, regular and non-authoritative participation of the ethicist in normal ward rounds allows continuous ethical education of the staff within the everyday clinical routine. By facilitating clinical ethical decision-making, the ethicist seeks to empower physicians and medical staff to deal appropriately with ethical problems by themselves. Because of this proactive approach, the ethics liaison service can make a significant contribution to preventative ethics in reducing the number of emerging ethical problems to the satisfaction of all parties involved. PMID:24902533

Richter, G

2014-08-01

421

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01

422

Contingency Operations Support to NASA Johnson Space Center Medical Operations Division  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wyle Laboratories Contingency Operations Group provides support to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Medical Operations Division in the event of a space flight vehicle accident or JSC mishap. Support includes development of Emergency Medical System (EMS) requirements, procedures, training briefings and real-time support of mishap investigations. The Contingency Operations Group is compliant with NASA documentation that provides guidance in these areas and maintains contact with the United States Department of Defense (DOD) to remain current on military plans to support NASA. The contingency group also participates in Space Operations Medical Support Training Courses (SOMSTC) and represents the NASA JSC Medical Operations Division at contingency exercises conducted worldwide by the DOD or NASA. The events of September 11, 2001 have changed how this country prepares and protects itself from possible terrorist attacks on high-profile targets. As a result, JSC is now considered a high-profile target and thus, must prepare for and develop a response to a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) incident. The Wyle Laboratories Contingency Operations Group supports this plan, specifically the medical response, by providing expertise and manpower.

Stepaniak, Philip; Patlach, Bob; Swann, Mark; Adams, Adrien

2005-01-01

423

[Profile of exposure to medication among women of reproductive age attended in a Toxicologial Information Center].  

PubMed

The scope of this article is to analyze the epidemiological data relating to exposure to medication among women of reproductive age attended at a Toxicology Information Center. A study was conducted among women of reproductive age exposed to medication between 2007 and 2011. The variables relating to the patients, the occurrence and the medication involved were studied in a total of 777 notified cases. Data was collected from Aggravated Injury Notification System forms and processed on Epi Info for Windows software. The majority of the occurrences (90.5%) was intentional, 33.7% of theses incidents involved the intake of 2 or 3 types of drugs by the patients and the percentile of hospitalization was 35.6%. Drugs acting on the central nervous system were responsible for 59.9% of the incidents, and antidepressants (21.3%) and anti-epileptics (21.2%) were most commonly involved. The main factors associated with hospitalization were: delayed medical rescue after exposure, patients with higher education, ingestion of 2 or 3 types of drugs and exposure to anti-epileptics and antidepressants. Data from this study showed that exposure to medication is a serious health problem for women of reproductive age and it contributes to the increase in the number of hospitalizations. PMID:24820602

Takahama, Carina Harumi; Turini, Conceição Aparecida; Girotto, Edmarlon

2014-04-01

424

Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology and Patient Centered Medical Home Recognition Survey Results  

PubMed Central

Objective Determine the factors that impact HIT use and MU readiness for community health centers (CHCs). Background The HITECH Act allocates funds to Medicaid and Medicare providers to encourage the adoption of electronic health records (EHR), in an effort to improve health care quality and patient outcomes, and to reduce health care costs. Methods We surveyed CHCs on their Readiness for Meaningful Use (MU) of Health Information Technology (HIT) and Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Recognition, then we combined responses with 2009 Uniform Data System data to determine which factors impact use of HIT and MU readiness. Results Nearly 70% of CHCs had full or partial EHR adoption at the time of survey. Results are presented for centers with EHR adoption, by the length of time that their EHR systems have been in operation. PMID:24834365

Shin, Peter; Sharac, Jessica

2013-01-01

425

NASA's Human Research Program at The Glenn Research Center: Progress and Opportunities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Human Research Program is aimed at correcting problems in critical areas that place NASA human spaceflight missions at risk due to shortfalls in astronaut health, safety and performance. The Glenn Research Center (GRC) and partners from Ohio are significant contributors to this effort. This presentation describes several areas of GRC emphasis, the first being NASA s path to creating exercise hardware requirements and protocols that mitigate the effects of long duration spaceflight. Computational simulations will be a second area that is discussed. This includes deterministic models that simulate the effects of spaceflight on the human body, as well as probabilistic models that bound and quantify the probability that adverse medical incidents will happen during an exploration mission. Medical technology development for exploration will be the final area to be discussed.

Nall, Marsha; Griffin, DeVon; Myers, Jerry; Perusek, Gail

2008-01-01

426

Health & Medical Journalism Concentration: Grady College MA Non-Thesis Program Planning Form  

E-print Network

Health & Medical Journalism Concentration: Grady College MA Non-Thesis Program Planning Form Methodology in Mass Communication 3. JRMC 7355 ( ) Health and Medical Journalism 4. JRMC 7356 ( ) Advanced Health and Medical Journalism Co-requisite for Concentration ­ for students with limited undergraduate

Arnold, Jonathan

427

Use of NBME and USMLE Examinations to Evaluate Medical Education Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Criteria are presented for determining whether licensure and/or achievement test results should be used for making various types of comparisons and judgments about medical education programs. The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) and National Board of Medical Examiners tests (NBME) are then considered as data sources. (Author/MSE)

Williams, Reed G.

1993-01-01

428

Training medical students in the social determinants of health: the Health Scholars Program at Puentes de Salud  

PubMed Central

Purpose Given the large influence of social conditions on health, physicians may be more effective if they are trained to identify and address social factors that impact health. Despite increasing interest in teaching the social determinants of health in undergraduate medical education, few models exist. Participants and methods We present a 9-month pilot course on the social determinants of health for medical and other health professional students, which is based at Puentes de Salud, Philadelphia, PA, USA, a community health center serving a Latino immigrant population. This service-learning course, called the Health Scholars Program (HSP), was developed and implemented by volunteer medical and public health faculty in partnership with the community-based clinic. The HSP curriculum combines didactic instruction with service experiences at Puentes de Salud and opportunities for critical reflection. The HSP curriculum also includes a longitudinal project where students develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention to address a community-defined need. Results In our quantitative evaluation, students reported high levels of agreement with the HSP meeting stated course goals, including developing an understanding of the social determinants of health and working effectively with peers to implement community-based projects. Qualitative assessments revealed students’ perception of learning more about this topic in the HSP than in their formal medical training and of developing a long-term desire to serve vulnerable communities as a result. Conclusion Our experience with the HSP suggests that partnerships between academic medical centers and community-based organizations can create a feasible, effective, and sustainable platform for teaching medical students about the social determinants of health. Similar medical education programs in the future should seek to achieve a larger scale and to evaluate both students’ educational experiences and community-defined outcomes. PMID:25278787

O’Brien, Matthew J; Garland, Joseph M; Murphy, Katie M; Shuman, Sarah J; Whitaker, Robert C; Larson, Steven C

2014-01-01

429

Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

1999-01-01

430

Quality improvement in healthcare delivery utilizing the patient-centered medical home model.  

PubMed

Despite the fact that the United States dedicates so much of its resources to healthcare, the current healthcare delivery system still faces significant quality challenges. The lack of effective communication and coordination of care services across the continuum of care poses disadvantages for those requiring long-term management of their chronic conditions. This is why the new transformation in healthcare known as the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) can help restore confidence in our population that the healthcare services they receive is of the utmost quality and will effectively enhance their quality of life. Healthcare using the PCMH model is delivered with the patient at the center of the transformation and by reinvigorating primary care. The PCMH model strives to deliver effective quality care while attempting to reduce costs. In order to relieve some of our healthcare system distresses, organizations can modify their delivery of care to be patient centered. Enhanced coordination of services, better provider access, self-management, and a team-based approach to care represent some of the key principles of the PCMH model. Patients that can most benefit are those that require long-term management of their conditions such as chronic disease and behavioral health patient populations. The PCMH is a feasible option for delivery reform as pilot studies have documented successful outcomes. Controversy about the lack of a medical neighborhood has created concern about the overall sustainability of the medical home. The medical home can stand independently and continuously provide enhanced care services as a movement toward higher quality care while organizations and government policy assess what types of incentives to put into place for the full collaboration and coordination of care in the healthcare system. PMID:25529790

Akinci, Fevzi; Patel, Poonam M

2014-01-01

431

Using a Quasi-Experimental Research Design to Assess Knowledge in Continuing Medical Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The objectives of continuing medical education (CME) programs include knowledge acquisition, skill development, clinical reasoning and decision making, and health care outcomes. We conducted a yearlong medical education research study in which knowledge acquisition in our CME programs was assessed. Method: A randomized…

Markert, Ronald J.; O'Neill, Sally C.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

2003-01-01

432

Graduate Medical Education Viewed from the National Intern and Resident Matching Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The total number of applicants for first-year programs in graduate medical education through the National Intern and Resident Matching Program in 1976 exceeded the number of positions offered for the second consecutive year. There were deficits in the number of openings offered in the primary care specialties and surfeits in medical and surgical…

Graettinger, John S.

1976-01-01

433

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs - Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communications Research  

Cancer.gov

The novelty and scope of this initiative reflects the enormous potential of cancer communication to improve health, and NCI's recognition that effective communications can and should be used to narrow the gap between discovery and application and to reduce health disparities among our citizens. It is expected that the Centers' interdisciplinary efforts will result in new theories, methods, and interventions, including those for diverse populations.

434

Upper extremity replantation at a regional medical center: a six-year review.  

PubMed

Trauma to the upper extremity can be a cause of significant morbidity and disability to otherwise productive people. Traumatic amputation can be particularly devastating, but many of these extremities can be saved by replanatation of the amputated parts. We reviewed the upper extremity replantations performed at the Medical Center of Central Georgia in the 6-year period from September 1987 to August 1993. A total of 48 replantations in 39 patients (33 male, six female) were studied: 36 fingers, seven thumbs, two transmetacarpals, one wrist, one forearm, and one brachium. Average patient age was 32.7 years, with a range of 4 to 69 years. All seven thumbs, two transmetacarpals, and three proximal replants survived. Viability of replanted fingers was 56 per cent; however, sharp injuries fared better than crush injuries (62% vs 50%). The success rate improved with experience of the surgeon (85% after 1990). Leeches were used effectively for venous congestion in nine of 13 cases (70%). Results were comparable with those of large academic medical institutions. Replantation of traumatic amputations can be performed with reasonable success at a regional medical center if a qualified surgeon and appropriate ancillary care are available. Results improve with experience of the surgeon and careful patient selection. Successful replantation significantly reduces the morbidity of upper extremity amputations and will continue to be important in the management of the trauma patient. PMID:7661486

Troum, S; Floyd, W E

1995-09-01

435

Columbia University Medical Center researchers find that a new computational approach finds gene that drives aggressive brain cancer  

Cancer.gov

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have combined existing computational tools with a new algorithm called DIGGIT, which 'walks' backward from the master regulators to find the genetic events that drive brain cancer.

436

Total pelvic exenteration: The Albert Einstein College of Medicine\\/Montefiore Medical Center Experience (1987 to 2003)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective.To review the trends, modifications and results of 103 consecutive total pelvic exenterations (TPE) performed at the Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine from 1987 to 2003.

Gary L. Goldberg; Paniti Sukumvanich; Mark H. Einstein; Harriet O. Smith; Patrick S. Anderson; Abbie L. Fields

2006-01-01

437

34 CFR 656.1 - What is the National Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES General § 656...National Resource Centers Program for Foreign Language and Areas Studies or Foreign Language...

2010-07-01

438

34 CFR 656.1 - What is the National Resource Centers Program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTERS PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES General § 656...National Resource Centers Program for Foreign Language and Areas Studies or Foreign Language...

2011-07-01

439

78 FR 45231 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality's (CIHQ's) Hospital Accreditation Program AGENCY...announces our decision to approve the Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality (CIHQ) as a national accrediting organization...

2013-07-26

440

Gondishapur School of Medicine: the most important medical center in antiquity.  

PubMed

Iran has a rich civilization and a long history during which medical science flourished at specific periods. For instance, medicine blossomed in Sassanids era (226 - 652 AD). One of the most remarkable cultural and scientific centers of Sassanids era was the city of Gondishapur located in the south-west Iran in Shah-Abad near Susa in Khuzestan Province. The city was rebuilt in the third century AD, whereupon it soon became the most important scientific focal point of the ancient world. Gondishapur Medical School was a renowned cosmopolitan institution and had a crucial impact upon the further development of Islamic medicine. Actually, at this school, the Greek, Persian, and Indian medical heritage was conserved, developed, and it was then transferred to the Islamic world and subsequently to the West. Gondishapur Hospital was also an excellent model for establishment of hospitals especially in the Islamic countries. Presented here is a brief account of the foundation of Gondishapur School of Medicine and its role in promoting medical science in antiquity. PMID:18154434

Azizi, Mohammad-Hossein

2008-01-01

441

The tele-interpreter service at the Bangkok Hospital Medical Center, Thailand.  

PubMed

Thailand has become one of the most famous medical hub countries, which is reflected in the increasing number of international patients visiting the Bangkok Hospital Medical Center (BMC). In response, the Interpreter Department at BMC has been established to provide translation for non-English speaking patients. Overtime the Interpreter Department frequently reaches maximum capacity when providing prompt services on demand, resulting in long waiting times and delayed medical treatment. BMC has foreseen the necessity to implement a tele-interpreter system via videoconferencing technology to provide effective translations in the medical environment where delay is usually not tolerated. Tele-interpretation allows doctors to simply select a language icon on their Wi-Fi IP telephone to instantly connect to an interpreter. After implementation in 2oo9, the overall customer satisfaction index for the Interpreter Department increased from 64.5% in Quarter 1 to 85.5% in Quarter 3 of 2011. The tele-interpretation system is currently the closest approximation to the face-to-face interpretation method. PMID:24228346

Jaroensawat, Boonthida; Wankijcharoen, Somsak

2013-01-01

442

An intelligent operating room of the future – an interview with the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on an interview with the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, which is currently building a new facility to include an intelligent operating room (OR). UCLA’s goals for the intelligent operating room are to lead the development of the latest robotic and computer-assisted medical and biomedical devices and technology, to have a flexible broad intelligence of space

Joanne Pransky

2001-01-01

443

Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.  

PubMed

This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise. PMID:25108980

Dhawan, Naveen

2014-01-01

444

Development of a Comprehensive Surgical Information System at Madigan Army Medical Center.  

PubMed

The Operative Registry (DA Form 4108) has been the information source for surgical data supporting quality assurance and utilization review efforts at Madigan Army Medical Center. Recently, Madigan's requirements for data and reporting changed. Like other government medical facilities, Madigan began pervasive quality-improvement efforts. This resulted in new ideas to measure hospital performance. Consequently, requirements for surgical data required to support quality and resource management reporting, utilization review, residency review reporting, research and credentialing changed. This article details Madigan's approach to addressing these requirements via development of a comprehensive computing solution. It discusses Madigan's fragmented data environment before system development, and gives the reader perspective on the decision-making process that led to system development rather than purchasing a commercial product. Finally, the article describes how a strong partnership between staff and developers was key to providing a solution that exceeded established goals. PMID:8637644

Westbrook, M L; Dunn, S E; Wilcox-Riggs, S

1996-03-01

445

Risk of colon perforation during colonoscopy at Baylor University Medical Center  

PubMed Central

Colonoscopy is an important procedure in preventing colon cancer. The risk of colonic perforation during colonoscopy at the Baylor University Medical Center (BUMC) Gastrointestinal Laboratory was chosen as a surrogate marker for the safety of colonoscopy. A recent 2-year experience at BUMC was examined and compared with reports in the medical literature. The results are presented here along with a discussion of problems inherent with different health care systems and their ability to accurately track complications. It was concluded that colonoscopy at BUMC is as safe as that reported by comparable health care systems. The risk of perforation at BUMC was 0.57 per 1000 procedures or 1 in 1750 colonoscopies. Continued efforts to make colonoscopy safer are needed. PMID:25552784

2015-01-01

446

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01

447

Integrating with users is one thing, but living with them? a case study on loss of space from the Medical Center Library, University of California, San Diego  

PubMed Central

The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is the primary hospital for the UCSD School of Medicine. The UCSD Medical Center Library (MCL), a branch of the campus's biomedical library, is located on the medical center campus. In 2007, the medical center administration made a request to MCL for space in its facility to relocate pharmacy administration from the hospital tower. The university librarian brought together a team of library managers to deliberate and develop a proposal, which ultimately accommodated the medical center's request and enhanced some of MCL's public services. PMID:20098651

Haynes, Craig

2010-01-01

448

Marshall Space Flight Center's Virtual Reality Applications Program 1993  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Virtual Reality (VR) applications program has been under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since 1989. Other NASA Centers, most notably Ames Research Center (ARC), have contributed to the development of the VR enabling technologies and VR systems. This VR technology development has now reached a level of maturity where specific applications of VR as a tool can be considered. The objectives of the MSFC VR Applications Program are to develop, validate, and utilize VR as a Human Factors design and operations analysis tool and to assess and evaluate VR as a tool in other applications (e.g., training, operations development, mission support, teleoperations planning, etc.). The long-term goals of this technology program is to enable specialized Human Factors analyses earlier in the hardware and operations development process and develop more effective training and mission support systems. The capability to perform specialized Human Factors analyses earlier in the hardware and operations development process is required to better refine and validate requirements during the requirements definition phase. This leads to a more efficient design process where perturbations caused by late-occurring requirements changes are minimized. A validated set of VR analytical tools must be developed to enable a more efficient process for the design and development of space systems and operations. Similarly, training and mission support systems must exploit state-of-the-art computer-based technologies to maximize training effectiveness and enhance mission support. The approach of the VR Applications Program is to develop and validate appropriate virtual environments and associated object kinematic and behavior attributes for specific classes of applications. These application-specific environments and associated simulations will be validated, where possible, through empirical comparisons with existing, accepted tools and methodologies. These validated VR analytical tools will then be available for use in the design and development of space systems and operations and in training and mission support systems.

Hale, Joseph P., II

1993-01-01

449

Evaluation of an instructional program for improving medication compliance for chronically mentally ill outpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outpatient medication adherence is a major problem, especially for patients repeatedly hospitalized for psychiatric disorders. This study included 39 such patients who were receiving case management services from a community mental health center. Patients were matched and randomly assigned to receive in a single session either (1) information regarding medication and its benefits, (2) guidelines for assuring adherence which encompassed

Nathan H. Azrin; Gordon Teichner

1998-01-01

450

Clostridium difficile-associated disease: Adherence with current guidelines at a tertiary medical center  

PubMed Central

AIM: To assess adherence with the the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA)/ the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for management of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)-associated disease (CDAD) at a tertiary medical center. METHODS: All positive C. difficile stool toxin assays in adults between May 2010 and May 2011 at the University of Maryland Medical Center were identified. CDAD episodes were classified as guideline adherent or non-adherent and these two groups were compared to determine demographic and clinical factors predictive of adherence. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of multiple predictors on guideline adherence. RESULTS: 320 positive C. difficile stool tests were identified in 290 patients. Stratified by disease severity criteria set forth by the SHEA/IDSA guidelines, 42.2% of cases were mild-moderate, 48.1% severe, and 9.7% severe-complicated. Full adherence with the guidelines was observed in only 43.4% of cases. Adherence was 65.9% for mild-moderate CDAD, which was significantly better than in severe cases (25.3%) or severe-complicated cases (35.5%) (P < 0.001). There was no difference in demographics, hospitalization, ICU exposure, recurrence or 30-d mortality between adherent and non-adherent groups. A multivariate model revealed significantly decreased adherence for severe or severe-complicated episodes (OR = 0.18, 95%CI: 0.11-0.30) and recurrent episodes (OR = 0.46, 95%CI: 0.23-0.95). CONCLUSION: Overall adherence with the SHEA/IDSA guidelines for management of CDAD at a tertiary medical center was poor; this was most pronounced in severe, severe-complicated and recurrent cases. Educational interventions aimed at improving guideline adherence are warranted. PMID:24379582

Curtin, Bryan F; Zarbalian, Yousef; Flasar, Mark H; von Rosenvinge, Erik

2013-01-01

451

Rape Crisis Centers and Programs: “Doing Amazing, Wonderful Things on Peanuts”  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though the anti-rape movement began more than 30 years ago and there is greater awareness of sexual violence, are rape crisis centers or programs financially secure? Data from interviews with 63 rape crisis workers and volunteers from 6 rape crisis centers or programs located in 4 East Coast states indicate not only that rape crisis centers\\/programs continue to struggle

Shana L. Maier

2011-01-01

452

Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Build a Habitat  

E-print Network

Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Build a Habitat The Build a Habitat program at Hatfield Marine Science Center is designed to be a 50- minute hands Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Suggested Pre- or Post

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

453

Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Animal Adaptations  

E-print Network

Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Animal Adaptations The Animal Adaptations program at Hatfield Marine Science Center is designed to be a 50- minute lab Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center organisms possess is camouflage that makes them

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

454

Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Plankton Lab  

E-print Network

Oregon Sea Grant Marine Education Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center Plankton Lab The Plankton Lab at Hatfield Marine Science center is designed to be a 50-minute program for 5th -12th grade Program at Hatfield Marine Science Center All plankton must avoid sinking. Phytoplankton require sunlight

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

455

State programs for medical diagnosis of child abuse and neglect: case studies of five established or fledgling programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the programs for medical diagnosis of child abuse and neglect in three states and efforts to establish state-wide programs in two states. To describe common themes and issues that emerged related to the establishment and maintenance of these programs.Methods: Five states were selected as case studies to represent a range of experience and type of function embodied

Rebecca R. S Socolar; Doren D Fredrickson; Robert Block; Joyce K Moore; Susanne Tropez-Sims; J. M Whitworth

2001-01-01

456

2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program at Glenn Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Office of Education at NASA Headquarters provides overall policy and direction for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP). The American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) have joined in partnership to recruit participants, accept applications from a broad range of participants, and provide overall evaluation of the NFFP. The NASA Centers, through their University Affairs Officers, develop and operate the experiential part of the program. In concert with co-directing universities and the Centers, Fellows are selected and provided the actual research experiences. This report summarizes the 2003 session conducted at the Glenn Research Center (GRC).Research topics covered a variety of areas including, but not limited to, biological sensors, modeling of biological fluid systems, electronic circuits, ceramics and coatings, unsteady probablistic analysis and aerodynamics, gas turbines, environmental monitoring systems for water quality, air quality, gaseous and particulate emissions, bearings for flywheel energy storage, shape memory alloys,photonic interrogation and nanoprocesses,carbon nanotubes, polymer synthesis for fuel cells, aviation communications, algorithm development and RESPlan Database.

Prahl, Joseph M.; Heyward, An O.; Kankam, Mark D.

2003-01-01

457

Inclusion of black Americans in oncology clinical trials: the Louisiana State University Medical Center experience.  

PubMed

Recruitment of patients from diverse ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds for clinical trials is desirable for both scientific and ethical reasons. Participation rates in clinical trials are low for minorities and especially for black Americans. This report summarizes the experience at Louisiana State University Medical Center in Shreveport, Louisiana, in enrolling black Americans in oncology treatment and prevention trials. Barriers to enrollment are identified and discussed. Although major strides must still be made in the area of cancer prevention, the university's experience demonstrates that black Americans can be encouraged to participate in and can be enrolled in cancer clinical trials. PMID:10025373

Holcombe, R F; Jacobson, J; Li, A; Moinpour, C M

1999-02-01

458

Analysis of One Year's Circulation at the Downstate Medical Center Library *  

PubMed Central

A survey of the circulation of books and journals at the Downstate Medical Center Library was conducted, based on cancelled circulation cards accumulated during a one-year period. Analysis of the results shows the frequency of use of various materials by several groups of borrowers and brings out important differences between circulation of books and that of journals. One of the results was the compilation of a list of most frequently used journals. The findings are graphically represented by several tables and charts. PMID:5901362

Kovacs, Helen

1966-01-01

459

The Demise of Oregon’s Medically Needy Program: Effects of Losing Prescription Drug Coverage  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND In January 2003, people covered by Oregon’s Medically Needy program lost benefits owing to state budget shortfalls. The Medically Needy program is a federally matched optional Medicaid program. In Oregon, this program mainly provided prescription drug benefits. OBJECTIVE To describe the Medically Needy population and determine how benefit loss affected this population’s health and prescription use. DESIGN A 49-question telephone survey instrument created by the research team and administered by a research contractor. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of 1,269 eligible enrollees in Oregon’s Medically Needy Program. Response rate was 35% with 439 individuals, ages 21–91 and 64% women, completing the survey. MEASUREMENTS Demographics, health information, and medicatication use at the time of the survey obtained from the interview. Medication use during the program obtained from administrative data. RESULTS In the 6 months after the Medically Needy program ended, 75% had skipped or stopped medications. Sixty percent of the respondents had cut back on their food budget, 47% had borrowed money, and 49% had skipped paying other bills to pay for medications. By self-report, there was no significant difference in emergency department visits, but a significant decrease in hospitalizations comparing 6 months before and after losing the program. Two-thirds of respondents rated their current health as poor or fair. CONCLUSIONS The Medically Needy program provided coverage for a low-income, chronically ill population. Since its termination, enrollees have decreased prescription drug use and increased financial burden. As states make program changes and Medicare Part D evolves, effects on vulnerable populations must be considered. PMID:17380369

Edlund, Tina; Krois, Lisa; Smith, Jeanene

2007-01-01

460

Providing Medical Information to College Health Center Personnel: A Circuit Librarian Service at the University of Illinois  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College health center personnel are no different from other health practitioners in their need for medical information. To help meet this need, the McKinley Health Center, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, developed a partnership in 1997 with the Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana, a regional site library of the University of Illinois at…

Stumpff, Julia C.

2003-01-01

461

Conformity of Pediatric/Adolescent HIV Clinics to the Patient-Centered Medical Home Care Model  

PubMed Central

Abstract The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3–88.3%] on PCMH measures—scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH. PMID:23651104

Agwu, Allison L.; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P. Todd; Gaur, Aditya H.; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A.; Berry, Stephen A.; Gebo, Kelly A.

2013-01-01

462

Medication Errors  

MedlinePLUS

... for Healthcare Research and Quality: Medical Errors and Patient Safety Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Medication Safety Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Patient Safety Institute for Safe Medication Practices To Err is ...

463

Evaluation of a Center of Excellence Program for Spine Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and many private health plans are encouraging patients to seek orthopedic care at hospitals designated as centers of excellence. No evaluations have been conducted to compare patient outcomes and costs at centers of excellence versus other hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess whether hospitals designated as spine surgery centers of excellence by a group of over 25 health plans provided higher quality care. Methods Claims representing approximately 54 million commercially insured individuals were used to identify individuals aged 18–64 years of age with one of three types of spine surgery in 2007–2009: one or two level cervical fusion (referred to as cervical simple fusion), one or two level lumbar fusion (referred to as lumbar simple fusion), or lumbar discectomy and/or decompression without fusion. The primary outcomes were any complication (7 complications were captured) and 30-day readmission. The multivariate models controlled for differences in age, gender, and comorbidities between the two sets of hospitals. Results A total of 29,295 cervical simple fusions, 27,214 lumbar simple fusions, and 28,911 lumbar discectomy/decompressions were identified, of which 42%, 42%, and 47%, respectively, were performed at a hospital designated as a spine surgery center of excellence. Designated hospitals had a larger number of beds and were more likely to be an academic center. Across the three types of spine surgery (cervical fusions, lumbar fusions, or lumbar discectomies/decompressions), there was no difference in the composite complication rate (OR 0.90 (95% CI 0.72–1.12), OR 0.98 (95% CI 0.85–1.13), OR 0.95 (95% CI 0.82–1.07) respectively) or readmission rate (OR 1.03 (95% CI 0.87–1.21), OR 1.01 (95% CI 0.89–1.13), OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.79–1.04) respectively) at designated hospitals compared to other hospitals. Conclusions On average, spine surgery centers of excellence had similar complication rates and readmission rates compared to other hospitals. These results highlight the importance of empirical evaluations of centers of excellence programs. PMID:23774514

Mehrotra, Ateev; Sloss, Elizabeth M.; Hussey, Peter S.; Adams, John L.; Lovejoy, Susan; SooHoo, Nelson F.

2014-01-01

464

A Well Elderly Program: An Intergenerational Model in Medical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes effort to dispel ageist attitudes in medical students in which medical students participated in weekly health seminars and provided health counseling for older adults living in community. Notes that exposing students to healthy elderly persons began to dispel stereotypical views engendered by previous exposure to only frail, acutely ill,…

Adelman, R.; And Others

1988-01-01

465

78 FR 19725 - Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Guard in making medical fitness determinations for issuance...or reach the Docket Management Facility by that date...visiting the Docket Management Facility in Room W12-140...Transportation to use the Docket Management Facility. Privacy Act...Guard in making medical fitness determinations for...

2013-04-02

466

78 FR 75245 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS)/TRICARE: Pilot Program...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Maintenance Medications for TRICARE for Life Beneficiaries Through the TRICARE Mail...that would generally require TRICARE for Life beneficiaries to obtain all refill prescriptions...year pilot program requiring TRICARE for Life beneficiaries to obtain all...

2013-12-11

467

Implementation of Single Source Based Hospital Information System for the Catholic Medical Center Affiliated Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objective of this research is to introduce the unique approach of the Catholic Medical Center (CMC) integrate network hospitals with organizational and technical methodologies adopted for seamless implementation. Methods The Catholic Medical Center has developed a new hospital information system to connect network hospitals and adopted new information technology architecture which uses single source for multiple distributed hospital systems. Results The hospital information system of the CMC was developed to integrate network hospitals adopting new system development principles; one source, one route and one management. This information architecture has reduced the cost for system development and operation, and has enhanced the efficiency of the management process. Conclusions Integrating network hospital through information system was not simple; it was much more complicated than single organization implementation. We are still looking for more efficient communication channel and decision making process, and also believe that our new system architecture will be able to improve CMC health care system and provide much better quality of health care service to patients and customers. PMID:21818432

Choi, Inyoung; Choi, Ran; Lee, Jonghyun

2010-01-01

468

Walter Reed Army Medical Center's mental health response to the Pentagon attack.  

PubMed

The September 11 terrorist attack on the Pentagon captured the attention and concern of America as well as the world. Given the extent of devastation, and the number of deaths at the Pentagon, it was believed that the uniformed mental health services would serve a pivotal role in the recovery and relief efforts. This article provides a synopsis of the complex and multidisciplinary mental health services provided by Walter Reed Army Medical Center in the wake of the September 11 attack on the Pentagon. This article offers an overview of the functions and roles of mental health team members, describes a constellation of services rendered, and describes how missions differed inside and outside of the Pentagon. Additionally, the authors provide the reader with how services were provided at the Family Assistance Center to family members of those killed during the attack. Liaison with civilian medical, mental health, and relief agencies and facilities will be discussed as well. The mental health response was an intensive and complicated experience and has yielded many lesson learned. To this end, the authors will provide the reader with an understanding of how the lessons learned during this mission may assist mental health commanders and leaders in planning and responding to similar deployments in the future. PMID:12363129

Cozza, Stephen J; Huleatt, William J; James, Larry C

2002-09-01

469

Population health and the academic medical center: the time is right.  

PubMed

Optimizing the health of populations, whether defined as persons receiving care from a health care delivery system or more broadly as persons in a region, is emerging as a core focus in the era of health care reform. To achieve this goal requires an approach in which preventive care is valued and "nonmedical" determinants of patients' health are engaged. For large, multimission systems such as academic medical centers, navigating the evolution to a population-oriented paradigm across the domains of patient care, education, and research poses real challenges but also offers tremendous opportunities, as important objectives across each mission begin to align with external trends and incentives. In clinical care, opportunities exist to improve capacity for assuming risk, optimize community benefit, and make innovative use of advances in health information technology. Education must equip the next generation of leaders to understand and address population-level goals in addition to patient-level needs. And the prospects for research to define strategies for measuring and optimizing the health of populations have never been stronger. A remarkable convergence of trends has created compelling opportunities for academic medical centers to advance their core goals by endorsing and committing to advancing the health of populations. PMID:24556766

Gourevitch, Marc N

2014-04-01

470

Robotics program at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Goddard telerobotic program is structured to increase the scope and efficiency of what man can accomplish in space through the use of robotics. The main focus is to service Space Station Freedom and its payloads, but robotic assembly of Space Station Freedom and platforms is also anticipated. The approach being taken to achieve this by telerobotics, where manipulators can be controlled by human operators or computer programs. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the responsability to develop the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) for Space Station Freedom. The current plan at GSFC in support of telerobotics for Space Station Freedom and the in-orbit servicing of platforms are reviewed. Plans for ground demonstrations involving the use of an engineering test bed and an operational facility are discussed.

Ollendorf, Stanford

1989-01-01

471

Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University] [William Marsh Rice University

2011-09-13

472

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Joseph�s/Candler, Savannah, Georgia  

Cancer.gov

The hospital runs a significant number of outreach programs including mammography education and screening of medically underserved women in surrounding counties. The Georgia Cancer Coalition is supporting St.

473

Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

2013-01-15

474

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) (Program Description)  

NSF Publications Database

... National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Description The National Center for Atmospheric ... information, contact the Director, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder ...

475

Reducing mortality in hip fracture patients using a perioperative approach and “Patient- Centered Medical Home” model: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Hip fracture patients experience high morbidity and mortality rates in the first post-operative year after discharge. We compared mortality, utilization, costs, pain and function between two prospective cohorts of hip fracture patients, both managed with identical perioperative protocols and one group subsequently managed via a “Patient-Centered Medical Home” (PCMH) primary care management model. Methods We analyzed 6 and 12-month outcomes from two matched cohorts of patients who were surgically treated for hip fracture from January 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 at two hospitals (n?=?194). Controls did not receive PCMH and were matched to cases on surgery date, sex, age, and comorbidities. Mortality and healthcare utilization were the primary outcomes studied, with medical costs, quality of life, pain and function at 12 months assessed as secondary outcomes in a subgroup. Survival analysis, regression and Student-t testing were used with p?program showed significant benefits in terms of reduced mortality at 6 months, with similar costs and functional outcomes at 12 months. PCMH was not shown to improve all outcomes studied, but these results suggest that ongoing Medical Home management can have some benefit for patients without negatively impacting function or cost. PMID:24490635

2014-01-01

476

Evaluation of responses of an air medical helicopter program during a comprehensive emergency response drill  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionParticipation of air medical service programs in emergency response drills can reveal important information regarding preparedness. This article reviews one program's participation in a drill, the evaluation methods used to assess the program's response, and the findings of the drill evaluation.

Karyl J. Burns; Kenneth Robinson; Eric G. Lowe

2007-01-01

477

Using a Geriatric Mentoring Narrative Program to Improve Medical Student Attitudes towards the Elderly  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined first-year medical student attitudes concerning the elderly before and after instituting a geriatric mentoring program. The program began and ended with a survey designed to assess students' attitudes toward the elderly. During the mentoring program, students visited the same senior for four visits throughout the academic year.…

Duke, Pamela; Cohen, Diane; Novack, Dennis

2009-01-01

478

Two Models for Implementing Senior Mentor Programs in Academic Medical Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper compares two models of undergraduate geriatric medical education utilizing senior mentoring programs. Descriptive, comparative multiple-case study was employed analyzing program documents, archival records, and focus group data. Themes were compared for similarities and differences between the two program models. Findings indicate that…

Corwin, Sara J.; Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Roberts, Ellen

2007-01-01

479

Administrative Problem-Solving for Writing Programs and Writing Centers: Scenarios in Effective Program Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addressing the issues and problems faced by writing program administrators (WPAs) and writing center directors (WCDs), and how they can most effectively resolve the political, pedagogical, and financial questions that arise, this book presents essays from experienced WPAs and WCDs at a wide variety of institutions that offer scenarios and case…

Myers-Breslin, Linda

480

The Use of the Internet in Geriatrics Education: Results of a National Survey of Medical Geriatrics Academic Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to characterize use of the Internet in medical geriatrics education programs, 130 medical education programs in the U.S. that train medical students, interns, residents, fellows and practicing physicians were asked to complete a survey developed by the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI). Sixty-eight programs

Hajjar, Ihab M.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Teasdale, Thomas A.; Mintzer, Michael J.

2007-01-01

481

Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary  

SciTech Connect

In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

2005-04-01

482

7 CFR 226.11 - Program payments for centers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...child care centers, at-risk afterschool care centers, adult day care centers, emergency shelters, and outside-school-hours...in determining this eligibility. For-profit adult day care centers must provide the reports required in...

2013-01-01

483

7 CFR 226.11 - Program payments for centers.  

...child care centers, at-risk afterschool care centers, adult day care centers, emergency shelters, and outside-school-hours...in determining this eligibility. For-profit adult day care centers must provide the reports required in...

2014-01-01

484

7 CFR 226.11 - Program payments for centers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...child care centers, at-risk afterschool care centers, adult day care centers, emergency shelters, and outside-school-hours...in determining this eligibility. For-profit adult day care centers must provide the reports required in...

2012-01-01

485

Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.  

PubMed

Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field. PMID:9803297

Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

1998-10-01

486

Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training: Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating an Evidenced-Based Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical residents do not receive adequate training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use disorders. The federally funded Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training program (SMaRT) is an evidence-based curriculum with goals of training residents in SBIRT knowledge and skills and…

Pringle, Janice L.; Melczak, Michael; Johnjulio, William; Campopiano, Melinda; Gordon, Adam J.; Costlow, Monica

2012-01-01

487

The Rural Physician Associate Program: The Value of Immersion Learning for Third-Year Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Changes in health care and new theories of learning have prompted significant changes in medical education. Some US medical schools employ immersion learning in rural communities to increase the number of physicians who choose to practice in these areas. Founded in 1971, the rural physician associate program (RPAP) is a longitudinal…

Zink, Therese; Halaas, Gwen W.; Finstad, Deborah; Brooks, Kathleen D.

2008-01-01

488

Implementation of a Study Skills Program for Entering At-Risk Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the first year of medical school is challenging for all students, there may be specific issues for students from rural areas, economically disadvantaged backgrounds, ethnic minorities, or nontraditional age groups. A Summer Prematriculation Program (SPP) was created to prepare entering at-risk students for the demands of medical school. For…

Miller, Cynthia J.

2014-01-01

489

Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy: Design and Implementation of a First-Year Medical School Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical students state the need for a clinically oriented anatomy class so to maximize their learning experience. We hypothesize that the first-year medical students, who take the Surgical Clinical Correlates in Anatomy program, will perform better than their peers in their anatomy course, their surgical clerkships and ultimately choose surgical…

Haubert, Lisa M.; Jones, Kenneth; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D.

2009-01-01

490

Medical Ethics Teaching Programs at the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Washington.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of medical ethics education at the University of California, San Francisco, is chronicled and its contributions to bioethics literature are noted. Emphasis is placed on the importance of using medical cases in such instruction. The University of Washington's ethics program and its potential for innovation are then described.…

Jonsen, Albert R.

1989-01-01

491

A Integracao de Ensino das Ciencias da Saude (An Integrated Medical Education Program [in Brazil]).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the Sixth Annual Reunion of the Brazilian Association of Medical Schools (VI Reuniao Anual da Associacao Brasileira de Escolas Medicas) leaders in the Brazilian medical profession proposed an integrated educational program for training students in the fields of medicine and public health. Under Brazil's present system of education, all…

Pourchet-Campos, M. A.; Guimaraes Junior, Paulino

492

75 FR 47452 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Retired Reserve...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 [Docket ID...Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Retired Reserve for Members of the Retired Reserve AGENCY: Office of...

2010-08-06

493

Artist concept of Mercury program study of medical effects and technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Artist concept of Mercury program study of medical effects and technology development. Drawing depicts cut-away view of Mercury capsule orbiting the Earth, showing the astronaut and his capsule's hardware.

1964-01-01

494

Clinical Metric and Medication Persistency Effects: Evidence from a Medicaid Care Management Program.  

PubMed

Abstract The objective was to estimate clinical metric and medication persistency impacts of a care management program. The data sources were Medicaid administrative claims for a sample population of 32,334 noninstitutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind, or disabled patients with diagnosed conditions of asthma, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or heart failure between 2005 and 2009. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis that exposure to a care management intervention increased the likelihood of having the appropriate medication or procedures performed, as well as increased medication persistency. Statistically significant clinical metric improvements occurred in each of the 5 conditions studied. Increased medication persistency was found for beta-blocker medication for members with coronary artery disease, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker and diuretic medications for members with heart failure, bronchodilator and corticosteroid medications for members with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and aspirin/antiplatelet medications for members with diabetes. This study demonstrates that a care management program increases the likelihood of having an appropriate medication dispensed and/or an appropriate clinical test performed, as well as increased likelihood of medication persistency, in people with chronic conditions. (Population Health Management 2014;xx:xxx-xxx). PMID:25093610

Berg, Gregory D; Leary, Fredric; Medina, Wendie; Donnelly, Shawn; Warnick, Kathleen

2014-08-01

495

An overview of the roles and responsibilities of Chinese medical colleges in body donation programs.  

PubMed

The use of human tissue is critical for gross anatomy education in the health professions. Chinese medical colleges have faced a shortage of anatomical specimens over the past decade. While body donation plays an important role in overcoming this gap, this practice has only recently been introduced in China, and the donation rate is relatively low and fraught with a number of difficulties. In the past, traditional Chinese culture focused on preserving the human body intact, which often limited body donation. In recent years, the public has become more open toward body donation. At Nanjing Medical University, only 20 bodies were donated in 2001. After the university became involved in an organized body donation program, this number increased to 70 donated bodies per year (2007 to 2012). This article describes and reviews Chinese medical colleges as a special case study among body donation programs, particularly in terms of the multiple responsibilities and roles that such institutions must assume in the course of adopting these programs. Medical colleges in China must serve as advocates, coordinators, builders, managers, educators, and beneficiaries in undertaking body donation programs. It is important for medical colleges to recognize these pluripotent roles and educate the public in order to promote body donation programs. This case study may also effectively guide and encourage Chinese medical colleges in refining their own body donation programs in the future. PMID:24227762

Zhang, Luqing; Xiao, Ming; Gu, Mufeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Jianliang; Ding, Jiong

2014-01-01

496

A Competency-Based Clinical Chemistry Course for the Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technician Graduate in a Medical Technology Baccalaureate Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a project that developed a competency-based clinical chemistry course for associate degree medical laboratory technicians (MLT) in a medical technology (MT) baccalaureate program. Content of the course was based upon competencies expected of medical technologists at career-entry as defined in the statements adopted in 1976 by the…

Buccelli, Pamela

497

Houston is the perfect setting for studying the dynamic nature of health law and policy. The nearby Texas Medical Center, the world's largest medical complex, offers extraordinary opportunities for legal scholars  

E-print Network

and sophisticated market for related legal services. The Texas Medical Center (foreground) is Houston's largest privacy and bioethical issues in large health information systems and biomedical research; healthcare

Azevedo, Ricardo

498

The masked educator-innovative simulation in an Australian undergraduate Medical Sonography and Medical Imaging program  

PubMed Central

Introduction Clinical learning experiences for sonography and medical imaging students can sometimes involve the practice of technical procedures with less of a focus on developing communication skills with patients. Whilst patient-based simulation scenarios have been widely reported in other health education programmes, there is a paucity of research in sonography and medical imaging. The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) in the learning and teaching of clinical communication skills to undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students. Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) is a simulation technique where the educator is hidden behind wearable realistic silicone body props including masks. Methods Focus group interviews were conducted with 11 undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students at CQUniversity, Australia. The number of participants was limited to the size of the cohort of students enrolled in the course. Prior to these interviews participants were engaged in learning activities that featured the use of the Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) method. Thematic analysis was employed to explore how the introduction of Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) contributed to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Results Key themes included: benefits of interacting with someone real rather than another student, learning made fun, awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection. Conclusions Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) combined with interactive sessions with an expert facilitator, contributed positively to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Participants believed that interacting with someone real, as in the Mask-Ed characters was beneficial. In addition to the learning being described as fun, participants gained an awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection. PMID:25598976

Reid-Searl, Kerry; Bowman, Anita; McAllister, Margaret; Cowling, Cynthia; Spuur, Kelly

2014-01-01

499

Early Postoperative Complications after Heart Transplantation in Adult Recipients: Asan Medical Center Experience  

PubMed Central

Background Heart transplantation has become a widely accepted surgical option for end-stage heart failure in Korea since its first success in 1992. We reviewed early postoperative complications and mortality in 239 patients who underwent heart transplantation using bicaval technique in Asan Medical Center. Methods Between January 1999 and December 2011, a total of 247 patients aged over 17 received heart transplantation using bicaval technique in Asan Medical Center. After excluding four patients with concomitant kidney transplantation and four with heart-lung transplantation, 239 patients were enrolled in this study. We evaluated their early postoperative complications and mortality. Postoperative complications included primary graft failure, cerebrovascular accident, mediastinal bleeding, renal failure, low cardiac output syndrome requiring intra-aortic balloon pump or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation insertion, pericardial effusion, and inguinal lymphocele. Follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up duration of 58.4±43.6 months. Results Early death occurred in three patients (1.3%). The most common complications were pericardial effusion (61.5%) followed by arrhythmia (41.8%) and mediastinal bleeding (8.4%). Among the patients complicated with pericardial effusion, only 13 (5.4%) required window operation. The incidence of other significant complications was less than 5%: stroke (1.3%), low cardiac output syndrome (2.5%), renal failure requiring renal replacement (3.8%), sternal wound infection (2.0%), and inguinal lymphocele (4.6%). Most of complications did not result in the extended length of hospital stay except mediastinal bleeding (p=0.034). Conclusion Heart transplantation is a widely accepted option of surgical treatment for end-stage heart failure with good early outcomes and relatively low catastrophic complications. PMID:24368968

Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Jae Joong; Kim, Joon Bum; Choo, Suk Jung; Yun, Tae-Jin; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

2013-01-01

500

The effects of arts-in-medicine programming on the medical-surgical work environment  

PubMed Central

Background: Arts in medicine programs have significant impacts on patients and staff in long-term care environments, but the literature lacks evidence of effectiveness on hospital units with shorter average lengths of stay. Methods: The qualitative study used individual structured interviews to assess the impacts of arts programming on job satisfaction, stress, unit culture, support, quality of care, and patient outcomes on a short-term medical-surgical unit, and used a qualitative cross comparison grounded theory methodology to analyze data. Results: The study confirmed that arts programming can positively affect unit culture, nursing practice, and quality of care on short-stay medical-surgical units. Significant insights related to nursing practice and the art program were found, including that music can cause negative distraction for staff. Conclusions: While positive impacts of arts programming on the medical-surgical environment are clear, potential negative effects also need to be considered in the development of practice protocols for artists. PMID:25544861

Sonke, Jill; Pesata, Virginia; Arce, Lauren; Carytsas, Ferol P.; Zemina, Kristen; Jokisch, Christine

2015-01-01