Sample records for medical center program

  1. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - University Medical Center Brackenridge, Austin, Texas

    Cancer.gov

    University Medical Center Brackenridge is one of four hospitals in the Seton Family of Hospitals, serving Central Texas, that offer a continuum of cancer services. Through its Shivers Center, University Medical Center Brackenridge offers the broadest range of cancer service in the network.

  2. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Francis Medical Center, Grand Island, Nebraska

    Cancer.gov

    Founded more than 115 years ago, Saint Francis Medical Center, Grand Island is a 198-bed healthcare provider serving as the regional referral center for 26-counties and approximately 78,000 residents in Central Nebraska. St. Francis Medical Center offers a wide array of specialty services including a cancer treatment center, joint replacement, diagnostic and interventional cardiology, a birthing center, dialysis, comprehensive surgical services, and interventional and diagnostic radiology services. The St.

  3. The University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's Health Information Services Outreach Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Susan B.; And Others

    Begun in 1980, the University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's statewide Outreach Program is a composite of many services and projects designed to meet the medical and health information needs of the state's diverse and scattered population. The only major biomedical library in New Mexico, the Library has built the program on existing…

  4. An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griest, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

  5. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska

    Cancer.gov

    St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center is a 257-bed hospital that serves a 17-county area, including the state capital of Lincoln. The St. Elizabeth Cancer Center treated 679 new cancer patients in 2005 and 682 in 2006.

  6. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

    Cancer.gov

    The Sanford USD Medical Center is the largest tertiary hospital in South Dakota with nearly 500 beds. It serves as the primary teaching institution for the Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota. The Medical Center serves as a regional institution, with half of its patients coming from outside the immediate Sioux Falls community. The Sanford Cancer Center is the region's largest, treating more than 1,278 new patients in 2005.

  7. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland

    Cancer.gov

    More than 40% of the medical center's patients come from outside the primary service area, defined as a 12-mile radius of the hospital. 78% of the Cancer Institute's patients are adults over 55, and 12% are African American.

  8. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Electronic Medical Records

    Cancer.gov

    Develop a national database of voluntarily-provided electronic medical records. Expanding the information available on people who have been screened for cancer, are at high risk, are actively being treated, and are cancer survivors will greatly contribute to the knowledge and treatment of cancer.

  9. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Cancer.gov

    Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center is the largest private medical center in Louisiana. With 740 licensed beds, Our Lady of the Lake provides services to more than 33,000 hospital patients and 350,000 outpatients. The hospital occupies 100 acres in the heart of Baton Rouge, including the cancer center. The cancer program includes Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, a nonprofit, comprehensive radiation therapy facility, which joined with Our Lady of the Lake in 1988 to offer multispecialty cancer care.

  10. UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER Anatomical Gift Program

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    to science" when they die. But, similar to organ donation or estate planning, they often may not know what death, you are a whole body donor. Organ and Body Donation A person may also donate his or her eyes and still donate their whole body to our program. However, the recovery of other internal organs

  11. The Crystal Charity Ball Autism Project is a collaborative program of Children's Medical Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center and The University of Texas at Dallas

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    The Crystal Charity Ball Autism Project is a collaborative program of Children's Medical Center, UT program Children up to 5 years old with a diagnosis of autism Minimum of 2 sessions per week 3 hrs each) Interested families please contact 214- 456- 7700 6300 Harry Hines Chase Bank Building, 1st floor Autism

  12. Gibbs Regional Medical Center

    Cancer.gov

    Gibbs Regional Medical Center Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg, SC Why GRCC Is Interested In Being Part Of The Pilot Program? To build on our 24 years of experience as a CCOP to increase accrual to Phase I/II trials To expand access

  13. Children's Hospital Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    UNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions Building WherryHall Veterans Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMC ShrinersHospital forChildren Shriners Garage Cincinnati Dept of Health LoganHall Medical Sciences Building

  14. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;400 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

  15. Children's Hospital Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    UNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center WherryHall Veterans Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC Holmes CHMC CHMC Children's Hospital Vontz Center Hamilton Co. Coroner Kettering Lab Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions Building

  16. Program Evaluation of Remote Heart Failure Monitoring: Healthcare Utilization Analysis in a Rural Regional Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A. Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. “Care Beyond Walls and Wires,” a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Materials and Methods: Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. Results: HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. Conclusions: The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems. PMID:25025239

  17. Children's Hospital Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    UNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC VAMC Holmes CHMC CHMC Children's Hospital Garage CHMC Kingsgate Co. Coroner Kettering Lab Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions Building WherryHall Veterans

  18. 76 FR 3209 - West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Veterans Programs Enhancement Act of 1998; Draft Master Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS West Los Angeles VA Medical Center Veterans Programs...for public comment on the West Los Angeles (WLA) Department of Veterans...is part of the larger VA Greater Los Angeles (GLA) Healthcare System,...

  19. The Effect of Federal Biomedical Research Programs on Academic Medical Centers. Prepared for the President's Biomedical Research Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, A. P.; And Others

    The effects of evolving federal research policies and programs on nongovernmental academic medical centers are examined. Medical schools, teaching hospitals, and research institutes are included. The major problem of analysis in this report is to sort out the effects of federally-supported biomedical research from other influences on academic…

  20. Primary care program improves reimbursement. The Federally Qualified Health Center program helps hospitals improve services to the medically indigent.

    PubMed

    Fahey, T M; Gallitano, D G

    1993-03-01

    Under a program created by Congress in 1989, certain primary care treatment centers serving the medically and economically indigent can become Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). Recently enacted rules and regulations allow participants in the FQHC program to receive 100 percent reasonable cost reimbursement for Medicaid services and 80 percent for Medicare services. An all-inclusive annual cost report is the basis for determining reimbursement rates. The report factors in such expenses as physician and other healthcare and professional salaries and benefits, medical supplies, certain equipment depreciation, and overhead for facility and administrative costs. Both Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement is based on an encounter rate, and states employ various methodologies to determine the reimbursement level. In Illinois, for example, typical reimbursement for a qualified encounter ranges from $70 to $88. To obtain FQHC status, an organization must demonstrate community need, deliver the appropriate range of healthcare services, satisfy management and finance requirements, and function under a community-based governing board. In addition, an FQHC must provide primary healthcare by physicians and (where appropriate) midlevel practitioners; it must also offer its community diagnostic laboratory and x-ray services, preventive healthcare and dental care, case management, pharmacy services, and arrangements for emergency services. Because FQHCs must be freestanding facilities, establishing them can trigger a number of ancillary legal issues, such as those involved in forming a new corporation, complying with not-for-profit corporation regulations, applying for tax-exempt status, and applying for various property and sales tax exemptions. Hospitals that establish FQHCs must also be prepared to relinquish direct control over the delivery of primary care services. PMID:10124301

  1. Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program Upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

  2. Dittrick Medical History Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    Currently operating as an interdisciplinary study center within the College of Arts and Sciences of Case Western Reserve University, the Dittrick Medical History Center was established as part of the Cleveland Medical Library Association in 1894. First-time visitors will definitely want to begin by looking through the museum's history, and then examine the museum artifacts and galleries, which represent a small sample of their holdings. The artifacts are divided into time periods and include such fascinating medical equipment as bloodletting devices, a phrenology bust, and a defribrillator from 1950. The galleries section allows visitors to take a virtual tour of the rooms within the museum, such as a doctor's office from the 1930s and a replica of a pharmacy from the 1880s. Several online exhibits are also available for perusal, such as one dedicated to Cleveland's brush with a smallpox epidemic in 1902. Utterly fascinating, though not for the squeamish, is the exhibit that details medical school photographs, many of them class photographs around dissection tables, and postcards featuring medical students and cadavers. The site is rounded out with a host of online guides and finding aids that help in using the Center's extensive collections dealing with the history of medicine.

  3. Medical Centers in Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Joye

    1995-01-01

    Rising costs, changes in the health-care system, reduced research money, and proposed cutbacks in funds for treating the poor are forcing academic medical centers to consider new ways to remain viable. Resulting actions being considered or implemented include administrative restructuring, worker layoffs, mergers, reduced physician hiring,…

  4. IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Mekalanos, John

    IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT Student: Program: Immunology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: PLEASE RETURN TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Immunology Program Administrator Modell Center Harvard Medical

  5. Columbia University Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    on West 168th Street work so hard to understand why people in Bangladesh are developing skin cancer from Comprehensive Cancer Center 1130 St. Nicholas Avenue New York, NY 10032 HERBERT IRVING COMPREHENSIVE CANCER THE DIRECTOR HISTORY OF THE HERBERT IRVING COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER BASIC SCIENCE PROGRAMS Cancer Genetics

  6. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future. PMID:25547538

  7. General Medical Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

  8. Horizon's patient-centered medical home program shows practices need much more than payment changes to transform.

    PubMed

    Patel, Urvashi B; Rathjen, Carl; Rubin, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Skyrocketing costs and the uneven quality of patient care challenge the US health care system. Some health insurance companies are exploring patient-centered medical homes as a way to change incentives and transform the health care delivery system by increasing primary care providers' accountability for care coordination and outcomes. Horizon Healthcare Services, Inc., New Jersey's oldest and largest health insurance company, developed medical home programs that include financial incentives with essential support tools. Our experience in implementing and evaluating various approaches indicates that medical homes require intensive and targeted patient care coordination supported by committed primary care leadership, as well as new payment structures that include a monthly care coordination fee and outcome-based payments. Our experience also indicates that considerable nonmonetary support-such as an education program for population care coordinators, a medical home guide that offers effective ways to transform a practice into a medical home, and useful data sharing-are needed to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. PMID:22949451

  9. Italian continuing medical education program: an evidence-based course for surgeons and health personnel of a regional transplantation center.

    PubMed

    Santori, G; Renzini, A M; Lasagna, F; Casaccia, M; Fontana, I; Valente, U

    2011-05-01

    In the organ transplantation area the application of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) methods may be limited by several, heterogeneous conditions, eg, mandatory laws and protocols, logistic concerns, as well as donor/recipient matching. In this report we have described the results of a first EBM-oriented course for surgeons and health personnel in a regional transplantation center under the Italian Continuing Medical Education (CME) program. The course was formally approved for 25 credits. It included a maximum of 70 medical and nursing staff registrants; 50 of the spots were reserved for our transplantation center. The course was scheduled in 10 sessions from June to November 2010. Each session was composed of 2 phases: (1) first, computer-assisted education including slide presentations (2 hours); and (2) subsequent discussion led by experts (1.5 hours). The registered participants were expected to be able to correctly answer a multiple-choice, 10-question questionnaire at the end of each session. The majority of the participants considered the course relevant to their need to be updated and effective to improve their clinical skills. The requirements to obtain credits by the Italian CME program for live events were overall presence ?80% and correct responses in the postsession questionnaires ?70%. However, among the initially registered participants 31.5% failed at least one of these requirements. The main reason for failure was exceeding the maximum number of absences. Paradoxically, the absences were largely caused by the simultaneous execution of surgical/medical transplantation procedures. For professional figures engaged in complex medical activities, the Italian CME program should consider different threshold limits for the maximum number of absences allowed at live events. PMID:21620030

  10. The University of Pennsylvania/Walter Reed Army Medical Center proton therapy program.

    PubMed

    McDonough, James; Tinnel, Brent

    2007-08-01

    The design of the proton therapy center being constructed at the University of Pennsylvania is based on several principles that distinguish it from other proton facilities. Among these principles is the recognition that advances in imaging, and particularly in functional imaging, will have a large impact on radiotherapy in the near future and that the conformation of proton dose distributions can utilize that information to a larger degree than other treatment techniques. The facility will contain four-dimensional CT-simulators, an MR-simulator capable of spectroscopy, and a PET-CT scanner. A second principle applied to the facility design is to incorporate into proton radiotherapy the recent progress in conventional radiotherapy; including imaging and monitoring of patients during treatment, imaging of soft tissue, accounting for respiratory motion, and expanding the use of intensity-modulated treatments. A third principle is to understand that the facility must be operated efficiently. To that end the specifications for the equipment have included requirements for high beam intensity, fast switching times between treatment rooms, a multileaf collimator to permit multiple fields to be treated quickly, and plans for an intelligent beam scheduler to determine where the beam can be best used at any given time. We expect to use "universal" nozzles, which can switch rapidly from scattering mode to scanning mode, and there will be a set-up room used for the first day of treatment to verify alignment rather than spend valuable time in a gantry room. Many of these ideas require development, including the applications of existing radiotherapy techniques to proton gantries, so a series of research and development projects have started to address these issues. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, which will provide a portal through which military personnel and their dependants can receive proton radiotherapy, is involved in several of these development projects as well as the creation of process to remotely perform treatment planning for the military patients under treatment at the proton facility. PMID:17668956

  11. Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future. PMID:23317516

  12. Helping cancer patients across the care continuum: the navigation program at the Queen's Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Allison, Amanda L; Ishihara-Wong, Debra D M; Domingo, Jermy B; Nishioka, Jocelyn; Wilburn, Andrea; Tsark, JoAnn U; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services. PMID:23795311

  13. CENTER FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION (CMI) Early-Stage Medical Technology Research and Development

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    CENTER FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION (CMI) Early-Stage Medical Technology Research and Development Round-2. The University of Pittsburgh's Center for Medical Innovation (CMI) (Center for Medical Innovation preproposals for early-stage medical technology research and development. Purpose: The Pilot Funding Program

  14. Texas regional medical technology center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Sah; T. D. Cain; E. K. Cleveland; K. Saadatmand; M. E. Schulze; R. A. Winje

    1995-01-01

    A linear accelerator was partially completed as part of the SSC construction project. The related assets will be incorporated into a world-class medical center dedicated to providing proton-beam radiation therapy for cancer patients. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission is collaborating with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas on this project, The linac will be used to

  15. Mentoring Programs for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Academic Medical Centers: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Beech, Bettina M.; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Hairston, Kristen G.; Langdon, Sarah E.; Latham-Sadler, Brenda A.; Bell, Ronny A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is critical for career advancement in academic medicine. However, underrepresented minority (URM) faculty often receive less mentoring than their nonminority peers. The authors conducted a comprehensive review of published mentoring programs designed for URM faculty to identify “promising practices.” Method Databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, PsychLit, Google Scholar, Dissertations Abstracts International, CINHAL, Sociological Abstracts) were searched for articles describing URM faculty mentoring programs. The RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) formed the model for analyzing programs. Results The search identified 73 citations. Abstract reviews led to retrieval of 38 full-text articles for assessment; 18 articles describing 13 programs were selected for review. The reach of these programs ranged from 7 to 128 participants. Most evaluated programs on the basis of the number of grant applications and manuscripts produced or satisfaction with program content. Programs offered a variety of training experiences, and adoption was relatively high, with minor changes made for implementing the intended content. Barriers included time-restricted funding, inadequate evaluation due to few participants, significant time commitments required from mentors, and difficulty in addressing institutional challenges faced by URM faculty. Program sustainability was a concern because programs were supported through external funds, with minimal institutional support. Conclusions Mentoring is an important part of academic medicine, particularly for URM faculty who often experience unique career challenges. Despite this need, relatively few publications exist to document mentoring programs for this population. Institutionally supported mentoring programs for URM faculty are needed, along with detailed plans for program sustainability. PMID:23425989

  16. The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

  17. Characterizing customers at medical center farmers' markets.

    PubMed

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; George, Daniel R; Rovniak, Liza S; Monroe, Diana L; Fiordalis, Elizabeth; Bates, Erica

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics--most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health. PMID:24421001

  18. Hearing Conservation Medical Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on hearing impairment is presented including causes and criteria for safe noise levels. The purpose of the Hearing Conservation Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Hearing Impairment at LeRC are discussed.

  19. IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Mekalanos, John

    IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM TO BE SUBMITTED PRIOR OR PRINT LEGIBLY. STUDENT: DMS PROGRAM AFFILIATION: Immunology Program CURRENT PHONE: CURRENT EMAIL ON IMMUNOLOGY, MODELL CENTER, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL Grades and credit for rotations will not be assigned unless

  20. Kennedy Space Center exercise program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Cristy

    1993-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Fitness Program began in Feb. 1993. The program is managed by the Biomedical Operations and Research Office and operated by the Bionetics Corporation. The facilities and programs are offered to civil servants, all contractors, temporary duty assignment (TDY) participants, and retirees. All users must first have a medical clearance. A computer-generated check-in system is used to monitor participant usage. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  1. University of Rochester Medical Center Strong Partners Health System

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    to activities required to complete an approved program of medical education. POLICY TERM: 01/01/2014 to 01University of Rochester Medical Center Strong Partners Health System Professional Liability. ________________________________________________________________ CARRIER: MCIC Vermont, Inc., an RRG ADDRESS: University of Rochester Medical Center Attn: Insurance

  2. Medical Center Farmers Markets: A Strategic Partner in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Morrison, Kathy J.; Dillon, Judith F.; Bates, Beth Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of medical center–based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. Community Context In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution’s commitment to the medical home. Methods We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market’s Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance’s report on the medical home. Outcome During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Interpretation Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:23906327

  3. NIH Medical Research Scholars Program

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    1 NIH Medical Research Scholars Program · A comprehensive, year-long residential research enrichment program for medical, dental, and veterinary students · NIH Intramural Research Program in Bethesda' personal interests and career goals NIH Medical Research Scholars Program -1 · Blends elements of two

  4. Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

  5. Emergence of serine carbapenemases (KPC and SME) among clinical strains of Enterobacteriaceae isolated in the United States Medical Centers: Report from the MYSTIC Program (1999–2005)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lalitagauri M. Deshpande; Paul R. Rhomberg; Helio S. Sader; Ronald N. Jones

    2006-01-01

    Among 8885 Enterobacteriaceae tested in the 1999 to 2005 period as part of the USA Meropenem Yearly Susceptibility Test Information Collection (MYSTIC) Program, 51 strains with increased imipenem and meropenem MIC values (?2 ?g\\/mL) were detected. blaKPC was identified from 28 Klebsiella pneumoniae from 3 medical centers in the New York City area (8 ribotypes), 2 Klebsiella oxytoca from Arkansas

  6. Introduction to Medical Terminology for Claretian Medical Center Worker Education Program of Northeastern Illinois University's Chicago Teachers' Center in Partnership with the Union of Needletrades, Industrial, Textile Employers (UNITE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essex Community Coll., MD.

    This manual consists of glossaries and descriptions of medical terminology for use in a workplace literacy program for hospital workers. The sections are as follows: hospital patient care areas; hospital departments; medical specialists; word elements (root, prefix, suffix, combining vowel, compound word); surgical procedures; diseases and…

  7. Effect of a Comprehensive Health Care Program by Korean Medicine Doctors on Medical Care Utilization for Common Infectious Diseases in Child-Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soonman

    2014-01-01

    As the role of traditional medicine in community health improvement increases, a comprehensive health care program for infectious diseases management in child-care centers by Korean medicine doctors was developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the program intervention on infection-related medical care utilization among children. The study used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group, comparing pre- and post-intervention data of the same children. The program implemented interventions in terms of management, education, and medical examination for the teachers, parents, and children in 12-week period. The frequency of utilization, cost, and prescription days of drugs and antibiotics due to infectious diseases prior to the intervention were compared with those during the 3-month intervention, using health insurance claim data. A panel analysis was also conducted to support the findings. A significant reduction (12%) in infection-related visit days of hospitals was observed with the intervention (incident rate ratio = 0.88, P = 0.01). And medical cost, drug prescription days, and antibiotics prescription days were decreased, although not statistically significant. A further cost-effectiveness analysis in terms of social perspectives, considering the opportunity costs for guardians to take children to medical institutions, would be needed. PMID:25302066

  8. Energy conservation in large hospitals & medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostroy, L

    1981-01-01

    Energy conservation programs can save money for medical centers. The necessary engineering capability to evaluate these methods can be provided by Clinical Engineering staffs since the analytical ability of the Clinical Engineer is directly transferable to energy conservation programs. Several conservation methods are applicable to hospitals and deserve consideration. Cogeneration can provide significant energy conservation without any sacrifice in comfort. Solar energy is well suited to hospitals and can provide good publicity as well as energy savings. Finally, better electronic and pneumatic controls for heating, air conditioning and ventilation can provide large energy savings at moderate cost. PMID:10252004

  9. National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR)

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) 20th Anniversary Scientific Symposium N S T I T U T ES O F H E A LT H Research for a Lifet me YEARS #12;#12;National Center for Medical anniversary of the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR): NCMRR has had a fabulous 20

  10. Johnson Space Center Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    1.HMTA responsibilities: a) Assure program/project compliance with Agency health and medical requirements at identified key decision points. b) Certify that programs/projects comply with Agency health and medical requirements prior to spaceflight missions. c) Assure technical excellence. 2. Designation of applicable NASA Centers for HMTA implementation and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) appointment. 3. Center CMO responsible for HMTA implementation for programs and projects at the center. JSC HMTA captured in "JSC HMTA Implementation Plan". 4. Establishes specifics of dissenting opinion process consistent with NASA procedural requirements.

  11. NIH Medical Research Scholars Program

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    NIH Medical Research Scholars Program The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medical Research creative, research-oriented medical, dental, and veterinary students to the intramural campus of the NIH and provides the opportunity for future clinician-scientists and medical researchers to carry out research

  12. Hospitalists in medical education: coming to an academic medical center near you.

    PubMed Central

    Pressel, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Hospitalists are physicians whose medical practice focuses on general medical inpatient care. In the past decade, the number of practicing hospitalists has soared, and hospitalist programs have been established at both community hospitals and academic medical centers. As hospitalists increasingly assume a greater share of inpatient care responsibilities, they will contribute to the training of medical students and house staff. This paper reviews current data on the impact of hospitalists on medical education and the future of hospitalist training. PMID:17019919

  13. UCSD Medical Center Ergonomic Funding Assistance Form Purpose: The UCSD Medical Center Workers' Compensation Unit (WCU) currently has funds

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    UCSD Medical Center Ergonomic Funding Assistance Form Purpose: The UCSD Medical Center Workers' Compensation Unit (WCU) currently has funds available to assist departments implement ergonomic recommendations identified during an ergonomic assessment. This program will match up to 50% of the cost of identified

  14. Stanford University Medical Center Lane Medical Library

    E-print Network

    Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    or group. 8) Lost cards should be reported immediately to the Lane Service Desk. 9) The Library reserves Library, exact cash or credit card (Visa of Master Card) Valid form of identificatio 94305-5126 Circulation: (650) 723-6691 LANE MEDICAL COMMUNITY MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION AND POLICIES

  15. Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: the University of Michigan-Coulter translational research partnership program.

    PubMed

    Pienta, Kenneth J

    2010-12-01

    Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the "valley of death". The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: scientific, intellectual property, market, and regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers (AMCs). PMID:21167009

  16. Training program in maxillofacial prosthetics for medical artists.

    PubMed

    Katz, A; Pruzansky, S

    1975-11-01

    A program in maxillofacial prosthetics for medical artists was initiated at the University of Illinois Medical Center in 1966 as a joint enterprise of the Center for Craniofacial Anomalies of the Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine and the Department of Medical Art of the School of Associated Medical Sciences. In the intervening years, 25 medical artists have been graduated from the program. The general background of the trainees, the scope of their training, and their clinical contribution were discussed and illustrated. PMID:1058902

  17. Emergency Medical Services Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard emergency medical services curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the emergency medical services field, and includes job skills in six emergency medical services divisions outlined in the national curriculum:…

  18. Medical Electronics Center-Interdisciplinary Coordination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Zworykin

    1959-01-01

    The Medical Electronics Center of the Rockefeller Institute seeks to advance the application of electronic techniques in the life sciences and medicine through conferences on specialized topics, by the publication of the Bibliography of Medical Electronics and by acting as a clearing house of ideas and facilities in the field of medical electronics. However, a much greater effort is needed

  19. Bioengineering Department Stanford Medical Center, James H. Clark Center

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Bioengineering Department Stanford Medical Center, James H. Clark Center 318 Campus Drive, Rm. S170 · Stanford, CA 94305-5444 Phone: (650) 725-4009 http://bioengineering.stanford.edu/ DIRECTIONS: FROM HWY. 280

  20. Yale-New Haven Medical Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    The Yale-New Haven Medical Center Web site contains information about the Medical Center and its constituent organizations, Yale-New Haven Hospital, the Yale University School of Medicine, and the Yale University School of Nursing. You will also find links to valuable external biomedical Internet resources.

  1. D. VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER D. VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    . The VAMC is a 378-bed general medical and surgical inpatient facility as well as a 120-bed Nursing Home a total of 149,615 gsf of inpatient care facilities, which includes a 120-bed Nursing Home Care facility with UCSF and serves as one of the teaching hospitals used by UCSF. As an affiliated institution, all

  2. New Hanover Regional Medical Center

    Cancer.gov

    ROCOG sites 5 Hospital, 3 Health Systems UPMC McKeesport, McKeesport, PA (lead) Jameson Hospital, New Castle, PA Somerset Cancer Center, Somerset, PA UPMC Murtha Cancer Center, Johnstown, PA Mercy Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA National Mentors Roswell Park, Buffalo, NY Washington University, St.

  3. Clinical career ladders: Hamot Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J D; Chrymko, M M; Kelly, W N

    1989-11-01

    The clinical career ladder program for pharmacists at Hamot Medical Center (HMC), a 500-bed not-for-profit community teaching hospital, is described. Between 1980 and 1989 a career ladder at HMC evolved from an idea to an established program with parallel administrative, business, and clinical tracks. The development of the career ladder mirrored the growth of clinical programs and the diversification of pharmaceutical services. A formal plan for a clinical ladder was developed when the first satellite pharmacy opened in 1984. An entry-level pharmacist at HMC starts with a six-month period during which he or she learns the drug distribution system and prepares for several certification tests. The employee is then promoted to staff pharmacist. Staff pharmacists are promoted to clinical pharmacist II (CP II) upon meeting requirements for competence in a broad range of clinical skills and knowledge. Candidates for the position of clinical pharmacist specialist (CP I) must have either a minimum of three years of experience as a CP II or a Pharm.D. degree and have established an area of clinical expertise. A CP I can progress to assistant and associate director positions as vacancies occur. The clinical ladder has enhanced job satisfaction and encouraged the development of clinical practitioners who provide improved care. Problems have included time constraints, competition for positions, and management of incentives. A parallel career ladder program with a clinical track has enhanced the growth of pharmacy practice at HMC and improved the quality of pharmaceutical care. PMID:2589340

  4. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

  5. Teamwork at the Detroit Medical Center. Bridging the gap.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, M

    1995-06-01

    In 1992, Harper Hospital, a part of the Detroit Medical Center, initiated a Quality Enhancement and Clinical Resource Management (QE/CRM) program. The program was designed to be physician-driven and multidisciplinary. Its goal is to "look closely and critically at the appropriate use of clinical resources to affect the most desired outcomes." Through the use of teams for different clinical services, led by physicians and comprised mainly of physicians, quality of care and cost issues are identified and investigated. Changes to practice have occurred that have not only improved outcomes and saved the medical center money, but prepared it to go to managed care. PMID:10143211

  6. The revised Bethesda guidelines: extent of utilization in a university hospital medical center with a cancer genetics program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In 1996, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop to develop criteria to identify patients with colorectal cancer who should be offered microsatellite instability (MSI) testing due to an increased risk for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC). These criteria were further modified in 2004 and became known as the revised Bethesda Guidelines. Our study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the percentage of patients diagnosed with HNPCC tumors in 2004 who met revised Bethesda criteria for MSI testing, who were referred for genetic counseling within our institution. Methods All HNPCC tumors diagnosed in 2004 were identified by accessing CoPath, an internal database. Both the Tumor Registry and patients' electronic medical records were accessed to collect all relevant family history information. The list of patients who met at least one of the revised Bethesda criteria, who were candidates for MSI testing, was then cross-referenced with the database of patients referred for genetic counseling within our institution. Results A total of 380 HNPCC-associated tumors were diagnosed at our institution during 2004 of which 41 (10.7%) met at least one of the revised Bethesda criteria. Eight (19.5%) of these patients were referred for cancer genetic counseling of which 2 (25%) were seen by a genetics professional. Ultimately, only 4.9% of patients eligible for MSI testing in 2004 were seen for genetic counseling. Conclusion This retrospective study identified a number of barriers, both internal and external, which hindered the identification of individuals with HNPCC, thus limiting the ability to appropriately manage these high risk families. PMID:21092199

  7. Programs for international medical graduates.

    PubMed Central

    Nasmith, L.

    1993-01-01

    Medical graduates from other countries provide health care in many regions of Canada; yet differences in training standards can cause problems. A recent survey looked at the requirements of provincial licensing bodies and the preresidency programs of Canadian faculties of medicine. Quebec, Ontario, and Manitoba provide such programs, which differ in length, content, and evaluation process. McGill has recently launched a more focused program. PMID:8292930

  8. Mobile Media at San Francisco Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Thomas L.

    1968-01-01

    In 1966 the University of California Medical Center at San Francisco (including Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy) established a broadly based communications media center designed to serve the variety of teaching, research, and continuing education requirements of the faculty. This article dwells on the variety of applications…

  9. Student perceptions of a patient- centered medical training curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Gallentine, Ashley; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily; Hinojosa, Sara; Monroe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate a patient-centered medical training curriculum, the SELECT program, through perceptions of the inaugural student cohort. Methods Data were collected from two focus groups conducted in the university setting, comprised of fifteen first-year medical students who participated in the SELECT program during its inaugural year. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion, which was transcribed and hand-coded through thematic analyses. Results Various themes related to patient-centered care were identified. Students noted changes in their attitudes towards interacting with patients in an empowering and educative manner as a result of communication and motivational interviewing exercises. Additionally, they recognized certain external, structural barriers as well as internal conflict between pragmatism and emotional intelligence that could potentially hinder patient-centered care. The impact of family dynamics and social support on quality of life and health outcomes was acknowledged. Students also emphasized the value of collaborating with multiple health professionals. Lastly, students provided suggestions for program improvement, namely additional simulations, more education regarding other healthcare professionals’ roles, more standardized experiences, and application of principles to acute and primary care. Conclusions Upon completion of the first year of the SELECT program, students gained an appreciation for patient-centered care and various factors and skills that facilitate such care. Additionally, they experienced a dissonance between didactic concepts from the curriculum and observed medical practices. This study highlights the educational benefits of a patient-centered medical curriculum and provides suggestions for future improvement. PMID:25341218

  10. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  11. CDRP - Funded Institutions - Laredo Medical Center

    Cancer.gov

    Laredo Medical Center, formerly known as Mercy Health Center, was a non-profit institution established by the Sisters of Mercy, a group of Catholic nuns. Mercy Health Center was sold to Community Health Systems (CHS) in 2003. CHS is based in Brentwood, Tennessee and is the leading operator of general acute care hospitals in non-urban markets throughout the United States. CHS owns 72 hospitals located in 22 states across the country. The present facility was completed in September 1999.

  12. Establishing a Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program: The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School–University Hospital Cancer Center Experience. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This academic medical center case study demonstrates the challenges encountered and lessons learned in establishing a NCI-supported Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOP). Despite programmatic strengths, successful accrual of sufficient numbers of minority patients was a challenge.

  13. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program NCCCP Program Advisory Committee 1 Maureen Johnson, PhD Norman Coleman, MD NCCCP Project Officer Special Advisor Special Assistant to the Director Radiation Oncology Branch, NIH 31 Center Drive

  14. Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center,

    Cancer.gov

    Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana The Cancer Program of Our Lady of the Lake and Mary Bird Perkins 5000 Hennessey Blvd Baton Rouge, LA 70808 www.ololrmc.com www.marybird.org • Robert Davidge, CEO, Our

  15. Vocational Rehabilitation within a V.A. Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Matthew; And Others

    Many military veterans struggle with substance abuse, homelessness, physical and emotional disabilities, disappointing work histories, and low income. A vocational rehabilitation program at a Veterans' Administration medical center, designed to help veterans with some of these struggles, is described here. Personnel work within the context of each…

  16. Academic medical center libraries on the Web.

    PubMed

    Tannery, N H; Wessel, C B

    1998-10-01

    Academic medical center libraries are moving towards publishing electronically, utilizing networked technologies, and creating digital libraries. The catalyst for this movement has been the Web. An analysis of academic medical center library Web pages was undertaken to assess the information created and communicated in early 1997. A summary of present uses and suggestions for future applications is provided. A method for evaluating and describing the content of library Web sites was designed. The evaluation included categorizing basic information such as description and access to library services, access to commercial databases, and use of interactive forms. The main goal of the evaluation was to assess original resources produced by these libraries. PMID:9803298

  17. Postgraduate Medical Education Clinician Investigator Program (CIP)

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    1 Postgraduate Medical Education Clinician Investigator Program (CIP .................................................4 1.2.1 Medical Research Expert.6 ACADEMIC SESSIONS AND ETHICS TRAINING ..................................................................10

  18. Use of Existing Institutional Resources: An Urban Medical Center and A Rural Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roglieri, John L.; Almy, Thomas

    1975-01-01

    Case studies are presented of the development of primary health care programs at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York City, by John Roglieri, and at Dartmouth Medical School by Thomas Almy. (JT)

  19. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  20. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  1. CDRP - Funded Institutions - New Hanover Regional Medical Center

    Cancer.gov

    The New Hanover Regional Medical Center (NHRMC) is the largest provider of health care services in Southeastern North Carolina. NHRMC is the network's 769-bed tertiary, teaching facility. Affiliated with the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the South East Area Health Education Center, it offers residency programs in surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, family practice, and internal medicine.

  2. The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, T N; Kemby, K M

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions. PMID:25089192

  3. University Medical Center New Orleans, Louisiana

    E-print Network

    Structure Wood Frame Masonry Constructed on 5' Thick Corbelled Masonry Foundation Est. Moving Weight 2M Pounds Actual Moving Weight 3M Pounds #12;1818 UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER McDonogh No. 11 School Surcharging the Site Factoids: 270,000 CY of Sand Hauled In 13,500 Dump Trucks 2,468,430 LF of Vertical Wick

  4. Health Insurance & Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Health Insurance & Patient- Centered Medical Homes Office of Rural Health Area Health Education insurance coverage for routine care for patients who undergo clinical trials · Health Care Cost Database · In the fall of 2010, the CSI took the lead · As chief insurance regulator, the CSI can bring private health

  5. The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty re-search initiatives within the Feinberg School of Medicine (FSM), and encourages medical stu-

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty re- search Center residents to engage in global health in a meaningful way via research projects, supervised professionals with global health interests to collaborate on research opportunities and new proposals

  6. The Six Sigma initiative at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chassin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma, in various forms, has been used widely in many Fortune 500 companies. Motorola, General Electric, Sony, American Express, and Bechtel all use Six Sigma to improve quality and performance. While the impact of this methodology has been documented extensively by the press in manufacturing and transactional settings, less evidence is available regarding its utility in health care environments. Mount Sinai Medical Center initiated a Six Sigma program in 2000 to determine its applicability and value in a large academic medical center. This article discusses Mount Sinai Medical Center's experience adapting this methodology to improve both patient care and business processes and outcomes. We present an overview of Six Sigma, and offer examples of projects undertaken using this data-driven approach to performance improvement. Lastly, the article provides insights and lessons learned regarding this organization-wide experience. PMID:18306249

  7. The medical story. [Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Dietlein, L. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the Skylab medical program is given. All medical subsystems provided in the orbital workshop functioned satisfactorily. Major systems included the food system, the waste management system, and provisions per personal hygiene. A series of lockers in the wardroom was used to stow the inflight medical support system. Cardiovascular counter pressure garments were launched in the orbital workshop for all three crews. Life services experiments were carried out. Two experiments were conducted in the Skylab missions to study the performance of the cardiovascular system during weightless flight and return to earth and the one g environment. A series of experiments was conducted to study mineral balance and the bioassay of body fluids.

  8. Rathmann Family Foundation Medical Education Faculty Fellowship in Patient-Centered Care

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    in weekly Medical Education Fellows' Seminar covering theory and methods in medical education research under the supervision of the faculty directors of the program and researchers in the Stanford Center for Medical Education Research and Innovation (SCeMERI) and development and conduct of a scholarly project in medical

  9. Teaching health centers: a new paradigm in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Candice; Chen, Frederick; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2012-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 created the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program to provide graduate medical education (GME) funding directly to community-based health centers that expand or establish new primary care residency programs. The THCGME program was the legislation's only new investment in GME, and it represents a significant departure from the Medicare GME funding system. It provides payments to ambulatory care centers for both direct and indirect GME expenses, and mandates a level of reporting from recipients that is not required for Medicare GME support. This initial look at the 11 inaugural teaching health centers (THCs) shows that they are training primary care residents in relevant delivery models (e.g., interprofessional teams, patient-centered medical homes), developing educational initiatives that address primary care practice in underserved areas, and transforming organizational and funding structures to support community-based training. The THCs plan to evaluate and report resident performance, patient quality of care, and graduate outcomes. The work of the first THCs has implications for primary care training, the GME system, and future policies and legislation aimed at strengthening the health care workforce. PMID:23095929

  10. Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

    Cancer.gov

    Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota Sanford Cancer Center 1305 W. 18th Street Sioux Falls, SD 57105 www.sanfordhealth.org • Pat O’Brien, MD, President, Sanford USD Medical Center • Dan Blue, MD, President, Sanford Clinic •

  11. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  12. Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) operates under the auspices of the USDA Agricultural Research Service. CMAVE "conducts research aimed at reducing or eliminating the harm caused by insects to crops, stored products, livestock and humans. Research is directed not only at the insects themselves but at pathogens they may transmit and at identifying inherent protective mechanisms in plants." The Center's website links to information about CMAVE researchers and research units. The site also lists CMAVE publications from 1991 to the present year. Reprints may be requested directly from the author(s), or from the CMAVE Secretary. Site visitors will also find links to employment listings from the USDA.

  13. Research Plan for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Research Plan for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research BETHESDA, MD MARCH.............................................................................................................................................................................5 National Advisory Board on Medical Rehabilitation Research...............................................................................................................................................18 Conceptual Model of the Rehabilitation Process.......................................................................................

  14. Patient-centered medical homes: recognition and reimbursement - part 3.

    PubMed

    Stack, Eric; Kier, Karen

    2014-01-01

    As a result of current weaknesses and deficiencies in the United States health care system, the concept of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), a way of organizing primary care that emphasizes coordination and communication among patients and providers, has taken root. The formation of the National Committee for Quality Assurance-Patient- Centered Medical Homes (NCQA-PCMH) Recognition Program and its associated standards has assisted many clinicians seeking to evolve with these changing models of medical practice. Not only have PCMHs been shown to improve patient health outcomes, but they also have been associated with decreasing overall health care costs. Additionally, there are many benefits of primary care practice sites to develop into a PCMH, including eligibility for both private party and government reimbursement. PMID:24849691

  15. Global Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Yates, Andrew

    Global Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM Request for Applications The Einstein Global Health Center Microgrant Program aims to provide small grants to help jumpstart faculty members' global health efforts. It is expected that the microgrants will lead to creation of new global health initiatives or further leveraging

  16. says Michel Torbey, MD, medical director of OSU Medical Center's Neurovascular Stroke Center.

    E-print Network

    of life. Ohio State's Stroke Rehabilitation Program at Dodd Hall is the only rehab program in central Ohio is brain,'" Dr. Torbey explains. `aMeriCa's best' stroke Care When a stroke patient arrives at The OhioNdePeNdeNCe Once the appropriate medical or surgical care is pro- vided to stabilize the stroke patient, the next

  17. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  18. Celebrating 10 Years of Undergraduate Medical Education: A Student-Centered Evaluation of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-Determinants of Community Health Year 2 Program.

    PubMed

    Fernando, E; Jusko-Friedman, A; Catton, P; Nyhof-Young, J

    2014-06-01

    Between 2000 and 2011, over 170 second-year medical students participated in a Determinants of Community Health (DOCH 2) project at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH). Students undertook community-based research projects at the hospital or with PMH community partners involving activities such as producing a literature review, writing a research proposal, obtaining ethics approval, carrying out data collection and analysis, presenting their data to classmates and supervisors, and production of a final report. An electronic survey consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was developed to evaluate the PMH-DOCH 2 program and was distributed to 144 past students with known email addresses. Fifty-eight students responded, a response rate of 40.3 %. Data analysis indicates that an increase in oncology knowledge, awareness of the impact of determinants of health on patients, and knowledge of research procedures increased participants' satisfaction and ability to conduct research following DOCH 2. Furthermore, the PMH-DOCH 2 program enhanced the development of CanMEDS competencies through career exploration and patient interaction as well as through shadowing physicians and other allied health professionals. In addition, some students felt their PMH-DOCH 2 projects played a beneficial role during their residency matching process. The PMH-DOCH 2 research program appeared to provide a positive experience for most participants and opportunities for medical students' professional growth and development outside the confines of traditional lecture-based courses. PMID:24906503

  19. American Medical Education: Institutions, Programs, and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    This report presents information about the academic medical centers belonging to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and profiles American medical education generally. Following a brief introduction, a section on institutions and resources offers information on medical schools' financial support, faculties, and faculty practice…

  20. NASA Johnson Space Center Medical Licensing Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reviews patented medical items that are available for licensing in the areas of Laboratory Technologies, Medical Devices, Medical Equipment and other technologies that are of interest to the medical community.

  1. UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay: 2000: Following California's

    E-print Network

    Derisi, Joseph

    design, budget and environmental plans for UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. October 2010: Groundbreak will open the doors of a new world-class facility. UCSF Medical Center is opening three state- of-the-art

  2. Graduate Appointee Medical/Dental/Vision Insurance Program 2013-2014 2013 2014 Medical Plan Summary for Academic Student Employees

    E-print Network

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Graduate Appointee Medical/Dental/Vision Insurance Program 2013-2014 2013 ­ 2014 Medical Plan Medical/Dental/Vision Insurance Program 2013-2014 Student Benefits Hall Health Center/ Rubenstein Pharmacy% of allowable charge after deductible Emergency Room Care Not Available 90% of allowable charge after deductible

  3. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  4. VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT SHOULD: Virology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: 2. 3. 4. Today TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Virology Program Administrator TMEC-346 Harvard Medical School 617-432-1977 YES

  5. Development and implementation of a comprehensive strategic plan for medical education at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Schwartzstein, Richard M; Huang, Grace C; Coughlin, Christine M

    2008-06-01

    Despite their vital contributions to the training of future physicians, many academic teaching hospitals have grown operationally and financially distinct from affiliated medical schools because of divergent missions, contributing to the erosion of clinical training. Some institutions have responded by building hybrid organizations; others by creating large health care networks with variable relationships with the affiliated medical school. In this case, the authors wished to establish the future educational mission of their medical center as a core element of the institution by creating data-driven recommendations for reorganization, programs, and financing. They conducted a self-study of all constituents, the results of which confirmed the importance of education at their institution but also revealed the insufficiency of incentives for teaching. They underwent an external review by a committee of prominent educators, and they involved administrators at the hospital and the medical school. Together, these inputs composed an informed assessment of medical education at their teaching hospital, from which they developed and actualized an institution-wide strategic plan for education. Over the course of three years, they centralized the administrative structure for education, implemented programs that cross departments and reinforce the UME-GME continuum, and created transparency in the financing of medical education. The plan was purposefully aligned with the clinical and research strategic plans by supporting patient safety in programs and the professional development of faculty. The application of a rigorous strategic planning process to medical education at an academic teaching hospital can focus the mission, invigorate faculty, and lead to innovative programs. PMID:18520458

  6. AUDIOLOGY PRACTICUM AND CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP GUIDELINES The University of Kansas Medical Center

    E-print Network

    AUDIOLOGY PRACTICUM AND CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP GUIDELINES The University of Kansas Medical Center in return. The program encourages mid-term conferences between clinical supervisors and their students. We concern raised will be brought to your attention. #12;University of Kansas Medical Center Department

  7. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain proficiency in using the combustion analyzer, IR camera, logging equipment, light metering equipment, and other equipment. Instruction included usage and basic maintenance. While undergraduate students worked with the coursework and on-the-job training, graduate students were expected to do more. A typical MS student was required to complete a 3-hour independent study in some interesting facet of energy management under the supervision of a director. PhD students were expected to complete from three to six hours of independent study work in the energy management field, as well as center their dissertation research in the general area of energy/productivity/quality management. During the project period, two PhDs were completed, with several more near completion.

  8. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - NCCCP Homepage

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - NCCCP Homepage Skip to content Related Programs Overview Cancer Centers Program Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOPs) Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (MB-CCOPs) Cancer Trials

  9. Ceftaroline Activity against Bacterial Pathogens Frequently Isolated in U.S. Medical Centers: Results from Five Years of the AWARE Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Streit, Jennifer M; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2015-04-01

    A total of 84,704 isolates were collected from 191 medical centers in 2009 to 2013 and tested for susceptibility to ceftaroline and comparator agents by broth microdilution methods. Ceftaroline inhibited all Staphylococcus aureus isolates at ?2 ?g/ml and was very active against methicillin-resistant strains (MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested are inhibited [MIC90], 1 ?g/ml; 97.6% susceptible). Among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates, the highest ceftaroline MIC was 0.5 ?g/ml, and ceftaroline activity against the most common Enterobacteriaceae species (MIC50, 0.12 ?g/ml; 78.9% susceptible) was similar to that of ceftriaxone (MIC50, ?0.25 ?g/ml; 86.8% susceptible). PMID:25645844

  10. Study Abroad Center Program Review

    E-print Network

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Study Abroad Center Program Review Self-Study Report January 2006 Office of the Provost #12;2 Table Purpose of Self-Study 8 External Review 9 II. Overview of the Study Abroad Center 10 History 10 Structure to Other Campus Study Abroad Offices 24 Relation to Other Campus Offices 26 Partners and Collaborators 30

  11. The Carlson School Medical Industry Leadership Programs

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    education and research, the Medical Industry Leadership Institute prepares MBA students for challengingThe Carlson School Medical Industry Leadership Programs Shaping the future of the medical industry #12;Driving innovation through education and research Dedicated to the advancement of cutting- edge

  12. Stanford University Medical Center: Ovarian Kaleidoscope Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Ovarian Kaleidoscope Database (OKDB) was developed by the Hsueh Lab in the Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics at Stanford University Medical Center. The OKDB "provides information regarding the biological function, expression pattern and regulation of genes expressed in the ovary. It also contains information on gene sequences, chromosomal localization, human and murine mutation phenotypes and biomedical publication links." Database users can conduct a Gene Search, or browse an extensive Alphabetical List of Ovarian Genes. After registering with OKDB, site users can access Submit and Update options as well. The site also contains an interactive diagram of Ovarian Gene Mutations Associated with Infertility or Sub-Fertility, information about Ovarian Gene Maps, and a selection of Useful Links.

  13. Graduate medical education in an HMO: an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, E S; Jones, H W

    1982-06-01

    Graduate medical education in the setting of a large health maintenance organization (HMO) is a challenging enterprise with surmountable problems and tangible rewards. Ten years ago an independent residency program in internal medicine was begun at one of the largest medical centers in the Kaiser-Permanente Medical Care Program in Northern California. The residency program, at the Kaiser-Permanente Medical Center in Santa Clara, is described and compared with other graduate medical programs. Included are discussions of curriculum development, faculty, funding, medical school affiliation, and the role of HMOs in graduate training. PMID:7077637

  14. UCSF Medical Scholars Program, 1986-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullilove, Mindy; And Others

    The University of California San Francisco's Medical Scholars Program was designed to encourage women and minority students to consider careers in academic medicine. The program ensured academic success in the basic pre-medical courses through the use of peer learning groups and exposed students to research opportunities through informal…

  15. VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM TO BE SUBMITTED PRIOR OR PRINT LEGIBLY. STUDENT: DMS PROGRAM AFFILIATION: Virology Program CURRENT PHONE: CURRENT EMAIL if needed, the Rotation Supervisor's signature as well) to: PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR, THE COMMITTEE ON VIROLOGY

  16. Evaluating Community Engagement in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Peter G.; Shone, Laura P.; Dozier, Ann M.; Newton, Ms. Gail L.; Green, Theresa; Bennett, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of academic medical centers (AMCs), community engagement is a collaborative process of working toward mutually defined goals to improve the community’s health, and involves partnerships between AMCs, individuals, and entities representing the surrounding community. AMCs increasingly recognize the importance of community engagement, and recent programs such as Prevention Research Centers and Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) have highlighted community engagement activities. However, there is no standard or accepted metric for evaluating AMCs’ performance and impact of community engagement activities. In this article, the authors present a framework for evaluating AMCs’ community engagement activities. The framework includes broad goals and specific activities within each goal, wherein goals and activities are evaluated using a health services research framework consisting of structure, process, and outcome criteria. To illustrate how to use this community engagement evaluation framework, the authors present specific community engagement goals and activities of the University of Rochester Medical Center to: 1) improve the health of the community served by the AMC; 2) increase the AMC’s capacity for community engagement, and 3) increase generalizable knowledge and practices in community engagement and public health. Using a structure-process-outcomes framework, a multi-disciplinary team should regularly evaluate an AMC’s community engagement program with the purpose of measurably improving the performance of the AMC and the health of its surrounding community. PMID:24556768

  17. Evaluating community engagement in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Peter G; Shone, Laura P; Dozier, Ann M; Newton, Gail L; Green, Theresa; Bennett, Nancy M

    2014-04-01

    From the perspective of academic medical centers (AMCs), community engagement is a collaborative process of working toward mutually defined goals to improve the community's health, and involves partnerships between AMCs, individuals, and entities representing the surrounding community. AMCs increasingly recognize the importance of community engagement, and recent programs such as Prevention Research Centers and Clinical and Translational Science Awards have highlighted community engagement activities. However, there is no standard or accepted metric for evaluating AMCs' performance and impact of community engagement activities.In this article, the authors present a framework for evaluating AMCs' community engagement activities. The framework includes broad goals and specific activities within each goal, wherein goals and activities are evaluated using a health services research framework consisting of structure, process, and outcome criteria. To illustrate how to use this community engagement evaluation framework, the authors present specific community engagement goals and activities of the University of Rochester Medical Center to (1) improve the health of the community served by the AMC; (2) increase the AMC's capacity for community engagement; and (3) increase generalizable knowledge and practices in community engagement and public health.Using a structure-process-outcomes framework, a multidisciplinary team should regularly evaluate an AMC's community engagement program with the purpose of measurably improving the performance of the AMC and the health of its surrounding community. PMID:24556768

  18. Herding cats: Designing DigitalCommons @ The Texas Medical Center, a multi-institutional repository

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leah Krevit; Linda Crays

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot program implemented by the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library and The University of Texas School of Nursing at Houston to design the multi-institutional repository for the Texas Medical Center. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The steps involved in the program are outlined and the lessons learned from the implementation

  19. Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC)

    Cancer.gov

    Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC) are partnerships on a large regional- and national-partnership scale. CNPCs continue the work of the Community Networks Program (CNP), which ended in 2010. A CNPC is headquartered at an academic institution or community-based organization and works closely with the local community to identify its cancer disparity problems and cancer prevention and control needs, and to develop culturally sensitive interventions specific to that community.

  20. Implementation of a clinical pharmacy specialist-managed telephonic hospital discharge follow-up program in a patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah L; Marrs, Joel C; Vande Griend, Joseph P; Hanratty, Rebecca

    2013-08-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to examine the feasibility and characteristics that define successful implementation of a Clinical Pharmacy Specialist (CPS) telephonic hospital discharge follow-up quality improvement initiative, as well as the impact of this initiative. Adult patients who were discharged from a safety-net hospital between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011 and who were part of a patient-centered medical home were included in this quality improvement initiative. CPSs attempted to contact 470 patients; of those, 207 received the intervention and 263 did not. Patients in the contacted group were more likely to attend a hospital discharge follow-up appointment (66.2% vs. 44.5%, P<0.01) and had lower rates of 30-day readmission (22 vs. 52, P<0.01) compared to those who were not contacted. Institutions should consider allocating resources for pharmacist-managed posthospital discharge follow-up services because of the potential for positive clinical and financial impact. PMID:23537153

  1. Implementing a national program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a quality improvement collaboration of state hospital associations, academic medical centers, professional societies, and governmental agencies.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Mohamad G; George, Christine; Edson, Barbara S; Goeschel, Christine A; Saint, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents a significant proportion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The US Department of Health and Human Services issued a plan to reduce HAIs with a target 25% reduction of CAUTI by 2013. Michigan's successful collaborative to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters and CAUTI was based on a partnership between diverse hospitals, the state hospital association (SHA), and academic medical centers. Taking the lessons learned from Michigan, we are now spreading this work throughout the 50 states. This national spread leverages the expertise of different groups and organizations for the unified goal of reducing catheter-related harm. The key components of the project are (1) centralized coordination of the effort and dissemination of information to SHAs and hospitals, (2) data collection based on established definitions and approaches, (3) focused guidance on the technical practices that will prevent CAUTI, (4) emphasis on understanding the socioadaptive aspects (both the general, unit-wide issues and CAUTI-specific challenges), and (5) partnering with specialty organizations and governmental agencies who have expertise in the relevant subject area. The work may serve in the future as a model for other large improvement efforts to address other hospital-acquired conditions, such as venous thromboembolism and falls. PMID:24018921

  2. Inflight Medical Events in the Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisden, Denise L.; Effenhauser, R. K.; Wear, Mary L.

    1999-01-01

    Since the first launch of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the astronauts and their flight surgeons have dealt with a variety of inflight medical issues. A review will be provided of these issues as well as medications used in the treatment of these medical problems. Detailed medical debriefs are conducted by the flight ,surgeon with the individual crewmembers three days after landing. These debriefs were review for Shuttle flights from 1988 through 1999 to determine the frequency of inflight medical events. Medical events were grouped by ICD category and the frequency of medical events within those categories were reviewed. The ICD category of Symptoms, Signs and Ill-defined Conditions had the most medical events. Facial fullness and headache were the most common complaints within this category. The ICD category of Respiratory System had the next most common medical events with sinus congestion being the most common complaint. This was followed by Digestive System complaints and Nervous System/Sense Organ complaints. A variety of inflight medical events have occurred throughout the Shuttle program. Fortunately, the majority of these problems have been minor and have been well within the capability of the medical equipment flown and the skills of the Crew Medical Officers. Medical ,problems/procedures that are routine on the ground often present unique problems in the space flight environment. It is important that the flight surgeon understand the common medical problems encountered.

  3. Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform -Involve -Enable

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform - Involve - Enable revised 6/04/13 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Please click medical education responsibilities II. Summary of medical education research experience III. Summary

  4. National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver's recent death serves as a reminder of her advocacy on behalf of those with mental retardation and her commitment to research about human development. The National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research is her legacy, born of her concern for her sister Rosemary's treatment, who was born mentally retarded and later lobotomized because of it, "Mrs. Eunice Kennedy set out to help the scientific community, policy makers, and the general public recognize the importance of such research [in itself and] as a bridge to understanding broader, more general aspects of human development, which would help all people." The website for the NCMRR has a number of available resources on the right side of the webpage, such as Funding Opportunities, Research Resources, and News Releases. Scientists interested in "Scientific Meetings, Conferences and Events", can find them by clicking on that very link on the left hand side of the page. "AtoZ Health and Human Development Topics", from AIDS to Turner Syndrome, can be found under the "Health Information" tab on the far left hand side of the page. "Clinical Research & Clinical Trials", "Health Education" and "Publications & Materials" can also be accessed under that tab.

  5. Summer research program (1992). Summer faculty research program (SFRP) reports. Volume 6. Arnold Engineering Development Center, Civil Engineering Laboratory, Frank J. Seiler research laboratory, Wilford Hall Medical Center. Annual report, 1 September 1991-31 August 1992

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    The following Topics were among those completed at the Air Force Faculty Research Summer Program: Experiences using Model-Based Techniques for the Development of a Large Parallel Instrumentation System; Data Reduction of Laser Induced Fluorescence in Rocket Motor Exhausts; Feasibility of Wavelet Analysis for Plume Data Study; Characterization of Seagrass Meadows in St. Andrew (Crooked Island) Sound, Northern Gulf of Mexico;

  6. Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence

    E-print Network

    Louisiana State University Medical Center · School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience Center University School of Medicine, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Medical Education Building, Seminar Room. Edward F. Dudek, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins Medical

  7. Program Use Only: Application: __________ Essay: ___________ Resume: __________ Transcript(s): __________ Harvard Medical School

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    (s): __________ Harvard Medical School George Church Lab 2014 Summer Undergraduate Research Internship Program Center-Siegel, Harvard Medical School New Research Building, Room 238H, Church Lab 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur Boston, MA

  8. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview Search NCCCP For General Information Frank Blanchard (Contractor) Director, Public Affairs SAIC-Frederick, Inc. National Cancer Institute at Frederick

  9. Authorization for Release of Medical Information: Billing & Fees Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    University Medical Center contracts with HealthPort to process requests for copies of medical records, we will provide up to 50 pages of the medical records that are relevant to your care. This is called is an abstract? An abstract contains only the medical records needed by you and your providers to continue your

  10. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  11. Establishing a Medical Library Technology Program— The SUNY Experience *

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, Evelyn L.

    1969-01-01

    A two-year program in Medical Library Technology leading to the Associate in Applied Science degree was developed and approved by the State University of New York and the New York State Board of Regents as a joint endeavor of the Upstate Medical Center and the Onondaga Community College, with classes scheduled to begin in September 1969. The curriculum is designed to allow continuation of study towards the Bachelor of Science degree and includes a summer internship at one of several participating medical libraries. An increasing number of library technology programs are being offered by junior colleges in the U. S. and Canada. However, this represents a first attempt at a technician education program designed specifically for medical libraries. PMID:5778723

  12. CignaMedicalVaccine ProgramDirectory

    E-print Network

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    CignaMedicalVaccine ProgramDirectory Pharmacies Cigna is pleased vaccines, at several retail pharmacy locations. These can be administered at the following pharmacies vaccines will be covered at no cost to you. Please present your Cigna medical ID card to the pharmacy

  13. TITLE: RESEARCH AND HIPAA CLINICAL AND MEDICAL RECORDS Columbia University Medical Center will administer and conduct medical records research

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    TITLE: RESEARCH AND HIPAA CLINICAL AND MEDICAL RECORDS POLICY: Columbia University Medical Center will administer and conduct medical records research activities in accordance with city, state, and federal laws Individuals conducting or assisting with research activities will follow existing Columbia University Medical

  14. Quality in Medical Practice: A Student Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garg, Mohan; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An updated report is offered of the successes and failures of the quality assurance program at the Medical College of Ohio during 1975-76. Students were used as auditors, submitting written evaluations of patient charts. (LBH)

  15. Houston is the perfect setting for studying the dynamic nature of health law and policy. The nearby Texas Medical Center, the world's largest medical complex, offers extraordinary opportunities for legal scholars

    E-print Network

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    and policy. The nearby Texas Medical Center, the world's largest medical complex, offers extraordinary them in addressing complex legal issues that affect their work. The Texas Medical Center includes scale and diversity, the Texas Medical Center is a critical link in the Institute's acclaimed programs

  16. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  17. The Biomedical Libraries Dartmouth College/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    The Biomedical Libraries Dartmouth College/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center 2000/2001 Annual-Fuller Health Sciences Library at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire-Fuller Library. · Jamie Dalton moved from Document Delivery Assistant to Learning Resources Technician. · Anne D

  18. Unique medical education programs at Nippon Medical School.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Toshiro; Yoshimura, Akinobu; Saito, Takuya; Aso, Ryoko

    2008-08-01

    In an attempt to improve the content of the educational programs offered by Nippon Medical School and to better prepare our students to work in the rapidly changing world of medicine, the school has recently revamped its teaching methodology. Particular emphasis has been placed on 1) simulator-based education involving the evaluation of students and residents in a new clinical simulation laboratory; 2) improving communication skills with the extensive help of simulated patients; 3) improving medical English education; 4) providing early clinical exposure with a one-week clinical nursing program for the first year students to increase student motivation at an early stage in their studies; 5) a new program called Novel Medical Science, which aims to introduce first-year students to the schools fundamental educational philosophy and thereby increase their motivation to become ideal physicians. The programs have been designed in line with 2006 guidelines issued by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology to allow flexibility for students to take part in education outside their own departments and year groups as part of the Ministry's program to encourage distinctive education at Japanese universities. PMID:18781040

  19. Teaching in a patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Teaching Lamaze International classes in a patient-centered medical home allows the childbirth educator the best environment for giving evidence-based information and empowering parents to give birth their way. Patient-centered medical home facilities and providers practice evidence-based care and adhere to the principles of family-centered maternity care. In patient-centered medical homes, women can expect to give birth using the Lamaze Healthy Birth Practices and to fully participate in their care with appropriate interventions and the right to informed consent and informed refusal. PMID:22654465

  20. Space Shuttle Program: STS-1 Medical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The necessity for developing medical standards addressing individual classes of Shuttle crew positions is discussed. For the U.S. manned program the conclusion of the Apollo era heralded the end of water recovery operations and the introduction of land-based medical operations. This procedural change marked a significant departure from the accepted postflight medical recovery and evaluation techniques. All phases of the missions required careful re-evaluation, identification of potential impact on preexisting medical operational techniques, and development of new methodologies which were carefully evaluated and tested under simulated conditions. Significant coordination was required between the different teams involved in medical operations. Additional dimensions were added to the concepts of medical operations, by the introduction of different toxic substances utilized by the Space Transportation Systems especially during ground operations.

  1. Medical Emergency Education in Dental Hygiene Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stach, Donna J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 169 dental hygiene training programs investigated the curriculum content and instruction concerning medical emergency treatment, related clinical practice, and program policy. Several trends are noted: increased curriculum hours devoted to emergency care; shift in course content to more than life-support care; and increased emergency…

  2. MedReach: building an Area Health Education Center medical information outreach system for Northwest Ohio*†

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Victoria; Hartmann, Jonathan; Ronau, Theodore

    2002-01-01

    In collaboration with regional partners in northwest Ohio, the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program at the Medical College of Ohio (MCO) at Toledo is reaching out to underserved areas, helping to provide educational opportunities to health care professionals in these communities. This paper describes the development of MedReach, a medical information outreach system that connects regional AHEC sites to MCO via the Internet. MedReach provides physicians and other health care professionals access and support to search computerized textbooks and databases for current information on medical diagnoses, treatments, and research. A unique aspect of the MedReach project is that users are able to receive personal help with information retrieval by calling or emailing MCO's outreach librarian. Periodically, the AHEC program and the Mulford Library at MCO also sponsor an educational program, titled “Medical Applications of Computers,” for regional practitioners. Current feedback on both the medical information outreach system and the educational program has been positive. PMID:12113517

  3. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs - Community-Clinical Oncology Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) is a network for conducting cancer prevention and treatment clinical trials by community medical practitioners. This network connects academic centers (Research Bases who design and conduct the trials) with community physicians who accrue patients to those trials.

  4. A Sustainable Medical Center in Texas

    E-print Network

    Pfeiffer, P. L.; Miller, B.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how one can successfully integrate many sustainable features into the construction and operation of a mid-sized medical clinic located in the hot/humid piney woods of east Texas for a moderate...

  5. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  6. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago�s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  7. UMass Amherst Medical Scholars Program (Phase I) and Baccalaureate MD Pathway Program with UMass Medical School (Phase II).

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Pathway Program with UMass Medical School (Phase II). Introduction to a school of medicine and to assure their success in medical careers. This program and identified as *" assured admission" to UMass Medical School and will enter Phase

  8. Prescription Medication Borrowing among Adult Patients at an Urban Medical Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Ward; Nima M. Patel; Alexandra Hanlon; Shaden Eldakar-Hein; Kristin Sherlinski; Stephanie H. Ward

    Prescription medication borrowing can result in adverse health outcomes. We aimed to study the patterns of borrowing prescription\\u000a medications in an adult urban population seeking healthcare in the outpatient, emergency, and inpatient units of an urban\\u000a medical center. Participants indicated whether they (1) had a primary care doctor, medical insurance, a prior history of substance\\u000a abuse, psychiatric disorders, or chronic

  9. Master's level graduate training in medical physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-06-01

    Medical physics is an applied branch of physics which is concerned with the application of energy in various forms to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is allied closely with medical electronics, bioengineering, and health physics, but extends beyond the boundaries of these rather specific disciplines. The diversity of medical physics demands a broad background of both coursework and experience for persons working in this field. To provide such training, educational programs have been developed such as the Master's degree program in medical physics of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. The program at the University of Colorado was established in 1971 and is noteworthy for its emphasis on the practical and clinical aspects of medical physics.

  10. Decision support system in a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kalyan S. Pasupathy; Karl M. Kochendorfer; Gordon D. Brown; Lanis L. Hicks; Linsey M. Barker; Ricky C. Leung

    2011-01-01

    Patient-Centered Medical Home is a care delivery model to transform how primary care is delivered in the United States. The information technology revolution has brought about several advancements and solutions for medicine and care delivery, and medical homes are no exception to this. Traditionally, such information technology solutions tend to be isolated in development and fragmented in implementation. However, it

  11. Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety Robbery Alert On Saturday, January 23, 2010 at approximately 6:00 pm, a Columbia University medical student reports he was a victim surroundings, trust your instincts, and immediately report any incidents or crimes by calling Public Safety

  12. THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF BEIRUT-MEDICAL CENTER

    E-print Network

    Shihadeh, Alan

    THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF BEIRUT- MEDICAL CENTER Site of Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology medical evaluation - Be able to establish an effective physician - patient relationship - Build core. You will be stimulated to consider situations from perspectives different from those you normally

  13. The Academy Center for Teaching and Learning Harvard Medical School

    E-print Network

    Paulsson, Johan

    sessions. One of the core values at HMS is the commitment to active vs. passive engagement with learning1 The Academy Center for Teaching and Learning Harvard Medical School Classroom Learning Small Medical School (HMS) to reassess the best uses of its most valuable resource ­ faculty time with students

  14. Predicting Grade Point Average, Withdrawal and Graduation from Four Allied Health Programs at Miami-Dade Community College Medical Center Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bistreich, Alan M.

    The validity of seven criteria utilized in conjunction with personal interviews and School and College Ability Test scores in the selection of applicants for admission to four Allied Health programs was investigated. The independent predictor variables studied were high school grade point average (GPA), the number of high school natural science…

  15. PROGRAM MANAGER CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    PROGRAM MANAGER CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU) seeks a Program Manager to organize and coordinate activities, programs, and projects for the Center for Nanotechnology in Society (CNS) at Arizona

  16. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Designing for Energy Conservation - The Cypress Fairbanks Medical Center Hospital

    E-print Network

    Wiernik, L. B.; Ranzau, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    efficient and economically constructed has the winning combination. This paper details the design concepts of a 1984 Grand Award winner, the Cypress Fairbanks Medical Center Hospital, in the Fourth Annual Energy Conservation Design Award Competition....

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT PFIZER INC. AND [ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    ") for the conduct of collaborative preclinical and clinical research studies in the area of identificationCOLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT BETWEEN PFIZER INC. AND [ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER] THIS COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT (hereinafter "Agreement") is entered into by and between Pfizer Inc

  18. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Media Center Overview Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact Contact For General Information Frank Blanchard (Contractor) Director,

  19. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. (Oregon Medical Laser Center, Portland, OR (United States))

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  20. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-print Network

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2013 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  1. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2012 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  2. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2014 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  3. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-print Network

    Martinez, Tony R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2011 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  4. Prescription medication borrowing among adult patients at an urban medical center.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lawrence; Patel, Nima M; Hanlon, Alexandra; Eldakar-Hein, Shaden; Sherlinski, Kristin; Ward, Stephanie H

    2011-12-01

    Prescription medication borrowing can result in adverse health outcomes. We aimed to study the patterns of borrowing prescription medications in an adult urban population seeking healthcare in the outpatient, emergency, and inpatient units of an urban medical center. Participants indicated whether they (1) had a primary care doctor, medical insurance, a prior history of substance abuse, psychiatric disorders, or chronic pain; and (2) had borrowed a prescription medication. If so, they noted the medication obtained, source, frequency of use, and reasons why they had not obtained a prescription from a licensed medical provider. Of the 641 participants, most were African American (75%), urban residents (75%), high school educated or less (71%), and lacked full-time employment (68%). Many had health insurance (90%) and had recently seen their primary medical provider (75%). Eighteen percent reported ever borrowing a prescription medication. On multivariate analysis, history of chronic pain was marginally associated with increased medication borrowing (odds ratio [OR]?=?1.58) while having Medicare insurance (OR?=?0.436) or a primary care medical provider routinely ask about medication usage (OR?=?0.589) were significantly associated with decreased medication borrowing. The most commonly obtained medications were for pain (74%), usually in the form of opioids, and were obtained from a family member (49%) or friend (38%). Thirty-five percent of those who borrowed medications did so more than once a year, with lack of convenient access to medical care the most frequently cited reason for use (67%). Only a third of those who borrowed medications had informed their primary medical providers of the behavior. In conclusion, borrowing prescription medications is a common behavior in the population studied. Further research is warranted into interventions to reduce such use, especially the impact of methods to improve the convenience of contacting licensed medical providers. PMID:21647797

  5. Medical Physics Graduate Program At An HBCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul

    2006-03-01

    The Physics Department at Hampton University houses the first Medical Physics graduate program at a minority institution, and the first in the state of Virginia. Jointly established with the Eastern Virginia Medical School, the program requires students to take standard physics courses in addition to medical physics classes and clinical rotations performed at local hospitals. The associated medical physics research primarily focuses on detectors development for absolute 3D dose distribution measurements (with accuracy better than ±100 microns), characterization of the uniformity or non-uniformity of Brachytherapy sources, and extraction of the 2D and 3D in-vivo dose maps for real time dose monitoring. Recent novel fundamental studies on the energy dependence of cancer cells to address, among others, mono-energetic Brachytherapy source treatments, reaction mechanisms associated with cancer cell destruction, and cancer genome identification have been launched. Each of the research conducted is strongly coupled to dedicated Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. After presenting this unique medical physics program, we will review results obtained from its research group.

  6. Miller Center: Presidential Recordings Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since 1940, six American presidents have secretly recorded close to 5,000 hours of conversations, many of which have been of great interest to presidential historians, the press, and the general public. This remarkable site provides access to a wide range of those conversations, and is hosted and maintained by the Presidential Recordings Program at the University of Virginia's Miller Center of Public Affairs. From the site's homepage, visitors can browse a list of highlighted audio clips (complete with full transcripts) and also access educational resource materials for use in the classroom. The site also has some additional virtual exhibits on a number of topics, including Vietnam and the civil rights movement. Finally, the site also contains a search engine so that visitors can quickly locate the audio clip or conversation they are looking for.

  7. Integrating team resource management program into staff training improves staff’s perception and patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation: the experience in a university-affiliated medical center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The process involved in organ procurement and transplantation is very complex that requires multidisciplinary coordination and teamwork. To prevent error during the processes, teamwork education and training might play an important role. We wished to evaluate the efficacy of implementing a Team Resource Management (TRM) program on patient safety and the behaviors of the team members involving in the process. Methods We implemented a TRM training program for the organ procurement and transplantation team members of the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), a teaching medical center in Taiwan. This 15-month intervention included TRM education and training courses for the healthcare workers, focused group skill training for the procurement and transplantation team members, video demonstration and training, and case reviews with feedbacks. Teamwork culture was evaluated and all procurement and transplantation cases were reviewed to evaluate the application of TRM skills during the actual processes. Results During the intervention period, a total of 34 staff members participated the program, and 67 cases of transplantations were performed. Teamwork framework concept was the most prominent dimension that showed improvement from the participants for training. The team members showed a variety of teamwork behaviors during the process of procurement and transplantation during the intervention period. Of note, there were two potential donors with a positive HIV result, for which the procurement processed was timely and successfully terminated by the team. None of the recipients was transplanted with an infected organ. No error in communication or patient identification was noted during review of the case records. Conclusion Implementation of a Team Resource Management program improves the teamwork culture as well as patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation. PMID:25115403

  8. Serving Medically Frail Individuals: Five Case Studies of Deaths of Residents of the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundram, Clarence J.

    The deaths of five resident clients at the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center (New York), a residential program for profoundly impaired and medically fragile individuals with developmental disabilities, in March and April of 1989 were investigated. Methods of study included examination of medical records from the Cooke Center and other…

  9. The Patient-Centered Medical Home: transforming primary care.

    PubMed

    Schram, Andrea Parsons

    2012-04-15

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a new care model that reorganizes primary care to improve access, coordination, quality, satisfaction, and comprehensive patient-centered care. Nurse practitioners should understand the PCMH concept, appraise the evidence, and become leaders in this transformation. PMID:22430928

  10. Minnesota Medical Foundation McNamara Alumni Center

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota Medical Foundation McNamara Alumni Center University of Minnesota 200 Oak Street SE Uni- versity President Robert Bruininks, Ph.D. The right time and place Masonic Cancer Center director to the next level. "This is the right time and place to really make an impact,"Yee says."Our members

  11. Healthy Eating and Harambee: curriculum development for a culturally-centered bio-medically oriented nutrition education program to reach African American women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Srimathi; Sparks, Arlene V; Webster, J DeWitt; Krishnakumar, Ambika; Lumeng, Julie

    2010-07-01

    The purpose was to develop, implement and evaluate a peer-led nutrition curriculum Healthy Eating and Harambee that addresses established objectives of maternal and infant health and to shift the stage for African American women of childbearing age in Genesee County toward healthier dietary patterns using a socio-cultural and biomedical orientation. The PEN-3 model, which frames culture in the context of health promotion interventions, was integrated with the Transtheoretical Model to guide this 13-week pre-test/post-test curriculum. Materials developed included soul food plate visuals, a micronutrient availability worksheet, a fruit stand, and gardening kits. Learning activities included affirmations, stories, case-scenarios, point-of-purchase product recognition, church health teams, and community health fairs. We investigated health-promoting dietary behaviors (consumption of more fruits and vegetables (F&V), serving more F&V to their families, and moderating dietary sodium and fat intakes), and biomedical behaviors (self-monitoring blood pressure and exercising) across five stages of change. Session attendance and program satisfaction were assessed. N = 102 women participated (mean age = 27.5 years). A majority (77%) reported adopting at least one healthy eating behavior (moderating sodium, serving more F&V to their families), 23% adopted at least two such behaviors (reading food labels for sodium; using culinary herbs/spices; serving more F&V to their families), and 45% adopted both dietary (moderating sodium; eating more fruits) and biomedical behaviors. Participants and facilitators favorably evaluated the curriculum and suggested improvements. A multi-conceptual approach coupled with cultural and biomedical tailoring has potential to promote young African American women's movement to more advanced stages of change and improve self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake, dietary sodium moderation, and self-monitoring blood pressure and physical activity. PMID:19655237

  12. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  13. Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology (Medical Sciences Graduate Program)

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology (Medical Sciences Graduate Program) GRADUATE PROGRAM Coordinator - Responsibilities .....................................................12 3.6 Medical Sciences ..............................................................................18 4.5 Ethics and Academic Integrity Training Requirement

  14. Focus on: Woodland Heights Medical Center, Biomedical Department.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, M K

    1994-01-01

    The Biomedical Engineering department of Woodland Heights Medical Center provides both emergency and scheduled medical equipment maintenance. Throughout the growth of the community and the acquisition of advanced, state-of-the art technology, the biomedical staff have endeavored to sharpen necessary skills and expand services in an effort to meet the equipment and user needs in a growing market. An unusual combination of medical repair technology and the management of total hospital risk has resulted in the creation of a new department. PMID:10135174

  15. [Promoting research in a medical center--the management narrative].

    PubMed

    Halevy, Jonathan; Turner, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Promoting research within a medical institute is a delicate balance between the importance of facilitating academia and maximizing resources towards the primary goal of a hospital--healing sick people. Shaare Zedek Medical Center have successfully adopted a "niche" approach to research in which the hospital invests in selected talented clinicians-scientists rather than futile expectation that all clinicians would be engaged in high impact research. Moreover, these research excellence centers are developing into a driving force to also foster research endeavors of other clinicians and residents in the hospital. In this special issue of Harefuah honoring Shaare Zedek investigators, 18 manuscripts included reflect the diversity of research projects performed in the medical center. We believe that this project will assist and encourage clinicians to be engaged in research, at all levels and disciplines. PMID:25654907

  16. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) Pilot Program Summary January 2007 1 of 5 Cancer Care in the United States: • The pace of research in understanding cancer has accelerated in recent years, raising the need for more effective

  17. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ...The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Community Health Center (CHC), Increased Demand for Services (IDS), and Capital...

  18. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - NCCCP Homepage

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - NCCCP Homepage Media Center Overview Contact information Quick Links Note from the NCI Director Participating Pilot Sites FAQ Contact Information Contact Information Contacts - NCI Office

  19. 78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY: Research...The United States Department of Transportation is publishing this notice...

  20. The Behavioral Health Laboratory: Building a Stronger Foundation for the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Tew; Johanna Klaus; David W. Oslin

    2010-01-01

    The Veterans Health Affairs is in the process of implementing a new model for the delivery of primary care: The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH). One critical challenge of any PCMH model will be the integration of basic mental health treatment into primary care. Such a mental health integration program must be flexible enough to incorporate new evidence-based treatments as patient

  1. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. t the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated i...

  2. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. At the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated ...

  3. LSU Eye Center Corneal Fellowship Program Demographics

    E-print Network

    /Ochsner Ophthalmology Residency Program at the LSUHSC Department of Ophthalmology. Mailing address and physical address inception: The LSU Department of Ophthalmology Corneal Fellowship Program, in its current format, began Fellows work closely with the ophthalmology residents and medical students rotating through our department

  4. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs Overview

    Cancer.gov

    One or more of the NCCCP's four focus areas is shared by several NCI programs including the NCI Cancer Centers Program, Community Clinical Oncology Program, Community Network Program, and others. The NCCCP will incorporate best practices from other NCI community cancer programs in delivering services to these communities.

  5. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs Overview

    Cancer.gov

    One or more of the NCCCP’s four focus areas is shared by several NCI programs – including the NCI Cancer Centers Program, Community Clinical Oncology Program, Community Network Program, and others. The NCCCP will incorporate best practices from other NCI community cancer programs in delivering services to these communities.

  6. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs Overview

    Cancer.gov

    One or more of the NCCCP�s four focus areas is shared by several NCI programs � including the NCI Cancer Centers Program, Community Clinical Oncology Program, Community Network Program, and others. The NCCCP will incorporate best practices from other NCI community cancer programs in delivering services to these communities.

  7. Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform -Involve -Enable

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform - Involve - Enable Revised 3/14/14 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Name (Last, First, M________________________ Date:________ ResetPrint Save #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform

  8. Accelerated Medical & Dental Programs Summer Financial Aid Fact Sheet

    E-print Network

    Accelerated Medical & Dental Programs Summer Financial Aid Fact Sheet To complete the undergraduate portion of the Accelerated Medical & Dental programs in 3 years, students are required to take summer enrolled in the 7-Year Liberal Arts/Medical and Dental Education Programs. Summer financial aid is awarded

  9. Automating Veterans Administration libraries: II. Implementation at the Kansas City Medical Center Library.

    PubMed

    Smith, V K; Ting, S C

    1987-04-01

    In 1985, the Kansas City Veterans Administration Medical Center began implementation of the Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). An integrated library system, a subset of that program, was started by the medical library for acquisitions and an outline catalog. To test the system, staff of the Neurology Service were trained to use the outline catalog and electronic mail to request interlibrary loans and literature searches. In implementing the project with the Neurology Service, the library is paving the way for many types of electronic access and interaction with the library. PMID:3594023

  10. Center Spectrum Esperanza Program Reaches

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    in the Esperanza program in Ithaca, NY. Esperanza focuses on Latino students in grades kindergarten through sixth grade; lessons are conducted in Spanish. Esperanza is an after-school program held at Beverly J. Martin with Monica Arambulo, coordinator of Esperanza, to provide lessons in Spanish. Faculty and graduate students

  11. Resident Program Guide: Hillside Outdoor Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Bonnie

    Founded in 1972 as part of the private, non-profit Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers, the Hillside Outdoor Education Center offers services to various educational groups by providing residential experiences for students and faculty, day-visit programs, school-site outdoor education programs, teacher workshops, college courses in outdoor…

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph of south side before perpendicular wing added. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 255 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hopital, Building 255, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety

    E-print Network

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety Robbery Alert On December 09, 2012 and removed the phone from her hand. The male fled east towards Fort Washington Avenue. Public Safety and NYPD with additional information should contact the 33rd precinct Detective Unit at 212.927.3780 or Public Safety

  6. Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety

    E-print Network

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety Attempted Robbery Security Alert Investigator Lucas Pena, Investigator Department of Public Safety Department of Public Safety 212-305-3493 212-305-0175 July 03rd , 2012 #32-2012 Public Safety Investigations was advised by the 33rd precinct detective unit

  7. Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety

    E-print Network

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety Security Alert On July 29, 2012 to follow and was last observed. The student contacted Public Safety immediately after the incident which an individual acting suspiciously, contact 911 immediately and Public Safety. Anyone with additional information

  8. Columbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety

    E-print Network

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    to Broadway, a Columbia University Student was the victim of a Robbery of her cell phone. The victim was talking on her cell phone when the Suspect came from behind, pushed her, and forcibly stole her cell phoneColumbia University Medical Center Department of Public Safety Security Alert ROBBERY ALERT

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in Veterans Affairs medical centers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andris Kazmers; Lloyd Jacobs; Anthony Perkins; S. Martin Lindenauer; Elizabeth Bates

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to define outcomes after abdominal ortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers during fiscal years 1991 through 1993.Methods: With VA patient treatment file data, patients were selected from diagnosis-related groups 110 and 111 and were then classified in a patient management category. In the categories of repair of nonruptured and ruptured AAA,

  10. USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    0000-00-00

    A bibliography of publications from the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology. Cataloged by year and searchable by peer-reviewed journal publications only or all publications. Links to each publication give reference details along with an interpretive summary as well as the technical abstract.

  11. Charles Brenner, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth Medical School

    E-print Network

    Nghiem, Paul

    .) · Protein Kinases as Targets in Cancer Therapy: Validated and Emerging Approaches (P. Nghiem, et al.) · RasEdited by: Charles Brenner, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth Medical School David Duggan.90 Oncogenomics: Molecular Approaches to Cancer offers the first rigorous yet broadly accessible treatment

  12. [Patient-centered medicine for tuberculosis medical services].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Akira; Narita, Tomoyo

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 edition of Specific Guiding Principles for Tuberculosis Prevention calls for a streamlined medical services system capable of providing medical care that is customized to the patient's needs. The new 21st Century Japanese version of the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) expands the indication of DOTS to all tuberculosis (TB) patients in need of treatment. Hospital DOTS consists of comprehensive, patient-centered support provided by a DOTS care team. For DOTS in the field, health care providers should select optimal administration support based on patient profiles and local circumstances. In accordance with medical fee revisions for 2012, basic inpatient fees have been raised and new standards for TB hospitals have been established, the result of efforts made by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis and other associated groups. It is important that the medical care system be improved so that patients can actively engage themselves as a member of the team, for the ultimate goal of practicing patient-centered medicine. We have organized this symposium to explore the best ways for practicing patient-centered medicine in treating TB. It is our sincere hope that this symposium will lead to improved medical treatment for TB patients. 1. Providing patient-centered TB service via utilization of collaborative care pathway: Akiko MATSUOKA (Hiroshima Prefectural Tobu Public Health Center) We have been using two types of collaborative care pathway as one of the means of providing patient-centered TB services since 2008. The first is the clinical pathway, which is mainly used by TB specialist doctors to communicate with local practitioners on future treatment plan (e.g. medication and treatment duration) of patients. The clinical pathway was first piloted in Onomichi district and its use was later expanded to the whole of Hiroshima prefecture. The second is the regional care pathway, which is used to share treatment progress, test results and other necessary patient information among the relevant parties. The regional care pathway was developed by the Tobu Public Health Center. It is currently being used by several other public health centers in Hiroshima. Utilization of these two pathways has resulted in improved adherence, treatment being offered at local clinics, shorter hospitalization and better treatment outcomes. 2. Patient-centered DOTS in Funabashi-city: Akiko UOZUMI (Funabashi-city Public Health Center) In Funabashi-city, all TB patients, including those with LTBI, are treated under DOTS which recognizes and tries to accommodate the various different needs of each individual patient. For example, various types of DOTS are offered, such as pharmacy-based DOTS and DOTS supported by caregivers of nursing homes. This enables public health nurses to take into consideration both the results of risk assessment and convenience for the patient, and choose DOTS which most effectively support the patient. Furthermore, DOTS in principle is offered face-to-face, so that DOTS providers may not only build relationship of trust with the patient, but also to collect and analyze the necessary information regarding the patient and respond timely when problems arise. Such effort has directly contributed to improved default and treatment rate. 3. Hospital DOTS and clinical path for the treatment of tuberculosis: Kentaro SAKASHITA, Akira FUJITA (Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center) We introduced a version of hospital DOTS at Tama Medical Center (formerly Fuchu Hospital) in 2004. As part of this three-stage version, patients are allowed to progress to the next stage if they meet the step-up criteria. Following the introduction of this hospital DOTS, the occurrence of drug administration-related incidents decreased and support for patient adherence became easier for health care workers than before. In 2006, we developed a clinical path based on this hospital DOTS with consistent eligibility criteria for patients. This clinical path helped increase the efficiency of medical services in the TB ward. In conclusion, a patient'

  13. Development and assessment of quality improvement education for medical students at The Ohio State University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Gonsenhauser, Iahn; Beal, Eliza; Shihadeh, Fadi; Mekhjian, Hagop S; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the feasibility of a quality improvement (QI) program that provided first and second year medical students with education in QI processes and demonstrate their utility within the framework of a real-world QI project. Medical students assessed the use of the Surgical Safety Checklist at The Ohio State University Medical Center. Before performing audits students were required to complete a self-paced online program that provided preliminary education in QI, patient safety, leadership, teamwork, and patient-centered care. A 2.5-hr orientation introduced basic operating room protocol, and the surgical checklist audit tool. Orientation included a multimedia simulation of checklist usage and a role-playing exercise simulating its use. Students completed pre- and postparticipation assessments. Results included an increased knowledge of QI methodology, an improved understanding of the evidence supporting the need for QI projects within health systems, and a greater awareness of available QI projects. Students' perspectives changed to indicate an increased belief that QI is the responsibility of all health professionals including physicians, administrators and other staff. This study concluded that QI education can be effectively disseminated to medical students early in their education using existing online tools and experiential QI projects, and can result in actionable QI data supporting hospital improvement initiatives. PMID:23163971

  14. Goddard Space Flight Center Education Programs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Education Programs provide teachers and students with a wide variety of curriculum enhancement materials geared for Earth science classroom use. These collections support the Earth system science curriculum developed by NASA scientists from the Earth Science Enterprise, a team of teachers from Anne Arundel County Public Schools, and the Education Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Site materials include a listing of featured programs, information on educational programs for the public, public schools-based programs, and programs for higher education. The Educator Resource Center (ERC) provides access to educational publications, teaching materials, educator workshops, video duplication and many other resources. There are also links to other NASA research and space flight centers, the Goddard media center, and state-specific listservs for educators.

  15. Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs presented to WSU SOM PAD January 10, 2012 presented by Sandra A. Rempel, Ph.D. Associate Director of Research, JFCC #12;JFCC Cancer Research Programs Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program Members: Gwen Alexander, Andrea Cassidy

  16. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Participating Program Sites

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Participating Program Sites Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools NCCCP Hospitals

  17. Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetyana Antimirova

    2006-01-01

    A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson's strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program's point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include

  18. Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

    2013-05-01

    The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages. PMID:23524918

  19. Regional program for acquisition of medical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannordstrand, P. C.

    1978-01-01

    A U.S. company was contracted to cover different regions of the country. A moderately detailed description of the highlights of the company activities along with some conclusions and recommendations are reported. In summary, the regional program effectively: (1) informed segments of the medical community of research opportunities; (2) validated formats for regional workshops; (3) assisted potential investigators with follow-up consultations and proposal preparations; and (4) identified a latent intersect requiring continual dialog at the scientist/engineer interface for successful cultivation and integration.

  20. UCSD Medical Center 2014 Overall 0 4406 4406 5954 74 % UCSD Medical Center 2014 0 4406 4406 5954

    E-print Network

    Squire, Larry R.

    /14/2014 11:09 AM #12;100840 Resp. Therapy / Pulmonary reporting to Jan Phillips-Clar 27 27 38 71 % 100830 12 12 26 46 % 100850 Respiratory Care reporting to Richard Ford 49 49 76 64 % UCSD Medical Center

  1. The changes involved in patient-centered medical home transformation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Edward H; Coleman, Katie; Reid, Robert J; Phillips, Kathryn; Abrams, Melinda K; Sugarman, Jonathan R

    2012-06-01

    In 2007, the major primary care professional societies collaboratively introduced a new model of primary care: the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). The published document outlines the basic attributes and expectations of a PCMH but not with the specificity needed to help interested clinicians and administrators make the necessary changes to their practice. To identify the specific changes required to become a medical home, the authors reviewed literature and sought the opinions of two multi-stakeholder groups. This article describes the eight consensus change concepts and 32 key changes that emerged from this process, and the evidence supporting their inclusion. PMID:22608865

  2. Community Networks Program Centers (CNP)

    Cancer.gov

    The Community Networks Program (CNP) was established in 2005 to reduce cancer health disparities through community-based participatory education, training, and research among underserved populations. NCI was awarded $95 million in five-year grants to fund 25 CNP cooperative agreement projects across the United States and in American Samoa.

  3. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices. PMID:24979282

  4. An academic medical center under prolonged rocket attack--organizational, medical, and financial considerations.

    PubMed

    Bar-El, Yaron; Michaelson, Moshe; Hyames, Gila; Skorecki, Karl; Reisner, Shimon A; Beyar, Rafael

    2009-09-01

    The Rambam Medical Center, the major academic health center in northern Israel, serving a population of two million and providing specialized tertiary care, was exposed to an unprecedented experience during the Second Lebanon War in the summer of 2006. For more than one month, it was subjected to continuous rocket attacks, but it continued to provide emergency and routine medical services to the civilian population and also served the military personnel who were evacuated from the battlefront. To accomplish the goals of serving the population while itself being under fire, the Rambam Medical Center had to undertake major organizational decisions, which included maximizing safety within the hospital by shifting patients and departments, ensuring that the hospital was properly fortified, managing the health professional teams' work schedules, and providing needed services for the families of employees. The Rambam Medical Center's Level I trauma center expertise included multidisciplinary teams and extensive collaborations; modern imaging modalities usually reserved for peacetime medical practice were frequently used. The function of the hospital teams during the war was efficient and smooth, based on the long-term actions taken to prepare for disasters and wartime conditions. Routine hospital services continued, although at 60% of normal occupancy. Financial losses incurred were primarily due to the decrease in revenue-generating activity. The two most important components of managing the hospital under these conditions are (1) the ability to arrive at prompt and meaningful decisions with respect to the organizational and medical hospital operations and (2) the leadership and management of the professional staff and teams. PMID:19707058

  5. Nuclear Medical Technology. Curriculum for a Two Year Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buatti, A.; Rich, D.

    Objectives of the project briefly described here were (1) to develop curriculum for a two-year nuclear medical technology program based on a working relationship between three institutions (community college, university health center, and hospital) and (2) to develop procedures for the operation of a medical imaging and radiation technology core…

  6. Characteristics of medical students completing an honors program in pathology.

    PubMed

    Fenderson, B A; Hojat, M; Damjanov, I; Rubin, E

    1999-11-01

    The Honors Program in pathology at Jefferson Medical College provides a voluntary enrichment opportunity for students who have demonstrated a superior ability to cope with the pathology curriculum and who rank in the upper fifth of their class. This study was performed to determine whether honor students possess cognitive and psychosocial attributes that distinguish them from their classmates. Students from five academic years (entering classes 1991 to 1995) were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who completed the Honors Program (n = 85), (2) those in the top 20% of the class who were offered the option but chose not to participate in the Honors Program (n = 128), and (3) students who did not qualify for the program (n = 953). Comparisons between these three groups were made on the basis of selected measures of academic achievement retrieved from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study database and psychosocial data obtained from a questionnaire completed during the first-year orientation. Students who completed the Honors Program in pathology had scored higher on the physical science section of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and had obtained higher first-year grade point averages than students in both of the other groups. Subsequently, they attained higher second-year grade point averages and scored higher on Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), compared with their peers in the other groups. There were no significant differences in psychosocial measures between honor students and the rest of the cohort (group 3). However, students in the top 20% of the class who declined the invitation to participate in the Honors Program (group 2) showed higher scores on the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Emotional Instability (Neuroticism) Scale than did their classmates. Despite these differences, students who completed the Honors Program (group 1) and eligible students who declined participation (group 2) selected similar pathways of postgraduate residency training: both groups preferred internal medicine to family practice, and both were more likely than the rest of the cohort to begin residency training at a top-ranked academic/research medical center. Voluntary participation in an Honors Program is a self-selection system that identifies students who are most likely to succeed academically at the highest levels. Residency selection committees may wish to pay dose attention to student involvement in similar programs, because this information may provide insights into student personality and general aptitude. PMID:10571508

  7. MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE ASSESSMENT UNL Respiratory Protection Program

    E-print Network

    Logan, David

    ://ehs.unl.edu/) Employee's Name/ID Number: Department: Date of Medical Evaluation: Medical Evaluator Contact Information for medical re-evaluation pertaining to respirator use by this employee are as follows: Medical re-evaluation (If not St. Elizabeth's Company Care): After reviewing the medical history and/or examination

  8. The Absent Interpreter in Administrative Detention Center Medical Units.

    PubMed

    Rondeau-Lutz, Murielle; Weber, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The particular situation of the French administrative detention center (ADC) medical units appears to be an exemplary case to study the difficulties facing medical practice. Indeed, the starting point of our inquiry was an amazing observation that needed to be addressed and understood: why are professional interpreters so seldom requested in ADC medical units, where one would expect that they would be "naturally" present? Aiming to fully explore the meanings of the "absent interpreter", this article takes into account the possible meanings of this situation: the recourse to professional interpreters in France is far from expected given cumulative evidence of its benefits; perceptions of illegal immigrants and medical habitus itself may both hamper the use of a third party; the ADCs are a very stressful place for healthcare professionals, with conflicting missions, political issues enmeshed with medical goals, and heavy affective burden that may lead to self-protection. Silencing voices of suffering others might be seen as the hidden indecent truth of the "absent interpreter". These reflections open a window to a larger issue with regard to the full range of medicine: what are the place, the role and the function of patient's words and narratives in contemporary medicine? The highly invested somatic perspective and its political corollary giving primacy to bare life harbor potential risks of obscuring speeches and undervaluing narratives. PMID:25189317

  9. Materials Characterization Center program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.D.; Ross, W.A.; Hill, O.F.; Mendel, J.E.; Merz, M.D.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-03-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) has been established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Materials Characterization Organization for providing an authoritative, referenceable basis for establishing nuclear waste material properties and test methods. The MCC will provide a data base that will include information on the components of the waste emplacement package - the spent fuel or processed waste form and the engineered barriers - and their interaction with each other and as affected by the environment. The MCC will plan materials testing, develop and document procedures, collect and analyze existing materials data, and conduct tests as necessary.

  10. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ...requested that HRSA transfer a Health Center Program section 330 grant to Genesee Health System to implement and carry out...Genesee County Community Mental Health (GCCMH)--now Genesee Health System--was formerly a...

  13. Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center offers two tracks of technology transfer fellowships under the Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) program. These fellowships provide scientists with training and mentored work experience in technology transfer.

  14. Evaluation of Intravenous Medication Errors with Smart Infusion Pumps in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W.

    2013-01-01

    While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted. PMID:24551395

  15. Health Care Savings with the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Community Care of North Carolina's Experience

    PubMed Central

    DuBard, C. Annette; Ritter, Grant A.; Jackson, Carlos T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the financial impact of integrating a systemic care management intervention program (Community Care of North Carolina) with person-centered medical homes throughout North Carolina for non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities during almost 5 years of program history. It examined Medicaid claims for 169,676 non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities from January 2007 through third quarter 2011. Two models were used to estimate the program's impact on cost, within each year. The first employed a mixed model comparing member experiences in enrolled versus unenrolled months, accounting for regional differences as fixed effects and within physician group experience as random effects. The second was a pre-post, intervention/comparison group, difference-in-differences mixed model, which directly matched cohort samples of enrolled and unenrolled members on strata of preenrollment pharmacy use, race, age, year, months in pre-post periods, health status, and behavioral health history. The study team found significant cost avoidance associated with program enrollment for the non-elderly disabled population after the first years, savings that increased with length of time in the program. The impact of the program was greater in persons with multiple chronic disease conditions. By providing targeted care management interventions, aligned with person-centered medical homes, the Community Care of North Carolina program achieved significant savings for a high-risk population in the North Carolina Medicaid program. (Population Health Management 2013;17:141–148) PMID:24053757

  16. Succession planning in an academic medical center nursing service.

    PubMed

    Barginere, Cynthia; Franco, Samantha; Wallace, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Succession planning is of strategic importance in any industry. It ensures the smooth transition from leader to leader and the ability of the organization to maintain the forward momentum as well as meet its operational and financial goals. Health care and nursing are no exception. In the complex and challenging world of health care today, leadership is critical to an organization's success and leadership succession is a key strategy used to ensure continuity of leadership and development of talent from within the organization. At Rush University Medical Center, a 667-bed academic medical center providing tertiary care to adults and children, the need for a focus on succession planning for the nursing leadership team is apparent as key leaders come to the end of their careers and consider retirement. It has become apparent that to secure the legacy and continue the extraordinary history of nursing excellence, care must be taken to grow talent from within and take the opportunity to leverage the mentoring opportunities before the retirement of many key leaders. To ensure a smooth leadership transition, nursing leadership and human resources partner at Rush University Medical Center to implement a systematic approach to leadership succession planning. PMID:23222756

  17. 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center 05 The Ohio State University Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Jones, Michelle

    , chronic pain and brain injuries · published 100+ peer-reviewed articles; was senior author of the 2007 director, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Spine Center · published 50+ peer-reviewed journal Harding Hospital · Research interests: depression and anxiety in hiV-infected individuals and depression

  18. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program Evaluation (NCCCP)

    Cancer.gov

    On September 10, 2007, NCI awarded a contract to RTI International to evaluate the National Cancer Institute's Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP). This three-year pilot program consists of 16 community-based cancer centers across the country that are testing the feasibility of bringing the latest scientific advances in biospecimen collection, clinical trial accrual, and information system technology, and the highest level of innovative and evidence-based cancer care to cancer patients and survivors in their home communities.

  19. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in a Student-Staffed Medication Therapy Management Call Center

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anna M.; Roane, Teresa E.; Mistry, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) designed to contribute to student pharmacists’ confidence and abilities in providing MTM. Design. Sixty-four student pharmacists provided MTM services during an APPE in a communication and care center. Assessment. Students conducted 1,495 comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) identifying 6,056 medication-related problems. Ninety-eight percent of the students who completed a survey instrument (52 of 53) following the APPE expressed that they had the necessary knowledge and skills to provide MTM services. Most respondents felt that pharmacist participation in providing Medicare MTM could move the profession of pharmacy forward and that pharmacists will have some role in deciding the specific provisions of the Medicare MTM program (92% and 91%, respectively). Conclusion. Students completing the MTM APPE received patient-centered experiences that supplemented their confidence, knowledge, and skill in providing MTM services in the future. PMID:22919086

  20. Implementing RECONSIDER, a diagnostic prompting computer system, at the Georgetown University Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Broering, N C; Corn, M; Ayers, W R; Mistry, P

    1988-01-01

    RECONSIDER, a computer program for diagnostic prompting developed at the University of California, San Francisco, has been implemented at the Georgetown University Medical Center as part of the Integrated Academic Information Management System Model Development grant project supported by the National Library of Medicine. The system is available for student use in the Biomedical Information Resources Center of the Dahlgren Memorial Library. Instruction on use of the computer system is provided by the library and instruction on medical use of the knowledge base is directed by the faculty. The implementation, capabilities, enhancements such as the addition of Current Medical Information and Terminology (5th ed.), and evaluation of the system are reported. PMID:3285937

  1. NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

  2. Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program (JCVA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydalch, Jeff

    This document provides information on the Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program of the Granite School District (Utah), the purpose of which is to maintain or reintegrate students who are potential high school dropouts or dropouts into appropriate educational alternatives. Its mission statement is followed by a list of program components,…

  3. The Goddard Space Flight Center ergonomics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, Eileen; Unite, Theodore

    1993-01-01

    Since the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Screening Program started in 1984, we have made many changes to accommodate the growing number of participants. As a result of these changes, screening of KSC employees has become more efficient and productive. Various aspects of the program are covered.

  4. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Resources Overview

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is committed to making progress against different cancer types through varied approaches. To this end, it develops, funds, and disseminates a vast array of programs, materials, and resources. Staff from across the Institute compiled this Guide to NCI Resources. This descriptive listing of key resources aims to meet the anticipated needs of the NCI Community Cancer Centers Program pilot sites.

  5. Labor Archives and Research Center Annual Program

    E-print Network

    Labor Archives and Research Center Annual Program February 28, 2014 | 6:30pm Music by Vukani in the 1930s-1950s Presented by Guest Speaker Lisa Phillips Indiana State University #12;Labor Archives://www.library.sfsu.edu/larc Celebrate the Labor Archives and Research Center's 28th Anniversary! Friday, February 28, 2014 ~ 6:30 p

  6. Ensuring excellence in centers of excellence programs.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Ateev; Dimick, Justin B

    2015-02-01

    Studies have found associations between better outcomes and a variety of structural and process criteria that help explain the wide outcome variations that occur across hospitals. In response, Centers of Excellence programs have been developed by multiple third parties. Despite this, programs have yielded disappointing results and can have unintended consequences. To outweigh potential harms, outcomes at Centers of Excellence must be clearly superior. We need to change how hospitals are designated and provide evidence that Centers of Excellence are truly excellent. PMID:25565122

  7. 78 FR 10610 - TRICARE; Demonstration Project for Participation in Maryland Multi-Payer Patient Centered Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...demonstration seeks to compensate medical homes for additional services not...evidence-based medicine; use of electronic medical records; care coordination; care transition...Quality Assurance Patient Centered Medical Home (PPC-PCMH)...

  8. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  9. Fusion Research Center, theory program. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Texas FRC theory program is directed primarily toward understanding the initiation, heating, and confinement of tokamak plasmas. It supports and complements the experimental programs on the TEXT and PRETEXT devices, as well as providing information generally applicable to the national tokamak program. A significant fraction of the Center's work has been carried out in collaboration with, or as a part of, the program of the Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS). During the past twelve months, 14 FRC theory reports and 12 IFS reports with partial FRC support have been issued (Appendices A and B).

  10. CALLIER CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION FOR DISPENSING MEDICATION

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    CALLIER CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION FOR DISPENSING MEDICATION Parent's Authorization Name of child to receive medicine: Prescribing physician Prescription No. Expiration Date: Dosage When with child's name and date medication is left at the facility. Medication can only be administered in amounts

  11. The Pre-Medical Enrichment Program at UTK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Patricia Davis; McGuire, Saundra Yancy

    1982-01-01

    Activities of the Pre-Medical Enrichment Program, sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Tennessee (Knoxville) are designed to increase the number of minority and low-income students who are unable to successfully compete for admission to medical school as well as successfully complete a medical degree. (NQA)

  12. Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hemak, Linda; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P; Meade, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents' self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents-12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents-began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA's) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. PMID:25699213

  13. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...will increase utilization of the direct care system by selected beneficiaries....

  15. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed. PMID:24667517

  16. An analytics approach to designing patient centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Ajorlou, Saeede; Shams, Issac; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Recently the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model has become a popular team based approach focused on delivering more streamlined care to patients. In current practices of medical homes, a clinical based prediction frame is recommended because it can help match the portfolio capacity of PCMH teams with the actual load generated by a set of patients. Without such balances in clinical supply and demand, issues such as excessive under and over utilization of physicians, long waiting time for receiving the appropriate treatment, and non-continuity of care will eliminate many advantages of the medical home strategy. In this paper, by using the hierarchical generalized linear model with multivariate responses, we develop a clinical workload prediction model for care portfolio demands in a Bayesian framework. The model allows for heterogeneous variances and unstructured covariance matrices for nested random effects that arise through complex hierarchical care systems. We show that using a multivariate approach substantially enhances the precision of workload predictions at both primary and non primary care levels. We also demonstrate that care demands depend not only on patient demographics but also on other utilization factors, such as length of stay. Our analyses of a recent data from Veteran Health Administration further indicate that risk adjustment for patient health conditions can considerably improve the prediction power of the model. PMID:24942633

  17. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program.

    PubMed

    Marmaro, G M; Cardinale, M A; Summerfield, B R; Tipton, D A

    1992-08-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials. PMID:1402776

  18. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  19. Development of a medical humanities and ethics certificate program in Texas.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Cheryl J

    2014-12-01

    Education in the medical humanities and ethics is an integral part of the formation of future physicians. This article reports on an innovative approach to incorporating the medical humanities and ethics into the four-year curriculum in a Certificate Program spanning all four years of the medical school experience. The faculty of the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston conceived and implemented this program to teach medical students a range of scholarly topics in the medical humanities and to engage the full human experience into the process of becoming a physician. This study follows six years of experience, and we report student experiences and learning in their own words. PMID:25283183

  20. The UNAM M. Sc. program in Medical Physics enters its teen years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandan, María-Ester

    2010-12-01

    The M.Sc. (Medical Physics) program at the National Autonomous University of Mexico UNAM, created in 1997, has graduated a substantial number of medical physicists who constitute today about 30% of the medical physics clinical workforce in the country. Up to present date (May 2010) more than 60 students have graduated, 60% of them hold clinical jobs, 20% have completed or study a Ph.D., and 15% perform activities related to this specialization. In addition to strengthening the clinical practice of medical physics, the program has served as an incentive for medical physics research in UNAM and other centers. We report the circumstances of the program origin, the evolution of its curriculum, the main achievements, and the next challenges.

  1. Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans NeuroscienceCenterofExcellence

    E-print Network

    Louisiana State University Medical Center · School of Medicine in New Orleans Neuroscience for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AK Novel Therapeutic Strategies for Retinal Angiogenesis Neuroscience.JulieBlendy,AssistantProfessor,DepartmentofPharmacology,Universityof PennsylvaniaMedicalCenter,Philadelphia,PA Molecular Genetic Analysis of CREB Deficient Mice NeuroscienceCenter8

  2. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation. PMID:23484431

  3. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Poncelet, Ann; Bokser, Seth; Calton, Brook; Hauer, Karen E.; Kirsch, Heidi; Jones, Tracey; Lai, Cindy J.; Mazotti, Lindsay; Shore, William; Teherani, Arianne; Tong, Lowell; Wamsley, Maria; Robertson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, medical educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), began developing the Parnassus Integrated Student Clinical Experiences (PISCES) program, a year-long longitudinal integrated clerkship at its academic medical center. The principles guiding this new clerkship were continuity with faculty preceptors, patients, and peers; a developmentally progressive curriculum with an emphasis on interdisciplinary teaching; and exposure to undiagnosed illness in acute and chronic care settings. Innovative elements included quarterly student evaluation sessions with all preceptors together, peer-to-peer evaluation, and oversight advising with an assigned faculty member. PISCES launched with eight medical students for the 2007/2008 academic year and expanded to 15 students for 2008/2009. Compared to UCSF's traditional core clerkships, evaluations from PISCES indicated significantly higher student satisfaction with faculty teaching, formal didactics, direct observation of clinical skills, and feedback. Student performance on discipline-specific examinations and United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 CK was equivalent to and on standardized patient examinations was slightly superior to that of traditional peers. Participants' career interests ranged from primary care to surgical subspecialties. These results demonstrate that a longitudinal integrated clerkship can be implemented successfully at a tertiary care academic medical center. PMID:21475642

  4. IAIMS at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center: accomplishments and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Roderer, N K; Clayton, P D

    1992-01-01

    The concept of "one-stop information shopping" is becoming a reality at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Our goal is to provide access from a single workstation to clinical, research, and library resources; university and hospital administrative systems; and utility functions such as word processing and mail. We have created new organizational units and installed a network of workstations that can access a variety of resources and systems on any of seventy-two different host computers/servers. In November 1991, 2,600 different individuals used the clinical information system, 700 different individuals used the library resources, and 900 different individuals used hospital administrative systems via the network. Over the past four years, our efforts have cost the equivalent of $23 million or approximately 0.5% of the total medical center budget. Even small improvements in productivity and in the quality of work of individuals who use the system could justify these expenditures. The challenges we still face include the provision of additional easy-to-use applications and development of equitable methods for financial support. PMID:1326368

  5. Primary care compensation at an academic medical center: a model for the mixed-payer environment.

    PubMed

    Sussman, A J; Fairchild, D G; Coblyn, J; Brennan, T A

    2001-07-01

    The authors' academic medical center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, developed a primary care physician (PCP) salary incentive program for employed academic physicians. This program, first implemented in 1999, was needed to meet the financial imperatives placed on the institution by managed care and the Balanced Budget Act of 1997; its goal was to create a set of incentives for PCPs that is consistent with the mission of the academic center and helps motivate and reward PCP's work. The program sought to simultaneously increase productivity while optimizing resource utilization in a mixed-payer environment. The salary incentive program uses work relative-value units (wRVUs) as the measure of productivity. In addition to productivity-derived base pay, bonus incentives are added for efficient medical management, quality of care, teaching, and seniority. The authors report that there was significant concern from several members of the physician staff before the plan was implemented; they felt that the institution's PCPs were already operating at maximum clinical capacity. However, after the first year of operation of this plan, there was an overall 20% increase in PCP productivity. Increases were observed in all PCP subgroups when stratified by professional experience, clinical time commitment, and practice location. The authors conclude that the program has succeeded in giving incentives for academic PCPs to achieve under the growing demands for revenue self-sufficiency, managed care performance, quality of care, and academic commitment. PMID:11448822

  6. Department of Graduate Medical Education -Stanford University Medical Center 300 Pasteur Drive, Room HC435, Stanford, CA 94305-5207

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Medical Records BEFORE coming to the GME office. Call Chart Completion's office in Redwood City at: (650Department of Graduate Medical Education - Stanford University Medical Center 300 Pasteur Drive://gme.stanford.edu HOUSE STAFF CHECK OUT RECORD NOTE: This form must be completed and returned to the GME Office in order

  7. A division of medical communications in an academic medical center's department of medicine.

    PubMed

    Drazen, Jeffrey M; Shields, Helen M; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Excellent physician communication skills (physician-to-patient and patient-to-physician) have been found to have a positive impact on patient satisfaction and may positively affect patient health behaviors and health outcomes. Such skills are also essential for accurate, succinct, and clear peer-to-peer (physician-to-physician), physician-to-lay-public, and physician-to-media communications. These skills are not innate, however; they must be learned and practiced repeatedly. The Division of Medical Communications (DMC) was created within the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital as an intellectual home for physicians who desire to learn and teach the wide variety of skills needed for effective communication.In this Perspective, the authors provide an overview of the key types of medical communications and share the DMC model as an innovative approach to providing expert guidance to physicians and physicians-in-training as they develop, practice, and refine their communication skills. Current DMC projects and programs include a Volunteer Patient Teaching Corps, which provides feedback to medical students, residents, and faculty on communication skills; a controlled trial of a modified team-based learning method for attending rounds; expert coaching in preparation for presentations of all types (e.g., grand rounds; oral presentations or poster presentations on basic science, clinical, or medical education research); sessions on speaking to the media and running a meeting well; and courses on writing for publication. Objective assessment of the impact of each of these interventions is planned. PMID:25186816

  8. Center for Consumer Information & Insurance Oversight: Consumer Assistance Program

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Assistance Program CCIIO The Center for Consumer Information & Insurance Oversight Programs and Initiatives Consumer Support and Information Health Insurance Market Reforms Health Insurance Marketplaces Insurance Programs Other ...

  9. Family-Centered Maternity Care for Deaf Refugees: The Patient-Centered Medical Home in Action

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirish K. Balachandra; Jennifer K. Carroll; Colleen T. Fogarty; Elizabeth G. Finigan

    2009-01-01

    The intersection of 2 underserved populations—refugees and deaf individuals—presents novel challenges to health care systems and has not been described previously. A patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is uniquely equipped to provide outstanding primary care to disadvantaged groups. As an illustrative case study, we present our experience applying principles of the PCMH to address an extremely challenging clinical situation: providing high-quality

  10. Evaluation of the Arizona Medical Student Exchange Program.

    PubMed

    Navin, T R; Nichols, A W

    1977-10-01

    In this article the authors describe and present an evaluation of the Arizona Medical Student Exchange Program of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. The program is designed to help defray the cost that an Arizona student faces in attending an out-of-state medical school by paying, in the student's behalf, the difference between the resident and nonresident tuition at the out-of-state school. Furthermore, the accepting medical school is paid an additional sum as an inducement to accepts more Arizona students in the future. The program's goal is to increase the number of graduating physicians who will return to practice in Arizona, especially in areas of medical need. While the program apparently has been successful in increasing the number of Arizona students studying medicine and the number of physicians returning to the state--both to metropolitan areas and to areas of medical need--these increases have not kept pace with Arizona's growing population. PMID:903947

  11. Strategic planning for clinical services: Hamot Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Kelly, W N

    1986-09-01

    As a result of a two-day strategic-planning program, a hospital pharmacy department developed a five-year plan for addressing seven critical issues facing the department. The pharmacy department at a large nonprofit community hospital began a formal planning process in 1981 after concluding that the existing clinical services had been implemented in a haphazard fashion and had mixed results. The planning process began with a two-day planning program aimed at identifying issues facing the department, followed by the development of consensus about the most important issues and the development of action plans for dealing with these. The planning program consisted of four parts: presentations by hospital administrators, nurses, and the medical staff on future directions in their respective areas and pharmacy's potential input; presentations on the future of pharmacy from the perspectives of the pharmacy director and the responsible hospital administrator; preliminary recommendations related to drug distribution services and clinical services by two pharmacy consultants; and discussions of departmental management issues and key points identified in previous sessions. The department's progress in addressing each of the seven critical issues is described; most of the action plan has been completed. The consensus-building planning process allowed the department to focus on the most important issues, identify support and possible conflicts from others, and obtain administrative approval of the department's focus on patient-oriented services. PMID:3094370

  12. The value of training and orientation programs in large medical organizations.

    PubMed

    Galt, R G

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure perceptions of program participants in a large medical center in West Palm Beach, Florida, and to determine the degree to which their participation in the training and orientation program led to 1) greater workplace effectiveness and 2) reduced employee turnover. The results revealed that well-run employee training and orientation programs are not only cost effective, but they also add to the overall quality of life and work in organizations. PMID:11913022

  13. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. 17.351 Section...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist...plant and facilities of the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, which the...

  14. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. 17.351 Section...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist...plant and facilities of the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, which the...

  15. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. 17.351 Section...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist...plant and facilities of the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, which the...

  16. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. 17.351 Section...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist...plant and facilities of the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, which the...

  17. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. 17.351 Section...and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist...plant and facilities of the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, which the...

  18. Life-Science Research within US Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    Context Besides the generic “basic” vs. “applied” labels, little information is known about the types of life-science research conducted within academic medical centers (AMC). Objective To determine the relative proportion, characteristics, funding, and productivity of AMC faculty by the type of research they conduct. Design Mailed survey conducted in 2007 of life sciences faculty at the 50 universities with medical schools that received the most NIH funding in 2004. Response rate was 74% (n=2,168) Setting and Participants Faculty affiliated with a medical school or teaching hospital who had published at least one research article in the previous three years. Main outcome measures Type of research (basic, translational, clinical trials, health services research/clinical epidemiology, multimode, other); total funding; industry funding; publications; professional activities; patenting behavior; and industry relationships. Results Nearly one in four (23.4%) of AMC research faculty exclusively conduct basic research. In comparison, translational researchers, clinical trial investigators, and health services research/clinical epidemiologists each comprise roughly ten percent of AMC staff. While principal investigators garnered a mean of $410,755 in total annual research funding, nearly one-fifth of all AMC research faculty are unfunded, a proportion that ranges from 11.5% for basic researchers to 46.8% for health services researchers (p<0.01). The average AMC faculty member received $33,417 in industry-sponsored funding, with most of this money concentrated among clinical trial ($110,869) and multimode ($59,916) principal investigators. Compared to basic science researchers, translational, clinical trial, and multimode researchers are significantly more likely to report a relationship with industry and that these relationships contributed to their most important scientific work (p<0.01 for all comparisons). Conclusions These data document many of the stresses in the research arena, especially those of the clinician-researcher. National R&D funding policies should reflect priorities for encouraging the right balance of life-science investigations. PMID:19724044

  19. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective. PMID:24369867

  20. Dryden Flight Research Center Chemical Pharmacy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bette

    1997-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Chemical Pharmacy "Crib" is a chemical sharing system which loans chemicals to users, rather than issuing them or having each individual organization or group purchasing the chemicals. This cooperative system of sharing chemicals eliminates multiple ownership of the same chemicals and also eliminates stockpiles. Chemical management duties are eliminated for each of the participating organizations. The chemical storage issues, hazards and responsibilities are eliminated. The system also ensures safe storage of chemicals and proper disposal practices. The purpose of this program is to reduce the total releases and transfers of toxic chemicals. The initial cost of the program to DFRC was $585,000. A savings of $69,000 per year has been estimated for the Center. This savings includes the reduced costs in purchasing, disposal and chemical inventory/storage responsibilities. DFRC has chemicals stored in 47 buildings and at 289 locations. When the program is fully implemented throughout the Center, there will be three chemical locations at this facility. The benefits of this program are the elimination of chemical management duties; elimination of the hazard associated with chemical storage; elimination of stockpiles; assurance of safe storage; assurance of proper disposal practices; assurance of a safer workplace; and more accurate emissions reports.

  1. Medical surveillance in work-site safety and health programs.

    PubMed

    Wesdock, J C; Sokas, R K

    2000-05-01

    Businesses frequently call on family physicians to provide employee health services at the work site or in the clinician's office. These services include medical screening (detection of dysfunction or disease before an employee would ordinarily seek medical care) and medical surveillance (analysis of health information to identify workplace problems that require targeted prevention). Such services can transform acute care and routine screening activities into opportunities for primary prevention when they are integrated into the broader framework of work-site safety and health programs. Components of these programs include management commitment, employee participation, hazard identification and control, employee training and program evaluation. For optimal program success, family physicians must communicate with frontline safety officers and have first-hand knowledge of the workplace and its hazards. Professional and technical resources are available to guide the family physician in the role of medical surveillance program coordinator. PMID:10821157

  2. History of the Medical Library Association's credentialing program.

    PubMed

    Bell, J A

    1996-07-01

    Since the Medical Library Association (MLA) adopted the Code for the Training and Certification of Medical Librarians in 1949, MLA members have reviewed and revised the program regularly. This paper traces the history of MLA's professional recognition program to illustrate how the program has changed over time and to identify the issues that have surrounded it. These issues include the value of the program to individual members, cost to MLA, appropriate entry requirements, certification examinations, and recertification requirements. The development and operation of MLA's current credentialing program, the Academy of Health Information Professionals, is described in detail. PMID:8883980

  3. Defining and Measuring the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; Jaén, Carlos R.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Flocke, Susan A.; Gill, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is four things: 1) the fundamental tenets of primary care: first contact access, comprehensiveness, integration/coordination, and relationships involving sustained partnership; 2) new ways of organizing practice; 3) development of practices’ internal capabilities, and 4) related health care system and reimbursement changes. All of these are focused on improving the health of whole people, families, communities and populations, and on increasing the value of healthcare. The value of the fundamental tenets of primary care is well established. This value includes higher health care quality, better whole-person and population health, lower cost and reduced inequalities compared to healthcare systems not based on primary care. The needed practice organizational and health care system change aspects of the PCMH are still evolving in highly related ways. The PCMH will continue to evolve as evidence comes in from hundreds of demonstrations and experiments ongoing around the country, and as the local and larger healthcare systems change. Measuring the PCMH involves the following:Giving primacy to the core tenets of primary careAssessing practice and system changes that are hypothesized to provide added valueAssessing development of practices’ core processes and adaptive reserveAssessing integration with more functional healthcare system and community resourcesEvaluating the potential for unintended negative consequences from valuing the more easily measured instrumental features of the PCMH over the fundamental relationship and whole system aspectsRecognizing that since a fundamental benefit of primary care is its adaptability to diverse people, populations and systems, functional PCMHs will look different in different settings.Efforts to transform practice to patient-centered medical homes must recognize, assess and value the fundamental features of primary care that provide personalized, equitable health care and foster individual and population health. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1291-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20467909

  4. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

  5. Remodeling of the occupational medical examination program in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Kim, Y; Kim, K S

    1999-09-01

    The South Korean government carried out reforms in the occupational medical examination program over a period of 2 years from 1997 to 1998 in a response to the discontent of workers, who had complained that occupational medical examinations were merely ritualistic and unproductive. The purposes of this manuscript are to describe the reason for the remodeling, with a historical review of the existing occupational medical examination program in South Korea, and to discuss the main issues involved in remodeling the program. The existing occupational medical examination program in South Korea was reviewed and criticized. The basic philosophy and the main issues in remodeling South Korea's occupational medical examination program were also discussed. In conclusion, the occupational medical examination program should not be conducted in a uniform manner according to legal regulations, but should be a part of overall occupational health services. Individual workplaces should be given the autonomy to perform medical examinations according to the characteristics of the workplace. An enabling approach based on the participation of labor and management should be taken into consideration. PMID:10473842

  6. A Comprehensive Medical Student Career Development Program Improves Medical Student Satisfaction With Career Planning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian J. Zink; Maya M. Hammoud; Eric Middleton; Donney Moroney; Amy Schigelone

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) initiated a new career development program (CDP). The CDP incorporates the 4-phase career development model described by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Careers in Medicine (CiM).The CDP offers self-assessment exercises with guidance from trained counselors for 1st and 2nd-year medical students. Career exploration experiences include Career Seminar Series luncheons,

  7. National Ice Center Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Meg

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the work done by Dr. Kim Partington were to manage NASA's polar research program, including its strategic direction, research funding and interagency and international collaborations. The objectives of the UCAR Visiting Scientist Program at the National Ice Center (NIC) are to: (1) Manage a visiting scientist program for the NIC Science Center in support of the mission of the NIC; (2) Provide a pool of researchers who will share expertise with the NIC and the science community; (3) Facilitate communications between the research and operational communities for the purpose of identifying work ready for validation and transition to an operational environment; and (4) Act as a focus for interagency cooperation. The NIC mission is to provide worldwide operational sea ice analyses and forecasts for the armed forces of the US and allied nations, the Departments of Commerce and Transportation, and other US Government and international agencies, and the civil sector. The NIC produces these analyses and forecasts of Arctic, Antarctic, Great Lakes, and Chesapeake Bay ice conditions to support customers with global, regional, and tactical scale interests. The NIC regularly deploys Naval Ice Center NAVICECEN Ice Reconnaissance personnel to the Arctic and Antarctica in order to perform aerial ice observation and analysis in support of NIC customers. NIC ice data are a key part of the US contribution to international global climate and ocean observing systems.

  8. 78 FR 68853 - International Medical Device Regulators Forum; Medical Device Single Audit Program International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...The Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP) was designed and developed to ensure a single audit will provide efficient yet thorough...medical devices quality management systems and other specific regulatory...and will accept the resulting audit reports as a substitute...

  9. Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose #12;Cover: SMYSP students proudly application process, learning about financial aid, writing their college essays and learning SAT test are paired with student counselors, medical students, faculty, health and education professionals, and alumni

  10. MD/PhD Program "Molecular Medicine" Hannover Medical School

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    is to train young German medical doctors as well as students from life sciences and to attract participants Roderbruch, which is in the eastern part of Hannover. The main scientific topics are transplantation research#12;#12;MD/PhD Program "Molecular Medicine" Hannover Medical School Report 2003 #12;#12;MD

  11. Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Research Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to improve patient care and safety. Feinberg provides 60 percent of all research across Northwestern

  12. Suborbital Science Program: Dryden Flight Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelFrate, John

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the suborbital science program at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Program Objectives are given in various areas: (1) Satellite Calibration and Validation (Cal/val)--Provide methods to perform the cal/val requirements for Earth Observing System satellites; (2) New Sensor Development -- Provide methods to reduce risk for new sensor concepts and algorithm development prior to committing sensors to operations; (3) Process Studies -- Facilitate the acquisition of high spatial/temporal resolution focused measurements that are required to understand small atmospheric and surface structures which generate powerful Earth system effects; and (4) Airborne Networking -- Develop disruption-tolerant networking to enable integrated multiple scale measurements of critical environmental features. Dryden supports the NASA Airborne Science Program and the nation in several elements: ER-2, G-3, DC-8, Ikhana (Predator B) & Global Hawk and Reveal. These are reviewed in detail in the presentation.

  13. Respiratory Protection Program medical clearance for respirator use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on occupational exposure to various inhalents is discussed including on-site hazard control measures, procedures, physiological effects, and interpretation of results for the medical clearance of employee for use of personal respiratory protection devices. The purpose of the Respiratory Protection Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Respiratory Protection at LeRC are discussed.

  14. Effect of primary medical care on addiction and medical severity in substance abuse treatment programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter D. Friedmann; Zhiwei Zhang; James Hendrickson; Michael D. Stein; Dean R. Gerstein

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the availability of primary medical care on-site at addiction treatment programs or off-site by referral\\u000a improves patients’ addiction severity and medical outcomes, compared to programs that offer no primary care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of patients admitted to a purposive national sample of substance abuse treatment\\u000a programs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Substance abuse treatment programs

  15. Program planning for the community teaching hospital medical library.

    PubMed Central

    McCorkel, J; Cook, V

    1985-01-01

    To respond to the increasing demand for information from medical educators and clinicians and to persuade administrators to purchase the newly available microcomputer library systems, medical librarians in community teaching hospitals may find it useful to engage in intermediate term (for example, five-year) program planning. To increase the probability that the plan which emerges will be implemented, the planning process should fit the organizational nexus. Planning involves needs assessment, prioritized program elements, a written plan, and facilities planning (if applicable), which lead to program implementation. Components of a model program plan are presented. PMID:4027443

  16. University of Maryland Medical Center Shadow day experience with a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA)

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    University of Maryland Medical Center Shadow day experience with a Certified Registered Nurse information via e-mail to: Linda Goetz, MHS, CRNA Director, Nurse Anesthetists University of Maryland Medical

  17. Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) conducts and coordinates research projects that provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Program is divided into 6 major elements, which a) Provide the Program s knowledge and capabilities to conduct research, addressing the human health and performance risks. b) Advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures to the point of transfer to the customer programs and organizations. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is a partner with the HRP in developing a successful research program. 3

  18. Developing a statewide medication technician pilot program in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Pamela K; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2010-09-01

    In times of fiscal constraints, nursing homes are seeking to maximize use of licensed staff through delegation of low-risk tasks to unlicensed personnel. Between 2004 and 2008, the Arizona State Board of Nursing developed and conducted a pilot program to determine the impact on patient health and safety of licensed nurses delegating medication administration to trained certified nursing assistants. There were no differences in patterns of medication errors before and after the introduction of medication technicians, and structured interviews revealed that participants viewed the role favorably, with reported increased role satisfaction on the part of delegating nurses. Efforts are underway to extend the program statewide. PMID:20438012

  19. Calendar of Events 1996 Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine in New Orleans

    E-print Network

    Calendar of Events 1996 Louisiana State University Medical Center · School of Medicine in New, Louisiana Regulation of Voltage-gated Ca2+ Channels in Teleost Retina February 14 Brian Davis, Ph of Ophthalmology, Lions Eye Center, LSU Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana Novel Nerve Regeneration Guides May

  20. A retrospective review of student pharmacist medication reconciliation activities in an outpatient family medicine center

    PubMed Central

    Andrus, Miranda R.; Anderson, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting is an important part of preventing medication errors, and is mandated by the Joint Commission. Objective: To describe and quantify medication reconciliation efforts by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of medication reconciliation documentation forms completed by student pharmacists during an outpatient clinical rotation between May 2012 and April 2013. Discrepancies were defined as any lack of agreement between the medication list in the electronic medical record and the patient reported regimen. Descriptive statistics were used to report results. Results: A total of 557 medication reconciliation documentation forms from 12 student pharmacists were reviewed. The average number of medications per patient interviewed was 9 (range 0-25). A total of 1,783 medication discrepancies were found with an average of 3.2 discrepancies per patient. An additional 272 medication allergy discrepancies were identified. The most common discrepancy was medications the patient was no longer taking (37.3%, n=766). The second most common discrepancy was over-the-counter and herbal medications that had not been added to the medication list (16.2%, n=335). Patient counseling was documented 159 times during the medication reconciliation process. Conclusions: Medication reconciliation by student pharmacists in an outpatient family medicine center resulted in the identification of many discrepancies in medication lists in an electronic health record. Student pharmacists also documented and clarified medication allergies and performed patient counseling.

  1. Medical direction of wilderness and other operational emergency medical services programs.

    PubMed

    Warden, Craig R; Millin, Michael G; Hawkins, Seth C; Bradley, Richard N

    2012-03-01

    Within a healthcare system, operational emergency medical services (EMS) programs provide prehospital emergency care to patients in austere and resource-limited settings. Some of these programs are additionally considered to be wilderness EMS programs, a specialized type of operational EMS program, as they primarily function in a wilderness setting (eg, wilderness search and rescue, ski patrols, water rescue, beach patrols, and cave rescue). Other operational EMS programs include urban search and rescue, air medical support, and tactical law enforcement response. The medical director will help to ensure that the care provided follows protocols that are in accordance with local and state prehospital standards, while accounting for the unique demands and needs of the environment. The operational EMS medical director should be as qualified as possible for the specific team that is being supervised. The medical director should train and operate with the team frequently to be effective. Adequate provision for compensation, liability, and equipment needs to be addressed for an optimal relationship between the medical director and the team. PMID:22441087

  2. Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Adams

    2009-01-07

    The following is a synopsis of the major achievements attributed to the operation of the Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center (WAPTAC) by the National Association for State Community Services Programs (NASCSP). During the past five years, the WAPTAC has developed into the premier source for information related to operating the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) at the state and local levels. The services provide through WAPTAC include both virtual technical support as well as hands-on training and instruction in classroom and in the field. The WAPTAC achieved several important milestones during its operation including the establishment of a national Weatherization Day now celebrated in most states, the implementation of a comprehensive Public Information Campaign (PIC) to raise the awareness of the Program among policy makers and the public, the training of more than 150 new state managers and staff as they assume their duties in state offices around the country, and the creation and support of a major virtual information source on the Internet being accessed by thousands of staff each month. The Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center serves the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program as a valuable training and technical assistance resource for the network of 54 direct state grantees (50 states, District of Columbia and three Native American tribes) and the network of 900 local subgrantees (comprised of community action agencies, units of local government, and other non-profit organizations). The services provided through WAPTAC focus on standardizing and improving the daily management of the WAP. Staff continually identify policies changes and best practices to help the network improve its effectiveness and enhance the benefits of the Program for the customers who receive service and the federal and private investors. The operations of WAPTAC are separated into six distinct areas: (1) Orientation for New WAP State Directors and Staff; (2) Pollution Occurrence Insurance Project; (3) Public Information Campaign; (4) State Management Training Project; (5) System for Integrating and Reviewing Technologies and Techniques; and (6) WAPTAC Services.

  3. Positron program at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio [Idaho State University, Department of Physics, Pocatello, Idaho 83209 (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2009-09-02

    Positron physics is an important part of the research activities at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). With positron annihilation spectroscopy, maps of nanodefects in materials have been obtained. For this purpose, positrons are generated by radioactive decay, photoactivation, or pair production. Preliminary tests of positron sources in the MeV range based on electron linacs have also been carried out at the IAC, and an expansion of this program is planned. A similar positron beam at Jefferson Lab would greatly improve our knowledge of the inner structure of the proton. In this paper, research with positrons at the IAC is reviewed. After a description of the Center's facilities, results from positron annihilation spectroscopy are discussed, together with future plans for testing a prototype positron source for CEBAF.

  4. UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MEDICAL CENTER The Strategic Map for the University of Kansas Medical Center summarizes KUMC's strategy for 2011 through 2016. This

    E-print Network

    #12;UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MEDICAL CENTER The Strategic Map for the University of Kansas Medical A Goal B Goal C Goal D Goal E Goal F Continuously Advance Educational Excellence Strengthen Research recruitment, development and retention of outstanding educators I. Implement a strategic approach to research

  5. Computer program and user documentation medical data tape retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    This volume provides several levels of documentation for the program module of the NASA medical directorate mini-computer storage and retrieval system. A biomedical information system overview describes some of the reasons for the development of the mini-computer storage and retrieval system. It briefly outlines all of the program modules which constitute the system.

  6. Evaluation of a Program to Teach Medical Students about Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Week-end Intervention Program (WIP) used by Wright State University School of Medicine, which assesses the alcohol problems of those convicted of offenses such as drunk driving and then assists in finding treatment, is described. The impact of the program in educating medical students about alcoholism is discussed. (MLW)

  7. Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose #12;Cover: SMYSP students proudly for SATs, writing their college essays, and learning about financial aid. · Research projects: Students students, faculty, health and education professionals, and alumni of the program who serve as role models

  8. MD/PhD Program "Molecular Medicine" Hannover Medical School

    E-print Network

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    __________________________________________________________________ 14 4. Organization of Educational Material________________________________________________ 15 5#12;#12;MD/PhD Program "Molecular Medicine" Hannover Medical School Report 2005 #12;#12;MD/Ph Chairman MD/PhD Program Carl-Neuberg Str. 1 30625 Hannover Tel: 0511-532-6656 immunologie@mh-hannover.de MD/Ph

  9. The role of the academic medical center library in training public librarians*†

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Charles B.; Wozar, Jody A.; Epstein, Barbara A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This project enhanced access to and awareness of health information resources on the part of public libraries in western Pennsylvania. Setting/Participants/Resources: The Health Sciences Library System (HSLS), University of Pittsburgh, conducted a needs assessment and offered a series of workshops to 298 public librarians. Brief Description: The National Library of Medicine–funded project “Access to Electronic Health Information” at the HSLS, University of Pittsburgh, provided Internet health information training to public libraries and librarians in sixteen counties in western Pennsylvania. Through this project, this academic medical center library identified the challenges for public librarians in providing health-related reference service, developed a training program to address those challenges, and evaluated the impact of this training on public librarians' ability to provide health information. Results/Outcome: The HSLS experience indicates academic medical center libraries can have a positive impact on their communities by providing health information instruction to public librarians. The success of this project—demonstrated by the number of participants, positive course evaluations, increased comfort level with health-related reference questions, and increased use of MEDLINEplus and other quality information resources—has been a catalyst for continuation of this programming, not only for public librarians but also for the public in general. Evaluation Method: A training needs assessment, course evaluation, and impact training survey were used in developing the curriculum and evaluating the impact of this training on public librarians' professional activities. PMID:12883558

  10. Collaborating to improve the global competitiveness of US academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Molly; Garman, Andrew; Johnson, Tricia; Hohmann, Samuel; Meurer, Steve

    2012-01-01

    President Obama announced the National Export Initiative in his 2010 State of the Union address and set the ambitious goal of doubling US exports by the end of 2014 to support millions of domestic jobs. Understanding the competitive position of US health care in the global market for international patients, University Health System Consortium (UHC), an alliance of 116 academic medical centers and 272 of their affiliated hospitals, representing 90 percent of the nation's non-profit academic medical centers partnered with Rush University, a private University in Chicago, IL and the International Trade Administration of the US Department of Commerce International Trade Administration (ITA) to participate in the Market Development Cooperator Program. The goal of this private-public partnership is to increase the global competitiveness of the US health care industry, which represents over 16 percent of the GDP, amongst foreign health care providers. This article provides an overview of the US health care market and outlines the aims of the US Cooperative for International Patient Programs, the end result of the partnership between UHC, ITA and Rush University. PMID:22913124

  11. Nonpsychiatric Medication Interventions Initiated by a Postgraduate Year 2 Psychiatric Pharmacy Resident in a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Studies have demonstrated the benefits of incorporating comprehensive medication management into primary care, but no study describes the types of nonpsychiatric medication–related interventions provided by a psychiatric pharmacist while providing comprehensive medication management. Method: A chart review of Center for Community Health patients enrolled in the University of Southern California Psychiatric Pharmacy Clinic, Los Angeles, between July 1, 2013, and January 10, 2014, was conducted. Progress notes were reviewed to collect medication recommendations and interventions. The number and types of interventions were compared between groups based on substance abuse history, comorbid medical conditions, number of psychiatric diagnoses, and number of medications. An anonymous survey was distributed to primary care providers (PCPs) regarding perceptions and attitudes toward a postgraduate year 2 psychiatric pharmacy resident’s interventions pertaining to nonpsychiatric medications. Results: 177 nonpsychiatric medication interventions were documented. Fifty interventions required PCP approval, and 45% of those were accepted. Having a diagnosis of diabetes (P < .0001), hypertension (P < .0001), gastroesophageal reflux disease (P < .0001), ? 9 medications (P < .0001), or ? 5 medical diagnoses (P < .0001) were all associated with an increased mean number of interventions. Of the PCPs, 66% viewed the psychiatric pharmacist as a resource for addressing medical interventions by providing drug information. The PCPs were agreeable to having a psychiatric pharmacist provide drug information and monitor the patient but reported mixed opinions on whether a psychiatric pharmacist should comanage nonpsychiatric conditions. Conclusions: Psychiatric pharmacists can successfully collaborate with PCPs in primary care clinics to provide comprehensive medication management that optimizes pharmacotherapy for patients with medical and psychiatric conditions. Continued efforts are needed to promote interdisciplinary approaches to provide comprehensive medication management services for patients with both psychiatric and medical disorders.

  12. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Frequently Asked Questions

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Frequently Asked Questions Search NCCCP Contact Us Overview Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Questions NCI Community Cancer Centers Program Pilot: 2007-2010 Key Points The NCI Community

  13. 77 FR 45716 - Proposed Information Collection (Foreign Medical Program); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ...Information Collection (Foreign Medical Program); Comment Request...reimburse healthcare providers for medical services provided to veterans...other forms of information technology. Titles: a. Foreign Medical Program Registration...

  14. Key aspects and health care benefits of patient-centered medical homes part 1 of 3.

    PubMed

    Stack, Eric; Kier, Karen

    2014-03-01

    The concept of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is one of the latest efforts to provide higher quality of life for patients while aiming to reduce overall health care costs. As part of this health care reform effort, PCMHs strive to provide patient-centered, coordinated, effective, and efficient care that leads to long-term relationships with patients. The objective of this three-part series is to provide a comprehensive review of the PCMH for health care practice sites and professionals, its key features, recognition of quality programs, support and payment models from government and third-party insurers, and patient and professional benefits. Part 1 describes the history and development of PCMHs, the overall concept of the health care model, and the process that is used to recognize quality PCMHs. Because of the current weaknesses and deficiencies in the United States' health care system, there is a definitive need for the establishment and expansion of PCMHs. PMID:24589769

  15. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Laboratory Technology Programs (CIP: 51.1004--Medical Laboratory Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the medical laboratory technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  16. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be interested in implementing a similar program at their NASA Center. Questions were asked pertaining to standardization for age, the validity of using the idealized male values also for the female population, and indications of the screening test's sensitivity and specificity.

  17. An example of program evaluation project in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Musal, Berna; Taskiran, Cahit; Gursel, Yucel; Ozan, Sema; Timbil, Sevgi; Velipasaoglu, Serpil

    2008-03-01

    Revisions to existing program evaluation approaches of the Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine (DEUSM) were made by the Medical Education Department in June 2005. After considering several evaluation models, a mixed evaluation model was developed to meet institutional needs. The general program evaluation plan was structured as areas of inquiry under the three main program evaluation questions: what are the effects of the educational program on students and graduates, what are the effects of the educational program on trainers, and is the educational program being implemented as planned. The School's first report made through its new program evaluation approach was prepared in July 2006, leading to important revisions to the educational program. This article presents DEUSM's project to revise its program evaluation approach and briefly discusses its early implementation. PMID:19034833

  18. Advancing Educational Continuity in Primary Care Residencies: An Opportunity for Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2014-12-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  19. University of Rochester University of Rochester Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Orthodontics Orofacial Pain/TMJD Please Note: Periodontology Prosthodontics · Interviews for the Ph.D. program Orthodontics · These graduate programs are not required for acceptance into the postdoctoral programs

  20. Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have conducted work terms in the fields of experimental

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    : Completed research projects in medical radiation physics and environmental radiation protection PreparedMedical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have, cancer centres, private industry and government ministries and agencies. Coop Jobs have Included: Medical

  1. MiltonS.Hershey Medical Center wCollege of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    PENNST~E MiltonS.Hershey Medical Center wCollege of Medicine Appendix M, .Page M 1 , hlichael F State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center Fax: (717) 531-4139 .4ssociate Professor of Medicine Office this is a large number of highly integrated changes, please allow us the opportunity to provide the perspective

  2. Penn State Faculty Appointment For The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center Clinical Staff

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    Document # Penn State Faculty Appointment For The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center Clinical Staff Fixed Term Appointment The President of The Pennsylvania State University has approved your appointment by The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, and this faculty appointment will automatically terminate in the event

  3. Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Based at The Ohio State University Libraries, the Byrd Polar Research Center Archival Program (BPRCAP) collects, preserves, and provides "access to historical documents concerned with polar regions." Their collection contains papers, records, photographs, and other forms of documentation concerning explorers, scientists, and other figures. Along the top of their page, visitors will find sections that profile select explorers (Byrd and Cook, among others), along with "Oral History" and "Online Resources". The Byrd area contains photographs of the man and his explorations, along with artifacts from his expeditions. Moving on, the "Oral History" area offers visitors the ability to view dozens of oral histories with people like Captain William Anderson and Chester Segers, who was one of the cooks at the South Pole Station.

  4. National Ice Center Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Meg

    2002-01-01

    The long-term goal of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Visiting Scientist Program at the National Ice Center (NIC) is to recruit the highest quality visiting scientists in the ice research community for the broad purpose of strengthening the relationship between the operational and research communities in the atmospheric and oceanic sciences. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research supports the scientific community by creating, conducting, and coordinating projects that strengthen education and research in the atmospheric, oceanic and earth sciences. UCAR accomplishes this mission by building partnerships that are national or global in scope. The goal of UCAR is to enable researchers and educators to take on issues and activities that require the combined and collaborative capabilities of a broadly engaged scientific community.

  5. Patient-centered outcomes of a value-based insurance design program for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Daniel J; Robinson, Edmondo J; Anthony, Karen B; Stillman, Paula L

    2013-04-01

    Value-based insurance design (VBID) initiatives have been associated with modest improvements in adherence based on evaluations of administrative claims data. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to report the patient-centered outcomes of a VBID program that eliminated co-payments for diabetes-related medications and supplies for employees and dependents with diabetes at a large health system. The authors compared self-reported values of medication adherence, cost-related nonadherence, health status, and out-of-pocket health care costs for patients before and 1 year after program implementation. Clinical metrics and satisfaction with the program also are reported. In all, 188 patients completed the follow-up evaluation. Overall, patients reported a significant reduction in monthly out-of-pocket costs (P<0.001), which corresponded to a significant reduction in cost-related nonadherence from 41% to 17.5% (P<0.001). Self-reported medication adherence increased for hyperglycemic medications (P=0.011), but there were no apparent changes in glycemic control. Overall, 89% of participants agreed that the program helped them take better care of their diabetes. The authors found that a VBID program for employees and dependents with diabetes was associated with self-reported reductions in cost-related nonadherence and improvements in medication adherence. Importantly, the program was associated with high levels of satisfaction among participants and strongly perceived by participants to facilitate medication utilization and self-management for diabetes. These findings suggest that VBID programs can accomplish the anticipated goals for medication utilization and are highly regarded by participants. Patient-centered outcomes should be included in VBID evaluations to allow decision makers to determine the true impact of VBID programs on participants. PMID:23405873

  6. Glaucoma Medication Adherence among African Americans: Program Development

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Campbell, Lisa; Wood, Andy; Gao, Liyan; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among African Americans (AA) with glaucoma and to elicit input from a community-based participatory research team in order to guide the development of a culturally informed, health promotion program for improving glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s. Methods The nominal group technique (NGT), a highly structured focus group methodology, was implemented with 12 separate groups of AA’s patients with glaucoma (N = 89) to identify barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication usage. Participant rank-ordering votes were summed across groups and categorized into themes. Next, an individually and culturally targeted health promotion program promoting appropriate medication adherence was developed based on focus group results and input from a community-based participatory research team. Results The top five barriers included problems with 1) forgetfulness, 2) side effects, 3) cost/affordability, 4) eye drop administration, and 5) the eye drop schedule. The most salient top five facilitators were 1) fear or thoughts about the consequences of not taking eye drops, 2) use of memory aids, cues, or strategies, 3) maintaining a regular routine or schedule for eye drop administration, 4) ability to afford eye drops, and 5) keeping eye drops in the same area. The resulting health promotion program was based on a multi-component empowerment framework that included glaucoma education, motivational interviewing, and problem-solving training to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators related to glaucoma medication adherence among AA’s are multifactorial. Based on the NGT themes and input from the community-based participatory research team, a culturally informed, health promotion program was designed and holds great promise for improving medication adherence among this vulnerable population. PMID:23873033

  7. Telemedicine for postoperative visits at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center. Results of a needs assessment study.

    PubMed

    Stypulkowski, Katie; Uppaluri, Sarika; Waisbren, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The Minneapolis VA Medical Center initiated a telemedicine program in the early 1990s as a way to streamline care and increase convenience for patients and clinicians. In this study, we explored employing telemedicine for postoperative visits for patients in the general surgery clinic. We surveyed 346 veterans about their preferred method of follow-up. In addition, we asked about their need to complete insurance paperwork, use of VA satellite clinics, distance from the VA Medical Center and from the nearest satellite clinic, and need for travel assistance. We found half of the respondents preferred face-to-face follow-up while the other half preferred follow up using some form of telemedicine. These findings suggest there is a demand for remote postop visits using telemedicine and that such visits may have advantages over face-to-face clinic appointments, especially for patients who have to travel long distances. Further studies are ongoing to determine the actual acceptance of remote visits by the patients and surgeons and to determine if there have been delays in recognition of postoperative complications. PMID:25771648

  8. The Visiting Medical Student Clerkship Program at Mayo Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Paul S.; McConahey, Linda L.; Orvidas, Laura J.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Kasten, Mary J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the history, objectives, statistics, and initiatives used to address challenges associated with the Mayo Clinic Visiting Medical Student (VMS) Clerkship Program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mayo Clinic administrative records were reviewed for calendar years 1995 through 2008 to determine the effect of interventions to increase the numbers of appropriately qualified international VMSs and underrepresented minority VMSs. For numerical data, descriptive statistics were used; for comparisons, ?2 tests were performed. RESULTS: During the specified period, 4908 VMSs participated in the Mayo VMS Program (yearly mean [SD], 351 [24]). Most students were from US medical schools (3247 [66%]) and were male (3084 [63%]). Overall, 3101 VMSs (63%) applied for and 935 (30%) were appointed to Mayo Clinic residency program positions. Interventions to address the challenge of large numbers of international students who participated in our VMS program but did not apply for Mayo residency positions resulted in significantly fewer international students participating in our VMS program (P<.001), applying for Mayo residency program positions (P<.001), and being appointed to residency positions (P=.001). Interventions to address the challenge of low numbers of underrepresented minority students resulted in significantly more of these students participating in our VMS program (P=.005), applying for Mayo residency positions (P=.008), and being appointed to residency positions (P=.04). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that specific interventions can affect the characteristics of students who participate in VMS programs and who apply for and are appointed to residency program positions. PMID:20675510

  9. Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program: The Prevalence of Asthma Medication Use During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Craig; Joski, Peter; Freiman, Heather C.; Andrade, Susan; Toh, Sengwee; Dublin, Sascha; Cheetham, T. Craig; Cooper, William O.; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Li, De-Kun; Beaton, Sarah J.; Scott, Pamela E.; Hammad, Tarek; Davis, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in women of reproductive age, occurring in up to 8% of pregnancies. Objective Assess the prevalence of asthma medication use during pregnancy in a large diverse cohort. Methods We identified women aged 15 to 45 years who delivered a live born infant between 2001 and 2007 across 11 U.S. health plans within the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). Using health plans’ administrative and claims data, and birth certificate data, we identified deliveries for which women filled asthma medications from 90 days before pregnancy through delivery. Prevalence (%) was calculated for asthma diagnosis and medication dispensing. Results There were 586,276 infants from 575,632 eligible deliveries in the MEPREP cohort. Asthma prevalence among mothers was 6.7%, increasing from 5.5% in 2001 to 7.8% in 2007. A total of 9.7% (n=55,914) of women were dispensed asthma medications during pregnancy. The overall prevalence of maintenance-only medication, rescue-only medication, and combined maintenance and rescue medication was 0.6%, 6.7%, and 2.4% respectively. The prevalence of maintenance-only use doubled during the study period from 0.4% to 0.8%, while rescue-only use decreased from 7.4% to 5.8%. Conclusions In this large population-based pregnancy cohort, the prevalence of asthma diagnoses increased over time. The dispensing of maintenance-only medication increased over time, while rescue-only medication dispensing decreased over time. PMID:23108737

  10. Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antimirova, Tetyana

    2006-12-01

    A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

  11. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    PubMed

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simi?, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates. PMID:24743088

  12. Process Programming to Support Medical Safety: A Case Study on Blood Transfusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lori A. Clarke; Yao Chen; George S. Avrunin; Bin Chen; Rachel L. Cobleigh; Kim Frederick; Elizabeth A. Henneman; Leon J. Osterweil

    2005-01-01

    Medical errors are now recognized as a major cause of untimely deaths or other adverse medical outcomes. To reduce the number of medical errors, the Medical Safety Project at the University of Massachusetts is exploring using a process programming language to define medical processes, a requirements elicita- tion framework for specifying important medical properties, and finite-state verifi- cation tools to

  13. RECEPTIONIST The certificate in medical dental/reception is a one year program

    E-print Network

    Hartman, Chris

    , medical law and ethics, and computer applications. Students are also required to complete a medical Applications · Medical Terminology · Professional Skills in the Workplace · Medical Law and EthicsMEDICAL/ DENTAL RECEPTIONIST The certificate in medical dental/reception is a one year program

  14. The Program for Professional Values and Ethics in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Cathy J.; Chauvin, Sheila W.; Rodenhauser, Paul; Whitlock, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Program for Professional Values and Ethics in Medical Education (PPVEME) at Tulane University School of Medicine. It brings together students, residents, and faculty into learning teams that teach the other teams about one of five themes: integrity, communication, teamwork, leadership, and service. It emphasizes learner-driven self…

  15. Medical Schedule of Benefits Johns Hopkins Student Health Program

    E-print Network

    Niebur, Ernst

    Medical Schedule of Benefits Johns Hopkins Student Health Program Effective July 1, 2014 Revised:6 (all options combined) Individual $100 $100 Family $300 $300 Co-Insurance Out of Pocket Maximum Per/ Radiation Therapy PhysicianVisit 100% 80% of R&C Physician Materials 80% 80% of R&C Chiropractic Care

  16. Institute of Functional Genomics, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany. Present address: Center for Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    address: Center for Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. 3 Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA. 4 Pulmonary Institute, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zeri n, Israel. 5 Department of Medicine­C, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon, Israel. 6 Department of Genetics, Faculty of Agriculture

  17. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  18. Minnesota Medical Foundation McNamara Alumni Center

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    in behavior genetics, Gottesman conducted a landmark study of identical and fraternal twins in the early 1960s that identi- fied a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia. he had found through an earlier twins study influenced by genetics. "In addition to his amazing academic contributions to the field of medical science

  19. Smartphones in medicine: emerging practices in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Angela C; El Hajj, Stephanie C; Perret, J Nelson; Caffery, Terrell S; Jones, Glenn N; Musso, Mandi W

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mobile phone technology now provide a myriad of resources to physicians' fingertips. However, the medical profession continues to struggle with potential for misuse of these devices. There is a need for better understanding of physicians' uses of smartphones in order to establish guidelines for appropriate and professional behavior. The purpose of the current study was to survey physicians' and medical students' practices concerning smartphone use in the healthcare setting. Physicians and medical students were asked to complete anonymous surveys regarding uses of smartphones within the past month in various healthcare settings. Overall, the participants reported distinctly different patterns in the uses they made of their phones in different settings (P<.001), with most individuals engaging in most behaviors while on break but few using their smartphones while with patients or during procedures. It appears that physicians and medical students make decisions about using their smartphones according to some combination of three considerations: degree of relevance to patient care, the appropriateness of the behavior in front of patients, and the issue of how disruptive that behavior may be. PMID:25526706

  20. Teacher training program for medical students: improvements needed

    PubMed Central

    van Diggele, Christie; Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Skills in peer teaching, assessment, and feedback are increasingly documented internationally as required graduate attributes in medicine. Yet these skills are rarely taught in medical schools. We sought to design and deliver a short but effective teacher training (TT) program for medical students that could be easily integrated into the professional development curriculum. This study sought to evaluate such a pilot program, based on student perception. Methods The study took place at a major metropolitan teaching hospital, where 38 medical students were invited to attend a voluntary, newly designed four-module TT program. In total, 23/38 (61%) of invited students attended. Mixed methods were used for evaluation. Questionnaires were completed by 21/23 (91%) of students, and 6/23 (26%) of students participated in a focus group. Results Students reported that as a result of the program they felt more confident to facilitate small group teaching activities and to provide feedback to peers using the suggested frameworks. Students would like the program to contain more in-depth educational theory and to allow a more time for small group learning activities. They would also like to see opportunities for participation across all clinical schools. Conclusion The TT program was successful in increasing student awareness of educational theory and practice, thereby improving their confidence in teaching and assessing their peers and making them feel better prepared for their careers as medical practitioners. Key improvements to the program are needed in terms of more in-depth theory and more time spent on small group learning. This might be achieved by complementing the course with e-learning. PMID:25878520

  1. Sources of information on postgraduate medical training programs - 2004 update.

    PubMed

    Brazin, Lillian R

    2004-01-01

    This is the biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most current and complete source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update goes beyond postgraduate training resources to include selected Web sites and books on resume writing, practice management, personal financial issues, the "Match," exam preparation, job hunting, and the DEA license application process. Print resources are included if they provide information not on the Internet or have features that are particularly useful. The Internet continues to be a major marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest for their residency and fellowship programs. Even the smallest community hospital usually has a presence on the 'Net. PMID:15148015

  2. Evaluation of a clinical medical librarian program at the Yale Medical Library.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, B; Battison, S; Kolisch, M; Leredu, M

    1978-07-01

    A clinical medical librarian (CML) program in a large university-based teaching hospital setting is viewed by the majority of clinicians as education-oriented, with slightly fewer clinicians viewing it as patient care oriented. The CML service has been utilized for research purposes only when it is clear that case-relevant information can evolve into research intended to have "clinical" impact. This study reports the results of a questionnaire circulated among clinicians receiving CML support by a large medical school library. Results indicate that (1) the CML effected a change in information-seeking behavior by the clinicians--they obtained information that would not have been available to them if the CML had not been present in patient-management conferences; (2) relevancy of information provided by the CML was judged by the clinicians to be very high; (3) the accuracy of the CML's search, coupled with the rapidity of delivery, was found to be highly satisfactory; (4) acceptance of the CML within the patient care setting was acknowledged by the majority of clinicians, who contact the CML in-hospital and overwhelmingly prefer to do so; and (5) there was no statistically significant variation in the manner in which different medical specialties use the services of a CML. These findings justify implementation of a clinical medical librarian program, on a modified basis, as an additional service to already existing reference services offered by a large medical school library. PMID:678700

  3. Perceptions of personal health risks by medical and non-medical workers in a university medical center: a survey study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tita Alissa Listyowardojo; Raoul E Nap; Addie Johnson

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health care workers (HCWs) are faced with many work-related choices which may depend on how they perceive risk, such as whether or not to comply with safety regulations. Little research has investigated risk perception in medical workers in comparison with non-medical workers and the extent to which risk perception differs in these groups. The current study thus investigates risk

  4. Health Services Management Education On-Site at a Military Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephen J.; Poss, W. Bradley; Cupp, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative educational program with the U.S. military is described to illustrate a unique opportunity that confronted a graduate healthcare management program. The resulting degree program supported the military's operational medical mission but also presented interesting and unexpected challenges resulting from the wars in Iraq and…

  5. University Hospitals Case Medical Center presents promising data for novel pancreatic cancer vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists from University Hospitals Case Medical Center’s Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented results of a Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with pancreatic cancer testing the Algenpantucel-L vaccine today at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, part of Digestive Disease Week in San Diego.

  6. RURAL MEDICAL EDUCATION (RMED) PROGRAM NAMES NEW DIRECTOR ROCKFORD, IL -The Rural Medical Education (RMED) Program at the University of Illinois at

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    graduation from medical school in 2007, he entered the Cedar Rapids Family Medicine Residency in Cedar Rapids. Another 68 RMED students are currently attending medical school at the University of Illinois CollegeRURAL MEDICAL EDUCATION (RMED) PROGRAM NAMES NEW DIRECTOR ROCKFORD, IL - The Rural Medical

  7. Medical care delivery in the US space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.

    1991-01-01

    The stated goal of this meeting is to examine the use of telemedicine in disaster management, public health, and remote health care. NASA has a vested interest in providing health care to crews in remote environments. NASA has unique requirements for telemedicine support, in that our flight crews conduct their job in the most remote of all work environments. Compounding the degree of remoteness are other environmental concerns, including confinement, lack of atmosphere, spaceflight physiological deconditioning, and radiation exposure, to name a few. In-flight medical care is a key component in the overall support for missions, which also includes extensive medical screening during selection, preventive medical programs for astronauts, and in-flight medical monitoring and consultation. This latter element constitutes the telemedicine aspect of crew health care. The level of in-flight resources dedicated to medical care is determined by the perceived risk of a given mission, which in turn is related to mission duration, planned crew activities, and length of time required for return to definitive medical care facilities.

  8. Patient-centered instructions for medications prescribed for the treatment of heart failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel G Morrow; Michael Weiner; Melissa M Deer; James M Young; Sarah Dunn; Patricia McGuire; Michael D Murray

    2004-01-01

    Background: Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with reduced functional capacity and quality of life, particularly among older adults. Complex medication regimens for CHF challenge older patients' ability to adhere to them, in part because of age-related cognitive decline and poor communication about medications.Objective: This article describes patient-centered instructions for taking CHF medications that were developed as part of a

  9. 75 FR 80762 - Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act: Applicability to Hospital and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act: Applicability to Hospital...policies related to the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA). Specifically...applicability of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA)....

  10. 77 FR 3242 - Comprehensive Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...resources across Comprehensive Centers...schools. 4. Evaluation. Each center...focus on continuous improvement...and leader evaluation and support...and sustain comprehensive district...methods of evaluation will provide continuous...

  11. Stem cell research and regenerative medicine at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center.

    PubMed

    Abumaree, Mohamed H; Al Askar, Ahmed S; Kalionis, Bill; Abomaray, Fawaz Mohamed; Jawdat, Dunia; Hajeer, Ali H; Fakhoury, Hana; Al Jumah, Mohammed A

    2014-12-01

    Translation of stem cell research from bench to bedside opens up exciting new therapeutic options for patients. Although stem cell research has progressed rapidly, its clinical applications have not kept pace. We report on the establishment of a stem cell research and regenerative medicine program at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC). The purpose of this unit is to coordinate advanced stem cell research and translational outcomes with the goal of treating chronic human diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, immunological, and liver diseases. Our first step in achieving this goal was to integrate the stem cells and regenerative medicine unit with our umbilical cord blood bank and bone marrow registry. This organizational structure will provide different sources for stem cells for research and clinical purposes, and facilitate our stem cell research and stem cell transplantation program. We are at an early and exciting stage in our program, but we believe that our progress to the international stage will be rapid and have a significant impact. PMID:25457954

  12. TRANSFERENCE TO A MEDICAL CENTER—A Cultural Dimension in Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wilmer, Harry A.

    1962-01-01

    The phenomenon of transference to a medical center is similar to the transference given to an individual physician, the feelings being invested in The Center rather than in a person. The reputation and the image of The Center can give therapeutic sustenance. There are common features to each healing organization from primitive times to the journeys to the Oracles at the shrine of Zeus at Dodona and Apollo at Delphi, to Mecca and St. Bartholomew's Hospital, to Lourdes and Gheel, and to the present-day medical center. A phenomenon which we have identified as Transference to a Center has previously been known to physicians, theologians, historians, sociologists and anthropologists, by different names. In a social sense, transference to a medical center is akin to an Edifice complex. PMID:14040281

  13. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Advocacy

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Advocacy Search NCCCP Pilot Goals Overview Pilot Subcommittees Pilot Executive Subcommittee Disparities Clinical Trials Information Technology Biospecimens

  14. Annual health examination program, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, L.; Ladou, J.

    1975-01-01

    A cost analysis of a low-volume multiphasic health testing program is presented. The results indicate that unit costs are similar to those of high-volume automated programs. The comparability in unit cost appears to result from the savings in personnel and space requirements of the smaller program as compared with the larger ones.

  15. USGS Alaska Science Center, Biological Science Office: Research Programs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website provides information about the research programs of the USGS Alaska Science Center - Biological Science Office (ASC-BSO). The programs are divided into several categories including Ecosystems & Habitats, Mammals, Technical Programs, Fish and Fisheries, and Birds. Links connect to research information about numerous program subcategories like Coastal and Marine, Sea Otters, Loons, Fisheries Projects, and more. The site also links to background information about the ASC-BSO, job listings, staff contact information, and the Alaska Science Center Publications Database.

  16. Patient-centered medical home technology effects on hypertension and diabetes control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marisol Alvarado

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hypertension and Diabetes is a public health and economic concern in the United States. The utilization of medical home concepts increases the receipt of preventive services, however, do they also increase adherence to treatments? This study examined the effect of patient-centered medical home technologies such as the electronic health record, clinical support system, and web-based care management in improving

  17. Analysis and optimization of the Emergency Department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center via simulation

    E-print Network

    Noyes, Clay W

    2008-01-01

    We develop a simulation model based on patient data from 2/1/05 to 1/31/06 that represents the operations of the Emergency Department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a Harvard teaching hospital and a leading medical ...

  18. The Medical Library and Media Center of Keio University in Tokyo: report on a visit.

    PubMed Central

    Accart, J P

    1995-01-01

    The Medical Library and Media Center at Keio University in Tokyo offers many facilities to its users: access to medical information within a large catalog of monographs and journals, online searching and CD-ROM databases, and a dynamic interlibrary loan service. This article is a report of a professional visit to the library on September 30, 1993. PMID:7703947

  19. PROJECT HEAD START MEDICAL--A GUIDE FOR DIRECTION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    HEALTH SERVICES OF PROJECT HEAD START CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS PROVIDE--A MEDICAL EVALUATION OF EACH CHILD INCLUDING MEDICAL HISTORY, DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION, SCREENING TESTS FOR VISION, HEARING, SPEECH, AND TUBERCULOSIS, LABORATORY TESTS OF URINE FOR ALBUMIN AND TESTS OF SUGAR AND BLOOD FOR ANEMIA, DENTAL ASSESSMENT,…

  20. Discharge/Home Care Plan for Childhood Asthma Children's Medical Center, University of Virginia

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Discharge/Home Care Plan for Childhood Asthma Children's Medical Center, University of Virginia _____________________________________________________________________. Eliminate from your child's environment the following triggers that make his/her asthma worse: House Dust medications is required. Your child's asthma is: Mild intermittent Mild persistent Moderate Severe ROUTINE

  1. 75 FR 6401 - Medical Devices Regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research; Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ...No. FDA-2009-M-0513] Medical Devices Regulated by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research; Availability of Summaries...for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). This list is intended...for Biologics Evaluation and Research (HFM-17), Food and...

  2. Mar 25, 2014 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is committed to improving people's lives.

    E-print Network

    tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. North Not to Scale 270's lives. That's why all Medical Center locations--inside and outside--are tobacco-free. This includes all

  3. Mar 25, 2014 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is committed to improving people's lives.

    E-print Network

    tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. North Not to Scale 670's lives. That's why all Medical Center locations--inside and outside--are tobacco-free. This includes all

  4. Mar 25, 2014 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is committed to improving people's lives.

    E-print Network

    tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. North Not to Scale 315's lives. That's why all Medical Center locations--inside and outside--are tobacco-free. This includes all

  5. Demand-based Optimal Control to Save Energy: A Case-Study in a Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Joo, I. S.; Song, L.; Liu, M.; Carico, M.

    demonstrates demand-based temperature, pressure and economizer control by the mathematical optimization methodology illustrated by a case-study, implemented with actual systems in a 1.2 million square foot medical center. Based on the optimization results...

  6. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - NCCCP Program Advisory Committee

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - NCCCP Program Advisory Committee Search NCCCP Pilot Goals Overview Pilot Subcommittees Pilot Executive Subcommittee Disparities Clinical Trials Information

  7. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  8. Association between early returns and frequent ED visits at a rural academic medical center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack E. Riggs; Stephen M. Davis; Gerald R. Hobbs; Debra J. Paulson; Ann S. Chinnis; Patricia L. Heilman

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of frequent emergency department (ED) use on early returns to the ED at a large rural academic medical center. An analysis was done of all 35,440 visits by 22,442 individuals to a large rural academic medical center ED during calendar year 2000. Of 35,440 ED visits, there were 1,992 (5.62%)

  9. Management of thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin: Gundersen\\/Lutheran Medical Center, 1969–1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renato G Martins; Robert H Caplan; Pamela J Lambert; Brenda Rooney; William A Kisken

    1997-01-01

    Background:Most reports regarding the treatment of thyroid cancer originate from university referral centers. In this article, we report our experience in managing thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin at a nonuniversity institution over a 26-year period.Study Design:We reviewed the medical records of all patients treated for thyroid cancer at the Gundersen\\/Lutheran Medical Center from 1969 to 1995. Histologic types, demographic

  10. University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers develop new radiation therapy for gynecologic cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center have developed a more effective way to treat gynecologic cancers, shortening radiation treatment time from five weeks to three days. The method was published in the Journal of Visualized Experiments on April 17. The new method, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used on other types of cancer, but University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the first treatment facility to apply it to gynecologic cancers.

  11. Labor Archives and Research Center Invites You to Attend the Center's 26th Anniversary Program

    E-print Network

    Labor Archives and Research Center Invites You to Attend the Center's 26th Anniversary Program and Open to the Public MCSVoiceApril23,1945 #12;Labor Archives and Research Center, SFSU 480 Winston Drive. Celebrate the Labor Archives and Research Center's 26th Anniversary! Friday, February 24, 2012 ~ 6:30 p

  12. Program on Nosocomial Infection in the Curricula of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing and Medical Technology in Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Somwang Danchaivijitr; Somsak Chakpaiwong DDS

    2005-01-01

    Objectives : To identify defects in the program on NI in curricula of medical, dental, medical technology and nursing schools. Impacts of the results of the study on the changes of the program were also evaluated Material and Method : Questionnaires study of all 12, 8, 9 medical, dental, medical technology and 20 of 62 nursing schools. Data were collected

  13. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...performance of its drug utilization management program, according to guidelines... (d) Medication therapy management program (MTMP) —(1...reduce the risk of adverse events, including adverse drug...level of medication therapy management services for each...

  14. Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs

    PubMed Central

    Ellaway, Rachel H.; Cooper, Gerry; Al-Idrissi, Tracy; Dubé, Tim; Graves, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research. PMID:24646440

  15. Predictors of early faculty attrition at one Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Faculty turnover threatens the research, teaching and clinical missions of medical schools. We measured early attrition among newly-hired medical school faculty and identified personal and institutional factors associated with early attrition. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified faculty hired during the 2005–2006 academic year at one school. Three-year attrition rates were measured. A 40-question electronic survey measured demographics, career satisfaction, faculty responsibilities, institutional/departmental support, and reasons for resignation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) identified variables associated with early attrition. Results Of 139 faculty, 34% (95% CI?=?26-42%) resigned within three years of hire. Attrition was associated with: perceived failure of the Department Chair to foster a climate of teaching, research, and service (OR?=?6.03; 95% CI: 1.84, 19.69), inclusiveness, respect, and open communication (OR?=?3.21; 95% CI: 1.04, 9.98). Lack of professional development of the faculty member (OR?=?3.84; 95% CI: 1.25, 11.81); institutional recognition and support for excellence in teaching (OR?=?2.96; 95% CI: 0.78, 11.19) and clinical care (OR?=?3.87; 95% CI: 1.04, 14.41); and >50% of professional time devoted to patient care (OR?=?3.93; 95% CI: 1.29, 11.93) predicted attrition. Gender, race, ethnicity, academic degree, department type and tenure status did not predict early attrition. Of still-active faculty, an additional 27 (48.2%, 95% CI: 35.8, 61.0) reported considering resignation within the 5 years. Conclusions In this pilot study, one-third of new faculty resigned within 3 years of hire. Greater awareness of predictors of early attrition may help schools identify threats to faculty career satisfaction and retention. PMID:24512629

  16. [Medical scientist training program of the University of Tokyo].

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Masahide

    2013-03-01

    It is five years since our medical scientist training program (MSTP) of the University of Tokyo started. The program is now working well, thanks to the former head Shigeo Okabe, lecturer Kano Mitsunobu (currently a professor at Okayama University), Assistant Professor Makoto Kurachi (currently a post-doc at University of Pennsylvania). Since last year, new stuffs were recruited and involved in managing the MSTP. Here, I think it is a good chance to verbalize the policy and history of the MSTP. PMID:23600316

  17. A Human-Centered Approach to Medical Informatics for Medical Students, Residents, and Practicing Clinicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahlhut, Richard W.; Gosbee, John W.; Gardner-Bonneau, Daryle J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes development of a curriculum in medical information science that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine rather than details of information technology. Design was guided by identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by examination of past failures of informatics…

  18. Higher Education: A Worldwide Inventory of Centers and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.; Engberg, David

    This inventory is a guide to higher education programs, centers, and related agencies. It opens with an essay that gives an overview of higher education research and training, providing a context for the programs and centers listed in the inventory. The chapters are: (1) "Research and Training in Higher Education: The State of the Art" (Philip G.…

  19. News Note: NCI Launches Centers of Quantitative Imaging Excellence Program

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is launching a new program to qualify existing NCI designated Cancer Centers with an added attribute -- as Centers of Quantitative Imaging Excellence. This program will significantly decrease potential variability in image procedures done while a patient is undergoing treatment as part of a NCI-sponsored clinical trial.

  20. Graduate Medical Education Leadership Development Curriculum for Program Directors

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Constance K.; Zenni, Elisa A.; West, Denise T.; Genuardi, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Program director (PD) orientation to roles and responsibilities takes on many forms and processes. This article describes one institution's innovative arm of faculty development directed specifically toward PDs and associate PDs to provide institutional resources and information for those in graduate medical education leadership roles. Methods The designated institutional official created a separate faculty development curriculum for leadership development of PDs and associate PDs, modeled on the Association of American Medical Colleges-GRA (Group on Resident Affairs) graduate medical education leadership development course for designated institutional officials. It consists of monthly 90-minute sessions at the end of a working day, for new and experienced PDs alike, with mentoring provided by experienced PDs. We describe 2 iterations of the curriculum. To provide ongoing support a longitudinal curriculum of special topics has followed in the interval between core curriculum offerings. Results Communication between PDs across disciplines has improved. The broad, inclusive nature allowed for experienced PDs to take advantage of the learning opportunity while providing exchange and mentorship through sharing of lessons learned. The participants rated the course highly and education process and outcome measures for the programs have been positive, including increased accreditation cycle lengths. Conclusion It is important and valuable to provide PDs and associate PDs with administrative leadership development and resources, separate from general faculty development, to meet their role-specific needs for orientation and development and to better equip them to meet graduate medical education leadership challenges. This endeavor provides a foundational platform for designated institutional official and PD interactions to work on program building and improvement. PMID:22655147

  1. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Emergency Medical Technology--Basic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Emergency Medical Technology--Paramedic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the emergency medical technology (EMT) programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline…

  2. Medical Specialists??? Patient-Centered Communication and Patient-Reported Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda C. Zandbelt; Ellen M. A. Smets; Frans J. Oort; Mieke H. Godfried

    2007-01-01

    Background: Physicians' patient-centered communication in the medical consultation is generally expected to improve patient out- comes. However, empirical evidence is contradictory so far, and most studies were done in primary care. Objective: We sought to determine the association of specialists' patient-centered communication with patient satisfaction, adher- ence, and health status. Methods: Residents and specialists in internal medicine (n 30) and

  3. Comprehensive quality of discharge summaries at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Leora I.; Jenq, Grace Y.; Brewster, Ursula C.; Chen, Christine; Kanade, Sandhya; Van Ness, Peter H.; Araujo, Katy L. B.; Ziaeian, Boback; Moriarty, John P.; Fogerty, Robert; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Discharge summaries are essential to safe transitions from hospital to home. Objective To conduct a comprehensive quality assessment of discharge summaries. Design Prospective cohort study. Subjects 377 patients discharged home after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome, heart failure or pneumonia. Measures Discharge summaries were assessed for timeliness of dictation, transmission of the summary to appropriate outpatient clinicians and presence of key content, including elements required by The Joint Commission and elements endorsed by six medical societies in the Transitions of Care Consensus Conference (TOCCC). Results A total of 376 of 377 patients had completed discharge summaries. A total of 174 (46.3%) summaries were dictated on the day of discharge; 93 (24.7%) were completed more than a week after discharge. A total of 144 (38.3%) discharge summaries were not sent to any outpatient physician. On average, summaries included 5.6 of 6 Joint Commission elements and 4.0 of 7 TOCCC elements. Summaries dictated by hospitalists were more likely to be timely and to include key content than summaries dictated by house staff or advanced practice nurses. Summaries dictated on the day of discharge were more likely to be sent to outside physicians and to include key content. No summary met all three quality criteria of timeliness, transmission and content. Conclusions Discharge summary quality is inadequate in many domains. This may explain why individual aspects of summary quality such as timeliness or content have not been associated with improved patient outcomes. However, improving discharge summary timeliness may also improve content and transmission. PMID:23526813

  4. Daily Program 1 for a Child Development Center: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jeannette Galambos; Janis, Marjorie Graham

    This booklet presents a brief overview of the components of a center-based Head Start child development program, including its general philosophy as well as guidelines for specific daily planning. Headings are: (1) What is a Child Development Program? (2) The Staff Designs Its Own Program; (3) The Children Themselves--What Are They Like? (4) Goals…

  5. 77 FR 480 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ...Projects and Centers Program--Field Initiated Projects Program AGENCY...Projects and Centers Program-- Field Initiated Projects Program Notice...Program: The purpose of the Field Initiated (FI) Projects program...Target population'' means the group of individuals,...

  6. Smartphone app use among medical providers in ACGME training programs.

    PubMed

    Franko, Orrin I; Tirrell, Timothy F

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has witnessed the advent of the smartphone, a device armed with computing power, mobility and downloadable "apps," that has become commonplace within the medical field as both a personal and professional tool. The popularity of medically-related apps suggests that physicians use mobile technology to assist with clinical decision making, yet usage patterns have never been quantified. A digital survey examining smartphone and associated app usage was administered via email to all ACGME training programs. Data regarding respondent specialty, level of training, use of smartphones, use of smartphone apps, desired apps, and commonly used apps were collected and analyzed. Greater than 85% of respondents used a smartphone, of which the iPhone was the most popular (56%). Over half of the respondents reported using apps in their clinical practice; the most commonly used app types were drug guides (79%), medical calculators (18%), coding and billing apps (4%) and pregnancy wheels (4%). The most frequently requested app types were textbook/reference materials (average response: 55%), classification/treatment algorithms (46%) and general medical knowledge (43%). The clinical use of smartphones and apps will likely continue to increase, and we have demonstrated an absence of high-quality and popular apps despite a strong desire among physicians and trainees. This information should be used to guide the development of future healthcare delivery systems; expanded app functionality is almost certain but reliability and ease of use will likely remain major factors in determining the successful integration of apps into clinical practice. PMID:22052129

  7. The health enhancement program at monash university medical school.

    PubMed

    Hassed, Craig; Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2008-01-01

    Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine is being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches in new models of education and practice. This column spotlights such innovations in integrative healthcare and CAM education and presents readers with specific educational interventions they can adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or programs. We invite readers to submit brief descriptions of efforts in their institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to Dr Sierpina at vssierpi@utmb.edu or Dr Kreitzer at kreit003@umn.edu. Submissions should be no more than 500 to1,500 words. Please include any Web site or other resource that is relevant, as well as contact information. PMID:18984555

  8. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christianne L. Roumie; Robert Greevy; Kenneth A. Wallston; Tom A. Elasy; Lisa Kaltenbach; Kristen Kotter; Robert S. Dittus; Theodore Speroff

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic\\u000a illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341\\u000a veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered\\u000a primary care. We prospectively collected each

  9. A case study: the evolution of a “facilitator model” liaison program in an academic medical library*

    PubMed Central

    DeShay, Claudia H.; Huslig, Mary Ann; Mayo, Helen G.; Patridge, Emily F.

    2012-01-01

    Question: What type of liaison program would best utilize both librarians and other library staff to effectively promote library services and resources to campus departments? Setting: The case is an academic medical center library serving a large, diverse campus. Methods: The library implemented a “facilitator model” program to provide personalized service to targeted clients that allowed for maximum staff participation with limited subject familiarity. To determine success, details of liaison-contact interactions and results of liaison and department surveys were reviewed. Results: Liaisons successfully recorded 595 interactions during the program's first 10 months of existence. A significant majority of departmental contact persons (82.5%) indicated they were aware of the liaison program, and 75% indicated they preferred email communication. Conclusion: The “facilitator model” provides a well-defined structure for assigning liaisons to departments or groups; however, training is essential to ensure that liaisons are able to communicate effectively with their clients. PMID:22879805

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center head development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrer, Jim

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the candidate head evaluation for the new long-life magnetic head per the SOW of Contract No. NAS8-39407, MSFC Head Development Program. The original program plans were to test a candidate head, fabricate a new head, then qualify the new head. These activities were scheduled to be carried out between March 1993 and March 1994. The program was halted after the evaluation of the candidate head by NAS8-39407 Amendment No. 4. MSFC has provided and authorized the use the MARS-2000 SRB QUAL Recorder PN 10400-0677-801 - Serial Number 200004 (Datatape PN 591000 - Serial Number 1004), Reproduce Amplifier Module (RAM) Datatape PN 533040 - Serial Number 2006, associated cables, and magnetic tape on special SRB/DFI tapered reels to Datatape for this program. All the testing that has been done for the candidate head evaluation was done at Datatape's facility in Pasadena,CA. The testing was performed in a Class 100,000 particle counts clean room at ambient temperature, except for the thermal testing which was conducted in a different area at Datatape. The Performance Verification Test Procedure PVT-11004-4 (PVT) and Acceptance Test Procedure ATP-11004-09 (ATP) procedures were used when tests were conducted on the recorder.

  11. Pearce Center Presentation Pilot Laptop Program

    E-print Network

    Moss, William F.

    in their work process real-time because we had many of the necessary resources right there in the classroom. I courses taught in newly renovated classrooms. These classrooms provide a technology lectern model of instruction. The goals of this program include improvement in teaching and learning, retention

  12. Crawford County Adult Education Center Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faubus, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    The Crawford County Adult Education Program Evaluation was implemented to gather data that would assist in increasing the number of enrolled students at CCAEC. The data were compiled from state, federal, local extant data, a Community Opinion Survey and focus group interviews. Of the 1,015 Crawford County Residents who were emailed the COS, 213…

  13. State Alcoholism Treatment Centers. Program Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geizer, Bernard P., Ed.

    The report presents the results of an evaluation of New York's 13 Alcoholism Treatment Centers (ATCs). The goals of the evaluation were to review the role of the ATCs in relation to other alcoholism treatment facilities, to assess their effectiveness and efficiency, and to determine how much money is collected for service provided to patients.…

  14. SJSU CAREER CENTER PROGRAM & EVENT CALENDAR

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    manage your stress by reviewing the basics of emotional intelligence (EI), learning techniques to increase your EI, and exploring resources. 8/13 What Can The Career Center Do for You? ­ Discover topics including: job/internship search strategies, interviewing tips, finding a career with your major

  15. Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program

    Cancer.gov

    The DHHS, NIH, NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) has fellowship opportunities available to qualified candidates in one of the fastest growing fields, technology transfer. These fellowship opportunities let you combine your science background with a new career in the technology transfer field.

  16. Outreach and Special Programs Guide Counseling Center

    E-print Network

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    oriented towards prevention, student development, and wellness. We are committed to working closely: The counseling center's mission is to assist students in reaching their personal and educational goals with faculty, staff and students to support student health and academic success. The following guide represents

  17. Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program

    Cancer.gov

    The DHHS, NIH, NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) has a fellowship opportunity available to qualified candidates in one of the fastest growing fields, technology transfer. This fellowship opportunity lets you combine your science, legal or business background with a new career in the technology transfer field.

  18. Sources of information on postgraduate medical training programs and medical specialty career resources-2006 update.

    PubMed

    Brazin, Lillian R

    2006-01-01

    This is the final biennial update listing directories, journal articles, Web sites, and general books that aid the librarian, house officer, or medical student in finding information on medical residency and fellowship programs. The World Wide Web provides the most complete and up-to-date source of information about postgraduate training programs and specialties. This update continues to go beyond postgraduate training resources to include selected Web sites and books on curriculum vitae writing, practice management, personal finances, the "Match," certification and licensure examination preparation, lifestyle issues, job hunting, and the DEA license application process. Print resources are included if they provide information not on the Internet, have features that are particularly useful, or cover too many relevant topics in depth to be covered in a journal article or on a Web site. The Internet is a major marketing tool for hospitals seeking to recruit the best and brightest physicians for their training programs. Even the smallest community hospital has a Web site. PMID:16782663

  19. Mentoring programs for medical students - a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther Frei; Martina Stamm; Barbara Buddeberg-Fischer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although mentoring is acknowledged as a key to successful and satisfying careers in medicine, formal mentoring programs for medical students are lacking in most countries. Within the framework of planning a mentoring program for medical students at Zurich University, an investigation was carried out into what types of programs exist, what the objectives pursued by such programs are, and

  20. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  1. The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Preconception Care: An Opportunity for Internists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia A. Files; Paru S. David; Keith A. Frey

    2008-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home is defined by the American College of Physicians as a comprehensive approach for delivering\\u000a medical care to patients. Internists have the role of caring for patients from adolescence through adulthood and have the\\u000a opportunity to deliver preconception care. Preconception care is the promotion of the health and well-being of a woman and her partner before pregnancy.

  2. Hurricane Katrina: Medical Response at the Houston Astrodome\\/Reliant Center Complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas F. Gavagan; Kieran Smart; Herminia Palacio; Carmel Dyer; Stephen Greenberg; Paul Sirbaugh; Avrim Fishkind; Douglas Hamilton; Umair Shah; George Masi; R Todd Ivey; Julie Jones; Faye Y. Chiou-Tan; Donna Bloodworth; David Hyman; Cliff Whigham; Valory Pavlik; Ralph D. Feigin; Kenneth Mattox

    2006-01-01

    On September 1, 2005, with only 12 hours notice, various collaborators established a medical facility—the Katrina Clinic—at the Astrodome\\/Reliant Center Complex in Houston. By the time the facility closed roughly two weeks later, the Katrina Clinic medical staff had seen over 11,000 of the estimated 27,000 Hurricane Kat- rina evacuees who sought shelter in the Complex. Herein, we de- scribe

  3. Duke Center for Personalized Medicine Travel Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Richardson, David

    of Nurses in Genetics National Society of Genetic Counselors American College of Medical Genetics for Personalized Medicine Program Lead in writing, and provide justification for rescheduling the travel session of the Genomic and Personalized Medicine Forum, and provide their presentation for publication

  4. [Medical fault or professional negligence? Case studies in two recovery nutrition centers in Niger].

    PubMed

    Halidou Doudou, M; Manzo, M L; Guero, D

    2014-12-01

    In developing countries such as Niger, the risk of medical malpractice is ubiquitous in health, jeopardizing patient safety. The aim of this work was to contribute to patients' safety and respect of code of ethics and conduct in the exercise of the medical profession. The reported cases involved two children under 5 years who were admitted to nutrition rehabilitation centers, died as a result of medical malpractice. In Niger, there are no statistics on this phenomenon and a few cases found have always been considered "accident" or "fate." The establishment of an observatory collections of such information should improve their frequency, consequences and propose a prevention plan. PMID:25449444

  5. Can Medical Students Teach? A Near-Peer-Led Teaching Program for "Year 1" Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, T. A.; Evans, D. J. R.

    2012-01-01

    The General Medical Council states that United Kingdom graduates must function effectively as educators. There is a growing body of evidence showing that medical students can be included as teachers within a medical curriculum. Our aim was to design and implement a near-peer-led teaching program in an undergraduate medical curriculum and assess…

  6. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public For Researchers NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools

  7. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Goals Overview

    Cancer.gov

    The NCCCP cancer centers have dedicated greater resources to reducing inequalities of care. Sites are increasing programs to more effectively reach the underserved in their communities to improve access to cancer screening, treatment, and research.

  8. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Progress Reports and Tools Search NCCCP NCCCP Home About Focus Areas NCI in the Community News & Publications Contact About Overview For Patients and Public NCCCP Progress Reports and Tools NCCCP Hospitals

  9. University of Washington Medical Center Living Donor Program

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    with important information to help evaluate your potential as living kidney donor also to help and support you of your kidneys? 2. How long have you been contemplating this decision? 3. What do you know at this time about being a living kidney donor? Where did you obtain this information? #12;University of Washington

  10. IU HEALTH ARNETT ONCOLOGICAL SCIENCES CENTER MEDICAL RESEARCH ADVOCATE PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Ginzel, Matthew

    . IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE Early detection is a key in significantly decreasing deaths from colon cancer a cure for cancer is the goal of cancer researchers everywhere. The participation of cancer patients in clinical trials is essential to advancing cancer research; however, the decision to participate

  11. Surgical teaching program for our senior medical students: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Annette; Wright, Caroline; Qasabian, Raffi; O’Mara, Deborah; Mellis, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure the quality of surgical teaching within our graduate entry medical program, a distinctive surgical teaching program has been developed at Sydney Medical School-Central. Spanning 2 years, the program includes lectures, small group surgical clinical tutorials, and formal student surgical grand rounds presentations, plus clinical placements and attendance in operating theaters. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Methods In 2013, at the completion of year 4, all graduating students (n=54) were asked to complete an open and closed-ended questionnaire regarding their experience of the surgical program. Results A total of 44/54 (81%) students completed the questionnaire. Students reported a high level of engagement with their experience in clinical tutorials, and a moderate level of engagement in surgical lectures. Students found the clinical attachment to be the least useful method of teaching, with the surgical grand rounds presentation also eliciting a poor response from students. Conclusion While both large group lectures and small group learner-centered teaching methods were highly valued by students, changes are needed to enhance clinical attachments for students in surgical wards. The benefits of students being made to feel part of a team during their surgical clinical attachments, along with adequate inpatient contact and formative feedback, should not be underestimated. PMID:25337002

  12. Impact of 5 years of lean six sigma in a University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; de Jong, Laura J; Wendt, Klaus W; Does, Ronald J M M

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherlands, with LSS. It was introduced in 2007 to create the financial possibility to develop innovations. In this article, we describe how LSS was introduced, and how it developed in the following years. We zoom in at the traumatology department, where all main processes have been analyzed and improved. An evaluation after 5 years shows that LSS helped indeed reducing cost and improving quality. Moreover, it aided the transition of the organization from purely problem oriented to more process oriented, which in turn is helpful in eliminating waste and finding solutions for difficult problems. A major benefit of the program is that own employees are trained to become project leaders for improvement. Several people from the primary process were thus stimulated and equipped to become role models for continuous improvement. PMID:23011073

  13. The impact of interhospital transfers on surgical quality metrics for academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Crippen, Cristina J; Hughes, Steven J; Chen, Sugong; Behrns, Kevin E

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of pay-for-performance systems pose a risk to an academic medical center's (AMC) mission to provide care for interhospital surgical transfer patients. This study examines quality metrics and resource consumption for a sample of these patients from the University Health System Consortium (UHC) and our Department of Surgery (DOS). Standard benchmarks, including mortality rate, length of stay (LOS), and cost, were used to evaluate the impact of interhospital surgical transfers versus direct admission (DA) patients from January 2010 to December 2012. For 1,423,893 patients, the case mix index for transfer patients was 38 per cent (UHC) and 21 per cent (DOS) greater than DA patients. Mortality rates were 5.70 per cent (UHC) and 6.93 per cent (DOS) in transferred patients compared with 1.79 per cent (UHC) and 2.93 per cent (DOS) for DA patients. Mean LOS for DA patients was 4 days shorter. Mean total costs for transferred patients were greater $13,613 (UHC) and $13,356 (DOS). Transfer patients have poorer outcomes and consume more resources than DA patients. Early recognition and transfer of complex surgical patients may improve patient rescue and decrease resource consumption. Surgeons at AMCs and in the community should develop collaborative programs that permit collective assessment and decision-making for complicated surgical patients. PMID:24987902

  14. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID:25780472

  15. Research on the Present Status of the Five-Year Medical Training Program in Chinese Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yan; Dong, Zhe; Miao, Le; Ke, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The five-year program is the main path for undergraduate medical training in China. Studies have shown that during the past eleven years, the scale of medical student enrollment increased annually with a relatively simple entrance exam. The ideas, teaching contents and methods, assessment and evaluation should be updated and improved. In general,…

  16. Visiting medical student elective and clerkship programs: a survey of US and Puerto Rico allopathic medical schools

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background No published reports of studies have provided aggregate data on visiting medical student (VMS) programs at allopathic medical schools. Methods During 2006, a paper survey was mailed to all 129 allopathic medical schools in the United States and Puerto Rico using a list obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Contents of the survey items were based on existing literature and expert opinion and addressed various topics related to VMS programs, including organizational aspects, program objectives, and practical issues. Responses to the survey items were yes-or-no, multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, and free-text responses. Data related to the survey responses were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results Representatives of 76 schools (59%) responded to the survey. Of these, 73 (96%) reported their schools had VMS programs. The most common reason for having a VMS program was "recruitment for residency programs" (90%). "Desire to do a residency at our institution" was ranked as the leading reason visiting medical students choose to do electives or clerkships. In descending order, the most popular rotations were in internal medicine, orthopedic surgery, emergency medicine, and pediatrics. All VMS programs allowed fourth-year medical students, and approximately half (58%) allowed international medical students. The most common eligibility requirements were documentation of immunizations (92%), previous clinical experience (85%), and successful completion of United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 (51%). Of the programs that required clinical experience, 82% required 33 weeks or more. Most institutions (96%) gave priority for electives and clerkships to their own students over visiting students, and a majority (78%) reported that visiting students were evaluated no differently than their own students. During academic year 2006-2007, the number of new resident physicians who were former visiting medical students ranged widely among the responding institutions (range, 0-76). Conclusions Medical schools' leading reason for having VMS programs is recruitment into residency programs and the most commonly cited reason students participate in these programs is to secure residency positions. However, further research is needed regarding factors that determine the effectiveness of VMS programs in residency program recruitment and the development of more universal standards for VMS eligibility requirements and assessment. PMID:20529301

  17. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  18. From poor farm to medical center: a century of library services to the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Olechno, G

    1975-01-01

    As its centennial approaches, the history and development of library services to the patients and professional staff of the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center is traced from the early days when the library was housed in the cafeteria of the dispensary to its present position of being first point of access to library service for one of the largest teaching hospitals in the country. Its recent affiliation with the Norris Medical Library of the University of Southern California School of Medicine is explained. The change in emphasis from patients' library to health sciences library is illustrated, and the contribution of the library to the Cumulative Index to Nursing Literature is detailed. Images PMID:1104006

  19. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  20. The Delta Program and the Center for Limnology Present

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    The Delta Program and the Center for Limnology Present University of Wisconsin­Madison Science House 1645 Linden Drive 608-262-9304 info@delta.wisc.edu www.delta.wisc.edu Learn more about the Delta in climate, all of which can alter the current wetland ecosystem infrastructure. The Delta Program promotes

  1. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

  2. Center for Engineering Diversity Women in Engineering Program

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Center for Engineering Diversity & Women in Engineering Program Traci Thomas-Navarro Director 213 and the Women in Engineering Program (WIE) exists to support the recruitment, retention and graduation-time graduate assistants to support CED and WIE students Roles & Responsibilities #12;· Summer Research

  3. Model Program: Southern Lehigh High School, Center Valley, PA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colelli, Richard

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the technology education program at Southern Lehigh High School, Center Valley, Pennsylvania. The school district is presently providing an educational program known for its excellence and forward-looking perspective, which is sensitive to the changing needs of its students. Within the technology education…

  4. The Converging Literacies Center: An Integrated Model for Writing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Shannon; Dunbar-Odom, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Converging Literacies Center (CLiC) is a deeply integrated model for writing programs, bringing together the writing center, first-year writing, basic writing, professional development activities, graduate coursework, and research activities to re-imagine and support twenty-first-century literacies. What is unique about CLiC is not merely the…

  5. The Puente Learning Center: A Building and a Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the People United To Enrich the Neighborhood through Education (Puente) Learning Center, a nonprofit center in Los Angeles (California) providing programs in literacy, English-as-a-Second-Language, study skills, job training, and computer skills for people who traditionally have had limited access to education and technology. (SLD)

  6. Optical Science and Engineering Program Center for High Technology Materials

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Optical Science and Engineering Program Center for High Technology Materials 1313 Goddard SE MSC04 Center for High Technology Materials CS Department of Computer Science DoD Department of Defense DTRA and Research Traineeship JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory MURI

  7. NSF's Engineering Research Center Program: How It Developed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Lewis G.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the recent history of the National Science Foundation's funding of engineering research and the Engineering Research Center program. Discusses the selection, review and evaluation of centers. Criticizes the systems approach to engineering. Highlights the importance of engineering practice and the opportunities for research. (CW)

  8. Alternate Learning Center. Abstracts of Inservice Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Div. of Development and Operations.

    This booklet is a collection of abstracts describing the 18 programs offered at the Alternate Learning Center of the Rhode Island Teacher Center which has as its Primary function school based inservice training for local teachers and administrators. Each project is described in detail, including course goals, specific objectives, training…

  9. Salt Lake Skills Center Handicapped Advocacy Program. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Bo; Armstrong, Terry L.

    The Handicapped Advocacy Program (HAP) is an advocacy service for individuals with disabilities who are sponsored in skills training by the Utah Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS). It has developed a system whereby DRS clients can be tracked throughout their tenure at the Salt Lake Skills Center. Other services include Skills Center

  10. Percent for Art Program Highlighted in New Autism Center

    E-print Network

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Percent for Art Program Highlighted in New Autism Center DECEMBER 2012 NT Daily/Erika Lambreton original works of art. Grant Manier is a 17-year- old artist with autism. Ma- nier's art, "Poof Butterfly and will be placed inside the Kristin Farmer Autism Center, which officially opened its doors on Sept. 19. Manier has

  11. Family Resource CenterFamily Resource Center -Family Resource Center-"Managing for Results" programNew Employee Welcome Orientation

    E-print Network

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    productivity, high employee morale and satisfaction and increased departmental effectiveness. · Develop" program­­New Employee Welcome Orientation­ ­Family Resource Center­­"Managing for Results" program­­New Employee Welcome Orientation­ COMINGATTRACTIONS COMINGATTRACTIONS 2009 Wow!Wow! NEW & IMPROVED in `08 NEW

  12. NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center's Metrology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suraci, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Since the establishment in 1962 of the NASA-JSC Metrology Program, the Reference Standards Laboratory has successfully accomplished its goal and objectives. An on-going laboratory surveillance program, established for insuring a continuing validation of the measurements required at the center, is shown to remain at the forefront of modern technology through its involvement in activities such as the NBS sponsored Measurement Assurance Programs and the utilization of an Automatic Calibration System.

  13. A New Concept for Medical Imaging Centered on Cellular Phone Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-01-01

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a) a data acquisition device (DAD) at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b) an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site). The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode. PMID:18446199

  14. Psychology Can Be Indispensable to Health Care Reform and the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine N. Runyan

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was passed into legislation in March 2010, making health care reform a reality. Perhaps the most well-developed model of primary care that aligns with the PPACA's agenda is the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Integrated care, as defined by collaborative care between mental health and primary care providers and systems, will undoubtedly play

  15. Methods for Evaluating Practice Change Toward a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Roberto Jaén; Benjamin F. Crabtree; Raymond F. Palmer; Robert L. Ferrer; Paul A. Nutting; William L. Miller; Elizabeth E. Stewart; Robert Wood; Marivel Davila; Kurt C. Stange

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Understanding the transformation of primary care practices to patient- centered medical homes (PCMHs) requires making sense of the change process, multilevel outcomes, and context. We describe the methods used to evaluate the country's fi rst national demonstration project of the PCMH concept, with an emphasis on the quantitative measures and lessons for multimethod evaluation approaches. METHODS The National Demonstration

  16. Context for Understanding the National Demonstration Project and the Patient Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt C. Stange; William L. Miller; Paul A. Nutting; Benjamin F. Crabtree; Elizabeth E. Stewart; Carlos Roberto Jaén

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a journal supplement evaluating the country's fi rst national demonstration of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) concept. The PCMH is touted by some as a linchpin for renewing the foundering US health care system and its primary care foundation. The National Demonstration Project (NDP) tested a new model of care and compared facilitated and self-directed implementation approaches

  17. Patient Outcomes at 26 Months in the Patient-Centered Medical Home National Demonstration Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Roberto Jaén; Robert L. Ferrer; William L. Miller; Raymond F. Palmer; Robert Wood; Marivel Davila; Elizabeth E. Stewart; Benjamin F. Crabtree; Paul A. Nutting; Kurt C. Stange

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient outcomes in the National Demonstration Project (NDP) of practices' transition to patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). METHODS In 2006, a total of 36 family practices were randomized to facilitated or self-directed intervention groups. Progress toward the PCMH was measured by independent assessments of how many of 39 predominantly technological NDP model

  18. thoracic outlet syndrome: a 50-year experience at Baylor University Medical Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harold C. Urschel; Harry Kourlis

    2007-01-01

    During the past 5 decades, the recognition and management of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) have evolved. This article elucidates these changes and improvements in the diagnosis and management of TOS at Baylor University Medical Center. The most remarkable change over the past 50 years is the use of nerve conduction velocity to diagnose and moni- tor patients with nerve compression.

  19. Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

  20. Developing a Sustainable Research Culture in an Independent Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Independent academic medical centers (IAMC) are challenged to develop and support a research enterprise and maintain primary goals of healthcare delivery and financial solvency. Strategies for promoting translational research have been shown to be effective at institutions in the top level of federal funding, but not for smaller IAMCs. The…

  1. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  2. Apr 2, 2014 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is committed to improving people's lives.

    E-print Network

    tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. north not to Scale-free. This includes all tobacco products, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco and pipe smoking. Driving's lives. That's why all Medical Center locations--inside and outside--are tobacco-free. This includes all

  3. Case Report: Initial Experience with Patient-Clinician Secure Messaging at a VA Medical Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Byrne; Shane Elliott; Anthony Firek

    2009-01-01

    The authors implemented what is possibly the first secure messaging system in a VA Medical Center. Since reimbursement for secure messaging is not of great concern and clinical data systems are fully computerized, several evaluation strategies were used to assess clinical adoption. To address known concerns of clinicians, the authors analyzed secure messaging use and performed a content analysis. Message

  4. Which Sexual Abuse Victims Receive a Forensic Medical Examination?: The Impact of Children's Advocacy Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Wendy A.; Cross, Theodore P.; Jones, Lisa M.; Simone, Monique; Kolko, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the impact of Children's Advocacy Centers (CAC) and other factors, such as the child's age, alleged penetration, and injury on the use of forensic medical examinations as part of the response to reported child sexual abuse. Methods: This analysis is part of a quasi-experimental study, the Multi-Site Evaluation of…

  5. Rural Medical Service Funding: Issues and Alternatives. Rural Information Center Publication Series, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, John D. H., III, Comp.; Leuci, Mary Simon, Comp.

    By almost any definition, rural America has been medically underserved. This bibliography includes materials available from the National Agricultural Library's (NAL) Rural Information Center. The listed materials include approximately 36 books and monographs, 106 articles, and the names and addresses of 17 related associations. Certain local…

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS MEDICAL CENTER DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISION SCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS MEDICAL CENTER DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISION SCIENCE DATE conducted at the Department of Ophthalmology, ACC Building, Suite 2400 Glaucoma 1. Title: Primary Tube of Ophthalmology in collabaoration with Bascom Palmer Eye Institute Purpose: The purpose of this study

  7. A User-Centered Cooperative Information System for Medical Imaging Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Enrique J.; Quiles, Jose A.; Sanz, Marcos F.; del Pozo, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    Presents a cooperative information system for remote medical imaging diagnosis. General computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) problems addressed are definition of a procedure for the design of user-centered cooperative systems (conceptual level); and improvement of user feedback and optimization of the communication bandwidth in highly…

  8. Impact on Seniors of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Evidence from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Paul A.; Johnson, Eric A.; Coleman, Kathryn; Larson, Eric B.; Hsu, Clarissa; Ross, Tyler R.; Liss, David; Tufano, James; Reid, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact on health care cost and quality among seniors of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) pilot at Group Health Cooperative, an integrated health care system in Washington State. Design and Methods: A prospective before-and-after evaluation of the experience of seniors receiving primary care services at 1 pilot clinic…

  9. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  10. Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

  11. The Houston Academy of Medicine--Texas Medical Center Library management information system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damon Camille; Sanjay Chadha; Richard Lyders

    1993-01-01

    A management information system (MIS) provides a means for collecting, reporting, and analyzing data from all segments of an organization. Such systems are common in business but rare in libraries. The Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library developed an MIS that operates on a system of networked IBM PCs and Paradox, a commercial database software package. The data collected

  12. An Information-Centric Framework for Designing Patient-Centered Medical Decision Aids and Risk Communication

    E-print Network

    Shneiderman, Ben

    An Information-Centric Framework for Designing Patient-Centered Medical Decision Aids and Risk decision aids have met with success. Such decision aids typically have been designed for a general population and evaluated based on whether or not users of the decision aid can accurately report the data

  13. DEPARTMENT OR CENTER MINI-GRANT PROGRAM Synopsis of Program

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    to apply for minigrants is given below. Multiple proposals may be submitted by a department or center Engineering, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Earth Science, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science should be no longer than two pages following the outline as follows: Key contact person(s) with contact

  14. Challenges and Opportunities to Improve Cervical Cancer Screening Rates in US Health Centers through Patient-Centered Medical Home Transformation.

    PubMed

    Moshkovich, Olga; Lebrun-Harris, Lydie; Makaroff, Laura; Chidambaran, Preeta; Chung, Michelle; Sripipatana, Alek; Lin, Sue C

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the incidence of cervical cancer has dramatically decreased. However, health disparities in cervical cancer screening (CCS) persist for women from racial and ethnic minorities and those residing in rural and poor communities. For more than 45 years, federally funded health centers (HCs) have been providing comprehensive, culturally competent, and quality primary health care services to medically underserved communities and vulnerable populations. To enhance the quality of care and to ensure more women served at HCs are screened for cervical cancer, over eight HCs received funding to support patient-centered medical home (PCMH) transformation with goals to increase CCS rates. The study conducted a qualitative analysis using Atlas.ti software to describe the barriers and challenges to CCS and PCMH transformation, to identify potential solutions and opportunities, and to examine patterns in barriers and solutions proposed by HCs. Interrater reliability was assessed using Cohen's Kappa. The findings indicated that HCs more frequently described patient-level barriers to CCS, including demographic, cultural, and health belief/behavior factors. System-level barriers were the next commonly cited, particularly failure to use the full capability of electronic medical records (EMRs) and problems coordinating with external labs or providers. Provider-level barriers were least frequently cited. PMID:25685561

  15. Wayne State University Graduate Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    857 #12;Regional Resources SEMCME­ Southeast Michigan Center for Medical Education Based at WSUSOM Model of Accreditation Outcomes based-actual accomplishment through assessment of program #12;Why1 Wayne State University Graduate Medical Education #12;Medical Education Continuum UNDERGRADUATE

  16. 78 FR 75245 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS)/TRICARE: Pilot Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...program or military treatment facility pharmacies. Covered maintenance medications are...covered prescriptions to the mail order pharmacy program. This regulation is being issued...Rear Admiral Thomas McGinnis, Chief, Pharmacy Operations Directorate, TRICARE...

  17. Managing knowledge and technology to foster innovation at the Ohio State University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Cain, Timothy J; Rodman, Ruey L; Sanfilippo, Fred; Kroll, Susan M

    2005-11-01

    Biomedical knowledge is expanding at an unprecedented rate-one that is unlikely to slow anytime in the future. While the volume and scope of this new knowledge poses significant organizational challenges, it creates tremendous opportunities to release and direct its power to the service of significant goals. The authors explain how the Center for Knowledge Management at The Ohio State University Medical Center, created during the academic year 2003-04, is doing just that by integrating numerous resource-intensive, technology-based initiatives-including personnel, services and infrastructure, digital repositories, data sets, mobile computing devices, high-tech patient simulators, computerized testing, and interactive multimedia-in a way that enables the center to provide information tailored to the needs of students, faculty and staff on the medical center campus and its surrounding health sciences colleges. The authors discuss how discovering, applying, and sharing new knowledge, information assets, and technologies in this way is a collaborative process. This process creates open-ended opportunities for innovation and a roadmap for working toward seamless integration, synergy, and substantial enhancement of the academic medical center's research, educational, and clinical mission areas. PMID:16249301

  18. Designing Anatomy Program in Modern Medical Curriculum: Matter of Balance

    PubMed Central

    Grkovi?, Ivica; Marinovi? Gui?, Maja; Košta, Vana; Polji?anin, Ana; ?ari?, Ana; Vilovi?, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. Methods TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman ? test. Results The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman ??=?0.83, P?=?0.015) and TA (Spearman ??=?0.73, P?=?0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Conclusion Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence. PMID:19260144

  19. An Innovative Portfolio of Research Training Programs for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Zier, Karen; Wyatt, Christina; Muller, David

    2013-01-01

    Medical student education continues to evolve, with an increasing emphasis on evidence-based decision making in clinical settings. Many schools are introducing scholarly programs to their curriculum in order to foster the development of critical thinking and analytic skills, encourage self-directed learning, and develop more individualized learning experiences. In addition, participation in rigorous scholarly projects teaches students that clinical care and research should inform each other, with the goal of providing more benefit to patients and society. Physician-scientists, and physicians who have a better appreciation of science, have the potential to be leaders in the field who will deliver outstanding clinical care, contribute new knowledge, and educate their patients. PMID:22418729

  20. A program using medical students to teach high school students about AIDS.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Sellew, J F; Campbell, A E; Haskell, E G; Gay, A A; Bell, B J

    1988-07-01

    In the spring of 1987, 20 medical students from the Eastern Virginia Medical School of the Medical College of Hampton Roads were involved in a pilot program to teach about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) to high school senior students in Norfolk, Virginia. The medical students received instruction about AIDS from basic science and clinical faculty members at the medical school in preparation for the project. All participating high school seniors completed a 15-item knowledge test about AIDS prior to the intervention and an equivalent posttest one week after the program was completed. T-test analysis revealed a significant increase in knowledge by students at all five high schools. Responses to 10 subjective posttest questions indicated that the high school students were interested in learning about AIDS and having medical students as their teachers. This program provides an example of how medical institutions can develop a collaborative community education project that contributes to the education of medical students. PMID:3385750