Science.gov

Sample records for medical center technical

  1. Johnson Space Center Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    1.HMTA responsibilities: a) Assure program/project compliance with Agency health and medical requirements at identified key decision points. b) Certify that programs/projects comply with Agency health and medical requirements prior to spaceflight missions. c) Assure technical excellence. 2. Designation of applicable NASA Centers for HMTA implementation and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) appointment. 3. Center CMO responsible for HMTA implementation for programs and projects at the center. JSC HMTA captured in "JSC HMTA Implementation Plan". 4. Establishes specifics of dissenting opinion process consistent with NASA procedural requirements.

  2. GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development operates a Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC). The Center provides support on issues regarding subsurface contamination, contaminant fluxes to other media (e.g., surface water or air), and ecosystem restoration. The GWTSC creat...

  3. Satellite medical centers project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  4. The Biomedical Engineer in the Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furst, Emanuel

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the roles of engineers in medical centers, including technical support, instrument control and safety for the hospital, and teaching and research tasks. Indicates that engineering education should take responsibilities to prepare them to understand the human relations and organizational characteristics of their environment through course…

  5. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  6. 75 FR 16351 - Medical Devices; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ..., and 1050 Medical Devices; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain medical.... 360hh- 360ss). The Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA) (Public Law 101- 629), transferred...

  7. An Effective Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Governance model directed the formation of three Technical Authorities, Engineering; Safety and Mission Assurance; and Health and Medical, to ensure that risks are identified and adjudicated efficiently and transparently in concert with the spaceflight programs and projects. The Health and Medical Technical Authority (HMTA) has been implemented at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) and consists of the Chief Medical Office (CMO), the Deputy CMO, and HMTA Delegates. The JSC HMTA achieves the goals of risk identification and adjudication through the discharge of the appropriate technical expertise to human space flight programs and projects and the escalation of issues within program and technical authority boards. The JSC HMTA relies on subject matter experts (SMEs) in the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC as well as experts from other Centers to work crew health and performance issues at the technical level, develop requirements, oversee implementation and validation of requirements, and identify risks and non-compliances. Once a risk or potential noncompliance has been identified and reported to the programs or projects, the JSC HMTA begins to track it and closely monitor the program's or project's response. As a risk is developed or a non-compliance negotiated, positions from various levels of decision makers are sought at the program and project control boards. The HMTA may support a program or project position if it is satisfied with the decision making and vetting processes (ex. the subject matter expert voiced his/her concerns and all dissenting opinions were documented) and finds that the position both acknowledges the risk and cost of the mitigation and resolves the issue without changing NASA risk posture. The HMTA may disagree with a program or project position if the NASA risk posture has been elevated or obfuscated. If the HMTA does disagree with the program or project position, it will appeal to successively higher levels of authority so that

  8. Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

  9. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University's College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor's assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  10. Patient-Centered Medical Homes in 2016.

    PubMed

    Tayloe, David T

    2016-01-01

    There is much information in the medical literature concerning the medical home concept. Each medical practice must utilize that literature to devise a system of care-a patient-centered medical home-that best meets the needs of patients, families, and practice staff. This article is Goldsboro Pediatrics' attempt to describe its system of care, its patient-centered medical home. PMID:27422953

  11. Defense Technical Information Center thesaurus

    SciTech Connect

    Dickert, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    This DTIC Thesaurus provides a basic multidisciplinary subject term vocabulary used by DTIC to index and retrieve scientific and technical information from its various data bases and to aid DTIC`s users in their information storage and retrieval operations. It includes an alphabetical posting term display, a hierarchy display, and a Keywork Out of Context (KWOC) display.

  12. A National Periodicals Center Technical Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library Resources, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This technical plan for developing, managing, and operating a national periodicals center (NPC), which was prepared at the request of the Library of Congress, is designed so that it could be used by the Library or any other agency prepared to assume responsibility for the creation of a major periodicals facility. The overall goal of the NPC is to…

  13. Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C. A.; Foley, J. T.

    1980-10-01

    In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel. The purpose of the Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center is to collect, analyze, store, and make available descriptions of the environment of transportation expressed in engineering terms. The data stored in the Center are expected to be useful in a variety of transportation related analyses. Formulations of environmental criteria for shipment of cargo, risk assessments, and detailed structural analyses of shipping containers are examples where these data have been applied. For purposes of indexing and data retrieval, the data are catalogued under two major headings: Normal and Abnormal Environments.

  14. Reengineering Academic Medical Centers: Reengineering Academic Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, David

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of academic medical centers (AMCs) looks at: change due to heavy federal funding in recent decades; adverse consequences, including deemphasis on education in favor of research and clinical service delivery, and discrepancies between AMC internal and external labor markets; and challenges to medical education in research, education, and…

  15. Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

    1982-06-01

    In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel.

  16. Skylab Medical Data Center and Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    The founding of the Skylab medical data center and archives as a central area to house medical data from space flights is described. Skylab program strip charts, various daily reports and summaries, experiment reports and logs, status report on Skylab data quality, raw data digital tapes, processed data microfilm, and other Skylab documents are housed in the data center. In addition, this memorandum describes how the data center acted as a central point for the coordination of preflight and postflight baseline data and how it served as coordinator for all data processing through computation and analysis. Also described is a catalog identifying Skylab medical experiments and all related data currently archived in the data center.

  17. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology 1988-1989 technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    The 1988 to 1989 Technical Report of the JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center. Listed are 321 publications, 282 presentations, and 140 new technology reports and patents.

  18. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology 1988-1989 technical report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Peggy

    1990-03-01

    The 1988 to 1989 Technical Report of the JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center. Listed are 321 publications, 282 presentations, and 140 new technology reports and patents.

  19. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.* PMID:10164266

  20. The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

  1. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  2. Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Adams

    2009-01-07

    The following is a synopsis of the major achievements attributed to the operation of the Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center (WAPTAC) by the National Association for State Community Services Programs (NASCSP). During the past five years, the WAPTAC has developed into the premier source for information related to operating the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) at the state and local levels. The services provide through WAPTAC include both virtual technical support as well as hands-on training and instruction in classroom and in the field. The WAPTAC achieved several important milestones during its operation including the establishment of a national Weatherization Day now celebrated in most states, the implementation of a comprehensive Public Information Campaign (PIC) to raise the awareness of the Program among policy makers and the public, the training of more than 150 new state managers and staff as they assume their duties in state offices around the country, and the creation and support of a major virtual information source on the Internet being accessed by thousands of staff each month. The Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center serves the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program as a valuable training and technical assistance resource for the network of 54 direct state grantees (50 states, District of Columbia and three Native American tribes) and the network of 900 local subgrantees (comprised of community action agencies, units of local government, and other non-profit organizations). The services provided through WAPTAC focus on standardizing and improving the daily management of the WAP. Staff continually identify policies changes and best practices to help the network improve its effectiveness and enhance the benefits of the Program for the customers who receive service and the federal and private investors. The operations of WAPTAC are separated into six

  3. Naval Training Device Center Index of Technical Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lemuel E.

    Published Naval Training Device Center technical reports and some technical notes (those available through the Defense Documentation Center-DDC) which have resulted from basic research, exploratory development, and advanced development type projects are listed. The reports are indexed by technical note number, by title, and by contractor code. The…

  4. Technical activities 1980: Center for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtman, J. B., Jr.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1980-10-01

    Part of the National Measurement Laboratory, one of the principal laboratories comprising the National Bureau of Standards, the Materials Science Center is organized in six divisions, each having responsibility in different areas of materials science appropriate to the major classes of materials metals, polymers, and ceramics and glass. These Divisions vary in their balance between theory and experiments, between direct standards work and research, and in their orientation toward industrial and Government needs and the needs of other components of the scientific and technical community. Achievements reported relate to signal processing and imaging; fracture theory; conformational changes in polymers; chemical stability and corrosion; fracture deformation; polymer science and standards; metallurgy and alloys; ceramics, glass, and solid state; and reactor radiation.

  5. Medical Center Farmers Markets: A Strategic Partner in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Morrison, Kathy J.; Dillon, Judith F.; Bates, Beth Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of medical center–based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. Community Context In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution’s commitment to the medical home. Methods We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market’s Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance’s report on the medical home. Outcome During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Interpretation Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:23906327

  6. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology. 1993 Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents. The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents.

  7. [Medical education centers: strategies and purpose].

    PubMed

    Binetti, P

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of new didactic guidelines, for the graduate degrees in medicine and allied disciplines, is secondary to the new needs of the National Health Care System, and in part to the significant developments of science. It is not easy to meet this challenge. It is likewise not easy to channel coherently the required changes, with respect to the scientific, clinical and didactic goals. Paradoxically the same institutions that are in such great need of transformation, are also a significant part of the existing problem. In many countries, schools of medicine have developed centers for medical education that are geared toward the development and growth of students, teachers-tutors, and patients alike. Medical education has become more global, in an attempt to meet much needed communication needs, from both ends, teachers and students, as well as the recipients of care, patients. One major goal of such centers is the introduction of innovative didactic activities. There is indeed a new tendency toward the development of methodological tracks aiming at the acquisition and consolidation of a deeper and broader cultural knowledge. Amongst these initiatives there is the introduction of an evaluation of the teaching delivered, as well as the development of a multidisciplinary approach to didactics. The latter, is a prerequisite of an effective training directed toward the development of the concept of "team approach", whose ultimate goal is patient care. In Italy, at the Università Campus Biomedico, in Rome, one of the first of such centers of medical education has been developed. Its goal is to be both a learning organization, as well as a center for both research and clinical services. PMID:10687267

  8. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING SW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  9. 4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  10. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  11. Managing Information in the Academic Medical Center: Building an Integrated Information Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Sherrilynne; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A program designed by the National Library of Medicine and the Association of American Medical Colleges to help academic medical centers develop appropriate information systems is described. The characteristics of such an integrated information environment, technical and organizational structures necessary for creating it, and the librarian's role…

  12. The Defense Technical Information Center: Acquiring Information and Imparting Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholm, Kurt N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This overview of the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) discusses how DTIC fits into the Department of Defense Scientific and Technical Information Program; its history, organization, users, and operations; types of information handled; subject classification; cataloging standards; Information Analysis Centers (IACs); and research and…

  13. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1983 is compiled. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  14. Filmless radiology at Brooke Army Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    The hospital at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas has an essentially filmless radiology department. Mammography is one of the few services still using film. The radiology department at Brooke takes advantage of a very capable Lockheed Martin PACS to achieve the filmless operation. The old hospital has been replaced by a new hospital, the new Brooke Army Medical Center. As a basis for predictions of activity at new Brooke, the activities at the old Brooke Army Medical Center were examined. The heart of the PACS at Brooke is the image server with an associated database. The image server has the performance required to keep the radiologist from returning to film for diagnosis. A directly connected workstation can present a full screen of images in less than two seconds, even during the busiest hour of the day for this large hospital. In addition the database is used to organize the workflow for the radiology examinations through the hospital. Information about the activity at the new Brooke hospital is used to predict the utilization of the short term storage and the long term storage. In particular, the time that an examination will be retained on the new Brooke short term storage is measured. The Brooke medical complex generates 384.8 exams per day on a typical weekday. The number of exams on a weekend is 40 percent of the exams on the weekday. The storage required is 18.3 gigabytes per day in the short term storage of the Image Storage Unit (ISU) and 9.7 gigabytes per day in the archive. The 256 gigabytes of the ISU will hold 11.7 weeks or about 2.5 months of exams. The archive will hold four years of exams in tow jukeboxes. A working year will have an effective 300 days of equivalent weekday radiology load. By ten years from now the hospital complex can be expected to handle to load that is estimated to be about 160 percent of the current load. With the changes in the storage of disks and archive media that will have occurred by that time, the

  15. NASA Johnson Space Center Medical Licensing Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reviews patented medical items that are available for licensing in the areas of Laboratory Technologies, Medical Devices, Medical Equipment and other technologies that are of interest to the medical community.

  16. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further

  17. Replacing the academic medical center's teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Reves, J G; Smith, Stuart; Greenberg, Ray; Johnson, Donald

    2005-11-01

    Addressing the need for updated teaching hospital facilities is one of the most significant issues that an academic medical center faces. The authors describe the process they underwent in deciding to build a new facility at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Initial issues included whether or not the teaching hospital would continue to play a role in clinical education and whether to replace or renovate the existing facility. Once the decision to build was reached, MUSC had to choose between an on-campus or distant site for the new hospital and determine what the function of the old hospital would be. The authors examine these questions and discuss the factors involved in different stages of decision making, in order to provide the academic medicine community guidance in negotiating similar situations. Open communication within MUSC and with the greater community was a key component of the success of the enterprise to date. The authors argue that decisions concerning site, size, and focus of the hospital must be made by developing university-wide and community consensus among many different constituencies. The most important elements in the success at MUSC were having unified leadership, incorporating constituent input, engaging an external consultant, remaining unfazed by unanticipated challenges, and adhering to a realistic, aggressive timetable. The authors share their strategies for identifying and successfully managing these complex and potentially divisive aspects of building a new teaching hospital. PMID:16249296

  18. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  19. Utton Center Scientific and Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marilyn C. O’Leary

    2006-07-01

    Final Report of DOE grant to the Utton Transboundary Resources Center at University of New Mexico School of Law supporting prevention and management of transboundary water conflicts. Describes work of Utton Center and refers to three other documents reported separately. Includes brief description of multidisciplinary collaborative process, understanding cultural values of water and a model water compact.

  20. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion Second Annual Technical Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings for the Center for Advanced Space Propulsion Second Annual Technical Symposium are divided as follows: Chemical Propulsion, CFD; Space Propulsion; Electric Propulsion; Artificial Intelligence; Low-G Fluid Management; and Rocket Engine Materials.

  1. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1981 are indexed and abstracted. All the publications were announced in the 1981 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patent applications, and theses. A total of 384 technical publications is listed.

  2. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1991. All the publications were announced in the 1991 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  3. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 800 technical publications that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1983. Announced in the 1983 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts), the documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  4. Evaluation of the Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panton, Karen L. M.; And Others

    Six Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers (IETACs) provide technical assistance to American Indian and Alaska Native education programs funded by Title V grants from the Office of Indian Education (OIE). This study examines the services provided by the IETACs and identifies factors that influence their effectiveness. Data were collected…

  5. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1982 is described. All the publications were announced in the 1982 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  6. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes Stafford Technical Center's Engineering Technology Academy (ETA), in which students pursue a variety of educational and career options for anything connected to construction technologies--including drafting and design, architecture, and even work in historic preservation. In addition to technical skills,…

  7. The need of community health centers for international medical graduates.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, L D; Konrad, T R; Miller, J S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine whether community health centers need international medical graduates to fill staff positions. METHODS: The authors surveyed 100 community health center administrators to learn about their perceptions of international medical graduates. RESULTS: Nationally, about one quarter of community health centers depend on international medical graduates to fill physician vacancies; most of these centers foresee unfilled positions in the event of a cutback. CONCLUSIONS: Policies calling for a national reduction in the supply of international medical graduates need to be balanced by an understanding of these individuals' role in reducing local physician shortages. PMID:10511843

  8. The Keystone Center final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-22

    The Keystone Center began its work with the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) in May, 1996, when The Center agreed to design, organize, and facilitate stakeholder meetings at two DOE sites: Savannah River and Hanford. These meetings were held June 24--25, 1996 for the purpose of discussing the role of EMSP in constructing a site-specific basic research agenda that maps site cleanup needs to basic science areas. Summaries of the discussions from these meetings as well as lists of the stakeholders who were invited are included as Attachment 1. In August/September 1996, the Keystone Center was asked to convene two additional site meetings using funds that remained in their contract. These meetings were held in October 1996 at Oak Ridge and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Summaries from these meetings and participant lists are included as Attachment 2.

  9. For Technical Career Jobs, a Career Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    This paper describes a career resource center (CRC) and its importance to technical career programs. The role of the professional staff in helping students make crucial decisions is described. A review of the literature is presented which lists resources and information that may be helpful in setting up a career resource center. Data are reported…

  10. A sustainable medical center in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.L.; Miller, B.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how one can successfully integrate many sustainable features into the construction and operation of a mid-sized medical clinic located in the hot/humid piney woods of east Texas for a moderate increase over normal construction costs. The subject project, known as The Texas Specialist Center, has enjoyed the predicted energy and green building results. It is a 6,300 square foot stand alone clinic located in Lufkin, Texas for a client with multiple chemical sensitivities. Green features include passive solar design for heating and cooling, enhanced natural ventilation (including the use of natural thermal siphons within the building), cool communities site planning (to reduce the urban heat island effect), extensive use of daylighting and energy-efficient artificial lighting, photovoltaics to provide security system and computer operations back-up, careful attention to material selections for low toxicity and high indoor air quality, use of regionally appropriate building materials and systems, an extensive rainwater collection system, and xeriscape landscaping principals. It was constructed in 1996 and has been under full operation for two years. Actual energy consumption data will be presented and the above Green design strategies will be elaborated upon.

  11. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' WITH HILLMAN HOSPITAL, THE FIVE-STORY BUILDING (CENTER RIGHT AT 20TH STREET AND SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH), JEFFERSON TOWER (CENTER LEFT AT 20TH STREET AND SEVENTH AVENUE SOUTH, AND THE MANY HOSPITALS AND TEACHING FACILITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER. - Hillman Hospital, 600 Block Westside Twentieth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. [Prospects of perfection and development of the technical devices of medical assignment in foreign armed forces].

    PubMed

    Bukhtiiarov, I V; Medvedev, V R; Petrovskiĭ, G V; Varfolomeev, V A; Pozdniakov, A V; Tushnova, L K

    2010-12-01

    In the article was analyzed the usage of the technical devices of medical assignment of NATO armed forces during the last military conflicts in different countries and prospects of its perfection. Among the most important programs were outlined: work on the systems of telemedicine with possibility of its usage in battle conditions, development of the independent life-support system in case of battle trauma and progressive medical mobile centers on the base of new motor carrier. PMID:21488360

  13. 75 FR 22438 - Proposed Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment Form) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... medical care copayment online. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of... 10-0505 will be used to allow claimants with medical care copayment debts to pay online with a credit... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Health Resource Center Medical Center Payment Form)...

  14. Children's Medications: A Guide for Schools and Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Richard D.; Nahata, Milap C.

    Noting the lack of reference sources available on the use of medications in schools and day care centers, this book was created to help school and day care center personnel become more aware of the medicine being given to children at home and at school. Using detailed medication charts, the book answers questions about how to administer medicines…

  15. An Artist in the University Medical Center. Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, A. Everette, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "An Artist in the University Medical Center" (M. Lesser, New Orleans: Tulane University Press, 1989), in which the artist captures the human side of the complex Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans (Louisiana). The interplay of drawings, etchings, watercolors, and prose conveys traditions of nurturing in the hospital. (SLD)

  16. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  17. The new reality: academic medical centers partner with the community.

    PubMed

    Scott, K

    1996-11-01

    As academic medical centers face a price-sensitive market dominated by managed care, their survival, says Association of American Medical Colleges' Robert Dickler, will depend on the combination of strategies they use in response. HSL looks at three centers' solution--building alliances to secure patient bases, focusing on expanding primary care capabilities, and downsizing and reorganizing for greater cost savings. PMID:10162189

  18. The Stanford University Medical Center and the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenzweig, Robert M.; And Others

    The Stanford University Medical Center consists of three main units: a medical school, a set of outpatient clinics, and a hospital. Financing of the center's functions cannot be carried out without federal support, and a network of relationships with government agencies has emerged. The impact of these relationships was discussed with key…

  19. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1985. All the publications were announced in the 1985 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  20. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1993. All the publications were announced in the 1993 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  1. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1984. All the publications were announced in the 1984 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  2. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts of the technical reports that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1988. Subject, author, and corporate source indexes are also included. All the publications were announced in the 1988 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  3. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This compilation of over 1100 abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1979. All the publications were announced in the 1979 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses are included. Subject, author, corporate source, contract number, and report number indexes are provided.

  4. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 technical reports resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1977. All the publications were announced in the 1977 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  5. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1987. All the publications were announced in the 1987 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  6. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1992. All the publications were announced in the 1992 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  7. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1989. All the publications were announced in the 1989 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  8. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1990. All the publications were announced in the 1990 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  9. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1986. All the publications were announced in the 1986 issues of Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) and/or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  10. 78 FR 18233 - Medical Devices; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    .../ MedicalDevices/ pma/. DeviceRegulationa ndGuidance/ HowtoMarketYourDe vice/ PremarketSubmissi ons/ PremarketApproval PMA/default.htm. 822.7 http://www.fda.gov/ http://www.fda.gov/ cdrh/ombudsman/...

  11. 76 FR 78969 - National Technical Assistance Center for Senior Transportation: Solicitation for Proposals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... National Senior Center will follow a number of strategies, especially coordination, empowerment, knowledge management and person- centered technical assistance. The Center will coordinate with other...

  12. Lessons learned: mobile device encryption in the academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kusche, Kristopher P

    2009-01-01

    The academic medical center is faced with the unique challenge of meeting the multi-faceted needs of both a modern healthcare organization and an academic institution, The need for security to protect patient information must be balanced by the academic freedoms expected in the college setting. The Albany Medical Center, consisting of the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital, was challenged with implementing a solution that would preserve the availability, integrity and confidentiality of business, patient and research data stored on mobile devices. To solve this problem, Albany Medical Center implemented a mobile encryption suite across the enterprise. Such an implementation comes with complexities, from performance across multiple generations of computers and operating systems, to diversity of application use mode and end user adoption, all of which requires thoughtful policy and standards creation, understanding of regulations, and a willingness and ability to work through such diverse needs. PMID:19382736

  13. Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) - Its role in the USAF Scientific and Technical Information Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Allan D.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), the central repository for DOD scientific and technical information concerning studies and research and engineering efforts, is discussed. The present makeup of DTIC is described and its functions in producing technical reports and technical report bibliographies are examined. DTIC's outreach services are reviewed, as are its DTIC information and technology transfer programs. DTIC's plans for the year 2000 and its relation to the mission of the U.S. Air Force, including the Air Force's STINFO program, are addressed.

  14. [SOROKA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: THE ROAD TO LEADERSHIP IN QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE, SERVICE AND RESEARCH].

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ehud; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    Soroka University Medical Center is a tertiary hospital, and the sole medical center in the Negev, the southern part of Israel. Soroka has invested in quality, service and research. The region has developed joint programs in order to advance the quality of medical care whilst optimizing the utilization of available resources. In this editorial we describe the path to leadership in quality of medical care, service and research. PMID:27215117

  15. Research support in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Fern M

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the Prior Health Sciences Library (Prior Library) at The Ohio State University (OSU) explored the possibility of providing specialized support to biomedical, nursing, and allied health researchers by adding a research librarian position. The decision came about after the Medical Library Association (MLA) investigated how libraries could provide enhanced support to medical researchers. This article describes how the research librarian position was developed and how it continues to evolve. PMID:20391163

  16. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Academy (ETA) program at Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, Vermont, offers benefits beyond the conventional high school learning experience. In September, at the beginning of the program, students learn the traditional skills of using tools, line weights and lettering. Once they develop these basic skills, students…

  17. Case Study: Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, W. Va.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, West Virginia, received a grant in 1997 for a project that was part of the High Schools That Work (HSTW) initiative to improve academic skills of career-bound students. The superintendent and faculty knew that improving achievement meant reaching out to the three home high schools to bring them…

  18. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1980. All the publications were announced in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports and/or International Aerospace Abstracts.

  19. CCC CAMP WICKIUP – OFFICE BUILDING, CENTER; TECHNICAL SERVICE QUARTERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CCC CAMP WICKIUP – OFFICE BUILDING, CENTER; TECHNICAL SERVICE QUARTERS, RIGHT; EDUCATIONAL BUILDING, LEFT. Photocopy of historic photographs (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR Photographer, December 9, 1938 - Wickiup Dam, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  20. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  1. Managerial Cost Accounting for a Technical Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmkamp, John G.

    A two-fold solution to the cost information deficiency problem is proposed. A formal managerial cost accounting system is designed expressly for the two information services of retrospective search and selective dissemination. The system was employed during a trial period to test its effectiveness in a technical information center. Once…

  2. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  3. Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Characterizing customers at medical center farmers’ markets1

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Monroe, Diana L.; Fiordalis, Elizabeth; Bates, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 100 farmers’ markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010-October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US: Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center were conducted. Markets reported serving 180–2000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n=585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics – most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers’ markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers’ markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health. PMID:24421001

  4. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. )

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  5. Ohio Medical Office Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document provides a framework for a broad-based secondary and postsecondary curriculum to prepare students for employment in medical office management. The first part of the technical competency profile (TCP) contains the following items: an explanation of the purpose and scope of Ohio's TCPs; college tech prep program standards; an overview…

  6. Technical Conduct of the Child Sexual Abuse Medical Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Martin A.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the technical conduct of the child-sexual-abuse medical examination and offers a research agenda. Introduction of the colposcope in the early 1980s is noted, as are other technological advances, such as the videocolposcopy and linkage with computer technology. Achievement highlights in the last 20 years of research are identified, along…

  7. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, William; Vasquez, Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  8. Behavioral anchors: building a medical center on solid foundations.

    PubMed

    Doordan, Martin L; Stupak, Ronald J

    2005-01-01

    Construction of new facilities in the healthcare arena is an ongoing, almost daily, occurrence. The desire to build wisely and effectively is evidenced at the Anne Arundel Medical Center which has attracted healthcare executives from all over the country who come to view, analyze, and experience the beauty, utility and interdependencies of the buildings and facilities that constitute "the AAMC campus." However, too often these executive visitors and benchmarking experts tend to focus on the technical, architectural, engineering, concrete aspects of the hospital, while naively overlooking and/or giving short shrift to the more critical behavioral dynamics of the construction process. The ultimate success of any building project requires a clear understanding by the leadership of "where people are coming from," so that both the design and the development of the final product can be brought under the synthesizing umbrella of patient care, clinical excellence, individual safety, and community responsibility. Not only must the leadership determine and drive the strategic thrust toward the final outcome; in addition, they must make sure that they allow significant colleagues to be actively, operationally, and symbolically engaged in a process that ends up in a structural outcome that everyone is proud to own, to see, and to inhabit. PMID:16521615

  9. Managing information in the academic medical center: building an integrated information environment.

    PubMed

    Fuller, S; Braude, R M; Florance, V; Frisse, M E

    1995-10-01

    The strategic importance of integrated information systems and resources for academic medical centers should not be underestimated. Ten years ago, the National Library of Medicine in collaboration with the Association of Academic Medical Centers initiated the Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) program to assist academic medical centers in defining a process for addressing deficiencies in their information environments. The authors give a brief history of the IAIMS program, and they describe both the characteristics of an integrated information environment and the technical and organizational structures necessary to create such an environment. Strategies some institutions have used to implement integrated information systems are also outlined. Finally, the authors discuss the role of librarians in integrated information system design. PMID:7575920

  10. [Medical and technical compensation of disabilities].

    PubMed

    Didier, J P; Gras, P; Cassillas, J M

    1994-10-01

    Thanks to technological advances handicaps can be treated in a better way by physicians. This real Metrology of Handicap constitutes a preliminary stage to medical decision. Functional repercussions of a lesion can thus be accurately assessed before the well adapted compensatory means are conceived, prescribed and applied. A better understanding of physiopathological mechanisms involving lesion, deficit and handicap and of compensatory procedures used by disabled people depends from this assessment. Some examples will be reported such as energy expenditure, 3-dimensional biomechanical analysis of daily activities and the correlation between both approaches. Likewise, efficiency of therapeutics can be assessed such as the analysis of gait with appliances with different types of prosthetic feet or effects on muscle of various training programs. Besides, sophisticated orthesis, prosthesis and living aids can be developed with the help of data processing, robotics and electrostimulation. This new type of devices will be added to the range of standard devices developed at little cost by occupational therapists. As for the future, caution is imperative. "Repaired" man turning "robotised" is an image provided by media that might bring disillusions. On one hand, numerous social, economic and personal factors intervene in the determination of the plan for life by the individual and his family. Thereby, all the possibilities offered by technological advances might not be studied in the choice of plan of life. On the other hand, priorities in aims of an increasingly demanding individual economy will be dictated by collective economy focused on cost management. However, the concept of increase in life expectancy without disability will be relevant in the determination of health policy and the role of rehabilitation physicians will be all the more important because they are the only one to be able to coordinate a team qualified to choose and apply the best therapeutics. Times

  11. Benefits of Student-Centered Tandem Teaching in Medical English.

    PubMed

    Antić, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses some of the key notions about English for special purposes with special regard to English for medical purposes. The content was determined by observations and based on authors' professional experience. The starting point of a medical English course is a thorough analysis of students' needs, which is then used in course design and definition of appropriate learning goals. The student is at the center of learning and it is necessary to establish a positive cooperation between students and teachers. As medical English course is highly context-based, the inclusion of medical teachers can offer many opportunities for a successful learning process. PMID:26506766

  12. 75 FR 49526 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Register on November 17, 2009 (74 FR 59249). At the request of the petitioners, the Department reviewed the... Employment and Training Administration Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Woburn, MA; Amended Certification...

  13. The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, T N; Kemby, K M

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions. PMID:25089192

  14. The Six Sigma initiative at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chassin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma, in various forms, has been used widely in many Fortune 500 companies. Motorola, General Electric, Sony, American Express, and Bechtel all use Six Sigma to improve quality and performance. While the impact of this methodology has been documented extensively by the press in manufacturing and transactional settings, less evidence is available regarding its utility in health care environments. Mount Sinai Medical Center initiated a Six Sigma program in 2000 to determine its applicability and value in a large academic medical center. This article discusses Mount Sinai Medical Center's experience adapting this methodology to improve both patient care and business processes and outcomes. We present an overview of Six Sigma, and offer examples of projects undertaken using this data-driven approach to performance improvement. Lastly, the article provides insights and lessons learned regarding this organization-wide experience. PMID:18306249

  15. STOR: From Pilot Project to Medical Center Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Henke, J.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Q.E.; Whiting, A.; Schaffner, R.; Schnake, R.; Goldstein, R.; Abrego, J.

    1988-01-01

    Summary Time Oriented Record (STOR) is a clinical information system operating at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center (UCSF). It provides two major services: on-line display of clinical information in the hospitals and clinics and an ambulatory medical record that partially replaces the traditional paper medical record for outpatient patient visits. In 1985 STOR was approved for clinic-wide implementation in the UCSF ambulatory care clinics. The implementation will be completed in September 1989. STOR captures clinical data directly from clinicians via hand written notations and ancillary data from other UCSF computers via a local area network. Development on STOR is continuing in order to meet the changing and diversified environment of inpatient and outpatient practices found in a university medical center.

  16. Student perceptions of a patient- centered medical training curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Gallentine, Ashley; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily; Hinojosa, Sara; Monroe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate a patient-centered medical training curriculum, the SELECT program, through perceptions of the inaugural student cohort. Methods Data were collected from two focus groups conducted in the university setting, comprised of fifteen first-year medical students who participated in the SELECT program during its inaugural year. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion, which was transcribed and hand-coded through thematic analyses. Results Various themes related to patient-centered care were identified. Students noted changes in their attitudes towards interacting with patients in an empowering and educative manner as a result of communication and motivational interviewing exercises. Additionally, they recognized certain external, structural barriers as well as internal conflict between pragmatism and emotional intelligence that could potentially hinder patient-centered care. The impact of family dynamics and social support on quality of life and health outcomes was acknowledged. Students also emphasized the value of collaborating with multiple health professionals. Lastly, students provided suggestions for program improvement, namely additional simulations, more education regarding other healthcare professionals’ roles, more standardized experiences, and application of principles to acute and primary care. Conclusions Upon completion of the first year of the SELECT program, students gained an appreciation for patient-centered care and various factors and skills that facilitate such care. Additionally, they experienced a dissonance between didactic concepts from the curriculum and observed medical practices. This study highlights the educational benefits of a patient-centered medical curriculum and provides suggestions for future improvement. PMID:25341218

  17. An Unsuccessful Experience with Computerized Medical Records in an Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dambro, Mark R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Experience with the Computer Stored Ambulatory Record (COSTAR), a computerized medical records system, installed at a large primary care clinic at a university medical center is reported. Use of the system was terminated because clinic revenues could not cover operating costs. (Author/MLW)

  18. Effectively implementing FDA medication alerts utilizing patient centered medical home clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Barbara J; Diez, Heidi L; Bostwick, Jolene R; Kales, Helen C; Zivin, Kara; Dalack, Gregory W; Fluent, Tom E; Standiford, Connie J; Stano, Claire; Mi Choe, Hae

    2016-03-01

    FDA medication alerts can be successfully implemented within patient centered medical home (PCMH) clinics utilizing clinical pharmacists. Targeted selection of high-risk patients from an electronic database allows PCMH pharmacists to prioritize assessments. Trusting relationships between PCMH clinical pharmacists and primary care providers facilitates high response rates to pharmacist recommendations. This health system approach led by PCMH pharmacists provides a framework for proactive responses to FDA safety alerts and medication related quality measure improvement. PMID:27001101

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 255 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hopital, Building 255, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of postcard from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center public affairs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of postcard from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center public affairs office, building 120, showing building 215 in the 1940's before the top of the smokestack blew off. Photograph shows north side and corner of west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph of south side before perpendicular wing added. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Claretian Medical Center Task Analysis. Worker Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees.

    This task analysis for positions at the Claretian Medical Center in southeast Chicago was developed to improve communication and customer service in the workplace. The task analysis was prepared through clinic tours, employee interviews, and supervisor questionnaires. It is used for the purpose of curriculum development for onsite instruction in…

  12. Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. The 'Adventist advantage'. Glendale Adventist Medical Center distinguishes itself.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, Calif., adopted an image-building campaign to differentiate the 450-bed hospital from its neighbors. This included the headline "Adventist Advantage," used in a series of sophisticated ads, printed in gold. In all their efforts, marketers consider the sensibilities of the sizable Armenian, Korean, Hispanic and Chinese populations. PMID:12134406

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. How Strong Is the Primary Care Safety Net? Assessing the Ability of Federally Qualified Health Centers to Serve as Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jamie; Riley, Pamela; Abrams, Melinda; Nocon, Robert

    2015-09-01

    By expanding access to affordable insurance coverage for millions of Americans, the Affordable Care Act will likely increase demand for the services provided by federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), which provide an important source of care in low-income communities. A pair of Commonwealth Fund surveys asked health center leaders about their ability to function as medical homes. Survey findings show that between 2009 and 2013, the percentage of centers exhibiting medium or high levels of medical home capability almost doubled, from 32 percent to 62 percent. The greatest improvement was reported in patient tracking and care management. Despite this increased capability, health centers reported diminished ability to coordinate care with providers outside of the practice, particularly specialists. Ongoing federal funding and technical support for medical home transformation will be needed to ensure that FQHCs can fulfill their mission of providing high-quality, comprehensive care to low-income and minority populations. PMID:26372972

  16. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-15

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  17. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  18. The changes involved in patient-centered medical home transformation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Edward H; Coleman, Katie; Reid, Robert J; Phillips, Kathryn; Abrams, Melinda K; Sugarman, Jonathan R

    2012-06-01

    In 2007, the major primary care professional societies collaboratively introduced a new model of primary care: the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). The published document outlines the basic attributes and expectations of a PCMH but not with the specificity needed to help interested clinicians and administrators make the necessary changes to their practice. To identify the specific changes required to become a medical home, the authors reviewed literature and sought the opinions of two multi-stakeholder groups. This article describes the eight consensus change concepts and 32 key changes that emerged from this process, and the evidence supporting their inclusion. PMID:22608865

  19. The impact of the IRB on medical centers.

    PubMed

    Lee, A S; Thompson, J H

    1981-01-01

    The role of the IRB in a Medical Center is presented with respect to investigations of medical device safety and effectiveness involving human subjects. The prime points presented and discussed are: the reasons (governmental, social, economic, legal-liability, scientific and moral) for the existence of an IRB; the analytical and descriptive documentation which should always precede experimentation; the concepts governing an application to a "typical" IRB; a practical, detailed outline of some special facts and circumstances typically most important to an IRB; and, the question of confidentiality of trade secrets. PMID:10251107

  20. [Patient-centered medicine for tuberculosis medical services].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Akira; Narita, Tomoyo

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 edition of Specific Guiding Principles for Tuberculosis Prevention calls for a streamlined medical services system capable of providing medical care that is customized to the patient's needs. The new 21st Century Japanese version of the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) expands the indication of DOTS to all tuberculosis (TB) patients in need of treatment. Hospital DOTS consists of comprehensive, patient-centered support provided by a DOTS care team. For DOTS in the field, health care providers should select optimal administration support based on patient profiles and local circumstances. In accordance with medical fee revisions for 2012, basic inpatient fees have been raised and new standards for TB hospitals have been established, the result of efforts made by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis and other associated groups. It is important that the medical care system be improved so that patients can actively engage themselves as a member of the team, for the ultimate goal of practicing patient-centered medicine. We have organized this symposium to explore the best ways for practicing patient-centered medicine in treating TB. It is our sincere hope that this symposium will lead to improved medical treatment for TB patients. 1. Providing patient-centered TB service via utilization of collaborative care pathway: Akiko MATSUOKA (Hiroshima Prefectural Tobu Public Health Center) We have been using two types of collaborative care pathway as one of the means of providing patient-centered TB services since 2008. The first is the clinical pathway, which is mainly used by TB specialist doctors to communicate with local practitioners on future treatment plan (e.g. medication and treatment duration) of patients. The clinical pathway was first piloted in Onomichi district and its use was later expanded to the whole of Hiroshima prefecture. The second is the regional care pathway, which is used to share treatment progress, test results and other

  1. FAA Technical Center Aeronautical Data Link Research Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Frank; Cratch, Preston; Fischer, Terence; Lunder, Joseph; Shingledecker, Clark; Stahl, David; Sweeney, David

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this plan is to project a clear and distinct description of the Data Link research that is to be conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center over the next 4 years. It explicitly defines what is to be achieved at a specific time in the future. End-to-end, high fidelity simulations will be the primary methodology for answering research questions. The end-to-end simulations identified in this plan are intended to investigate controller/aircrew integration issues using candidate Data Link hardware and software configurations. Research will also focus on testing Data Link applications in terms of their impact on controllers, aircrew, and the overall safety, efficiency, and productivity of the system. Additionally, research efforts are planned to address the most critical human factors issues surrounding Data Link.

  2. Computer Assisted Multi-Center Creation of Medical Knowledge Bases

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, Nunzia Bettinsoli; Giuse, Dario A.; Miller, Randolph A.

    1988-01-01

    Computer programs which support different aspects of medical care have been developed in recent years. Their capabilities range from diagnosis to medical imaging, and include hospital management systems and therapy prescription. In spite of their diversity these systems have one commonality: their reliance on a large body of medical knowledge in computer-readable form. This knowledge enables such programs to draw inferences, validate hypotheses, and in general to perform their intended task. As has been clear to developers of such systems, however, the creation and maintenance of medical knowledge bases are very expensive. Practical and economical difficulties encountered during this long-term process have discouraged most attempts. This paper discusses knowledge base creation and maintenance, with special emphasis on medical applications. We first describe the methods currently used and their limitations. We then present our recent work on developing tools and methodologies which will assist in the process of creating a medical knowledge base. We focus, in particular, on the possibility of multi-center creation of the knowledge base.

  3. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  4. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Best practice in unbilled account management: one medical center's story.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Debra; Miller, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    After implementing its new electronic health record, a large metropolitan academic medical center (AMC) decided to optimize its supporting business systems, beginning with billing. By identifying problems and taking the following corrective actions immediately, the AMC significantly reduced the number and average age of its unbilled accounts: Realigning system automation to improve routing efficiency. Facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration to better identify and correct the root causes of issues. Ensuring transparent data reporting by setting up different ways of viewing the underlying information. PMID:26999975

  7. Understanding and improving inpatient mortality in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Behal, Raj; Finn, Jeannine

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe factors contributing to potentially preventable mortality in academic medical centers and the organizational characteristics associated with success in reducing mortality. Sixteen U.S. academic medical centers that wished to improve risk-adjusted inpatient mortality rates requested a consultation that included interviews with physicians, nurses, and hospital leaders; review of medical records; and evaluation of systems and processes of care. The assessments took place on-site; they identified key factors contributing to preventable mortality, and each hospital received specific recommendations. Changes in observed mortality and in the ratio of observed to expected mortality were measured from 2002 to final follow-up in 2007. Evaluations determined each hospital's success factors and key barriers to improvement. The key factors contributing to preventable mortality were delays in responding to deteriorating patients, suboptimal critical care, hospital-acquired infections, postoperative complications, medical errors, and community issues such as the availability of hospice care. Of the 16 hospitals, 12 were able to reduce their mortality index. The five hospitals that had the greatest improvement in mortality were the only hospitals with a broad level of engagement among hospital and physician leaders, including the department chairs. In the hospitals whose performance did not improve, the department chairs were not engaged in the process. The academic medical centers that focused on mortality reduction and had engagement of physicians, especially department chairs, were able to achieve meaningful reductions in hospital mortality. The necessary ingredients for achieving meaningful improvement in clinical outcomes included good data, a sound method for change, and physician leadership. PMID:19940569

  8. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Interim Report. NCEE 2010-4033

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek; Sipe, Cynthia L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2010-01-01

    This first of two reports presents early findings from the National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers (Comprehensive Centers), a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. The law authorizing the Comprehensive Centers, the…

  9. Succession planning in an academic medical center nursing service.

    PubMed

    Barginere, Cynthia; Franco, Samantha; Wallace, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Succession planning is of strategic importance in any industry. It ensures the smooth transition from leader to leader and the ability of the organization to maintain the forward momentum as well as meet its operational and financial goals. Health care and nursing are no exception. In the complex and challenging world of health care today, leadership is critical to an organization's success and leadership succession is a key strategy used to ensure continuity of leadership and development of talent from within the organization. At Rush University Medical Center, a 667-bed academic medical center providing tertiary care to adults and children, the need for a focus on succession planning for the nursing leadership team is apparent as key leaders come to the end of their careers and consider retirement. It has become apparent that to secure the legacy and continue the extraordinary history of nursing excellence, care must be taken to grow talent from within and take the opportunity to leverage the mentoring opportunities before the retirement of many key leaders. To ensure a smooth leadership transition, nursing leadership and human resources partner at Rush University Medical Center to implement a systematic approach to leadership succession planning. PMID:23222756

  10. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  11. Geriatric education centers address medication issues affecting older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, A; Blandford, D H; Krueger, K; Zwick, D I

    1992-01-01

    Serious problems have been identified in the prescribing of medications for elderly patients and use of prescription and nonprescription drugs by older persons. Overuse, underuse, and inappropriate use of drugs by the elderly have been widely documented, and the harmful consequences have been described. This paper reviews information concerning the need for action to improve health professionals' knowledge and skills with respect to drugs and the elderly and activities being undertaken by geriatric education centers (GECs) to enhance these capacities. Grant support for the centers from the Health Resources and Services Administration, a Public Health Service component agency, began in 1983. In fiscal year 1992 there are 31 centers operating in 26 States. The centers are multi-institutional and conduct four types of educational activities. These include review of pharmacological issues for multidisciplinary groups, specialized training for pharmacists, discipline-specific programs focusing on medication issues, and activities aimed at educating the public. Examples of the GECs' educational activities are given. PMID:1738807

  12. An academic medical center under prolonged rocket attack--organizational, medical, and financial considerations.

    PubMed

    Bar-El, Yaron; Michaelson, Moshe; Hyames, Gila; Skorecki, Karl; Reisner, Shimon A; Beyar, Rafael

    2009-09-01

    The Rambam Medical Center, the major academic health center in northern Israel, serving a population of two million and providing specialized tertiary care, was exposed to an unprecedented experience during the Second Lebanon War in the summer of 2006. For more than one month, it was subjected to continuous rocket attacks, but it continued to provide emergency and routine medical services to the civilian population and also served the military personnel who were evacuated from the battlefront. To accomplish the goals of serving the population while itself being under fire, the Rambam Medical Center had to undertake major organizational decisions, which included maximizing safety within the hospital by shifting patients and departments, ensuring that the hospital was properly fortified, managing the health professional teams' work schedules, and providing needed services for the families of employees. The Rambam Medical Center's Level I trauma center expertise included multidisciplinary teams and extensive collaborations; modern imaging modalities usually reserved for peacetime medical practice were frequently used. The function of the hospital teams during the war was efficient and smooth, based on the long-term actions taken to prepare for disasters and wartime conditions. Routine hospital services continued, although at 60% of normal occupancy. Financial losses incurred were primarily due to the decrease in revenue-generating activity. The two most important components of managing the hospital under these conditions are (1) the ability to arrive at prompt and meaningful decisions with respect to the organizational and medical hospital operations and (2) the leadership and management of the professional staff and teams. PMID:19707058

  13. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  14. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  15. Interpersonal Communications Curriculum. Claretian Medical Center for the Worker Education Program of Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago Teacher's Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Florence S.

    This teaching guide contains the materials required to teach a 6-week course in interpersonal communications that was developed for the workers of a Chicago medical center through a partnership involving the medical center, its employees, their union, and Northeastern Illinois University. Based on the student-centered philosophy of teaching, the…

  16. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  17. Design for Medical Education. The Development and Planning of a Medical College and Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peery, Thomas M.; Green, Alan C.

    Planning and design procedures which one medical education center employed in translating its educational objectives, philosophy and techniques into laboratory, classroom and clinic facilities are described. Basic planning considerations included--(1) determination of the curriculum, (2) facility utilization rate, (3) housing of research…

  18. Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-08

    This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

  19. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dorland, William

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  20. Unique strategies for technical information management at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Vijay

    1994-01-01

    In addition to the current NASA manned programs, the maturation of Space Station and the introduction of the Space Exploration programs are anticipated to add substantially to the number and variety of data and documentation at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). This growth in the next decade has been estimated at five to ten fold compared to the current numbers. There will be an increased requirement for the tracking and currency of space program data and documents with National pressures to realize economic benefits from the research and technological developments of space programs. From a global perspective the demand for NASA's technical data and documentation is anticipated to increase at local, national, and international levels. The primary users will be government, industry, and academia. In our present national strategy, NASA's research and technology will assume a great role in the revitalization of the economy and gaining international competitiveness. Thus, greater demand will be placed on NASA's data and documentation resources. In this paper the strategies and procedures developed by DDMS, Inc., to accommodate the present and future information utilization needs are presented. The DDMS, Inc., strategies and procedures rely on understanding user requirements, library management issues, and technological applications for acquiring, searching, storing, and retrieving specific information accurately and quickly. The proposed approach responds to changing customer requirements and product deliveries. The unique features of the proposed strategy include: (1) To establish customer driven data and documentation management through an innovative and unique methods to identify needs and requirements. (2) To implement a structured process which responds to user needs, aimed at minimizing costs and maximizing services, resulting in increased productivity. (3) To provide a process of standardization of services and procedures. This standardization is the central

  1. Imaging Systems for Medical Diagnosis: Fundamentals and Technical Solutions - X-Ray Diagnostics- Computed Tomography - Nuclear Medical Diagnostics - Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Ultrasound Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krestel, Erich

    1990-10-01

    Erick Krestel, Editor Imaging Systems for Medical Diagnostics This book provides physicians and clinical physicists with detailed information on todya's imaging modalities and assists them in selecting the optimal system for each clinical application. Physicists, engineers and computer specialists engaged in research and development and sales departments will also find this book to be of considerable use. It may also be employed at universities, training centers and in technical seminars. The physiological and physical fundamentals are explained in part 1. The technical solutions contained in part 2 illustrate the numerous possibilities available in x-ray diagnostics, computed tomography, nuclear medical diagnostics, magnetic resonance imaging, sonography and biomagnetic diagnostics. Overview of Contents Physiology of vision Image quality X-ray and gamma radiation X-ray diagnostics Computed tomography Nuclear medical diagnostics Magnetic resonance imaging Sonography Biomagnetic diagnostics

  2. Final Scientific Technical Report Crowder College MARET Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boyt, Art; Eberle, Dan; Hudson, Pam; Hopper, Russ

    2013-06-30

    Following decades of success in solar energy projects, the Missouri Legislature designated Crowder College in 1992 as the State's renewable energy education center. The resulting Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center is recognized internationally for its contributions to the energy field. The mission of the MARET Center is to expand renewable energy throughout the region with education, applied research, and economic development. Educational programs include certification and transfer degrees encompassing green construction, solar thermal energy, solar electricity, and wind. The MARET Center also assists in new product development and other business support services in renewable energy. The Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center at Crowder College hopes to eventually develop a 27,500 ft2 facility as a living laboratory to support solar and other renewable and sustainable energy development through professional degrees, new product development and commercialization, renewable energy business incubation, and consumer education. The primary objective of the current project was to complete Stage One of this building, with solar, wind, and geothermal technologies installed to power its 9,216 ft2 office, classroom, and research spaces. This MARET Center includes a modular roof structure that permits both solar module mounting and daylighting, PV/thermal hybrid modules pioneered in Crowder Solar Decathlon homes, modular electrical management subsystems; and modular delivery systems for heating and cooling the structure. The MARET Facility will operate as a Net Positive energy building, consistently producing surplus energy for distributed generation on the utility grid. The modular design of the energy systems within the building is to serve as a scalable and repeatable model for a wide variety of building applications and climate zones. As a living laboratory of renewable energy, exploring

  3. Evaluation of Intravenous Medication Errors with Smart Infusion Pumps in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W.

    2013-01-01

    While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted. PMID:24551395

  4. A cryptologic based trust center for medical images.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate practical solutions that can integrate cryptographic techniques and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to improve the security of medical images. DESIGN: The PACS at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center consolidate images and associated data from various scanners into a centralized data archive and transmit them to remote display stations for review and consultation purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the model of a digital trust center that integrates cryptographic algorithms and protocols seamlessly into such a digital radiology environment to improve the security of medical images. MEASUREMENTS: The timing performance of encryption, decryption, and transmission of the cryptographic protocols over 81 volumetric PACS datasets has been measured. Lossless data compression is also applied before the encryption. The transmission performance is measured against three types of networks of different bandwidths: narrow-band Integrated Services Digital Network, Ethernet, and OC-3c Asynchronous Transfer Mode. RESULTS: The proposed digital trust center provides a cryptosystem solution to protect the confidentiality and to determine the authenticity of digital images in hospitals. The results of this study indicate that diagnostic images such as x-rays and magnetic resonance images could be routinely encrypted in PACS. However, applying encryption in teleradiology and PACS is a tradeoff between communications performance and security measures. CONCLUSION: Many people are uncertain about how to integrate cryptographic algorithms coherently into existing operations of the clinical enterprise. This paper describes a centralized cryptosystem architecture to ensure image data authenticity in a digital radiology department. The system performance has been evaluated in a hospital-integrated PACS environment. PMID:8930857

  5. Promoting cancer screening within the patient centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Wender, Richard; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    While consensus has grown that primary care is the essential access point in a high-performing health care system, the current model of primary care underperforms in both chronic disease management and prevention. The Patient Centered Medical Home model (PCMH) is at the center of efforts to reinvent primary care practice, and is regarded as the most promising approach to addressing the burden of chronic disease, improving health outcomes, and reducing health spending. However, the potential for the medical home to improve the delivery of cancer screening (and preventive services in general) has received limited attention in both conceptualization and practice. Medical home demonstrations to date have included few evidence-based preventive services in their outcome measures, and few have evaluated the effect of different payment models. Decreasing use of hospitals and emergency rooms and an emphasis on improving chronic care represent improvements in effective delivery of healthcare, but leave opportunities for reducing the burden of cancer untouched. Data confirm that what does or does not happen in the primary care setting has a substantial impact on cancer outcomes. Insofar as cancer is the leading cause of death before age 80, the PCMH model must prioritize adherence to cancer screening according to recommended guidelines, and systems, financial incentives, and reimbursements must be aligned to achieve that goal. This article explores capacities that are needed in the medical home model to facilitate the integration of cancer screening and other preventive services. These capacities include improved patient access and communication, health risk assessments, periodic preventive health exams, use of registries that store cancer risk information and screening history, ability to track and follow up on tests and referrals, feedback on performance, and payment models that reward cancer screening. PMID:22086728

  6. A suicide prevention advisory group at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Hough, D; Lewis, P

    2000-02-01

    During a 15-month period, there were seven suicides among patients who were in active treatment or who had been seen recently by providers in the Department of Psychiatry of Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. As a result, a Suicide Prevention Advisory Group was formed to identify possible causes and make recommendations aimed at improving the identification and treatment of suicidal patients. The group made 11 specific recommendations. No known suicides occurred during the 22 months after the implementation of the Suicide Prevention Advisory Group's recommendations. PMID:10709368

  7. A suicide prevention advisory group at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Hough, David; Lewis, Philip

    2010-05-01

    During a 15-month period, there were seven suicides among patients who were in active treatment or who had been seen recently by providers in the Department of Psychiatry of Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. As a result, a Suicide Prevention Advisory Group (SPAG) was formed to identify possible causes and make recommendations aimed at improving the identification and treatment of suicidal patients. The group made 11 specific recommendations. No known suicides occurred during the 22 months after the implementation of the Suicide Prevention Advisory Group's recommendations. PMID:20486507

  8. Case study: a data warehouse for an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Einbinder, J S; Scully, K W; Pates, R D; Schubart, J R; Reynolds, R E

    2001-01-01

    The clinical data repository (CDR) is a frequently updated relational data warehouse that provides users with direct access to detailed, flexible, and rapid retrospective views of clinical, administrative, and financial patient data for the University of Virginia Health System. This article presents a case study of the CDR, detailing its five-year history and focusing on the unique role of data warehousing in an academic medical center. Specifically, the CDR must support multiple missions, including research and education, in addition to administration and management. Users include not only analysts and administrators but clinicians, researchers, and students. PMID:11452578

  9. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

  11. Forensic neuropsychological evaluations in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lauren; Schrift, Michael; Pliskin, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Within the expanding field of clinical neuropsychology, the subspecialty of forensic neuropsychology has developed. Currently, there is considerable diversity within the discipline as to how practitioners approach test selection, reports, and number of hours billed. How individuals handle these issues is subject to debate, but what is clear is that there are no specific guidelines as to how to conduct these evaluations. The current study provides an introduction to the issues faced by clinical neuropsychologists completing forensic evaluations. In addition, the authors present how the relevant issues are addressed in one neuropsychology service housed within a university-affiliated academic medical center. PMID:19333065

  12. An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griest, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

  13. 76 FR 50201 - National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center; Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center; Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver AGENCY... Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center to receive funding from October 1, 2011 through September 30.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On June 7, 2011, the Department published a notice in the Federal Register (76...

  14. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  15. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  16. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  17. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for Calendar Year 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1985 is presented. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  18. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1984 is compiled. Approximately 1650 citations are included comprising formal reports, quick-release technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles and other publications, meeting presentations, technical talks, computer programs, tech briefs, and patents.

  19. Improving Literature Searching in a Technical Information Center, an Internship and a Staff Improvement Course at the Owens-Illinois Technical Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terbille, Charles I.

    A staff improvement course was developed by an intern at the technical information center (TIC) at Owens-Illinois, Inc. (O-I). First an analysis was made of the information center itself--its goals, services, literature search procedures, information sources, and the function of the information representative-analysts. Next a comparison was made…

  20. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  1. IAIMS at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center: accomplishments and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Roderer, N K; Clayton, P D

    1992-01-01

    The concept of "one-stop information shopping" is becoming a reality at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Our goal is to provide access from a single workstation to clinical, research, and library resources; university and hospital administrative systems; and utility functions such as word processing and mail. We have created new organizational units and installed a network of workstations that can access a variety of resources and systems on any of seventy-two different host computers/servers. In November 1991, 2,600 different individuals used the clinical information system, 700 different individuals used the library resources, and 900 different individuals used hospital administrative systems via the network. Over the past four years, our efforts have cost the equivalent of $23 million or approximately 0.5% of the total medical center budget. Even small improvements in productivity and in the quality of work of individuals who use the system could justify these expenditures. The challenges we still face include the provision of additional easy-to-use applications and development of equitable methods for financial support. PMID:1326368

  2. An analytics approach to designing patient centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Ajorlou, Saeede; Shams, Issac; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Recently the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model has become a popular team based approach focused on delivering more streamlined care to patients. In current practices of medical homes, a clinical based prediction frame is recommended because it can help match the portfolio capacity of PCMH teams with the actual load generated by a set of patients. Without such balances in clinical supply and demand, issues such as excessive under and over utilization of physicians, long waiting time for receiving the appropriate treatment, and non-continuity of care will eliminate many advantages of the medical home strategy. In this paper, by using the hierarchical generalized linear model with multivariate responses, we develop a clinical workload prediction model for care portfolio demands in a Bayesian framework. The model allows for heterogeneous variances and unstructured covariance matrices for nested random effects that arise through complex hierarchical care systems. We show that using a multivariate approach substantially enhances the precision of workload predictions at both primary and non primary care levels. We also demonstrate that care demands depend not only on patient demographics but also on other utilization factors, such as length of stay. Our analyses of a recent data from Veteran Health Administration further indicate that risk adjustment for patient health conditions can considerably improve the prediction power of the model. PMID:24942633

  3. Measuring physicians' productivity in a Veterans' Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Coleman, David L; Moran, Eileen; Serfilippi, Delchi; Mulinski, Paul; Rosenthal, Ronnie; Gordon, Bruce; Mogielnicki, R Peter

    2003-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs includes patient care, education, research, and backup to the Department of Defense. Because the measurement of physicians' productivity must reflect both institutional goals and market forces, the authors designed a productivity model that uses measures of clinical workload and academic activities commensurate with the VA's investments in these activities. The productivity model evaluates four domains of physicians' activity: clinical work, education, research, and administration. Examples of the application of the productivity model in the evaluation of VA-paid physician-staff and in the composition of contracts for clinical services are provided. The proposed model is a relatively simple strategy for measuring a broad range of the work of academic physicians in VA medical centers. The model provides incentives for documentation of resident supervision and participation in administrative activities required for effective and efficient clinical care. In addition, the model can aid in determining resource distribution among clinical services and permits comparison with non-VA health care systems. A strategy for modifying the model to incorporate measures of quality of clinical care, research, education, and administration is proposed. The model has been a useful part of the process to ensure the optimum use of resources and to meet clinical and academic institutional goals. The activities and accomplishments used to define physician productivity will have a substantial influence on the character of the medical profession, the vitality of medical education and research, and the cost and quality of health care. PMID:12857686

  4. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed. PMID:24667517

  5. The Determination of a Technical Core Curriculum for a Two Year Technical Program in Bio-Medical Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, William G., Sr.

    The major concerns of this study were to determine the extent of need for bio-medical electronic technicians and to determine what would constitute a functional technical core curriculum for training to fill that need. Following a review of medical and electronic literature, a survey instrument was developed and sent to hospitals, manufacturers,…

  6. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  7. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  8. A special issue on the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Blount, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    This special issue on the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) reflects its times. At the present time, the PCMH is an aspirational model with a few pilots functioning well around the country. How long the current period of idealism, fueled by the energy of early adopters, the consensus of diverse stakeholders, and the dollars of the Affordable Care Act will continue is anybody's guess. Representing the thinking of some of the best minds in the field, the articles in this issue have an aspirational and idealistic tone as much as a descriptive and analytic one. A year ago the balance would have been tipped more toward idealism and model building and a year from now it would, in all likelihood, tip more toward model description and analysis. The authors in this volume have been personally responsible for helping to move behavioral health to a more central position in the PCMH model. PMID:21299276

  9. An academic medical center's response to widespread computer failure.

    PubMed

    Genes, Nicholas; Chary, Michael; Chason, Kevin W

    2013-01-01

    As hospitals incorporate information technology (IT), their operations become increasingly vulnerable to technological breakdowns and attacks. Proper emergency management and business continuity planning require an approach to identify, mitigate, and work through IT downtime. Hospitals can prepare for these disasters by reviewing case studies. This case study details the disruption of computer operations at Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC), an urban academic teaching hospital. The events, and MSMC's response, are narrated and the impact on hospital operations is analyzed. MSMC's disaster management strategy prevented computer failure from compromising patient care, although walkouts and time-to-disposition in the emergency department (ED) notably increased. This incident highlights the importance of disaster preparedness and mitigation. It also demonstrates the value of using operational data to evaluate hospital responses to disasters. Quantifying normal hospital functions, just as with a patient's vital signs, may help quantitatively evaluate and improve disaster management and business continuity planning. PMID:24352930

  10. 78 FR 40152 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory... Health and Human Services. The CDC is soliciting nominations for membership on the World Trade...

  11. 76 FR 27648 - World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program... establishment of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee. The WTC... WTC Program Administrator. For information, contact Larry Elliott, Designated Federal Officer,...

  12. 78 FR 38983 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... name of the Committee should read World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical...

  13. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    All the publications were announced in the 1978 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  14. 78 FR 16679 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy Council; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy... interested organizations, on medical policy issues that may be considered by the CDER Medical Policy Council (Council) in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). These comments will help the...

  15. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Rizer, Milisa K.; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J.; Hefner, Jennifer L.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation. PMID:26396558

  16. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation. PMID:26396558

  17. Health IT–Enabled Care Coordination: A National Survey of Patient-Centered Medical Home Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Suzanne; Shih, Sarah C.; Winther, Chloe H.; Tinoco, Aldo; Kessler, Rodger S.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Health information technology (IT) offers promising tools for improving care coordination. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of 6 proposed care coordination objectives for stage 3 of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services electronic health record incentive program (Meaningful Use) related to referrals, notification of care from other facilities, patient clinical summaries, and patient dashboards. METHODS We surveyed physician-owned and hospital/health system–affiliated primary care practices that achieved patient-centered medical home recognition and participated in the Meaningful Use program, and community health clinics with patient-centered medical home recognition (most with certified electronic health record systems). The response rate was 35.1%. We ascertained whether practices had implemented proposed objectives and perceptions of their importance. We analyzed the association of organizational and contextual factors with self-reported use of health IT to support care coordination activities. RESULTS Although 78% of the 350 respondents viewed timely notification of hospital discharges as very important, only 48.7% used health IT systems to accomplish this task. The activity most frequently supported by health IT was providing clinical summaries to patients, in 76.6% of practices; however, merely 47.7% considered this activity very important. Greater use of health IT to support care coordination activities was positively associated with the presence of a nonclinician responsible for care coordination and the practice’s capacity for systematic change. CONCLUSIONS Even among practices having a strong commitment to the medical home model, the use of health IT to support care coordination objectives is not consistent. Health IT capabilities are not currently aligned with clinicians’ priorities. Many practices will need financial and technical assistance for health IT to enhance care coordination. PMID:25964403

  18. Directory of Federal Libraries and Information Centers: 1994. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollins, Martha

    This Directory is based on a survey of 1,234 federal libraries and information centers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia conducted in 1994. The survey was developed and funded by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) with the advice and guidance of a survey working group of the Federal Library and Information Center…

  19. Government acronyms and alphabetic organizational designations used in DTIC (Defense Technical Information Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.M.

    1984-05-01

    A guide to acronyms as assigned by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) is given. The listing contains entries from the Department of Defense, Federal Government and foreign military organizations. The acronyms reflect reports processed into the DTIC collections.

  20. WORKSHOPS, SEMINARS, AND CONFERENCES (TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER, SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the Technical Support Center's (TSC's) technology transfer program includes conducting information transfer workshops, seminars, and conferences as well as training courses. These activities provide a forum for discussing cutting-edge issues among government, acade...

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment Patterns in Academic Urban Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Paulette D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Williams, Michelle A.; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Bates, David W.; Hicks, LeRoi S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assess racial/ethnic and sex differences in treatment of vitamin D deficiency with high dose ergocalciferol (‘vitamin D2’) or other forms of vitamin D in a northeastern U.S. ambulatory clinic of an academic urban medical center. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional observational review of electronic medication prescribing records of patients with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) deficiency (25OHD < 20 ng/ml) from 2004–2008. METHODS Using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for patients’ demographics, and Elixhauser comorbidity score, we examined the association of sex and race/ethnicity with prescription for at least one dose of vitamin D. RESULTS Among 2,140 patients without renal disease and tested for 25OHD deficiency (25OHD < 20 ng/ml), 66.2% received no vitamin D prescription for vitamin D deficiency. Blacks and Hispanics received vitamin D prescriptions at a higher frequency than whites, 37.8% 38.4% and 30.9%, respectively, p=0.003. The vitamin D prescription rate for women versus men was 26.3% and 7.5%, respectively, p=0.04. In a fully adjusted model, no difference in prescription likelihood for blacks and whites [OR=1.18 95% CI, 0.88–1.58; p=0.29] or Hispanics and whites was noted [OR=1.01 95% CI, 0.70–1.45;p=0.73]. Similarly, fully adjusted model showed no difference in prescription likelihood for females and males [OR=1.23 95% CI, 0.93–1.63; p=0.12]. CONCLUSIONS Among primary care patients with vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation was low and white patients were less likely to receive vitamin D treatment than blacks or Hispanics. Interventions to correct the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency should address the markedly low rate of vitamin D prescribing when 25OHD levels are measured. PMID:25328637

  2. Implementation of Single Source Based Hospital Information System for the Catholic Medical Center Affiliated Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inyoung; Choi, Ran; Lee, Jonghyun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this research is to introduce the unique approach of the Catholic Medical Center (CMC) integrate network hospitals with organizational and technical methodologies adopted for seamless implementation. Methods The Catholic Medical Center has developed a new hospital information system to connect network hospitals and adopted new information technology architecture which uses single source for multiple distributed hospital systems. Results The hospital information system of the CMC was developed to integrate network hospitals adopting new system development principles; one source, one route and one management. This information architecture has reduced the cost for system development and operation, and has enhanced the efficiency of the management process. Conclusions Integrating network hospital through information system was not simple; it was much more complicated than single organization implementation. We are still looking for more efficient communication channel and decision making process, and also believe that our new system architecture will be able to improve CMC health care system and provide much better quality of health care service to patients and customers. PMID:21818432

  3. Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research Fifth Annual Technical Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Fifth Annual Technical Symposium, sponsored by the UT-Calspan Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research (CSTAR), is organized to provide an overview of the technical accomplishments of the Center's five Research and Technology focus areas during the past year. These areas include chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, commerical space transportation, computational methods, and laser materials processing. Papers in the area of artificial intelligence/expert systems are also presented.

  4. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Final Report. Executive Summary. NCEE 2011-4032

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This final report presents findings from a multi-year evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers, a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. With the redesign of the Center…

  5. The National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center Model for Long-Term Systems Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Lynne; Hurth, Joicey; Kasprzak, Christina M.; Diefendorf, Martha J.; Goode, Susan E.; Ringwalt, Sharon S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center was charged by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs from October 2001 through September 2006 to develop, implement, and evaluate an approach to technical assistance (TA) that would result in sustainable systems change in state early intervention and…

  6. The Use and Value of Defense Technical Information Center Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderer, Nancy K.; And Others

    This study describes the use and value of the major information products and services provided by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC). These products and services include technical report distribution on an on-demand basis and through the Automatic Document Distribution (ADD) program; secondary information dissemination through online…

  7. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1980. Approximately 1400 citations are given. Formal reports, quick-release technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting/conference papers, computer programs, tech briefs, patents, and unpublished research are included.

  8. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1986. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Techncial Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  9. 75 FR 34249 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 13521). That notice contained background information and our reasons for proposing the... Education Centers for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance; Notices #0;#0;Federal... for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance Catalog of Federal...

  10. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Final Report. NCEE 2011-4031

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This final report presents findings from a multi-year evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers, a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. With the redesign of the Center…

  11. Crowder College MARET Center Facility Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Amy

    2013-08-20

    This project was a research facility construction project and did not include actual research. The new facility will benefit the public by providing training opportunities for students, as well as incubator and laboratory space for entrepreneurs in the areas of alternative and renewable energies. The 9,216 -square-foot Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center was completed in late 2011. Classes in the MARET Center began in the spring 2012 semester. Crowder College takes pride in the MARET Center, a focal point of the campus, as the cutting edge in education, applied research and commercial development in the growing field of green technology.

  12. The Evolution of the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, James J.; Danaher, Joan C.; Clifford, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    This review traces the evolution from 1971 to the present of a national technical assistance (TA) program to support the creation, expansion, and improvement of services for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with special needs. From its beginning as a TA resource for demonstration projects, to linking outreach projects' expertise with state…

  13. Naval Training Device Center 25th Anniversary Commemorative Technical Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amico, G. Vincent; Regan, James J.

    Both the technical history of training devices and the issues which currently confront their design and use are discussed by a group of distinguished scientists and engineers. A blend of human factors and engineering paper reflects the twin thrusts that make up the educational tools that are training device systems. (Author)

  14. Nonstandard Programs: the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's next frontier in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Kroboth, Frank J; Zerega, W Dennis; Patel, Rita M; Barnes, Barbara E; Webster, Marshall W

    2011-02-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has seen continuous growth in the number and types of graduate training programs not accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Board of Medical Specialties, or the American Osteopathic Association. For the purposes of ensuring best educational products and of controlling unrecognized competition with our accredited programs, a sequential process of centralized oversight of these nonstandard programs was undertaken. The first step involved programs whose fellows were hired and tracked like accredited fellows (i.e., not instructors). The basic process began with consensus among leadership, writing of policy with consultation as necessary, establishment of a registry of programs and graduates, and a committee to allow sharing of best practices and dissemination of policy. The second step applied the same process to instructor-level programs. Whereas the previous group of programs was made subject to ACGME regulations, more latitude in duty hours and progressive responsibility were allowed for instructor programs. The final step, in progress, is extending a similar but modified approach to short-duration clinical experiences and observerships. The outcomes of these efforts have been the creation of a centralized organizational structure, policies to guide this structure, an accurate registry of a surprising number of training programs, and a rolling record of all graduates from these programs. Included in the process is a mechanism that ensures that core program directors and department chairs specifically review the impact of new programs on core programs before allowing their creation. PMID:21169779

  15. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  16. California Diploma Project Technical Report II: Alignment Study--Alignment Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Draft Standards and California's Exit Level Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaughy, Charis; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education is in the process of revising the Career and Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards. The Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) conducted an investigation of the draft version of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards (Health Science). The purpose of the study is to…

  17. ORD Scientific and Engineering Technical Support for RPMs – Ground Water Technical Support Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD Scientific and Engineering Technical Support for RPMs (and Others) is a hybrid informational and panel session that focuses on the technical support available from EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) to RPMs and other EPA cleanup program staff. Examples of technica...

  18. 75 FR 13521 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ...The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes a priority under the Centers for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance (CIL-TA program). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2010, using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funds appropriated for the Centers for Independent......

  19. 77 FR 20369 - Applications for New Awards; Centers for Independent Living-Training and Technical Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Centers for Independent Living-- Training and Technical Assistance AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education ACTION: Notice. Overview Information Centers for Independent...

  20. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report FY 2012: October 2011 – September 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA's National Risk Management...

  1. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA's National Risk Management...

  2. Survey of Specialized Technical Information Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safety Management Inst., Washington, DC.

    A study was conducted to determine the most advantageous method of acquiring selected bibliographic data collections specializing in highway safety literature in order to provide the National Highway Safety Documentation Center (NHSDC) with a significant data base. This data base is necessary for NHSDC to accomplish its objective of being a…

  3. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices. PMID:24979282

  4. Enriching Patient-Centered Medical Homes Through Peer Support

    PubMed Central

    Daaleman, Timothy P.; Fisher, Edwin B.

    2015-01-01

    Peer supporters are recognized by various designations—community health workers, promotores de salud, lay health advisers—and are community members who work for pay or as volunteers in association with health care systems or nonprofit community organizations and often share ethnicity, language, and socioeconomic status with the mentees that they serve. Although emerging evidence demonstrates the efficacy of peer support at the community level, the adoption and implementation of this resource into patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is still under development. To accelerate that integration, this article addresses three major elements of peer support interventions: the functions and features of peer support, a framework and programmatic strategies for implementation, and fiscal models that would support the sustained viability of peer support programs within PCMHs. Key functions of peer support include assistance in daily management of health-related behaviors, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and longitudinal or ongoing support. An organizational model of innovation implementation provides a useful framework for determining how to implement and evaluate peer support programs in PCMHs. Programmatic strategies that can be useful in developing peer support programs within PCMHs include peer coaching or mentoring, group self-management training, and programs designed around the telephone and information technology. Fiscal models for peer support programs include linkages with hospital or health care systems, service- or community-based nonprofit organizations, and partnerships between health care systems and community groups. Peer support promises to enrich PCMHs by activating patients in their self-care, providing culturally sensitive outreach, and opening the way for partnerships with community-based organizations. PMID:26304975

  5. Energy savings through retrofits in a large medical center

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, P.F.

    1997-06-01

    A 600,000-square-foot medical center in the southeastern United States is presently undergoing major renovations which will result in savings of energy use and costs. The current project, funded for FY96 includes a number of modifications to the Heating and Cooling Plant and the hospital itself. These upgrades include: (1) High efficiency chillers, (2) Cooling tower replacement, (3) High efficiency condenser and chilled water pump motors, (4) New chilled water and condenser pumps and piping, (5) Condenser water reset controls, (6) Electricity demand reduction using gas-fired absorption chiller, (7) Secondary chilled water variable speed flow, (8) Boiler controls improvements, (9) Feedwater pump replacements, (10) Repair of air-side economizer HVAC system, (11) New 2x4 parabolic troffers with T-8 lamps and electronic ballasts, and (12) DDC controls. The current hospital energy use was modeled using Trane`s TRACE 600{reg_sign} computer simulation program to agree with recent historical energy use data. A second model was created implementing the energy conservation improvements listed above to quantify the associated energy and cost savings. Additional energy saving ideas were evaluated for cost effectiveness. These are: (1) New unattended boilers, (2) Boiler pressure reduction, (3) Boiler economizer, (4) Additional boiler controls, (5) Exhaust air heat recovery, (6) Domestic hot water decentralization, (7) Desiccant cooling, (8) Supply air reduction scheduling, (9) Compact fluorescents, (10) Variable air volume HVAC systems, and (11) Occupancy sensors. Another interesting aspect of this project was an evaluation of harmonic distortion due to electronic ballasts. Direct field measurements were made on similar lighting circuits to compare the harmonic currents generated by electronic and magnetic ballasts. A graphical as well as quantitative analysis is presented.

  6. Enriching Patient-Centered Medical Homes Through Peer Support.

    PubMed

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Fisher, Edwin B

    2015-08-01

    Peer supporters are recognized by various designations-community health workers, promotores de salud, lay health advisers-and are community members who work for pay or as volunteers in association with health care systems or nonprofit community organizations and often share ethnicity, language, and socioeconomic status with the mentees that they serve. Although emerging evidence demonstrates the efficacy of peer support at the community level, the adoption and implementation of this resource into patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is still under development. To accelerate that integration, this article addresses three major elements of peer support interventions: the functions and features of peer support, a framework and programmatic strategies for implementation, and fiscal models that would support the sustained viability of peer support programs within PCMHs. Key functions of peer support include assistance in daily management of health-related behaviors, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and longitudinal or ongoing support. An organizational model of innovation implementation provides a useful framework for determining how to implement and evaluate peer support programs in PCMHs. Programmatic strategies that can be useful in developing peer support programs within PCMHs include peer coaching or mentoring, group self-management training, and programs designed around the telephone and information technology. Fiscal models for peer support programs include linkages with hospital or health care systems, service- or community-based nonprofit organizations, and partnerships between health care systems and community groups. Peer support promises to enrich PCMHs by activating patients in their self-care, providing culturally sensitive outreach, and opening the way for partnerships with community-based organizations. PMID:26304975

  7. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical contributions announced in 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of Lewis authored publications and publications resulting from Lewis managed contracts which were announced in the 1976 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts) are presented. Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and these are included. The arrangement is by NASA subject category. Citations indicate report literature (identified by their N-numbers) and the journal and conference presentations (identified by their A-numbers). A grouping of indexes helps locate specific publications by author (including contractor authors), contractor organization, contract number, and report number.

  8. Center of Excellence: Microlaser microscope. Annual progress technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: Development of an imaging, system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In year 2 we have dealt with the slow delivery of new microlaser array approach to the idea of all-solid-state confocal microscopy. One solution was moderately successful, and another has produced the first microscope that is electronically switchable from confocal to non-confocal. We think this may be a useful alternative to the final design. This report thus discloses patentable material. We describe first the central Microlaser Microscope project, then we will tough briefly on the other projects of the Center. Publications are primarily those of the smaller projects, though no longer exclusively so. The appendix includes some of the publications.

  9. Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Julian C.

    2012-01-14

    The Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) project was a multi-institutional research effort funded jointly by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The effort was led by our Principal Investigator, CS Chang, at the Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences at New York University. The Center included participants from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Lehigh University, Rutgers University, University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Davis, University of California at Irvine, North Carolina State University, and Georgia Institute of Technology. This report concerns the work performed by Dr. Julian C. Cummings, who was the institutional Principal Investigator for the CPES project at Caltech.

  10. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  11. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application. PMID:25742664

  12. A new model for enhanced information services in an academic medical center.

    PubMed Central

    Panko, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    The information base used in the biomedical enterprise, already large, continues to expand at a striking rate. Networking and desktop computing technology is playing a more important role in the operations of academic medical centers. Integration efforts aimed at enhancing information access by using distributed computing are very substantial technical challenges. However, if these integration efforts focus only on the technical aspects, they are doomed to failure. New organizational approaches are also needed. This paper describes an new model for enhanced information services. This model calls for the central information supplier to provide a set of core services. Users, who may be individuals or units and generally have more insight into the nature of their problems, will be encouraged to add value to these core services in the form of specialization or customization to meet their unique and critical needs. This model provides a way to adapt and transform current organizational elements to effectively use the large information technology investments and to meet the increasing challenges of biomedical information use. PMID:1807648

  13. The Changing Landscape of Molecular Diagnostic Testing: Implications for Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Heidi L.; Hynes, Elizabeth; Funke, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the field of molecular diagnostics has undergone tremendous transformation, catalyzed by the clinical implementation of next generation sequencing (NGS). As technical capabilities are enhanced and current limitations are addressed, NGS is increasingly capable of detecting most variant types and will therefore continue to consolidate and simplify diagnostic testing. It is likely that genome sequencing will eventually serve as a universal first line test for disorders with a suspected genetic origin. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), which have been at the forefront of this paradigm shift are now presented with challenges to keep up with increasing technical, bioinformatic and interpretive complexity of NGS-based tests in a highly competitive market. Additional complexity may arise from altered regulatory oversight, also triggered by the unprecedented scope of NGS-based testing, which requires new approaches. However, these challenges are balanced by unique opportunities, particularly at the interface between clinical and research operations, where AMCs can capitalize on access to cutting edge research environments and establish collaborations to facilitate rapid diagnostic innovation. This article reviews present and future challenges and opportunities for AMC associated molecular diagnostic laboratories from the perspective of the Partners HealthCare Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM). PMID:26828522

  14. The Patient-Centered Medical Neighborhood: Transformation of Specialty Care.

    PubMed

    Spatz, Christin; Bricker, Patricia; Gabbay, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The growing need for coordinated care of those with medically complex diseases is becoming more important in today's health care system, wherein reimbursement changes are driving methods to improve quality and cost. This article discusses the 6 key processes that, according to the American College of Physicians, define an effective medical neighborhood; the evidence supporting the need for this coordinated system; and pilot medical neighborhood strategies being implemented. PMID:23966551

  15. Alternative Energy Center, Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, Howard D.; Marshall, JaNice C.

    2007-09-07

    The Lansing Community College Alternative Energy Center was created with several purposes in mind. The first purpose was the development of educational curricula designed to meet the growing needs of advanced energy companies that would allow students to articulate to other educational institutions or enter this growing workforce. A second purpose was the professional development of faculty and teachers to prepare them to train tomorrow's workforce and scholars. Still another purpose was to design, construct, and equip an alternative energy laboratory that could be used for education, demonstration, and public outreach. Last, the Center was to engage in community outreach and education to enhance industry partnerships, inform decision makers, and increase awareness and general knowledge of hydrogen and other alternative energy technologies and their beneficial impacts on society. This project has enabled us to accomplish all of our goals, including greater faculty understanding of advanced energy concepts, who are now able to convey this knowledge to students through a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum, in a facility well-equipped with advanced technologies, which is also being used to better educate the public on the advantages to society of exploring alternative energy technologies.

  16. Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center--Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Theodore A. Kozman

    2007-10-17

    This is the Final Report for the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center for the period of 9/1/2002 through 11/30/2006, although we were still gathering data through 02/16/2007. During this period, our Industrial Assessment Center completed 109 energy assessments for manufacturing firms in our area, offered 3 Save Energy Workshops, taught 26 students (9 graduate and 17 undergraduate) energy management savings techniques and offered an Energy Management Graduate class three times. These 109 energy assessments made a total of 738 energy savings recommendations, 33 waste reduction recommendations, and 108 productivity improvement recommendations. These combined recommendations would save client companies more than $87,741,221.16, annually at the then current energy costs. If all of these recommendations were implemented separately, the implementation cost would have been $34,113,482.10 or a Simple Payback Period, SPP=4.7 months. Between 9 months and 12 months after the assessment, we surveyed the manufacturing firms to find out what they implemented. They had implemented approximately 50 percent of our recommendations at an annual saving of $25,867,613.18. The three Save Energy Workshops had an average attendance of twelve individuals. The three graduate Energy Management courses had an average attendance of eleven students.

  17. Peace Valley Nature Center: solar expansion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-08

    An addition to an existing building at the Peace Valley Nature Center to provide exhibit space, an assembly room and a greenhouse for use in nature demonstrations was constructed. The work consisted of the construction of insulated footings, drainage of footings, insulation and construction of rock heat storage area beneath the building floor, building of the superstructure and installation of glazing around greenhouse, installation of Clivus multrum composting toilet and a wood stove for auxiliary heating. This project will expand and retrofit the existing building to make it a demonstration for solar energy use, wood heating, alternative sewage disposal and food production through innovative and intensive gardening techniques. After construction is completed the area will be used for energy education programs.

  18. Career Directions in Technical Writing: Becoming a Medical Journalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Looks at medical writing as a career. Provides information about types of jobs available such as pharmaceutical manufacturing, textbooks, trader journals, indexing and abstracting, hospital publications, and online editing; salaries; job growth rate; and education needed. Offers job search tips. (JOW)

  19. Medical Automation System at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spraul, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    A computer system is reported for scheduling and coordinating physical examinations for groups of people who work with chemicals, lasers, X-rays, isotopic sources, toxic fuels, adhesives, and exotic metals. Complete medical data on the examined population are continuously updated for a broad medical master file. Statistical methods are employed to project progressive changes in the health status of these employees for possible clinical interventions.

  20. The Iowa Flood Center's River Stage Sensors—Technical Details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.; Ceynar, D.; Fahim Rezaei, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Center (IFC), along with support from the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) have developed a bridge-mounted river stage sensor. Each sensor consists of an ultrasonic distance measuring module, cellular modem, a GPS unit that provides accurate time and an embedded controller that orchestrates the sensors' operation. A sensor is powered by a battery and solar panel along with a solar charge controller. All the components are housed in/on a sturdy metal box that is then mounted on the side of a bridge. Additionally, each sensor incorporates a water-intrusion sensor and an internal temperature sensor. In operation, the microcontroller wakes, and turns on the electronics every 15 minutes and then measures the distance between the ultrasonic sensor and the water surface. Several measurements are averaged and transmitted along with system health information (battery voltage, state of water intrusion sensor, and internal temperature) via cellular modem to remote servers on the internet. The microcontroller then powers the electronics down and enters a sleep/power savings mode. The sensor's firmware allows the remote server to adjust the measurement rate to 5, 15, and 60 minutes. Further, sensors maintain a 24-day buffer of previous measurements. If a sensor could not successfully transmit its data because of cellular network connection problems, it will transmit the backlog on subsequent transmissions. We paid meticulous attention to all engineering aspects and sensors are very robust and have operated essentially continuously through two Iowa winters and summers, including the 2012 record-breaking warm summer.

  1. Technical challenges for the construction of a medical image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Francis J.; Ammer, Kurt; Wiecek, Boguslaw; Plassmann, Peter; Jones, Carl D.; Jung, Anna; Murawski, Piotr

    2005-10-01

    Infrared thermal imaging was first made available to medicine in the early 1960's. Despite a large number of research publications on the clinical application of the technique, the images have been largely qualitative. This is in part due to the imaging technology itself, and the problem of data exchange between different medical users, with different hardware. An Anglo Polish collaborative study was set up in 2001 to identify and resolve the sources of error and problems in medical thermal imaging. Standardisation of the patient preparation, imaging hardware, image capture and analysis has been studied and developed by the group. A network of specialist centres in Europe is planned to work to establish the first digital reference atlas of quantifiable images of the normal healthy human body. Further processing techniques can then be used to classify abnormalities found in disease states. The follow up of drug treatment has been successfully monitored in clinical trials with quantitative thermal imaging. The collection of normal reference images is in progress. This paper specifies the areas found to be the source of unwanted variables, and the protocols to overcome them.

  2. Scientific and Technical Translation and the All-Union Translation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchuk, Yuri Nikolaevich

    1984-01-01

    The investigation and use of machine translation as an adjunct to human translation at the Soviet Union's All-Union Translation Center, a centralized scientific and technical translation facility, is examined. The issues of error correction, the variety of translation types needed, and special lexical considerations are discussed. (MSE)

  3. Teaching Technology with Technology. An Off-the-Shelf Robotics Course Builds Technical Center Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannemann, Jim; Rice, Thomas R.

    1991-01-01

    At the Oakland Technical Center, which provides vocational programs for nine Michigan high schools, a one-semester course in Foundations of Technology Systems uses a computer-simulated manufacturing environment to teach applied math, science, language arts, communication skills, problem solving, and teamwork in the context of technology education.…

  4. 75 FR 11936 - Hewlett Packard; Technical Support Call Center; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard; Technical Support Call Center; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an...

  5. New York City Bilingual Technical Assistance Center 1984-1985. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    The New York City Bilingual Technical Center's first year of operation (academic year 1984-85) is evaluated in terms of the objectives addressed, activities implemented and problems encountered and solved. To promote the linguistic and academic program of limited English proficient (LEP) students, it adopted the specific objectives of revising and…

  6. Briefing Paper regarding the Establishment of a Regional Technical and Industrial Skills Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Roger Baden

    In spring 1997, Oregon's Regional Workforce Committee commissioned a study to investigate the feasibility of creating a technical and industrial skills training center in Region 12 of the state. Interviews were conducted with 40 individuals from area companies, social service agencies, and training organizations regarding the need for such a…

  7. 75 FR 77666 - General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Technical Center, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Technical Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek, Bartech Group, CDI Professional Services, EDS/HP Enterprise Services,...

  8. Development Trends in Federal Library and Information Center Automation. Guides for Administrative and Technical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Dynamics Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    These two guides for interviews on trends in library automation in federal libraries and information centers cover administrative and technical interviews. The guide for administrative interviews is divided into five steps: (1) determining the details of the agency's mission and organizational structure, (2) establishing the administrative…

  9. Smartphones in medicine: emerging practices in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Angela C; El Hajj, Stephanie C; Perret, J Nelson; Caffery, Terrell S; Jones, Glenn N; Musso, Mandi W

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mobile phone technology now provide a myriad of resources to physicians' fingertips. However, the medical profession continues to struggle with potential for misuse of these devices. There is a need for better understanding of physicians' uses of smartphones in order to establish guidelines for appropriate and professional behavior. The purpose of the current study was to survey physicians' and medical students' practices concerning smartphone use in the healthcare setting. Physicians and medical students were asked to complete anonymous surveys regarding uses of smartphones within the past month in various healthcare settings. Overall, the participants reported distinctly different patterns in the uses they made of their phones in different settings (P<.001), with most individuals engaging in most behaviors while on break but few using their smartphones while with patients or during procedures. It appears that physicians and medical students make decisions about using their smartphones according to some combination of three considerations: degree of relevance to patient care, the appropriateness of the behavior in front of patients, and the issue of how disruptive that behavior may be. PMID:25526706

  10. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  11. Medication Practices at Center Of Hospital and Nursing Home Proposals: Discharge and Pharmacy Requirements to Change.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Rules proposed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services would change discharge policies at hospitals and long-term care facilities and update conditions of participation with a focus on medication reconciliation and pharmacist responsibilities. PMID:27069341

  12. Dealing with the flood crisis of 1993. A medical center's account.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, D S

    1994-01-01

    On Saturday, 10 July 1993, Iowans were assaulted by the greatest natural disaster in the state's history when virtually all rain-swollen rivers and creeks in the Midwest spilled over their banks. In Des Moines, the Iowa Methodist Medical Center was suddenly surrounded by flood waters and stripped of power, water, computer, and telephone communication. Striving to deliver quality patient care in the face of the crisis, medical staff, administrators, and employees at the center achieved recovery in record time. PMID:10134872

  13. Changing Economics of Health Care Are Devastating Academic Medical Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Werf, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Once a financially healthy part of American universities, many academic health centers are struggling to survive. Many are merging with for-profit chains or declaring bankruptcy. The advance of managed care and insurance companies focusing on reducing costs appears to be affecting teaching hospitals more than community hospitals. (MSE)

  14. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland OR, Houston TX, and Galveston TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulant of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  15. Trend of knowledge production of research centers in the field of medical sciences in iran.

    PubMed

    Falahat, K; Eftekhari, Mb; Habibi, E; Djalalinia, Sh; Peykari, N; Owlia, P; Malekafzali, H; Ghanei, M; Mojarrab, Sh

    2013-01-01

    Establishment of medical research centers at universities and health-related organizations and annually evaluation of their research activities was one of the strategic policies which followed by governmental organization in last decade in order to strengthening the connections between health research system and health system. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the role of medical research centers in medical science production in Iran. This study is a cross sectional which has been performed based on existing reports on national scientometrics and evaluation results of research performance of medical research centers between years 2001 to 2010. During last decade number of medical research centers increased from 53 in 2001 to 359 in 2010. Simultaneous scientific output of medical research centers has been increased especially articles indexed in ISI (web of science). Proper policy implementation in the field of health research system during last decades led to improving capacity building and growth knowledge production of medical science in recent years in Iran. The process embedding research into the health systems requires planning up until research products improves health outcomes and health equity in country. PMID:23865017

  16. A Podiatric Medical Residency Program in an Academic Health Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogy, Louis T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The podiatric medical residency program in the Health Science Center at San Antonio provides an intensive exposure for the newly graduated podiatrist to practice in a multidisciplinary environment. Residents become more familiar with general medical and surgical diseases and disorders as well as podiatric pathology. (LBH)

  17. Medication Adherence among Adolescents in a School-Based Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Cynthia J.; Charlebois, Nicole M.; Holl, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    School-based health centers are an integral part of the health care delivery system for low-income children. Medication adherence for these patients may be challenging because the student is often responsible for bringing home the prescription and receiving the instructions. This study assesses medication fill, initiation, and adherence rates…

  18. PROJECT HEAD START MEDICAL--A GUIDE FOR DIRECTION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    HEALTH SERVICES OF PROJECT HEAD START CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS PROVIDE--A MEDICAL EVALUATION OF EACH CHILD INCLUDING MEDICAL HISTORY, DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION, SCREENING TESTS FOR VISION, HEARING, SPEECH, AND TUBERCULOSIS, LABORATORY TESTS OF URINE FOR ALBUMIN AND TESTS OF SUGAR AND BLOOD FOR ANEMIA, DENTAL ASSESSMENT,…

  19. The University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's Health Information Services Outreach Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Susan B.; And Others

    Begun in 1980, the University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's statewide Outreach Program is a composite of many services and projects designed to meet the medical and health information needs of the state's diverse and scattered population. The only major biomedical library in New Mexico, the Library has built the program on existing…

  20. Developing a frenotomy policy at one medical center: a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Masaitis, N S; Kaempf, J W

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this study was to change procedures in our medical center regarding frenotomy for ankyloglossia (tongue-tie). The medical and breastfeeding outcomes of 36 fullterm infants who received frenotomies were studied. The information was used to develop frenotomy eligibility standards that would guide other physicians and insure timely treatment to avoid breastfeeding cessation. PMID:9025430

  1. The Medical Library and Media Center of Keio University in Tokyo: report on a visit.

    PubMed Central

    Accart, J P

    1995-01-01

    The Medical Library and Media Center at Keio University in Tokyo offers many facilities to its users: access to medical information within a large catalog of monographs and journals, online searching and CD-ROM databases, and a dynamic interlibrary loan service. This article is a report of a professional visit to the library on September 30, 1993. PMID:7703947

  2. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  3. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  4. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  5. Human-centered risk management for medical devices - new methods and tools.

    PubMed

    Janß, Armin; Plogmann, Simon; Radermacher, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Studies regarding adverse events with technical devices in the medical context showed, that in most of the cases non-usable interfaces are the cause for use deficiencies and therefore a potential harm for the patient and third parties. This is partially due to the lack of suitable methods for interlinking usability engineering and human-centered risk management. Especially regarding the early identification of human-induced errors and the systematic control of these failures, medical device manufacturers and in particular the developers have to be supported in order to guarantee reliable design and error-tolerant human-machine interfaces (HMI). In this context, we developed the HiFEM methodology and a corresponding software tool (mAIXuse) for model-based human risk analysis. Based on a two-fold approach, HiFEM provides a task-type-sensitive modeling structure with integrated temporal relations in order to represent and analyze the use process in a detailed way. The approach can be used from early developmental stages up to the validation process. Results of a comparative study with the HiFEM method and a classical process-failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) depict, that the new modeling and analysis technique clearly outperforms the FMEA. Besides, we implemented a new method for systematic human risk control (mAIXcontrol). Accessing information from the method's knowledge base enables the operator to detect the most suitable countermeasures for a respective risk. Forty-one approved generic countermeasure principles have been indexed as a resulting combination of root causes and failures in a matrix. The methodology has been tested in comparison to a conventional approach as well. Evaluation of the matrix and the reassessment of the risk priority numbers by a blind expert demonstrate a substantial benefit of the new mAIXcontrol method. PMID:26985681

  6. City of Faith Medical and Research Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The gold towers of the City of Faith command the viewer's attention as they soar into the Tulsa sky. Built by Evangelist Oral Roberts, the City of Faith combines a 60-story clinic and diagnostic center, a 30-story full-service hospital and a 20-story research center on one 80-acre site adjacent to the Oral Roberts University campus. Due in part to their futuristic architectural features, the campus and the City of Faith are one of the top tourist attractions in Oklahoma. Construction began in early 1978. The clinic, first opened in June 1981 with nine physicians, is now staffed with more than 80, all with faculty appointments to the Oral Roberts School of Medicine. The hospital accepted its first patient in November, 1981 and is currently certified for 294 beds (final plans call for a total of 777). The research center began operations last June and focuses on cancer, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes and geriatrics. Built entirely through contributions from followers of the Oral Roberts Ministries, the debt-free City of Faith is expected to cost more than $500 million when completed in 1988. PMID:10267423

  7. 78 FR 38445 - Hyundai-Kia America Technical Center, Inc., Grant of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Hyundai-Kia America Technical Center, Inc., Grant of... Register (77 FR 33807). No comments were received. To view the petition and all supporting documents log... Administration, DOT. ACTION: Grant of Petition. SUMMARY: Hyundai America Technical Center, Inc. on behalf...

  8. 75 FR 41522 - Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center, Including On-Site... workers of Hewlett Packard, Technical Support Call Center, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Volt, and Adecco, Boise, Idaho. The notice was published in the Federal Register March 12, 2010 (75...

  9. Origins, Chronology, and Current Status of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education: 1963-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.; Stone, James R., III

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) had a unique status among federally funded research and development center in education. Its funding was authorized by the federal legislation for career and technical and administered by the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, not the Institute for Education Sciences.…

  10. [The Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senior at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time s o h a r e applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community. In the 7000 Directorate I work directly in the 7611 organization. This organization is known as the Aviation Environments Technical Branch. My mentor is Vincent Satterwhite who is also the Branch Chief of the Aviation Environments Technical Branch. In this branch, I serve as the Assistant program manager of the Engineering Technology Program. The Engineering Technology Program (ETP) is one of three components of the High School L.E.R.C.I.P. This is an Agency-sponsored, eight-week research-based apprenticeship program designed to attract traditionally underrepresented high school students that demonstrate an aptitude for and interest in mathematics, science, engineering, and technology.

  11. Dealing with the stress of an HIV-positive diagnosis at an Army medical center.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, J M; Bain, M W; Boggiano, W; Cline, W R; Grace, W C; Holloway, H C; Rock, N L

    1990-03-01

    Following mandatory military-wide testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Army medical facilities have gained extensive experience with HIV-positive persons who undergo special stresses as a result of their affiliation with the military. The consequences of evacuation to medical centers for evaluation of HIV status are presented and the impact of this process on the medical center staff are considered. This paper is a description of one system designed to evaluate, treat, and support HIV-positive soldiers and their families. PMID:2107473

  12. Implementing a medication safety and poison prevention program at a senior center.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Jennifer A

    2013-10-01

    The Institute for Safe Medication Practices encourages pharmacists to assist in preventing medication misuse. The purpose of this article is to discuss a medication-safety education session conducted by a pharmacy professor, the faculty advisor to the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists university student chapter and students in a pharmacovigilance rotation, which was conducted at a local senior center. The author attended a train-the-trainer Webinar and then educated the pharmacy students. Participants at the senior center were taught about poison prevention, drug interactions, and appropriate drug disposal through an interactive format. We plan to continue the medication safety program at the senior center as a longitudinal project to promote patient safety. Pharmacists should be encouraged to play an active role in community outreach programs. PMID:24129222

  13. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities. PMID:23108741

  14. Predictors of early faculty attrition at one Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Faculty turnover threatens the research, teaching and clinical missions of medical schools. We measured early attrition among newly-hired medical school faculty and identified personal and institutional factors associated with early attrition. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified faculty hired during the 2005–2006 academic year at one school. Three-year attrition rates were measured. A 40-question electronic survey measured demographics, career satisfaction, faculty responsibilities, institutional/departmental support, and reasons for resignation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) identified variables associated with early attrition. Results Of 139 faculty, 34% (95% CI = 26-42%) resigned within three years of hire. Attrition was associated with: perceived failure of the Department Chair to foster a climate of teaching, research, and service (OR = 6.03; 95% CI: 1.84, 19.69), inclusiveness, respect, and open communication (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.04, 9.98). Lack of professional development of the faculty member (OR = 3.84; 95% CI: 1.25, 11.81); institutional recognition and support for excellence in teaching (OR = 2.96; 95% CI: 0.78, 11.19) and clinical care (OR = 3.87; 95% CI: 1.04, 14.41); and >50% of professional time devoted to patient care (OR = 3.93; 95% CI: 1.29, 11.93) predicted attrition. Gender, race, ethnicity, academic degree, department type and tenure status did not predict early attrition. Of still-active faculty, an additional 27 (48.2%, 95% CI: 35.8, 61.0) reported considering resignation within the 5 years. Conclusions In this pilot study, one-third of new faculty resigned within 3 years of hire. Greater awareness of predictors of early attrition may help schools identify threats to faculty career satisfaction and retention. PMID:24512629

  15. Conflict of interest issues pertinent to Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jennifer; Simiele, Ernest; Lawson, D Curtis; Tyler, Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Conflicts of interest exist when an arrangement potentially exerts inappropriate influence on decision making or professional judgment, or is perceived to do so, and can thus damage the public trust and undermine the integrity of those decisions. Concerns regarding financial conflicts of interest in the medical arena have reached their height as of late, given that physicians now function in a milieu of complex and delicate relationships with pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. Even when such relationships do not correlate with actual compromise of judgment or patient care, it threatens the credibility of both the health care professional and the institution because of the social perception of the effect of these relationships. Although most institutions in the Western world set forth a code of ethics and conflict-of-interest policies to be followed under threat of termination, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) presents itself as a unique environment in which conflicts of interest are subject to governmental laws, violation of which may not only result in employment-related discipline, but may be sanctioned by civil and criminal penalties. Moreover, these provisions are developed by a national authoritative organization rather than being institution-specific guidelines. Given that many academic physicians working within the VHA may also have a component of their practice in a University setting, it becomes important to understand the differences in policy between these contexts so as not to threaten the public trust in the veracity of decisions made and, therefore, maintain the integrity of the relationship between physician and patient. This article will review aspects of conflict-of-interest policies in the realm of research, financial relationships, foreign travel, and vendor contracting that are particular to the VHA and make it a unique environment to function in as a physician and scientist. PMID:21872117

  16. PASTE: patient-centered SMS text tagging in a medication management system

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B; Denny, Joshua C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance of a system that extracts medication information and administration-related actions from patient short message service (SMS) messages. Design Mobile technologies provide a platform for electronic patient-centered medication management. MyMediHealth (MMH) is a medication management system that includes a medication scheduler, a medication administration record, and a reminder engine that sends text messages to cell phones. The object of this work was to extend MMH to allow two-way interaction using mobile phone-based SMS technology. Unprompted text-message communication with patients using natural language could engage patients in their healthcare, but presents unique natural language processing challenges. The authors developed a new functional component of MMH, the Patient-centered Automated SMS Tagging Engine (PASTE). The PASTE web service uses natural language processing methods, custom lexicons, and existing knowledge sources to extract and tag medication information from patient text messages. Measurements A pilot evaluation of PASTE was completed using 130 medication messages anonymously submitted by 16 volunteers via a website. System output was compared with manually tagged messages. Results Verified medication names, medication terms, and action terms reached high F-measures of 91.3%, 94.7%, and 90.4%, respectively. The overall medication name F-measure was 79.8%, and the medication action term F-measure was 90%. Conclusion Other studies have demonstrated systems that successfully extract medication information from clinical documents using semantic tagging, regular expression-based approaches, or a combination of both approaches. This evaluation demonstrates the feasibility of extracting medication information from patient-generated medication messages. PMID:21984605

  17. Scientific and Technical Publishing at Goddard Space Flight Center in Fiscal Year 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of scientific and technical material that was researched, written, prepared, and disseminated by the Center's scientists and engineers during FY94. It is presented in numerical order of the GSFC author's sponsoring technical directorate; i.e., Code 300 is the Office of Flight Assurance, Code 400 is the Flight Projects Directorate, Code 500 is the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate, Code 600 is the Space Sciences Directorate, Code 700 is the Engineering Directorate, Code 800 is the Suborbital Projects and Operations Directorate, and Code 900 is the Earth Sciences Directorate. The publication database contains publication or presentation title, author(s), document type, sponsor, and organizational code. This is the second annual compilation for the Center.

  18. The Oak Ridge Technical Information Center: A trailblazer in federal documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This document attempts to record the history of US AEC`s Technical Information Center, from its conception (1947) to 1977. This organization centralizes and manages the issues related to control and dissemination of technical information, to fulfill the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946. TIC tried to search out and install efficient and economical systems for servicing the various technical information programs. It coordinated a direct organization-to-organization information exchange program, and it also participated in official bilateral exchange programs and in developing information systems for IAEA and Euratom. The work, planning, and strategies employed to achieve goals are chronicled in this document, with 18 chapters arranged into four sections according to different presidential administrations.

  19. The Oak Ridge Technical Information Center: A trailblazer in federal documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This softbound book attempts to record the history of US AEC's Technical Information Center, from its conception (1947) to 1977. This organization centralizes and manages the issues related to control and dissemination of technical information, to fulfill the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946. TIC tried to search out and install efficient and economical systems for servicing the various technical information programs. It coordinated a direct organization-to-organization information exchange program, and it also participated in official bilateral exchange programs and in developing information systems for IAEA and Euratom. The work, planning, and strategies employed to achieve goals are chronicled in this book, whose 18 chapters are arranged into four sections according to different presidential administrations.

  20. 77 FR 4820 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC) Program... within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program,...

  1. Publication and reporting of clinical trial results: cross sectional analysis across academic medical centers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruijun; Desai, Nihar R; Ross, Joseph S; Zhang, Weiwei; Chau, Katherine H; Wayda, Brian; Murugiah, Karthik; Lu, Daniel Y; Mittal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine rates of publication and reporting of results within two years for all completed clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov across leading academic medical centers in the United States. Design Cross sectional analysis. Setting Academic medical centers in the United States. Participants Academic medical centers with 40 or more completed interventional trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. Methods Using the Aggregate Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov database and manual review, we identified all interventional clinical trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov with a primary completion date between October 2007 and September 2010 and with a lead investigator affiliated with an academic medical center. Main outcome measures The proportion of trials that disseminated results, defined as publication or reporting of results on ClinicalTrials.gov, overall and within 24 months of study completion. Results We identified 4347 interventional clinical trials across 51 academic medical centers. Among the trials, 1005 (23%) enrolled more than 100 patients, 1216 (28%) were double blind, and 2169 (50%) were phase II through IV. Overall, academic medical centers disseminated results for 2892 (66%) trials, with 1560 (35.9%) achieving this within 24 months of study completion. The proportion of clinical trials with results disseminated within 24 months of study completion ranged from 16.2% (6/37) to 55.3% (57/103) across academic medical centers. The proportion of clinical trials published within 24 months of study completion ranged from 10.8% (4/37) to 40.3% (31/77) across academic medical centers, whereas results reporting on ClinicalTrials.gov ranged from 1.6% (2/122) to 40.7% (72/177). Conclusions Despite the ethical mandate and expressed values and mission of academic institutions, there is poor performance and noticeable variation in the dissemination of clinical trial results across leading academic medical centers. PMID:26888209

  2. Underserved patients' perspectives on patient-centered primary care: does the patient-centered medical home model meet their needs?

    PubMed

    Mead, Holly; Andres, Ellie; Regenstein, Marsha

    2014-02-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has gained significant interest as a delivery system model that can improve health care quality while reducing costs. This study uses focus groups to investigate underserved, chronically ill patients' preferences for care and develops a patient-centered framework of priorities. Seven major priorities were identified: (a) communication and partnership, (b) affordable care, (c) coordinated care, (d) personal responsibility, (e) accessible care, (f) education and support resources, and (g) the essential role of nonphysician providers in supporting their care. Using the framework, we analyzed the PCMH joint principals as developed by U.S. medical societies to identify where the PCMH model could be improved to better meet the needs of these patients. Four of the seven patient priorities were identified as not present in or supported by current PCMH joint principles. The study discusses how the PCMH model can better address the needs of low-income, disadvantaged patients. PMID:24288366

  3. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde in a medical center autopsy service

    SciTech Connect

    Coldiron, V.R.; Ward, J.B. Jr.; Trieff, N.M.; Janssen, H.E. Jr.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-07-01

    The formaldehyde exposures occurring in the autopsy service of a medical complex were evaluated as part of a study to detect genetically harmful effects of chemical exposures. Determination of time-weighted average (TWA) exposures and characterization of the patterns of exposure experienced by individuals with different work responsibilities in this occupational setting were sought. Both general area and breathing zone samples were evaluated. Estimated weekly time-weighted average exposures for pathologists, residents and technicians were determined to be between 0.61 and 1.32 parts per million with little difference between work roles. While the averages were similar, the patterns of exposure of technicians and physicians were different. Technicians were exposed to a baseline level of formaldehyde for a prolonged period of time. In contrast, physicians were exposed for shorter times but experienced higher levels during specific tasks, particularly tissue-sectioning and examination. Evaluations of work procedures and environmental conditions in autopsy services are recommended to reduce personnel exposure to formaldehyde vapor.

  4. Black Services in Community Mental Health Centers: A Need for Technical Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Carter, James H.; Green, Pamela D.

    1981-01-01

    The experiences of two black mental health professionals, who were invited to provide technical assistance to improve services to blacks in three community mental health centers in South Carolina, are described. This was a new and unprecedented attempt to elucidate and correct the problems of inadequate mental health services for blacks, while improving compliance with affirmative action. Camouflaged in elite professionalism were subtle hostile feelings and negative beliefs about blacks. PMID:7230264

  5. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  6. The 1990 Johnson Space Center bibliography of scientific and technical papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of scientific and technical papers written and/or presented by L. B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) authors, including civil servants, contractors, and grantees, during the calendar year of 1990. Citations include conference and symposium presentations, papers published in proceedings or other collective works, seminars, and workshop results, NASA formal report series (including contractually required final reports), and articles published in professional journals.

  7. What do clinicians want? Interest in integrative health services at a North Carolina academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kathi J; Dirkse, Deborah; Eadie, Dee; Pennington, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Background Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. Methods We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in 2006. The survey contained questions on referrals and recommendations in the past year and interest in therapies or services if they were to be provided at the medical center in the future. Results Responses were received from 173 clinicians in 26 different departments, programs and centers. There was strong interest in offering several specific therapies: therapeutic exercise (77%), expert consultation about herbs and dietary supplements (69%), and massage (66%); there was even stronger interest in offering comprehensive treatment programs such as multidisciplinary pain management (84%), comprehensive nutritional assessment and advice (84%), obesity/healthy lifestyle promotion (80%), fit for life (exercise and lifestyle program, 76%), diabetes healthy lifestyle promotion (73%); and comprehensive psychological services for stress management, including hypnosis and biofeedback (73%). Conclusion There is strong interest among medical staff at an academic health center in comprehensive, integrated services for pain, obesity, and diabetes and in specific services in fitness, nutrition and stress management. Future studies will need to assess the cost-effectiveness of such services, as well as their financial sustainability and impact on patient satisfaction, health and quality of life. PMID:17291340

  8. Outsourcing your medical practice call center: how to choose a vendor to ensure regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Medical practices receive hundreds if not thousands of calls every week from patients, payers, pharmacies, and others. Outsourcing call centers can be a smart move to improve efficiency, lower costs, improve customer care, ensure proper payer management, and ensure regulatory compliance. This article discusses how to know when it's time to move to an outsourced call center, the benefits of making the move, how to choose the right call center, and how to make the transition. It also provides tips on how to manage the call center to ensure the objectives are being met. PMID:25807604

  9. Cancers in Eastern Libya: First results from Benghazi Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Bodalal, Zuhir; Azzuz, Raouf; Bendardaf, Riyad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the pattern of cancer incidence and determine the incidence rates in Eastern Libya (for the first time in a decade). METHODS: A hospital-based registry of cancer patients was formed using records from the primary oncology center in eastern Libya - focusing on those diagnosed in the year 2012. RESULTS: The most common malignancies in men were cancers of the colon (22.3%, n = 90), lung (20.3%, n = 82), prostate (16.1%, n = 65), pancreas (4.2%, n = 17) and liver (4.2%, n = 17). For women, they were found to be cancers of the breast (41.5%, n = 213), colon (16.4%, n = 84), uterus (8%, n = 41), ovary (5.5%, n = 28) and pancreas (3.1%, n = 16). Additionally age-standardized rates (ASR) were determined for Libya. The different cities and towns in eastern Libya were compared for any variation. The city of Beida in particular was found to have a remarkably high incidence of gastric cancer. The different findings were discussed and comparisons were made with past literature as well as the incidence rates for neighbouring countries. The incidence rates given for the eastern region showed differences from previously reported values (i.e., the rate of colon cancer was the highest in North Africa whereas other malignancies occurred less frequently). Potential explanations for the urban-rural difference as well as the difference in incidence rates were put forth. The significance of this study is that it establishes a baseline of cancer incidence which should be the backbone for any future national cancer plan in Libya. CONCLUSION: Proper surveillance programs need to be in place and healthcare policy should be adjusted to take into account the more prevalent and pressing cancers in society. PMID:24876750

  10. Psychologists in medical schools and academic medical centers: over 100 years of growth, influence, and partnership.

    PubMed

    Robiner, William N; Dixon, Kim E; Miner, Jacob L; Hong, Barry A

    2014-04-01

    Psychologists have served on the faculties of medical schools for over 100 years. Psychologists serve in a number of different roles and make substantive contributions to medical schools' tripartite mission of research, education, and clinical service. This article provides an overview of the history of psychologists' involvement in medical schools, including their growing presence in and integration with diverse departments over time. We also report findings from a survey of medical school psychologists that explored their efforts in nonclinical areas (i.e., research, education, administration) as well as clinical endeavors (i.e., assessment, psychotherapy, consultation). As understanding of the linkage between behavioral and psychological factors and health status and treatment outcomes increases, the roles of psychologists in health care are likely to expand beyond mental health. An increasing focus on accountability-related to treatment outcomes and interprofessional research, education, and models of care delivery-will likely provide additional opportunities for psychologists within health care and professional education. The well-established alignment of psychologists' expertise and skills with the mission and complex organizational needs of medical schools augurs a partnership on course to grow stronger. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24588315

  11. Improving Medication Knowledge among Older Adults with Heart Failure: A Patient-Centered Approach to Instruction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel G.; Weiner, Michael; Young, James; Steinley, Douglas; Deer, Melissa; Murray, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether patient-centered instructions for chronic heart failure medications increase comprehension and memory for medication information in older adults diagnosed with chronic heart failure. Design and Methods: Patient-centered instructions for familiar and unfamiliar medications were compared with instructions for the…

  12. A Human-Centered Approach to Medical Informatics for Medical Students, Residents, and Practicing Clinicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahlhut, Richard W.; Gosbee, John W.; Gardner-Bonneau, Daryle J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes development of a curriculum in medical information science that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine rather than details of information technology. Design was guided by identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by examination of past failures of informatics…

  13. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate. PMID:26789861

  14. Center for Electronics and Electrical Engineering technical progress bulletin covering center programs, July to September 1989, with 1990 CEEE events calender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, E. Jane

    1990-02-01

    s are presented for all Center papers released for publication by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the quarter and citations and abstracts for Center papers published in the quarter. Technical topics addressed include: semiconductor technology; fast signal acquisition, processing, and transmission; electrical systems; and radiated electromagnetic interference.

  15. Access to patient-centered medical home among Ohio's Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Elizabeth J; Seidu, Dazar; Ryan, Norma J; Chapman, Dj Sam

    2013-06-01

    Medical homes deliver primary care that is accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family centered, coordinated, compassionate and culturally effective. Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) require a wide range of support to maintain health, making medical home access particularly important. We sought to understand independent risk factors for lacking access. We analyzed Ohio, USA data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (2005-2006). Among CSHCN, 55.6% had medical home access. The proportion achieving each medical home component was highest for having a personal doctor/nurse and lowest for receiving coordinated care, family-centered care and referrals. Specific subsets of CSHCN were significantly and independently more likely to lack medical home access: Hispanic (AOR=3.08), moderate/high severity of difficulty (AOR=2.84), and any public insurance (AOR=1.60). Efforts to advance medical home access must give special attention to these CSHCN populations and improvements must be made to referral access, family-centered care, and care coordination. PMID:23242811

  16. Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Simon; Endacott, Ruth; Cant, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Aim To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care. Background Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures. Methods Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance. Results A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills. Conclusion A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care. PMID:27147832

  17. [Medical fault or professional negligence? Case studies in two recovery nutrition centers in Niger].

    PubMed

    Halidou Doudou, M; Manzo, M L; Guero, D

    2014-12-01

    In developing countries such as Niger, the risk of medical malpractice is ubiquitous in health, jeopardizing patient safety. The aim of this work was to contribute to patients' safety and respect of code of ethics and conduct in the exercise of the medical profession. The reported cases involved two children under 5 years who were admitted to nutrition rehabilitation centers, died as a result of medical malpractice. In Niger, there are no statistics on this phenomenon and a few cases found have always been considered "accident" or "fate." The establishment of an observatory collections of such information should improve their frequency, consequences and propose a prevention plan. PMID:25449444

  18. [Urgency and acuity judgment systems before medical care (emergency telephone consultation center #7119, JTAS etc.)].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hideki; Yoshida, Masashi; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Currently growing the demand of the emergency medical care in Japan, sharing the concept about medical urgency is needed in the whole society in order to maintain the emergency medical systems as social resources. The present conditions and challenges are outlined: Emergency Telephone Consultation Center in Tokyo Fire Department (established in June 2007) and on-site triage as representatives of "pre-hospital urgency determination systems", and JTAS (Japan Triage and Acuity System, introduced in April 2012) as a representative of "in-hospital, pre-examination urgency determination systems". PMID:26915257

  19. Evolution and Integration of Medical Laboratory Information System in an Asia National Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Sao-Jie; Lai, Jin-Shin

    This work elucidates the evolution of three generations of the laboratory information system in the National Taiwan University Hospital, which were respectively implemented in an IBM Series/1 mini-computer, a client/server and a plug-and-play HL7 interface engine environment respectively. The experience of using the HL7 healthcare information exchange in the hospital information system, laboratory information system, and automatic medical instruments over the past two decades are illustrated and discussed. The latest design challenge in developing intelligent laboratory information services is to organize effectively distributed and heterogeneous medical instruments through the message gateways. Such experiences had spread to some governmental information systems for different purposes in Taiwan; besides, the healthcare information exchange standard, software reuse mechanism, and application service provider adopted in developing the plug-and-play laboratory information system are also illustrated.

  20. Involvement of Pharmacists in Medical Care in Emergency and Critical Care Centers.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toru; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Emergency and critical care centers provide multidisciplinary therapy for critically ill patients by centralizing the expertise and technology of many medical professionals. Because the patients' conditions vary, different drug treatments are administered along with surgery. Therefore, the role of pharmacists is important. Critically ill patients who receive high-level invasive treatment undergo physiological changes differing from their normal condition along with variable therapeutic effects and pharmacokinetics. Pharmacists are responsible for recommending the appropriate drug therapy using their knowledge of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Further, pharmacists need to determine the general condition of patients by understanding vital signs, blood gas analysis results, etc. It is therefore necessary to conduct consultations with physicians and nurses. The knowledge required for emergency medical treatment is not provided during systematic training in pharmaceutical education, meaning that pharmacists acquire it in the clinical setting through trial and error. To disseminate the knowledge of emergency medical care to pharmacy students, emergency care training has been started in a few facilities. I believe that medical facilities and universities need to conduct joint educational sessions on emergency medical care. Moreover, compared with other medical fields, there are fewer studies on emergency medical care. Research-oriented pharmacists must resolve this issue. This review introduces the work conducted by pharmacists for clinical student education and clinical research at the Emergency and Critical Care Center of Nihon University Itabashi Hospital and discusses future prospects. PMID:27374959

  1. MedReach: building an Area Health Education Center medical information outreach system for northwest Ohio.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Victoria; Hartmann, Jonathan; Ronau, Theodore

    2002-07-01

    In collaboration with regional partners in northwest Ohio, the Area Health Education Center (AHEC) program at the Medical College of Ohio (MCO) at Toledo is reaching out to underserved areas, helping to provide educational opportunities to health care professionals in these communities. This paper describes the development of MedReach, a medical information outreach system that connects regional AHEC sites to MCO via the Internet. MedReach provides physicians and other health care professionals access and support to search computerized textbooks and databases for current information on medical diagnoses, treatments, and research. A unique aspect of the MedReach project is that users are able to receive personal help with information retrieval by calling or emailing MCO's outreach librarian. Periodically, the AHEC program and the Mulford Library at MCO also sponsor an educational program, titled "Medical Applications of Computers," for regional practitioners. Current feedback on both the medical information outreach system and the educational program has been positive. PMID:12113517

  2. The medical information needs of internists and pediatricians at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Woolf, S H; Benson, D A

    1989-10-01

    Medical information needs were examined in a survey of sixty-seven physicians selected from the faculty and housestaff at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A standardized questionnaire was administered personally by a medical informatics physician to collect data on information needs, attitudes, and previous experience with computers. The types of information most frequently required by both faculty and housestaff were treatment recommendations and differential diagnosis. The sources of reference information most commonly used were textbooks and colleagues. The information needs of housestaff differed significantly in several categories from those of faculty physicians. Housestaff more frequently needed information for patient care (P less than 0.05), and preferred the use of textbooks (P less than 0.01) and handbooks (P less than 0.001) as information sources. Faculty more frequently needed information for activities unrelated to patient care (P less than 0.01) and placed greater importance on basic science information (P less than 0.01). When asked to suggest references for online access, the respondents named 143 journals and textbooks, with journals overwhelmingly preferred over textbooks. Only one reference, the New England Journal of Medicine, was requested by a majority of the respondents. The importance of a broad understanding of physician information needs through improved data-collection techniques is discussed as a means of increasing the use of medical information systems. PMID:2790344

  3. Undergoing Transformation to the Patient Centered Medical Home in Safety Net Health Centers: Perspectives from the Front Lines

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Michael T.; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Nocon, Robert S.; Lewis, Sarah E.; Vable, Anusha M.; Tang, Hui; Park, Seo-Young; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Huang, Elbert S.; Birnberg, Jonathan; Burnet, Deborah L.; Summerfelt, W. Thomas; Chin, Marshall H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Safety Net Health Centers (SNHCs), which include Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) provide primary care for underserved, minority and low income patients. SNHCs across the country are in the process of adopting the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, based on promising early implementation data from demonstration projects. However, previous demonstration projects have not focused on the safety net and we know little about PCMH transformation in SNHCs. Design This qualitative study characterizes early PCMH adoption experiences at SNHCs. Setting and Participants We interviewed 98 staff,(administrators, providers, and clinical staff) at 20 of 65 SNHCs, from five states, who were participating in the first of a five-year PCMH collaborative, the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Main Measures We conducted 30-45 minute, semi-structured telephone interviews. Interview questions addressed benefits anticipated, obstacles encountered, and lessons learned in transition to PCMH. Results Anticipated benefits for participating in the PCMH included improved staff satisfaction and patient care and outcomes. Obstacles included staff resistance and lack of financial support for PCMH functions. Lessons learned included involving a range of staff, anticipating resistance, and using data as frequent feedback. Conclusions SNHCs encounter unique challenges to PCMH implementation, including staff turnover and providing care for patients with complex needs. Staff resistance and turnover may be ameliorated through improved healthcare delivery strategies associated with the PCMH. Creating predictable and continuous funding streams may be more fundamental challenges to PCMH transformation. PMID:23914423

  4. [Current aspects of war surgery. From the trauma center to precarious medical care].

    PubMed

    Houdelette, P

    1997-01-01

    War, said Carl von Clausewitz, is a cameleon. In this century, each armed conflict has proved to be unique, particularly in its medical aspects, with its own features and teaching its won lessons. As recent events show, no conflict is a fact of the past. Medical care delivered to war casualties depend on the circumstances of the war, on the medical resources available, but also on the price that cultures or circumstances place on it. Everything separates these two paradigms; on the one hand the "precious" casualty of western armies whose medical support is organized in a concept (forward medical and surgical care, ultra-rapid medical evacuation) tailored to each case, and as close as possible to the medical care of a civilian trauma patient whose models remains the North-American ballistic wound managed in trauma centers; on the other hand, civilian victims, in large numbers, in poor and disorganized countries, often abandoned to their own fate or sorted by "epidemiological" triage, which guarantees a distribution, as efficient as possible, of limited medical care. In war, advanced medical care and precarious medicine may work side by side according to two logics which do not exclude one another and constantly improve. PMID:9297902

  5. Three-Year Experience of an Academic Medical Center Ombuds Office

    PubMed Central

    Layde, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    An ombuds is an individual who informally helps people or groups (visitors) resolve disputes and/or interpersonal conflicts as an alternative to formal dispute resolution mechanisms within an organization. Ombuds are nearly ubiquitous in many governmental, business, and educational settings but only recently have gained visibility at medical schools. Medical schools in the United States are increasingly establishing ombuds offices as part of comprehensive conflict management systems to address concerns of faculty, staff, students, and others. As of 2015, more than 35 medical schools in the United States have active ombuds Web pages. Despite the growing number of medical schools with ombuds offices, the literature on medical school ombuds offices is scant. In this article, the authors review the first three years of experience of the ombuds office at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a freestanding medical and graduate school with a large physician practice. The article is written from the perspective of the inaugural ombuds and the president who initiated the office. The authors discuss the rationale for, costs of, potential advantages of, and initial reactions of faculty, staff, and administration to having an ombuds office in an academic medical center. Important questions relevant to medical schools that are considering an ombuds office are discussed. The authors conclude that an ombuds office can be a useful complement to traditional approaches for conflict management, regulatory compliance, and identification of systemic issues. PMID:26675192

  6. Three-Year Experience of an Academic Medical Center Ombuds Office.

    PubMed

    Raymond, John R; Layde, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    An ombuds is an individual who informally helps people or groups (visitors) resolve disputes and/or interpersonal conflicts as an alternative to formal dispute resolution mechanisms within an organization. Ombuds are nearly ubiquitous in many governmental, business, and educational settings but only recently have gained visibility at medical schools. Medical schools in the United States are increasingly establishing ombuds offices as part of comprehensive conflict management systems to address concerns of faculty, staff, students, and others. As of 2015, more than 35 medical schools in the United States have active ombuds Web pages. Despite the growing number of medical schools with ombuds offices, the literature on medical school ombuds offices is scant. In this article, the authors review the first three years of experience of the ombuds office at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a freestanding medical and graduate school with a large physician practice. The article is written from the perspective of the inaugural ombuds and the president who initiated the office. The authors discuss the rationale for, costs of, potential advantages of, and initial reactions of faculty, staff, and administration to having an ombuds office in an academic medical center. Important questions relevant to medical schools that are considering an ombuds office are discussed. The authors conclude that an ombuds office can be a useful complement to traditional approaches for conflict management, regulatory compliance, and identification of systemic issues. PMID:26675192

  7. Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

  8. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... appropriately trained provider within 4 weeks or sooner, if required, and within 1-hour travel time from the beneficiary's residence. The geographic area that represents 1-hour travel time surrounding an MTF is referred... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care...

  9. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  10. Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

  11. Impact on Seniors of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Evidence from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Paul A.; Johnson, Eric A.; Coleman, Kathryn; Larson, Eric B.; Hsu, Clarissa; Ross, Tyler R.; Liss, David; Tufano, James; Reid, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact on health care cost and quality among seniors of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) pilot at Group Health Cooperative, an integrated health care system in Washington State. Design and Methods: A prospective before-and-after evaluation of the experience of seniors receiving primary care services at 1 pilot clinic…

  12. Family-Centered Health Care for Medically Fragile Children: Principles and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelkin, Valerie

    The booklet explains ten principles of family-centered health care and six components of community based programs for children with significant medical problems. The principles are: The child and the family have basic rights of self-determination and autonomy. Health care services should be family oriented and maximize family control. Service…

  13. Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

  14. Using a facilitation model to achieve patient-centered medical home recognition.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sandi J; Watkins, R W Chip

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how a facilitation model that included a partnership between a Community Care of North Carolina network and undergraduates at a regional university supported rural primary care practices in transforming their practices to become National Committee for Quality Assurance-recognized patient-centered medical homes. Health care management and preprofessional undergraduate students worked with 14 rural primary care practices to redesign practice processes and complete the patient-centered medical home application. Twelve of the practices participated in the evaluation of the student contribution. A semistructured interview guide containing questions about practice characteristics, student competencies, and the value of the student's contribution to their practice's achievement of patient-centered medical home recognition was used to interview practice managers or their designee. Analysis included item-descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis of narrative content. All 12 participating practices achieved 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance patient-centered medical home recognition, with 4 practices achieving level 3, 5 practices achieving level 2, and 3 practices achieving level 1. The facilitation model using partnerships between health care agencies and universities might be an option for enhancing a practice's internal capacity for successful transformation and should be explored further. PMID:25909396

  15. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers. Part 1: Their changing role.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1996-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management, intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development; management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. This article article was prepared by the author from research into and presentation of a thesis entitled. "The Importance of Leadership Training And Development For Physicians In Academic Medical Centers In An Increasingly Complex Healthcare Environment, " prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in the College (ACHE). Part 2 will appear in the next issue of the Journal. PMID:10162876

  16. Program review of the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) has a history that starts in 1932 in Orlando to develop methods to control mosquitoes, including malaria vectors under conditions simulating those of the south Pacific jungles, and other insects affecting man and animals...

  17. A User-Centered Cooperative Information System for Medical Imaging Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Enrique J.; Quiles, Jose A.; Sanz, Marcos F.; del Pozo, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    Presents a cooperative information system for remote medical imaging diagnosis. General computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) problems addressed are definition of a procedure for the design of user-centered cooperative systems (conceptual level); and improvement of user feedback and optimization of the communication bandwidth in highly…

  18. Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program Upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

  19. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. t the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated i...

  20. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. At the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated ...

  1. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  2. Developing a Sustainable Research Culture in an Independent Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Independent academic medical centers (IAMC) are challenged to develop and support a research enterprise and maintain primary goals of healthcare delivery and financial solvency. Strategies for promoting translational research have been shown to be effective at institutions in the top level of federal funding, but not for smaller IAMCs. The…

  3. Which Sexual Abuse Victims Receive a Forensic Medical Examination?: The Impact of Children's Advocacy Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Wendy A.; Cross, Theodore P.; Jones, Lisa M.; Simone, Monique; Kolko, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the impact of Children's Advocacy Centers (CAC) and other factors, such as the child's age, alleged penetration, and injury on the use of forensic medical examinations as part of the response to reported child sexual abuse. Methods: This analysis is part of a quasi-experimental study, the Multi-Site Evaluation of…

  4. The Development and Implementation of a School-to-Work Apprenticeship Model at a Technical Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, James A.

    A business and education partnership model addressed a shortage of local, qualified, entry-level, technically skilled workers through a school-to-work apprenticeship program at the North Montco Technical Career Center in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. The research-based solution plan of the Pennsylvania Youth Apprenticeship Program (PYAP) included three…

  5. A Survey of Vocational Administrators and Teachers in Career and Technical Education Centers regarding Their Perception of Vocational Program Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Richard Lynn, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this statewide study is to assess the perceived improvements made to programs that are offered at Career and Technical Education Centers from the perspective of vocational administrators and teachers following the Bureau of Career and Technical Education conduction of an Approved Program Evaluation. The Pennsylvania Bureau of Career…

  6. Preparing Academic Medical Centers for the Clinical Learning Environment Review: Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative IV Outcomes and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Markova, Tsveti; Polis, Rachael L.; Peters, Marguerite; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Driven by changes to improve quality in patient care and population health while reducing costs, evolvement of the health system calls for restructuring health professionals' education and aligning it with the healthcare delivery system. In response to these changes, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) encourages the integration of health system leadership, faculty, and residents in restructuring graduate medical education (GME). Innovative approaches to achieving this restructuring and the CLER objectives are essential. Methods: The Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative (NI) IV provided a multiinstitutional learning collaborative focused on supporting GME redesign. From October 2013 through March 2015, participants conducted relevant projects, attended onsite meetings, and participated in teleconferences and webinars addressing the CLER areas. Participants shared best practices, resources, and experiences. We designed a pre/post descriptive study to examine outcomes. Results: Thirty-three institutions completed NI IV, and at its conclusion, the majority reported greater CLER readiness compared with baseline. Twenty-two (88.0%) institutions reported that NI IV had a great impact on advancing their efforts in the CLER area of their project focus, and 15 (62.5%) reported a great impact in other CLER focus areas. Opportunities to share progress with other teams and the national group meetings were reported to contribute to teams' success. Conclusion: The NI IV learning collaborative prepared institutions for CLER, suggesting successful integration of the clinical and educational enterprises. We propose that national learning collaboratives of GME-sponsoring health systems enable advancement of their education mission, leading ultimately to better healthcare outcomes. This learning model may be generalizable to newfound programs for academic medical centers

  7. Is there a role for academic medical centers in emerging markets?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Charles M; Thompson, Steven J; Wu, Sandford; Chellappa, Mohan; Hasham, Salim

    2012-01-01

    Governments in emerging markets face mounting challenges in managing health spending, building capability and capacity, modernizing ageing infrastructure, and investing in skills and resources. One path to overcoming these challenges is to establish new public-private models of health care development and delivery based on United States academic medical centers, whose missions are to advance medical education and clinical delivery. Johns Hopkins Medicine is a participant in the collaboration developing between the Perdana University Hospital and the Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine in Malaysia. These two organizations comprise an academic health science center based on the United States model. The Perdana project provides constructive insights into the opportunities and challenges that governments, universities, and the private sector face when introducing new models of patient care that are integrated with medical education, clinical training, and biomedical research. PMID:23484425

  8. The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Specialty Medical Home: A New Model of Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Miguel D; McAnallen, Sandra E; Greer, Julia B; Perkins, Stephen E; Ramalingam, S; Szigethy, Eva

    2016-08-01

    New models of health care have emerged over the past decade. Accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes are designed to improve the patient experience, enhance health care quality, and decrease cost. These models have been developed in the primary care domain and have yet to be tested in specialty care. Certain chronic diseases require principal care by a specialist or health care team. The specialty medical home would provide patient-centered care for specific populations of patients whose health care derives from a single chronic disease. This article defines the parameters for a specialty medical home and provides a specific payer-provider experience for the comprehensive care of an inflammatory bowel disease population. PMID:27135486

  9. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in a Student-Staffed Medication Therapy Management Call Center

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anna M.; Roane, Teresa E.; Mistry, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) designed to contribute to student pharmacists’ confidence and abilities in providing MTM. Design. Sixty-four student pharmacists provided MTM services during an APPE in a communication and care center. Assessment. Students conducted 1,495 comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) identifying 6,056 medication-related problems. Ninety-eight percent of the students who completed a survey instrument (52 of 53) following the APPE expressed that they had the necessary knowledge and skills to provide MTM services. Most respondents felt that pharmacist participation in providing Medicare MTM could move the profession of pharmacy forward and that pharmacists will have some role in deciding the specific provisions of the Medicare MTM program (92% and 91%, respectively). Conclusion. Students completing the MTM APPE received patient-centered experiences that supplemented their confidence, knowledge, and skill in providing MTM services in the future. PMID:22919086

  10. Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience

    PubMed Central

    Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J.; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P.; Meade, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents’ self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents—12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents—began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA’s) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. PMID:25699213

  11. Nurturing 21st century physician knowledge, skills and attitudes with medical home innovations: the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education teaching health center curriculum experience.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hemak, Linda; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Gollamudi, Lakshmi Rani; Sheth, Jignesh; Ebersole, Brian; Gardner, Katlyn J; Nardella, Julie; Ruddy, Meaghan P; Meade, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The effect of patient centered medical home (PCMH) curriculum interventions on residents' self-reported and demonstrated knowledge, skills and attitudes in PCMH competency arenas (KSA) is lacking in the literature. This study aimed to assess the impact of PCMH curricular innovations on the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. Methods. Twenty four (24) Internal Medicine residents-12 Traditional (TR) track residents and 12 Teaching Health Center (THC) track residents-began training in Academic Year (AY) 2011 at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education (WCGME). They were followed through AY2013, covering three years of training. PCMH curricular innovations were focally applied July 2011 until May 2012 to THC residents. These curricular innovations were spread program-wide in May 2012. Semi-annual, validated PCMH Clinician Assessments assessing KSA were started in AY2011 and were completed by all residents. Results. Mean KSA scores of TR residents were similar to those of THC residents at baseline for all PCMH competencies. In May 2012, mean scores of THC residents were significantly higher than TR residents for most KSA. After program-wide implementation of PCMH innovations, mean scores of TR residents for all KSA improved and most became equalized to those of THC residents. Globally improved KSA scores of THC and TR residents were maintained through May 2014, with the majority of improvements above baseline and reaching statistical significance. Conclusions. PCMH curricular innovations inspired by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA's) Teaching Health Center funded residency program expansion quickly and consistently improved the KSA of Internal Medicine residents. PMID:25699213

  12. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  13. Using a medical simulation center as an electronic health record usability laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B; Redden, Lisa; Neri, Pamela; Poole, Stephen; Horsky, Jan; Raja, Ali S; Pozner, Charles N; Schiff, Gordon; Poon, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Usability testing is increasingly being recognized as a way to increase the usability and safety of health information technology (HIT). Medical simulation centers can serve as testing environments for HIT usability studies. We integrated the quality assurance version of our emergency department (ED) electronic health record (EHR) into our medical simulation center and piloted a clinical care scenario in which emergency medicine resident physicians evaluated a simulated ED patient and documented electronically using the ED EHR. Meticulous planning and close collaboration with expert simulation staff was important for designing test scenarios, pilot testing, and running the sessions. Similarly, working with information systems teams was important for integration of the EHR. Electronic tools are needed to facilitate entry of fictitious clinical results while the simulation scenario is unfolding. EHRs can be successfully integrated into existing simulation centers, which may provide realistic environments for usability testing, training, and evaluation of human–computer interactions. PMID:24249778

  14. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the afternoon.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who recently began her new faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. After completing her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School), she did her internal medicine residency and fellowship training at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center. Her morning in gastroenterology clinic was highlighted by: (1) being reprimanded by the clinic nurse manager for a patient who not only arrived early, before clinic had opened, but also neglected to schedule the anesthesiologist for his colonoscopy; (2) the continued challenges of LEGEND (also known as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues), the new electronic medical record system after the BEST discarded the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patient's Lives Electronic) system; (3) a nurse's interruption of an office visit-once the egg timer on the examination room door ran out-because she had exceeded the allocated time for the appointment; and (4) her chairman's unanticipated arrival in the clinic to visit with the clinic nurse manager. In addition to seeing her patients, Dr. Lystic's afternoon is occupied by attending a LOST (Laboratory OverSight and Testing) Committee meeting and a visit from a wayfinding and signage specialist to depersonalize the doorpost plaques of the examination rooms. Her day ends with a demeaning email from her chairman regarding the poor results of the most recent patient satisfaction survey and being personally held accountable to develop solutions to improve not only her performance but also that of the clinic. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes mentioned in this essay are based on individual patients and their physicians, clinics in medical centers and their administration

  15. MiPLAN: a learner-centered model for bedside teaching in today's academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Stickrath, Chad; Aagaard, Eva; Anderson, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Clinician educators and medical trainees face intense pressure to complete numerous patient care and teaching activities in a limited amount of time. To address the need for effective and efficient teaching methods for use in the inpatient setting, the authors used constructivist learning theory, the principles of adult learning, and their expertise as clinician educators to develop the MiPLAN model for bedside teaching. This three-part model is designed to enable clinical teachers to simultaneously provide care to patients while assessing learners, determining high-yield teaching topics, and providing feedback to learners.The "M" refers to a preparatory meeting between teacher and learners before engaging in patient care or educational activities. During this meeting, team members should become acquainted and the teacher should set goals and clarify expectations. The "i" refers to five behaviors for the teacher to adopt during learners' bedside presentations: introduction, in the moment, inspection, interruptions, and independent thought. "PLAN" is an algorithm to establish priorities for teaching subsequent to a learner's presentation: patient care, learners' questions, attending's agenda, and next steps.The authors suggest that the MiPLAN model can help clinical teachers gain more confidence in their ability to teach at the bedside and increase the frequency and quality of bedside teaching. They propose further research to assess the generalizability of this model to other institutions, settings, and specialties and to evaluate educational and patient outcomes. PMID:23348088

  16. Improving the Transition of Care in Patients Transferred Through the Ochsner Medical Center Transfer Center

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Maronge, Genevieve F.; Pinsky, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient transfers from other hospitals within the Ochsner Health System to the main campus are coordinated through a Transfer Center that was established in fall 2008. We analyzed the transfer process to assess distinct opportunities to enhance the overall transition of patient care. Methods We surveyed internal medicine residents and nocturnists to determine their satisfaction with transfers in terms of safety, efficiency, and usefulness of information provided at the time of transfer. After a kaizen event at which complementary goals for the institution and members of the study team were recognized and implemented, we resurveyed the group to evaluate improvement in the transfer process. Results The preintervention average satisfaction score was 1.18 (SD=0.46), while the postintervention score was 3.7 (SD=1.01). A t test showed a significant difference in the average scores between the preintervention and postintervention surveys (P<0.0001). Conclusions By including residents in the transfer calls (a result of the kaizen event), data were collected that facilitated fewer and higher quality handoffs that were performed in less time. In addition, the process resulted in increased awareness of the value of resident participation in institutional quality improvement projects. PMID:23267257

  17. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    PubMed

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. PMID:23611153

  18. A 5-year scientometric analysis of research centers affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Kamran; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Ghalichi, Leila; Khalili, Malahat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) has the oldest and highest number of research centers among all Iranian medical universities, this study was conducted to evaluate scientific output of research centers affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) using scientometric indices and the affecting factors. Moreover, a number of scientometric indicators were introduced. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate a 5-year scientific performance of research centers of TUMS. Data were collected through questionnaires, annual evaluation reports of the Ministry of Health, and also from Scopus database. We used appropriate measures of central tendency and variation for descriptive analyses. Moreover, uni-and multi-variable linear regression were used to evaluate the effect of independent factors on the scientific output of the centers. Results: The medians of the numbers of papers and books during a 5-year period were 150.5 and 2.5 respectively. The median of the "articles per researcher" was 19.1. Based on multiple linear regression, younger age centers (p=0.001), having a separate budget line (p=0.016), and number of research personnel (p<0.001) had a direct significant correlation with the number of articles while real properties had a reverse significant correlation with it (p=0.004). Conclusion: The results can help policy makers and research managers to allocate sufficient resources to improve current situation of the centers. Newly adopted and effective scientometric indices are is suggested to be used to evaluate scientific outputs and functions of these centers. PMID:26157724

  19. American Academy of Pediatrics: Technical report: Alternative dispute resolution in medical malpractice.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J J

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide pediatricians with an understanding of past crises within the professional liability insurance industry, the difficulties of the tort system, and alternative strategies for resolving malpractice disputes that have been applied to medical malpractice actions. Through this report, pediatricians will gain a technical understanding of common alternative dispute resolution (ADR) strategies. The report explains the distinctions between various ADR methods in terms of process and outcome, risks and benefits, appropriateness to the nature of the dispute, and long-term ramifications. By knowing these concepts, pediatricians faced with malpractice claims will be better-equipped to participate in the decision-making with legal counsel on whether to settle, litigate, or explore ADR options. PMID:11230609

  20. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Fereshteh; Zahed, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. Results: We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. Conclusion: With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary. PMID:26759575

  1. Towards Interactive Medical Content Delivery Between Simulated Body Sensor Networks and Practical Data Center.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaobo; Li, Wei; Song, Jeungeun; Hossain, M Shamim; Mizanur Rahman, Sk Md; Alelaiwi, Abdulhameed

    2016-10-01

    With the development of IoT (Internet of Thing), big data analysis and cloud computing, traditional medical information system integrates with these new technologies. The establishment of cloud-based smart healthcare application gets more and more attention. In this paper, semi-physical simulation technology is applied to cloud-based smart healthcare system. The Body sensor network (BSN) of system transmit has two ways of data collection and transmission. The one is using practical BSN to collect data and transmitting it to the data center. The other is transmitting real medical data to practical data center by simulating BSN. In order to transmit real medical data to practical data center by simulating BSN under semi-physical simulation environment, this paper designs an OPNET packet structure, defines a gateway node model between simulating BSN and practical data center and builds a custom protocol stack. Moreover, this paper conducts a large amount of simulation on the real data transmission through simulation network connecting with practical network. The simulation result can provides a reference for parameter settings of fully practical network and reduces the cost of devices and personnel involved. PMID:27562482

  2. Montefiore Medical Center in The Bronx, New York: improving health in an urban community.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Spencer

    2004-12-01

    The author calls on academic medical centers that serve urban communities to go beyond the traditional mission of patient care, teaching, and research by accepting responsibility to build community-based care systems that are capable of improving the health of underserved populations within their reach. The experience of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, is presented to illustrate the nature, scope, and complexity of the undertaking that is required. Eight initiatives are described: expanding the primary care network, creating The Children's Hospital at Montefiore and the Child Health Network, responding to the needs of other high-risk populations, integrating the network with health information technology, using care-management systems to improve quality, reinforcing ethical allocation of resources, building teaching and research into the network, and preserving community vitality. The author believes that the current health care environment offers opportunities that may help to stimulate change in the direction of community-based systems. Managed care provides financial incentives to academic centers that are willing to accept risk and responsibly manage the care of a defined community, and advanced information technologies can support them in that endeavor. The author concludes that for academic medical centers with the proper systems in place, accepting responsibility for the community is not only the right thing to do, it is the strategic thing to do. PMID:15563649

  3. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation. PMID:23484431

  4. The Effects of Corporatization on Academic Medical Centers. How Will the Corporatization of Health Care Influence Health Professions Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Marvin R.

    Areas of agreement/conflict between academic medical centers and investor owned corporations are considered. Academic medical centers are part of the university system, which is responsible for education, research, and the related public good (e.g., nurturing of professions). Major areas for a potential confluence of interest between the academic…

  5. A model for training medical student innovators: the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care Abundance Agents of Change program

    PubMed Central

    Duong, David B.; Sullivan, Erin E.; Minter-Jordan, Myechia; Giesen, Lindsay; Ellner, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2013, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care established the Abundance Agents of Change (AoC) program to promote interprofessional learning and innovation, increase partnership between 15 academic and community health centers (CHCs) in Boston's most under-served communities, and increase medical student interest in primary care careers. Methods The AoC is modeled in the form of a ‘grants challenge’, offering $20,000 to interprofessional student teams to develop an innovative solution that addresses a healthcare delivery need identified by CHCs. The program's initial two years were characterized by a four-stage process which included working with CHCs and crafting a request for proposals, forming interprofessional 20 student teams comprising students from across and outside of Harvard University, training students using a systems-based innovation curriculum, and performing program evaluation. Results Our evaluation data from cohorts 1 and 2 of the AoC program demonstrate that we succeeded in training students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams. We also learned valuable lessons regarding creating better alignment with CHC priorities, extending the program cycle from 12 to 18 months, and changing the way funding is disbursed to 25 students, which will be incorporated in later versions of the program. Conclusions Based on our experience and evaluation data, we believe that this program is a replicable way to train students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams to address the current complex healthcare environment. PMID:27306994

  6. Medical diplomacy and global mental health: from community and national institutions to regional centers of excellence.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Kohrt, Brandon A

    2013-12-01

    We explore how regional medical diplomacy can increase funding for global mental health initiatives. Interventions for infectious diseases have dominated medical diplomacy by focusing on security concerns. The global mental health movement has adopted similar strategies, but unsuccessfully since mental illnesses do not cause international epidemics. Instead, realpolitik arguments may increase funding by prioritizing economic productivity and regional diplomacy based on cultural ties to advance mental health services and research at the community level. In South Asia, initiatives to train personnel and provide refugee services offer a foundation for regional centers of excellence. This model can be expanded elsewhere. PMID:23918068

  7. Diseases pattern among patients attending Holy Mosque (Haram) Medical Centers during Hajj 1434 (2013)

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsh, Abdulrahman R.; Sindy, Abdulfattah I.; Baljoon, Mostafa J.; Dhafar, Khalid O.; Gazzaz, Zohair J.; Baig, Mukhtiar; Deiab, Basma A.; Hothali, Fauzea T. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diseases pattern among pilgrims attending the 2 Holy Mosque (Haram) Health Care Centers during the Hajj season 2013 (Hijra 1434). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data was collected from 2 medical centers located in the Holy Mosque in Makkah city, Saudi Arabia, from the first of Dhul-Hijjah to sixteenth Dhul-Hijjah 1434. The present study was completed in 16 days (6th October to 21st October 2013). Results: Over 16 days, 1008 patients attended the medical centers during Hajj 1434, (2013), out of which 554 (55%) were males and 454 (45%) were females. Most of the patients were Egyptians (n=242, 24%), followed by Saudis (n=116, 11.5%), Pakistani (n=114, 11.3%), Turkish (n=50, 5%), and other nationalities (n=404). According to age distribution, mostly were in the 51-60 years age group (n=237, 23.5%), followed by other age groups. Out of 1008 patients, 842 (83.5%) patients were treated and subsequently discharged, while 166 patients (16.5%) were referred to the tertiary centers. According to the diseases pattern, most of the patients were suffering from respiratory problems (n=177, 17.6%) followed by skin diseases (n=158, 15.7%), gastrointestinal tract (GIT) diseases (n=133, 13.2%), and others. Conclusion: Most of the patients were suffering from respiratory problems followed by skin and GIT diseases, and <25% of patients were referred to tertiary care centers. PMID:26219447

  8. Retaining medical directors in community health centers. The importance of administrative relationships.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Christopher; Peltier, James W

    2003-01-01

    Physician retention has become a critical issue for maintaining the success of today's health care organizations. With many external factors--increasing malpractice premiums, lower reimbursement rates, and managed care controls--driving physicians out of the practice, it is imperative to understand how the internal functions of the organization can help maintain satisfaction in the workplace and prevent physicians from leaving (Reece, 2000; Taylor, 2002). This is especially important in Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs), federally supported health clinics providing care to low-income and uninsured patients in medically underserved communities and neighborhoods. In this study, we examine the medical directors' roles and responsibilities, their relationships with the C/MHC administrators, and whether these impact satisfaction and, ultimately retention in the centers. PMID:12856504

  9. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Simon, Melissa A; Samaras, Athena T; Nonzee, Narissa J; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients' interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus-community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  10. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Samaras, Athena T.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S.; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients’ interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus–community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  11. Pathology service line: a model for accountable care organizations at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Ira; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2012-05-01

    Accountable care is designed to manage the health of patients using a capitated cost model rather than fee for service. Pay for performance is an attempt to use quality and not service reduction as the way to decrease costs. Pathologists will have to demonstrate value to the system. This value will include (1) working with clinical colleagues to optimize testing protocols, (2) reducing unnecessary testing in both clinical and anatomic pathology, (3) guiding treatment by helping to personalize therapy, (4) designing laboratory information technology solutions that will promote and facilitate accurate, complete data mining, and (5) administering efficient cost-effective laboratories. The pathology service line was established to improve the efficiency of delivering pathology services and to provide more effective support of medical center programs. We have used this model effectively at the Montefiore Medical Center for the past 14 years. PMID:22333926

  12. St. Luke's Medical Center Global City--Global Trigger Tool (GTT) Project.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Alejandro C; Macaraig, Victor J; Magpusao, Eulalia C

    2016-01-01

    The Global Trigger Tool (GTT) was developed by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI), to identify and measure the rate of adverse events over time in a healthcare facility. It is a sampling methodology that utilizes "triggers" in the detection of random adverse events and harms and it also measures the adverse events overtime. The Quality and Patient Safety Group of St. Luke's Medical Center--Global City initiated the implementation of the Global Trigger Tool as a proactive solution using retrospective information gathered to address the growing challenge that adverse events and harms impose in the institution with the ultimate goat of improving patient safety. St. Luke's Medical Center Global City is the first and only hospital in the Philippines to implementand utilize the Global Trigger Tool. PMID:27180470

  13. The Birth of a New Vocational-Technical Center. National Vocational-Technical Facility Planning Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, May, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Clayton

    The principal of the Southern Nevada Vocational-Technical Center at Las Vegas, Nevada, briefly outlines its development and function. The facility cost approximately 3 million dollars and was built on 390 acres of land purchased from the Federal government. The PERT method was used in planning. Instructional facilities, including those for auto…

  14. Medical Student Volunteerism Addresses Patients' Social Needs: A Novel Approach to Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Onyekere, Chinwe; Ross, Sandra; Namba, Alexa; Ross, Justin C.; Mann, Barry D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare providers must be equipped to recognize and address patients' psychosocial needs to improve overall health outcomes. To give future healthcare providers the tools and training necessary to identify and address psychosocial issues, Lankenau Medical Center in partnership with the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine designed the Medical Student Advocate (MSA) program. Methods: The MSA program places volunteer second-year osteopathic medical students in care coordination teams at Lankenau Medical Associates, a primary care practice serving a diverse patient population in the Philadelphia, PA, region. As active members of the team, MSAs are referred high-risk patients who have resource needs such as food, employment, child care, and transportation. MSAs work collaboratively with patients and the multidisciplinary team to address patients' nonmedical needs. Results: From August 2013 to August 2015, 31 osteopathic medical students volunteered for the MSA program and served 369 patients with 720 identified needs. Faculty and participating medical students report that the MSA program provided an enhanced understanding of the holistic nature of patient care and a comprehensive view of patient needs. Conclusion: The MSA program provides students with a unique educational opportunity that encompasses early exposure to patient interaction, social determinants of health, population health, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Students develop skills to help them build patient relationships, understand the psychosocial factors shaping health outcomes, and engage with other healthcare professionals. This work in the preclinical years provides students with the knowledge to help them perform more effectively in the changing healthcare environment. PMID:27046404

  15. Evaluating A Patient-Centered Medical Home From the Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Betty M.; Moody-Thomas, Sarah; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Horswell, Ronald; Griffin, Willene P.; Coleman, Mary T.; Herwehe, Jane; Besse, Jay A.; Willis, Kathleen H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The medical home is an organizational approach for improving care, improving patient experience, and reducing costs. The purpose of this qualitative project was to obtain input from patients that could be used to improve their experiences in the medical home for ongoing disease management and health improvement and to obtain their recommendations for the most effective methods to involve patients in shaping system policies, procedures, and practices consistent with patient- and family-centered care principles. Methods We conducted cognitive interviews to complete patient experience surveys, structured focus groups, and exit surveys. A sample of 32 adults participated in cognitive interviews (n=15) and structured focus groups (n=17) using the nominal group technique (NGT). Exit surveys collected demographic information and input from patients about opportunities for their involvement in shaping medical homes. Results Cognitive interviews, NGT sessions, and exit surveys revealed patient-perceived strengths and inadequacies within the medical home. Better access to care, including more efficient appointment scheduling and reduced wait times to see a physician once patients arrived for scheduled appointments, was identified as a necessary improvement. Patients' positive perceptions included how the medical home helps them reach their health goals and their overall satisfaction with the quality of care received. Conclusion The input received from patients through the methods used in this project was useful in revealing needed improvements within a medical home and, if resolved, will ensure that all patients have access to the kind of care that works for them. PMID:24052763

  16. Positioning academic medical centers and teaching hospitals to thrive in the next decade.

    PubMed

    Morris, D E

    1985-06-01

    Market share for academic medical centers and teaching hospitals will decline over the next five years necessitating new strategies to ensure growth and profitability. These types of institutions are, however, in a strong position to compete and gain market share locally by building a defensible competitive advantage. This article offers three avenues for increasing market share: networking, brand name product differentiation, and business diversification. PMID:10271804

  17. Information Technology Support for Clinical Genetic Testing within an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Samuel; Mahanta, Lisa; Ros, Lei Lei; Clark, Eugene; Babb, Lawrence; Oates, Michael; Rehm, Heidi; Lebo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical centers require many interconnected systems to fully support genetic testing processes. We provide an overview of the end-to-end support that has been established surrounding a genetic testing laboratory within our environment, including both laboratory and clinician facing infrastructure. We explain key functions that we have found useful in the supporting systems. We also consider ways that this infrastructure could be enhanced to enable deeper assessment of genetic test results in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26805890

  18. Information Technology Support for Clinical Genetic Testing within an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Samuel; Mahanta, Lisa; Ros, Lei Lei; Clark, Eugene; Babb, Lawrence; Oates, Michael; Rehm, Heidi; Lebo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical centers require many interconnected systems to fully support genetic testing processes. We provide an overview of the end-to-end support that has been established surrounding a genetic testing laboratory within our environment, including both laboratory and clinician facing infrastructure. We explain key functions that we have found useful in the supporting systems. We also consider ways that this infrastructure could be enhanced to enable deeper assessment of genetic test results in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26805890

  19. Television spots win national award. Part of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center's branding effort.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    "Miracles in Medicine," a series of award-winning television spots, was produced for OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, Ill., by The Roberts Group, Inc., Waukesha, Wis. They are an integral part of a broader branding campaign, launched in May 2003, that includes newspaper, radio, and outdoor elements. The spots were deemed so successful, the branding effort was expanded to include Children's Hospital of Illinois. PMID:15162576

  20. Identifying Head Start and Public Pre-K Participation in NSECE Data on Center-Based ECE Programs. NSECE Technical Report Supplement. OPRE Report 2015-92b

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goerge, Robert; Datta, A. Rupa; Xia, Kanru; Witte, Ann D.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Milesi, Carolina; Brandon, Richard; Guzman, Lina; Zanoni, Wladimir

    2015-01-01

    The analyses presented in the Technical Report, "Which Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten" characterize centers that have at least one child whose enrollment is funded through Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. This supplement to the technical report provides interested readers with technical details of the…

  1. My personal experiences at the BEST Medical Center: A day in the clinic-the morning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic is a gastroenterologist who trained at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center, after having completed her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (recently renamed the Harvey Provider School). She accepted a faculty position at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center. Dr. Lystic shares her experiences on a typical morning in gastroenterology clinic. Although her clinic start date was delayed by 2 months after becoming sick following a mandatory flu shot and having to complete more than 70 hours of compliance training modules, she is now familiar with the BEST system. Clinic scheduling priorities include ensuring that the staff can eat lunch together and depart at 5:00 pm. It is a continual challenge to find time to complete the electronic medical record after BEST changed from the SIMPLE (Succinct Input Making Patients Lives Electronic) system to LEGEND (referred to as Lengthy and Excessively Graded Evaluation and Nomenclature for Diagnosis by her colleagues). To maintain clinic punctuality, a compliance spreadsheet is e-mailed monthly to the Wait Time Committee. Their most recent corrective action plan for tardy physicians included placing egg timers on the doors and having nurses interrupt visits that exceed the allotted time. Administrative decisions have resulted in downsizing personnel. Patients are required to schedule their own tests and procedures and follow-up appointments-causing low patient satisfaction scores; however, the money saved lead to a large year-end bonus for the vice president of BEST Efficiency, who holds "providers" accountable for the poor patient experience. Although Dr. Ida Lystic and the gastroenterology clinic at "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, the majority of the anecdotes are based on actual events. PMID:27265082

  2. Implementation of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in Adult Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Markovitz, Amanda R; Paustian, Michael L; Wise, Christopher G; El Reda, Darline K; Green, Lee A; Fetters, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There has been relatively little empirical evidence about the effects of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation on patient-related outcomes and costs. Using a longitudinal design and a large study group of 2,218 Michigan adult primary care practices, our study examined the following research questions: Is the level of, and change in, implementation of PCMH associated with medical surgical cost, preventive services utilization, and quality of care in the following year? Results indicated that both level and amount of change in practice implementation of PCMH are independently and positively associated with measures of quality of care and use of preventive services, after controlling for a variety of practice, patient cohort, and practice environmental characteristics. Results also indicate that lower overall medical and surgical costs are associated with higher levels of PCMH implementation, although change in PCMH implementation did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:25861803

  3. Key Elements of Clinical Physician Leadership at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dine, C. Jessica; Kahn, Jeremy M; Abella, Benjamin S; Asch, David A; Shea, Judy A

    2011-01-01

    Background A considerable body of literature in the management sciences has defined leadership and how leadership skills can be attained. There is considerably less literature about leadership within medical settings. Physicians-in-training are frequently placed in leadership positions ranging from running a clinical team or overseeing a resuscitation effort. However, physicians-in-training rarely receive such training. The objective of this study was to discover characteristics associated with effective physician leadership at an academic medical center for future development of such training. Methods We conducted focus groups with medical professionals (attending physicians, residents, and nurses) at an academic medical center. The focus group discussion script was designed to elicit participants' perceptions of qualities necessary for physician leadership. The lead question asked participants to imagine a scenario in which they either acted as or observed a physician leader. Two independent reviewers reviewed transcripts to identify key domains of physician leadership. Results Although the context was not specified, the focus group participants discussed leadership in the context of a clinical team. They identified 4 important themes: management of the team, establishing a vision, communication, and personal attributes. Conclusions Physician leadership exists in clinical settings. This study highlights the elements essential to that leadership. Understanding the physician attributes and behaviors that result in effective leadership and teamwork can lay the groundwork for more formal leadership education for physicians-in-training. PMID:22379520

  4. Parental Perceptions of Family Centered Care in Medical Homes of Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Zajicek-Farber, Michaela L; Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R; Long, Toby M; Farber, Jon Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Life course theory sets the framework for strong inclusion of family centered care (FCC) in quality medical homes of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities (CNDD). The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of families with their experiences of FCC in medical homes for CNDD. Using a structured questionnaire, the Family-Centered Care Self-Assessment Tool developed by Family Voices, this study surveyed 122 parents of CNDD in a large urban area during 2010-2012. Data collected information on FCC in the provision of primary health care services for CNDD and focused on family-provider partnerships, care setting practices and policies, and community services. Frequency analysis classified participants' responses as strengths in the "most of the time" range, and weaknesses in the "never" range. Only 31 % of parents were satisfied with the primary health care their CNDD received. Based on an accepted definition of medical home services, 16 % of parents reported their CNDD had most aspects of a medical home, 64 % had some, and 20 % had none. Strengths in FCC were primarily evident in the family-provider partnership and care settings when focused on meeting the medical care needs of the child. Weaknesses in FCC were noted in meeting the needs of families, coordination, follow-up, and support with community resources. Improvements in key pediatric health care strategies for CNDD are recommended. CNDD and their families have multifaceted needs that require strong partnerships among parents, providers, and communities. Quality medical homes must include FCC and valued partnerships with diverse families and community-based providers. PMID:25724538

  5. Analysis of 10-Year Training Results of Medical Students Using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Ota, Tomoyuki; Thuzar, Moe

    2016-06-01

    Background In this article, we reviewed the training results of medical students using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP), and proposed an ideal microsurgical training program for all individuals by analyzing the training results of medical students who did not have any surgical experience. Methods As of 2015, a total of 29 medical students completed the MRCP. In the most recent 12 medical students, the number of trials performed for each training stage and the number of rats needed to complete the training were recorded. Additionally, we measured the operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students after it became a current program. Results The average operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students was 120 minutes ± 11 minutes (standard deviation [SD]). The average vascular anastomosis time (for the artery and vein) was 52 minutes ± 2 minutes (SD). For the most recent 12 medical students, there was a negative correlation between the number of trials performed in the non-rat stages (stages 1-3) and the number of rats used in the rat stages (stages 4-5). Conclusion Analysis of the training results of medical students suggests that performing microsurgery first on silicon tubes and chicken wings saves animals' lives later during the training program. We believe that any person can learn the technique of microsurgery by performing 7 to 8 hours of training per day over a period of 15 days within this program setting. PMID:26636888

  6. Savannah River Site sample and analysis plan for Clemson Technical Center waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, T.

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to determine the chemical, physical and radiological properties of the SRS radioactive Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) liquid waste stream, to verify that it conforms to Waste Acceptance Criteria of the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Incineration Facility. Waste being sent to the ETTP TSCA Incinerator for treatment must be sufficiently characterized to ensure that the waste stream meets the waste acceptance criteria to ensure proper handling, classification, and processing of incoming waste to meet the Waste Storage and Treatment Facility`s Operating Permits. This sampling and analysis plan is limited to WSRC container(s) of homogeneous or multiphasic radioactive PCB contaminated liquids generated in association with a treatability study at Clemson Technical Center (CTC) and currently stored at the WSRC Solid Waste Division Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF).

  7. Technical assistance report No. TA 80-39, Brookhaven IRS Service Center, Holtzville, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Hartle, R.W.; Keenlyside, R.

    1980-09-01

    Employee health complaints at the Brookhaven Internal Revenue Service Center in Holtzville, New York were investigated on June 18 to 20, 1980, in response to a request for technical assistance from the Acting Regional Administrator for Public Buildings, General Services Administration. Environmental air samples were collected to determine worker exposures to formaldehyde (50000), oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide (7446095), carbon monoxide (630080), total organics, and dust. Employee interviews disclosed worker complants of burning eyes, sore throat, sinus irritation, nausea, dizziness, light headedness, metallic taste, and headache. All sampled substances were either nondetectable or were well within the applicable federal exposure standards. Although no conclusive toxic exposures were noted, the authors recommend increasing the stack heights of the diesel engines, and the installation of gas trapping devices in the roof drains to lessen the number of contaminants entering the work area.

  8. Neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a center of excellence: A success story.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmohan; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-01-01

    The department of neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) started its humble beginning in 1965. With the untiring and selfless hard work of Prof. P N Tandon and Prof. A K Banerji, the department progressed over time to become a center of excellence in the subcontinent. To establish a neurosciences center at AIIMS was an uphill task, which was accomplished with great efforts. The department has established itself as one of the highest centers of learning in the country with its vast infrastructure and diversity in all fields of neurosurgery. AIIMS, New Delhi was established by an act of the parliament in 1956. It was started with a grant from the Government of New Zealand under the "Colombo Plan." It was the vision of Rajkumari Amrita Kaur, the first Health Minister of India, that led to the establishment of a medical institute of international repute in India. AIIMS, New Delhi is an autonomous institute and is governed by the AIIMS Act, 1956. The department of neurosurgery at AIIMS was started in March 1965 with Prof. P.N. Tandon as the Head of the Department. Prof. A.K. Banerji joined him a few months later. The Department celebrated its golden jubilee in the year 2015, and has tremendously grown in stature from its humble beginnings to being a center of excellence with world-wide recognition. PMID:26238896

  9. The Tulane University Medical Center/Columbia partnership: opportunities and challenges for pathology.

    PubMed

    Krause, J R; Salmon, B C; Gerber, M A

    1996-01-01

    A joint venture between the largest health-care corporation in the country (Columbia/HCA) and Tulane University Hospital/Clinic was established about 1 year ago. Early indications are that the partnership is successful and mutually beneficial. For Tulane University Medical Center, the joint venture provides financial stability and support for academic centers of excellence. Tulane University Hospital/Clinic will become the referral center for complicated cases from the regional Columbia hospitals. The Tulane University Hospital laboratories are positioned to become the regional referral laboratory for esoteric testing. For the pathologists of the regional Columbia hospitals, the opportunity beckons to form a group of equal partners that will contract with Columbia to provide laboratory services at Columbia hospitals and to consolidate the laboratories in the New Orleans division. Columbia has brought corporate expertise, capital, and opportunities for cost-saving economies of scale to the partnership. Quality and cost-effectiveness of patients care will be emphasized as will research on clinical outcomes. This model of corporate/academic partnership represents a new option for academic medical centers around the country as they respond to the rapid changes in the health-care environment. PMID:10162016

  10. Strom Thurmond Biomedical Research Center at the Medical Univesity for South Carolina Charleston, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Strom Thurmond Biomedical Research Center (Center) at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, SC. The DOE is evaluating a grant proposal to authorize the MUSC to construct, equip and operate the lower two floors of the proposed nine-story Center as an expansion of on-going clinical research and out-patient diagnostic activities of the Cardiology Division of the existing Gazes Cardiac Research Institute. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  11. Training Tomorrow's Doctors: The Medical Education Mission of Academic Health Centers. A Report of the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report, fifth of a series on Academic Health Centers (AHCs), addresses the fundamental rationale of such centers: the education of the health care workforce. None of the missions of the 125 AHCs in the United States, medical schools and their closely affiliated hospitals and physician groups, is more important than the education of…

  12. Contingency Operations Support to NASA Johnson Space Center Medical Operations Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepaniak, Philip; Patlach, Bob; Swann, Mark; Adams, Adrien

    2005-01-01

    The Wyle Laboratories Contingency Operations Group provides support to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Medical Operations Division in the event of a space flight vehicle accident or JSC mishap. Support includes development of Emergency Medical System (EMS) requirements, procedures, training briefings and real-time support of mishap investigations. The Contingency Operations Group is compliant with NASA documentation that provides guidance in these areas and maintains contact with the United States Department of Defense (DOD) to remain current on military plans to support NASA. The contingency group also participates in Space Operations Medical Support Training Courses (SOMSTC) and represents the NASA JSC Medical Operations Division at contingency exercises conducted worldwide by the DOD or NASA. The events of September 11, 2001 have changed how this country prepares and protects itself from possible terrorist attacks on high-profile targets. As a result, JSC is now considered a high-profile target and thus, must prepare for and develop a response to a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) incident. The Wyle Laboratories Contingency Operations Group supports this plan, specifically the medical response, by providing expertise and manpower.

  13. Multimedia-based courseware in the Virtual Learning Center at the Hannover Medical School.

    PubMed

    Matthies, H K; von Jan, U; Porth, A J; Tatagiba, M; Stan, A C; Walter, G F

    2000-01-01

    The commercial use of the World Wide Web causes an extensive change in information technology. Web browser are becoming the universal front-end for all kinds of client-server applications. The possibilities of telematics offer a base for multimedia applications, for instance telelearning. Learning is not limited by geography and does not cause pressure of time by the user. The development of such multimedia information and communication systems demands cooperative working teams of authors, who are able to master several areas of medical knowledge as well as the presentation of these using different multimedia facilities. A very important part of graphic design in the context of multimedia applications is the creation and interactive use of images (still, moving). The growth and the complexity of medical knowledge as well as the need for continuous, fast, and economically feasible maintenance impose requirements on the media used for medical education and training. Web-based courseware in the Virtual Learning Center at the Hannover Medical School is an innovative education resource for medical students and professionals. PMID:11187611

  14. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  15. Providing Total Quality Fundamentals: 1995 Workshops for the NASA Lewis Research Center's Technical Services Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antczak, Paul; Jacinto,Gilda; Simek, Jimmy

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) agency-wide movement to cultivate a quality workplace is the basis for Lewis Research Center to implement Total Quality Fundamentals (TQF) initiatives. The Lewis Technical Services Directorate (TSD) introduced the Total Quality Fundamentals (TQF) workshops to its work force as an opportunity to introduce the concepts and principles of TQF. These workshops also provided the participants with the opportunity to dialogue with fellow TSD employees and managers. This report describes, through the perspective of the Lewis TSD TQF Coaches, how the TQF work- shop process was accomplished in TSD. It describes the structure for addressing the need, implementation process, input the TSD Coaches provided, common themes and concerns raised, conclusions, and recommendations. The Coaches concluded that these types of workshops could be the key to open the communication channels that are necessary to help everyone at Lewis understand where they fit in the organization. TQF workshops can strengthen the participant's connection with the Mission, Vision of the Center, and Vision of the Agency. Reconunendations are given based on these conclusions that can help the TSD Quality Board develop attainable measures towards a quality workplace.

  16. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-07-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  17. [Bioethics in medical institutions--new custom or help? The example of clinical ethics consultation at a University Medical Center].

    PubMed

    Richter, G

    2014-08-01

    Although ethics committees are well established in the medical sciences for human clinical trials, animal research and scientific integrity, the development of clinical ethics in German hospitals started much later during the first decade of the twenty-first century. Clinical ethics consultation should be pragmatic and problem-centered and can be defined as an ethically qualified and informed conflict management within a given legal framework to deal with and resolve value-driven, normative problems in the care of patients. Clinical ethics consultations enable shared clinical decision-making of all parties (e.g. clinicians, patients, family and surrogates) involved in a particular patient's care. The clinical ethicist does not act as an ethics expert by making independent recommendations or decisions; therefore, the focus is different from other medical consultants. Ethics consultation was first established by healthcare ethics committees (HEC) or clinical ethics consultation (CEC) groups which were called in to respond to an ethically problematic situation. To avoid ethical dilemmas or crises and to act preventively with regard to ethical issues in individual patients, an ethics liaison service is an additional option to ethics case consultations which take place on a regular basis by scheduled ethics rounds during the normal ward rounds. The presence of the ethicist offers some unique advantages: it allows early recognition of even minor ethical problems and accommodates the dynamics of ethical and clinical goal-setting in the course of patient care. Most importantly, regular and non-authoritative participation of the ethicist in normal ward rounds allows continuous ethical education of the staff within the everyday clinical routine. By facilitating clinical ethical decision-making, the ethicist seeks to empower physicians and medical staff to deal appropriately with ethical problems by themselves. Because of this proactive approach, the ethics liaison service

  18. The empires strike back. Broken promises: Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Ignoring the community's needs: St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center.

    PubMed

    Neal, R

    1990-01-01

    In the fall of 1985 in an issue titled "Fighting Back Against the Empires" (Vol. 16, No. 5), Health/PAC reported on the plans of four of New York City's academic medical center "empires" for major expansion. The focus of our coverage was the efforts of two of the communities served by these institutions to ensure that the plans were responsive to their needs. At the time, we were cautiously optimistic that these events were signs that "although the empires still dominate New York City's health care system, they no longer rule unchallenged." In the past six months, the plans of two of these institutions, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, warrant another look at the success of the efforts to hold the major medical centers responsible for the welfare of the communities in which they are located. PMID:10104819

  19. Aprepitant and Fosaprepitant Use in Children and Adolescents at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Biondo, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of aprepitant and fosaprepitant, a neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptor inhibitor, in children and adolescents at a large academic medical center, for the prevention and management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted using an electronic medical record system to evaluate the use of aprepitant and fosaprepitant in all pediatric patients that were discharged from a single academic medical center between February 25, 2009 and May 25, 2012. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included in this review and received a total of 287 doses over the span of 114 cycles. Mean age was 10.1 years, with a range of 11 months to 17 years old. In 16 of 26 patients, aprepitant was used as the primary prophylaxis. Of those patients who received primary prophylaxis, 6 of 16 received it for highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and 10 of 16 received it for moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Intravenous fosaprepitant was used in 7 of 26 patients, ages 13 to 17 (median 14) years old. No adverse effects attributable to aprepitant were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Use of aprepitant and fosaprepitant in pediatric patients appeared to be well tolerated. No currently published reports data using aprepitant in a patient younger than 32 months old, whereas we reported its use in patients as young as 11 months old. PMID:25024673

  20. Finding Common Ground: Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competencies in Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Swihart, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home model is predicated on interprofessional collaborative practice and team-based care. While information on the roles of various providers is increasingly woven into the literature, the competencies of those providers have been generally profession-specific. In 2011, the Interprofessional Education Collaborative comprising the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the American Dental Education Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, and the Association of Schools of Public Health sponsored an expert panel of their members to identify and develop 4 domains of core competencies needed for a successful interprofessional collaborative practice: (1) Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice; (2) Roles/Responsibilities; (3) Interprofessional Communication; and (4) Teams and Teamwork. Their findings and recommendations were recorded in their Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: Report of an Expert Panel. This article explores these 4 domains and how they provide common ground for team-based care within the context of the medical home model approach to patient-centered primary care. PMID:26938181

  1. An experience of liver transplantation in Latin America: a medical center in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Londoño, Mauricio; Marín, Juan; Muñoz, Octavio; Mena, Álvaro; Guzmán, Carlos; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan; Arbeláez, María; Correa, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for acute and chronic liver failure, for selected cases of tumors, and for conditions resulting from errors in metabolism. This paper reports the experience of a medical center in Latin America. Methods: Were conducted 305 orthotopic liver transplantations on 284 patients between 2004 and 2010. Of these patients, 241 were adults undergoing their first transplantation. Results: The average age of patients was 52 years old, and 62% of the individuals were male. The most common indication was alcoholic cirrhosis. The rate of patient survival after 1 and 5 years was 82 and 72% respectively. The rate of liver graft survival after 1 and 5 years was 78 and 68% respectively. The main cause of death was sepsis. Complications in the hepatic artery were documented for 5% of the patients. Additionally, 14.5% of the patients had complications in the biliary tract. Infections were found in 41% of the individuals. Acute rejection was observed in 30% of the subjects, and chronic rejection in 3%. Conclusion: In conclusion, liver transplantation at our medical center in Colombia offers good mid-term results, with a complication rate similar to that reported by other centers around the world. PMID:26019379

  2. Recognition as a Patient-Centered Medical Home: Fundamental or Incidental?

    PubMed Central

    Dohan, Daniel; McCuistion, Mary Honodel; Frosch, Dominick L.; Hung, Dorothy Y.; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about reasons why a medical group would seek recognition as a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). We examined the motivations for seeking recognition in one group and assessed why the group allowed recognition to lapse 3 years later. METHODS As part of a larger mixed methods case study, we conducted 38 key informant interviews with executives, clinicians, and front-line staff. Interviews were conducted according to a guide that evolved during the project and were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed and thematically coded. RESULTS PCMH principles were consistent with the organization’s culture and mission, which valued innovation and putting patients first. Motivations for implementing specific PCMH components varied; some components were seen as part of the organization’s patient-centered culture, whereas others helped the practice compete in its local market. Informants consistently reported that National Committee for Quality Assurance recognition arose incidentally because of a 1-time incentive from a local group of large employers and because the organization decided to allocate some organizational resources to respond to the complex reporting requirements for about one-half of its clinics. CONCLUSIONS Becoming patient centered and seeking recognition as such ran along separate but parallel tracks within this organization. As the Affordable Care Act continues to focus attention on primary care redesign, this apparent disconnect should be borne in mind. PMID:23690381

  3. Energy survey of Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. Volume 2. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-23

    1.1 Perform a complete energy audit of the entire Army Medical Center`s (AMC) heating and cooling systems, lighting system, and other systems and areas as indicated in Annex A. 1.2 Perform a comprehensive analysis of all data collected during the audit. 1.3 Identify all Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s) including low cost/no cost ECO`s and perform complete evaluations of each. Energy equipment replacement projects already underway, approved, or planned by the Medical Center staff will be factored into the evaluations. 1.4 Prepare programming documentation for all Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and/or Energy Conservation Improvement Program (ECIP) projects. 1.5 Prepare implementation documentation and instructions for those projects recommended for accomplishment by local forces. 1.6 List and prioritize all recommended ECO`s. 1.7 Prepare a comprehensive report which will docwnent the work accomplished, the results of the field investigation and engineering analysis, the conclusions, and recommendations.

  4. The tele-interpreter service at the Bangkok Hospital Medical Center, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jaroensawat, Boonthida; Wankijcharoen, Somsak

    2013-01-01

    Thailand has become one of the most famous medical hub countries, which is reflected in the increasing number of international patients visiting the Bangkok Hospital Medical Center (BMC). In response, the Interpreter Department at BMC has been established to provide translation for non-English speaking patients. Overtime the Interpreter Department frequently reaches maximum capacity when providing prompt services on demand, resulting in long waiting times and delayed medical treatment. BMC has foreseen the necessity to implement a tele-interpreter system via videoconferencing technology to provide effective translations in the medical environment where delay is usually not tolerated. Tele-interpretation allows doctors to simply select a language icon on their Wi-Fi IP telephone to instantly connect to an interpreter. After implementation in 2oo9, the overall customer satisfaction index for the Interpreter Department increased from 64.5% in Quarter 1 to 85.5% in Quarter 3 of 2011. The tele-interpretation system is currently the closest approximation to the face-to-face interpretation method. PMID:24228346

  5. Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise. PMID:25108980

  6. Changing environment and the academic medical center: the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Heyssel, R M

    1989-01-01

    Academic medical centers need strong patient bases and strong financial bases to educate and to support research. After careful delineation of its mission with regard to patient care, research, and education, the Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the health care marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization in the Baltimore area. The resulting conglomerate, operating under the direction of a holding company, the Johns Hopkins Health System, has achieved its goals of expanding patient care capabilities, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and cash flow. Half the medical residents at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine receive training at nontraditional sites, and further expansion of teaching activities is being explored. Potential roles of traditional and nontraditional teachers in these activities are discussed. PMID:2914070

  7. Socioeconomic disparities in lung cancer treatment and outcome persist within a single academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Yorio, Jeffrey T.; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Yang; Gerber, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic disparities in treatment and outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are well established. To explore whether these differences are secondary to individual or institutional characteristics, we examined treatment selection and outcome in a diverse population treated at a single medical center. Patient and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients diagnosed with NSCLC stages I-III from 2000-2005 at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Treatment selection was dichotomized as “standard” (surgery for stage I-II; surgery and/or radiation therapy for stage III) or “other.” Associations between patient characteristics (including socioeconomic status) and treatment selection were examined using logistic regression; associations between characteristics and overall survival were examined using Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results A total of 450 patients were included. Twenty-eight percent of patients had private insurance, 43% had Medicare, and 29% had an indigent care plan. The likelihood of receiving “standard” therapy was significantly associated with insurance type [indigent plan versus private insurance OR 0.13 (95% CI 0.04-0.43) for stage I-II; OR 0.38 (95% CI 0.14-1.00) for stage III]. For patients with stage I-II NSCLC, survival was associated with age, gender, insurance type (indigent plan versus private insurance HR 1.98; 95% CI 1.16-3.37), stage, and treatment selection. In stage III NSCLC, survival was associated with treatment selection. Conclusion Within a single academic medical center, socioeconomically disadvantaged patients with stage I-III NSCLC are less likely to receive “standard” therapy. Socioeconomically disadvantaged patients with stage I-II NSCLC have inferior survival independent of therapy. PMID:22512997

  8. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Philippines § 17.351 Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist the Republic of the Philippines in the replacement and upgrading of equipment and...

  9. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Philippines § 17.351 Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist the Republic of the Philippines in the replacement and upgrading of equipment and...

  10. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Philippines § 17.351 Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist the Republic of the Philippines in the replacement and upgrading of equipment and...

  11. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Philippines § 17.351 Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist the Republic of the Philippines in the replacement and upgrading of equipment and...

  12. 38 CFR 17.351 - Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Philippines § 17.351 Grants for the replacement and upgrading of equipment at Veterans Memorial Medical Center. Grants to assist the Republic of the Philippines in the replacement and upgrading of equipment and...

  13. mHealth tools for the pediatric patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Slaper, Michael R; Conkol, Kimberly

    2014-02-01

    The concept of the pediatric patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a theory has been evolving since it was initially conceived more than 40 years ago. When the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Council on Pediatric Practice first wrote about this model, "medical home" was defined solely as the central location of a pediatric patient's medical records. Approximately two decades later, the AAP published its inaugural policy statement on this topic. Through this policy statement, the medical home was defined as a place where care for pediatric patients would be accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective. Although the lack of access to providers, especially in rural communities, may inhibit the adoption of the PCMH or chronic care models, technology has evolved to the point where many of the gaps in care can be bridged. mHealth, defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as the use of mobile and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, health care services, and health research, can be one specific example of how technology can address these issues. One early study has shown that patients who use mHealth tools are more likely to adhere to self-monitoring requirements and, in turn, have significantly improved outcomes. A rapidly evolving and scalable mHealth technology that has the ability to address these issues are self-management mobile applications, or apps. It has been estimated that there are currently more than 40,000 health care-related apps available. Furthermore, use of these apps is growing, as more than 50% of smartphone users surveyed responded that they have used their device to gather health information, and almost 20% of this population has at least one health care app on their device. PMID:24512160

  14. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  15. A decade of offering a Healing Enhancement Program at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Rodgers, Nancy J; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Thomley, Barbara S; Do, Alexander; Wood, Christina; Pronk, Susan C; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-11-01

    An increased focus has been given to improving the patient experience in health care. This focus has included placing value in a patient-centric, holistic approach to patient care. In the past decade, the Healing Enhancement Program was developed at 1 large medical center to address this focus through implementation of such integrative medicine services as massage, acupuncture, and music therapy to holistically address the pain, anxiety, and tension that hospitalized patients often experience. We describe the development and growth of this program over the past decade. PMID:26573445

  16. Maternal mortality in the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC) 1971-1982.

    PubMed

    Mashini, I; Mroueh, A; Hadi, H

    1984-08-01

    Maternal deaths were reviewed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC) during an 11-year period, 1971-1982. There were 35,058 live births and 45 deaths making a maternal mortality rate of 128 per 100,000 live births. Hemorrhage, sepsis and toxemia were the main direct obstetric causes of death. The most important indirect causes were cerebrovascular accidents and heart disease. In this review, an analytic discussion of the direct and indirect causes of maternal death in Lebanon are presented and preventive measures are discussed. PMID:6152795

  17. Inventory management for cardiac catheterization labs: the Princeton-Baptist Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Long, T A

    1993-08-01

    Several issues must be considered for implementation in order to decrease inventories and make them more manageable. Physician consensus on products, strict vendor control by the department manager, setting and maintaining low par levels, inventorying stock daily, negotiating just-in-time deliveries, conservation-minded staff, and working in concert with central supply and materiel management personnel are steps that when employed correctly can lead to more manageable inventories in cardiac catheterization departments. If these steps are implemented, they will enhance the liquidity of the department and ultimately that of the medical center. PMID:10127553

  18. Multidisciplinary Teams and Obesity: Role of the Modern Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Kevin M; Manning, Debra A; Julian, Regina M

    2016-03-01

    With the growing obesity epidemic, it is difficult for individual primary care providers to devote the time and effort necessary to achieve meaningful weight loss for significant numbers of patients. A variety of health care professionals provide value and evidence-based care that is effective in treating obesity and other preventable diseases. Multidisciplinary collaboration between primary care physicians and other trained health professionals within patient-centered medical homes offers an effective approach to sustainable behavioral treatment options for individuals who are obese or overweight. PMID:26896199

  19. Conjoined twins: three cases in one tertiary medical center and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kongling, L; Shi, X; Yao, Q

    2014-01-01

    Conjoined twins are so rare that most obstetricians will not be personally exposed to such cases during their professional lifetimes. The authors report three cases including one of dicephalic parapagus conjoined twins and two thoracopagus conjoined twins in the present tertiary medical center, and discuss the diagnosis and management details. They also review the incidence, embryological, diagnostic, obstetrical, and prognostic aspects of conjoined twins. Regular antenatal visits and serial ultrasound scanning are crucial for early diagnosis of conjoined twins, optimal obstetric management and perinatal preparation still remain challenging, and multidisciplinary cooperation is urgently needed. PMID:25864269

  20. Accelerating change: Fostering innovation in healthcare delivery at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Barnett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) have the potential to be leaders in the era of healthcare delivery reform, but most have yet to display a commitment to delivery innovation on par with their commitment to basic research. Several institutional factors impede delivery innovation including the paucity of adequate training in design and implementation of new delivery models and the lack of established pathways for academic career advancement outside of research. This paper proposes two initiatives to jumpstart disruptive innovation at AMCs: an institutional "innovation incubator" program and a clinician-innovator career track coupled with innovation training programs. PMID:26250082

  1. Cost outcomes of supplemental nurse staffing in a large medical center.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ying; Chappel, Andre R; Freund, Deborah A; Aiken, Linda H; Noyes, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Use of agency-employed supplemental nurses on nursing personnel costs was examined in 19 adult patient care units in a large academic medical center. Results indicated that the modest use of supplemental nurses was cost-efficient with regard to overall nursing personnel costs, but heavy reliance on supplemental nurses to meet staffing needs was not cost-efficient. In addition, there was no statistical difference in hourly personnel cost between the use of supplemental nurses and overtime worked by permanent nurses. PMID:25479239

  2. Prevalence of the microbiologic flora in contact lens wearers at the Puerto Rico Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, N; Díaz Mendoza, S; Townsend, W; Carro, J

    1991-03-01

    The prevalence of microbioogic flora was determined in a convenience sample of contact lens wearers at the Puerto Rico Medical Center, ophthalmology clinics obtaining cultures from the conjunctival fornices. Gram positive bacterial prevalence was 100% in the control group, as well as in rigid gas permeable lens wearers. In the soft contact lens group, gram positive bacterial prevalence was 94.7%. On the other hand prevalence of Gram negative bacteria is null in the soft contact lens wearer population, being only 2.5% in control group, and 45.5% for Rigid Gas Permeable wearers. These contact lens wearers were using different disinfection systems. PMID:1854385

  3. Spreading a patient-centered medical home redesign: a case study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Clarissa; Coleman, Katie; Ross, Tyler R; Johnson, Eric; Fishman, Paul A; Larson, Eric B; Liss, David; Trescott, Claire; Reid, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Health care leaders and policymakers are turning to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model to contain costs, improve the quality of care, and create a more positive primary care work environment. We describe how Group Health, an integrated delivery system, developed and implemented a PCMH intervention that included standardized structural and practice level changes. This intervention was spread to a diverse set of 26 primary care practices in 14 months using Lean Management principles. Group Health's experience provides valuable insights that can be used to improve the design and implementation of future PCMH models. PMID:22415283

  4. The Citizen Health System (CHS): a modular medical contact center providing quality telemedicine services.

    PubMed

    Maglaveras, Nicos; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Koutkias, Vassilis G; Gogou, George; Lekka, Irini; Goulis, Dimitrios; Avramidis, Avram; Karvounis, Charalambos; Louridas, George; Balas, E Andrew

    2005-09-01

    In the context of the Citizen Health System (CHS) project, a modular Medical Contact Center (MCC) was developed, which can be used in the monitoring, treatment, and management of chronically ill patients at home, such as diabetic or congestive heart failure patients. The virtue of the CHS contact center is that, using any type of communication and telematics technology, it is able to provide timely and preventive prompting to the patients, thus, achieving better disease management. In this paper, we present the structure of the CHS system, describing the modules that enable its flexible and extensible architecture. It is shown, through specific examples, how quality of healthcare delivery can be increased by using such a system. PMID:16167689

  5. Effectiveness of Diabetes Interventions in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Ackroyd, Sarah A.; Wexler, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care model for the provision of primary care that is being rapidly adopted in the U.S. with the support of federal agencies and professional organizations. Its goal is to provide comprehensive, patient-centered care with increased access, quality, and efficiency. Diabetes, as a common, costly, chronic disease that requires ongoing management by patients and providers, is a condition that is frequently monitored as a test case in PCMH implementations. While in theory a PCMH care model that supports patient engagement and between-visit care may help improve diabetes care delivery and outcomes, the success of this approach may depend largely upon the specific strategies used and implementation approach. The cost-effectiveness of diabetes care in the PCMH model is not yet clear. Interventions have been most effective and most cost-effective for those with the poorest diabetes management at baseline. PMID:24477830

  6. Secretarial Instruction in Florida Community Colleges and Area Vocational-Technical Centers: Meeting the Demands of the Future. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    The secretarial instructional programs at Florida community colleges and area vocational-technical centers were reviewed to determine the actions that are needed to enable the programs to meet current and future demands for secretaries who are competent in the use of advanced office systems technology. Data for the review were drawn from a…

  7. Hurley Medical Center report makes fund-raising look like fun. Hackensack, CMH use styles suited to their donors.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2000-01-01

    Myriad elements go into making a great fund-raising publication. Judges singled out three reports with content and design clearly aimed at thanking supporters and stimulating the flow of contributions. They are: Hurley Medical Center, Grand Rapids, Mich., first place; Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, N.J., second place; and Clinton Memorial Healthcare Regional Health System Foundation, Wilmington, Ohio, third place. PMID:11188143

  8. Stakeholder Perspectives on Changes in Hypertension Care Under the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Alison J.; Kellom, Katherine; Miller-Day, Michelle; McClintock, Heather F. de Vries; Kaye, Elise M.; Gabbay, Robert; Cronholm, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, yet the proportion of adults whose hypertension is controlled is low. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model for care delivery that emphasizes patient-centered and team-based care and focuses on quality and safety. Our goal was to investigate changes in hypertension care under PCMH implementation in a large multipayer PCMH demonstration project that may have led to improvements in hypertension control. Methods The PCMH transformation initiative conducted 118 semistructured interviews at 17 primary care practices in southeastern Pennsylvania between January 2011 and January 2012. Clinicians (n = 47), medical assistants (n = 26), office administrators (n = 12), care managers (n = 11), front office staff (n = 7), patient educators (n = 4), nurses (n = 4), social workers (n = 4), and other administrators (n = 3) participated in interviews. Study personnel used thematic analysis to identify themes related to hypertension care. Results Clinicians described difficulties in expanding services under PCMH to meet the needs of the growing number of patients with hypertension as well as how perceptions of hypertension control differed from actual performance. Staff and office administrators discussed achieving patient-centered hypertension care through patient education and self-management support with personalized care plans. They indicated that patient report cards were helpful tools. Participants across all groups discussed a team- and systems-based approach to hypertension care. Conclusion Practices undergoing PCMH transformation may consider stakeholder perspectives about patient-centered, team-based, and systems-based approaches as they work to optimize hypertension care. PMID:26916899

  9. Clostridium difficile Infections in Medical Intensive Care Units of a Medical Center in Southern Taiwan: Variable Seasonality and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Critical patients are susceptible to Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), which cause significant morbidity and mortality in the hospital. In Taiwan, the epidemiology of CDI in intensive care units (ICUs) is not well understood. This study was aimed to describe the incidence and the characteristics of CDI in the ICUs of a medical center in southern Taiwan. Adult patients with diarrhea but without colostomy/colectomy or laxative use were enrolled. Stool samples were collected with or without 5 ml alcohol and were plated on cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar. C. difficile identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. There were 1,551 patients admitted to ICUs, 1,488 screened, and 145 with diarrhea. A total of 75 patients were excluded due either to laxative use, a lack of stool samples, or refusal. Overall, 70 patients were included, and 14 (20%) were diagnosed with CDI, with an incidence of 8.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. The incidence of CDI was found to be highest in March 2013 and lowest in the last quarter of 2013. The cases were categorized as the following: 5 severe, complicated, 5 severe, and 4 mild or moderate diseases. Among the 14 cases of CDI, the median patient age was 74 (range: 47–94) years, and the median time from admission to diarrhea onset was 16.5 (4–53) days. Eight cases received antimicrobial treatment (primarily metronidazole), and the time to diarrheal resolution was 11.5 days. Though 6 cases were left untreated, no patients died of CDI. The in-hospital mortality of CDI cases was 50%, similar to that of patients without CDI (46.4%; P = 1.0). We concluded that the overall incidence of CDI in our medical ICUs was low and there were variable seasonal incidences and disease severities of CDI. PMID:27509051

  10. Health Maintenance Organizations and Academic Medical Centers. Proceedings of a National Conference (Colorado Springs, Colorado, October 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, James I., Ed.; Nevins, Madeline M., Ed.

    In October 1980 a national conference on health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) was held by the Association of American Medical Colleges and supported by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, in response to inquiries about the advantages and disadvantages of AMC affiliation with or sponsorship of HMOs.…

  11. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Citations are presented for 1380 for formal reports; quick-release technical memorandum; contractor reports; journal articles and periodical literature; technical talks and meeting presentations; computer programs; tech briefs, and patents produced during 1982. An author index is provided.

  12. Assessment of diabetic teleretinal imaging program at the Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Tsan, Grace L; Hoban, Keely L; Jun, Weon; Riedel, Kevin J; Pedersen, Amy L; Hayes, John

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective chart review of 200 diabetic patients who had teleretinal imaging performed between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, at Portland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics to assess the effectiveness of the diabetic teleretinal imaging program. Twenty patients (10%) had diabetic retinopathy. Ninety percent of the available teleretinal imaging studies were of adequate quality for interpretation. In accordance with local VA policy at that time, all teleretinal imaging patients should have been referred for a dilated retinal examination the following year. Image readers referred 97.5% of the patients to eye clinics for subsequent eye examinations, but the imagers scheduled appointments for only 80% of these patients. The redundancy rate, i.e., patients who had an eye examination within the past 6 mo, was 11%; the duplicate recall rate, i.e., patients who had a second teleretinal imaging performed within 1 yr of the eye examination, was 37%. Rates of timely diabetic eye examinations at clinics with teleretinal imaging programs, particularly when teleretinal imaging and eye clinics were colocated at the same community-based outpatient clinic, were higher than those without a teleretinal imaging program. We concluded that the Portland VA Medical Center's teleretinal imaging program was successful in increasing the screening rate for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26230276

  13. Information technology leadership in academic medical centers: a tale of four cultures.

    PubMed

    Friedman, C P

    1999-07-01

    Persons and groups within academic medical centers bring consistent and predictable viewpoints to planning and decision making. The varied professional and academic cultures of these individuals appear to account primarily for the diversity of their viewpoints. Understanding these professional cultures can help leaders achieve some predictability in the complex environments for which they are responsible. Leaders in information technology in particular, in order to be successful, must become part-time anthropologists, immersing themselves in the varied workplaces of their constituents to understand the work they do and the cultures that have grown up around this work. Only in this way will they be able to manage the challenges that arise continuously as the technology and the needs it can address change over time. In this article, the author briefly describes the concept of culture, portrays four specific professional cultures that typically coexist in academic medical centers, and argues that understanding these cultures is absolutely critical to effective management and use of information resources. PMID:10429588

  14. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective. PMID:24369867

  15. Phased Implementation Of At&T PACS At Duke University Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockbridge, Chris; Ravin, Carl E.

    1986-01-01

    "Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians". This request was the driving force behind the installation of the AT&T CommViewm System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpreted diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modal-ities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT&T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field trial of the AT&T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center.

  16. "Phased Implementation Of AT&T PACS At Duke University Medical Center"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockbridge, Chris; Ravin, Carl E.

    1986-06-01

    "Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians". This request was the driving force behind the installation of the AT&T CommView System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpreted diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modalities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT&T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field trial of the AT&T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center.

  17. Patient-Centered Medical Home Adoption: Results From Aligning Forces For Quality.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Megan; Shi, Yunfeng; Ramsay, Patricia P; Harvey, Jillian B; Casalino, Lawrence P; Shortell, Stephen M; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    To improve health care quality within communities, increasing numbers of multistakeholder alliances-groups of payers, purchasers, providers, and consumers-have been created. We used data from two rounds (conducted in July 2007-March 2009 and January 2012-November 2013) of a large nationally representative survey of small and medium-size physician practices. We examined whether the adoption of patient-centered medical home processes spread more rapidly in fourteen Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Aligning Forces for Quality communities, where multistakeholder health care alliances promoted their use, than in other communities. We found no difference in the overall growth of adoption of the processes between the two types of communities. However, improvement on a care coordination subindex was 7.17 percentage points higher in Aligning Forces for Quality communities than in others. Despite the enthusiasm for quality improvement led by multistakeholder alliances, such alliances may not be a panacea for spreading patient-centered medical home processes across a community. PMID:26733712

  18. Health Information Security: A Case Study of Three Selected Medical Centers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Health Information System (HIS) is considered a unique factor in improving the quality of health care activities and cost reduction, but today with the development of information technology and use of internet and computer networks, patients’ electronic records and health information systems have become a source for hackers. Methods This study aims at checking health information security of three selected medical centers in Iran using AHP fuzzy and TOPSIS compound model. To achieve that security measures were identified, based on the research literature and decision making matrix using experts’ points of view. Results and discussion Among the 27 indicators, seven indicators were selected as effective indicators and Fuzzy AHP technique was used to determine the importance of security indicators. Based on the comparisons made between the three selected medical centers to assess the security of health information, it is concluded that Chamran hospital has the most acceptable level of security and attention in three indicators of “verification and system design, user access management, access control system”, Al Zahra Hospital in two indicators of “access management and network access control” and Amin Hospital in “equipment safety and system design”. In terms of information security, Chamran Hospital ranked first, Al-Zahra Hospital ranked second and Al- Zahra hospital has the third place. PMID:23572861

  19. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Albert; Legowski, Elizabeth; Chakka, Anish; Chandran, Uma R; Barmada, M Michael; LaFramboise, William A; Berg, Jeremy; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1) how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2) research objectives and goals for NGS, (3) workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4) storage capacity and unmet needs, (5) available and anticipated funding resources, and (6) future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs. PMID:26115441

  20. The role of the academic medical center library in training public librarians*†

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Charles B.; Wozar, Jody A.; Epstein, Barbara A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This project enhanced access to and awareness of health information resources on the part of public libraries in western Pennsylvania. Setting/Participants/Resources: The Health Sciences Library System (HSLS), University of Pittsburgh, conducted a needs assessment and offered a series of workshops to 298 public librarians. Brief Description: The National Library of Medicine–funded project “Access to Electronic Health Information” at the HSLS, University of Pittsburgh, provided Internet health information training to public libraries and librarians in sixteen counties in western Pennsylvania. Through this project, this academic medical center library identified the challenges for public librarians in providing health-related reference service, developed a training program to address those challenges, and evaluated the impact of this training on public librarians' ability to provide health information. Results/Outcome: The HSLS experience indicates academic medical center libraries can have a positive impact on their communities by providing health information instruction to public librarians. The success of this project—demonstrated by the number of participants, positive course evaluations, increased comfort level with health-related reference questions, and increased use of MEDLINEplus and other quality information resources—has been a catalyst for continuation of this programming, not only for public librarians but also for the public in general. Evaluation Method: A training needs assessment, course evaluation, and impact training survey were used in developing the curriculum and evaluating the impact of this training on public librarians' professional activities. PMID:12883558

  1. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Geskin, Albert; Legowski, Elizabeth; Chakka, Anish; Chandran, Uma R; Barmada, M. Michael; LaFramboise, William A.; Berg, Jeremy; Jacobson, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1) how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2) research objectives and goals for NGS, (3) workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4) storage capacity and unmet needs, (5) available and anticipated funding resources, and (6) future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs. PMID:26115441

  2. Population Health and the Academic Medical Center: The Time Is Right

    PubMed Central

    Gourevitch, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing the health of populations, whether defined as persons receiving care from a healthcare delivery system or more broadly as persons in a region, is emerging as a core focus in the era of healthcare reform. To achieve this goal requires an approach in which preventive care is valued and “non-medical” determinants of patients’ health are engaged. For large multi-mission systems such as academic medical centers, navigating the evolution to a population-oriented paradigm across the domains of patient care, education, and research poses real challenges but also offers tremendous opportunities, as important objectives across each mission begin to align with external trends and incentives. In clinical care, opportunities exist to improve capacity for assuming risk, optimize community benefit, and make innovative use of advances in health information technology. Education must equip the next generation of leaders to understand and address population-level goals in addition to patient-level needs. And the prospects for research to define strategies for measuring and optimizing the health of populations have never been stronger. A remarkable convergence of trends has created compelling opportunities for academic medical centers to advance their core goals by endorsing and committing to advancing the health of populations. PMID:24556766

  3. Patient-centered medical home: how it affects psychosocial outcomes for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie T; Miller, Benjamin F; Gabbay, Robert A; Sparling, Kerri; Dickinson, W Perry

    2012-12-01

    Fragmentation of the current U.S. health care system and the increased prevalence of chronic diseases in the U.S. have led to the recognition that new models of care are needed. Chronic disease management, including diabetes, is often accompanied by a myriad of associated psychosocial issues that need to be addressed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Diabetes care should be aligned with comprehensive whole-person health care. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has emerged as a model for enhanced primary care that focuses on comprehensive integrated care. PCMH demonstration projects have shown improvements in quality of care, patient experience, care coordination, access to care, and quality measures for diabetes. Key PCMH transformative features associated with psychosocial issues related to diabetes reviewed in this article include integration of mental and behavioral health, care management/coordination, payment reform, advanced access, and putting the patient at the center of health care. This article also reviews the evidence supporting comprehensive and integrated care for addressing psychosocial issues associated with diabetes in the medical home. PMID:22961115

  4. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients’ nonadherence and doctors’ clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. PMID:27103790

  5. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution.

    PubMed

    Reach, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients' nonadherence and doctors' clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. PMID:27103790

  6. A 10-year analysis of "revenues," costs, staffing, and workload in an academic medical center clinical chemistry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Benge, H; Csako, G; Parl, F F

    1993-09-01

    From 1980 to 1990 we found progressive increases in workload (number of billable tests; 12.1% per year), staffing [number of full-time equivalents (FTEs); 5.6% per year], "revenues" (gross billings; 25.8% per year), and direct cost (12.9% per year) in the clinical chemistry laboratory of a large tertiary-care university medical center. The increase in direct cost was mainly attributable to an increase in salary cost (23.7% per year), whereas the impact of increasing "consumable" cost was relatively small (5.3% per year). In fact, after adjustment for inflation, the consumable cost was virtually unchanged or decreased during the 10-year study period. Initially, consumables represented about 60% of the direct cost, and the remaining 40% was for salaries. After 1982/83, however, the relative contribution of consumables and salaries to direct cost gradually reversed. Because the workload grew at a higher rate than staffing, the workload per FTE increased from 1980 to 1990. This was paralleled by gradual increases in both "revenue" per FTE and salary per FTE in actual dollars, but by lesser increases to no increases in inflation-corrected dollars. After adjusting for inflation with different indices, the direct cost per test, the consumable cost per test, and the salary cost per test either remained unchanged or decreased in the 1980s. The findings are discussed in the context of technical advancements in laboratory testing, nationwide shortages of medical technologists, and implementation of prospective fixed-fee reimbursement practices during the study period. PMID:8375047

  7. A Problem Solving Curriculum for Active Learning at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, Indiana University School of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iatridis, Panayotis G.

    An innovative curriculum called the "Regional Center Alternative Pathway," recently adopted by the Northwest Center for Medical Education (part of Indiana University's School of Medicine), is presented. The curriculum combines the traditional structure's didactic approach with a new problem-based tutorial curriculum. In this curriculum the…

  8. Providing Medical Information to College Health Center Personnel: A Circuit Librarian Service at the University of Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumpff, Julia C.

    2003-01-01

    College health center personnel are no different from other health practitioners in their need for medical information. To help meet this need, the McKinley Health Center, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, developed a partnership in 1997 with the Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana, a regional site library of the University of Illinois at…

  9. Medical Laboratory Technician--Hematology, Serology, Blood Banking & Immunohematology, 10-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the third of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  10. Development of a Screening Methodology for Entry into Medical Technical Training Courses. Final Report for Period October 1975-April 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisey, Sandra A.; Guinn, Nancy

    At the request of the Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, a project was initiated to evaluate the current screening process used for entry into three medical technical training courses: Aeromedical Specialist, Environmental Health Specialist, and Physiological Training Specialist. A sample of 1,003 students were administered the General…

  11. Medical Laboratory Technician--Chemical Chemistry & Urinalysis, 10-2. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This publication, the last of three course materials in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from the Military Curriculum Materials for Use in Technical and Vocational Education series, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It can be used by advanced students or beginning students participating in a…

  12. Factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among 4,669 clinical medical students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Yunbo; Hu, Guijie; Chen, Qingyun; Peng, Hailun; Li, Kailan; Wei, Jinling; Yi, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To produce competent undergraduate-level medical doctors for rural township health centers (THCs), the Chinese government mandated that medical colleges in Central and Western China recruit rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMSs) starting in 2010. This study aimed to identify and assess factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among both RTMSs and other students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China. Methods: An internet-based self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with medical students in Guangxi province. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the attitudes toward work in a rural township health center. Results: Among 4,669 medical students, 1,523 (33%) had a positive attitude and 2,574 (55%) had a neutral attitude toward working in THCs. Demographic characteristics, personal job concerns, and knowledge of THCs were associated with the choice of a career in THCs. The factors related to a positive attitude included the following: three-year program, a rural-oriented medical program, being male, an expectation of working in a county or township, a focus on medical career development, some perceived difficulty of getting a job, having family support, sufficient knowledge of THCs, optimism toward THC development, seeking lower working pressure, and a lower expected monthly salary. Conclusion: Male students in a three-year program or a rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education program were more likely to work in THCs. Selecting medical students through interviews to identify their family support and intentions to work in THCs would increase recruitment and retention. Establishing favorable policies and financial incentives to improve living conditions and the social status of rural physicians is necessary. PMID:26268830

  13. Methods for Evaluating Practice Change Toward a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Palmer, Raymond F.; Ferrer, Robert L.; Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; Stewart, Elizabeth E.; Wood, Robert; Davila, Marivel; Stange, Kurt C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Understanding the transformation of primary care practices to patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) requires making sense of the change process, multilevel outcomes, and context. We describe the methods used to evaluate the country’s first national demonstration project of the PCMH concept, with an emphasis on the quantitative measures and lessons for multimethod evaluation approaches. METHODS The National Demonstration Project (NDP) was a group-randomized clinical trial of facilitated and self-directed implementation strategies for the PCMH. An independent evaluation team developed an integrated package of quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate the process and outcomes of the NDP for practices and patients. Data were collected by an ethnographic analyst and a research nurse who visited each practice, and from multiple data sources including a medical record audit, patient and staff surveys, direct observation, interviews, and text review. Analyses aimed to provide real-time feedback to the NDP implementation team and lessons that would be transferable to the larger practice, policy, education, and research communities. RESULTS Real-time analyses and feedback appeared to be helpful to the facilitators. Medical record audits provided data on process-of-care outcomes. Patient surveys contributed important information about patient-rated primary care attributes and patient-centered outcomes. Clinician and staff surveys provided important practice experience and organizational data. Ethnographic observations supplied insights about the process of practice development. Most practices were not able to provide detailed financial information. CONCLUSIONS A multimethod approach is challenging, but feasible and vital to understanding the process and outcome of a practice development process. Additional longitudinal follow-up of NDP practices and their patients is needed. PMID:20530398

  14. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH. PMID:24585412

  15. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  16. How psoriasis patients perceive, obtain, and use biologic agents: Survey from an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Isip, Leah; Bhutani, Tina; Dennis, Madison; Heller, Misha M; Lee, Eric S; Nie, Hong; Liao, Wilson

    2013-02-01

    The availability of new biologic agents for the treatment of psoriasis provides hope for improved quality of life outcomes. However, the way patients come to use biologics, the potential barriers they encounter, and their attitudes towards using these medications are still not well studied. Here, we conducted a survey of 106 psoriasis patients at an academic medical center to discern patient attitudes towards biologics. We found that most patients learn of biologics through their physician and perform follow-up research using the Internet. Most patients did not find it difficult to make the decision to start a biologic. Difficulty in obtaining biologics was associated with age less than 55 (p = 0.01), lower income level (p = 0.007), and lack of insurance (p = 0.04). Patients were found to have high satisfaction and compliance rates on biologics. Of patients who missed a dose of their biologic, this was mainly due to logistical reasons such as not having the medication or forgetting to take it, rather than being depressed or overwhelmed. Patients with lower income levels had increased cut backs in personal expenses due to co-payments (p = 0.001). Among respondents, the mean annual out-of-pocket expense for a biologic was $557.12 per year, with a range of $0-7000. PMID:22007699

  17. Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center. A unique orthopaedic resource and teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Hsu, J D

    2000-05-01

    Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, initially a poor farm in the County of Los Angeles, CA became a world renown medical institution because of the polio epidemics in the 1950s. Responding to the need for day to day inpatient care were an overflow of victims of polio who had spine and extremity weakness and were dependent on respirators. Team care, developed at the institution, was used by Vernon L. Nickel, chief orthopaedic surgeon so that maximum use of the limited staff's efforts would be to take care of patients. This need spawned many innovative developments through clinical observations and trials, basic research, and engineering innovations that resulted in the patient's functional improvement and helped return many victims of polio to independence and to their communities. Subsequently, orthopaedic surgeons, Jacquelin Perry, and Alice Garrett joined the full-time staff as the workload increased. Stabilizing the spine using fascial supports, spinal fusion, spinal instrumentation, orthoses, and seating systems allowed those patients who were not totally dependent on respirators to be upright and mobilized. When polio was eradicated, newer programs were established for physically disabled persons with musculoskeletal disorders affecting the spine and extremities and for those patients with congenital, acquired, neurologic, and neuromuscular disorders. In formal graduate residency affiliations, fellowships, and continuing medical education programs orthopaedic surgeons from around the world have been taught the basic principles of "categorical care" for physically disabled people for 50 years. Orthopaedic care given through these programs formed the basis of a new orthopaedic subspecialty, Orthopaedic Rehabilitation. PMID:10818973

  18. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  19. Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael H; Sandler, Lynne; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2005-01-01

    This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies. Thus, few academic medical centers have sufficiently integrated CAM services into conventional care by developing consensus-written policies governing credentialing, malpractice liability, and dietary supplement use. PMID:15712764

  20. Suggested Minimum Data Set for Speech Therapy Centers Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Damanabi, Shahla; Abdolnejad, Shawbo; Karimi, Gelavizh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The minimum data considered as a conceptual framework, based on the achievement of effectiveness indicators and it ensures to access of precise and clear health data. The aims of the present study were identified and proposed a data element set of speech therapy centers affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This study that was cross – sectional type, performed in 9 speech therapy clinic from medical university in 2014. Firstly, the minimum data elements set evaluated using the check list in these centers. Using the findings from the first step and survey of internal and external documentation forms, designed a questionnaire containing a minimum data speech therapy files and it shared between 36 Speech therapy experts using 5 options of Likert scale. Validity of questionnaire was examined through its validity and reliability of content by retest. For data analysis, data processing was performed using descriptive statistics by SPSS21 software. Results: The minimum data set for speech therapy were divided into two categories: clinical and administrative data. The Name and surname, date of birth, gender, address, telephone number, date of admission and the number of treatments, the patient’s complaint, the time of occurrence of injury or disorder, reason and age of disease considered as the most important elements for management data and health history. For the most important elements of clinical information were selected Short-term and long-term aims and development of speech history. Conclusion: The design and implementation of suitable data collection of speech therapy for gathering of data, we recommended planning for the control and prevention of speech disorders to providing high quality and good care of patient in speech therapy centers. PMID:26483600

  1. How big should an integrated health care delivery system be at an academic medical center?

    PubMed

    Lewis, J E

    1995-07-01

    The author defines integrated health care delivery systems and comments that there are few such systems now but many in various stages of development. The size of such a system can be described in terms of the number of patients it serves, including their health status and utilization of care, the geographic configuration of the served area, the number of physicians, and the scope and extent of the facilities network. There are a variety of factors that influence a system's size; the author concentrates on the factors that an academic medical center must consider when formulating system-size goals. He discusses (1) the influence of how the institution structures itself to survive; (2) the effects of technology, innovation, and health care costs on the size and organization of these systems; and (3) the effects of the specific characteristics of the institutions' missions of education, research, and patient care. Real numbers describing integrated systems are presented as they relate to three possible institutional goals: economic viability, academic viability, and academic leadership. The author explains why academic medical centers should not try to be only tertiary or quaternary care providers for other integrated health care delivery systems, but at the same time emphasizes that there is no easy or inexpensive way for centers to develop their own systems. Alternative structures for integrated systems are discussed, such as "disease management systems" being developed by the pharmaceutical industry, an "end-to-end linkage" approach, and various ideas to include "captive markets," such as prisoners, university students, and members of communities for the elderly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7612122

  2. Scientific and Technical Information Output of the Langley Research Center, for calendar year 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Documents listed include NASA Technical Reports, Technical Notes, Technical Memorandums, Special Publications, Contractor Reports, journal articles, and technical presentations made at Society meetings. NASA formal reports listed are those that were mailed and distributed to the ultimate user. The material presented here is listed first by Division and then under the following headings: (a) Formal Reports, (b) Contractor Reports, (c) Articles and Meeting Presentations, and (d) High Number Technical Memorandums (High TMX's). Under each heading, the material cited authors in alphabetical order. If a report has more than one author and these authors are from different Divisions, the report is listed only once, under the senior author's name.

  3. Creating an academy of clinical excellence at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center: a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Wright, Scott M; Kravet, Steven; Christmas, Colleen; Burkhart, Kathleen; Durso, Samuel C

    2010-12-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are committed to the tripartite missions of research, education, and patient care. Promotion decisions at many AHCs focus predominantly on research accomplishments, and some members of the community remain concerned about how to reward clinicians who excel in, and spend a majority of their time, caring for patients. Many clinically excellent physicians contribute substantively to all aspects of the mission by collaborating with researchers (either through intellectual discourse or enrolling participants in trials), by serving as role models for trainees with respect to ideal caring and practice, and by attracting patients to the institution. Not giving fair and appreciative recognition to these clinically excellent faculty places AHCs at risk of losing them. The Center for Innovative Medicine at Johns Hopkins set out to address this concern by defining, measuring, and rewarding clinical excellence. Prior to this initiative, little attention was directed toward the "bright spots" of excellence in patient care at Johns Hopkins Bayview. Using a scholarly approach, the authors launched a new academy; this manuscript describes the history, creation, and ongoing activities of the Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence at Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center. While membership in the academy is honorific, the members of this working academy are committed to influencing institutional culture as they collaborate on advocacy, scholarship, and educational initiatives. PMID:20978424

  4. [The provision of quality and security of medical care on the basis of standardization of medical nurse activities in counseling diagnostic center].

    PubMed

    Chikineva, A V

    2010-01-01

    The enhancement of curative diagnostic process and the increase of its quality depend not only on the management, but on the reasonable implementation of high-tech new technologies. Nowadays, the evidence-based medical nursing practice represents an actively developing direction of medical nurse business. The State Novosibirsk oblast diagnostic center has developed the standards of nurse activities targeted to decrease the duplication in work, the provision of personnel and patient security. The audit of implementation of standards and the monitoring of nursing process permit to timely input the adjustments to the provision of quality of medical nurse care. PMID:20967968

  5. Improvement in the family-centered medical home enhances outcomes for children and youth with special healthcare needs.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Jeanne W; Sherrieb, Kathleen; Cooley, W Carl

    2009-01-01

    Family-centered, coordinated, comprehensive, and culturally competent care for children and youth with special healthcare needs is a national priority. Access to a primary care medical home is a US Maternal and Child Health Bureau performance measure. Most primary care practices lack methods by which to partner with families and improve care. Gaps remain in the number of children with access to a high-quality medical home. The Medical Home Index and Medical Home Family Index and Survey resulting from 10 pilot practices reveal improvements in practice capacity and subsequently in child and family outcomes. PMID:19542808

  6. Treatment Outcomes From a Specialist Model for Treating Tobacco Use Disorder in a Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael V.; Ebbert, Jon O.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; McFadden, David D.; Hays, J. Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cigarette smoking causes premature mortality and multiple morbidity; stop smoking improves health. Higher rates of smoking cessation can be achieved through more intensive treatment, consisting of medication and extended counseling of patients, but there are challenges to integrating these interventions into healthcare delivery systems. A care model using a master-level counselor trained as a tobacco treatment specialist (TTS) to deliver behavioral intervention, teamed with a supervising physician/prescriber, affords an opportunity to integrate more intensive tobacco dependence treatment into hospitals, clinics, and other medical systems. This article analyzes treatment outcomes and predictors of abstinence for cigarette smokers being treated using the TTS-physician team in a large outpatient clinic over a 7-year period. This is an observational study of a large cohort of cigarette smokers treated for tobacco dependence at a medical center. Patients referred by the primary healthcare team for a TTS consult received a standard assessment and personalized treatment planning guided by a workbook. Medication and behavioral plans were developed collaboratively with each patient. Six months after the initial assessment, a telephone call was made to ascertain a 7-day period of self-reported abstinence. The univariate association of each baseline patient characteristic with self-reported tobacco abstinence at 6 months was evaluated using the chi-squared test. In addition, a multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with self-reported tobacco abstinence as the dependent variable and all baseline characteristics included as explanatory variables. Over a period of 7 years (2005–2011), 6824 cigarette smokers who provided general research authorization were seen for treatment. The 6-month self-reported abstinence rate was 28.1% (95% confidence interval: 27.7–30.1). The patients most likely to report abstinence were less dependent, more motivated to quit

  7. Injury patterns of seniors in traffic accidents: A technical and medical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Otte, Dietmar; Mueller, Christian Walter; Petri, Maximilian; Haas, Philipp; Stuebig, Timo; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the actual injury situation of seniors in traffic accidents and to evaluate the different injury patterns. METHODS: Injury data, environmental circumstances and crash circumstances of accidents were collected shortly after the accident event at the scene. With these data, a technical and medical analysis was performed, including Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale and Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale. The method of data collection is named the German In-Depth Accident Study and can be seen as representative. RESULTS: A total of 4430 injured seniors in traffic accidents were evaluated. The incidence of sustaining severe injuries to extremities, head and maxillofacial region was significantly higher in the group of elderly people compared to a younger age (P < 0.05). The number of accident-related injuries was higher in the group of seniors compared to other groups. CONCLUSION: Seniors are more likely to be involved in traffic injuries and to sustain serious to severe injuries compared to other groups. PMID:23173111

  8. Website design: technical, social and medical issues for self-reporting by elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J; Stables, Rod; Matata, Bashir; Lisboa, Paulo J G; Laws, Andy; Almond, Peter

    2014-06-01

    There is growing interest in the use of the Internet for interacting with patients, both in terms of healthcare information provision and information gathering. In this article, we examine the issues in designing healthcare websites for elderly users. In particular, this article uses a year-long case study of the development of a web-based system for self-reporting of symptoms and quality of life with a view to examine the issues relating to website design for elderly users. The issues identified included the technical, social and medical aspects of website design for elderly users. The web-based system developed was based on the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions health-status questionnaire, a commonly used tool for patient self-reporting of quality of life, and the more specific coronary revascularisation outcome questionnaire. Currently, self-reporting is generally administered in the form of paper-based questionnaires to be completed in the outpatient clinic or at home. There are a variety of issues relating to elderly users, which imply that websites for elderly patients may involve different design considerations to other types of websites. PMID:24047573

  9. [Medical and technical means for united circle of evacuation measures in military-medical organisations of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ya; Kalachev, O V; Shchegolev, A V; Vertii, B D

    2015-06-01

    Experts of the medical service of the Armed Forces carried out an analysis of capabilities of modern Russian enterprises and their innovative projects regarding creation of unified means of evacuation of wounded and providing to them necessary types of emergency care with the use of existing and future special and regular means of transport for medical evacuation. As a result of the work of industrial enterprises of the OAO Kazan "Vertoletniy Zavod", "Zarechie", "Vysota" was created a device for the medical evacuation of severe wounded patients. The device is designed for medical evacuation of severe wounded patients from the military medical unit to the site providing comprehensive medical care with maintenance of vital functions and monitoring of his condition. Testing was conducted on the products of regular vehicles medical company of one of the brigades of the Western Military District. The device was presented at the special tactical exercises the Armed Forces Medical Service "Frontier-2014", "Innovation Day" of the Defence Ministry in 2014. PMID:26442308

  10. Rome Air Development Center Air Force technical objective document fiscal year 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-12-01

    This TOD describes the RADC technical programs in support of the Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) mission. The technical objectives have been aligned with the VANGUARD mission areas of Command, Control, and Communications (C3), Reconnaissance and Intelligence, Strategic Systems (Defense) and Technology as a means of focusing the RADC support of VANGUARD. This document is prepared to provide industry and universities with the midterm technical objectives in these areas.

  11. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance...

  12. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance...

  13. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance...

  14. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance...

  15. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance...

  16. Activity of daptomycin against staphylococci collected from bloodstream infections in Spanish medical centers.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Betriu, Carmen; Culebras, Esther; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Gómez, María; López, Fátima

    2009-08-01

    We used the broth microdilution method to determine the MICs of daptomycin and 13 comparator agents against 319 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 201 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, and 183 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Isolates were consecutively collected from bloodstream infections in 39 Spanish medical centers during a 3-month period (March through May 2008). Among MRSA, 1 isolate with intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin and 6 isolates resistant to linezolid were found. Nonsusceptibility to teicoplanin was detected in 3.9% of CoNS. Daptomycin was highly active against the staphylococcal blood isolates tested-all were inhibited at the daptomycin susceptibility breakpoint of < or = 1 microg/mL. Daptomycin retained its activity against the isolates that were resistant to teicoplanin or linezolid, or that had reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. These data suggest that daptomycin could be useful for the treatment of bloodstream infections caused by staphylococci. PMID:19631100

  17. Clinical, scholarly & campus information hypertext tools at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, J.; Kahn, R. M.; Natarajan, N.

    1993-01-01

    In conjunction with other researchers at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (CPMC) we have developed a number of hypertext and free text retrieval computer applications aimed at an extremely diverse audience which includes students and faculty in a university setting as well as health care providers and patients in hospital and clinic settings. Hypertext and free text systems offer features which make them ideal for presenting information in a wide variety of contexts; however, they also have several major weaknesses which must be addressed before these applications can be useful tools. We have learned to maximize the strengths and minimize the weaknesses to present material in a manner that is individualized to the needs of each user from the research scientist in the lab to the patient at the bedside. PMID:8130531

  18. History of the Georgia Baptist/Atlanta Medical Center surgical residency.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, George M; Humphries, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    The Georgia Baptist Hospital established itself as a premier healthcare facility during the first 50 years of the 20th century. The surgical residency started in the 1940s, became accredited in 1958, and has grown into one of the most respected independent programs in the country. The development and growth of the program was a result of the commitment and dedication of the Program Directors in Surgery over the past 50 years. These key leaders included A. Hamblin Letton, John P. Wilson, Paul Stanton, and George Lucas. The hospital's name has changed to Atlanta Medical Center with the sale of the hospital to Tenet in 1997. The same old school approach to surgical training that characterized the residency when it was known as Georgia Baptist persists and provides outstanding training for future surgeons interested in a broadly based surgical education and experience. PMID:20698368

  19. The Patient-Centered Medical Home: Preparation of the Workforce, More Questions than Answers.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P Preston; Klink, Kathleen; Gilman, Stuart; Green, Larry A; Phillips, Russell S; Shipman, Scott; Keahey, David; Rugen, Kathryn; Davis, Molly

    2015-07-01

    As American medicine continues to undergo significant transformation, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is emerging as an interprofessional primary care model designed to deliver the right care for patients, by the right professional, at the right time, in the right setting, for the right cost. A review of local, state, regional and national initiatives to train professionals in delivering care within the PCMH model reveals some successes, but substantial challenges. Workforce policy recommendations designed to improve PCMH effectiveness and efficiency include 1) adoption of an expanded definition of primary care, 2) fundamental redesign of health professions education, 3) payment reform, 4) responsiveness to local needs assessments, and 5) systems improvement to emphasize quality, population health, and health disparities. PMID:25707941

  20. Searching for Excellence & Diversity: Increasing the Hiring of Women Faculty at One Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Jennifer T.; Fine, Eve; Pribbenow, Christine Maidl; Handelsman, Jo; Carnes, Molly

    2014-01-01

    One opportunity to realize the diversity goals of academic health centers comes at the time of hiring new faculty. To improve the effectiveness of search committees in increasing the gender diversity of faculty hires, the authors created and implemented a training workshop for faculty search committees designed to improve the hiring process and increase the diversity of faculty hires at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. They describe the workshops, which they presented in the School of Medicine and Public Health between 2004 and 2007, and they compare the subsequent hiring of women faculty in participating and nonparticipating departments and the self-reported experience of new faculty within the hiring process. Attendance at the workshop correlates with improved hiring of women faculty and with a better hiring experience for faculty recruits, especially women. The authors articulate successful elements of workshop implementation for other medical schools seeking to increase gender diversity on their faculties. PMID:20505400

  1. The Houston Academy of Medicine--Texas Medical Center Library management information system.

    PubMed Central

    Camille, D; Chadha, S; Lyders, R A

    1993-01-01

    A management information system (MIS) provides a means for collecting, reporting, and analyzing data from all segments of an organization. Such systems are common in business but rare in libraries. The Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library developed an MIS that operates on a system of networked IBM PCs and Paradox, a commercial database software package. The data collected in the system include monthly reports, client profile information, and data collected at the time of service requests. The MIS assists with enforcement of library policies, ensures that correct information is recorded, and provides reports for library managers. It also can be used to help answer a variety of ad hoc questions. Future plans call for the development of an MIS that could be adapted to other libraries' needs, and a decision-support interface that would facilitate access to the data contained in the MIS databases. PMID:8251972

  2. Perspectives on the role of patient-centered medical homes in HIV Care.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Gregory; Yujiang, Jia; Seiler, Naomi; Malcarney, Mary-Beth; Horton, Katherine; Shaikh, Irshad; Freehill, Gunther; Alexander, Carla; Akhter, Mohammad N; Hidalgo, Julia

    2014-07-01

    To strengthen the quality of HIV care and achieve improved clinical outcomes, payers, providers, and policymakers should encourage the use of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), building on the Ryan White CARE Act Program established in the 1990s. The rationale for a PCMH with HIV-specific expertise is rooted in clinical complexity, HIV's social context, and ongoing gaps in HIV care. Existing Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program clinicians are prime candidates to serve HIV PCMHs, and HIV-experienced community-based organizations can play an important role. Increasingly, state Medicaid programs are adopting a PCMH care model to improve access and quality to care. Stakeholders should consider several important areas for future action and research with regard to development of the HIV PCMH. PMID:24832431

  3. Perspectives on the Role of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Yujiang, Jia; Seiler, Naomi; Malcarney, Mary-Beth; Horton, Katherine; Shaikh, Irshad; Freehill, Gunther; Alexander, Carla; Akhter, Mohammad N.; Hidalgo, Julia

    2014-01-01

    To strengthen the quality of HIV care and achieve improved clinical outcomes, payers, providers, and policymakers should encourage the use of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), building on the Ryan White CARE Act Program established in the 1990s. The rationale for a PCMH with HIV-specific expertise is rooted in clinical complexity, HIV’s social context, and ongoing gaps in HIV care. Existing Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program clinicians are prime candidates to serve HIV PCMHs, and HIV-experienced community-based organizations can play an important role. Increasingly, state Medicaid programs are adopting a PCMH care model to improve access and quality to care. Stakeholders should consider several important areas for future action and research with regard to development of the HIV PCMH. PMID:24832431

  4. The Critical Role of Clerks in the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Greg L; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2016-07-01

    Research evaluating the effectiveness, function, and implementation of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) has found major socioprofessional transformations and contributions of primary care physicians and, to a lesser degree, nurses. Our longitudinal ethnographic research with teams implementing PCMH in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care identifies the important but largely underutilized contributions of clerks to PCMH outcomes. Although the relationship of high-performing clerical staff to patient satisfaction is widely acknowledged, PCMH can be further enhanced by enabling clerks to use administrative tasks as conduits for investing in long-term personalized relationships with patients that foster trust in the PCMH and the broader health care organization. Such relationships are engendered through the care-coordination activities clerks perform, which may be bolstered by organizational investment in clerks as skilled health care team members. PMID:27401428

  5. Rebuilding a statewide network of community health centers for the medically underserved: a longitudinal assessment.

    PubMed

    Verderber, Stephen; Thomas, Cabrenia M

    2013-01-01

    The Strategic Facility Improvement (SFI) initiative, has resulted in the replacement of 44 outpatient clinics and 28 clinic renovation capital improvement projects across Louisiana's 64 parishes. A total of $67.3 million has been invested in this effort to date. The goal of the SFI is to improve the health status of medically underserved patient populations. It remains the sole capital improvement effort of its kind and has been in continuous implementation since 1991. The SFI consists of predesign needs assessment, analysis of alternate site planning options, historic preservation options in the adaptation of noteworthy community civic resources to healthcare uses, and the postoccupancy assessment of completed capital improvements with the aim of learning positive lessons that can be carried into future efforts. It is based on advocacy and guided by a statewide public health agency. The discussion is centered on a status report on a 21-year period and is examined critically from the perspective of key stakeholders. PMID:23892383

  6. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; status of the Proton Therapy Center at Samsung Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sang Gyu; Jung, Sang Hoon; Chung, Yoonsun; Cho, Sungkoo; Jo, Kwanghyun; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Hong, Chae-Seon; Shin, Jung Suk; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Boram; Shibagaki, Gantaro; Nonaka, Hideki; Sasai, Kenzo; Koyabu, Yukio; Choi, Changhoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Noh, Jae Myung; Yu, Jeong Il; Song, Sanghyuk; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Bomi; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. Materials and Methods The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. Results The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. Conclusion The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015. PMID:26756034

  7. The Technical Efficiency of Earthquake Medical Rapid Response Teams Following Disasters: The Case of the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Tang, Bihan; Yang, Hongyang; Liu, Yuan; Xue, Chen; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Performance assessments of earthquake medical rapid response teams (EMRRTs), particularly the first responders deployed to the hardest hit areas following major earthquakes, should consider efficient and effective use of resources. This study assesses the daily technical efficiency of EMRRTs in the emergency period immediately following the 2010 Yushu earthquake in China. Methods: Data on EMRRTs were obtained from official daily reports of the general headquarters for Yushu earthquake relief, the emergency office of the National Ministry of Health, and the Health Department of Qinghai Province, for a sample of data on 15 EMRRTs over 62 days. Data envelopment analysis was used to examine the technical efficiency in a constant returns to scale model, a variable returns to scale model, and the scale efficiency of EMRRTs. Tobit regression was applied to analyze the effects of corresponding influencing factors. Results: The average technical efficiency scores under constant returns to scale, variable returns to scale, and the scale efficiency scores of the 62 units of analysis were 77.95%, 89.00%, and 87.47%, respectively. The staff-to-bed ratio was significantly related to global technical efficiency. The date of rescue was significantly related to pure technical efficiency. The type of institution to which an EMRRT belonged and the staff-to-bed ratio were significantly related to scale efficiency. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that supports improvements to EMRRT efficiency and serves as a reference for earthquake emergency medical rapid assistance leaders and teams. PMID:26690182

  8. Fiscal strain and access to opiate substitution therapy at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Robert; Leslie, Douglas; Woody, George

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between institutional fiscal strain and the availability of opiate substitution therapy (eg, methadone maintenance), an effective but relatively expensive treatment for heroin addiction. An observational design was used to examine the association of changes in funding and changes in provision for treating opiate addiction at 29 VA Medical Centers (VAMCs). We hypothesized that VAMCs experiencing greater fiscal strain would show reduced availability of opiate substitution treatment. Administrative records from each of 29 VAMCs that provided opiate substitution therapy in both Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 and FY 1999 were used to measure changes in the availability of this service, ie, the percent change in total patients treated, annual visits per patient, and total services delivered. Institutional fiscal strain was measured by the percent decline in per capita funding at four levels at each VAMC: the entire medical center, all mental health programs, all substance abuse programs (inpatient and outpatient), and outpatient substance abuse programs alone. The total number of patients receiving opiate substitution increased from 5,549 in FY 1995 to 6,884 in FY 1999 (24%), annual visits per patient decreased by 16%, and the total number of units of services increased by 4%. There were no significant relationships between changes in the delivery of opiate substitution services and changes in per capita funding at any of the four institutional levels. No new programs were started during these years. Although no new programs were started, the availability of opiate substitution therapy at VA facilities with existing programs was maintained over a five-year period regardless of local funding changes, although at somewhat reduced intensity. PMID:12851018

  9. Acinetobacter Infections and Outcomes at an Academic Medical Center: A Disease of Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jennifer; Park, An Na; Gander, Rita; Orr, Kathleen; Arocha, Doramarie; Zhang, Song; Greenberg, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Our study aims to describe the epidemiology, microbial resistance patterns, and clinical outcomes of Acinetobacter infections at an academic university hospital. This retrospective study analyzed all inpatient clinical isolates of Acinetobacter collected at an academic medical center over 4 years. The data were obtained from an Academic tertiary referral center between January 2008 and December 2011. All consecutive inpatients during the study period who had a clinical culture positive for Acinetobacter were included in the study. Patients without medical records available for review or less than 18 years of age were excluded. Methods. Records were reviewed to determine source of isolation, risk factors for acquisition, drug resistance patterns, and clinical outcomes. Repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction of selected banked isolates was used to determine patterns of clonal spread in and among institutions during periods of higher infection rates. Results. Four hundred eighty-seven clinical isolates of Acinetobacter were found in 212 patients (in 252 admissions). Patients with Acinetobacter infections were frequently admitted from healthcare facilities (HCFs) (59%). One hundred eighty-three of 248 (76%) initial isolates tested were resistant to meropenem. One hundred ninety-eight of 249 (79.5%) initial isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR). Factors associated with mortality included bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] = 1.93, P = .024), concomitant steroid use (OR = 2.87, P < .001), admission from a HCF (OR = 6.34, P = .004), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 3.17, P < .001). Conclusions. Acinetobacter isolates at our institution are frequently MDR and are more common among those who reside in HCFs. Our findings underline the need for new strategies to prevent and treat this pathogen, including stewardship efforts in long-term care settings. PMID:26034772

  10. Implementation of Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Wilford, Joseph D.; Howard, Wanita; Dane, Susan K.; Davis, Scott R.; Karandikar, Nitin J.; Blau, John L.; Ford, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology (CP) is a relatively new laboratory information system (LIS) operating within the Epic suite of software applications. To date, there have not been any publications describing implementation of Beaker CP. In this report, we describe our experience in implementing Beaker CP version 2012 at a state academic medical center with a go-live of August 2014 and a subsequent upgrade to Beaker version 2014 in May 2015. The implementation of Beaker CP was concurrent with implementations of Epic modules for revenue cycle, patient scheduling, and patient registration. Methods: Our analysis covers approximately 3 years of time (2 years preimplementation of Beaker CP and roughly 1 year after) using data summarized from pre- and post-implementation meetings, debriefings, and the closure document for the project. Results: We summarize positive aspects of, and key factors leading to, a successful implementation of Beaker CP. The early inclusion of subject matter experts in the design and validation of Beaker workflows was very helpful. Since Beaker CP does not directly interface with laboratory instrumentation, the clinical laboratories spent extensive preimplementation effort establishing middleware interfaces. Immediate challenges postimplementation included bar code scanning and nursing adaptation to Beaker CP specimen collection. The most substantial changes in laboratory workflow occurred with microbiology orders. This posed a considerable challenge with microbiology orders from the operating rooms and required intensive interventions in the weeks following go-live. In postimplementation surveys, pathology staff, informatics staff, and end-users expressed satisfaction with the new LIS. Conclusions: Beaker CP can serve as an effective LIS for an academic medical center. Careful planning and preparation aid the transition to this LIS. PMID:26955505

  11. OPEN PELVIC FRACTURES: THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE MEDICAL CENTER AT KNOXVILLE EXPERIENCE OVER TEN YEARS

    PubMed Central

    Black, Emily Anne; Lawson, Christy M; Smith, Scott; Daley, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Open fractures of the pelvis remain a devastating injury with a high mortality and morbidity. Such injuries require an aggressive treatment plan and the coordination of trauma and orthopaedic surgeons to achieve the best outcomes. We report our experience at the University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville with open pelvic fractures over the last ten years. Methods After IRB and institutional approval, we reviewed patients admitted with a diagnosis of open fracture of the pelvis from 1999 to 2009. Demographic and admission data were recorded in the trauma registry (TRACS) of the Level I Trauma Center, serving the 1.2 million people living in the regions of east Tennessee, western North Carolina and southeastern Kentucky. Data on fractures were obtained from review of the medical records and radiographs within the chart Results There were 3053 pelvic fractures from January 1999 to December 2009. There were 231 deaths in this group (6%) and ages ranged from 18 to 89 years old and Injury Severity Scores ranged from 4 to 75, with a mean of 18.3. Seventy five percent of patients were able to be discharged home. Fifty-two fractures were open. There were 43 men and the mean age was 39 years old. Average ISS was 23 and ranged from 5 to 50. There were 10 deaths (19%) and eight patients underwent an-gioembolization for control of bleeding (3 deaths). Motorcycle crashes were the most frequent cause of an open fracture, with lateral compression injuries representing 71%. A defined algorithm for fracture management has been in place and employed to assure adequate resuscitation and fracture care and is presented. Discussion Open pelvic fractures are usually the result of a high energy transfer, and convey a high morbidity and mortality. A defined resuscitation and fixation strategy improves outcome from historical reports. Injuries from penetrating mechanisms are associated with less morbidity and lower mortality. PMID:22096441

  12. Technologies in the patient-centered medical home: examining the model from an enterprise perspective.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Cortney L; Marshall, Capt Robert; Murphy, Edward; Mun, Seong K

    2011-01-01

    Fee-for-service reimbursement has fragmented the healthcare system. Providers are paid based on the number of services rendered instead of quality, leading to the cost of care rising at a faster rate than its value. One approach to counter this is the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a primary care model that emphasizes team-based medicine, a partnership between patients and providers, and expanded access and communication. The transition to PCMH is facilitated by innovative technologies, such as telemedicine for additional services, electronic medical records to document patients' health needs, and online portals for electronic visits and communication between patients and providers. Implementing these technologies involves tremendous investment of funds and time from practices and healthcare organizations. Although PCMH does not require such technologies, they facilitate its success, as care coordination and population management necessitated by the model are difficult to do without. This article argues that there is a paradox in PCMH and technology is at its center. Although PCMH intends to be cost effective by reducing hospital admissions and ER visits through providing better preventative services, it is actually a financial risk due to the very real upfront costs of implementing and sustaining technologies needed to carry out the intent of the PCMH model, which may not be made up immediately, if ever. This article delves into the rationale behind why payers, providers, and patients have adopted PCMH regardless of this risk and in doing so, maps out the roles that innovative technologies play in the conversion to PCMH. PMID:21663447

  13. Final Technical Report for Industrial Assessment Center at West Virginia University

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran

    2008-01-09

    The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program at West Virginia University (WVU), which is funded by the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has provided a unique opportunity to enhance efficient energy utilization in small to medium-sized manufacturers. It has also provided training to engineering students in the identification and analysis of efficient energy use in each aspect of the manufacturing process and associated supporting elements. The outcomes of the IAC Program at WVU have assisted the manufacturers and the students in having a heightened sensitivity to industrial energy conservation, waste reduction, and productivity improvement, as well as a better understanding of the technical aspects of manufacturing processes and the supporting elements through which efficient energy utilization can be enhanced. The IAC at WVU has conducted 101 energy assessments from 2002 until 2006. The focus of the industrial assessments has been on energy savings. It has been the IAC’s interest to strongly focus on energy savings and on waste minimization and productivity improvements that strictly have an impact on energy. The IAC at WVU was selected as the Center of the year in 2005 from amongst 26 centers and has obtained a ranking within the top 5 in the previous few years. From 2002 to 2006, the total recommended energy savings produced by the IAC at WVU is 1,214,414 MMBtu, of which the electricity accounts for 93,826,067 kWh (equivalent to 320,226 MMBtu) and natural gas for 871,743 MMBtu. The balance is accounted for in savings in other fuels, mainly coal and wood. This results in an average recommended energy savings of 928,971 kWh from electricity and 8,631 MMBtu from natural gas per facility. The total CO2 emissions saved from 2002 to 2006 is 154,462 tons, with an average of 1,529.3 tons per facility. The average recommended energy cost savings per facility is

  14. Value-based financially sustainable behavioral health components in patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Kathol, Roger G; Degruy, Frank; Rollman, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    Because a high percentage of primary care patients have behavioral problems, patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) that wish to attain true comprehensive whole-person care will find ways to integrate behavioral health services into their structure. Yet in today's health care environment, the incorporation of behavioral services into primary care is exceptional rather than usual practice. In this article, we discuss the components considered necessary to provide sustainable, value-added integrated behavioral health care in the PCMH. These components are to: (1) combine medical and behavioral benefits into one payment pool; (2) target complex patients for priority behavioral health care; (3) use proactive onsite behavioral "teams;" (4) match behavioral professional expertise to the need for treatment escalation inherent in stepped care; (5) define, measure, and systematically pursue desired outcomes; (6) apply evidence-based behavioral treatments; and (7) use cross-disciplinary care managers in assisting the most complicated and vulnerable. By adopting these 7 components, PCHMs will augment their ability to achieve improved health in their patients at lower cost in a setting that enhances ease of access to commonly needed services. PMID:24615314

  15. Summary of the National Demonstration Project and recommendations for the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Benjamin F; Nutting, Paul A; Miller, William L; Stange, Kurt C; Stewart, Elizabeth E; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes findings from the National Demonstration Project (NDP) and makes recommendations for policy makers and those implementing patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) based on these findings and an understanding of diverse efforts to transform primary care. The NDP was launched in June 2006 as the first national test of a particular PCMH model in a diverse sample of 36 family practices, randomized to facilitated or self-directed groups. An independent evaluation team used a multimethod evaluation strategy, analyzing data from direct observation, depth interviews, e-mail streams, medical record audits, and patient and clinical staff surveys. Peer-reviewed manuscripts from the NDP provide answers to 4 key questions: (1) Can the NDP model be built? (2) What does it take to build the NDP model? (3) Does the NDP model make a difference in quality of care? and (4) Can the NDP model be widely disseminated? We find that although it is feasible to transform independent practices into the NDP conceptualization of a PCMH, this transformation requires tremendous effort and motivation, and benefits from external support. Most practices will need additional resources for this magnitude of transformation. Recommendations focus on the need for the PCMH model to continue to evolve, for delivery system reform, and for sufficient resources for implementing personal and practice development plans. In the meantime, we find that much can be done before larger health system reform. PMID:20530397

  16. Integration of footprints information systems in palliative care: the case of Medical Center of Central Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tsavatewa, Christopher; Musa, Philip F; Ramsingh, Isaac

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare in America continues to be of paramount importance, and one of the most highly debated public policy issues of our time. With annual expenditures already exceeding $2.4 trillion, and yielding less than optimal results, it stands to reason that we must turn to promising tools and solutions, such as information technology (IT), to improve service efficiency and quality of care. Presidential addresses in 2004 and 2008 laid out an agenda, framework, and timeline for national health information technology investment and development. A national initiative was long overdue. This report we show that advancements in both medical technologies and information systems can be capitalized upon, hence extending information systems usage beyond data collection to include administrative and decision support, care plan development, quality improvement, etc. In this paper we focus on healthcare services for palliative patients. We present the development and preliminary accounts of a successful initiative in the Medical Center of Central Georgia where footprints information technology was modified and integrated into the hospital's palliative care service and existing EMR systems. The project provides evidence that there are a plethora of areas in healthcare in which innovative application of information systems could significantly enhance the care delivered to loved ones, and improve operations at the same time.. PMID:21057887

  17. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  18. Training Residents to Work in a Patient-Centered Medical Home: What Are the Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Hasley, Peggy B; Simak, Deborah; Cohen, Elan; Buranosky, Raquel

    2016-05-01

    Background The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) provides a setting to enhance resident training in systems-based practice. Few studies have addressed the impact of PCMHs on resident knowledge and confidence. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate resident knowledge, confidence, behavior, and patient outcomes in a PCMH. Methods Our curriculum emphasized patient panel report card interpretation, a telephone medicine curriculum, and interdisciplinary team-based care of chronic medical conditions. We measured resident satisfaction, knowledge, and confidence. Patient outcomes included hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and blood pressures. Prescores and postscores were compared using paired t tests for continuous measures and McNemar's test for binary measures. Results A total of 154 residents were eligible for the curriculum. All residents participated in the curriculum, though not all residents completed the evaluation. Completion rates for paired pre-post knowledge and confidence surveys were 38% and 37%, respectively. Nearly 80% (69 of 87) of residents indicated that the curriculum was above average or outstanding. Our evaluation revealed very small immediate improvements in knowledge and confidence. No significant improvement in patients' HbA1cs or blood pressures occurred after the curriculum. Conclusions Explicit training to work in a PCMH was feasible and resulted in high levels of resident satisfaction and immediate small improvements in knowledge and confidence. PMID:27168892

  19. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Amerine, Lindsey B.; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N.; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T.; Rodgers, Philip T.; Williams, Dennis M.; Pinelli, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  20. Nurses and Psychologists Advancing the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model.

    PubMed

    Corso, Kent A; Gage, Donna

    2016-01-01

    As America experiences the largest health care revolution of the past 50 years, clinicians and administrators are refocusing their attention on the goals of the Quadruple Aim. Motivation and capabilities among stakeholders vary as practical tools and an adequate workforce remain elusive. At the same time, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is spreading rapidly but demonstrating variable results. Positive PCMH outcomes seem to reflect high-quality teamwork. A primary care physician shortage is looming, and increasing numbers of health professionals are being pushed into the PCMH, mandated to provide "integrated" care. Even now, the majority of our Graduate Medical Education programs do not train clinicians in team-based workflow models and interaction skills. Consequently, PCMH teams will only optimize and realize the model's true potential if they learn to coordinate, communicate, and collaborate effectively. This means all PCMH staff members achieve solid teamwork skills and work at the top of their license. The authors discuss resources for improving coordination, communication, and collaboration among members of PCMH teams, and strategies for including other professionals. PMID:27259123