Science.gov

Sample records for medical evaluation part

  1. Preoperative Medical Evaluation: Part 1: General Principles and Cardiovascular Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    A thorough assessment of a patient's medical status is standard practice when dental care is provided. Although this is true for procedures performed under local anesthesia alone, the information gathered may be viewed somewhat differently if the dentist is planning to use sedation or general anesthesia as an adjunct to dental treatment. This article is the first of a 2-part sequence and will address general principles and cardiovascular considerations. A second article will address pulmonary, metabolic, and miscellaneous disorders. PMID:19769423

  2. Modernizing medical photography, part 1.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Government, media and public focus on waiting times in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom has forced the organization to look closely at the process by which a patient progresses through an increasingly complex and ever changing system. In an effort to streamline the patient journey or care pathway, modernizers have turned to business and manufacturing for solutions. Whilst medical photographers need to recognize their role in this context, they are also facing major technological modernization through the development of digital photography. Part 1 of this paper looks at the origins of some of the techniques presently being used to modernize the patient journey. Part 2 shows how these tools of modernization can be utilized to harness the advantages of digital technology to provide a modern and appropriate medical photography service in a large, disparate teaching hospital. PMID:15805027

  3. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 240 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines F Appendix F to Part.... F Appendix F to Part 240—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide... chart, may be further evaluated as determined by the railroad's medical examiner....

  4. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 240 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines F Appendix F to Part.... F Appendix F to Part 240—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide... chart, may be further evaluated as determined by the railroad's medical examiner....

  5. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 240 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines F Appendix F to Part.... F Appendix F to Part 240—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide... chart, may be further evaluated as determined by the railroad's medical examiner....

  6. New Medical Device Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, as a member of the Harmonization by Doing (HBD) project, I discuss the significance of regulatory science in global medical device development and our experience in the international collaboration process for medical devices. In Japan, most innovative medical therapeutic devices were previously developed and exported by foreign-based companies. Due to this device lag, Japanese had minimal opportunities for receiving treatment with innovative medical devices. To address this issue, the Japanese government has actively accepted foreign clinical trial results and promoted global clinical trials in projects such as HBD. HBD is a project with stakeholders from academia, regulatory authorities, and industry in the US and Japan to promote global clinical trials and reduce device lags. When the project started, medical device clinical trials were not actively conducted in Japan at not just hospitals but also at medical device companies. We started to identify issues under the concept of HBD. After 10 years, we have now become key members in global clinical trials and able to obtain approvals without delay. Recently, HBD has started promoting international convergence. Physicians and regulatory authorities play central roles in compiling guidelines for the clinical evaluation of medical device development, which will be a more active field in the near future. The guidelines compiled will be confirmed with members of academia and regulatory authorities in the United Sates. PMID:27040333

  7. Evaluation of Medical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Howard S.; Hiatt, Howard H.

    1978-01-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of a medical intervention requires measurements of both its benefits and risks as compared to those of alternative forms of management. The requisite measurements are more difficult to make than this description suggests, and the accumulation of information is inhibited by certain characteristics of our pattern of health…

  8. Evaluating instruction in medical education.

    PubMed

    Irby, D M

    1983-11-01

    The component parts and development of a comprehensive system to evaluate and improve teaching in a school of medicine are described by the author in this paper. This system integrates quantitative measures of teaching (student/resident ratings of classroom and clinical teaching), descriptive documentation (faculty teaching load, innovations, and research on teaching), and qualitative judgments (peer review) on the full spectrum of instruction in medicine. Medical school policies have standardized evaluation criteria, instrumentation, and procedures while granting departments flexibility in conducting peer review. The results of two studies indicate that the evaluation system described here has had a positive impact both on the improvement of teaching and on academic promotions. PMID:6631922

  9. Course Evaluation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Jennifer R.; Shea, Judy A.

    2007-01-01

    Course evaluation is integral to medical education. We discuss (1) distinctive features of medical education that impact on course evaluation, (2) a framework for course evaluations, (3) details that shape the evaluation process, (4) key measurement issues important to data gathering and interpretation, and (5) opportunities for expanding the…

  10. Hypertension. Part 2: The Role of Medication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the differences between exercise alone and exercise with medication (e.g., diuretics, beta blockers, and ACE inhibitors) for treating hypertensive patients. Guidelines are presented for physicians wanting to change the therapeutic regimen or to step down from medical therapy, noting exercise must always be part of the program. (SM)

  11. 78 FR 23940 - Use of International Standard ISO-10993, “Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices Part 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... updated information on the use of the Office of Device Evaluation (ODE) General Program Memorandum G95-1... is to provide further clarification and updated information on the use of ODE General...

  12. 5 CFR 930.108 - Periodic medical evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Periodic medical evaluation. 930.108... Operators § 930.108 Periodic medical evaluation. At least once every 4 years, each agency will ensure that..., the employee may be referred for a medical examination in accordance with the provisions of part...

  13. Evaluating ethics competence in medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, J; Crisp, R; Fulford, K W; Hope, T

    1999-01-01

    We critically evaluate the ways in which competence in medical ethics has been evaluated. We report the initial stage in the development of a relevant, reliable and valid instrument to evaluate core critical thinking skills in medical ethics. This instrument can be used to evaluate the impact of medical ethics education programmes and to assess whether medical students have achieved a satisfactory level of performance of core skills and knowledge in medical ethics, within and across institutions. PMID:10536759

  14. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 242 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... likely occur if the examinee's medical condition has improved in some way or if technology has advanced... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines D Appendix D to Part... Appendix D to Part 242—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide...

  15. Drug safety: withdrawn medications are only part of the picture.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Nigel S B

    2016-01-01

    In a research article published in BMC Medicine, Onakpoya and colleagues provide a historical review of withdrawals of medications for safety reasons. However, withdrawn medications are only one part of the picture about how regulatory agencies manage drug risks. Moreover, medications introduced before the increased pre-marketing regulations and post-marketing monitoring systems instituted after the thalidomide tragedy have little relevance when considering the present drug safety picture because the circumstances under which they were introduced were completely different. To more fully understand drug safety management and regulatory agency actions, withdrawals should be evaluated within the setting and timeframe in which the medications are approved, which requires information about approvals and safety warnings. Studies are needed that provide a more comprehensive current picture of the identification and evaluation of drug safety risks as well as how regulatory agencies deal with them. Please see related research article: http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0553-2. PMID:26873482

  16. Evaluating a medical error taxonomy.

    PubMed Central

    Brixey, Juliana; Johnson, Todd R.; Zhang, Jiajie

    2002-01-01

    Healthcare has been slow in using human factors principles to reduce medical errors. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) recognizes that a lack of attention to human factors during product development may lead to errors that have the potential for patient injury, or even death. In response to the need for reducing medication errors, the National Coordinating Council for Medication Errors Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP) released the NCC MERP taxonomy that provides a standard language for reporting medication errors. This project maps the NCC MERP taxonomy of medication error to MedWatch medical errors involving infusion pumps. Of particular interest are human factors associated with medical device errors. The NCC MERP taxonomy of medication errors is limited in mapping information from MEDWATCH because of the focus on the medical device and the format of reporting. PMID:12463789

  17. Medication use evaluation: pharmacist rubric for performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Fanikos, John; Jenkins, Kathryn L; Piazza, Gregory; Connors, Jean; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2014-12-01

    Despite rigorous expert review, medications often fall into routine use with unrecognized and unwanted complications. Use of some medications remains controversial because information to support efficacy is conflicting, scant, or nonexistent. Medication use evaluation (MUE) is a performance improvement tool that can be used when there is uncertainty regarding whether a medication will be beneficial. It is particularly useful when limited evidence is available on how best to choose between two or more medications. MUEs can analyze the process of medication prescribing, preparation, dispensing, administration, and monitoring. MUEs can be part of a structured or mandated multidisciplinary quality management program that focuses on evaluating medication effectiveness and improving patient safety. Successful MUE programs have a structure in place to support completion of rapid-cycle data collection, analysis, and intervention that supports practice change. PMID:25521847

  18. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. PMID:23664251

  19. Word smithing in medical genetics. Part II.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M Michael

    2013-01-01

    Terminology discussed here is subsumed under "common misused terms in medical genetics articles" (depressed nasal bridge; anophthalmia; rotated ears; low-set ears; heterotopia; ASD as an abbreviation for autism spectrum disorders; mental retardation; "radiographs revealed something"; and new syndrome) and also subsumed under "erroneous terminology that persists at the editorial and publishing level" (failure to understand the possessive case of names ending in "s"; failure to understand that a comma should not be used before Jr; problematic use of numbers in reference sections; failure to italicize Latin phrases; failure to honor book titles that begin words with upper case letters; omitting the corresponding author; and inadequate citation of foreign languages). PMID:23132830

  20. Astronaut Jack Lousma with part of Inflight Medical Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, reaches into a medical kit, part of the Inflight Medical Support System (IMSS), during training for the second manned Skylab Earth-orbital mission. This activity took place in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility at JSC.

  1. Novel psoriasis therapies and patient outcomes, part 1: topical medications.

    PubMed

    Feely, Meghan A; Smith, Barry L; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, advances in our understanding of inflammatory mediators and the underlying pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have shed light on potential therapeutic targets, which has led to the development of several new promising treatments. In this article, key clinical trials, mechanisms of action, patient outcomes, and relevant safety information for these novel topical medications will be evaluated. This article is the first in a 3-part series on treatments presently in the pipeline for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis including topical agents, biologic treatments, and systemic therapies in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials. With novel approaches to the disease process, these therapies may afford more targeted individualized treatment regimens and offer hope to patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis who have reported a suboptimal therapeutic response to conventional therapies. PMID:25844785

  2. Chat reference service in medical libraries: part 2--Trends in medical school libraries.

    PubMed

    Dee, Cheryl R

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of medical school libraries offer chat service to provide immediate, high quality information at the time and point of need to students, faculty, staff, and health care professionals. Part 2 of Chat Reference Service in Medical Libraries presents a snapshot of the current trends in chat reference service in medical school libraries. In late 2002, 25 (21%) medical school libraries provided chat reference. Trends in chat reference services in medical school libraries were compiled from an exploration of medical school library Web sites and informal correspondence from medical school library personnel. Many medical libraries are actively investigating and planning new chat reference services, while others have decided not to pursue chat reference at this time. Anecdotal comments from medical school library staff provide insights into chat reference service. PMID:12723811

  3. Chat reference service in medical libraries: part 1--An introduction.

    PubMed

    Dee, Cheryl R

    2003-01-01

    Chat reference services offer the opportunity to provide immediate access to quality information to meet the medical information needs of students, faculty, staff, physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. Part 1 of this two-part article on chat reference service in medical libraries is an introduction to the management of chat reference services and to features available for chat reference. The management of chat reference services raises issues of planning, staffing, selecting, and marketing. Planning issues focus on the identification of the users, the users' medical information needs, and the users' information-seeking behavior. Staffing issues relate to the selection of chat hours, the location of the chat service, and participation in collaborative agreements. Selecting chat software weighs the sophistication of the chat features against the related cost. Marketing uses techniques similar to traditional reference services and often begins slowly as chat expertise develops. Part 2 of the article discusses trends in chat reference services in medical libraries. PMID:12723810

  4. Automated Assessment of Medical Training Evaluation Text

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Pakhomov, Serguei; Gladding, Sophia; Aylward, Michael; Borman-Shoap, Emily; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2012-01-01

    Medical post-graduate residency training and medical student training increasingly utilize electronic systems to evaluate trainee performance based on defined training competencies with quantitative and qualitative data, the later of which typically consists of text comments. Medical education is concomitantly becoming a growing area of clinical research. While electronic systems have proliferated in number, little work has been done to help manage and analyze qualitative data from these evaluations. We explored the use of text-mining techniques to assist medical education researchers in sentiment analysis and topic analysis of residency evaluations with a sample of 812 evaluation statements. While comments were predominantly positive, sentiment analysis improved the ability to discriminate statements with 93% accuracy. Similar to other domains, Latent Dirichlet Analysis and Information Gain revealed groups of core subjects and appear to be useful for identifying topics from this data. PMID:23304426

  5. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 1: overview, clinical characteristics, and laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Dawn Zhang; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-10-01

    Acne presenting in adult women is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Many affected women have had acne during their teenaged years, have tried several therapies in the past, and are seeking effective treatment. Others are frustrated by the inexplicable emergence of acne as an adult when they never had it as a teenager. Both groups seek an explanation of why they have acne, are often psychosocially affected by its effects on appearance and self-esteem, and all are wanting effective and safe treatment. Clinicians are encouraged to connect favorably with each patient through careful history and physical examination and to consider underlying causes of androgen excess. Practical approaches to examination and laboratory evaluation are discussed. PMID:26682286

  6. Research and Evaluation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena A.; Collins, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of medical education is continuously evolving, as are the needs of the learner. The appropriate use of research and evaluation is key when assessing the need for change and instituting one's innovative endeavours. This paper demonstrates how research seeks to generate new knowledge, whereas evaluation uses information acquired from…

  7. Medical Marijuana Laws Reduce Prescription Medication Use In Medicare Part D.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Ashley C; Bradford, W David

    2016-07-01

    Legalization of medical marijuana has been one of the most controversial areas of state policy change over the past twenty years. However, little is known about whether medical marijuana is being used clinically to any significant degree. Using data on all prescriptions filled by Medicare Part D enrollees from 2010 to 2013, we found that the use of prescription drugs for which marijuana could serve as a clinical alternative fell significantly, once a medical marijuana law was implemented. National overall reductions in Medicare program and enrollee spending when states implemented medical marijuana laws were estimated to be $165.2 million per year in 2013. The availability of medical marijuana has a significant effect on prescribing patterns and spending in Medicare Part D. PMID:27385238

  8. Evaluating a Federated Medical Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Belden, J.; Williams, J.; Richardson, B.; Schuster, K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Federated medical search engines are health information systems that provide a single access point to different types of information. Their efficiency as clinical decision support tools has been demonstrated through numerous evaluations. Despite their rigor, very few of these studies report holistic evaluations of medical search engines and even fewer base their evaluations on existing evaluation frameworks. Objectives To evaluate a federated medical search engine, MedSocket, for its potential net benefits in an established clinical setting. Methods This study applied the Human, Organization, and Technology (HOT-fit) evaluation framework in order to evaluate MedSocket. The hierarchical structure of the HOT-factors allowed for identification of a combination of efficiency metrics. Human fit was evaluated through user satisfaction and patterns of system use; technology fit was evaluated through the measurements of time-on-task and the accuracy of the found answers; and organization fit was evaluated from the perspective of system fit to the existing organizational structure. Results Evaluations produced mixed results and suggested several opportunities for system improvement. On average, participants were satisfied with MedSocket searches and confident in the accuracy of retrieved answers. However, MedSocket did not meet participants’ expectations in terms of download speed, access to information, and relevance of the search results. These mixed results made it necessary to conclude that in the case of MedSocket, technology fit had a significant influence on the human and organization fit. Hence, improving technological capabilities of the system is critical before its net benefits can become noticeable. Conclusions The HOT-fit evaluation framework was instrumental in tailoring the methodology for conducting a comprehensive evaluation of the search engine. Such multidimensional evaluation of the search engine resulted in recommendations for

  9. Anniversary paper: evaluation of medical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Yulei

    2008-02-01

    Medical imaging used to be primarily within the domain of radiology, but with the advent of virtual pathology slides and telemedicine, imaging technology is expanding in the healthcare enterprise. As new imaging technologies are developed, they must be evaluated to assess the impact and benefit on patient care. The authors review the hierarchical model of the efficacy of diagnostic imaging systems by Fryback and Thornbury [Med. Decis. Making 11, 88-94 (1991)] as a guiding principle for system evaluation. Evaluation of medical imaging systems encompasses everything from the hardware and software used to acquire, store, and transmit images to the presentation of images to the interpreting clinician. Evaluation of medical imaging systems can take many forms, from the purely technical (e.g., patient dose measurement) to the increasingly complex (e.g., determining whether a new imaging method saves lives and benefits society). Evaluation methodologies cover a broad range, from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) techniques that measure diagnostic accuracy to timing studies that measure image-interpretation workflow efficiency. The authors review briefly the history of the development of evaluation methodologies and review ROC methodology as well as other types of evaluation methods. They discuss unique challenges in system evaluation that face the imaging community today and opportunities for future advances. PMID:18383686

  10. Parting Thoughts on Foundation Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisely, D. Susan

    2002-01-01

    Discusses four reasons why progress in evaluation in private foundations has been so slow and intermittent. These include: (1) inflated claims for the power of evaluation as a guide; (2) foundations' distance from the consequences of their actions; (3) sensitivity to hostile criticism and the difficulties of learning from legitimate criticism; and…

  11. Evaluation of medical waste incinerators in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Labib, Ossama A; Hussein, Ahmed H; El-Shall, Waffaa I; Zakaria, Adel; Mohamed, Mona G

    2005-01-01

    Medical establishments play important roles in different activities by using of modern technology to serve the humans and the environment through different departments in the establishment and its firms. Medical wastes are considered as a hazardous waste because they contain toxic materials, infectious, or non-infectious wastes and they are considered as a hazard to millions of patients, health care workers, and visitors. Treatment processes for medical wastes comprise autoclaving, microwaving, chemical disinfection, irradiation, plasma system, and incineration. Incineration is a thermal process, which destroys most of the waste including microorganisms. Combustion process must be under controlled conditions to convert wastes containing hazardous materials into mineral residues and gases. Hospital waste incinerators may emit a number of pollutants depending on the waste being incinerated. These pollutants include particulate matter, acid gases, toxic metals, and toxic organic compounds products of incomplete combustion, e.g., dioxins, furans, and carbon monoxide, as well as sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides. So, there should be a reduction of emissions of most of these pollutants by air pollution control devices. This study was conducted in 51 medical establishments (ME) in Alexandria. To evaluate its incinerators. It was found that only 31.4% of total ME have their own incinerators to treat their medical waste. Also, the incinerators conditions were poor with incomplete combustion. So, the study recommend handling of all medical wastes of ME in Alexandria by the company which is responsible now for management of domestic solid wastes of the city. PMID:16900615

  12. Drugs on the Internet, part II: antidepressant medication web sites.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Melissa; Montagne, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant medications have been the fastest growing category of use of pharmaceutical products over the past decade. Selected Internet web sites providing information on antidepressant medications were identified and assessed using code of conduct criteria for posting health information on the Internet as developed by the Health on the Internet Foundation. Thirteen representative web sites were evaluated. Degree of compliance with each of the eight criterion varied by site, though all 13 sites met the criterion for legality of content and conduct on their web site. WebMD and FamilyDoctor.org met most of the criteria, while pharmaceutical company sites tended to meet the fewest criteria. PMID:21895517

  13. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part II: prophylactic treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Guerzoni, Simona; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    The present part II review highlights pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (excluding those of minor severity) of medications used in prophylactic treatment of the main primary headaches (migraine, tension-type and cluster headache). The principles of pharmacokinetics and metabolism, and the interactions of medications for acute treatment are examined in part I. The overall goal of this series of two reviews is to increase the awareness of physicians, primary care providers and specialists regarding pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of headache medications. The aim of prophylactic treatment is to reduce the frequency of headache attacks using beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, antidepressants, antiepileptics, lithium, serotonin antagonists, corticosteroids and muscle relaxants, which must be taken daily for long periods. During treatment the patient often continues to take symptomatic drugs for the attack, and may need other medications for associated or new-onset illnesses. DDIs can, therefore, occur. As a whole, DDIs of clinical relevance concerning prophylactic drugs are a limited number. Their effects can be prevented by starting the treatment with low dosages, which should be gradually increased depending on response and side effects, while frequently monitoring the patient and plasma levels of other possible coadministered drugs with a narrow therapeutic range. Most headache medications are substrates of CYP2D6 (e.g., beta-blockers, antidepressants) or CYP3A4 (e.g., calcium-channel blockers, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, corticosteroids). The inducers and, especially, the inhibitors of these isoenzymes should be carefully coadministered. PMID:17125412

  14. Trends in Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Qin, Yolanda; Young, Theo; Thomas, Zachary; Spivey, Christina A.; Solomon, David K.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background To increase the enrollment rate of medication therapy management (MTM) programs in Medicare Part D plans, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) lowered the allowable eligibility thresholds based on the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs for Medicare Part D plans for 2010 and after. However, an increase in MTM enrollment rates has not been realized. Objectives To describe trends in MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans and to identify patterns that may hinder enrollment in MTM programs. Methods This study analyzed data extracted from the Medicare Part D MTM Programs Fact Sheets (2008–2014). The annual percentages of utilizing each threshold value of the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs, as well as other aspects of MTM enrollment practices, were analyzed among Medicare MTM programs that were established by Medicare Part D plans. Results For 2010 and after, increased proportions of Medicare Part D plans set their eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. For example, in 2008, 48.7% of Medicare Part D plans (N = 347:712) opened MTM enrollment to Medicare beneficiaries with only 2 chronic disease states (specific diseases varied between plans), whereas the other half restricted enrollment to patients with a minimum of 3 to 5 chronic disease states. After 2010, only approximately 20% of plans opened their MTM enrollment to patients with 2 chronic disease states, with the remaining 80% restricting enrollment to patients with 3 or more chronic diseases. Conclusion The policy change by CMS for 2010 and after is associated with increased proportions of plans setting their MTM eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. Changes to the eligibility thresholds by Medicare Part D plans might have acted as a barrier for increased MTM enrollment. Thus, CMS may need to identify alternative strategies to increase MTM enrollment in Medicare plans. PMID:26380030

  15. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental..., and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for payment... medical findings; (3) Medical history; (4) Mental and physical functional capacity; (5) Prognoses; and...

  16. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental..., and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for payment... medical findings; (3) Medical history; (4) Mental and physical functional capacity; (5) Prognoses; and...

  17. Deformable part models for object detection in medical images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Object detection in 3-D medical images is often necessary for constraining a segmentation or registration task. It may be a task in its own right as well, when instances of a structure, e.g. the lymph nodes, are searched. Problems from occlusion, illumination and projection do not arise, making the problem simpler than object detection in photographies. However, objects of interest are often not well contrasted against the background. Influence from noise and other artifacts is much stronger and shape and appearance may vary substantially within a class. Methods Deformable models capture the characteristic shape of an anatomic object and use constrained deformation for hypothesing object boundaries in image regions of low or non-existing contrast. Learning these constraints requires a large sample data base. We show that training may be replaced by readily available user knowledge defining a prototypical deformable part model. If structures have a strong part-relationship, or if they may be found based on spatially related guiding structures, or if the deformation is rather restricted, the supporting data information suffices for solving the detection task. We use a finite element model to represent anatomic variation by elastic deformation. Complex shape variation may be represented by a hierarchical model with simpler part variation. The hierarchy may be represented explicitly as a hierarchy of sub-shapes, or implicitly by a single integrated model. Data support and model deformation of the complete model can be represented by an energy term, serving as quality-of-fit function for object detection. Results The model was applied to detection and segmentation tasks in various medical applications in 2- and 3-D scenes. It has been shown that model fitting and object detection can be carried out efficiently by a combination of a local and global search strategy using models that are parameterized for the different tasks. Conclusions A part-based elastic

  18. Asclepius, Caduceus, and Simurgh as medical symbols, part I.

    PubMed

    Nayernouri, Touraj

    2010-01-01

    This is the first of two articles reviewing the history of medical symbols. In this first article I have briefly reviewed the evolution of the Greek god, Asclepius, (and his Roman counterpart Aesculapius) with the single serpent entwined around a wooden rod as a symbol of western medicine and have alluded to the misplaced adoption of the Caduceus of the Greek god Hermes (and his Roman counterpart Mercury) with its double entwined serpents as an alternative symbol. In the second part of this article (to be published later), I have made a tentative suggestion of why the Simorgh might be adopted as an Eastern or an Asian symbol for medicine. PMID:20039773

  19. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... Bureau institution considered medically appropriate, or to a community hospital....

  20. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205 Section 339.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS MEDICAL QUALIFICATION DETERMINATIONS Physical and Medical Qualifications § 339.205 Medical evaluation programs....

  1. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205 Section 339.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS MEDICAL QUALIFICATION DETERMINATIONS Physical and Medical Qualifications § 339.205 Medical evaluation programs....

  2. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part I: HSV, HPV.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Majewska, Anna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world and important cause of morbidity and mortality. Especially STDs of viral etiology are difficult to cure. In many cases the antiviral therapy can relieve the symptoms but not eliminate the virus. During the past decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of antiviral drugs. One of the oldest antiviral medications is acyclovir (ACV). It is approved to treat initial and recurrent genital herpes and as a suppressive therapy in severe recurrent genital infections as well. Drug resistance to ACV and related drugs is seen among immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus HIV-infected patients. Resistant infections can be managed by second-line drugs - foscarnet or cidofovir- but they are more toxic than ACV. In case of HPV there is not known specific target for the medication and that is why the substances used in human papilloma virus HPV infection therapy are either antimitotics or immunomodulators. The Part I review focuses on mechanisms of actions and mechanisms of resistance to antiviral agents used in a treatment of the genital herpes and genital HPV infection. In Part II we will show the therapeutic options in other sexually transmitted infections: hepatitis B, C and HIV. PMID:24032509

  3. Evaluation of hospital medication inventory policies.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Marek; Mooney, Ed; Chen, Shi-Jie Gary; Mazur, Lukasz M

    2014-09-01

    As supply chain costs constitute a large portion of hospitals' operating expenses and with $27.7 billion spent by the US hospitals on drugs alone in 2009, improving medication inventory management provides a great opportunity to decrease the cost of healthcare. This study investigates different management approaches for a system consisting of one central storage location, the main pharmacy, and multiple dispensing machines located in each department. Each medication has a specific unit cost, availability from suppliers, criticality level, and expiration date. Event-driven simulation is used to evaluate the performance of several inventory policies based on the total cost and patient safety (service level) under various arrangements of the system defined by the number of drugs and departments, and drugs' criticality, availability, and expiration levels. Our results show that policies that incorporate drug characteristics in ordering decisions can address the tradeoff between patient safety and cost. Indeed, this study shows that such policies can result in higher patient safety and lower overall cost when compared to traditional approaches. Additional insights from this study allow for better understanding of the medication inventory system's dynamics and suggest several directions for future research in this topic. Findings of this study can be applied to help hospital pharmacies with managing their inventory. PMID:24014095

  4. 78 FR 19725 - Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... mariner medical evaluation program. Section 718 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2012 directed the...'s merchant mariner medical evaluation program and alternatives to the program. Congress...

  5. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  6. 42 CFR 456.170 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456... Hospitals Medical, Psychiatric, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.170 Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or before authorization for...

  7. 42 CFR 456.370 - Medical, psychological, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. 456...: Intermediate Care Facilities Medical, Psychological, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.370 Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to an ICF or before authorization...

  8. 42 CFR 456.370 - Medical, psychological, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. 456...: Intermediate Care Facilities Medical, Psychological, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.370 Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to an ICF or before authorization...

  9. 42 CFR 456.370 - Medical, psychological, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. 456...: Intermediate Care Facilities Medical, Psychological, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.370 Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to an ICF or before authorization...

  10. 42 CFR 456.370 - Medical, psychological, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. 456...: Intermediate Care Facilities Medical, Psychological, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.370 Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to an ICF or before authorization...

  11. 42 CFR 456.370 - Medical, psychological, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. 456...: Intermediate Care Facilities Medical, Psychological, and Social Evaluations and Admission Review § 456.370 Medical, psychological, and social evaluations. (a) Before admission to an ICF or before authorization...

  12. Improvement of Automotive Part Supplier Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongmunee, Chalermkwan; Chutima, Parames

    2016-05-01

    This research investigates the problem of the part supplier performance evaluation in a major Japanese automotive plant in Thailand. Its current evaluation scheme is based on experiences and self-opinion of the evaluators. As a result, many poor performance suppliers are still considered as good suppliers and allow to supply parts to the plant without further improvement obligation. To alleviate this problem, the brainstorming session among stakeholders and evaluators are formally conducted. The result of which is the appropriate evaluation criteria and sub-criteria. The analytical hierarchy process is also used to find suitable weights for each criteria and sub-criteria. The results show that a newly developed evaluation method is significantly better than the previous one in segregating between good and poor suppliers.

  13. Investigating the faculty evaluation system in Iranian Medical Universities

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Farahnaz; Yamani, Nikoo; Changiz, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To achieve a valid evaluation of faculty members, it is necessary to develop an inclusive and dynamic system of evaluation addressing all the activities and responsibilities of faculty members. Among these responsibilities, educational activities comprise an important part which needs to be investigated. This study aimed to investigate the current system of evaluating the faculty members’ educational duties. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a checklist for investigating the current evaluation system and was developed confirmed by a focus group. The data for checklist were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire and interview with eight experts of faculty evaluation that worked in different Iranian Medical Universities. For completion of information, the available documents and records were studied. Finally, the current evaluation system of different universities was depicted. Results: The developed checklist had six themes and 123 subthemes. The extracted themes included: Tools, evaluators, processes, appropriateness of faculty field of work with evaluation, feedback status, and university status regarding decisions made based on faculty evaluation results. As for comprehensiveness, all evaluation items except for evaluation and assessment skills and religiosity from personality traits subtheme were fully investigated. The evaluation tools were not enough for different types of education such as clinical education. In six universities, the feedbacks provided were only for making inter/intra department comparison, and no scientific suggestions were included. The results of evaluations were used only for the faculties’ promotions. Discussion: Suitability between evaluation and performance components is a necessity in every evaluation system. The study showed this does not exist in Iranian Universities. For instance, there was no appropriate tool for the evaluation of clinical education. Also, the results of the faculty

  14. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  15. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  16. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  17. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  18. Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part II. Trichoscopic and laboratory evaluations.

    PubMed

    Mubki, Thamer; Rudnicka, Lidia; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shapiro, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    The use of trichoscopy for evaluating a number of hair and scalp disorders is gaining popularity. It is a simple and noninvasive in vivo tool for visualizing hair shafts and the scalp. Recently, alopecias have been classified according to their trichoscopic findings. The second part of this 2-part continuing medical education article reviews recent advances in this field and describes a systematic approach for using the differential diagnostic findings of trichoscopy in alopecia. PMID:25128119

  19. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Services for Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.482 Medical... under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  20. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Services for Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.482 Medical... under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  1. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Services for Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.482 Medical... under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  2. Safety of dermatologic medications in pregnancy and lactation: Part I. Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murase, Jenny E; Heller, Misha M; Butler, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Dermatologists are frequently faced with questions about the safety of commonly prescribed topical and systemic medications during pregnancy and lactation from women of childbearing age who are pregnant, considering pregnancy, or breastfeeding. Safety data, particularly regarding medications that are unique to dermatology, can be difficult to locate and are not consolidated in a single reference guide for clinicians. Parts I and II of this continuing medical education article provide a capsule summary of key points for the most commonly prescribed dermatologic medications to facilitate patient medication risk counseling in pregnancy. A summary table details safety classification data for 3 primary international classification systems: the US Food and Drug Administration, the Swedish Catalogue of Approved Drugs, and the Australian Drug Evaluation Committee. In addition, this table includes an alternative pregnancy classification system developed by a consortium of active members of teratology societies in the US and Europe detailed in Drugs during Pregnancy and Lactation: Treatment Options and Risk Assessment and a safety classification system developed for breastfeeding mothers detailed in Medications and Mother's Milk. PMID:24528911

  3. 78 FR 76507 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cancer (Malignant Neoplastic Diseases)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...We propose to revise the criteria in parts A and B of the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate cases involving cancer (malignant neoplastic diseases) in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act). These proposed revisions reflect our adjudicative experience, advances in medical knowledge, and recommendations from medical experts we......

  4. Integrating Geriatrics into Medical School: Student Journaling as an Innovative Strategy for Evaluating Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shield, Renee R.; Farrell, Timothy W.; Nanda, Aman; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: The Alpert Medical School of Brown University began to integrate geriatrics content into all preclerkship courses and key clerkship cases as part of a major medical school curriculum redesign in 2006. This study evaluates students' responses to geriatrics integration within the curriculum using journals kept by volunteer…

  5. Medical evaluations on the KC-135 1990 flight report summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Guess, Terrell M.; Whiting, Charles W.; Doarn, Charles R.

    1991-01-01

    The medical investigations completed on the KC-135 during FY 1990 in support of the development of the Health Maintenance Facility and Medical Operations are discussed. The experiments are comprised of engineering evaluations of medical hardware and medical procedures. The investigating teams are made up of both medical and engineering personnel responsible for the development of medical hardware and medical operations. The hardware evaluated includes dental equipment, a coagulation analyzer, selected pharmaceutical aerosol devices, a prototype air/fluid separator, a prototype packaging and stowage system for medical supplies, a microliter metering system, and a workstation for minor surgical procedures. The results of these engineering evaluations will be used in the design of fleet hardware as well as to identify hardware specific training requirements.

  6. Risk evaluation of medical and industrial radiation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Cunningham, R.E.; Rathbun, P.A.

    1994-03-01

    In 1991, the NRC, Division of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety, began a program to evaluate the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in regulating medical devices. This program represents an initial step in an overall plant to evaluate the use of PRA in regulating the use of nuclear by-product materials. The NRC envisioned that the use of risk analysis techniques could assist staff in ensuring that the regulatory approach was standardized, understandable, and effective. Traditional methods of assessing risk in nuclear power plants may be inappropriate to use in assessing the use of by-product devices. The approaches used in assessing nuclear reactor risks are equipment-oriented. Secondary attention is paid to the human component, for the most part after critical system failure events have been identified. This paper describes the risk methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), initially intended to assess risks associated with the use of the Gamma Knife, a gamma stereotactic radiosurgical device. For relatively new medical devices such as the Gamma Knife, the challenge is to perform a risk analysis with very little quantitative data but with an important human factor component. The method described below provides a basic approach for identifying the most likely risk contributors and evaluating their relative importance. The risk analysis approach developed for the Gamma Knife and described in this paper should be applicable to a broader class of devices in which the human interaction with the device is a prominent factor. In this sense, the method could be a prototypical model of nuclear medical or industrial device risk analysis.

  7. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  8. 42 CFR 456.482 - Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations. 456..., psychiatric, and social evaluations. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21, the medical, psychiatric, and social evaluations required by §§ 456.170, and 456.370...

  9. Medical evaluations on the KC-135 1991 flight report summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    The medical investigations completed on the KC-135 during FY 1991 in support of the development of the Health Maintenance Facility and Medical Operations are presented. The experiments consisted of medical and engineering evaluations of medical hardware and procedures and were conducted by medical and engineering personnel. The hardware evaluated included prototypes of a crew medical restraint system and advanced life support pack, a shuttle orbiter medical system, an airway medical accessory kit, a supplementary extended duration orbiter medical kit, and a surgical overhead canopy. The evaluations will be used to design flight hardware and identify hardware-specific training requirements. The following procedures were evaluated: transport of an ill or injured crewmember at man-tended capability, surgical technique in microgravity, transfer of liquids in microgravity, advanced cardiac life support using man-tended capability Health Maintenance Facility hardware, medical transport using a model of the assured crew return vehicle, and evaluation of delivery mechanisms for aerosolized medications in microgravity. The results of these evaluation flights allow for a better understanding of the types of procedures that can be performed in a microgravity environment.

  10. Terror Medicine as Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Leonard A.; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D.; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training. PMID:25309891

  11. Reform of the Method for Evaluating the Teaching of Medical Linguistics to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hongkui; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Longlu

    2014-01-01

    Explorating reform of the teaching evaluation method for vocational competency-based education (CBE) curricula for medical students is a very important process in following international medical education standards, intensify ing education and teaching reforms, enhancing teaching management, and improving the quality of medical education. This…

  12. Medical Evaluation of Suspected Child Sexual Abuse: 2011 Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    The medical evaluation of children with suspected sexual abuse includes more than just the physical examination of the child. The importance of taking a detailed medical history from the parents and a history from the child about physical sensations following sexual contact has been emphasized in other articles in the medical literature. The…

  13. Medical Laboratory Science: An International Comparison for Credentials Evaluators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Solveig M.; Karlsson, Britta

    Information is presented to help medical technology schools abroad evaluate their credentials in comparison to U.S. requirements. After defining the subfields of medical technology, also called medical laboratory science, a summary is provided of the educational requirements, the professional titles, and the certification recognition of medical…

  14. Faculty Evaluation of Educational Strategies in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Mandira; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate faculty opinion of existing medical curricula in two medical schools in different countries in terms of six educational strategies using the "SPICES continuum." Significant differences between existing educational plans of the two medical schools were identified. (LZ)

  15. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205 Section 339.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS MEDICAL... risks due to occupational or environmental exposure or demands. The need for a medical...

  16. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205 Section 339.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS MEDICAL... risks due to occupational or environmental exposure or demands. The need for a medical...

  17. 5 CFR 339.205 - Medical evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Medical evaluation programs. 339.205 Section 339.205 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS MEDICAL... risks due to occupational or environmental exposure or demands. The need for a medical...

  18. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students’ education

    PubMed Central

    IMANIEH, MOHAMMAD HADI; DEHGHANI, SEYED MOHSEN; SOBHANI, AHMAD REZA; HAGHIGHAT, MAHMOOD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning) as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Methods: Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical students introduced from Medical Faculty to the Pediatrics Department with no personal involvement. 120 medical students were assigned to 8 groups of 15 students each. For four months, 4 groups were trained with traditional method and 4 other groups underwent problem-based learning method on selected subject materials. In each method, a pre-course test at the beginning and a post-course test at the end of each course were given to each group. The questionnaire used in this study as the instrument was composed of 39 questions, 37 multiple choice questions and two short answer questions. Three professors of pediatric gastroenterologist took part in the training. Two of these professors were responsible for solving task training method. The third professor used traditional teacher-centered methodology to eliminate any possible bias. Scores obtained from these tests were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The scores of the students undergoing the traditional method were 14.70±3.03 and 21.20±4.07 in the first and second test, respectively. In problem-based learning, the scores were 15.82±3.29 in the first and 27.52±4.72 in the second test. There was a significant difference between the mean scores of post-course exams of the two groups (p=0.001), while no significant difference was observed between the mean scores of pre-course exams of the groups (p=0.550). Conclusion: It may be concluded that

  19. Moorgate tube train disaster. Part 1-Response of medical services.

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Experience of the medical staff at a major subterranean accident scene showed that there appeared to be a substantial advantage in using site medical teams that could offer anaesthetic facilities. The need for adequate communication from the accident site to the hospital is emphasized. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1174871

  20. Shuttle Orbiter medical system equipment/supplies evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maidlow, Kristin; Schulz, John M.; Lloyd, Charles W.; Breeding, Tiffany

    1991-01-01

    The effectivity was evaluated in zero gravity of several medical equipment and supply items flown in the Shuttle Orbiter Medical System (SOMS). Several procedures listed in Medical Operations Medical Checklist, JSC 1732 were also evaluated. Several items were drawn out of the kits and tested on the KC-135. In two different flights, the following elements were examined: (1) measuring IV flow (drip chamber, one way flow valve, and air/fluid separator); (2) chemstrip protocol for urine analysis in zero-gravity; and (3) tamper resistant seals for injectable medications.

  1. Evaluating innovation. Part 2: Development in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Patients, practitioners, payers, and regulators are advocating for reform in how medical advances are evaluated. Because surgery does not adhere to a standardized developmental pathway, how the medical community accepts a procedure remains unclear. The authors developed a new model, using publication data and patterns, that quantifies this process. Using this technique, the authors identified common archetypes and influences on neurosurgical progress from idea inception to acceptance. METHODS Seven neurosurgical procedures developed in the past 15-25 years were used as developmental case studies (endovascular coil, deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-l-nitrosourea wafer, and 3 radiosurgery procedures), and the literature on each topic was evaluated. A new metric the authors termed "progressive scholarly acceptance" (PSA) was used as an end point for community acceptance. PSA was reached when the number of investigations that refine or improve a procedure eclipsed the total number of reports assessing initial efficacy. Report characteristics, including the number of patients studied, study design, and number of authoring groups from the first report to the point of PSA, were assessed. RESULTS Publication data implicated factors that had an outsized influence on acceptance. First, procedural accessibility to investigators was found to influence the number of reports, number of patients studied, and number of authoring groups contributing. Barriers to accessibility included target disease rarity, regulatory restrictions, and cost. Second, the ease or difficulty in applying a randomized controlled trial had an impact on study design. Based on these 2 factors, 3 developmental archetypes were characterized to generally describe the development of surgery. CONCLUSIONS Common surgical development archetypes can be described based on factors that impact investigative methods, data accumulation, and ultimate acceptance by society

  2. 5 CFR 930.108 - Periodic medical evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Periodic medical evaluation. 930.108 Section 930.108 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Operators § 930.108 Periodic medical evaluation. At least once every 4 years, each agency will ensure...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 121 - First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits A... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. A Appendix A to Part 121—First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits Approved first-aid kits, at least one approved emergency medical kit,...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 121 - First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits A... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. A Appendix A to Part 121—First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits Approved first-aid kits, at least one approved emergency medical kit,...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 121 - First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits A... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. A Appendix A to Part 121—First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits Approved first-aid kits, at least one approved emergency medical kit,...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 121 - First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits A... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. A Appendix A to Part 121—First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits Approved first-aid kits, at least one approved emergency medical kit,...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 121 - First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits A... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. A Appendix A to Part 121—First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits Approved first-aid kits, at least one approved emergency medical kit,...

  8. 23 CFR Appendix E to Part 1240 - Determination of Federal Medical Savings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of Federal Medical Savings E Appendix E to Part 1240 Highways NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION... SEAT BELT USE RATES Pt. 1240, App. E Appendix E to Part 1240—Determination of Federal Medical Savings...

  9. 78 FR 16614 - Medicare Program; Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) and Medicare Supplementary Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ..., appeals of Part A claim denials that were remanded from the ALJ level to the QIC level will be returned to the ALJ level for adjudication of the Part A claim appeal consistent with the scope of review... Medicare Program; Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) and Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part...

  10. Medicare Part D Benzodiazepine Exclusion and Use of Psychotropic Medication by Patients With New Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Michael K.; Zhang, Lily; Xu, Haiyong; Azocar, Francisca; Ettner, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) specifically excluded benzodiazepines from Medicare Part D coverage starting in 2006; however, benzodiazepines are an effective, low-cost treatment for anxiety. This study evaluated the effect of the Medicare Part D benzodiazepine coverage exclusion among patients with new anxiety disorders. Methods The authors used a quasi-experimental cohort design to study patients with new anxiety diagnoses from a large national health plan during the first six months of 2005, 2006, and 2007. Logistic and zero-truncated negative-binomial regression models using covered claims for behavioral, medical, and pharmaceutical care linked with eligibility files were used to estimate utilization and costs of psychotropic medication and health care utilization among elderly Medicare Advantage enrollees (N=8,397) subject to the MMA benzodiazepine exclusion and a comparison group of near-elderly (ages 60–64) enrollees (N=1,657) of a managed care plan. Results Medicare Advantage enrollees diagnosed in 2005 had significantly (p<.05) higher rates of covered claims for benzodiazepines and all psychotropic drugs, lower rates of covered claims for nonbenzodiazepines, and lower expenditures for psychotropic drugs than enrollees diagnosed in 2006 and 2007. There were no significant differences over time in utilization or expenditures related to psychotropic medication among the comparison group. There also were no significant changes over time in outpatient visits for behavioral care by either cohort. Conclusions Among elderly patients with new anxiety diagnoses, the MMA benzodiazepine exclusion increased use of nonbenzodiazepine psychotropic drugs without substitution of increased behavioral care. Overall, the exclusion was associated with a modest increase in covered claims for psychotropic medication. PMID:22549332

  11. Evaluation of Affective Traits of Medical Technology Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogleman, Janice M.

    An observational rating instrument was developed to measure affective traits of medical technology students. Fourteen categories of behavioral traits evaluated by medical technology programs were identified, based on results of a national survey. These traits were then grouped according to the affective domains established by Krathwohl, Bloom, and…

  12. Service Learning in Medical Education: Project Description and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Although medical education has long recognized the importance of community service, most medical schools have not formally nor fully incorporated service learning into their curricula. To address this problem, we describe the initial design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a service-learning project within a first-year medical…

  13. The Evaluation of Teaching in Medical Schools. Springer Series on Medical Education, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rippey, Robert M.

    Strengths and weaknesses of systems for evaluating teaching in medical schools are reviewed, and a framework for dealing with issues and critical questions is presented. The model addresses the following areas: goals of the school, the purpose of evaluating teaching, standards that characterize the quality of teaching evaluation measures, measures…

  14. A social media self-evaluation checklist for medical practitioners.

    PubMed

    Visser, Benjamin J; Huiskes, Florian; Korevaar, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of medical practitioners and medical students are using online social and business-related networking websites such as Facebook, Doc2doc and LinkedIn. These rapidly evolving and growing social media have potential to promote public health by providing powerful instruments for communication and education. However, evidence is emerging from studies, legal cases, and media reports that the use of these new technologies is creating several ethical problems for medical practitioners as well as medical students. Improper online activities may harm not only individual reputations and careers, but also the medical profession as a whole, for example by breach of patient confidentiality, defamation of colleagues and employers, undisclosed conflict of interests that bias the medical practitioner's medical advice, posting of advice/information without an evidence base, and infringement of copyright. We developed a self-evaluation checklist for medical practitioners using social media. The checklist addresses three key elements in the use of social media: personal information and accessibility, connections, and postings. It contains questions specifically formulated to evaluate a medical practitioner's social media profile, to prevent unintended, improper online activities and to promote professional online behaviour. PMID:23099596

  15. Assessing peer review in the quest for improved medical services and the implications for education in quality assessment: Part IV.

    PubMed

    Hershey, N

    1990-11-01

    Three court decisions reviewing medical peer review conducted in hospitals were discussed at length in part III of this article. In their opinions the courts gave at least tacit approval to the procedures followed in the hospitals, and they accepted that an evidentiary basis for adverse action against the physicians was present. But not all medical peer review in hospitals resulting in adverse actions is found satisfactory when challenged in court, and the most prominent litigation in the decade of the 1980s concerning medical peer review, Patrick v. Burget (1), is testimony to the potential for its perversion. Part II adverted to the potential for bias or lack of objectivity in assessing physician performance. Part I mentioned the problem of bias in the context of peer review of articles for publication and of research grant proposals. The objectives of Part IV are: (1) to examine the concern about bias in medical peer review and to indicate how it may be lessened, if not eliminated; (2) to address further the difficulty created by the relative lack of valid criteria to employ in medical peer review; (3) to review the extent of protection from liability afforded to participants in medical peer review; and (4) to describe the changes that should be anticipated in review of medical services in the future. Before addressing these subjects it is essential to remind the reader that medical peer review is not conducted primarily for disciplinary purposes; rather, its purpose is to evaluate the quality of care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2136677

  16. [Growth check-ups as part of preventive medical examinations].

    PubMed

    Butenandt, O

    1982-09-01

    Failure to thrive as well as increased growth velocity may have different causes. Specific diagnostic evaluation has to be performed as soon as a delineation of the growth rate is observed. Examples are hypopituitarism, hypothyroidism, celiac disease in depressed growth or congenital adrenal hypoplasia or pubertas praecox in enhanced growth. PMID:7129318

  17. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  18. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  19. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  20. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  1. 42 CFR 456.243 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.243... Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.243 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related...

  2. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143...: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical care evaluation study must— (a) Identify and analyze medical or administrative factors related to the...

  3. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of faculty evaluation in continuing education and community service programs. Discusses the shortcomings of student evaluations. Identifies key steps in evaluation (i.e., establishing minimum qualifications, providing orientation to teaching, conducting in-class observations and evaluations, and taking follow-up action).…

  4. Accreditation of Veterinary Medical Education: Part II--Influence of the American Veterinary Medical Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Elizabeth K.

    1975-01-01

    Traces the development, since its founding in 1863, of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) influence over the standards of training required in the veterinary profession. Attention is focused on the roles of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the military, and the land-grant colleges in that development. (JT)

  5. [Understanding and Thinking on America Clinical Evaluation of Medical Devices].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fuqiang; Yuan, Peng; Deng, Gang

    2015-09-01

    This paper introduces the risk classification and listing way of medical devices in the United States, and according to the contents in various situations, FDA provides the requirements for clinical evaluation. At the same time, through the comparative study on the similarities and differences between USA and our country of the clinical evaluation, the paper puts forward some suggestions. PMID:26904887

  6. A model for selecting assessment methods for evaluating medical students in African medical schools.

    PubMed

    Walubo, Andrew; Burch, Vanessa; Parmar, Paresh; Raidoo, Deshandra; Cassimjee, Mariam; Onia, Rudy; Ofei, Francis

    2003-09-01

    Introduction of more effective and standardized assessment methods for testing students' performance in Africa's medical institutions has been hampered by severe financial and personnel shortages. Nevertheless, some African institutions have recognized the problem and are now revising their medical curricula, and, therefore, their assessment methods. These institutions, and those yet to come, need guidance on selecting assessment methods so as to adopt models that can be sustained locally. The authors provide a model for selecting assessment methods for testing medical students' performance in African medical institutions. The model systematically evaluates factors that influence implementation of an assessment method. Six commonly used methods (the essay examinations, short-answer questions, multiple-choice questions, patient-based clinical examination, problem-based oral examination [POE], and objective structured clinical examination) are evaluated by scoring and weighting against performance, cost, suitability, and safety factors. In the model, the highest score identifies the most appropriate method. Selection of an assessment method is illustrated using two institutional models, one depicting an ideal situation in which the objective structured clinical examination was preferred, and a second depicting the typical African scenario in which the essay and short-answer-question examinations were best. The POE method received the highest score and could be recommended as the most appropriate for Africa's medical institutions, but POE assessments require changing the medical curricula to a problem-based learning approach. The authors' model is easy to understand and promotes change in the medical curriculum and method of student assessment. PMID:14507620

  7. 77 FR 5734 - New Medical Criteria for Evaluating Language and Speech Disorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... person, during regular business hours, by arranging with the contact person identified below. FOR FURTHER... published on April 13, 2005 (70 FR 19351); \\1\\ \\1\\ The comments we received in response to this ANPRM are... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Part 404 RIN 0960-AG21 New Medical Criteria for Evaluating Language and Speech...

  8. Evaluation of the medically complex living kidney donor.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Yasar; Yildiz, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    Due to organ shortage and difficulties for availability of cadaveric donors, living donor transplantation is an important choice for having allograft. Live donor surgery is elective and easier to organize prior to starting dialysis thereby permitting preemptive transplantation as compared to cadaveric transplantation. Because of superior results with living kidney transplantation, efforts including the usage of "Medically complex living donors" are made to increase the availability of organs for donation. The term "Complex living donor" is probably preferred for all suboptimal donors where decision-making is a problem due to lack of sound medical data or consensus guidelines. Donors with advanced age, obesity, asymptomatic microhematuria, proteinuria, hypertension, renal stone disease, history of malignancy and with chronic viral infections consist of this complex living donors. This medical complex living donors requires careful evaluation for future renal risk. In this review we would like to present the major issues in the evaluation process of medically complex living kidney donor. PMID:22655169

  9. Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Respiratory System Disorders. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    We are revising the criteria in the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate claims involving respiratory disorders in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act). The revisions reflect our program experience and advances in medical knowledge since we last comprehensively revised this body system in 1993, as well as comments we received from medical experts and the public. PMID:27295734

  10. A protocol-based evaluation of medical image digitizers.

    PubMed

    Efstathopoulos, E P; Costaridou, L; Kocsis, O; Panayiotakis, G

    2001-09-01

    Medical film digitizers play an important transitory role as digital-to-analogue bridges in radiology. Their use requires performance evaluation to assure medical image quality. A complete quality control protocol is presented, based on a set of test objects adaptable to the specification of various digitizers. The protocol includes parameters such as uniformity, input-output response, noise, geometric distortion, spatial resolution, low contrast discrimination, film slippage and light leakage, as well as associated measurement methods. The applicability of the protocol is demonstrated with two types of medical film digitizers; a charge-coupled device (CCD) digitizer and a laser digitizer. The potential value of the protocol is also discussed. PMID:11560833

  11. A new microcomputer software system evaluation paradigm: the medical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kokol, P

    1991-08-01

    The new fourth-generation software has enormously eased the burden of computing for users, but they have also created a confusing, difficult problem in software evaluation and selection. Therefore it is argued that a sound and complete evaluation paradigm is a key element in an efficient and effective software system design and use process. While much has been written about software evaluation in general, in the medical field, the guidances and recommendations previously provided are too general to be of practical use. Considering also the other weaknesses of conventional evaluation paradigms we have decided to develop a more adequate one which will have a solid theoretical framework, specific guidances, strict and well-defined taxonomic space, and a fair ranking approach. In the present paper we will therefore introduce our new evaluation paradigm and show its applicability in evaluation and selection of medical software systems according to their usability. PMID:1800598

  12. Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program: The Prevalence of Asthma Medication Use During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Craig; Joski, Peter; Freiman, Heather C.; Andrade, Susan; Toh, Sengwee; Dublin, Sascha; Cheetham, T. Craig; Cooper, William O.; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Li, De-Kun; Beaton, Sarah J.; Scott, Pamela E.; Hammad, Tarek; Davis, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in women of reproductive age, occurring in up to 8% of pregnancies. Objective Assess the prevalence of asthma medication use during pregnancy in a large diverse cohort. Methods We identified women aged 15 to 45 years who delivered a live born infant between 2001 and 2007 across 11 U.S. health plans within the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). Using health plans’ administrative and claims data, and birth certificate data, we identified deliveries for which women filled asthma medications from 90 days before pregnancy through delivery. Prevalence (%) was calculated for asthma diagnosis and medication dispensing. Results There were 586,276 infants from 575,632 eligible deliveries in the MEPREP cohort. Asthma prevalence among mothers was 6.7%, increasing from 5.5% in 2001 to 7.8% in 2007. A total of 9.7% (n=55,914) of women were dispensed asthma medications during pregnancy. The overall prevalence of maintenance-only medication, rescue-only medication, and combined maintenance and rescue medication was 0.6%, 6.7%, and 2.4% respectively. The prevalence of maintenance-only use doubled during the study period from 0.4% to 0.8%, while rescue-only use decreased from 7.4% to 5.8%. Conclusions In this large population-based pregnancy cohort, the prevalence of asthma diagnoses increased over time. The dispensing of maintenance-only medication increased over time, while rescue-only medication dispensing decreased over time. PMID:23108737

  13. How Does Emergency Department Crowding Affect Medical Student Test Scores and Clerkship Evaluations?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Grant; Arya, Rajiv; Ritz, Z. Trevor; He, Albert S.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; McCoy, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The effect of emergency department (ED) crowding has been recognized as a concern for more than 20 years; its effect on productivity, medical errors, and patient satisfaction has been studied extensively. Little research has reviewed the effect of ED crowding on medical education. Prior studies that have considered this effect have shown no correlation between ED crowding and resident perception of quality of medical education. Objective To determine whether ED crowding, as measured by the National ED Overcrowding Scale (NEDOCS) score, has a quantifiable effect on medical student objective and subjective experiences during emergency medicine (EM) clerkship rotations. Methods We collected end-of-rotation examinations and medical student evaluations for 21 EM rotation blocks between July 2010 and May 2012, with a total of 211 students. NEDOCS scores were calculated for each corresponding period. Weighted regression analyses examined the correlation between components of the medical student evaluation, student test scores, and the NEDOCS score for each period. Results When all 21 rotations are included in the analysis, NEDOCS scores showed a negative correlation with medical student tests scores (regression coefficient= −0.16, p=0.04) and three elements of the rotation evaluation (attending teaching, communication, and systems-based practice; p<0.05). We excluded an outlying NEDOCS score from the analysis and obtained similar results. When the data were controlled for effect of month of the year, only student test score remained significantly correlated with NEDOCS score (p=0.011). No part of the medical student rotation evaluation attained significant correlation with the NEDOCS score (p≥0.34 in all cases). Conclusion ED overcrowding does demonstrate a small but negative association with medical student performance on end-of-rotation examinations. Additional studies are recommended to further evaluate this effect. PMID:26594289

  14. A Quantitative Evaluation of Medication Histories and Reconciliation by Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael R.; Fogg, Sarah M.; Schminke, Brandon C.; Zackula, Rosalee E.; Nester, Tina M.; Eidem, Leslie A.; Rosendale, James C.; Ragan, Robert H.; Bond, Jack A.; Goertzen, Kreg W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background/Objective: Medication reconciliation at transitions of care decreases medication errors, hospitalizations, and adverse drug events. We compared inpatient medication histories and reconciliation across disciplines and evaluated the nature of discrepancies. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients admitted from the emergency department at our 760-bed hospital. Eligible patients had their medication histories conducted and reconciled in order by the admitting nurse (RN), certified pharmacy technician (CPhT), and pharmacist (RPh). Discharge medication reconciliation was not altered. Admission and discharge discrepancies were categorized by discipline, error type, and drug class and were assigned a criticality index score. A discrepancy rating system systematically measured discrepancies. Results: Of 175 consented patients, 153 were evaluated. Total admission and discharge discrepancies were 1,461 and 369, respectively. The average number of medications per participant at admission was 8.59 (1,314) with 9.41 (1,374) at discharge. Most discrepancies were committed by RNs: 53.2% (777) at admission and 56.1% (207) at discharge. The majority were omitted or incorrect. RNs had significantly higher admission discrepancy rates per medication (0.59) compared with CPhTs (0.36) and RPhs (0.16) (P < .001). RPhs corrected significantly more discrepancies per participant than RNs (6.39 vs 0.48; P < .001); average criticality index reduction was 79.0%. Estimated prevented adverse drug events (pADEs) cost savings were $589,744. Conclusions: RPhs committed the fewest discrepancies compared with RNs and CPhTs, resulting in more accurate medication histories and reconciliation. RPh involvement also prevented the greatest number of medication errors, contributing to considerable pADE-related cost savings. PMID:25477614

  15. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical...

  16. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical...

  17. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical...

  18. 42 CFR 456.143 - Content of medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Content of medical care evaluation studies. 456.143... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.143 Content of medical care evaluation studies. Each medical...

  19. Cost-related Nonadherence by Medication Type among Medicare Part D Beneficiaries with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica; Steers, W. Neil; Ettner, Susan L.; Mangione, Carol M.; Duru, O. Kenrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the rollout of Medicare Part D, cost-related non-adherence (CRN) among older adults remains a problem. Objectives To examine the rate and correlates of self-reported CRN among a population of older persons with diabetes. Research Design Cross-sectional. Subjects 1,264 Part D patients with diabetes, who entered the coverage gap in 2006. Measures Initial administrative medication lists were verified in computer-assisted telephone interviews, in which participants brought their medication bottles to the phone. Medications were classified into cardiometabolic (diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol-lowering), symptom relief, and “other.” Participants were asked if they had any cost-related non-adherence during 2006, and if so to which medication/s. We used the person-medication dyad as the unit of analysis, and tested a multivariate random effects logistic regression model to analyze the correlates of CRN. Results Approximately 16% of participants reported any CRN. CRN was more frequent for cholesterol-lowering medications [Relative risk 1.54, 95%CI 1.01-2.32] compared to medications taken for symptom relief. CRN was reported less frequently with increasing age above 75 years, compared to patients between 65 and 69. In addition, compared to those with incomes >$40,000, CRN risk for those with incomes <$25,000 was markedly higher [RR 3.05, 95%CI 1.99-4.65]. Conclusions In summary, we found high rates of CRN among Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes, particularly those with lower incomes. We observed more frequent CRN for cholesterol-lowering medications as compared to medications for symptom relief. Efforts to ensure medication affordability for this population will be important in boosting adherence to key medications. PMID:23032359

  20. Medical education: part of the problem and part of the solution.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Catherine Reinis

    2013-09-23

    Medical education today is pedagogically superb, but the graduates of our educational programs are still unable to successfully translate decades of biomedical advances into health care that reliably meets the Institute of Medicine quality criteria. Realizing the promise of high-quality health care will require that medical educators accept that they must fulfill their contract with society to reduce the burden of suffering and disease through the education of physicians. Educational redesign must begin with the understanding that the professional identity of the physician who was successful in the acute disease era of the 20th century will not be effective in the complex chronic disease era of the 21st century. Medical schools and residency programs must restructure their views of basic and clinical science and workplace learning to give equal emphasis to the science and skills needed to practice in and lead in complex systems. They must also rethink their relationships with clinical environments so that the education of students and residents accelerates the transformation in health care delivery needed to fulfill our contract with society. PMID:23857567

  1. Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Neurological Disorders. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    We are revising the criteria in the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate disability claims involving neurological disorders in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act). These revisions reflect our program experience; advances in medical knowledge, treatment, and methods of evaluating neurological disorders; comments we received from medical experts and the public at an outreach policy conference; responses to an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM); and public comments we received in response to a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) and a Federal Register notice that reopened the NPRM comment period. PMID:27373016

  2. 78 FR 63501 - Request To Submit a Two-Part Application-Northwest Medical Isotopes, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Rules of Practice and Procedure,'' on April 24, 1974 (39 FR 14506). The intent of this final rule was to... licenses under 10 CFR part 52, ``Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants'' (72 FR... COMMISSION Request To Submit a Two-Part Application--Northwest Medical Isotopes, LLC AGENCY:...

  3. How children perceive the medical evaluation for suspected sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, R; Zimet, G D; Ebert, J; Anglin, T M; Williams, P; Bunch, D L; Krowchuk, D P

    1994-09-01

    This study investigated how 99 children who were examined for suspected sexual abuse (SSA) perceived their own medical evaluation experiences. Each child was interviewed about the degree of pain and fear associated with the experience, the kindness of the doctor, general fear of doctor visits, and degree of fear associated with a hypothetical second examination. The majority of children did not perceive their SSA examination to be strongly negative. However children did report greater fear associated with the SSA evaluation compared to an ordinary doctor visit. Using multiple regression, general fear of doctor visits and fear and pain associated with the SSA examination contributed to the prediction of intensity of fear about a hypothetical second SSA evaluation. Perceived kindness of the doctor, patient sex and age, and physician sex and age did not contribute to the regression equation. The relatively low reported rate of intense distress associated with medical evaluation of SSA suggests that fear and pain can be minimized and effectively managed for many children. The results of the regression analysis suggest that previous negative medical experiences may play an important role in determining how a child interprets the experience of an SSA medical evaluation. PMID:8000904

  4. Medical evaluation of suspected child sexual abuse: 2011 update.

    PubMed

    Adams, Joyce A

    2011-09-01

    The medical evaluation of children with suspected sexual abuse includes more than just the physical examination of the child. The importance of taking a detailed medical history from the parents and a history from the child about physical sensations following sexual contact has been emphasized in other articles in the medical literature. The examination is important, however, and medical providers who examine children need to be aware of published research on findings in nonabused children, studies of healing of injuries, and studies documenting the association between sexual contact and the diagnosis of sexually transmissible infections in children. This article reviews the current approach to interpreting findings in children who may have been sexually abused and why additional research is needed. PMID:21970647

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Management Courses: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Cyril

    1973-01-01

    The author describes how he developed a method of evaluating and comparing management courses of different types and lengths by applying an ordinal system of relative values using a process of transmutation. (MS)

  6. 10 CFR Appendix K to Part 50 - ECCS Evaluation Models

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ECCS Evaluation Models K Appendix K to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. K Appendix K to Part 50—ECCS Evaluation Models I. Required and Acceptable Features of Evaluation Models. II. Required Documentation. I. Required...

  7. Implementation and Evaluation of a Medical Informatics Distance Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, William R.; Junium, Katherine; Mailhot, Mark; Tidmarsh, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Given the need for continuing education in medical informatics for mid-career professionals, the authors aimed to implement and evaluate distance learning courses in this area. Design: The authors performed a needs assessment, content and technology planning, implementation, and student evaluation. Measurements: The needs assessment and student evaluations were assessed using a combination of Likert scale and free-form questions. Results: The needs assessment indicated much interest in a medical informatics distance learning program, with electronic medical records and outcome research the subject areas of most interest. The courses were implemented by means of streaming audio plus slides for lectures and threaded discussion boards for student interaction. Students were assessed by multiple-choice tests, a term paper, and a take-home final examination. In their course evaluations, student expressed strong satisfaction with the teaching modalities, course content, and system performance. Although not assessed experimentally, the performance of distance learning students was superior to that of on-campus students. Conclusion: Medical informatics education can be successfully implemented by means of distance learning technologies, with favorable student satisfaction and demonstrated learning. A graduate certificate program is now being implemented. PMID:11687564

  8. Considered Evaluation of Clinical Placements in a New Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Jerry; Collins, Sarah; Hammond, Anna

    2009-01-01

    This article suggests that quality assessment in the UK has been largely set apart from learning and teaching and reports on a pilot project at the Hull York Medical School which attempted to integrate students' evaluation of their clinical placements into the curriculum. It outlines the operational demands of this integrated method and compares…

  9. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  10. Development of a Psychotropic PRN Medication Evaluative Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Larry; Watt, Jackie; Pilon, Nancy; Draper, Chad

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a psychotropic PRN Evaluative Tool developed by interprofessional clinicians to address inconsistent reporting and assessment of the effectiveness of PRN medications used for people who are developmentally disabled. Fifty-nine participants (37 males, 22 females), ages 16 to 60 years, were included in the review, all…

  11. Instrumentation for Evaluating Medical School Courses in Human Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggers, T. Thorne; And Others

    A Sex Content Scale was developed to evaluate a series of simulated interviews conducted with 24 second year medical students and an actress who was carefully coached to reveal a specific sexual problem as she felt comfortable with the student and as he/she asked her appropriate questions. A patient response form was also developed to quantify the…

  12. Evaluation of the Noncognitive Professional Traits of Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Sharon; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A University of New Mexico medical school program to evaluate students having difficulty with noncognitive professional traits (responsibility, reliability, maturity, self-assessment, communication, honesty, integrity, respect for patients and peers) has identified 10 students with difficulties and provided interventions and remediation over a…

  13. 78 FR 25521 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Federal Register of March 28, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-06975, on page 18842, in the second column, under c... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders AGENCY: Social Security...

  14. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... we published in the Federal Register on February 4, 2013 (78 FR 7968). We use Listings 3.04 and 103... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security... additional information regarding this teleconference, please contact Cheryl Williams, Office of...

  15. An Evaluation Model for Professional Education--Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Christine H.

    There are striking similarities between medical education of today and progressive education of the thirties with respect to motivation for change, the values to be sought in change, and the zest with which change is pursued. It is in this climate conducive to change that a new approach to evaluation is beginning to make a significant contribution…

  16. Evaluating Medical Students' Patient Interviewing Skills: A Biopsychosocial Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    An evaluation design project was undertaken to design a cost effective, standardized method for assessing the instructional effectiveness of the changes and outcomes associated with a pilot curriculum project focusing on the importance of the medical history in clinical problem solving. (LMO)

  17. Teaching Evidence-based Medical Care: Description and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grad, Roland; Macaulay, Ann C.; Warner, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a teaching initiative in evidence-based medical care in McGill University's family practice residency program. Discusses results of pre- and post-course self-assessments by students, which indicated significant increases in skill at formulating clinical questions and searching for evidence-based answers, appraising reviews,…

  18. Eligibility For And Enrollment In Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Programs Varies By Plan Sponsor.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Hendrick, Franklin B; Shen, Xian; Dai, Mingliang; Tom, Sarah E; Dougherty, J Samantha; Miller, Laura M

    2016-09-01

    Medicare Part D prescription drug plans must offer medication therapy management to beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions and high drug expenditures. However, plan sponsors have considerable latitude in setting eligibility criteria. Newly available data indicate that enrollment rates in medication therapy management among stand-alone prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage drug plans averaged only 10 percent in 2012. The enrollment variation across plan sponsors-from less than 0.2 percent to more than 57.0 percent-was associated with the restrictiveness of their eligibility criteria. For example, enrollment was 16.4 percent in plans requiring two chronic conditions versus 9.2 percent in plans requiring three, and 12.7 percent in plans requiring the use of any Part D drug versus 4.4 percent in plans requiring the use of drugs in specific classes. This variation represents inequities in access to medication therapy management across plans and results in missed opportunities for interventions that might improve therapeutic outcomes and reduce spending. The new Part D Enhanced Medication Therapy Management model of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has the potential to significantly increase the impact of medication therapy management by aligning financial incentives with improvements in medication use and encouraging innovation. PMID:27605635

  19. Forensic medical evaluations of child maltreatment: a proposed research agenda.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, Howard; Christian, Cindy W; Hymel, Kent; Kellogg, Nancy D

    2014-11-01

    Physicians play an important role in the forensic evaluation of suspected child abuse and neglect. There has been considerable progress in the medical field, helping distinguish findings related to maltreatment from other conditions or circumstances. Nevertheless, important questions remain. This article covers several of these questions and proposes a research agenda concerning five main topics: sexual abuse, neglect, fractures, abusive head trauma, and physicians work in interdisciplinary settings. The suggestions are hardly inclusive, but offer suggestions the authors think are priorities, and ones that research could reasonably address. By providing some background to gaps in our knowledge, this paper should be of interest to a broader audience than just medical professionals. PMID:25224781

  20. Pre-Participation Medical Evaluation for Adventure and Wilderness Watersports.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Andrew T; Young, Justin Mark J; Young, Craig

    2015-12-01

    A request for a preparticipation medical evaluation for wilderness watersports may be made by guiding agencies, instructional camps, or by patients presenting for an annual visit. Although guidelines have been published regarding preparticipation physical evaluation for traditional competitive high school and collegiate sports, little has been written about medical evaluations for those wishing to engage in wilderness and adventure watersports. in this article, we offer guidance based on literature review and expert opinion. Watersports are among the most common recreational activities in the United states and are generally safe. Drowning, however, is a significant risk, particularly in small, self-propelled craft, and among children. Medical counseling before participation in watersports should include screening for medical conditions which may impair swimming ability, including a history of seizures, heart disease, and lung disease. Physicians should also promote preventive health measures such as use of lifejackets and sun protection, as well as alcohol avoidance. Swim testing tailored to specific activities should be strongly considered for children and those with questionable swimming ability. PMID:26617379

  1. Hepatitis C: Part II. Prevention counseling and medical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moyer, L A; Mast, E E; Alter, M J

    1999-01-15

    An estimated 3.9 million Americans are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and most do not know that they are infected. This group includes persons who are at risk for HCV-associated chronic liver disease and who also serve as reservoirs for transmission of HCV to others. Because there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection and immune globulin is not effective for postexposure prophylaxis, prevention of HCV infection is paramount. Patients who are at risk of exposure to HCV should be advised on steps they might take to minimize their risk of infection. Patients who are infected with HCV should be counseled on ways to prevent transmission of HCV to others and to avoid hepatotoxins. They should also be examined for liver disease and referred for treatment, if indicated. PMID:9930128

  2. Systematic review of economic evaluations of Alzheimer's disease medications.

    PubMed

    Oremus, Mark

    2008-06-01

    This systematic review was conducted to summarize published pharmacoeconomic studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) medications. Pharmacoeconomic studies were included in the review if they were published in English and contained a full and complete report of an original economic evaluation. The studies also had to be comparative in nature (i.e., cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility or cost-minimization analyses). Existing AD medications were found to dominate standard treatment (i.e., no drugs), or they were found to be more costly and more effective than standard treatment. Estimates of cost and effect varied widely because of different underlying models, assumptions and data sources. More research is needed to draw firmer conclusions regarding the overall cost-effectiveness of AD medications. PMID:20528379

  3. Knee Pain in Children: Part I: Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the information obtained from the history and physical examination is the key to establishing a diagnosis and directing initial management of knee pain. • By applying history and physical examination findings to a diagnosis and management algorithm, clinicians can efficiently and effectively determine the potential cause of the knee pain. • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the most important step of the evaluation of knee pain is to identify emergent conditions, including limb- and life-threatening conditions (eg, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and malignancy), hip pathology, or conditions associated with effusions. PMID:26729778

  4. Evaluation in medical education: A topical review of target parameters, data collection tools and confounding factors

    PubMed Central

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Feufel, Markus A.; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: Evaluation is an integral part of education in German medical schools. According to the quality standards set by the German Society for Evaluation, evaluation tools must provide an accurate and fair appraisal of teaching quality. Thus, data collection tools must be highly reliable and valid. This review summarises the current literature on evaluation of medical education with regard to the possible dimensions of teaching quality, the psychometric properties of survey instruments and potential confounding factors. Methods: We searched Pubmed, PsycINFO and PSYNDEX for literature on evaluation in medical education and included studies published up until June 30, 2011 as well as articles identified in the “grey literature”. Results are presented as a narrative review. Results: We identified four dimensions of teaching quality: structure, process, teacher characteristics, and outcome. Student ratings are predominantly used to address the first three dimensions, and a number of reliable tools are available for this purpose. However, potential confounders of student ratings pose a threat to the validity of these instruments. Outcome is usually operationalised in terms of student performance on examinations, but methodological problems may limit the usability of these data for evaluation purposes. In addition, not all examinations at German medical schools meet current quality standards. Conclusion: The choice of tools for evaluating medical education should be guided by the dimension that is targeted by the evaluation. Likewise, evaluation results can only be interpreted within the context of the construct addressed by the data collection tool that was used as well as its specific confounding factors. PMID:26421003

  5. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  6. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  7. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  8. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  9. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  10. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  11. Evaluation of STAT medication ordering process in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Walsh., Kim; Schwartz., Barbara

    Background: In most health care facilities, problems related to delays in STAT medication order processing time are of common concern. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate processing time for STAT orders at Kimball Medical Center. Methods: All STAT orders were reviewed to determine processing time; order processing time was also stratified by physician order entry (physician entered (PE) orders vs. non-physician entered (NPE) orders). Collected data included medication ordered, indication, time ordered, time verified by pharmacist, time sent from pharmacy, and time charted as given to the patient. Results: A total of 502 STAT orders were reviewed and 389 orders were included for analysis. Overall, median time was 29 minutes, IQR 16–63; p<0.0001.). The time needed to process NPE orders was significantly less than that needed for PE orders (median 27 vs. 34 minutes; p=0.026). In terms of NPE orders, the median total time required to process STAT orders for medications available in the Automated Dispensing Devices (ADM) was within 30 minutes, while that required to process orders for medications not available in the ADM was significantly greater than 30 minutes. For PE orders, the median total time required to process orders for medications available in the ADM (i.e., not requiring pharmacy involvement) was significantly greater than 30 minutes. [Median time = 34 minutes (p<0.001)]. Conclusion: We conclude that STAT order processing time may be improved by increasing the availability of medications in ADM, and pharmacy involvement in the verification process. PMID:27382418

  12. Impact of Medicare Part D on Racial Disparities in Adherence to Cardiovascular Medications Among the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mustafa; Waters, Teresa M; Chang, Cyril F; Bailey, James E; Brown, Lawrence M; Solomon, David K

    2016-08-01

    Medicare Part D improved medication adherence among the elderly, but to date, its effect on disparities in adherence remains unknown. We estimated Part D impact on racial/ethnic disparities in adherence to cardiovascular medications among seniors, using pooled data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2002-2010) on 14,221 Medicare recipients (65+ years) and 3,456 near-elderly controls (60-64 years). Study sample included White, Black, or Hispanic respondents who used at least one cardiovascular medication. Twelve-month adherence was measured as having an overall proportion of days covered ≥80%. Adherence disparities were defined according to the Institute of Medicine framework. Using difference-in-differences logistic regression, we found Part D to be associated with a 16-percentage-point decrease in the White-Hispanic disparity in overall adherence among seniors, net of the change among controls. Black-White disparities worsened only among men, by 21 percentage points. Increasing access and improving quality of medication use among disadvantaged seniors should remain a policy priority. PMID:26577228

  13. Evaluation of the Medically Complex Living Kidney Donor

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Yasar; Yildiz, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    Due to organ shortage and difficulties for availability of cadaveric donors, living donor transplantation is an important choice for having allograft. Live donor surgery is elective and easier to organize prior to starting dialysis thereby permitting preemptive transplantation as compared to cadaveric transplantation. Because of superior results with living kidney transplantation, efforts including the usage of “Medically complex living donors” are made to increase the availability of organs for donation. The term “Complex living donor” is probably preferred for all suboptimal donors where decision-making is a problem due to lack of sound medical data or consensus guidelines. Donors with advanced age, obesity, asymptomatic microhematuria, proteinuria, hypertension, renal stone disease, history of malignancy and with chronic viral infections consist of this complex living donors. This medical complex living donors requires careful evaluation for future renal risk. In this review we would like to present the major issues in the evaluation process of medically complex living kidney donor. PMID:22655169

  14. 23 CFR Appendix E to Part 1240 - Determination of Federal Medical Savings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES SAFETY INCENTIVE GRANTS FOR USE OF SEAT BELTS-ALLOCATIONS BASED ON SEAT BELT USE RATES Pt. 1240, App. E Appendix E to Part 1240—Determination of Federal Medical Savings A... belt use, NHTSA will first estimate the impact of seat belt use on the number of fatalities...

  15. 23 CFR Appendix E to Part 1240 - Determination of Federal Medical Savings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES SAFETY INCENTIVE GRANTS FOR USE OF SEAT BELTS-ALLOCATIONS BASED ON SEAT BELT USE RATES Pt. 1240, App. E Appendix E to Part 1240—Determination of Federal Medical Savings A... belt use, NHTSA will first estimate the impact of seat belt use on the number of fatalities...

  16. 23 CFR Appendix E to Part 1240 - Determination of Federal Medical Savings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES SAFETY INCENTIVE GRANTS FOR USE OF SEAT BELTS-ALLOCATIONS BASED ON SEAT BELT USE RATES Pt. 1240, App. E Appendix E to Part 1240—Determination of Federal Medical Savings A... belt use, NHTSA will first estimate the impact of seat belt use on the number of fatalities...

  17. 23 CFR Appendix E to Part 1240 - Determination of Federal Medical Savings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GUIDELINES SAFETY INCENTIVE GRANTS FOR USE OF SEAT BELTS-ALLOCATIONS BASED ON SEAT BELT USE RATES Pt. 1240, App. E Appendix E to Part 1240—Determination of Federal Medical Savings A... belt use, NHTSA will first estimate the impact of seat belt use on the number of fatalities...

  18. Messages of Medication: Effects of Actual versus Informed Medication Status on Hyperactive Boys' Expectancies and Self-Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Carol K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    After 15 boys with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were informed that they had taken either medication or placebo, they completed computer tasks, self-assessments, and causal judgments. Boys predicted better performance when told they were on medication. For self-evaluations, medication status and information interacted, with boys…

  19. A framework for evaluating and utilizing medical terminology mappings.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajjad; Sun, Hong; Sinaci, Anil; Erturkmen, Gokce Banu Laleci; Mead, Charles; Gray, Alasdair J G; McGuinness, Deborah L; Prud'Hommeaux, Eric; Daniel, Christel; Forsberg, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Use of medical terminologies and mappings across them are considered to be crucial pre-requisites for achieving interoperable eHealth applications. Built upon the outcomes of several research projects, we introduce a framework for evaluating and utilizing terminology mappings that offers a platform for i) performing various mappings strategies, ii) representing terminology mappings together with their provenance information, and iii) enabling terminology reasoning for inferring both new and erroneous mappings. We present the results of the introduced framework from SALUS project where we evaluated the quality of both existing and inferred terminology mappings among standard terminologies. PMID:25160255

  20. Forensic neuropsychological evaluations in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lauren; Schrift, Michael; Pliskin, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Within the expanding field of clinical neuropsychology, the subspecialty of forensic neuropsychology has developed. Currently, there is considerable diversity within the discipline as to how practitioners approach test selection, reports, and number of hours billed. How individuals handle these issues is subject to debate, but what is clear is that there are no specific guidelines as to how to conduct these evaluations. The current study provides an introduction to the issues faced by clinical neuropsychologists completing forensic evaluations. In addition, the authors present how the relevant issues are addressed in one neuropsychology service housed within a university-affiliated academic medical center. PMID:19333065

  1. [Medical evaluation prior to fertility treatment--time for reconsideration?].

    PubMed

    Yakir, Segev; Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit; Lavie, Ofer; Auslender, Ron

    2011-11-01

    The aim of modern obstetrics is to bring a healthy child to a healthy mother. Preconception counseling is a form of preventive medicine that consists of three main components: risk assessment, health promotion and intervention, in order to improve pregnancy outcome. A large proportion of women, who need assisted reproductive technologies (ART) due to infertility, are older than the average pregnant women. The risk for chronic maternal disease such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and malignant disease greatly increases with maternal age. Chronic maternal illness might increase the risk of in vitro fertilization procedure and is also associated with increased obstetrics risk and even death. A previous study has shown that most maternal deaths in the USA, due to chronic maternal disease, are potentially preventable through better medical care from preconception, yet most studies that deal with preconception care in infertility patients only address the problems of infertility. Therefore, similar to the recommendations of the American Heart Association before non-competitive physical activity, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists before an elective surgery, we suggest a pre-ART medical assessment. Our objective is to outline the potential risks for older women who undergo ART procedure and potentially, pregnancy, and to characterize guidelines for evaluation prior to enrolling them in ART programs. Pre-ART assessment should include a thorough medical questionnaire and medical examination. Appropriate treatment for women with medical conditions prior to ART procedure and optimizing disease control in preparation for pregnancy including changing a potentially teratogenic treatment, can improve women's health status prior to pregnancy and reduce pregnancy related complications. At the end of the evaluation, and before ART treatment, the women should be consulted, based on the results of tests, on the possible risks

  2. Forensic evaluation of medical liability cases in general surgery.

    PubMed

    Moreira, H; Magalhães, T; Dinis-Oliveira, Rj; Taveira-Gomes, A

    2014-10-01

    Although medical liability (disciplinary, civil and criminal) is increasingly becoming an issue, few studies exist, particularly from the perspective of forensic science, which demonstrate the extent to which medical malpractice occurs, or when it does, the reasons for it. Our aims were to evaluate the current situation concerning medical liability in general surgery (GS) in Portugal, the reasons for claims, and the forensic evaluations and conclusions, as well as the association between these issues and the judicial outcomes. We analysed the Medico-Legal Council (CML) reports of the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences of Portugal related to GS during 2001-2010. The judicial outcomes of each case were requested from the Public Prosecutor Office (PPO) and the court. Alleged cases of medical liability in GS represented 11.2% of the total cases analysed by the CML. We estimated that in Portugal, 4:100,000 surgeries are subject to litigation. The majority of complaints were due to the patient's death (75.4%), with laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgeries representing 55.2% of cases. In 76.1% of the cases, the CML believed that there was no violation of legesartis and in 55.2% of cases, no causal nexus was found between the medical practice and the alleged harm. The PPO prosecuted physicians in 6.4% of the cases and resulted in one conviction. Finally, the importance of the CML reports as a relevant technical-scientific tool for judicial decision was evident because these reports significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the prosecutor's decision, whether to prosecute or not. PMID:24351525

  3. Understanding and applying the principles of contemporary medical professionalism: illustration of a suggested approach, part 2.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, formal professionalism education, training, and assessment have been introduced to medical schools and accredited residency training programs. Current constructs of medical professionalism characterize it as a multidimensional competency rather than a trait. Medical professionalism is a belief system for organizing and delivering care, in which group members (medical professionals) promise patients and the public that they will self-regulate (ie, ensure that medical professionals live up to standards of competence and ethical values). Physicians who are good professionals have lapses in professionalism. Responses to professional lapses should focus on remediation. Failure of groups of professionals to enforce the standards and values can convey to patients and the public a lack of trustworthiness and thereby undermine the foundation of professionalism, the social contract. The Physician Charter sets forth the 3 fundamental principles and 10 commitments that offer guidance in some of the most challenging situations. One example is illustrated herein and is continued from Part 1 of this two-part series. PMID:25444064

  4. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  5. Medical marijuana: the conflict between scientific evidence and political ideology. Part one of two.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Whether "medical marijuana" (Cannabis sativa used to treat a wide variety of pathologic states) should be accorded the status of a legitimate pharmaceutical agent has long been a contentious issue. Is it a truly effective drug that is arbitrarily stigmatized by many and criminalized by the federal government? Or is it without any medical utility, its advocates hiding behind a screen of misplaced (or deliberately misleading) compassion for the ill? Should Congress repeal its declaration that smoked marijuana is without "current medical benefit"? Should cannabis be approved for medical use by a vote of the people as already has been done in 13 states? Or should medical marijuana be scientifically evaluated for safety and efficacy as any other new investigational drug? How do the competing--and sometimes antagonistic--roles of science, politics and prejudice affect society's attempts to answer this question? This article examines the legal, political, policy, and ethical problems raised by the recognition of medical marijuana by over one-fourth of our states although its use remains illegal under federal law. Although draconian punishment can be imposed for the "recreational" use of marijuana, I will not address the contentious question of whether to legalize or decriminalize the use of marijuana solely for its psychotropic effects, a fascinating and important area of law and policy that is outside the scope of this paper. Instead, the specific focus of this article will be on the conflict between the development of policies based on evidence obtained through the use of scientific methods and those grounded on ideological and political considerations that have repeatedly entered the longstanding debate regarding the legal status of medical marijuana. I will address a basic question: Should the approval of medical marijuana be governed by the same statute that applies to all other drugs or pharmaceutical agents, the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), after the

  6. [An improved medical image fusion algorithm and quality evaluation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiling; Tao, Ling; Qian, Zhiyu

    2009-08-01

    Medical image fusion is of very important value for application in medical image analysis and diagnosis. In this paper, the conventional method of wavelet fusion is improved,so a new algorithm of medical image fusion is presented and the high frequency and low frequency coefficients are studied respectively. When high frequency coefficients are chosen, the regional edge intensities of each sub-image are calculated to realize adaptive fusion. The choice of low frequency coefficient is based on the edges of images, so that the fused image preserves all useful information and appears more distinctly. We apply the conventional and the improved fusion algorithms based on wavelet transform to fuse two images of human body and also evaluate the fusion results through a quality evaluation method. Experimental results show that this algorithm can effectively retain the details of information on original images and enhance their edge and texture features. This new algorithm is better than the conventional fusion algorithm based on wavelet transform. PMID:19813594

  7. Subjective evaluation of user experience in interactive 3D visualization in a medical context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourancheau, Sylvain; Sjöström, Mårten; Olsson, Roger; Persson, Anders; Ericson, Thomas; Rudling, Johan; Norén, Bengt

    2012-02-01

    New display technologies enable the usage of 3D-visualization in a medical context. Even though user performance seems to be enhanced with respect to 2D thanks to the addition of recreated depth cues, human factors, and more particularly visual comfort and visual fatigue can still be a bridle to the widespread use of these systems. This study aimed at evaluating and comparing two different 3D visualization systems (a market stereoscopic display, and a state-of-the-art multi-view display) in terms of quality of experience (QoE), in the context of interactive medical visualization. An adapted methodology was designed in order to subjectively evaluate the experience of users. 14 medical doctors and 15 medical students took part in the experiment. After solving different tasks using the 3D reconstruction of a phantom object, they were asked to judge their quality of the experience, according to specific features. They were also asked to give their opinion about the influence of 3D-systems on their work conditions. Results suggest that medical doctors are opened to 3D-visualization techniques and are confident concerning their beneficial influence on their work. However, visual comfort and visual fatigue are still an issue of 3D-displays. Results obtained with the multi-view display suggest that the use of continuous horizontal parallax might be the future response to these current limitations.

  8. Medical marijuana: the conflict between scientific evidence and political ideology. Part two of two.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    In Part I of this article, I examined the role of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in drug approval and then detailed the known risks of medical marijuana (any form of Cannabis sativa used--usually by smoking--to treat a wide variety of pathologic states and diseases). Part II of the article will begin by reviewing the benefits of Cannabis sativa as documented by well designed scientific studies that have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. I will then propose that ability of scientists to conduct impartial studies designed to answer the question of marijuana's role in medical therapy has been greatly hampered by political considerations. I will posit that in spite of the considerable efforts of policymakers, it is becoming apparent that marijuana's benefits should be weighed against its well-described risks. I will conclude that political advocacy is a poor substitute for dispassionate analysis and that neither popular votes nor congressional "findings" should be permitted to trump scientific evidence in deciding whether or not marijuana is an appropriate pharmaceutical agent to use in modern medical practice. Whether or not marijuana is accepted as a legitimate medical therapy should remain in the hands of the usual drug-approval process and that the statutory role of the Food and Drug Administration should be dispositive. PMID:19492213

  9. Marco (Medical Record Communications) - System Concept, Design and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, P. H.; Heisler, B. D.; Mela, W. D.; Alpert, J. J.; Goldstein, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    MARCO, an interfacility communication system, has been designed to promote safe relevant health care delivery to the inner city pediatric patient receiving care in a network consisting of Boston City Hospital and its affiliated Neighborhood Health Centers. This application of computer technology to communication of medical information compiled on an individual patient in multiple locations has implications for private group practice as well as other urban networks similar to our own. This paper provides the MARCO system concept, the system design and evaluation of its success after two years of operation.

  10. Television spots win national award. Part of OSF Saint Francis Medical Center's branding effort.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    "Miracles in Medicine," a series of award-winning television spots, was produced for OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, Ill., by The Roberts Group, Inc., Waukesha, Wis. They are an integral part of a broader branding campaign, launched in May 2003, that includes newspaper, radio, and outdoor elements. The spots were deemed so successful, the branding effort was expanded to include Children's Hospital of Illinois. PMID:15162576

  11. [Evaluation of medication advertising broadcast on radio stations].

    PubMed

    Batista, Almária Mariz; Carvalho, Maria Cleide Ribeiro Dantas de

    2013-02-01

    The scope of this paper was to evaluate advertising for medication broadcast on radio stations in Natal, State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, from April to September 2008 and from April to September 2010. The advertising was recorded and transcribed in order to conduct legal analysis and content analysis based on the precepts of Laurence Bardin. Both the advertising recorded during the first stage (regulated by RDC 102/00) and the second stage (regulated by RDC 96/08) contained some form of legal violation. Content analysis detected practically the same violations in both stages, namely the lack of information regarding adverse effects of the medication, appeal to consumption, exaggeration of efficiency/effectiveness and abusive exploitation of illness. Despite the inclusion of more modern and restrictive legislation, radio advertising continues to violate the law blatantly, committing abuse and disrespecting the population's entitlement to good health. The study reveals the need for medication advertising to be dealt with in a broader context, in other words to be treated as a public health concern. It must take into consideration the socio-historical scenario in which it evolved, since the legislation alone is insufficient to combat abuse committed to the detriment of public health. PMID:23358781

  12. Method of evaluating and improving ambulatory medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, B C; Lyons, T F; Neuhaus, E; Kolton, M; Dwarshius, L

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of an action-research model is demonstrated in the evaluation and improvement of ambulatory medical care in a variety of settings: solo office practice, prepaid capitation multiple-specialty group practice, and medical school hospital-based outpatient clinic practice. Improvements in the process of medical care are found to relate directly to the intensity and duration of planned interventions by the study group and are demonstrated to follow organizational changes in the participating sites--primarily managerial and support services initiated by policy decisions in each study site. Improvement in performance approaching one standard deviation results from the most intense intervention, about one-half standard deviation at the next level of intervention, and virtually no change from a simple feedback of performance measures. On the basis of these findings and other operational and research efforts to improve physician performance, it is unlikely that simple feedback of performance measures will elicit a change in behavior. However, noncoercive methods involving health care providers in problem identification, problem solving, and solution implementation are demonstrated to be effective. PMID:6735736

  13. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (p<0.01), complicated drug regimen (p=0.001), and side effects (p=0.006) were predictors of low adherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. PMID:26232704

  14. Using Survival Analysis to Evaluate Medical Equipment Battery Life.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, David

    2016-01-01

    As hospital medical device managers obtain more data, opportunities exist for using the data to improve medical device management, enhance patient safety, and evaluate costs of decisions. As a demonstration of the ability to use data analytics, this article applies survival analysis statistical techniques to assist in making decisions on medical equipment maintenance. The analysis was performed on a large amount of data related to failures of an infusion pump manufacturer's lithium battery and two aftermarket replacement lithium batteries from one hospital facility. The survival analysis resulted in statistical evidence showing that one of the third-party batteries had a lower survival curve than the infusion pump manufacturer's battery. This lower survival curve translates to a shorter expected life before replacement is needed. The data suggested that to limit unexpected failures, replacing batteries at a two-year interval, rather than the current industry recommendation of three years, may be warranted. For less than $5,400 in additional annual cost, the risk of unexpected battery failures can be reduced from an estimated 28% to an estimated 7%. PMID:27164203

  15. Assessment of an itinerant medical evaluation program for school dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sandler, A D

    1999-04-01

    This paper describes an itinerant medical evaluation (IME) project and reports on the outcome of 108 consecutive referrals made in the first year. Subjects were of ages 5 to 17 years. Most students had been evaluated by the schools but were not receiving special education or related services. IME led to clinical diagnosis of ADHD in 70% of the sample, and specific learning disabilities were diagnosed in 26%. Several other clinically significant and educationally relevant diagnoses were made. As a result of the IME, many students were placed in special education and/or began to receive related services. At three-month follow-up, classroom accommodations were being made for 97% of the students. Teachers reported they felt more capable of teaching challenging students as a result of the IME. Significant improvements occurred in hyperactivity, conduct problems, and inattention, and grades improved in 31% of the sample. Reasons for the project's success are discussed. PMID:10354982

  16. Evaluation of the dentists' knowledge on medical urgency and emergency.

    PubMed

    Stafuzza, Tássia Carina; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Oliveira, Fernanda Veronese; Santos, Carlos Ferreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating how well dentists understand medical emergency/urgency procedures and issues during dental treatment at a hospital specialized in cleft lip and palate. It comprised a hundred dentists from the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo (HRAC/USP), Brazil, from different dental specialties. A questionnaire was applied to evaluate their knowledge of medical emergencies/urgencies from June through September 2011. The questionnaire was anonymous, confidential and constructed with closed questions and either yes-no or multiple-choice responses. Results showed that most professionals (87%) were trained in basic life support (BLS), but only 43% considered themselves capable of providing first aid and performing the necessary maneuvers. Most participants (94%) claimed that they knew the difference between medical urgencies and emergencies, and 69% had BLS training in their undergraduate courses, as opposed to 37%, during their specialization. Some participants (23%) mentioned that they had received knowledge of the subject during extracurricular courses and/or graduate courses (12%). Only 9% had not been educated on the subject; however, all participants showed interest in attending a course in BLS. In regard to assessing training that dentists who attended BLS courses received, 49% were satisfied and 42% were dissatisfied. Results of the present study emphasize that dentists from HRAC/USP have little knowledge about BLS procedures to perform them. Dentists must gain adequate education and training to minimize possible technical, ethical and legal problems associated with dental practice. It is necessary to improve both knowledge and practice in order to become well-qualified practitioners. PMID:25141014

  17. Methodologies for medication adherence evaluation: Focus on psoriasis topical treatment.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana; Teixeira, Maribel; Almeida, Vera; Torres, Tiago; Sousa Lobo, José Manuel; Almeida, Isabel Filipa

    2016-05-01

    Adherence to topical treatment has been less studied in comparison with systemic therapeutic regimens and is poorly understood. High-quality research on this area is essential to outline a strategy to increase medication adherence and clinical outcomes. For a more comprehensive understanding of this issue, a systematic review of the methodologies for topical treatment adherence evaluation in psoriasis was undertaken. Twenty one studies were selected from the literature which used six different adherence methodologies. Merely three studies used multiple adherence measurement methods. The most used method was questionnaire (44%) which was also associated with higher variability of the adherence results. One possible explanation is the lack of a validated questionnaire designed specifically for the evaluation of adherence to topical treatment. Only one method (medication weight) takes into consideration the applied dose. However, the estimation of the expected weight is complex, which renders this method, as used presently, less effective. The use of a dosing device could improve its accuracy and be helpful to clearly instruct the patients about the correct dose. As there is no single method that allows an accurate and complete assessment of adherence it is recommended to use a combination of methods, including self-report and medicines' weight measurements. PMID:26917347

  18. Evaluation of board performance in Iran’s universities of medical sciences

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Ravaghi, Hamid; Farzan, Homayoun; Aminlou, Hasan; Hadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. Methods: The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME). In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Results: Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time.Results also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards’ resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Conclusion: Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process. PMID:25337597

  19. Experimental Evaluation of an Invasive Medical Instrument Based on a Displacement Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Fotiadis, Dimitris A; Astaras, Alexandros; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Papathanasiou, Kostas; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking the position of a medical instrument's tip. The system is based on phase locking a high frequency signal transmitted from the medical instrument's tip to a reference signal. Displacement measurement is established having the loop open, in order to get a low frequency voltage representing the medical instrument's movement; therefore, positioning is established by means of conventional measuring techniques. The voltage-controlled oscillator stage of the phase-locked loop (PLL), combined to an appropriate antenna, comprises the associated transmitter located inside the medical instrument tip. All the other low frequency PLL components, low noise amplifier and mixer, are located outside the human body, forming the receiver part of the system. The operating details of the proposed system were coded in Verilog-AMS. Simulation results indicate robust medical instrument tracking in 1-D. Experimental evaluation of the proposed position tracking system is also presented. The experiments described in this paper are based on a transmitter moving opposite a stationary receiver performing either constant velocity or uniformly accelerated movement, and also together with two stationary receivers performing constant velocity movement again. This latter setup is implemented in order to demonstrate the prototype's accuracy for planar (2-D) motion measurements. Error analysis and time-domain analysis are presented for system performance characterization. Furthermore, preliminary experimental assessment using a saline solution container to more closely approximate the human body as a radio frequency wave transmission medium has proved the system's capability of operating underneath the skin. PMID:25265618

  20. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers. Part 1: Their changing role.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1996-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management, intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development; management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. This article article was prepared by the author from research into and presentation of a thesis entitled. "The Importance of Leadership Training And Development For Physicians In Academic Medical Centers In An Increasingly Complex Healthcare Environment, " prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in the College (ACHE). Part 2 will appear in the next issue of the Journal. PMID:10162876

  1. Gains in medication affordability following Medicare Part D are eroding among elderly with multiple chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Naci, Huseyin; Soumerai, Stephen B; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Zhang, Fang; Briesacher, Becky A; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Madden, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    Elderly Americans, especially those with multiple chronic conditions, face difficulties paying for prescriptions, resulting in worse adherence and discontinuation of therapy (“cost-related medication nonadherence” or CRN). We investigated whether the gains in medication affordability attributable to Medicare Part D implementation in January 2006 persisted during the six years that followed. Overall, we found continued incremental improvements in medication affordability in the early years of Part D (2007–2009), which then eroded during more recent years (2009–2011). Among elderly beneficiaries with four or more chronic conditions, we observed an increase in the prevalence of CRN from 14.4% in 2009 to 17.0% in 2011, reversing previous downward trends. Similarly, the prevalence of forgoing basic needs in order to purchase medicines among the sickest elderly decreased from 8.7% in 2007 to 6.8% in 2009, then rose to 10.2% in 2011. Our findings highlight the need for targeted policy efforts to alleviate the persistent burden of drug treatment costs in this vulnerable population. PMID:25092846

  2. Medical Literature Evaluation Education at US Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jennifer; Demaris, Kendra

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine how medical literature evaluation (MLE) is being taught across the United States and to summarize methods for teaching and assessing MLE. Methods. An 18-question survey was administered to faculty members whose primary responsibility was teaching MLE at schools and colleges of pharmacy. Results. Responses were received from 90 (71%) US schools of pharmacy. The most common method of integrating MLE into the curriculum was as a stand-alone course (49%). The most common placement was during the second professional year (43%) or integrated throughout the curriculum (25%). The majority (77%) of schools used a team-based approach. The use of active-learning strategies was common as was the use of multiple methods of evaluation. Responses varied regarding what role the course director played in incorporating MLE into advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Conclusion. There is a trend toward incorporating MLE education components throughout the pre-APPE curriculum and placement of literature review/evaluation exercises into therapeutics practice skills laboratories to help students see how this skill integrates into other patient care skills. Several pre-APPE educational standards for MLE education exist, including journal club activities, a team-based approach to teaching and evaluation, and use of active-learning techniques. PMID:26941431

  3. Evaluating educational preparation for a health education role in practice: the case of medication education.

    PubMed

    Latter, S; Rycroft-Malone, J; Yerrell, P; Shaw, D

    2000-11-01

    Current health care policy and practice contexts in the UK point to the importance of nurses' ability to make an effective contribution to educating patients about medication, as part of their role in health education and health promotion. Nurses' potential contribution to this important activity will inevitably be dependent on knowledge and skills acquired during preregistration and postregistration programmes of education. Against this backdrop, changes in pre and postregistration nurse education in the UK in the past decade highlight the importance and timeliness of evaluating the adequacy of educational preparation for a medication role. This paper reports on the findings from an evaluation of UK educational preparation for a medication education role in practice. A case study design was used to investigate current educational preparation at three education institutions. Multiple methods of data collection at each site involved focus group discussions with lecturers and practitioners, individual interviews with key personnel, nonparticipant observation of teaching sessions, postobservation interviews with students and curriculum analysis. Findings highlighted the importance of a number of dimensions of preparation for practice of such a role: the need for sufficient taught pharmacology; opportunities for application and integration of prerequisite knowledge and skills; the importance of practice-based learning; the need for an evidence-based curriculum, and the importance of clarifying outcomes and competencies required for a medication education role within pre and postregistration curricula. The paper concludes with a discussion and implications of the findings. PMID:11115014

  4. Combined Versus Detailed Evaluation Components in Medical Student Global Rating Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Askew, Kim L.; O’Neill, James C.; Hiestand, Brian; Manthey, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To determine if there is any correlation between any of the 10 individual components of a global rating index on an emergency medicine (EM) student clerkship evaluation form. If there is correlation, to determine if a weighted average of highly correlated components loses predictive value for the final clerkship grade. Methods This study reviewed medical student evaluations collected over two years of a required fourth-year rotation in EM. Evaluation cards, comprised of a detailed 10-part evaluation, were completed after each shift. We used a correlation matrix between evaluation category average scores, using Spearman’s rho, to determine if there was any correlation of the grades between any of the 10 items on the evaluation form. Results A total of 233 students completed the rotation over the two-year period of the study. There were strong correlations (>0.80) between assessment components of medical knowledge, history taking, physical exam, and differential diagnosis. There were also strong correlations between assessment components of team rapport, patient rapport, and motivation. When these highly correlated were combined to produce a four-component model, linear regression demonstrated similar predictive power in terms of final clerkship grade (R2=0.71, CI95=0.65–0.77 and R2=0.69, CI95=0.63–0.76 for the full and reduced models respectively). Conclusion This study revealed that several components of the evaluation card had a high degree of correlation. Combining the correlated items, a reduced model containing four items (clinical skills, interpersonal skills, procedural skills, and documentation) was as predictive of the student’s clinical grade as the full 10-item evaluation. Clerkship directors should be aware of the performance of their individual global rating scales when assessing medical student performance, especially if attempting to measure greater than four components. PMID:26594284

  5. Evaluating innovation. Part 1: The concept of progressive scholarly acceptance.

    PubMed

    Schnurman, Zane; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the relevant medical community accepts new therapies is vital to patients, physicians, and society. Increasingly, focus is placed on how medical innovations are evaluated. But recognizing when a treatment has become accepted practice-essentially, acceptance by the scientific community-remains a challenge and a barrierto investigating treatment development. This report aims to demonstrate the theory, method, and limitations of a model for measuring a new metric that the authors term "progressive scholarly acceptance." A model was developed to identify when the scientific community has accepted an innovation, by observing when researchers have moved beyond the initial study of efficacy. This model could enable further investigations into the methods and influences of treatment development. PMID:26252458

  6. Periorbital hyperpigmentation: review of etiology, medical evaluation, and aesthetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wendy E

    2014-04-01

    Periorbital hyperpigmentation (POH) is a common worldwide problem. It is challenging to treat, complex in pathogenesis, and lacking straightforward and repeatable therapeutic options. It may occur in the young and old, however the development of dark circles under the eyes in any age is of great aesthetic concern because it may depict the individual as sad, tired, stressed, and old. While "dark circles" are seen in all skin types, POH is often more commonly seen in skin of color patients worldwide. With a shifting US demographic characterized by growing number of aging patients as well as skin of color patients, we will encounter POH with greater frequency. As forecasted by the US Census, by 2030 1 in 5 Americans will be 65 plus years old and greater than 50% of the population will possess ethnic skin of color. The disparity in the medical community's understanding of POH versus popular demand for treatment is best illustrated when you have only 65 cited articles to date indexed on PubMed line compared to the 150,000,000 results on Google search engine. Most importantly POH may be a final common pathway of dermatitis, allergy, systemic disorders, sleep disturbances, or nutritional deficiences that lends itself to medical, surgical, and cosmeceutical treatments. A complete medical history with ROS and physical examination is encouraged prior to treating the aesthetic component. Sun protection is a cornerstone of therapy. Safety issues are of utmost concern when embarking upon treatments such as chemical peeling, filler injection, and laser therapy as not to worsen the pigmentation. Without intervention, POH usually progresses over time so early intervention and management is encouraged. The objective of this study was to review the current body of knowledge on POH, provide the clinician with a guide to the evaluation and treatment of POH, and to present diverse clinical cases of POH that have responded to different therapies including non-ablative fractional

  7. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-01-01

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy. PMID:26151905

  8. Evaluation of various speckle reduction filters on medical ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shibin; Zhu, Qingsong; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    At present, ultrasound is one of the essential tools for noninvasive medical diagnosis. However, speckle noise is inherent in medical ultrasound images and it is the cause for decreased resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. Low image quality is an obstacle for effective feature extraction, recognition, analysis, and edge detection; it also affects image interpretation by doctor and the accuracy of computer-assisted diagnostic techniques. Thus, speckle reduction is significant and critical step in pre-processing of ultrasound images. Many speckle reduction techniques have been studied by researchers, but to date there is no comprehensive method that takes all the constraints into consideration. In this paper we discuss seven filters, namely Lee, Frost, Median, Speckle Reduction Anisotropic Diffusion (SRAD), Perona-Malik's Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) filter, Speckle Reduction Bilateral Filter (SRBF) and Speckle Reduction filter based on soft thresholding in the Wavelet transform. A comparative study of these filters has been made in terms of preserving the features and edges as well as effectiveness of de-noising.We computed five established evaluation metrics in order to determine which despeckling algorithm is most effective and optimal for real-time implementation. In addition, the experimental results have been demonstrated by filtered images and statistical data table. PMID:24109896

  9. 78 FR 16679 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy Council; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy... interested organizations, on medical policy issues that may be considered by the CDER Medical Policy Council (Council) in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). These comments will help the...

  10. 20 CFR 702.409 - Evaluation of medical questions; results disputed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of medical questions; results... PROCEDURE Medical Care and Supervision § 702.409 Evaluation of medical questions; results disputed. Any party who is dissatisfied with such report may request a review or reexamination of the employee by...

  11. 76 FR 27380 - Proposed Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation); Comment.... Title: Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation, VA Form 21-2545. OMB Control Number... solicits comments for information needed from claimants prior to undergoing a VA medical examination...

  12. 20 CFR 702.409 - Evaluation of medical questions; results disputed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evaluation of medical questions; results disputed. 702.409 Section 702.409 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT... PROCEDURE Medical Care and Supervision § 702.409 Evaluation of medical questions; results disputed....

  13. Evaluation of stereoscopic medical video content on an autostereoscopic display for undergraduate medical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, Justus F. R.; Kawai, Takashi; Shibata, Takashi; Yamazoe, Takashi; Westhofen, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Introduction: An increasing number of surgical procedures are performed in a microsurgical and minimally-invasive fashion. However, the performance of surgery, its possibilities and limitations become difficult to teach. Stereoscopic video has evolved from a complex production process and expensive hardware towards rapid editing of video streams with standard and HDTV resolution which can be displayed on portable equipment. This study evaluates the usefulness of stereoscopic video in teaching undergraduate medical students. Material and methods: From an earlier study we chose two clips each of three different microsurgical operations (tympanoplasty type III of the ear, endonasal operation of the paranasal sinuses and laser chordectomy for carcinoma of the larynx). This material was added by 23 clips of a cochlear implantation, which was specifically edited for a portable computer with an autostereoscopic display (PC-RD1-3D, SHARP Corp., Japan). The recording and synchronization of left and right image was performed at the University Hospital Aachen. The footage was edited stereoscopically at the Waseda University by means of our original software for non-linear editing of stereoscopic 3-D movies. Then the material was converted into the streaming 3-D video format. The purpose of the conversion was to present the video clips by a file type that does not depend on a television signal such as PAL or NTSC. 25 4th year medical students who participated in the general ENT course at Aachen University Hospital were asked to estimate depth clues within the six video clips plus cochlear implantation clips. Another 25 4th year students who were shown the material monoscopically on a conventional laptop served as control. Results: All participants noted that the additional depth information helped with understanding the relation of anatomical structures, even though none had hands-on experience with Ear, Nose and Throat operations before or during the course. The monoscopic

  14. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Freimuth, Robert R.; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  15. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Freimuth, Robert R; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  16. AMEE Guide 32: e-Learning in medical education Part 1: Learning, teaching and assessment.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel; Masters, Ken

    2008-06-01

    In just a few years, e-learning has become part of the mainstream in medical education. While e-learning means many things to many people, at its heart it is concerned with the educational uses of technology. For the purposes of this guide, we consider the many ways that the information revolution has affected and remediated the practice of healthcare teaching and learning. Deploying new technologies usually introduces tensions, and e-learning is no exception. Some wish to use it merely to perform pre-existing activities more efficiently or faster. Others pursue new ways of thinking and working that the use of such technology affords them. Simultaneously, while education, not technology, is the prime goal (and for healthcare, better patient outcomes), we are also aware that we cannot always predict outcomes. Sometimes, we have to take risks, and 'see what happens.' Serendipity often adds to the excitement of teaching. It certainly adds to the excitement of learning. The use of technology in support of education is not, therefore, a causal or engineered set of practices; rather, it requires creativity and adaptability in response to the specific and changing contexts in which it is used. Medical Education, as with most fields, is grappling with these tensions; the AMEE Guide to e-Learning in Medical Education hopes to help the reader, whether novice or expert, navigate them. This Guide is presented both as an introduction to the novice, and as a resource to more experienced practitioners. It covers a wide range of topics, some in broad outline, and others in more detail. Each section is concluded with a brief 'Take Home Message' which serves as a short summary of the section. The Guide is divided into two parts. The first part introduces the basic concepts of e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment, and then focuses on the day-to-day issues of e-learning, looking both at theoretical concepts and practical implementation issues. The second part examines technical

  17. Virtue ethics - an old answer to a new dilemma? Part 1. Problems with contemporary medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Misselbrook, David

    2015-02-01

    The commonest practical model used in contemporary medical ethics is Principlism. Yet, while Principlism is a widely accepted consensus statement for ethics, the moral theory that underpins it faces serious challenges in its attempt to provide a coherent and accepted system of moral analysis. This inevitably challenges the stability of such a consensus statement and makes it vulnerable to attack by competitors such as preference consequentialism. This two-part paper proposes an inclusive version of virtue theory as a more grounded system of moral analysis. PMID:25721113

  18. Peer Dynamics Final Evaluation Report. 1979/1980. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cathy; Walker, Connie

    This is Part I of a final evaluation of a program designed to reduce the incidence of destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g. drug-alcohol abuse, and juvenile delinquency) among school-age youth. Background research indicates that peer group pressure is the single most important factor in dictating the presence or absence of juvenile delinquency…

  19. Peer Dynamics 1979-1980 Evaluation Report. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cathy; Walker, Connie

    This is Part 2 of a final evaluation of a program to reduce destructive risk-taking behavior (e.g., drug-alcohol abuse and juvenile delinquency) in school-age youth. The program uses peer counseling in schools to develop self-esteem and better communication skills in students. Analysis of attitude tests is performed and factors affecting the…

  20. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 379 - Evaluation Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROJECTS WITH INDUSTRY Pt. 379, App. A Appendix A to Part 379—Evaluation Standards Standard 1: The primary objective of the project must be to assist individuals...

  1. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 379 - Evaluation Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROJECTS WITH INDUSTRY Pt. 379, App. A Appendix A to Part 379—Evaluation Standards Standard 1: The primary objective of the project must be to assist individuals...

  2. Use of modulated excitation signals in medical ultrasound. Part II: Design and performance for medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-02-01

    In the first paper, the superiority of linear FM signals was shown in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and robustness to tissue attenuation. This second paper in the series of three papers on the application of coded excitation signals in medical ultrasound presents design methods of linear FM signals and mismatched filters, in order to meet the higher demands on resolution in ultrasound imaging. It is shown that for the small time-bandwidth (TB) products available in ultrasound, the rectangular spectrum approximation is not valid, which reduces the effectiveness of weighting. Additionally, the distant range sidelobes are associated with the ripples of the spectrum amplitude and, thus, cannot be removed by weighting. Ripple reduction is achieved through amplitude or phase predistortion of the transmitted signals. Mismatched filters are designed to efficiently use the available bandwidth and at the same time to be insensitive to the transducer's impulse response. With these techniques, temporal sidelobes are kept below 60 to 100 dB, image contrast is improved by reducing the energy within the sidelobe region, and axial resolution is preserved. The method is evaluated first for resolution performance and axial sidelobes through simulations with the program Field II. A coded excitation ultrasound imaging system based on a commercial scanner and a 4 MHz probe driven by coded sequences is presented and used for the clinical evaluation of the coded excitation/compression scheme. The clinical images show a significant improvement in penetration depth and contrast, while they preserve both axial and lateral resolution. At the maximum acquisition depth of 15 cm, there is an improvement of more than 10 dB in the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. The paper also presents acquired images, using complementary Golay codes, that show the deleterious effects of attenuation on binary codes when processed with a matched filter, also confirmed by presented simulated images. PMID

  3. 76 FR 44086 - Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity.... 2900-0052.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Report of Medical Examination for Disability...

  4. Part 2, Conflict management. How to shape positive relationships in medical practices and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sotile, W M; Sotile, M O

    1999-01-01

    Managing workplace conflict is one of the most important, stressful, and time-consuming tasks faced by today's physician leaders. In Part 1 of this article series, the authors describe how to assess an organization's interpersonal dynamics. True change comes from interventions that help an organization to become a positive interpersonal culture, one that fosters cooperation and collaboration. Part 2 offers seven steps to solving the disruptive physician problem: (1) provide protection to complainants; (2) listen, empathize, and avoid communication triangles; (3) confront offenders with data, authority, and compassion; (4) if needed, get outside help; (5) offer workplace training and experiences that foster positive relationships; (6) follow-up; and (7) practice what you preach. The self-assessment and intervention guidelines discussed in this series of articles can help physician executive move beyond struggling with episodes of conflict to shaping stress-resilient medical organizations. PMID:10558284

  5. Evaluation of an Inpatient Computerized Medication Reconciliation System

    PubMed Central

    Turchin, Alexander; Hamann, Claus; Schnipper, Jeffrey L.; Graydon-Baker, Erin; Millar, Sally G.; McCarthy, Patricia C.; Coley, Christopher M.; Gandhi, Tejal K.; Broverman, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    We designed the Pre-Admission Medication List (PAML) Builder medication reconciliation application and implemented it at two academic hospitals. We asked 1,714 users to complete a survey of their satisfaction with the application and analyzed factors associated with user efficiency. The survey was completed by 626 (36.5%) users. Most (64%) responders agreed that medication reconciliation improves patient care. Improvement requests included better medication information sources and propagation of medication information to order entry. Sixty-nine percent of admitting clinicians reported a typical time to build a PAML of <10 min. Decreased reported time to build a PAML was associated with reported experience with the application and ease of use but not the average number of medications on the PAML. Most users agreed that medication reconciliation improves patient care but requested tighter integration of the different stages of the medication reconciliation process. Further training may be helpful in improving user efficiency. PMID:18436909

  6. Evaluation of an inpatient computerized medication reconciliation system.

    PubMed

    Turchin, Alexander; Hamann, Claus; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Graydon-Baker, Erin; Millar, Sally G; McCarthy, Patricia C; Coley, Christopher M; Gandhi, Tejal K; Broverman, Carol A

    2008-01-01

    We designed the Pre-Admission Medication List (PAML) Builder medication reconciliation application and implemented it at two academic hospitals. We asked 1,714 users to complete a survey of their satisfaction with the application and analyzed factors associated with user efficiency. The survey was completed by 626 (36.5%) users. Most (64%) responders agreed that medication reconciliation improves patient care. Improvement requests included better medication information sources and propagation of medication information to order entry. Sixty-nine percent of admitting clinicians reported a typical time to build a PAML of <10 min. Decreased reported time to build a PAML was associated with reported experience with the application and ease of use but not the average number of medications on the PAML. Most users agreed that medication reconciliation improves patient care but requested tighter integration of the different stages of the medication reconciliation process. Further training may be helpful in improving user efficiency. PMID:18436909

  7. Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF)

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Brunner, Edgar; Hildenbrand, Sibylle; Loew, Thomas H.; Raupach, Tobias; Spies, Claudia; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here. Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third-party funds and the

  8. Improving emergency department flow through Rapid Medical Evaluation unit

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Lucas; Josephson, Timothy; Bates, Kathy; Kuipers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The Toronto Western Hospital is an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada, with an annual Emergency Department (ED) volume of 64,000 patients. Despite increases in patient volumes of almost six percent per annum over the last decade, there have been no commensurate increases in resources, infrastructure, and staffing. This has led to substantial increase in patient wait times, most specifically for those patients with lower acuity presentations. Despite requiring only minimal care, these patients contribute disproportionately to ED congestion, which can adversely impact resource utilization and quality of care for all patients. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving wait times experienced by patients with lower acuity presentations. A rapid improvement event was organized by frontline workers to rapidly overhaul processes of care, leading to the creation of the Rapid Medical Evaluation (RME) unit – a new pathway of care for patients with lower acuity presentations. The RME unit was designed by re-purposing existing resources and re-assigning one physician and one nurse towards the specific care of these patients. We evaluated the performance of the RME unit through measurement of physician initial assessment (PIA) times and total length of stay (LOS) times for multiple groups of patients assigned to various ED care pathways, during three periods lasting three months each. Weekly measurements of mean and 90th percentile of PIA and LOS times showed special cause variation in all targeted patient groups. Of note, the patients seen in the RME unit saw their median PIA and LOS times decrease from 98min to 70min and from 165min to 130min, respectively, from baseline. Despite ever-growing numbers of patient visits, wait times for all patients with lower acuity presentations remained low, and wait times of patients with higher acuity presentations assigned to other ED care pathways were not adversely affected. By

  9. Evaluation of Mobile Authoring and Tutoring in Medical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alepis, Efthymios; Virvou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Mobile computing facilities may provide many assets to the educational process. Mobile technology provides software access from anywhere and at any time, as well as computer equipment independence. The need for time and place independence is even greater for medical instructors and medical students. Medical instructors are usually doctors that…

  10. A Flexible Two-Part Random Effects Model for Correlated Medical Costs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Cowen, Mark E.; Strawderman, Robert L.; Shih, Ya-Chen T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a flexible “two-part” random Effects model (Olsen and Schafer 2001; Tooze, Grunwald, and Jones 2002) for correlated medical cost data. Typically, medical cost data are right-skewed, involve a substantial proportion of zero values, and may exhibit heteroscedasticity. In many cases, such data is also obtained in hierarchical form, e.g., on patients served by the same physician. The proposed model specification therefore consists of two generalized linear mixed models (GLMM), linked together by correlated random Effects. Respectively, and conditionally on the random Effects and covariates, we model the odds of cost being positive (Part I) using a GLMM with a logistic link and the mean cost (Part II) given that costs were actually incurred using a generalized gamma regression model with random Effects and a scale parameter that is allowed to depend on covariates (c.f. Manning, Basu, and Mullahy 2005). The class of generalized gamma distributions is very flexible and includes the lognormal, gamma, inverse gamma and Weibull distributions as special cases. We demonstrate how to carry out estimation using the Gaussian quadrature techniques conveniently implemented in SAS Proc NLMIXED. The proposed model is used to analyze pharmacy cost data on 56,245 adult patients clustered within 239 physicians in a mid-western U.S. managed care organization. PMID:20015560

  11. Evaluating the accuracy of technicians and pharmacists in checking unit dose medication cassettes.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Peter J; Saya, Frank G; Lovett, Larry T; Tan, Sandy; Adams, Dale W; Shane, Rita

    2002-06-15

    The accuracy rates of board-registered pharmacy technicians and pharmacists in checking unit dose medication cassettes in the inpatient setting at two separate institutions were examined. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, both in Los Angeles county, petitioned the California State Board of Pharmacy to approve a waiver of the California Code of Regulations to conduct an experimental program to compare the accuracy of unit dose medication cassettes checked by pharmacists with that of cassettes checked by trained, certified pharmacy technicians. The study consisted of three parts: assessing pharmacist baseline checking accuracy (Phase I), developing a technician-training program and certifying technicians who completed the didactic and practical training (Phase II), and evaluating the accuracy of certified technicians checking unit dose medication cassettes as a daily function (Phase III). Twenty-nine pharmacists and 41 technicians (3 of whom were pharmacy interns) participated in the study. Of the technicians, all 41 successfully completed the didactic and practical training, 39 successfully completed the audits and became certified checkers, and 2 (including 1 of the interns) did not complete the certification audits because they were reassigned to another work area or had resigned. In Phase II, the observed accuracy rate and its lower confidence limit exceeded the predetermined minimum requirement of 99.8% for a certified checker. The mean accuracy rates for technicians were identical at the two institutions (p = 1.0). The difference in mean accuracy rates between pharmacists (99.52%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 99.44-99.58%) and technicians, (99.89%; 95% CI 99.87-99.90%) was significant (p < 0.0001). Inpatient technicians who had been trained and certified in a closely supervised program that incorporated quality assurance mechanisms could safely and accurately check unit dose medication cassettes filled by other technicians

  12. Medication safety in acute care in Australia: where are we now? Part 2: a review of strategies and activities for improving medication safety 2002-2008

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Susan J; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper presents Part 2 of a literature review examining medication safety in the Australian acute care setting. This review was undertaken for the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, updating the 2002 national report on medication safety. Part 2 of the review examined the Australian evidence base for approaches to build safer medication systems in acute care. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify Australian studies and programs published from 2002 to 2008 which examined strategies and activities for improving medication safety in acute care. Results and conclusion Since 2002 there has been significant progress in strategies to improve prescription writing in hospitals with the introduction of a National Inpatient Medication Chart. There are also systems in place to ensure a nationally coordinated approach to the ongoing optimisation of the chart. Progress has been made with Australian research examining the implementation of computerised prescribing systems with clinical decision support. These studies have highlighted barriers and facilitators to the introduction of such systems that can inform wider implementation. However, Australian studies assessing outcomes of this strategy on medication incidents or patient outcomes are still lacking. In studies assessing education for reducing medication errors, academic detailing has been demonstrated to reduce errors in prescriptions for Schedule 8 medicines and a program was shown to be effective in reducing error prone prescribing abbreviations. Published studies continue to support the role of clinical pharmacist services in improving medication safety. Studies on strategies to improve communication between different care settings, such as liaison pharmacist services, have focussed on implementation issues now that funding is available for community-based services. Double checking versus single-checking by nurses and patient self-administration in hospital has been

  13. Toward Meaningful Evaluation of Medical Trainees: The Influence of Participants' Perceptions of the Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watling, Christopher J.; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    An essential goal of evaluation is to foster learning. Across the medical education spectrum, evaluation of clinical performance is dominated by subjective feedback to learners based on observation by expert supervisors. Research in non-medical settings has suggested that participants' perceptions of evaluation processes exert considerable…

  14. A reference data set for the evaluation of medical image retrieval systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Henning; Rosset, Antoine; Vallée, Jean-Paul; Terrier, François; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2004-09-01

    Content-based image retrieval is starting to become an increasingly important factor in medical imaging research and image management systems. Several retrieval systems and methodologies exist and are used in a large variety of applications from automatic labelling of images to diagnostic aid and image classification. Still, it is very hard to compare the performance of these systems as the used databases often contain copyrighted or private images and are thus not interchangeable between research groups, also for patient privacy. Most of the currently used databases for evaluating systems are also fairly small which is partly due to the high cost in obtaining a gold standard or ground truth that is necessary for evaluation. Several large image databases, though without a gold standard, start to be available publicly, for example by the NIH (National Institutes for Health). This article describes the creation of a large medical image database that is used in a teaching file containing more than 8,700 varied medical images. The images are anonymised and can be exchanged free of charge and copyright. Ground truth (a gold standard) has been obtained for a set of 26 images being selected as query topics for content-based query by image example. To reduce the time for the generation of ground truth, pooling methods well known from the text or information retrieval field have been used. Such a database is a good starting point for comparing the current image retrieval systems and to measure the retrieval quality, especially within the context of teaching files, image case databases and the support of teaching. For a comparison of retrieval systems for diagnostic aid, specialised image databases, including the diagnosis and a case description will need to be made available, as well, including gold standards for a proper system evaluation. A first evaluation event for image retrieval is foreseen at the 2004 CLEF conference (Cross Language Evaluation Forum) to compare text

  15. The use of information technology in improving medical performance. Part II. Physician-support tools.

    PubMed

    Gawande, A A; Bates, D W

    2000-02-14

    Increasing data from a few sites demonstrate that information technologies can improve physician decision making and clinical effectiveness. For example, computer-based physician order entry systems, automated laboratory alert systems, and artificial neural networks have demonstrated significant reductions in medical errors. In addition, Internet services to disseminate new knowledge and safety alerts to physicians more rationally and effectively are rapidly developing, and telemedicine to improve rural access to specialty services is undergoing substantial growth. However, even technologies demonstrated to yield beneficial effects have not yet achieved widespread adoption, though the pace of change appears to be increasing as the Internet takes hold. Scientific evaluation of many technologies is also lacking, and the dangers of some of these technologies may be underappreciated. Research on the effects of specific technologies should be a priority. Policies should be developed to press information technology companies, such as pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers, to recognize the importance of clinical evaluation. Research could also analyze the characteristics of effective technologies and of physicians and organizations who implement these technologies effectively. PMID:11104459

  16. AME survey-003 A1-part 2: the motivation factors of medical doctors in China

    PubMed Central

    Káplár, Zoltán; Lǐ, Yáo T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The professional moral and job satisfaction of medical profession remain highly disputed in media in China. On the other hand, there is wide disaffection of patients toward doctors in China. This survey aims to obtain a better understanding of the motivation of Chinese medical professionals. Methods An anonymous online cross-sectional survey, AME survey III, was conducted using the platform provided by DXY (www.dxy.cn) during the period of September 10-23, 2015. In total 2,356 DXY users completed the survey, including 1,740 males and 617 females, with a mean age of 31.96±7.03 yrs. Results The reasons (multiple choices) for career disaffection included poor patient/doctor relationship (88.6%), imbalance between workload and pay (79.5%), could not enter the preferred specialty (14.14%), and working in small clinics with no career progress (11.17%). If given the choice to enter the specialty as well as the hospital grade of their choice, 73.8% dissatisfied respondents replied they would like to be a doctor. For the dis-satisfied respondents, university teacher appeared to be the most popular career choice. The cited high workload was considered to be due to (I) imbalance in geographical allocation of doctors and insufficient training of doctors; (II) many red-tapism formalities; (III) Chinese patients often have unreasonable requests; (IV) over-examination and over-treatment; (V) high pressure to publish papers. One hundred and twelve respondents have their child/children attending university or graduated from university, 25.0% of them are pursuing a career in medicine. Nine hundred and ninety respondents have child/children while did not reach university age yet, among them 23.62% would like their child/children to study medicine. 64.87% of the 2,356 participants favor China to open up medical market to qualified foreign medical organizations to take part in fair competition, and 57.91% favor the government supporting regulated private hospitals

  17. Evaluation of aerosolized medications during parabolic flight maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.; Martin, William J.; Gosbee, John

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to visually evaluate the effect gravity has on delivery of medications by the use of various aerosol devices. During parabolic flight the same four aerosols were retested as performed in studio ground tests. It appears that the Cetacaine spray and the Ventolin inhaler function without failure during all test. The pump spray (Nostril) appeared to function normally when the container was full, however it appeared to begin to fail to deliver a full mist with larger droplet size when the container was nearly empty. The simple hand spray bottle appeared to work when the container was full and performed progressively worse as the container was emptied. During Apollo flights, it was reported that standard spray bottles did not work well, however, they did not indicate why. It appears that we would also conclude that standard spray bottles do not function as well in zero gravity by failing to produce a normal mist spray. The standard spray bottle allowed the fluid to come out in a narrow fluid stream when held with the nozzle either level or slightly tilted upward.

  18. Evaluation of life in Skylab from a medical viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hordinsky, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab program established the opportunity for the first time to perform extensive medical experimentation on man in a long-term zero-g environment. This experimentation involved metabolic studies, cardiovascular systems, nutrition and mineral balance, hematology, vestibular function, and many other related investigations. This report presents an overview of the significant results of the medical experiments performed during the program and a summary of the medical observations gathered by the team of life scientists.

  19. Evaluating User Perceptions of Mobile Medication Management Applications With Older Adults: A Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication nonadherence has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals with chronic disease. Several mobile medication management applications are available to help users track, remember, and read about their medication therapy. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the usability and usefulness of existing medication management applications for older adults. Methods We recruited 35 participants aged 50 and over to participate in a 2-hour usability session. The average age ranged from 52-78 years (mean 67 years) and 71% (25/35) of participants were female. Each participant was provided with an iPad loaded with four medication management applications: MyMedRec, DrugHub, Pillboxie, and PocketPharmacist. These applications were evaluated using the 10 item System Usability Scale (SUS) and visual analog scale. An investigator-moderated 30-minute discussion followed, and was recorded. We used a grounded theory (GT) approach to analyze qualitative data. Results When assessing mobile medication management applications, participants struggled to think of a need for the applications in their own lives. Many were satisfied with their current management system and proposed future use only if cognition and health declined. Most participants felt capable of using the applications after a period of time and training, but were frustrated by their initial experiences with the applications. The early experiences of participants highlighted the benefits of linear navigation and clear wording (eg, “undo” vs “cancel”) when designing for older users. While there was no order effect, participants attributed their poor performance to the order in which they tried the applications. They also described being a part of a technology generation that did not encounter the computer until adulthood. Of the four applications, PocketPharmacist was found to be the least usable with a score of 42/100 (P<.0001) though it offered a drug interaction

  20. The HIV Medication Taking Self-Efficacy Scale: Psychometric Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Erlen, Judith A.; Cha, EunSeok; Kim, Kevin H.; Caruthers, Donna; Sereika, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an examination of the psychometric properties of the HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale. Background Self-efficacy is a critically important component of strategies to improve HIV medication-taking; however, valid and reliable tools for assessing HIV medication-taking self-efficacy are limited. Method We used a cross-sectional, correlational design. Between 2003 and 2007, 326 participants were recruited from sites in Pennsylvania and Ohio in the United States of America. Six self-report questionnaires administered at baseline and 12 weeks later during “Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy” were used to examine the variables of interest. Means and variances, reliability, criterion, and construct validity of the HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale were assessed. Findings Participants reported high self-confidence in their ability to carry out specific medication-related tasks (mean=8.31) and in the medication’s ability to effect good outcomes (mean=8.56). The HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale and subscales showed excellent reliability (α = .93 ~ .94). Criterion validity was well-established by examining the relationships between the HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale and selected physiological and psychological factors, and self-reported medication adherence (r = −.20 ~ .58). A two-factor model with a correlation between self-efficacy belief and outcome expectancy fitted the data well (model χ2 = 3871.95, df = 325, p<001; CFA =.96; RMSEA =.046). Conclusion The HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale is a psychometrically sound measure of medication-taking self-efficacy for use by researchers and clinicians with people with HIV. The findings offer insight into the development of interventions to promote self-efficacy and medication adherence in persons with HIV. PMID:20722799

  1. Evaluation of Psychological Factors in Medical School Admissions Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bonnie J.; Borges, Nicole J.

    Medical school admissions committees are expected to select physicians with specific attributes such as intelligence, altruism, dutifulness, and compassion. Besides basing these attributes on the best professional judgment of the physicians and medical school faculty, there has been little quantitative research to determine the psychological…

  2. Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO). Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gloria

    A partnership was formed to address the crisis that rural health care facilities in rural Nebraska face in attracting and hiring trained health care workers. The Rural Allied Medical Business Occupations (RAMBO) project trained economically disadvantaged individuals in high technology medical fields. Five objectives were outlined in the project:…

  3. Planning a pharmacy-led medical mission trip, part 3: development and implementation of an elective medical missions advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) rotation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dana A; Ferrill, Mary J

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of new pharmacy schools/colleges and expansion of existing ones, pharmacy schools/colleges are often in need of elective rotation experiences as part of the final year advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) program. Offering a medical missions elective APPE in either a domestic or international setting is a unique opportunity to expose pharmacy students to direct patient care. APPE students can be involved in triaging patients, compounding and dispensing medications, and providing patient education. As part of this APPE, pharmacy students are expected to complete projects such as formulary development, case presentations, book club discussions, journal reflections, manuscript preparations, and trip logistics planning. An elective APPE focused on medical missions facilitates the learning process and promotes the emergence of team leaders and leadership skills in general. PMID:22739719

  4. A student authored online medical education textbook: editing patterns and content evaluation of a medical student wiki.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C L; Schulz, Wade L; Terrence, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The University of Minnesota medical student wiki (UMMedWiki) allows students to collaboratively edit classroom notes to support medical education. Since 2007, UMMedWiki has grown to include 1,591 articles that have collectively received 1.2 million pageviews. Although small-scale wikis have become increasingly important, little is known about their dynamics compared to large wikis, such as Wikipedia. To better understand UMMedWiki's management and its potential reproducibility at other medical schools, we used an edit log with 28,000 entries to evaluate the behavior of its student editors. The development of tools to survey UMMedwiki allows for quality comparisons that improve both the wiki and the curriculum itself. We completed a content survey by comparing the UMMedWiki with two types of rubric data: TIME, a medical education taxonomy consisting of 1500 terms and national epidemiological data on 2,100 diseases. PMID:22195202

  5. Evaluation of Intravenous Medication Errors with Smart Infusion Pumps in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W.

    2013-01-01

    While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted. PMID:24551395

  6. [Medical expert assessment in civil and criminal law--legal evaluation of medical expert opinion].

    PubMed

    Schlund, G H

    1996-11-01

    The constitutional position of the judge and the medical expert witness during a lawsuit is explained. From this, the demands on a judicial expert witness for the preparation of his expert assessment are derived and the judge's function in the appointment of the expert witness is explained. Additionally, criteria, duties, and rules are worked out, which should be followed by the judge during assessment of the medical expert testimony. PMID:9064930

  7. Evaluation of Information Literacy Skill Development in First Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sandra; Iredell, Helena; Newton-Smith, Carol; Clark, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Medical practitioners need the skills to find relevant information and evaluate its authenticity, validity, and reliability. The learning of information literacy has been embedded in the University of Western Australia (UWA) medical course since 2000. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the enhanced information literacy…

  8. The Role of the Medical Provider in the Evaluation of Sexually Abused Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Alice Whittier; Vandeven, Andrea Marie

    2010-01-01

    It was only 30 years ago that the medical community began to develop an increased awareness of child sexual abuse, and the role of the medical provider in the evaluation of sexually abused children has evolved significantly. As clinicians worldwide develop a greater understanding of the impact of the sexual abuse evaluation on the child, the roles…

  9. Evaluation of a clinical medical librarian program at the Yale Medical Library.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, B; Battison, S; Kolisch, M; Leredu, M

    1978-07-01

    A clinical medical librarian (CML) program in a large university-based teaching hospital setting is viewed by the majority of clinicians as education-oriented, with slightly fewer clinicians viewing it as patient care oriented. The CML service has been utilized for research purposes only when it is clear that case-relevant information can evolve into research intended to have "clinical" impact. This study reports the results of a questionnaire circulated among clinicians receiving CML support by a large medical school library. Results indicate that (1) the CML effected a change in information-seeking behavior by the clinicians--they obtained information that would not have been available to them if the CML had not been present in patient-management conferences; (2) relevancy of information provided by the CML was judged by the clinicians to be very high; (3) the accuracy of the CML's search, coupled with the rapidity of delivery, was found to be highly satisfactory; (4) acceptance of the CML within the patient care setting was acknowledged by the majority of clinicians, who contact the CML in-hospital and overwhelmingly prefer to do so; and (5) there was no statistically significant variation in the manner in which different medical specialties use the services of a CML. These findings justify implementation of a clinical medical librarian program, on a modified basis, as an additional service to already existing reference services offered by a large medical school library. PMID:678700

  10. [Medical expert assessment in civil and criminal law--stand for evaluating medical expert assessment].

    PubMed

    Kienzle, H F

    1996-11-01

    The standard for the assessment of the medical expert opinion is defined by the high demands expected from the judgement of a high court: Objectiveness, solid knowledge, self-criticism, in contestability in diction and firmness in the argumentation. From the legal point of view, the knowledge of the medical expert witness has to clearly go beyond the knowledge of his profession. The obligation for objectiveness is the basis of expert witness' activity. From the medical point of view, the physician has to take into account during the preparation of his expert assessment that structural deficiency of the personnel and surgical equipment of a department for surgery frequently plays a role due to the development of surgery to high tech medicine and the hospital physician cannot affect this. It is necessary for a physician as an expert witness to have basic knowledge about the evidence law and the medical liability process. On the other hand, judges and lawyers should basically know the medical way of thinking. PMID:9064929

  11. In-office evaluation of medical fitness to drive

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Frank J.; Byszewski, Anna M.; Marshall, Shawn C.; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide background for physicians’ in-office assessment of medical fitness to drive, including legal risks and responsibilities. To review opinion-based approaches and current attempts to promote evidence-based strategies for this assessment. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Ageline, and Sociofile were searched from 1966 on for articles on health-related and medical aspects of fitness to drive. More than 1500 papers were reviewed to find practical approaches to, or guidelines for, assessing medical fitness to drive in primary care. Only level III evidence was found. No evidence-based approaches were found. MAIN MESSAGE Three practical methods of assessment are discussed: the American Medical Association guidelines, SAFE DRIVE, and CanDRIVE. CONCLUSION There is no evidence-based information to help physicians make decisions regarding medical fitness to drive. Current approaches are primarily opinion-based and are of unknown predictive value. Research initiatives, such as the CanDRIVE program of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, can provide empiric data that would allow us to move from opinion to evidence. PMID:15794022

  12. LIMITING OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL EVALUATIONS UNDER THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT AND THE GENETIC INFORMATION NONDISCRIMINATION ACT.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Mark A; Roberts, Jessica; Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Although medical care delivery by one's personal physician is the paradigmatic American healthcare arrangement, in the workplace setting, many Americans undergo medical evaluations to assess their fitness for duty or degree of impairment. This Article explores the complex and evolving legal status of occupational medical evaluations. Beginning with the legal and ethical frameworks of occupational medical practice, the Article then examines the effects of increasingly detailed legal regulation under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act on employees, employers, and physicians. PMID:26863849

  13. Evaluating an interprofessional disease state and medication management review model.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Forman, Dawn; Hughes, Jeffery

    2014-03-01

    There is lack of literature data reporting an incorporation of medication management reviews in students' interprofessional education (IPE) and practice programs in aged care settings. This pilot study reports how an interprofessional disease state and medication management review program (DSMMR) was established in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. Students from the professions of nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy focused on a wellness check in the areas of cognition, falls and continence while integrating a medication management review. Students' attitudes were explored using a pre- and post-placement questionnaire. Students indicated positive experience with the IPE DSMMR program which also resulted in their positive attitudinal shift towards IPE and practice. These findings indicated that aged care can be a suitable setting for student interprofessional programs focusing on DSMMR. PMID:24246025

  14. Critical Illness in Pregnancy: Part II: Common Medical Conditions Complicating Pregnancy and Puerperium.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Hall, Nicole; Belfort, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The first of this two-part series on critical illness in pregnancy dealt with obstetric disorders. In Part II, medical conditions that commonly affect pregnant women or worsen during pregnancy are discussed. ARDS occurs more frequently in pregnancy. Strategies commonly used in nonpregnant patients, including permissive hypercapnia, limits for plateau pressure, and prone positioning, may not be acceptable, especially in late pregnancy. Genital tract infections unique to pregnancy include chorioamnionitis, group A streptococcal infection causing toxic shock syndrome, and polymicrobial infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and Clostridium perfringens causing necrotizing vulvitis or fasciitis. Pregnancy predisposes to VTE; D-dimer levels have low specificity in pregnancy. A ventilation-perfusion scan is preferred over CT pulmonary angiography in some situations to reduce radiation to the mother's breasts. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparins form the mainstay of treatment; vitamin K antagonists, oral factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors are not recommended in pregnancy. The physiologic hyperdynamic circulation in pregnancy worsens many cardiovascular disorders. It increases risk of pulmonary edema or arrhythmias in mitral stenosis, heart failure in pulmonary hypertension or aortic stenosis, aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome, or valve thrombosis in mechanical heart valves. Common neurologic problems in pregnancy include seizures, altered mental status, visual symptoms, and strokes. Other common conditions discussed are aspiration of gastric contents, OSA, thyroid disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, and cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy. Studies confined to pregnant women are available for only a few of these conditions. We have, therefore, reviewed pregnancy-specific adjustments in the management of these disorders. PMID:26020727

  15. Promoting medical humanism: design and evaluation of an online curriculum.

    PubMed

    Wiecha, John M; Markuns, Jeffrey F

    2008-10-01

    To provide patient-centered care, physicians must be well trained in the concepts and methods of humanistic practice. Educational efforts to promote humanism may help to overcome the counter-training of the hidden medical school curriculum, responsible for a decline in empathy and idealism over the course of medical training. The online component of the clerkship in family medicine at Boston University introduced activities founded on reflection, self-awareness, collaborative learning, and applied practice to successfully promote student confidence in three key areas of humanistic practice. PMID:18830833

  16. Charles W. Dohner, PhD: an evaluator and mentor in medical education.

    PubMed

    Irby, David M; Wilkerson, Luann

    2003-01-01

    As one of the first generation medical education pioneers, Charles W. Dohner, PhD established the ninth office of medical education at the University of Washington (UW) where he served as chairman from 1967-1996. With a background in education and measurement, he focused his work on evaluation of educational programs and faculty development. The Department of Medical Education went through three distinct stages of development: pathfinding 1967-1972 focused on developing working relationships with the faculty and clarifying identity, integration into academic affairs 1972-1980, and direct leadership by department faculty 1980-1996. Dohner helped to create and evaluate the WAMI program, a regional medical education program for the states of Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho. He served as a consultant to a specialty board, the founding president of the Society of Directors of Research in Medical Education, and a frequent consultant in international medical education. Dohner identified three important innovations in medical education: educators in academic medicine, simulations and performance assessment, and community-based medical education. Success factors for professional education include technical competence in education, interpersonal communication and collaboration skills, a plan for personal growth, and use of mentors. Future trends in medical education will involve information technology, professionalism, wellness and complementary medicine, and performance assessment. He has been a passionate spokesman for excellence in medical education and most noted for his roles as an evaluator, program developer, and mentor of academic leaders. PMID:12652169

  17. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - Criteria for Designation of Areas Having Shortages of Primary Medical Care Professional(s)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of Primary Medical Care Professional(s) A Appendix A to Part 5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... Medical Care Professional(s) Part I—Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions. 1... facilities will be designated as having a shortage of primary medical care professional(s) if both...

  18. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - Criteria for Designation of Areas Having Shortages of Primary Medical Care Professional(s)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of Primary Medical Care Professional(s) A Appendix A to Part 5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... Medical Care Professional(s) Part I—Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions. 1... facilities will be designated as having a shortage of primary medical care professional(s) if both...

  19. Actuarial considerations of medical malpractice evaluations in M&As.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    To best project an actuarial estimate for medical malpractice exposure for a merger and acquisition, a organization's leaders should consider the following factors, among others: How to support an unbiased actuarial estimation. Experience of the actuary. The full picture of the organization's malpractice coverage. The potential for future loss development. Frequency and severity trends. PMID:25647911

  20. Evaluating the Systematic Validity of a Medical Subspecialty Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raddatz, Mikaela M.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Pennington, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the construct of a medical subspecialty examination, as defined by the hierarchy of item difficulties, is stable across physicians who completed a fellowship and recertifiers as compared to non-fellows. Three comparisons of groups are made: 1) Practice pathway board candidates compared to members of all…

  1. STARPAHC space-oriented medical evaluation. [telemedicine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Development of the STARPAHC telemedicine system is documented. Using STARPAHC assessment results and monitoring experience, on board and ground based flight medical system monitoring requirements and operational procedures were developed for use with the Space Transportation System during OFT and mature operation phases of the shuttle.

  2. Evaluation of a Lecture Recording System in a Medical Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacro, Thierry R. H.; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Fitzharris, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the Medical University of South Carolina adopted a lecture recording system (LRS). A retrospective study of LRS was implemented to document the students' perceptions, pattern of usage, and impact on the students' grades in three basic sciences courses (Cell Biology/Histology, Physiology, and Neurosciences). The number of accesses and…

  3. Evaluation of Measuring Devices Packaged With Prescription Oral Liquid Medications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The US Food and Drug Administration industry guidelines for manufacturers of oral, over-the-counter, liquid medications recommend that these products be packaged with dosage-delivery devices. This study describes the prevalence of these devices and instructions packaged with prescription, oral, liquid medications. METHODS: This was a descriptive study of prescription oral-liquid medications dispensed during a 6-month period at a community pharmacy. Product information was obtained from the National Library of Medicine's DailyMed database and from the products themselves. Endpoints included provision of a measuring device, the type of device, the maximum dose measurable and intervals on the provided device, and inclusion of instructions to the pharmacist. RESULTS: A total of 382 liquid prescription medications were included in the study. Forty-nine of the 382 products (12.8%) were packaged with a measuring device. The most commonly provided device was a calibrated dropper (n = 18; 36.7%), followed by an oral syringe with a bottle adaptor (n = 9, 18.4%). Specific instructions on proper use of the provided measuring device were included with 20 products (40.8%). Among the products that did not provide a measuring device, only 70 of the 333 package inserts (21%) included instructions to the pharmacist regarding counseling the patient on proper administration. CONCLUSIONS: Packaging of prescription oral-liquid medications is inconsistent and leaves room for vast variability in patient or parent administration practices. In the future, patterns of actual dispensing practices among pharmacies and pharmacists would help determine the true incidence of dispensing of measuring devices. PMID:26997931

  4. A new strategy for stiffness evaluation of sheet metal parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Q.; Volk, W.; Düster, A.; Rank, E.

    2011-08-01

    In the automotive industry, surfaces of styling models are shaped very often in physical models. For example, in the styling process of a car body important design work is realized by clay models and the resulting geometry information typically comes from optical scans. The scanned data is given in the form of point clouds which is then utilized in the virtual planning process for engineering work, e.g. to evaluate the load-carrying capacity. This is an important measure for the stiffness of the car body panels. In this contribution, the following two issues are discussed: what is the suitable geometric representation of the stiffness of the car body and how it is computed if only discrete point clouds exist. In the first part, the suitable geometric representation is identified by constructing continuous CAD models with different geometric parameters, e.g. Gaussian curvature and mean curvature. The stiffness of models is then computed in LS-DYNA and the influence of different geometric parameters is presented based on the simulation result. In the second part, the point clouds from scanned data, rather than continuous CAD models, are directly utilized to estimate the Gaussian curvature, which is normally derived from continuous surfaces. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is applied to estimate the Gaussian curvature of the point clouds and the sensitivity of the algorithm with respect to the mesh quality is analyzed. In this way, the stiffness evaluation process in an early stage can be accelerated since the transformation from discrete data to continuous CAD data is labor-intensive. The discrete Gauss-Bonnet algorithm is finally applied to a sheet metal model of the BMW 3 series.

  5. Part-whole reasoning in medical ontologies revisited--introducing SEP triplets into classification-based description logics.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S.; Romacker, M.; Hahn, U.

    1998-01-01

    The development of powerful and comprehensive medical ontologies that support formal reasoning on a large scale is one of the key requirements for clinical computing in the next millennium. Taxonomic medical knowledge, a major portion of these ontologies, is mainly characterized by generalization and part-whole relations between concepts. While reasoning in generalization hierarchies is quite well understood, no fully conclusive mechanism as yet exists for part-whole reasoning. The approach we take emulates part-whole reasoning via classification-based reasoning using SEP triplets, a special data structure for encoding part-whole relations that is fully embedded in the formal framework of standard description logics. Images Figure 3 PMID:9929335

  6. How we conduct ongoing programmatic evaluation of our medical education curriculum.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly; Abendroth, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of undergraduate medical education programs is necessary to meet accreditation standards; however, implementation and maintenance of an adequate evaluation process is challenging. A curriculum evaluation committee (CEC) was established at the Penn State University College of Medicine in 2000 to complement the already established activities of the Office of the Vice Dean for Medical Education and the Committee on Undergraduate Medical Education. Herein, we describe the methodology used by the CEC at our academic medical center and outcomes attributable to the curriculum evaluation process that was enacted. Strengths of our process include ongoing, regular assessments that guarantee a course is reviewed at least every two years and a feedback loop whereby course directors are held accountable for implementing changes when necessary. Our evaluative process has proven effective, sustainable, and has identified additional areas for curricular improvements. PMID:22816980

  7. The medical film 1897-1997: Part II. The second half-century.

    PubMed

    Essex-Lopresti, M

    1998-06-01

    Following the reluctance of teachers to use film for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education up until the Second World War, the active promotion of medical films after the war was encouraged by the production of catalogues of films available and the publication of medical film reviews both in journals and in books. This resulted in an increased use of films in the three decades following the war until videorecordings began to take their place and film projection is now a rarity in centres of medical education. PMID:9876406

  8. Large-scale evaluation of a medical cross-language information retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Markó, Kornél; Daumke, Philipp; Schulz, Stefan; Klar, Rüdiger; Hahn, Udo

    2007-01-01

    We propose an approach to multilingual medical document retrieval in which complex word forms are segmented according to medically relevant morpho-semantic criteria. At its core lies a multilingual dictionary, in which entries are equivalence classes of subwords, i.e. semantically minimal units. Using two different standard test collections for the medical domain, we evaluate our approach for six languages covered by our system. PMID:17911746

  9. Evaluation of two thermoluminescent detection systems for medical imaging environments.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J; Nabelssi, B K; Rucker, R H; Klingler, G W

    1990-12-01

    Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) can provide accurate and precise measurements for both patient and personnel dosimetry in the medical imaging environment. They have the advantages of tissue equivalency, an excellent dynamic range, and dose rate independence. In the work reported here, experiments with planar x-ray, fluoroscopy, and a 57Co source were conducted to test the repeatability and energy dependence of an LiF TL ribbon/automatic reader system and a four-element CaSO2 and Li2B4O7 badge/automatic reader system for diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine dosimetry. The results indicate the usefulness and appropriateness of the TLD systems tested for both personnel and patient dosimetry in the medical diagnostic environment. PMID:2228610

  10. Evaluation of two thermoluminescent detection systems for medical imaging environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kearfott, K.J.; Nabelssi, B.K.; Rucker, R.H.; Klingler, G.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) can provide accurate and precise measurements for both patient and personnel dosimetry in the medical imaging environment. They have the advantages of tissue equivalency, an excellent dynamic range, and dose rate independence. In the work reported here, experiments with planar x-ray, fluoroscopy, and a 57Co source were conducted to test the repeatability and energy dependence of an LiF TL ribbon/automatic reader system and a four-element CaSO2 and Li2B4O7 badge/automatic reader system for diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine dosimetry. The results indicate the usefulness and appropriateness of the TLD systems tested for both personnel and patient dosimetry in the medical diagnostic environment.

  11. Applying the institutional review board data repository approach to manage ethical considerations in evaluating and studying medical education

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, Erin K.; Rathkey, Daniel; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Palmer, Ryan; Mejicano, George C.; Pusic, Martin; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen; Carney, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Issue Medical educators and educational researchers continue to improve their processes for managing medical student and program evaluation data using sound ethical principles. This is becoming even more important as curricular innovations are occurring across undergraduate and graduate medical education. Dissemination of findings from this work is critical, and peer-reviewed journals often require an institutional review board (IRB) determination. Approach IRB data repositories, originally designed for the longitudinal study of biological specimens, can be applied to medical education research. The benefits of such an approach include obtaining expedited review for multiple related studies within a single IRB application and allowing for more flexibility when conducting complex longitudinal studies involving large datasets from multiple data sources and/or institutions. In this paper, we inform educators and educational researchers on our analysis of the use of the IRB data repository approach to manage ethical considerations as part of best practices for amassing, pooling, and sharing data for educational research, evaluation, and improvement purposes. Implications Fostering multi-institutional studies while following sound ethical principles in the study of medical education is needed, and the IRB data repository approach has many benefits, especially for longitudinal assessment of complex multi-site data. PMID:27443407

  12. Stability of Repeated Student Evaluations of Teaching in the Second Preclinical Year of a Medical Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz-Girod, Catherine; Bonvin, Raphael; Lanares, Jacques; Cueanot, Seagoleine; Feihl, Francois; Bosman, Fred; Waeber, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The second preclinical year of the medical curriculum at the Medical Faculty of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland includes nine multidisciplinary organ-system-oriented modules consisting of lectures and problem-based-learning tutorials. This study reports the experience accumulated with the evaluation of lectures during the academic years…

  13. Using Multiple Assessments to Evaluate Medical Students' Clinical Ability in Psychiatric Clerkships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Peng-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Frank Huang-Chih; Tsang, Hin-Yeung; Chang, Yu-San; Huang, Mei-Feng; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Background: No single assessment method can successfully evaluate the clinical ability of medical students in psychiatric clerkships; however, few studies have examined the efficacy of multiple assessments, especially in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship among different types of assessments of medical students'…

  14. [Evaluation of the actual traceability of labile blood products using medical records].

    PubMed

    Ingrand, P; Salmi, L R; Benz-Lemoine, E; Dupuis, M

    1998-12-01

    The traceability of blood products is an essential part of haemovigilance and transfusion safety. A pilot survey assessed the actual traceability by analysing transfusion information collected from medical records of a representative sample of 390 labile blood products transfused in a French university hospital. Transfusion and distribution forms were missing in 2.3% and 6.9% respectively. Availability and validity of transfusion information varied according to the nature of the expected information, elements of patients' records and types of wards. The location where the transfusion was performed was false or ambiguous in 38% of cases in surgery. Crude traceability, evaluated by the feedback of validated distribution forms, was estimated at 85.2% whereas actual traceability was estimated at 81.9% (SD 1.7%). High availability (98.7%) of at least one of the two sheets of the distribution form in medical records, or in the blood bank, revealed that a significant improvement of traceability should come from a better compliance to the rules of information transmission. The actual traceability differed significantly according to clinical services (worse in surgery) and was lower in case of autologous or absence of previous transfusion. An analysis of markers of good traceability should suggest efficient evolution of organization and information systems. This pilot study shows the relevance and feasibility of this kind of survey which could interestingly be performed on a large national representative random sample. PMID:9894331

  15. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part II: Home and Lifestyle Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Despite the increasing complexity of medication regimens for persistent cancer pain, little is known about how oncology outpatients and their family caregivers manage pain medications at home. Objectives To describe the day-to-day management of pain medications from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self © Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management in the context of highly individualized home environments and lifestyles. Methods This qualitative study was conducted as part of a RCT in which an embedded mixed methods research design was used. Audio-recorded dialogue among patients, family caregivers, and intervention nurses was analyzed using qualitative research methods. Results Home and lifestyle contexts for managing pain medications included highly individualized home environments, work and recreational activities, personal routines, and family characteristics. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant in these contexts included understanding, organizing, storing, scheduling, remembering, and taking the medications. With the exception of their interactions with the intervention nurses, most study participants had little involvement with clinicians as they worked through these processes. Conclusion Pain medication management is an ongoing multidimensional process, each step of which has to be mastered by patients and family caregivers when cancer treatment and supportive care is provided on an outpatient basis. Realistic patient- and family-centered skill-building interventions are needed to achieve effective and safe pain medication management in the contexts of individual home environments and lifestyles. PMID:24709364

  16. Benefits and Challenges of Focus Groups in the Evaluation of a New Graduate Entry Medical Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestel, Debra; Ivkovic, Amelie; Hill, Robyn A.; Warrens, Anthony N.; Paraskevas, Paraskeva A.; McDonnell, Jacqueline A.; Mudarikwa, Ruvimbo S.; Browne, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Programme evaluation is essential for quality assurance in education. In this paper, we describe our evaluation strategy for the first year of a new medical programme. Although we used multiple methods in the evaluation, the use of the focus group method was core. This paper reports our experiences of focus groups for this purpose. We describe the…

  17. Standardizing Evaluation of On-Line Continuing Medical Education: Physician Knowledge, Attitudes, and Reflection on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Kristofco, Robert E.; Strasser, Sheryl; Reilly, Michael; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Rabin, Andrew; Zheng, Shimin; Karp, Simone; Myers, Lloyd

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Physicians increasingly earn continuing medical education (CME) credits through on-line courses, but there have been few rigorous evaluations to determine their effects. The present study explores the feasibility of implementing standardized evaluation templates and tests them to evaluate 30 on-line CME courses. Methods: A time…

  18. 'Ten Golden Rules' for Designing Software in Medical Education: Results from a Formative Evaluation of DIALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jha, Vikram; Duffy, Sean

    2002-01-01

    Reports the results of an evaluation of Distance Interactive Learning in Obstetrics and Gynecology (DIALOG) which is an electronic program for continuing education. Presents 10 golden rules for designing software for medical practitioners. (Contains 26 references.) (Author/YDS)

  19. Evaluating parallel relational databases for medical data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Wilson, Andrew T.

    2012-03-01

    Hospitals have always generated and consumed large amounts of data concerning patients, treatment and outcomes. As computers and networks have permeated the hospital environment it has become feasible to collect and organize all of this data. This raises naturally the question of how to deal with the resulting mountain of information. In this report we detail a proof-of-concept test using two commercially available parallel database systems to analyze a set of real, de-identified medical records. We examine database scalability as data sizes increase as well as responsiveness under load from multiple users.

  20. An investigative model evaluating how consumers process pictorial information on nonprescription medication labels.

    PubMed

    Sansgiry, S S; Cady, P S

    1997-01-01

    Currently, marketed over-the-counter (OTC) medication labels were simulated and tested in a controlled environment to understand consumer evaluation of OTC label information. Two factors, consumers' age (younger and older adults) and label designs (picture-only, verbal-only, congruent picture-verbal, and noncongruent picture-verbal) were controlled and tested to evaluate consumer information processing. The effects exerted by the independent variables, namely, comprehension of label information (understanding) and product evaluations (satisfaction, certainty, and perceived confusion) were evaluated on the dependent variable purchase intention. Intention measured as purchase recommendation was significantly related to product evaluations and affected by the factor label design. Participants' level of perceived confusion was more important than actual understanding of information on OTC medication labels. A Label Evaluation Process Model was developed which could be used for future testing of OTC medication labels. PMID:10168485

  1. Evaluation of Web-Based Consumer Medication Information: Content and Usability of 4 Australian Websites

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Amina; Richardson, Lauren; Byrne, Mary; Robinson, Maureen; Li, Ling; Westbrook, Johanna I; Baysari, Melissa T

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication is the most common intervention in health care, and written medication information can affect consumers’ medication-related behavior. Research has shown that a large proportion of Australians search for medication information on the Internet. Objective To evaluate the medication information content, based on consumer medication information needs, and usability of 4 Australian health websites: Better Health Channel, myDr, healthdirect, and NPS MedicineWise . Methods To assess website content, the most common consumer medication information needs were identified using (1) medication queries to the healthdirect helpline (a telephone helpline available across most of Australia) and (2) the most frequently used medications in Australia. The most frequently used medications were extracted from Australian government statistics on use of subsidized medicines in the community and the National Census of Medicines Use. Each website was assessed to determine whether it covered or partially covered information and advice about these medications. To assess website usability, 16 consumers participated in user testing wherein they were required to locate 2 pieces of medication information on each website. Brief semistructured interviews were also conducted with participants to gauge their opinions of the websites. Results Information on prescription medication was more comprehensively covered on all websites (3 of 4 websites covered 100% of information) than nonprescription medication (websites covered 0%-67% of information). Most websites relied on consumer medicines information leaflets to convey prescription medication information to consumers. Information about prescription medication classes was less comprehensive, with no website providing all information examined about antibiotics and antidepressants. Participants (n=16) were able to locate medication information on websites in most cases (accuracy ranged from 84% to 91%). However, a number of

  2. Strategies against Burnout and Anxiety in Medical Education – Implementation and Evaluation of a New Course on Relaxation Techniques (Relacs) for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Ropohl, Axel; Bräuer, Lars; Paulsen, Friedrich; Burger, Pascal H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Burnout and stress-related mental disorders (depression, anxiety) occur in medical students and physicians with a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. At the same time, the learning of coping mechanisms against stress is still not an integral part of medical education. In this pilot study we developed an elective course for learning relaxation techniques and examined the condition of the students before and after the course. 42 students participated in the semester courses in 2012 and 2013 as well as in a survey at the start and end of each course. The students were instructed in autogenic training (AT) and progressive muscle relaxation according to Jacobsen (PMR) with the goal of independent and regular exercising. At the beginning and the end of the semester/course the students were interviewed using standardized, validated questionnaires on burnout (BOSS-II) and anxiety (STAI-G), depression (BDI), quality of life (SF-12) and sense of coherence (SOC-L9). We compared the results of our students participating in Relacs with results from eight semester medical students (n = 88), assessed with the same questionnaires at similar points of time within their semester. Participating students showed a significant decline in cognitive and emotional burnout stress and in trait anxiety. Furthermore, they showed a reduction in state anxiety and a conspicuous decrease in mean depression. The sense of coherence increased at the same time. A comparative cohort of medical students of 8th semester students, showed lower values for the specified measurement parameters at the beginning, but showed no progressive changes. Our course introducing AT and PMR led to a significant reduction of burnout and anxiety within the participating group of medical students. Even the course attendance for just one semester resulted in significant improvements in the evaluated parameters in contrast to those students who did not attend the course. PMID:25517399

  3. Optimal evaluation of infectious medical waste disposal companies using the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chao Chung

    2011-07-15

    Ever since Taiwan's National Health Insurance implemented the diagnosis-related groups payment system in January 2010, hospital income has declined. Therefore, to meet their medical waste disposal needs, hospitals seek suppliers that provide high-quality services at a low cost. The enactment of the Waste Disposal Act in 1974 had facilitated some improvement in the management of waste disposal. However, since the implementation of the National Health Insurance program, the amount of medical waste from disposable medical products has been increasing. Further, of all the hazardous waste types, the amount of infectious medical waste has increased at the fastest rate. This is because of the increase in the number of items considered as infectious waste by the Environmental Protection Administration. The present study used two important findings from previous studies to determine the critical evaluation criteria for selecting infectious medical waste disposal firms. It employed the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to set the objective weights of the evaluation criteria and select the optimal infectious medical waste disposal firm through calculation and sorting. The aim was to propose a method of evaluation with which medical and health care institutions could objectively and systematically choose appropriate infectious medical waste disposal firms.

  4. Toward meaningful evaluation of medical trainees: the influence of participants' perceptions of the process.

    PubMed

    Watling, Christopher J; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-05-01

    An essential goal of evaluation is to foster learning. Across the medical education spectrum, evaluation of clinical performance is dominated by subjective feedback to learners based on observation by expert supervisors. Research in non-medical settings has suggested that participants' perceptions of evaluation processes exert considerable influence over whether the feedback they receive actually facilitates learning, but similar research on perceptions of feedback in the medical setting has been limited. In this review, we examine the literature on recipient perceptions of feedback and how those perceptions influence the contribution that feedback makes to their learning. A focused exploration of relevant work on this subject in higher education and industrial psychology settings is followed by a detailed examination of available research on perceptions of evaluation processes in medical settings, encompassing both trainee and evaluator perspectives. We conclude that recipients' and evaluators' perceptions of an evaluation process profoundly affect the usefulness of the evaluation and the extent to which it achieves its goals. Attempts to improve evaluation processes cannot, therefore, be limited to assessment tool modification driven by reliability and validity concerns, but must also take account of the critical issue of feedback reception and the factors that influence it. Given the unique context of clinical performance evaluation in medicine, a research agenda is required that seeks to more fully understand the complexity of the processes of giving, receiving, interpreting, and using feedback as a basis for real progress toward meaningful evaluation. PMID:20143260

  5. [The evaluation of costs: standards of medical care and clinical statistic groups].

    PubMed

    Semenov, V Iu; Samorodskaia, I V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the comparative analysis of techniques of evaluation of costs of hospital treatment using medical economic standards of medical care and clinical statistical groups. The technique of evaluation of costs on the basis of clinical statistical groups was developed almost fifty years ago and is largely applied in a number of countries. Nowadays, in Russia the payment for completed case of treatment on the basis of medical economic standards is the main mode of payment for medical care in hospital. It is very conditionally a Russian analogue of world-wide prevalent system of diagnostic related groups. The tariffs for these cases of treatment as opposed to clinical statistical groups are counted on basis of standards of provision of medical care approved by Minzdrav of Russia. The information derived from generalization of cases of treatment of real patients is not applied. PMID:25799750

  6. Asylum grant rates following medical evaluations of maltreatment among political asylum applicants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Stuart L; Kureshi, Sarah; Delucchi, Kevin L; Iacopino, Vincent; Morse, Samantha C

    2008-02-01

    Although many individuals applying for political asylum allege maltreatment and sometimes torture in their countries of origin, the utility of medical evaluations in asylum adjudication has not been documented. This study compares the asylum grant rate among US asylum seekers who received medical evaluations from Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), with rates among asylum seekers who did not receive PHR evaluations. Retrospective analysis was carried out on all asylum cases referred to PHR between 2000 and 2004 for medical evaluations for which adjudication outcome was available. Basic demographic information was obtained: age, sex, country of origin, English language ability, US region where adjudication occurred, whether legal representation was pro bono, type of evaluation, provision of oral court testimony, and whether asylum seekers were in detention. Cases were analyzed descriptively and with chi square tests. Between 2000 and 2004, 1663 asylum seekers received medical evaluations from PHR; the adjudication status (either granted or denied) was determined in 746 cases at the time of the study. Of these cases, 89% were granted asylum, compared to the national average of 37.5% among US asylum seekers who did not receive PHR evaluations. Medical evaluations may be critical in the adjudications of asylum cases when maltreatment is alleged. PMID:17492260

  7. Evaluation of doctors’ performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Salwani; Salam, Abdus; Alattraqchi, Ahmed G; Annamalai, Lakshmi; Chockalingam, Annamalai; Elena, Wan Putri; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Background Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students’ perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012–2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. Results The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Conclusion Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning. PMID:25878516

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency of medical masks and the creation of new medical masks.

    PubMed

    Huang, J T; Huang, V I

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of medical masks in preventing respiratory infection was investigated by testing bacterial leakage, filtration efficiency, respiratory resistance and oxygen concentration of the enclosed space. Polypropylene (PP) fibres were treated with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide to impart a positive electrical charge capable of attracting bacteria. The fluffed PP fibres were used to make a polypropylene mask and to edge standard surgical and N-95 respirators to prevent leakage. A PP napkin was created by melting and blowing PP. The PP edging seal dramatically reduced bacterial leakage of standard masks and was more effective than adhesive paper tape edging in reducing respiratory resistance. Bacterial or viral filtration efficiency was almost 100% for the PP mask and the PP napkin. The specially designed PP mask with a synthetic adhesive at the edge of the mask may be more effective than the standard surgical mask and the N-95 respirator. The PP napkin is an important tool in preventing the spread of pathogens. PMID:17542408

  9. Evaluation of the consultation program in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    REZAEE, RITA; NABEIEI, PARISA; SAGHEB, MOHAMMAD MAHDI

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Consultation and guidance is a process of learning which is done through the relationship between two individuals. In this mutual relationship, the ounsellor, through his scientific and occupational skills and qualification, tries to help the students using the methods corresponding to their needs. The main objective of this study was to provide a framework for the management of the advisors’ plans in the university based on the analysis of different schools. Methods: This research is a cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study. Data were collected both qualitatively (centralized groups at the presence of advisors in universities) and quantitatively (self-assessment of teachers and students' evaluation). Sampling was done randomly from all students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. All the teachers who were advisor took part in this study. Results: This study was conducted in eight schools of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences simultaneously and 974 students and 125 teachers took part in it. At the time of data collection, 25.5 percent of the students declared that the advisors have provided allocated time to them and 45.4 percent believed that the advisors helped the students to understand the importance of the courses. Conclusion: The emergence of weaknesses and strengths of the academic advising program and the guidance through teacher's self assessment, not only may be the sign of realization of programmed objectives, but also may be the starting point for qualitative improvement of the situation. Moreover, in order to improve the advisory services and guidance, it is necessary to regard consultation as a scientific subject which needs training. PMID:25512915

  10. The medical film 1897-1997: Part I. The first half-century.

    PubMed

    Essex-Lopresti, M

    1998-03-01

    Medicine has frequently been in the forefront of applying new illustrative media to its needs, and cinematographic film is a good example. Within a year of the introduction of moving pictures, cine-film was used for medical research and to a lesser extent for teaching. The profession took advantage of the spread of cinemas by making health education films, and during the first half century of cinematography surgeons were keen to have their operations filmed. Medical educators were slow to include film in their teaching programmes and several organizations were formed to encourage their use. After the Second World War, medical films for undergraduate and postgraduate education became accepted until, as the medical film reached its centenary, cine-film declined in favour of video-recordings. PMID:9764516

  11. Safety of dermatologic medications in pregnancy and lactation: Part II. Lactation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Daniel C; Heller, Misha M; Murase, Jenny E

    2014-03-01

    Dermatologists are frequently faced with questions from women who are breastfeeding about the safety of commonly prescribed topical and systemic medications during lactation. Safety data in lactation, particularly regarding medications that are unique to dermatology, are limited and can be difficult to locate. We have consolidated the available safety data in a single reference guide for clinicians. We review literature pertaining to the safety of common dermatologic therapies in lactation and offer recommendations based on the available evidence. PMID:24528912

  12. Dermatology – a compulsory part of the UK medical school curriculum?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hemal; Pozo-Garcia, Lucia; Koulouroudias, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological conditions form a significant number of consultations seen by general practitioners on a daily basis. There is a lack of training and formal assessment of dermatology during medical school and we propose that there should be a mandatory component in OSCEs for dermatology during medical school to enhance one's diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills which will ultimately lead to better care for the patient and efficacious use of NHS resources. PMID:26701607

  13. Medical and surgical evaluation and care of illness in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, John H.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done on the contract NAG9-567, which was activated at the New Jersey Medical School-UMDNJ in April 1992 and carried on during the 1992-93 year to the present 1993-94 year which was terminated in May 1994. The initial examination stage was completed of an interactive program for the recording of physical and physiologic injury information obtained from examination of an injured person, who might be an astronaut sustaining traumatic injury, due to a burn or physical trauma, either in space or in an earth bound training environment. In this report three aspects will be discussed: 1) a description of the system of diagnostic examination graphics, 2) a description of the organization of the therapeutic advisory systems with a demonstration of two specific modules, and 3) a brief technical description of the organization of the programming system carried out on a UNIX based work station using a WINDOWS environment.

  14. [Clinical signs, neurophysiological evaluation, and medication of spasticity--review].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2008-12-01

    Spasticity is usually observed along with paralysis, hyperreflexia, Babinski sign and abnormal associated movements associated with dysfunction of central motor tracts. In spasticity, exaggeration of the stretch reflex results in increased resistance during passive movements. Therefore, spasticity is pathophysiologically described as increased muscle tone whose pathognomonic sign is decreased passivity. Resistance is more strongly felt during rapid passive movements than during slow movements. The resistance felt at the beginning of the passive movement abruptly diminishes, which is well known as the clasp-knife phenomenon. Another character of spasticity is the distribution of the increment in the muscle tone. Not only rigidity, dystonia, and muscle stiffness demonstrating increased muscle tone, but also Gegenhalten and contracture of joint with normal muscle tone should be differentiated. No neurophysiological parameters reflect the degree of spasticity in a strictly parallel fashion. However, neurophysiological examinations provide some supportive objective data. Surface electromyography is useful to distinguish spasticity from rigidity and other conditions with increase muscle tone. The increased amplitude ratio and the decreased threshold ratio of the H-wave to the M-wave, and increased amplitude and persistence of the F-wave are observed the patients with spasticity. Magnetic stimulation is a useful tool to detect corticospinal tract lesions that induce leading to spasticity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic brainstem stimulation, and magnetic spinal motor root stimulation are used to examine the entire motor pathway. Since positive correlation between spasticity and shortening of the silent period is reported, many investigations including paired-pulse magnetic stimulation will be necessary for understanding pathophysiology of spasticity. Patients with mild and reversible spasticity are usually treated with medications. Significant variations

  15. [Novel dynamic TOPSIS method in evaluation for quality of medical care].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiren; Ren, Lifeng; Sun, Zhenqiu

    2012-10-01

    The quality of medical care shows characteristics of dynamic state with changes in time. However, many of appraisal and evaluation projects usually keep on the status of "past" or "present". Most of these models are static evaluation approach. In this study, besides the "past" and "present" status, we took one step further to unveil the future development trends of the medical therapeutical effects. Based on the index value and index increment, a dynamic TOPSIS method is presented. This method pays attention to both transverse and lengthwise information and can not only perform the evaluation on each time section but also can make the final dynamic evaluation. We applied this new method to the evaluation of quality of medical care, which was proved to be effective. PMID:23117462

  16. Providing medications for low-income and indigent patients: success for Medicare Part D walks in the back door.

    PubMed

    Flaer, Paul J; Younis, Mustafa Z; Malow, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Hailed by politicians as long-awaited assistance for seniors and the disabled with the rising costs of prescription drugs, Medicare Part D primarily helps indigent and low-income patients. Moreover, poverty-level patients will find stable prices and versatility in obtaining prescription medications under Medicare D. For low-income patients using pharmacies of their choice--including hospital pharmacies, if they so choose, there are reduced transportation hassles and reduced associated expenses. Poverty-level patients with the additional Social Security subsidy have no deductible and no gaps in their coverage. However, two unintended, unforeseen circumstances occurred with the implementation of Medicare Part D: 1. The exodus of patients from hospital pharmacies and from central pharmacies (e.g., pharmacies serving a particular HMO plan) to neighborhood pharmacies lowered the volume of medications provided and stabilized a teetering and overwhelmed system of prescription drug provision; and 2. Many hospital pharmacies charge on a sliding scale, and the users of specialty medications (e.g., Zyprexa) with large copays under Medicare Part D found minimal costs and big savings at the low end of the sliding scale (for example, $5). The biggest successes for Medicare Part D truly came through an unintended back door and serve as an economic advantage for the poor. PMID:18468374

  17. The Value of Upward Evaluation in Libraries--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Gay Helen

    1995-01-01

    Examines the value of upward evaluation by reviewing historical outcomes of upward evaluations in industrial psychology/business literature and library literature. Also discusses the utilization of upward evaluation in libraries and focuses on results of the Western Kentucky University Libraries' annual process of supervisor evaluation. Appendixes…

  18. Extracting Cancer Quality Indicators from Electronic Medical Records: Evaluation of an Ontology-Based Virtual Medical Record Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Nchih; Tu, Samson W.; Das, Amar K.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring quality in clinical care is a time-consuming manual task. The vast amounts of clinical data collected through electronic medical records (EMRs) create an opportunity to develop tools that automatically assess quality indicators; however, the diversity of EMR implementations limits the ability to implement general, reusable methods. We evaluate an ontology-based virtual medical record (VMR) approach as a standardized, sharable methodology for defining data abstractions needed for quality of care assessment. Using a set of cancer quality indicators, we conducted a requirements analysis for modeling these abstractions with an OWL-based VMR. We found that the VMR approach needs to be extended to support population-based aggregations of clinical events, models of intended versus completed actions, and models of workflow and delivery systems. Incorporating the patient perspective on quality also requires additional extension of the VMR. We are using these results to create a virtual quality record based on EMR data. PMID:20351878

  19. BEME guide no. 3: systematic searching for evidence in medical education--part 2: constructing searches.

    PubMed

    Haig, Alex; Dozier, Marshall

    2003-09-01

    Searching for evidence to inform best practice in medical education is a complex undertaking. With very few information sources dedicated to medical education itself, one is forced to consult a wide range of often enormous sources-and these are dedicated to either medicine or education, making a medical education search all the more challenging. This guide provides a comprehensive overview of relevant information sources and methods (including bibliographic databases, grey literature, hand searching and the Internet) and describes when they should be consulted. The process of constructing a search is explained:identifying and combining core concepts, using Boolean algebra and search syntax, limiting results sets, and making best use of databases' controlled vocabularies. This process is illustrated with images from search screens and is followed by numerous examples designed to reinforce skills and concepts covered. The guide has been developed from the ongoing experience gained from the systematic searches conducted for the Best Evidence Medical Education Collaboration, and concludes by looking ahead to initiatives that will shape future searching for medical education evidence. PMID:14522667

  20. The communication skills course for second year medical students at Hannover Medical School: An evaluation study based on students' self-assessments

    PubMed Central

    von Lengerke, Thomas; Kursch, Angelika; Lange, Karin

    2011-01-01

    In the model medical curriculum HannibaL at Hannover Medical School (MHH, Hannover, Germany), communication skills in taking case histories and disclosing diagnoses (breaking bad news) are assessed through an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). This is part of the examinations which at the MHH represent the equivalent to the First Part of the Medical Examinations. The second year doctor-patient communication course preparing for these examinations was evaluated during the 2009/10 academic year. Using questionnaires specific to the learning objectives, learning needs were assessed, pre-post comparisons of self-assessed competencies were performed and key teaching methods were evaluated (5-point Likert scales, “5”=fully agree). At T0 (start of the course) 267 students participated (response rate: 93.7%), of which 180 filled out the T1 questionnaire during the last session of the course (67.4%). Within-subject analyses of variance and paired t-tests were conducted. The highest learning needs were found for the “to show how”-items regarding history taking and disclosing diagnoses (M=4.4). The T1-T0 comparisons showed the greatest improvements for history taking (“to know how”: mean difference = +1.7, “to show how”: +1.8, p<.0001 as with all tests) and the “to know how”-item regarding the disclosure of diagnoses (+1.6), followed by the “to show how”-items on disclosing a diagnosis (+1.4), shared decision making (+1.2), self-assessing one’s own strengths/weaknesses (+1.0) and confidently approaching new patients (+0.7). Students with T0 values of 1 or 2 on the respective scales improved on average by 2.2 points across all items, students with the value of 3 by 1.1, and from 4 or 5 by 0.1. Methodically, the use of simulated patients was rated the most helpful (M=4.8, 87% with the scale value 5). This doctor-patient communication course is associated with substantial improvements regarding all key learning objectives. Regarding

  1. 77 FR 7549 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... disorders and speech and language disorders separately. \\1\\ 71 FR 67037. What changes are we proposing to... training. \\2\\ 71 FR 67040, 67045, 67046, and 67049. Section 2.00A5, How do we measure your best-corrected..., such as counts fingers (CF) or no light perception (NLP), to evaluate your vision loss. This...

  2. Evaluation of an Online Bioterrorism Continuing Medical Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical…

  3. Electronic medical records: a practitioner's perspective on evaluation and implementation.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Edward; French, Kim; Gronkiewicz, Cynthia; Borkgren, Marilyn

    2010-09-01

    This article describes the initial and ongoing efforts of our pulmonary medicine practice to deploy an electronic medical records (EMR) system. Key factors in the vendor selection and implementation process included (1) identification and commitment to long-term goals for EMR; (2) dedicated resources, including both physician and nonphysician champions to lead the design and implementation teams; and (3) ample patience and time allotted to achieve the desired results: a fully functional system that enhances quality, improves operational efficiency, and reduces costs. An EMR scorecard including multiple system attributes was designed to facilitate vendor comparisons. Perseverance, patience, and compromise were necessary to overcome the challenge of changing the behavior of providers and support staff. We have accomplished improvements in workflow automation and reductions in staff hours, office supplies, file space, and transcription costs. Our system lacks pulmonary-specific templates and prompts for work flow and clinical decision making. We have directed internal resources and outsourced professional support to design these features as our practice strives to enhance our quality of care with pulmonary disease management that conforms to national guidelines. PMID:20822993

  4. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future. PMID:25547538

  5. Design, formulation, and evaluation of ginger medicated chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Rostami, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various ginger compounds improve gastrointestinal problems and motion sickness. The main effects of ginger allocate to some phenolics such as gingerols and shogaols that act as their active agents. Chewing gums are among convenient dosage forms which patients prefer due to their advantages. Hence, this study tried to design, formulate, and evaluate ginger chewing gum of favorable taste and texture to avoid motion sickness and have gastro-protective and anti-oxidant effect. Materials and Methods: Dried ginger rhizomes were percolated to extract ginger compounds. Total phenolics were measured in 70% hydro-alcoholic extract of ginger by gallic and tannic acid standards using Folin–Ciocalteu’s reagent. Chewing gums containing 50 mg of concentrated extract were prepared. Content uniformity, weight variation, release pattern, organoleptic, and mechanical properties were evaluated. Results: Phenolic content was measured 61.50 ± 5.27 mg/g and 76.75 ± 5.45 mg/g of concentrated extract as gallic acid and tannic acid equivalents, respectively. Release pattern of formulations with different gum bases and sweeteners demonstrated almost 100% release of drug. Evaluation of organoleptic properties was on 10 healthy volunteers and later prepared formulations exhibited better characteristics. Formulations without any flavorants have higher acceptability. Evaluation of mechanical properties showed higher stiffness of F15. Conclusion: Ginger chewing gum comprises admissible properties to be used as a modern drug delivery system due to its advantageous results in motion sickness. It passed all the specified tests for an acceptable chewing gum. Thus, it may be successfully produced to help GI problems. PMID:27563640

  6. Evaluation of an ESP Medical Textbook: Instructors and Learners' Perceptions in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Hadi; Khadivar, Zahra; Mehrabi, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation is basically a matching process, which concerns matching learners' needs to available solutions. Through analysis and assessment of ESP textbooks, a much more promising and desirable approach to a theory of ESP takes place. To this aim, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ESP medical textbook. To gather the necessary…

  7. An Evaluating Study on ESP Medical Textbook: Instructors and Learners' Needs Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Hadi; Khadivar, Zahra; Babaee, Ruzbeh; Singh, Hardev Kaur Ap Jujar

    2015-01-01

    Textbook evaluation is determining the productivity and value of textbooks with respect to stated objectives, standards, or criteria. This study was an attempt to evaluate the ESP medical textbook, which is taught at some universities in Iran. To gather the necessary data, two researcher-made questionnaires and one interview protocol were used.…

  8. Evaluation of virtual microscopy in medical histology teaching.

    PubMed

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Histology stands as a major discipline in the life science curricula, and the practice of teaching it is based on theoretical didactic strategies along with practical training. Traditionally, students achieve practical competence in this subject by learning optical microscopy. Today, students can use newer information and communication technologies in the study of digital microscopic images. A virtual microscopy program was recently introduced at Ghent University. Since little empirical evidence is available concerning the impact of virtual microscopy (VM) versus optical microscopy (OM) on the acquisition of histology knowledge, this study was set up in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. A pretest-post test and cross-over design was adopted. In the first phase, the experiment yielded two groups in a total population of 199 students, Group 1 performing the practical sessions with OM versus Group 2 performing the same sessions with VM. In the second phase, the research subjects switched conditions. The prior knowledge level of all research subjects was assessed with a pretest. Knowledge acquisition was measured with a post test after each phase (T1 and T2). Analysis of covariance was carried out to study the differential gain in knowledge at T1 and T2, considering the possible differences in prior knowledge at the start of the study. The results pointed to non-significant differences at T1 and at T2. This supports the assumption that the acquisition of the histology knowledge is independent of the microscopy representation mode (VM versus OM) of the learning material. The conclusion that VM is equivalent to OM offers new directions in view of ongoing innovations in medical education technology. PMID:23463716

  9. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part II, 10-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction and lesson plans and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the second…

  10. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... medically determinable impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a... his or her maximum sustained work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work... at the various functional levels (sedentary, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy) as supported...

  11. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... medically determinable impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a... his or her maximum sustained work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work... at the various functional levels (sedentary, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy) as supported...

  12. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... medically determinable impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a... his or her maximum sustained work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work... at the various functional levels (sedentary, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy) as supported...

  13. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... severe medically determinable physical or mental impairment(s) is not engaging in substantial gainful... degree to which the individual retains the capacity for sustained performance of the physical-mental... tolerate some physical feature(s) of work settings that occur in certain industries or types of work,...

  14. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part X: Other Technology to Reduce Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Harolds, Laura B

    2016-05-01

    There are many devices, as well as computer programs, that have the potential to reduce medication errors. In the prior article, computer provider order entry linked to electronic clinical decision support was discussed. The current article discusses bar coding, automated dispensing cabinets, and smart intravenous infusion pumps. PMID:26914567

  15. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part I, 10-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction, lesson plans, and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the first of…

  16. Early days in the St. Mary's Medical School Photographic Department: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cardew, P

    1992-10-01

    This article gives an account of the problems which faced medical photographers in the late 1940s and early 1950s. The lack of suitable equipment particularly in regard to cinematography led to ingenious but laborious techniques. The attitude of teaching staff towards the use of lantern slides was coloured by the cumbersome apparatus of the period. PMID:1339783

  17. Changes in Emotions Related to Medication Used to Treat ADHD. Part II: Clinical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Brams, Matthew; Childress, Ann C.; Lopez, Frank A.; Manos, Michael J.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    ADHD is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders of childhood, and FDA-approved medications offer an efficacious treatment option. However, case reports and anecdotal sources suggest that children can have emotional responses, both salutary and detrimental, to these agents. We have previously conducted a comprehensive literature review and…

  18. [Evaluation of medical and psychological expert opinions in asylum and residence legislation].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mareike; Hagemeier, Ina; Altenhain, Karsten; Kruse, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The quality of medical and psychological certificates and expert opinions in asylum and residence legislation was analyzed using judicial requirements as well as standards of the German Bundesärztekammer (SBPM). A sample of 53 cases of asylum seekers including 86 medical certificates and 15 expert opinions was evaluated qualitative and quantitative. The quality varies strongly from exemplary to insufficient. Predominantly, the medical certificates did not comply with judicial requirements. Two thirds of the expert opinions met the standards formulated by SBPM. Experts should write medical/psychological opinions being familiar with both traumatized individuals and refugees. The minimum requirements and standards should be better communicated to involved medical and psychological practitioners. PMID:23784797

  19. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - Criteria for Designation of Areas Having Shortages of Primary Medical Care Professional(s)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of Primary Medical Care Professional(s) A Appendix A to Part 5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS DESIGNATION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONAL(S) SHORTAGE... Medical Care Professional(s) Part I—Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions....

  20. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - Criteria for Designation of Areas Having Shortages of Primary Medical Care Professional(s)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of Primary Medical Care Professional(s) A Appendix A to Part 5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS DESIGNATION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONAL(S) SHORTAGE... Medical Care Professional(s) Part I—Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions....

  1. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - Criteria for Designation of Areas Having Shortages of Primary Medical Care Professional(s)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of Primary Medical Care Professional(s) A Appendix A to Part 5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS DESIGNATION OF HEALTH PROFESSIONAL(S) SHORTAGE... Medical Care Professional(s) Part I—Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions....

  2. Medical educational culture: introducing patients to applicants as part of the medical school interview: feasibility and initial impact show and tell

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Shireen Madani; Lynch, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The College of Medicine at our institution underwent a major curricular revision in order to develop a patient-centered context for learning. The admission process was revised to reflect this change, adopting a holistic review process, with the hope of attracting students who were particularly well suited to a patient-centered curriculum and learning culture. Methods Patients from a single practitioner, who were accustomed to working with medical students, were asked if they would like to select the next generation of physicians. The patient's experience included a brief didactic presentation related to the patient's diagnosis and treatment. This was followed by an informal session with the applicants and the physician, where they shared their story in a small group setting. They were encouraged to share their experiences with the healthcare system, both positive and negative. The goal was to allow applicants to glean the importance of the human aspects of disease in our institutional culture of learning. Results The response and experience were overwhelmingly positive for the patients who donated their time to participate and for our applicants. Follow-up surveys indicated that our applicants found the experience to be unique and positive. Many of the students who chose to attend our university cited the interview experience and learning culture as factors that influenced their choice of medical schools. In addition, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education cited the favorability of the admission process in their recent site visit. Discussion Now in its fifth year, we can say that the inclusion of patients as part of the interview day is feasible as part of our admission process. We continue to make changes and monitor our progress, and we have added several other faculty members and specialties in order to ensure the program is sustainable. PMID:27520404

  3. Medical malpractice as reflected by the forensic evaluation of 4450 autopsies.

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard; Preuss, Johanna

    2009-09-10

    A multicentre retrospective analysis of 4450 autopsies carried out due to suspicion of medical malpractice in 17 German institutes of forensic medicine from 1990 to 2000 was performed for the German Federal Ministry of Health. During the time period analysed an increase of cases could be mentioned. The main results of the study are: in the cooperating institutes the total number of autopsies due to suspected medical malpractice ranged from 1.4 to 20%. In more than 40% of the cases preliminary proceedings were started because the manner of death was certified as non-natural or not clarified. Hospital doctors were more affected by medical malpractice claims than doctors in private practice. However, the number of confirmed cases of medical malpractice was higher for doctors in private practice than for hospital doctors. Although surgery is still at the top of the disciplines involved in medical malpractice claims the number of confirmed surgical cases was below the average. Mistakes in care were confirmed to be above the average. Medico-legal autopsies are still a very sufficient method to evaluate cases of medical malpractice: 2863 cases could already be clarified by autopsy. Up to now there is no systematic registration of medical malpractice charges in Germany. A systematic registration should be initiated to build up and/or improve error reporting systems and, thus, to improve patient safety. Compared to other sources of medical malpractice claims (arbitration committees of the medical chambers, reference material of health and insurance companies, files of civil courts) the data of the present multicentre study are in so far unique as only lethal cases were evaluated and a complete autopsy report was available as basis of an expert opinion in alleged medical malpractice cases. PMID:19524380

  4. [SIGAPS: a software package for the evaluation of medical publications].

    PubMed

    Derancourt, C; Devos, P; Moore, N; Rouvillain, J-L

    2014-01-01

    The "système d'interrogation, de gestion et d'analyse des publications scientifiques" (System for Identification, Management and Analysis of Scientific Publications), or SIGAPS, is an innovative tool of French design that enables the identification and analysis of bibliographic references produced by a given researcher or unit using the Medline database (PubMed). This evaluation takes into account the author's rank of signature and the impact factor of the journal of publication within the discipline in question. The limits are those of the impact factor. Analyses produced by SIGAPS enable financial assessment to be made by hospitals. PMID:25209819

  5. The pre-travel medical evaluation: the traveler with chronic illness and the geriatric traveler.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The pre-travel medical evaluation of elderly patients and patients with chronic illness requires special assessment and advice. Screening and special precautions are reviewed for traveling patients with respiratory disease, cardiac disease, sinusitis, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, and other chronic medical conditions. Current guidelines for empiric therapy and prophylaxis of travelers' diarrhea are reviewed, with emphasis on concerns in geriatric or chronically ill travelers. Special considerations such as potential drug-drug interactions and insurance coverage are also discussed. PMID:1290273

  6. Evaluation of the Uni-Yeast-Tek kit for the identification of medically important yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, P I; Ahearn, D G

    1975-01-01

    The Uni-Yeast-Tek system, a commercially prepared kit and scheme for the rapid identification of medically important yeasts (Corning Medical), was evaluated in comparison with a conventional procedure in the identification of 623 yeasts. The system permitted the presumptive identification of 99.8% of 436 isolates representing 16 common species commonly isolated in the clinical laboratory. Correct biochemical and morphological analyses were obtained with 48 other species, but their specific identification required additional data. Images PMID:1102563

  7. SIGAPS: a prototype of bibliographic tool for medical research evaluation.

    PubMed

    Devos, P; Dufresne, E; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of research activity is extremely important but remains a complex domain. There's no standardized methods and evaluation is often based on the scientific publications. It is easy to identify, for a researcher, all the publications realized over a given period of time. At the level of an important establishment like an University Hospital, with about 500 researchers, this sort of inventory is very difficult to realize: we have to list the researchers, to list their publications, to determine the quality of articles produced, to store retrieved data and to calculate summary statistics. We have developed a full-Web prototype, using free software which, for a given researchers' list, interrogates the Pubmed server, downloads the found references and stores them in a local database. They are then enriched with local data which allow the realization of more or less complex analyses, the automatic production of reports, or keyword search. This tool is very easy to use, allowing for immediate analysis of publications of a researcher or a research team. This tool will allow to identify those active teams to be maintained or emergent teams to be supported. It will also allow to compare candidate profiles for appointments to research posts. PMID:14664073

  8. Planning a pharmacy-led medical mission trip, part 2: servant leadership and team dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dana A; Brown, Daniel L; Yocum, Christine K

    2012-06-01

    While pharmacy curricula can prepare students for the cognitive domains of pharmacy practice, mastery of the affective aspects can prove to be more challenging. At the Gregory School of Pharmacy, medical mission trips have been highly effective means of impacting student attitudes and beliefs. Specifically, these trips have led to transformational changes in student leadership capacity, turning an act of service into an act of influence. Additionally, building team unity is invaluable to the overall effectiveness of the trip. Pre-trip preparation for teams includes activities such as routine team meetings, team-building activities, and implementation of committees, as a means of promoting positive team dynamics. While in the field, team dynamics can be fostered through activities such as daily debriefing sessions, team disclosure times, and provision of medical services. PMID:22619473

  9. Pulmonary drug delivery. Part I: Physiological factors affecting therapeutic effectiveness of aerosolized medications

    PubMed Central

    Labiris, N R; Dolovich, M B

    2003-01-01

    As the end organ for the treatment of local diseases or as the route of administration for systemic therapies, the lung is a very attractive target for drug delivery. It provides direct access to disease in the treatment of respiratory diseases, while providing an enormous surface area and a relatively low enzymatic, controlled environment for systemic absorption of medications. As a major port of entry, the lung has evolved to prevent the invasion of unwanted airborne particles from entering into the body. Airway geometry, humidity, mucociliary clearance and alveolar macrophages play a vital role in maintaining the sterility of the lung and consequently are barriers to the therapeutic effectiveness of inhaled medications. In addition, a drug's efficacy may be affected by where in the respiratory tract it is deposited, its delivered dose and the disease it may be trying to treat. PMID:14616418

  10. Physician-entrepreneurship: a user's manual, part 1: critical questions for early-stage medical ventures.

    PubMed

    Lexa, Frank James; Lexa, Frank J

    2005-07-01

    The medical field is one of the most exciting in America for entrepreneurs. Radiologists and other medical practitioners are in a unique position to take advantage of opportunities to invent and create innovative products and services. Physicians have led many of the most important revolutionary and evolutionary changes that have occurred in the field in the past 100 years. However, many radiologists find the process of entrepreneurship a daunting one and are often deterred from acting on their ideas. This article addresses the key issues and challenges that entrepreneurs face when embarking on new enterprises. Although most of these issues face all entrepreneurs at this stage, this article focuses on medical innovation and its particular challenges. This article concentrates on the kinds of questions that physician-entrepreneurs need to ask before jumping in, the types of common pitfalls that await those who don't address these issues, and some answers to seek if you are to beat the odds and succeed. PMID:17411886

  11. SFE/SFHTA/AFCE consensus on primary aldosteronism, part 7: Medical treatment of primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Herpin, Daniel; Lefebvre, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Spironolactone, which is a potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, represents the first line medical treatment of primary aldosteronism (PA). As spironolactone is also an antagonist of the androgen and progesterone receptor, it may present side effects, especially in male patients. In case of intolerance to spironolactone, amiloride may be used to control hypokaliemia and we suggest that eplerenone, which is a more selective but less powerful antagonist of the mineralocorticoid receptor, be used in case of intolerance to spironolactone and insufficient control of hypertension by amiloride. Specific calcic inhibitors and thiazide diuretics may be used as second or third line therapy. Medical treatment of bilateral forms of PA seem to be as efficient as surgical treatment of lateralized PA for the control of hypertension and the prevention of cardiovascular and renal morbidities. This allows to propose medical treatment of PA to patients with lateralized forms of PA who refuse surgery or to patients with PA who do not want to be explored by adrenal venous sampling to determine whether they have a bilateral or lateralized form. PMID:27315759

  12. Selected Medication Safety Risks to Manage in 2016-Part I Intravenous Fat Emulsion Needs a Filter.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2016-05-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:27303086

  13. Selected Medication Safety Risks to Manage in 2016-Part II; Methylergonovine Errors in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2016-06-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:27354742

  14. Assessment and Accountability in Reference Work. Part V: Reference Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hults, Patricia; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss the evaluation of library reference services. Topics addressed include unobtrusive testing; measuring the accountability of reference librarians by behavioral rather than factual evaluation; on-the-job training of reference librarians; and faculty expectations of academic reference librarians. (52 references)…

  15. Impact of medical students' descriptive evaluations on long-term course development

    PubMed Central

    Wahlqvist, Mats; Skott, Annika; Björkelund, Cecilia; Dahlgren, Gösta; Lonka, Kirsti; Mattsson, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    Background In medical education, feedback from students is helpful in course evaluation. However, the impact of medical students' feedback on long-term course development is seldom reported. In this project we studied the correspondence between medical students' descriptive evaluations and key features of course development over five years. Methods Qualitative content analysis was used. The context was consultation skills courses in the middle of the Göteborg undergraduate curriculum during five years. An analysis of 158 students' descriptive evaluations was brought together with an analysis of key features of course development; learning objectives, course records, protocols from teachers' evaluations and field notes. Credibility of data was tested by two colleagues and by presenting themes at seminars and conferences. Authors' experiences of evaluating the course over many years were also used. Results A corresponding pattern was found in students' descriptive evaluations and key features of course development, indicating the impact of students' open-ended feed-back. Support to facilitators and a curriculum reform also contributed. Students' descriptive feedback was both initiating and validating longitudinal course implementation. During five years, students' descriptive evaluations and teachers' course records were crucial sources in a learner-centred knowledge-building process of course development. Conclusion Students' descriptive evaluations and course records can be seen as important instruments in developing both courses and students' learning. Continuity and endurance in the evaluation process must be emphasized for achieving relevant and useful results. PMID:16638146

  16. Principles and practice of hyperbaric medicine: a medical practitioner's primer, part II.

    PubMed

    Perdrizet, George A

    2014-08-01

    Advances in the treatment of chronic wounds* have steadily occurred over the past decade and include the specialized use of dynamic compression therapy, implementation of moist wound care techniques, chronic lymphedema therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, arterial compression therapy and application of off-loading devices. General medical practitioners should recognize when timely patient referral to a comprehensive wound care center is indicated. The clinical practice of HBOT and its scientific basis has also advanced significantly during this same time period. HBOT is a therapeutic tool with many qualities that are unique to medical care and enable difficult and otherwise untreatable conditions to be safely and effectively managed. Level 1 evidence exists for HBOT and the therapeutic indications are growing. It is the responsibility of all practitioners to become informed about the modern principles and practice of HBOT. Clinicians should take the advice of Mark Twain: "Supposing is good but finding out is better." It is the responsibility of educational institutions and medical societies to become informed and actively engaged in hyperbaric medical care, education and research. This will benefit our patients as well as our systems of medical care. There is now ample access to hyperbaric oxygen facilities and expertise with the state. There is a growing need for HBOT services due to the rising incidence of obesity and diabetes combined with an aging demographic. Appropriate networks and patterns of referral have lagged behind this demand due to a generalized lack of understanding of the true risks, benefits and indications for HBOT. This review will hopefully begin to address this problem. Hyperbaric medicine is in an early phase of development. The current and future demand for clinical services will drive development of research and educational programs. Only through continued efforts for perform high quality research and education will the full potential

  17. Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

    2000-10-11

    Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

  18. How are we doing? Evaluation as part of sexuality education.

    PubMed

    Brick, P

    1997-01-01

    In 1986, Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey (PPGNNJ) began to evaluate its sex education programs. First PPGNNJ staff evaluated a 1-day, 40-minute lesson designed to help high school students 1) identify risk behavior for unplanned pregnancy, 2) estimate risk, and 3) review basic contraceptive methods. This project showed that a single lesson could substantially increase knowledge about contraception and comfort with the idea of condoms and family planning (FP) clinic use. A second PPGNNJ evaluation project revealed that adding a motivational video to the lesson increased the feeling of comfort expressed about use of an FP clinic and that PPGNNJ staff were more effective than regular teachers in promoting change in attitudes about FP services, but teachers were more effective in promoting longterm knowledge of risk. Evaluation of five popular AIDS prevention videos revealed that all of the videos significantly increased HIV/AIDS knowledge and motivation to seek protection. However, the videos made many viewers feel helpless about their ability to protect themselves and unwilling to support an AIDS home in their neighborhood. PPGNNJ's staff also designed the "Human Sexuality Questionnaire" to determine the impact of a five-session sex education program delivered to high-risk youth. This tool is now used in program evaluation nationwide. Evaluation of two date rape prevention strategies (a single-lesson, interactive date-rape scenario and a video) revealed a significant impact on females and none on males. Testing of a 1994 video and discussion session designed to improve adolescent attitudes towards use of an FP clinic also had positive results. While these evaluation methodologies were not problem-free, evaluation forced PPGNNJ staff to define objectives and lessons, enter a new collaboration with schools, and use results to continually evaluate work. PMID:12321001

  19. Environmental Influences on the Onset and Clinical Course of Crohn’s Disease—Part 2: Infections and Medication Use

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Adam M.; Dam, Aamir N.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD) involves host, genetic, and environmental factors. These factors result in disturbances in the innate and adaptive immune systems and composition of the intestinal microbiota. Epidemiologic and migration studies support an environmental component in the development of CD. Environmental risk factors include childhood hygiene, air pollution, breastfeeding, smoking, diet, stress, exercise, seasonal variation, appendectomy, medications, and infections. This 2-part series provides an overview of these external contributors to the development or exacerbation of CD. Part 1, which was published in a previous issue, focused on childhood factors, perinatal influences, and lifestyle choices. Part 2, presented here, details the effects of infections, antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and oral contraceptives. PMID:24772046

  20. Hospice and palliative medicine: curriculum evaluation and learner assessment in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra; Ross, Jeanette S

    2012-01-01

    Major efforts have been pursued to improve palliative care education for physicians at all levels of their training. Such changes include the incorporation of palliative care curriculum and guidelines, an established process for competency-based evaluation and certification, faculty development, innovative educational experiences, the improvement of textbooks, and the establishment of accredited palliative medicine fellowships. Hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) has been clearly defined as a subspecialty and a crucial area of medical education. As innovative curricular approaches have become available to educate medical and other interprofessional trainees, this article aims to describe different models and methods applied in curriculum evaluation, tailoring such approaches to the field of palliative medicine. A stepwise process of curriculum development and evaluation is described, focusing on available curriculum evaluation competency-based tools for each level of learners. As HPM evolves and its educational programs grow, curriculum evaluation will provides invaluable feedback to institutions and programs in many ways. PMID:22268408

  1. [Evaluation of disability pensions by a medical polyclinic: 1990-1995].

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, M; Osterwalder, P; Vetter, W

    1998-10-21

    The question if and in what manner changes of the labour market, in first line increasing unemployment, may influence the composition of the collective demanding a disability pension on one hand and the diagnoses relevant for assessment of requests on the other hand have been investigated as well as possible influences on the criteria for assessments. To this end all expert reports elaborated by the Medical Outpatient Clinic of the University Hospital of Zürich and submitted to the disability insurance between 1990 and 1995 have been evaluated retrospectively. The results show that the fraction of men remained stable around 70% over the whole observation period. The number of persons employed in auxiliary functions remained also constantly high. Over the whole period of observation there was a high, growing percentage of foreign applicants. The most marked change during the observation period was a significant increase of unemployment in the collective. This increase particularly affected applicants with higher ranking jobs or persons over 50. Foreigners became an important part of the unemployed applicants. Rheumatoid disorders and "back pain" in particular were of increasing importance among the relevant diagnoses for assessment of disability. There was a significant decline in the extent of invalidity acknowledged in marked contrast to our initial expectation that the strictness of the applied criteria would weaken when confronted with an increasing number of applications. PMID:9844487

  2. Health care professionals’ pain narratives in hospitalized children’s medical records. Part 1: Pain descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Rashotte, Judy; Coburn, Geraldine; Harrison, Denise; Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Abbott, Laura K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although documentation of children’s pain by health care professionals is frequently undertaken, few studies have explored the nature of the language used to describe pain in the medical records of hospitalized children. OBJECTIVES: To describe health care professionals’ use of written language related to the quality and quantity of pain experienced by hospitalized children. METHODS: Free-text pain narratives documented during a 24 h period were collected from the medical records of 3822 children (0 to 18 years of age) hospitalized on 32 inpatient units in eight Canadian pediatric hospitals. A qualitative descriptive exploration using a content analysis approach was used. RESULTS: Pain narratives were documented a total of 5390 times in 1518 of the 3822 children’s medical records (40%). Overall, word choices represented objective and subjective descriptors. Two major categories were identified, with their respective subcategories of word indicators and associated cues: indicators of pain, including behavioural (eg, vocal, motor, facial and activities cues), affective and physiological cues, and children’s descriptors; and word qualifiers, including intensity, comparator and temporal qualifiers. CONCLUSIONS: The richness and complexity of vocabulary used by clinicians to document children’s pain lend support to the concept that the word ‘pain’ is a label that represents a myriad of different experiences. There is potential to refine pediatric pain assessment measures to be inclusive of other cues used to identify children’s pain. The results enhance the discussion concerning the development of standardized nomenclature. Further research is warranted to determine whether there is congruence in interpretation across time, place and individuals. PMID:24093122

  3. The health of healthcare, Part I: The right approach is medical.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    Fantasize for a moment. Imagine that our healthcare system is a human being, a patient with a name, a family, and a mortgage who walks into your office looking acutely ill. How would you approach this patient? What would you do? Now consider what has actually been done to patient Healthcare by its treating "doctors." Is the patient better or worse as a result of their therapy? This series of articles will explore these issues, starting with the need to use a medical--rather than a political or financial--approach to treat patient Healthcare. PMID:24044195

  4. Developing medical educators – a mixed method evaluation of a teaching education program

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Marco; Kadmon, Martina; Kirschfink, Michael; Koch, Eginhard; Jünger, Jana; Strittmatter-Haubold, Veronika; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well accepted that medical faculty teaching staff require an understanding of educational theory and pedagogical methods for effective medical teaching. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 5-day teaching education program. Methods An open prospective interventional study using quantitative and qualitative instruments was performed, covering all four levels of the Kirkpatrick model: Evaluation of 1) ‘Reaction’ on a professional and emotional level using standardized questionnaires; 2) ‘Learning’ applying a multiple choice test; 3) ‘Behavior’ by self-, peer-, and expert assessment of teaching sessions with semistructured interviews; and 4) ‘Results’ from student evaluations. Results Our data indicate the success of the educational intervention at all observed levels. 1) Reaction: The participants showed a high acceptance of the instructional content. 2) Learning: There was a significant increase in knowledge (P<0.001) as deduced from a pre-post multiple-choice questionnaire, which was retained at 6 months (P<0.001). 3) Behavior: Peer-, self-, and expert-assessment indicated a transfer of learning into teaching performance. Semistructured interviews reflected a higher level of professionalism in medical teaching by the participants. 4) Results: Teaching performance ratings improved in students’ evaluations. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the success of a 5-day education program in embedding knowledge and skills to improve performance of medical educators. This multimethodological approach, using both qualitative and quantitative measures, may serve as a model to evaluate effectiveness of comparable interventions in other settings. PMID:24679671

  5. INTERLIBRARY COOPERATION IN SWEDEN AND THE MEDICAL PART OF THE SCANDIA PLAN.

    PubMed

    STROEM, F

    1964-01-01

    In Sweden, as in Scandinavia generally, the interlibrary loan service is widely extended. The large research libraries traditionally follow a very liberal lending policy. Of fundamental importance to the Swedish interloan system is the maintenance of a union catalog. The free flow of materials from one library to another is facilitated by the franking privilege accorded public institutions. During the fifties, the idea arose of establishing acquisitional cooperation among the research libraries in Sweden. The highly developed interlibrary loan service was of basic significance for the realization of this project. In 1956 the possibilities were investigated of further expanding the acquisitional cooperation to include the greater libraries of Scandinavia. Thus, the so-called Scandia Plan was born. In 1960 the time was ripe to discuss the possibilities of applying the Scandia Plan to medical literature. At a meeting that year it was agreed that such cooperation could apply only to the literature which from a Scandinavian point of view would be considered peripheral. The plan was to include periodicals only, and be restricted to materials which, mainly for language reasons, are infrequently used in Scandinavian research. The task of acquiring such periodicals could be divided between the different libraries of the four countries. Such an arrangement would make it economically possible to increase the common stock of medical periodicals and avoid unnecessary duplication of material least in demand. PMID:14119301

  6. Using ultrasound to teach anatomy in the undergraduate medical curriculum: an evaluation of the experiences of tutors and medical students

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the experiences of staff and students at two UK medical schools, who introduced portable ultrasound (PU) as an imaging technology to deliver clinical anatomy teaching and to aid skill development in interpretation of cross-sectional anatomy (CSA). A sonographer contributed to curriculum design and teaching, but mostly anatomy tutors delivered the teaching. This case study method evaluates staff and student perspectives on the ultrasound-based anatomy teaching. Quantitative data and qualitative data were collected and analysed. Staff were positive about the experience. They described their expectations for students and solutions for practical issues regarding the teaching, but were concerned about their competency in scanning and wanted bespoke training for sonoanatomy teaching. Curriculum development was accelerated through engagement with a sonographer and an ultrasound champion. Students were extremely positive about their experience; they valued the expertise of a sonographer who taught more challenging sonoanatomy, but were equally positive regarding teaching sessions led by well-trained anatomy tutors who taught more simple sonoanatomy. Students affirmed most tutors’ expectations that ultrasound could reinforce existing anatomical knowledge, added clinical contextualisation, but not that use of ultrasound (US) assisted in interpreting CSA. Students valued the introduction to the technology and found sonoimage interpretation challenging, but not insurmountable. Students wanted more instruction on ultrasound physics, an expansion of ultrasound curriculum, with smaller groups and opportunities to scan volunteers. These data support the case for the use of PU to deliver anatomy teaching and to prime medical students for later clinical encounters with PU.

  7. Medical grand rounds. West Virginia University Health Sciences Center. Bites and stings. Part 1. Spiders.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, I H

    1989-04-01

    Most animals can bite or sting. In narrowing the kingdom down to those that harm humans, the field still is vast. It would be interesting to explore the rich variety of pathology produced in us by moray eels, lionfish, sea urchins, jellyfish, sting rays, fire ants, kissing bugs, flies, lice, mosquitoes, ticks, mites, fleas, puss caterpillars, centipedes, snakes, dogs and cats, camels, and myriad other creatures including homo sapiens (not a trivial biter)--but for this grand rounds, the topic will simply be spiders (Part 1), bees and vespid (Part 2). Vespids are the wasps, yellow jackets and hornets. PMID:2718467

  8. Undergraduate medical education programme renewal: a longitudinal context, input, process and product evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Mirzazadeh, Azim; Gandomkar, Roghayeh; Hejri, Sara Mortaz; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Koochak, Hamid Emadi; Golestani, Abolfazl; Jafarian, Ali; Jalili, Mohammad; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Saleh, Narges; Shahi, Farhad; Razavi, Seyed Hasan Emami

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a comprehensive framework to guide initiating, planning, implementing and evaluating a revised undergraduate medical education programme. The eight-year longitudinal evaluation study consisted of four phases compatible with the four components of the CIPP model. In the first phase, we explored the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional programme as well as contextual needs, assets, and resources. For the second phase, we proposed a model for the programme considering contextual features. During the process phase, we provided formative information for revisions and adjustments. Finally, in the fourth phase, we evaluated the outcomes of the new undergraduate medical education programme in the basic sciences phase. Information was collected from different sources such as medical students, faculty members, administrators, and graduates, using various qualitative and quantitative methods including focus groups, questionnaires, and performance measures. The CIPP model has the potential to guide policy makers to systematically collect evaluation data and to manage stakeholders' reactions at each stage of the reform in order to make informed decisions. However, the model may result in evaluation burden and fail to address some unplanned evaluation questions. PMID:26820748

  9. An Evaluation of Crisis Hotline Outcomes. Part 2: Suicidal Callers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Kalafat, John; HarrisMunfakh, Jimmie Lou; Kleinman, Marjorie

    2007-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effectiveness of telephone crisis services/hotlines, examining proximal outcomes as measured by changes in callers' suicide state from the beginning to the end of their calls to eight centers in the U.S. and again within 3 weeks of their calls. Between March 2003 and July 2004, 1,085 suicide callers were assessed…

  10. Evaluating the FONE FIM: Part I. Construct Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wei-Ching; Slaughter, Susan; Cartwright, Deborah; Chan, Chetwyn

    1997-01-01

    Rasch analysis, often used in educational research, was used to evaluate the Motor component of the FONE FIM, the telephone version of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) (validated by T. Dodds, and others, 1993) with 132 geriatric patients. Rasch difficulty measures demonstrated the similarity of the phone and observational FIM measures.…

  11. [The effect of evidence-based evaluation and economic evaluation for price control of medical disposable materials].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai

    2010-05-01

    Evidence-based evaluation and economic evaluation could be identical to the products which should be priced by bidding or which should be listed individually through evidence-based evaluation. Meanwhile, economic evaluation is helpful to price listing individual products in a reasonable range. It will be extremely grateful if all colleagues can be a part of the program and set up a standard pricing rationale in science. PMID:20812653

  12. Ethical and professional considerations providing medical evaluation and care to refugee asylum seekers.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Ramin; Smith, Clyde L

    2013-01-01

    A significant number of asylum seekers who largely survived torture live in the United States. Asylum seekers have complex social and medical problems with significant barriers to health care access. When evaluating and providing care for survivors, health providers face important challenges regarding medical ethics and professional codes. We review ethical concerns in regard to accountability, the patient-physician relationship, and moral responsibilities to offer health care irrespective of patient legal status; competing professional responsibility toward society and the judiciary system; concerns about the consistency of asylum seekers' claims; ethical concerns surrounding involving trainees and researching within the evaluation setting; and the implication of broader societal views towards rights and social justice. We discuss contributing factors, including inadequate and insufficient provider training, varying and inadequate institutional commitment, asylum seekers' significant medical and social problems, and the broader health and social system issues. We review existing resources to address these concerns and offer suggestions. PMID:23767428

  13. Potential medications for the treatment of alcohol use disorder: An evaluation of clinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Litten, Raye Z; Wilford, Bonnie B; Falk, Daniel E; Ryan, Megan L; Fertig, Joanne B

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD), as currently defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th Edition (DSM-5), is a heterogeneous disorder stemming from a complex interaction of neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors. As a result of this heterogeneity, there is no one treatment for AUD that will work for everyone. During the past 2 decades, efforts have been made to develop a menu of medications to give patients and clinicians more choices when seeking a therapy that is both effective and which has limited side effects. To date, 3 medications have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat alcohol dependence: disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate. In addition to these approved medications, researchers have identified new therapeutic targets and, as a result, a number of alternative medications are now being evaluated for treatment of AUD in human studies. Although not approved by the FDA for the treatment of AUD, in some cases, these alternative medications are being used off-label by clinicians for this purpose. These potential medications are reviewed here. They include nalmefene, varenicline, gabapentin, topiramate, zonisamide, baclofen, ondansetron, levetiracetam, quetiapine, aripiprazole, and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The effectiveness of these medications has been mixed-some show good efficacy with side effects that are mild to moderate in intensity; others have mixed or promising results but are awaiting findings from ongoing studies; and still others show poor efficacy, despite promising preliminary results. Medications development remains a high priority. Key initiatives for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) include supporting the discovery and development of more effective and safer medications, advancing the field of personalized medicine, and forging public and private partnerships to investigate new and more effective compounds. PMID:26928397

  14. [Medical and legal aspects of genital mutilation and circumcision part I: female genital mutilation (FGM)].

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Laux, Johannes; Friedl, Hannah; Zedler, Barbara; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Parzeller, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is considered to be against the law and against morality not only in Western countries, although a woman of age and able to consent may sometimes think differently. The procedure may have serious physical and emotional consequences for the girl or woman. Nevertheless there are attempts to justify the procedure with medical and hygienic pseudoarguments, ideology, freedom of religion, cultural identity and social adequacy. Outside the Western world, some people claim that religion and culture alone justify the practice. In Germany, parents can lose the right to determine the residence of their daughter, if she is faced with the risk of genital mutilation in order to prevent that the child or girl is taken to her home country. Genital mutilation as a gender-specific threat is recognized as a reason to grant asylum or prevent deportation. Proposals to make genital mutilation a separate punishable offence are presently discussed by the legislator. PMID:21404547

  15. Drug Abuse Among Medical Students at a Nigerian University: Part 1. Prevalence and Pattern of Use

    PubMed Central

    Ihezue, U. H.

    1988-01-01

    Using a structured pro forma, 728 out of 775 medical undergraduates at a Nigerian university were surveyed for the prevalence and pattern of drug use. An operational definition of substance abuse was made, and 28 percent of students fell within that criterion. Male abusers (81 percent) exceeded female abusers (19 percent). Substances most commonly abused were alcohol (60 percent), minor tranquilizers (48 percent), tobacco (35 percent), and narcotics (29 percent), particularly codeine. Only 11 percent abused cannabis. While most students were polydrug users, there was a low frequency of daily drug use. A general lifetime (occasional use) prevalence of substance use of 56 percent was found. Drugs consumed on a daily basis were alcohol (2 percent) and tobacco (6 percent). The prevalence of drug use was highest among the fourth and final year students. The majority of students were occasional abusers; there was no evidence of physical dependence. PMID:3257527

  16. Military medical advances resulting from the conflict in Korea, Part II: Historic clinical accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    Throughout the recorded history of civilization, there has been armed conflict. Warfare has been associated with advances in care for the wounded. Many of these advances when shown effective on the battlefield become incorporated into civilian health care. It is a laboratory where there is unfortunately much clinical material and presents opportunity for the creative, curious, and innovative. This article reviews the medical advances that resulted from the Korean War. There were notable advances in neurosurgery, vascular surgery, and plastic surgery. Tools from prior wars were rediscovered, dusted off, and used to stop combat losses from psychiatric trauma. A treatment was developed for cleft lip by a plastic surgeon, thus giving hope to young lives. War is a disruptive, destructive, and harrowing experience--but can lead to improvements in care for the wounded and these developments can improve the lives of people everywhere. PMID:22594134

  17. Clinical Problem Solving Exercises for Pre-Clinical Medical Education: A Design, Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordage, Georges

    Clinical problem solving exercises for preclinical medical education that were developed at Michigan State University School of Osteopathic Medicine are described. Two types of outcomes were set as priorities in the design and implementation of the problem solving sessions: small group peer interactions as instructional and evaluative resources;…

  18. An Evaluation of a Medical School Smoking Policy: A Student Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Jesse; Ronay, Ashley; Telfer, Megan; Becker, Craig M.; Cremeens, Jennifer; Swinker, Marian

    2012-01-01

    A medical school at a Southeastern university implemented a tobacco free policy to promote a healthy environment for its employees, patients, and visitors. Eighteen months post policy implementation, undergraduate students in the Department of Health Education and Promotion evaluated the satisfaction, awareness, and perceived…

  19. Evaluation of status of tuberculin skin sensitivity test among medical students.

    PubMed

    Chander, J; Gupta, R; Subrahmanyan, S

    1997-02-01

    The status of tuberculin skin sensitivity tests was evaluated in 87 medical students. It was found that Mantoux test has less significant role to play in the vaccinated individuals and in the population at high risk of exposure. Hence this test is to be supplemented with clinical manifestations and other investigations to establish the final diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:9355707

  20. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: Model Description and Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the…

  1. 49 CFR 391.47 - Resolution of conflicts of medical evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... upon which the party making application relies in the form set out in 49 CFR 386.37. (9) The... (49 U.S.C. 1801, et seq.); 49 CFR 1.48, 301.60) ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resolution of conflicts of medical evaluation....

  2. Integrating and Evaluating Geriatrics in Medical School: A Novel Approach for the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besdine, Richard W.; Shield, Renee R.; McNicoll, Lynn; Campbell, Susan E.; Wetle, Terrie

    2011-01-01

    Brown Medical School developed a comprehensive curriculum in which enriched aging content increased from 22 to 80 hours in preclerkship courses and was also added for clerkships, residencies, and nongeriatrician physicians. Innovative evaluation strategies are also described. Highlights include "treasure hunts" in the anatomy laboratory, a…

  3. Toward Diversity-Responsive Medical Education: Taking an Intersectionality-Based Approach to a Curriculum Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muntinga, M. E.; Krajenbrink, V. Q.; Peerdeman, S. M.; Croiset, G.; Verdonk, P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rise in the efforts to implement diversity topics into medical education, using either a "narrow" or a "broad" definition of culture. These developments urge that outcomes of such efforts are systematically evaluated by mapping the curriculum for diversity-responsive content. This study was aimed at…

  4. The Medical Evaluation of the Special Child: A Guide for Parents and Teachers. Monograph #24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddleton, Cindy

    This monograph describes the basic physical/neurological examination of children with special needs and how such an exam fits into the multidisciplinary evaluation and development of individualized programming for such children. The first section addresses the importance of the medical history. Next, the basic exam is described, followed by…

  5. Shortcomings in the Evaluation of Students' Clinical Skills and Behaviors in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Donald G.; Eaglen, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the extent to which current medical-student evaluation assesses noncognitive clinical skills and behaviors needed by graduates, including small-group conferences, case-based discussion, library research, lifelong learning, reasoned thinking, interpersonal skills, and logical/sequenced history taking and physical examinations.…

  6. Evaluation of treatment effects in obese children with co-morbid medical or psychiatric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for effective treatments for pediatric overweight is well known. We evaluated the applicability of an evidence-based treatment in an applied clinic setting that includes children with severe obesity and comorbid medical or psychiatric conditions. Forty-eight overweight children and their fa...

  7. Introduction: feature issue on phantoms for the performance evaluation and validation of optical medical imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeeseong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nordstrom, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on "Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices." This topic was the focus of a technical workshop that was held on November 7-8, 2011, in Washington, D.C. The feature issue includes 13 contributions from workshop attendees. PMID:22741084

  8. Is Wikipedia a Reliable Learning Resource for Medical Students? Evaluating Respiratory Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azer, Samy A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to critically evaluate the accuracy and readability of English Wikipedia articles on the respiratory system and its disorders and whether they can be a suitable resource for medical students. On April 27, 2014, English Wikipedia was searched for articles on respiratory topics. Using a modified DISCERN instrument,…

  9. Evaluating Preclinical Medical Students by Using Computer-Based Problem-Solving Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Ronald H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of creating and administering computer-based problem-solving examinations for evaluating second-year medical students in immunology and to determine how students would perform on these tests relative to their performances on concurrently administered objective and essay examinations is described. (Author/MLW)

  10. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women. PMID:26761932

  11. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 2: topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-11-01

    In part 1 of this 3-part series, an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women was provided. Proper selection and integration of skin care products is important in the management of AV in this patient population. Part 2 of this series includes a discussion of over-the-counter and prescription topical therapies for adult women with AV. A summary of key randomized controlled trials also is provided. Further well-designed studies are needed, as data on the use of topical agents in this subpopulation are limited. PMID:26682555

  12. Predictive value of grade point average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores on Medical Council of Canada qualifying examination part I (MCCQE-1) scores

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Banibrata; Ripstein, Ira; Perry, Kyle; Cohen, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine whether the pre-medical Grade Point Average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores are correlated with and predict the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE-1) scores. Methods Data from 392 admitted students in the graduating classes of 2010–2013 at University of Manitoba (UofM), College of Medicine was considered. Pearson’s correlation to assess the strength of the relationship, multiple linear regression to estimate MCCQE-1 score and stepwise linear regression to investigate the amount of variance were employed. Results Complete data from 367 (94%) students were studied. The MCCQE-1 had a moderate-to-large positive correlation with NBME scores and Block scores but a low correlation with GPA and MCAT scores. The multiple linear regression model gives a good estimate of the MCCQE-1 (R2 =0.604). Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that 59.2% of the variation in the MCCQE-1 was accounted for by the NBME, but only 1.9% by the Block exams, and negligible variation came from the GPA and the MCAT. Conclusions Amongst all the examinations used at UofM, the NBME is most closely correlated with MCCQE-1. PMID:27103953

  13. Evaluating the Potential Impact of Pharmacist Counseling on Medication Adherence Using a Simulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rolee Pathak; Mansukhani, Rupal Patel; Cosler, Leon E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of counseling in a simulated medication adherence activity. Design. Students were randomized into 2 groups: patient medication monograph only (PMMO) and patient medication monograph with counseling (PMMC). Both groups received a fictitious medication and monograph. Additionally, the PMMC group received brief counseling. A multiple-choice, paper-based survey instrument was used to evaluate simulated food-drug interactions, adherence, and perceptions regarding the activity’s value and impact on understanding adherence challenges. Assessment. Ninety-two students participated (PMMC, n=45; and PMMO, n=47). Overall, a significantly higher incidence of simulated food-drug interactions occurred in the PMMO group (30%) vs the PMMC group (22%) (p=0.02). Doses taken without simulated food-drug interactions were comparable: 46.2% (PMCC) vs 41.9% (PMMO) (p=0.19). The average number of missed doses were 3.2 (PMMC) vs 2.8 (PMMO) (p=0.55). Approximately 70% of the students found the activity to be valuable and 89% believed it helped them better understand adherence challenges. Conclusion. This activity demonstrated the challenges and important role of counseling in medication adherence. PMID:26056407

  14. Prospective Evaluation of Cases of Discharge against Medical Advice in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anthonia, Obalim-Chris; Chinwe, Igwilo; Oluwafemi, Adewumi; Ganiyu, Aremu; Haroun, Adamu; Chinwe, Eziechila; Joshua, Aiyekomogbon

    2015-01-01

    Background. Discharge against medical advice (DAMA) is a global clinical phenomenon contributing significantly to adverse patients' outcome. Literatures abound on self-discharges in specific medical subpopulations. However, multidisciplinary studies on this subject in our region are few. Aim. To prospectively evaluate cases of DAMA in a wholesale multidisciplinary perspective at Federal Staff Medical Centre, Abuja, and suggest strategies to reduce it. Patients and Methods. All consecutive patients who DAMA from our medical centre between June 2013 and May 2014 were included in the study. Data harvested from the standard proforma were analyzed using IBM SPSS version 19.0. Results. We recorded an overall DAMA rate of 2.1%. The majority of the patients were paediatric cases (n = 63, 44.6%) while closed long bone fractures represented the leading diagnosis (n = 35, 24.8%). The most commonly cited reasons for leaving the hospital were financial constraints (n = 46, 32.6%) and seeking alternative therapy (n = 25, 17.7%). Conclusion. The DAMA rate in our study is comparable to some urban hospitals elsewhere. However, the leading reasons for this phenomenon are unacceptable in the current medical best practice. Thus, strengthening the Health Insurance Scheme, strict control of traditional medical practices, and focused health education are recommended strategies to reduce DAMA. PMID:25821850

  15. Gallium-doped germanium, evaluation of photoconductors, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Gallium-doped germanium far infrared detectors were evaluated at low temperatures and low background simulating the space environment. Signal and noise characteristics were determined for detector temperatures in the 2K to 4K range. Optimum performance occurs at about 2.5K for all devices tested. The minimum average NEP in the 40-130 micron region was found to be approximately 4 x 10 to the minus 17th power watt Hz(-1/2) at a frequency of 1 Hz.

  16. How Medicare Part D Benefit Phases Affect Adherence with Evidence-Based Medications Following Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Bruce; Davidoff, Amy; Erten, Mujde; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Dai, Mingliang; Shaffer, Thomas; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Bryant-Comstock, Lynda; Shenolikar, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Assess impact of Medicare Part D benefit phases on adherence with evidence-based medications after hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction. Data Source. Random 5 percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Study Design. Difference-in-difference analysis of drug adherence by AMI patients stratified by low-income subsidy (LIS) status and benefit phase. Data Collection/Extraction Methods. Subjects were identified with an AMI diagnosis in Medicare Part A files between April 2006 and December 2007 and followed until December 2008 or death (N = 8,900). Adherence was measured as percent of days covered (PDC) per month with four drug classes used in AMI treatment: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), beta-blockers, statins, and clopidogrel. Monthly exposure to Part D benefit phases was calculated from flags on each Part D claim. Principal Findings. For non-LIS enrollees, transitioning from the initial coverage phase into the Part D coverage gap was associated with statistically significant reductions in mean PDC for all four drug classes: statins (−7.8 percent), clopidogrel (−7.0 percent), beta-blockers (−5.9 percent), and ACE inhibitor/ARBs (−5.1 percent). There were no significant changes in adherence associated with transitioning from the gap to the catastrophic coverage phase. Conclusions. As the Part D doughnut hole is gradually filled in by 2020, Medicare Part D enrollees with critical diseases such as AMI who rely heavily on brand name drugs are likely to exhibit modest increases in adherence. Those reliant on generic drugs are less likely to be affected. PMID:23742013

  17. Evaluating community-based medical education programmes in Africa: A workshop report

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Rebecca J; Baingana, Rhona K; Couper, Ian D; Deery, Christopher B; Nestel, Debra; Ross, Heather; Sagay, Atiene Solomon; Talib, Zohray M

    2015-01-01

    Background The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) supports medical schools in Africa to increase the capacity and quality of medical education, improve retention of graduates, and promote regionally relevant research. Many MEPI programmes include elements of community-based education (CBE) such as: community placements; clinical rotations in underserved locations, community medicine, or primary health; situational analyses; or student-led research. Methods CapacityPlus and the MEPI Coordinating Center conducted a workshop to share good practices for CBE evaluation, identify approaches that can be used for CBE evaluation in the African context, and strengthen a network of CBE collaborators. Expected outcomes of the workshop included draft evaluation plans for each school and plans for continued collaboration among participants. The workshop focused on approaches and resources for evaluation, guiding exploration of programme evaluation including data collection, sampling, analysis, and reporting. Participants developed logic models capturing inputs, activities, outputs, and expected outcomes of their programmes, and used these models to inform development of evaluation plans. This report describes key insights from the workshop, and highlights plans for CBE evaluation among the MEPI institutions. Results Each school left the workshop with a draft evaluation plan. Participants agreed to maintain communication and identified concrete areas for collaboration moving forward. Since the workshop’s conclusion, nine schools have agreed on next steps for the evaluation process and will begin implementation of their plans. Conclusion This workshop clearly demonstrated the widespread interest in improving CBE evaluation efforts and a need to develop, implement, and disseminate rigorous approaches and tools relevant to the African context. PMID:26523230

  18. Evaluating and selecting an information system, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Neal, T

    1993-01-01

    Initial steps in the process of evaluating and selecting a computerized information system for the pharmacy department are described. The first step in the selection process is to establish a steering committee and a project committee. The steering committee oversees the project, providing policy guidance, making major decisions, and allocating budgeted expenditures. The project committee conducts the departmental needs assessment, identifies system requirements, performs day-to-day functions, evaluates vendor proposals, trains personnel, and implements the system chosen. The second step is the assessment of needs in terms of personnel, workload, physical layout, and operating requirements. The needs assessment should be based on the department's mission statement and strategic plan. The third step is the development of a request for information (RFI) and a request for proposal (RFP). The RFI is a document designed for gathering preliminary information from a wide range of vendors; this general information is used in deciding whether to send the RFP to a given vendor. The RFP requests more detailed information and gives the purchaser's exact specifications for a system; the RFP also includes contractual information. To help ensure project success, many institutions turn to computer consultants for guidance. The initial steps in selecting a computerized pharmacy information system are establishing computerization committees, conducting a needs assessment, and writing an RFI and an RFP. A crucial early decision is whether to seek a consultant's expertise. PMID:8427267

  19. Concept of Operations Evaluation for Mitigating Space Flight-Relevant Medical Issues in a Planetary Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsten, Kristina; Hurst, Victor, IV; Scheuring, Richard; Baumann, David K.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Analogue environments assist the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) in developing capabilities to mitigate high risk issues to crew health and performance for space exploration. The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) is an analogue habitat used to assess space-related products for planetary missions. The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) was tasked with developing planetary-relevant medical scenarios to evaluate the concept of operations for mitigating medical issues in such an environment. Methods: Two medical scenarios were conducted within the simulated planetary habitat with the crew executing two space flight-relevant procedures: Eye Examination with a corneal injury and Skin Laceration. Remote guidance for the crew was provided by a flight surgeon (FS) stationed at a console outside of the habitat. Audio and video data were collected to capture the communication between the crew and the FS, as well as the movements of the crew executing the procedures. Questionnaire data regarding procedure content and remote guidance performance also were collected from the crew immediately after the sessions. Results: Preliminary review of the audio, video, and questionnaire data from the two scenarios conducted within the HDU indicate that remote guidance techniques from an FS on console can help crew members within a planetary habitat mitigate planetary-relevant medical issues. The content and format of the procedures were considered concise and intuitive, respectively. Discussion: Overall, the preliminary data from the evaluation suggest that use of remote guidance techniques by a FS can help HDU crew execute space exploration-relevant medical procedures within a habitat relevant to planetary missions, however further evaluations will be needed to implement this strategy into the complete concept of operations for conducting general space medicine within similar environments

  20. Use of Preclinical Drug vs. Food Choice Procedures to Evaluate Candidate Medications for Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L; Hutsell, Blake A; Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Drug addiction is a disease that manifests as an inappropriate allocation of behavior towards the procurement and use of the abused substance and away from other behaviors that produce more adaptive reinforcers (e.g. exercise, work, family and social relationships). The goal of treating drug addiction is not only to decrease drug-maintained behaviors, but also to promote a reallocation of behavior towards alternative, nondrug reinforcers. Experimental procedures that offer concurrent access to both a drug reinforcer and an alternative, nondrug reinforcer provide a research tool for assessment of medication effects on drug choice and behavioral allocation. Choice procedures are currently the standard in human laboratory research on medications development. Preclinical choice procedures have been utilized in biomedical research since the early 1940’s, and during the last 10–15 years, their use for evaluation of medications to treat drug addiction has increased. We propose here that parallel use of choice procedures in preclinical and clinical studies will facilitate translational research on development of medications to treat cocaine addiction. In support of this proposition, a review of the literature suggests strong concordance between preclinical effectiveness of candidate medications to modify cocaine choice in nonhuman primates and rodents and clinical effectiveness of these medications to modify either cocaine choice in human laboratory studies or metrics of cocaine abuse in patients with cocaine use disorder. The strongest evidence for medication effectiveness in preclinical choice studies has been obtained with maintenance on the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine, a candidate agonist medication for cocaine use analogous to use of methadone to treat heroin abuse or nicotine formulations to treat tobacco dependence. PMID:26009706

  1. Evaluation of a nutrition education activity for medical students in China.

    PubMed

    Guldan, G S; Yu, W S; Yu, Y; Zhao, M; Xiang, D P; Yang, L; Long, F

    1993-06-01

    In China, where cancers and cardiovascular disease are the major causes of morbidity and mortality, an important role for preventive medicine has emerged. Therefore, preparing China's medical students to tackle contemporary health problems requires attention to nutrition and health promotion in the medical curriculum. To evaluate the effectiveness of a nutrition education activity for medical students, a two-group pre-test/post-test nutrition education program was conducted in a medical university in south-western China (n=300 per group). Students in another south-western Chinese medical university served as controls (n= 150 per group). Special features of the intervention were: (1) nutrition education materials developed from (a) the results of a pre-test survey of medical students and (b) discussions with medical students, faculty, and physicians; and (2) a multi-channel delivery, which included a classroom lecture-discussion; a nutrition knowledge competition; a handout providing a day's dietary allotment; campus radio and movie theatre announcements, and posters. Analysis of variance, chi-square, and t-tests showed a significant increase (P<0.05) in nutrition knowledge, but not in nutrition attitude score. The final nutrition knowledge and attitude scores were also found to be related to the students' increased exposure to the various channels (P<0.001). Also observed was an increase in the consumption of soybean and dairy products (P<0.05). It is concluded that the method is a useful and practical model for designing and developing student nutrition education activities in China, as well as demonstrating nutrition and health education methods among the medical university community. PMID:24352102

  2. Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.H.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

  3. Evaluation of Methods for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodiyalam, Srinivas; Yuan, Charles; Sobieski, Jaroslaw (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new MDO method, BLISS, and two different variants of the method, BLISS/RS and BLISS/S, have been implemented using iSIGHT's scripting language and evaluated in this report on multidisciplinary problems. All of these methods are based on decomposing a modular system optimization system into several subtasks optimization, that may be executed concurrently, and the system optimization that coordinates the subtasks optimization. The BLISS method and its variants are well suited for exploiting the concurrent processing capabilities in a multiprocessor machine. Several steps, including the local sensitivity analysis, local optimization, response surfaces construction and updates are all ideally suited for concurrent processing. Needless to mention, such algorithms that can effectively exploit the concurrent processing capabilities of the compute servers will be a key requirement for solving large-scale industrial design problems, such as the automotive vehicle problem detailed in Section 3.4.

  4. RIPE integrity primitives, part 1 (RACE Integrity Primitives Evaluation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denboer, B.; Boly, J. P.; Bosselaers, A.; Brandt, J.; Chaum, D.; Damgaard, I.; Dichtl, M.; Fumy, W.; Vanderham, M.; Jansen, C. J. A.

    1993-04-01

    A manual intended for those seeking to secure information systems by applying modern cryptography is presented. It represents the successful attainment of goals by RIPE (RACE (Research and development of Advanced Communication technology in Europe) Integrity Primitives Evaluation). The recommended portfolio of integrity primitives, which is the main product of the project, forms the heart of the manual. By integrity, is meant the kinds of security that can be achieved through cryptography, apart from keeping messages secret. Thus included are ways to ensure that stored or communicated data is not illicitly modified, that parties exchanging messages are actually present, and that 'signed' electronic messages can be recognized as authentic by anyone. Of particular concern to the project were the high speed requirements of broadband communication. The project also aimed for completeness in its recommendations. As a result, the portfolio contains primitives, that is building blocks, that can meet most of today's perceived needs for integrity.

  5. RIPE integrity primitives, part 2 (RACE Integrity Primitives Evaluation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denboer, B.; Boly, J. P.; Bosselaers, A.; Brandt, J.; Chaum, D.; Damgaard, I.; Dichtl, M.; Fumy, W.; Vanderham, M.; Jansen, C. J. A.

    1993-04-01

    A manual intended for those seeking to secure information systems by applying modern cryptography is presented. It represents the successful attainment of goals by RIPE (RACE (Research and development of Advanced Communications technology in Europe) Integrity Primitives Evaluation). The recommended portfolio of integrity primitives, which is the main product of the project, forms the heart of the manual. By integrity, is meant the kinds of security that can be achieved through cryptography, apart from keeping messages secret. Thus included are ways to ensure that stored or communicated data is not illicitly modified, that parties exchanging messages are actually present, and that 'signed' electronic messages can be recognized as authentic by anyone. Of particular concern to the project were the high speed requirements of broadband communication. The project also aimed for completeness in its recommendations. As a result, the portfolio contains primitives, that is building blocks, that can meet most of today's perceived needs for integrity.

  6. Evaluating fitness to drive after cerebral injury: basic issues and recommendations for medical and legal communities.

    PubMed

    Galski, T; Ehle, H T; McDonald, M A; Mackevich, J

    2000-06-01

    Specialists in rehabilitation are typically called upon to evaluate and render an opinion about whether or not a person can be entrusted to resume driving. And, because driving is an individual privilege to be balanced against the public's right to safety and protection from the dangers of a driver whose residual deficits may impede ability to drive safely, these specialists have developed a number of methods to assess fitness to drive. Unfortunately, many evaluators remain unfamiliar with research used as basis for evaluations or lack understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of tests in use. Therefore, there may be unquestioning trust in tests and methods that leads to errors of significant consequence in decisions about fitness to drive as well as unawareness of expanding risks of litigation that can emanate from inappropriate recommendations. This article intends to draw attention to issues, considerations, and problems underlying the conduct of driver evaluations, including focus on ways in which the legal and medical communities approach question of fitness, legal and medical definitions and terminology, responsibility for assessment as well as tests and methods used in evaluations. Conclusions are drawn from discussion of these matters and recommendations are outlined for addressing identified problems at the interface between medical and legal communities. PMID:10785621

  7. Emergency medical services data for cardiovascular disease surveillance, program planning, and evaluation in Maine.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Katie A; Decker, Kathy; Mervis, Cynthia A; Louder, Danielle; Bradshaw, Jay; DeVader, Shannon; Wigand, Debra

    2008-04-01

    Rapid access to medical treatment is a key determinant of outcomes for cardiovascular events. Emergency medical services (EMS) play an important role in delivering early treatment for acute cardiovascular events. Attention has increased on the potential for EMS data to contribute to our understanding of prehospital treatment. Maine recently began to explore the possible role of EMS data in cardiovascular disease surveillance and cardiovascular health program planning and evaluation. We describe the Maine EMS data system, discuss findings on ease of data use and data quality, provide a sample of findings, and share how we plan to use EMS data for program planning and evaluation of community-level interventions and to partner with EMS provider organizations to improve treatment. Our objective is to increase understanding of the promise and limitations of using EMS data for cardiovascular disease surveillance and program planning and evaluation. PMID:18341789

  8. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie Lk

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients' needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the risk

  9. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie LK

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients’ needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the

  10. An Independent Human Factors Analysis and Evaluation of the Emergency Medical Protocol Checklist for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Whitmore, Mihriban; Ortiz, Rosie; Segal, Michele; Smart, Kieran; Hughes, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Emergency medical capabilities aboard the ISS include a Crew Medical Officer (CMO) (not necessarily a physician), and back-up, resuscitation equipment, and a medical checklist. It is essential that CMOs have reliable, usable and informative medical protocols that can be carried out independently in flight. The study evaluates the existing ISS Medical Checklist layout against a checklist updated to reflect a human factors approach to structure and organization. Method: The ISS Medical checklist was divided into non-emergency and emergency sections, and re-organized based on alphabetical and a body systems approach. A desk-top evaluation examined the ability of subjects to navigate to specific medical problems identified as representative of likely non-emergency events. A second evaluation aims to focus on the emergency section of the Medical Checklist, based on the preliminary findings of the first. The final evaluation will use Astronaut CMOs as subjects comparing the original checklist against the updated layout in the task of caring for a "downed crewmember" using a Human Patient Simulator [Medical Education Technologies, Inc.]. Results: Initial results have demonstrated a clear improvement of the re-organized sections to determine the solution to the medical problems. There was no distinct advantage for either alternative, although subjects stated having a preference for the body systems approach. In the second evaluation, subjects will be asked to identify emergency medical conditions, with measures including correct diagnosis, time to completion and solution strategy. The third evaluation will compare the original and fully updated checklists in clinical situations. Conclusions: Initial findings indicate that the ISS Medical Checklist will benefit from a reorganization. The present structure of the checklist has evolved over recent years without systematic testing of crewmember ability to diagnose medical problems. The improvements are expected to enable ISS

  11. Evaluation of Periodicals Journals and Community of Medical Sciences in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najari¹, A; Ghazisaid, SJ M.; Ghorbani, N R.; Heidari, RN

    2010-01-01

    Background: Medical journals are scientific resources where utilization of knowledge is availed and create an environment of competitiveness. To speed up the growth and increase scientific production and in order that the rank of Iranian journals be defined regionally and globally, journal standardization is necessary. This study was done to evaluate the country’s medical journals from 2004–2006. Methods: This is a descriptive/analytical study. Evaluation was based on the following; scientific credibility, registry and year of service, journal management, technical quality and accessibility. The number of journals evaluated during 2004–2006 were 86, 103 and 93, respectively and the process involved 3 phases 1) defining the journal’s structural indicators and designing the evaluation form 2) collection, sharing and final confirmation of information with the publication staff 3) data entry, analysis and ranking Results: Improvement and growth of publication depends largely on 5 parameters and its development were based on the following; publication management (61.62 points), scientific credibility (43.80 points), quality of accessing the journals (37.05 points), quality of publication (14.80 points) and registry and year of service (0.02 points). Based on the study, an upward developmental trend of the country’s medical journals can be seen and the tools were sufficient in terms of validity and reliability. A revised and more comprehensive checklist that would evaluate all aspects of a publication basing on latest indicators is developed. Conclusion: Evaluations of the country’s medical journals not only promote compliance to international standards but also led to more indexing of journals in accredited international indices. PMID:23113024

  12. Evaluation of seismic hazard at the northwestern part of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzelarab, M.; Shokry, M. M. F.; Mohamed, A. M. E.; Helal, A. M. A.; Mohamed, Abuoelela A.; El-Hadidy, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the seismic hazard at the northwestern Egypt using the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment approach. The Probabilistic approach was carried out based on a recent data set to take into account the historic seismicity and updated instrumental seismicity. A homogenous earthquake catalogue was compiled and a proposed seismic sources model was presented. The doubly-truncated exponential model was adopted for calculations of the recurrence parameters. Ground-motion prediction equations that recently recommended by experts and developed based upon earthquake data obtained from tectonic environments similar to those in and around the studied area were weighted and used for assessment of seismic hazard in the frame of logic tree approach. Considering a grid of 0.2° × 0.2° covering the study area, seismic hazard curves for every node were calculated. Hazard maps at bedrock conditions were produced for peak ground acceleration, in addition to six spectral periods (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 s) for return periods of 72, 475 and 2475 years. The unified hazard spectra of two selected rock sites at Alexandria and Mersa Matruh Cities were provided. Finally, the hazard curves were de-aggregated to determine the sources that contribute most of hazard level of 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for the mentioned selected sites.

  13. Recommendations for the medical evaluation of children prior to adoption in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Haeri Mazanderani, Ahmad F; du Plessis, Nicolette M; Lumb, Janet; Feucht, Ute D; Myburgh, Marcelle; Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H; Lekalakala, Molebogeng R; Swanepoel, De Wet; Georgakis, Hellen; Avenant, Theunis

    2014-08-01

    The current legislative framework in South Africa (SA) supports adoption as the preferred form of care for children with inadequate or no parental or family support. There are an estimated 3.8 million orphans in SA, with approximately 1.5 - 2 million children considered adoptable. As a means of improving services, newly drafted adoption guidelines from the National Department of Social Development will in future require both non-profit and private sector adoption agencies to obtain a medical report on a child prior to placement. However, no local guidelines specify what an appropriate medical examination entails or how it should be reported. For the purposes of proposing and developing such guidelines, an open forum was convened at the Institute of Pathology, University of Pretoria, in March 2013. These 'Recommendations for the medical evaluation of children prior to adoption in South Africa' emanate from this meeting. PMID:25213841

  14. Robotic Assistance in Medication Management: Development and Evaluation of a Prototype.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Marco; Hoerbst, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of elderly people and the prevalence of multimorbid conditions often lead to age-related problems for patients in handling their common polypharmaceutical, domestic everyday medication. Ambient Assisted Living therefore provides means to support an elderly's everyday life. In the present paper we investigated the viability of using a commercial mass-produced humanoid robot system to support the domestic medication of an elderly person. A prototypical software application based on the NAO-robot platform was implemented to remind the patient for drug intakes, check for drug-drug-interactions, document the compliance and assist through the complete process of individual medication. A technical and functional evaluation of the system in a laboratory setting revealed versatile and viable results, though further investigations are needed to examine the practical use in an applied field. PMID:27332235

  15. The financial burden of medical spending: estimates and implications for evaluating the impact of ACA reforms.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Joelle; O'Hara, Brett

    2015-04-01

    This article uses the 2013 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement to estimate the financial burden of medical out-of-pocket costs by comparing medical out-of-pocket expenditures to income. This measure is important for evaluating the magnitude of burden, better understanding who bears it, and establishing a baseline to assess the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. We examine the distribution of burden and the incidence of high burden across all families and by individuals' health insurance status and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. We look more closely at one group vulnerable to having high burden: those younger than age 65 with incomes between 138% and 200% of the federal poverty line. We find that 18.5% of these individuals have incomes below the threshold of expansion Medicaid eligibility after accounting for non-over-the-counter medical expenses and examine the characteristics associated with being classified below this threshold. PMID:25524865

  16. Geochemical evaluation of part of the Cambay basin, India

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A. ); Rao, K.L.N.

    1993-01-01

    In Broach-Jambusar and Ahmedabad-Mehsana blocks of Cambay basin, India, the hydrocarbon generated (HCG) and hydrocarbon expelled (HCE) per unit area of four Paleogene formations were computed at 38 locations to select the best targets and thus reduce exploration risk. Fractional generation curves, which show relation between vitrinite reflectance and fraction of original generative potential converted to hydrocarbons, were constructed for study areas and used to calculate HCG through remaining generation potential (S[sub 2] of Rock-Eval) and the thickness of the sedimentary section. HCE was estimated by subtracting volatile hydrocarbon content (S[sub 1] of Rock-Eval), representing the unexpelled in-situ-generated bitumen, from the computed value of HCG. HCG and HCE, which combine source rock richness, thickness, and maturity, are useful for comparative evaluation of charging capacity of source rocks. Positive and negative HCEs characterize drainage and accumulation locales, respectively. In the study areas, the major generative depressions are at Sobhasan/Linch/Wadu and Ahmedabad in the Ahmedabad-Mehsana block and the Tankari and Broach depressions in the Broach-Jambusar block. In these areas, Paleogene source rocks have generated between 3 million and 12 million MT hydrocarbon/km[sup 2]. The major known oil and gas accumulations, which are in middle to lower Eocene sandstones in vicinity of the generative depressions, overlie 2 million to 7 million MT hydrocarbon/km[sup 2] and HCG contours in both blocks and correlate well with negative HCE in the reservoir. Isopach maps of several major middle to lower Eocene reservoir sandstones in conjunction with HCG maps for Paleogene section help to delineate favorable exploration locales. 23 refs., 31 figs.

  17. Evaluation of water resources in part of central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.; Duffin, G.; Flores, R.; Lynch, T.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources in the Brazos, Red, Colorado, and Trinity River basins, in central Texas, were evaluated. In 1985 there was a little less than 81,000 acre-ft of groundwater pumped from all aquifers in the study area, with a little less than 77,000 acre-ft of groundwater pumped from the Trinity Group aquifer. Irrigation accounted for about 56% of all groundwater pumped. A serious problem associated with the development of groundwater from the Trinity Group aquifer is the decline of artesian pressure in areas of large groundwater withdrawals. Degradation of groundwater within the Antlers and Travis Peak Formations from oil-field brines and organic material are problems in several counties. The deterioration of water qualify for the City of Blum has occurred over a 26-year period and is associated with water level declines in the Hensell Member of the Travis Peak Formation. The Woodbine Group yields good quality water at or near the outcrop; however, the residual sodium carbonate and percent sodium limits its use for irrigation, while high iron and fluoride content restricts its use for public supply. Existing surface reservoirs in the study area alone can supply 296,400 acre-ft of water under 2010 conditions. Nearly all of this water is either currently owned or under contract to supply current and future needs. An additional 176,000 acre-ft of surface water could become available with the development of the proposed Lake Bosque and Paluxy Reservoir projects and with reallocation of storage in existing Lakes Waco and Whitney. The amount of groundwater currently pumped exceeds the estimated annual effective recharge to the Trinity Group aquifer; the groundwater supply for the area will continue to be drawn from storage within the aquifer. 84 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Evaluation of medical staff and patient satisfaction of Chinese hospitals and measures for improvement.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Huang, Chengyu; Lu, Xiangchan; Chen, Siyuan; Zhao, Pan; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    Our goal is to establish criteria for evaluating satisfaction of medical staff and patients of Chinese hospitals and propose measures for improvement. A survey was conducted among medical staff and patients of infectious disease hospitals in three locations, i.e., Shanghai, Chongqing, and Nanning. The analyses included item analysis, factor analysis, reliability analysis, Pearson correlation and one-way analysis of variance. For the patient group, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) = 0.973, Cronbach's α = 0.962 and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.583 to 0.795. For the medical staff group, KMO = 0.972, Cronbach's α = 0.970, and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.603 to 0.854. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the patient group were 0.74 to 1.34, 0.81 to 1.17, 0.78 to 1.07, 0.89 to 1.34, and 0.71 to 1.10. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the medical staff group were 0.17 to 1.03, ‒ 0.16 to 0.60, ‒ 0.18 to 0.74, 0.23 to 0.72, and ‒ 0.39 to 0.37. The clinicians were less satisfied with the hospitals than the patients. Medical staff and patients in Shanghai were relatively more satisfied. Improving the evaluation criteria and survey methods with respect to medical staff and patient satisfaction with Chinese hospitals may increase clinician and patient satisfaction and improve the health care environment in China. PMID:26166371

  19. Community Characteristics Associated With Seeking Medical Evaluation for Suspected Child Sexual Abuse in Greater Houston.

    PubMed

    Greeley, Christopher Spencer; Chuo, Ching-Yi; Kwak, Min Ji; Henin, Sally S; Donnaruma-Kwoh, Marcella; Ferrell, Jamie; Giardino, Angelo Peter

    2016-06-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) affects over 62,000 children annually in the United States. A primary obstacle to the success of a public health prevention strategy is the lack of knowledge around community level risk factors for CSA. We evaluated community level characteristics for children seeking care for suspected CSA in the Greater Houston area for 2009. There was a total incidence rate of medical evaluations for suspected CSA of 5.9/1000 children. We abstracted the medical charts of 1982 (86 %) children who sought a medical evaluation for suspected CSA at three main medical systems in the Greater Houston area for 2009. We evaluated 18 community level variables from the American Community Survey for the 396 zip codes these children lived in. The mean number of cases per Greater Houston zip code was 2.77 (range 0-27), with 62 % of zip codes not having a case at any of the three sites surveyed. Zip codes with a higher than Houston average rate of vacant houses, never married females and unemployed labor force with high family poverty rate, were associated with an increased rate of children seeking care for suspected CSA. We demonstrated zip codes level characteristics which were associated with an increased rate of children seeking care for suspected CSA. Our modelling process and our data have implications for community based strategies aimed at improved surveillance or prevention of CSA. The process of identifying locally specific community level factors suggests target areas which have particular socioeconomic characteristics which are associated with increased rate of seeking CSA evaluations. PMID:26803840

  20. Teaching Medical Students at a Distance: Using Distance Learning Benchmarks to Plan and Evaluate a Web-Enhanced Medical Student Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Cynthia A.; Chumley, Heidi; Parra, Juan M.

    2004-01-01

    A team designing a Web-enhanced third-year medical education didactic curriculum based their course planning and evaluation activities on the Institute for Higher Education Policy's (2000) 24 benchmarks for online distance learning. The authors present the team's blueprint for planning and evaluating the Web-enhanced curriculum, which incorporates…

  1. Introduction of an electronic medical record system into physician practice offices: why is it so #%!&-ing hard for everybody?-Part II.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph P; Klasko, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Medical practice offices are experiencing a revolutionary change in the microprocesses that have been the norm for documenting and communicating patient care for decades. While this revolution is welcome for dozens of good reasons, migration of data storage from the paper-based record to electronic form often causes considerable stress for all involved. This three-part series looks at electronic medical record implementations from organizational and sociological perspectives, and draws attention to the often unappreciated aspects of medical work that give rise to the stress. In addition, IT professionals' perspectives are also addressed to highlight how medical /IT professional differences affect the experience of implementation. PMID:21815548

  2. Drug dependence, a chronic medical illness: implications for treatment, insurance, and outcomes evaluation.

    PubMed

    McLellan, A T; Lewis, D C; O'Brien, C P; Kleber, H D

    2000-10-01

    The effects of drug dependence on social systems has helped shape the generally held view that drug dependence is primarily a social problem, not a health problem. In turn, medical approaches to prevention and treatment are lacking. We examined evidence that drug (including alcohol) dependence is a chronic medical illness. A literature review compared the diagnoses, heritability, etiology (genetic and environmental factors), pathophysiology, and response to treatments (adherence and relapse) of drug dependence vs type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and asthma. Genetic heritability, personal choice, and environmental factors are comparably involved in the etiology and course of all of these disorders. Drug dependence produces significant and lasting changes in brain chemistry and function. Effective medications are available for treating nicotine, alcohol, and opiate dependence but not stimulant or marijuana dependence. Medication adherence and relapse rates are similar across these illnesses. Drug dependence generally has been treated as if it were an acute illness. Review results suggest that long-term care strategies of medication management and continued monitoring produce lasting benefits. Drug dependence should be insured, treated, and evaluated like other chronic illnesses. JAMA. 2000;284:1689-1695. PMID:11015800

  3. A pilot study on the evaluation of medical student documentation: assessment of SOAP notes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was evaluation of the current status of medical students' documentation of patient medical records. Methods: We checked the completeness, appropriateness, and accuracy of 95 Subjective-Objective-Assessment-Plan (SOAP) notes documented by third-year medical students who participated in clinical skill tests on December 1, 2014. Students were required to complete the SOAP note within 15 minutes of an standard patient (SP)-encounter with a SP complaining rhinorrhea and warring about meningitis. Results: Of the 95 SOAP notes reviewed, 36.8% were not signed. Only 27.4% documented the patient’s symptoms under the Objective component, although all students completed the Subjective notes appropriately. A possible diagnosis was assessed by 94.7% students. Plans were described in 94.7% of the SOAP notes. Over half the students planned workups (56.7%) for diagnosis and treatment (52.6%). Accurate documentation of the symptoms, physical findings, diagnoses, and plans were provided in 78.9%, 9.5%, 62.1%, and 38.0% notes, respectively. Conclusion: Our results showed that third-year medical students’ SOAP notes were not complete, appropriate, or accurate. The most significant problems with completeness were the omission of students’ signatures, and inappropriate documentation of the physical examinations conducted. An education and assessment program for complete and accurate medical recording has to be developed. PMID:26996436

  4. Enhancing medical students' communication skills: development and evaluation of an undergraduate training program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a relative lack of current research on the effects of specific communication training offered at the beginning of the medical degree program. The newly developed communication training "Basics and Practice in Communication Skills" was pilot tested in 2008 and expanded in the following year at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany. The goal was to promote and improve the communicative skills of participants and show the usefulness of an early offered intervention on patient-physician communication within the medical curriculum. Methods The students participating in the project and a comparison group of students from the standard degree program were surveyed at the beginning and end of the courses. The survey consisted of a self-assessment of their skills as well as a standardised expert rating and an evaluation of the modules by means of a questionnaire. Results Students who attended the communication skills course exhibited a considerable increase of communication skills in this newly developed training. It was also observed that students in the intervention group had a greater degree of self-assessed competence following training than the medical students in the comparison group. This finding is also reflected in the results from a standardised objective measure. Conclusions The empirical results of the study showed that the training enabled students to acquire specialised competence in communication through the course of a newly developed training program. These findings will be used to establish new communication training at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf. PMID:22443807

  5. What makes a top research medical school? A call for a new model to evaluate academic physicians and medical school performance.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Matthew J; Lunn, Mitchell R; Peng, Lily

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication of the Flexner Report in 1910, the medical education enterprise has undergone many changes to ensure that medical schools meet a minimum standard for the curricula and clinical training they offer students. Although the efforts of the licensing and accrediting bodies have raised the quality of medical education, the educational processes that produce the physicians who provide the best patient care and conduct the best biomedical research have not been identified. Comparative analyses are powerful tools to understand the differences between institutions, but they are challenging to carry out. As a result, the analysis performed by U.S. News & World Report (USN&WR) has become the default tool to compare U.S. medical schools. Medical educators must explore more rigorous and equitable approaches to analyze and understand the performance of medical schools. In particular, a better understanding and more thorough evaluation of the most successful institutions in producing academic physicians with biomedical research careers are needed. In this Perspective, the authors present a new model to evaluate medical schools' production of academic physicians who advance medicine through basic, clinical, translational, and implementation science research. This model is based on relevant and accessible objective criteria that should replace the subjective criteria used in the current USN&WR rankings system. By fostering a national discussion about the most meaningful criteria that should be measured and reported, the authors hope to increase transparency of assessment standards and ultimately improve educational quality. PMID:25607941

  6. [Biomechanical study of medical hard tissue adhesive bonding butterfly fracture fragment in middle part of fresh human tibia].

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Tu, Zhongqi; Pei, Fuxing; Chen, Mengshi; Liu, Lei

    2004-06-01

    A medical hard tissue adhesive, octyl-a-cyanoacrylate, was tested in 6 fresh human tibiae. A 90 degrees butter-fly fracture fragment was made in the middle part of tibia by bandsaw. The compressive stress, torsional stress and angular deflection were assessed before and after osteoectomy respectively. After adhesive bonding, the compressive stress, torsional stress and angular deflection were tested again. The butterfly fracture fagment decreased the bending strength, torsion strength, yielding strength of tibia bone. In torsion test, the torque of tibia before osteoectomy is greater than bonded tibia, the bonded tibia is greater than that of the unbonded tibia. In compression test, before adhesive bonding broken, the compressive curve slope of tibia before osteoectomy is greater than that of bonded tibia, the bonded tibia is greater than that of the unbonded tibia. In angular deflection test before adhesive bonding of broken,the curve slope of tibia before osteoectomy is not different from that of bonded tibia (P>0.05), the slope the bonded tibia is greater than the slope of unbonded tibia(P<0.05). The elastic modulus, rigidity coefficient and moment of area inertia show no statistical difference between the bonded tibia and intact tibia. The used of medical hard tissue adhesive to bond the fracture fragment could improve the bending strength, torsion strength, yielding strength of tibia bone. In operation, it can reduce the soft tissue injury when the fracture fragment is being fixed, and this will benefit bone healing. PMID:15250133

  7. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  8. Evaluation of fatal dog bites: the view of the medical examiner and animal behaviorist.

    PubMed

    Lauridson, J R; Myers, L

    1993-05-01

    The multidisciplinary evaluation of fatal dog bites in the context of a case is discussed. This approach emphasizes detailed examination of the animals including matching of bite marks, autopsy, and canine behavioral analysis. It further provides details such as contributory medical conditions, past animal behavior and physical evidence linking the dogs to the attack. Such information is important in the legal proceedings that usually accompany these events. PMID:8515224

  9. Evaluation of internet access and utilization by medical students in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The internet is increasingly being used worldwide in imparting medical education and improving its delivery. It has become an important tool for healthcare professionals training but the data on its use by medical students in developing countries is lacking with no study on the subject from Pakistan. This study was, therefore, carried out with an aim to evaluate the pattern of internet access and utilization by medical students in Pakistan. Methods A structured pre-tested questionnaire was administered to a group of 750 medical students in clinical years studying at various public and private medical colleges in Lahore. The questions were related to patterns of internet access, purpose of use and self reported confidence in performing various internet related tasks, use of health related websites to supplement learning and the problems faced by students in using internet at the institution. Results A total of 532 medical students (70.9%) returned the questionnaire. The mean age of study participants was 21.04 years (SD 1.96 years). Majority of the respondents (84.0%) reported experience with internet use. About half of the students (42.1%) were using internet occasionally with 23.1%, 20.9% and 13.9% doing so frequently, regularly and rarely respectively. About two third of the students (61.0%) stated that they use internet for both academic and professional activities. Most of the participants preferred to use internet at home (70.5%). Self reported ability to search for required article from PubMed and PakMedinet was reported by only 34.0% of the entire sample. Students were moderately confident in performing various internet related tasks including downloading medical books from internet, searching internet for classification of diseases and downloading full text article. Health related websites were being accessed by 55.1% students to supplement their learning process. Lack of time, inadequate number of available computers and lack of support from

  10. Managing proposals and evaluations of updates to medical knowledge: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Anselma, Luca; Bottrighi, Alessio; Montani, Stefania; Terenziani, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    The process of keeping up-to-date the medical knowledge stored in relational databases is of paramount importance. Since quality and reliability of medical knowledge are essential, in many cases physicians' proposals of updates must undergo experts' evaluation before possibly becoming effective. However, until now no theoretical framework has been provided in order to cope with this phenomenon in a principled and non-ad hoc way. Indeed, such a framework is important not only in the medical domain, but in all Wikipedia-like contexts in which evaluation of update proposals is required. In this paper we propose GPVM (General Proposal Vetting Model), a general model to cope with update proposal⧹evaluation in relational databases. GPVM extends the current theory of temporal relational databases and, in particular, BCDM - Bitemporal Conceptual Data Model - "consensus" model, providing a new data model, new operations to propose and accept⧹reject updates, and new algebraic operators to query proposals. The properties of GPVM are also studied. In particular, GPVM is a consistent extension of BCDM and it is reducible to it. These properties ensure consistency with most relational temporal database frameworks, facilitating implementation on top of current frameworks and interoperability with previous approaches. PMID:23380684

  11. Toward diversity-responsive medical education: taking an intersectionality-based approach to a curriculum evaluation.

    PubMed

    Muntinga, M E; Krajenbrink, V Q E; Peerdeman, S M; Croiset, G; Verdonk, P

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen a rise in the efforts to implement diversity topics into medical education, using either a 'narrow' or a 'broad' definition of culture. These developments urge that outcomes of such efforts are systematically evaluated by mapping the curriculum for diversity-responsive content. This study was aimed at using an intersectionality-based approach to define diversity-related learning objectives and to evaluate how biomedical and sociocultural aspects of diversity were integrated into a medical curriculum in the Netherlands. We took a three-phase mixed methods approach. In phase one and two, we defined essential learning objectives based on qualitative interviews with school stakeholders and diversity literature. In phase three, we screened the written curriculum for diversity content (culture, sex/gender and class) and related the results to learning objectives defined in phase two. We identified learning objectives in three areas of education (medical knowledge and skills, patient-physician communication, and reflexivity). Most diversity content pertained to biomedical knowledge and skills. Limited attention was paid to sociocultural issues as determinants of health and healthcare use. Intersections of culture, sex/gender and class remained mostly unaddressed. The curriculum's diversity-responsiveness could be improved by an operationalization of diversity that goes beyond biomedical traits of assumed homogeneous social groups. Future efforts to take an intersectionality-based approach to curriculum evaluations should include categories of difference other than culture, sex/gender and class as separate, equally important patient identities or groups. PMID:26603884

  12. Evaluation of generic medical information accessed via mobile phones at the point of care in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Goldbach, Hayley; Chang, Aileen Y; Kyer, Andrea; Ketshogileng, Dineo; Taylor, Lynne; Chandra, Amit; Dacso, Matthew; Kung, Shiang-Ju; Rijken, Taatske; Fontelo, Paul; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Seymour, Anne K; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many mobile phone resources have been developed to increase access to health education in the developing world, yet few studies have compared these resources or quantified their performance in a resource-limited setting. This study aims to compare the performance of resident physicians in answering clinical scenarios using PubMed abstracts accessed via the PubMed for Handhelds (PubMed4Hh) website versus medical/drug reference applications (Medical Apps) accessed via software on the mobile phone. Methods A two-arm comparative study with crossover design was conducted. Subjects, who were resident physicians at the University of Botswana, completed eight scenarios, each with multi-part questions. The primary outcome was a grade for each question. The primary independent variable was the intervention arm and other independent variables included residency and question. Results Within each question type there were significant differences in ‘percentage correct’ between Medical Apps and PubMed4Hh for three of the six types of questions: drug-related, diagnosis/definitions, and treatment/management. Within each of these question types, Medical Apps had a higher percentage of fully correct responses than PubMed4Hh (63% vs 13%, 33% vs 12%, and 41% vs 13%, respectively). PubMed4Hh performed better for epidemiologic questions. Conclusions While mobile access to primary literature remains important and serves an information niche, mobile applications with condensed content may be more appropriate for point-of-care information needs. Further research is required to examine the specific information needs of clinicians in resource-limited settings and to evaluate the appropriateness of current resources in bridging location- and context-specific information gaps. PMID:23535665

  13. Evaluating the role of gigabit speed wide-area networks in remote medical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Walid G.; Rodgers, James E.; Mun, Seong K.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Hansen, Mark; Cook, Jay F.; Popescu, George; Yun, David Y.; Garcia, Hong-Mei C.

    1995-05-01

    This paper assesses the utility of gigabit speed wide-area networks such as the ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology Satellite) in enabling the delivery of medical expertise and service to remote regions, providing radiation treatment planning with access to supercomputers, and conducting workload redistribution. The first part of this multi- institutional effort between the University of Hawaii, Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) and the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) uses a T1-VSAT (very small aperture terminal) for transmitting teleradiology images. The second part of the project uses high data rate (HDR) communications through the ACTS satellite at OC-3 transmission speeds (155 Mbps). This allows 3-D volume rendering of radiation therapy planning images between GUMC and OSC as well as the transmission of high-volume teleradiology loads between Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) and GUMC. It is shown that while the bandwidth required to perform 3D interactive radiation treatment planning is around 300 Mbps, OC-3 rates can be adequate. Another important application is workload redistribution either for hospitals that need to reroute a certain percentage of their workload to other institutions of the same magnitude but with different subspecialties or for peak workload leveling. This paper shows that gigabit speed wide area networks such as the ACTS-HDR network are required in order to achieve effective remote treatment planning as well as high volume teleradiology for workload redistribution.

  14. Evaluation of a cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program at a workplace medical clinic.

    PubMed

    Andres, Kara L; Renn, Tracy A; Gray, David A; Englund, Joanne M; Olsen, Geary W; Letourneau, Barbara K

    2013-10-01

    The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program (CVRRP) was implemented in the 3M Medical Clinic in December 2009. The goal of the CVRRP was to evaluate 3M employees at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and address any related modifiable risk factors with appropriate intervention strategies through clinic visits with a 3M nurse practitioner or physician and, if needed, a registered dietitian and/or exercise professional. Data for the first 100 participants were analyzed to initially assess the effectiveness of the program. Based on this evaluation, the 3M CVRRP and active collaboration between participants and providers in the workplace successfully reduced modifiable CVD risk factors. PMID:24053219

  15. 20 CFR 416.969 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. 416.969 Section 416.969 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles...

  16. 20 CFR 416.969 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. 416.969 Section 416.969 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles...

  17. Evaluation of White Shield School, Roseglen, North Dakota. Part B: Appendix. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 30-B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    As an appendix to "Evaluation of White Shield School, Roseglen, North Dakota. Part A", August 1974, this document substantiated findings of an evaluation team. A brief on-site visitation report stated that students wanted more flexible course requirements and firmer student discipline; teachers wanted more authority clarification on discipline…

  18. Evaluating Medical Marijuana Dispensary Policies: Spatial Methods for the Study of Environmentally-Based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Freisthler, Bridget; Kepple, Nancy J.; Sims, Revel; Martin, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    In 1996, California was the first state to pass a Compassionate Use Act allowing for the legal use of marijuana for medical purposes. Here we review several current policy and land use environmental interventions designed to limit problems related to the influx of medical marijuana dispensaries across California cities. Then we discuss the special challenges, solutions, and techniques used for studying the effects of these place-based policies. Finally, we present some of the advanced spatial analytic techniques that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of environmental interventions, such as those related to reducing problems associated with the proliferation of medical marijuana dispensaries. Further, using data from a premise survey of all the dispensaries in Sacramento, this study will examine what characteristics and practices of these dispensaries are related to crime within varying distances from the dispensaries (e.g., 100, 250, 500, and 1000 feet). We find that some security measures, such as security cameras and having a door man outside, implemented by medical marijuana dispensary owners might be effective at reducing crime within the immediate vicinity of the dispensaries. PMID:22821130

  19. "It Was Definitely Very Different": An evaluation of palliative care teaching to medical students using a mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Brand, Alison H; Harrison, Amanda; Kumar, Koshila

    2015-01-01

    Given our ageing population and the increase in chronic disease, palliative care will become an increasingly important part of doctors' workloads, with implications for palliative care education. This study used a mixed methods strategy to evaluate second-year medical students' learning outcomes and experiences within a palliative care education program. Analysis of pre- and post-test scores showed a significant improvement in students' attitudinal scores, but no change in knowledge as measured by multiple-choice questions. Analysis of qualitative data revealed that students' learning experience was marked by a lack of clear learning objectives and experiential learning opportunities. Students also reported divergent reactions to death and dying and noted that palliative care was different from other areas of clinical medicine. This study revealed that palliative care teaching results in improved attitudes toward palliative care, reflecting the holistic and patient-focused nature of the palliative care curriculum. PMID:26399087

  20. Informatics in radiology: evaluation of an e-learning platform for teaching medical students competency in ordering radiologic examinations.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nina L; Spooner, Muirne; Galvin, P Leo; Ti, Joanna P; McElvaney, N Gerald; Lee, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary audit of orders for computed tomography was performed to evaluate the typical performance of interns ordering radiologic examinations. According to the audit, the interns showed only minimal improvement after 8 months of work experience. The online radiology ordering module (ROM) program included baseline assessment of student performance (part I), online learning with the ROM (part II), and follow-up assessment of performance with simulated ordering with the ROM (part III). A curriculum blueprint determined the content of the ROM program, with an emphasis on practical issues, including provision of logistic information, clinical details, and safety-related information. Appropriate standards were developed by a committee of experts, and detailed scoring systems were devised for assessment. The ROM program was successful in addressing practical issues in a simulated setting. In the part I assessment, the mean score for noting contraindications for contrast media was 24%; this score increased to 59% in the part III assessment (P = .004). Similarly, notification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus status and pregnancy status and provision of referring physician contact information improved significantly. The quality of the clinical notes was stable, with good initial scores. Part III testing showed overall improvement, with the mean score increasing from 61% to 76% (P < .0001). In general, medical students lack the core knowledge that is needed for good-quality ordering of radiology services, and the experience typically afforded to interns does not address this lack of knowledge. The ROM program was a successful intervention that resulted in statistically significant improvements in the quality of radiologic examination orders, particularly with regard to logistic and radiation safety issues. PMID:21775674

  1. Addressing medical coding and billing part II: a strategy for achieving compliance. A risk management approach for reducing coding and billing errors.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Diane L.; Norman, Helen; Burroughs, Valentine J.

    2002-01-01

    Medical practice today, more than ever before, places greater demands on physicians to see more patients, provide more complex medical services and adhere to stricter regulatory rules, leaving little time for coding and billing. Yet, the need to adequately document medical records, appropriately apply billing codes and accurately charge insurers for medical services is essential to the medical practice's financial condition. Many physicians rely on office staff and billing companies to process their medical bills without ever reviewing the bills before they are submitted for payment. Some physicians may not be receiving the payment they deserve when they do not sufficiently oversee the medical practice's coding and billing patterns. This article emphasizes the importance of monitoring and auditing medical record documentation and coding application as a strategy for achieving compliance and reducing billing errors. When medical bills are submitted with missing and incorrect information, they may result in unpaid claims and loss of revenue to physicians. Addressing Medical Audits, Part I--A Strategy for Achieving Compliance--CMS, JCAHO, NCQA, published January 2002 in the Journal of the National Medical Association, stressed the importance of preparing the medical practice for audits. The article highlighted steps the medical practice can take to prepare for audits and presented examples of guidelines used by regulatory agencies to conduct both medical and financial audits. The Medicare Integrity Program was cited as an example of guidelines used by regulators to identify coding errors during an audit and deny payment to providers when improper billing occurs. For each denied claim, payments owed to the medical practice are are also denied. Health care is, no doubt, a costly endeavor for health care providers, consumers and insurers. The potential risk to physicians for improper billing may include loss of revenue, fraud investigations, financial sanction

  2. Evaluation and diagnosis of the hair loss patient: part I. History and clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Mubki, Thamer; Rudnicka, Lidia; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shapiro, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    Hair loss (alopecia) is a common problem and is often a major source of distress for patients. The differential diagnosis of alopecia includes both scarring and nonscarring alopecias. In addition, many hair shaft disorders can produce hair shaft fragility, resulting in different patterns of alopecia. Therefore, an organized and systematic approach is needed to accurately address patients' complaints to achieve the correct diagnosis. Part 1 of this 2-part continuing medical education article on alopecia describes history taking and the clinical examination of different hair loss disorders. It also provides an algorithmic diagnostic approach based on the most recent knowledge about different types of alopecia. PMID:25128118

  3. Evaluation of a personal and professional development module in an undergraduate medical curriculum in India.

    PubMed

    Komattil, Ramnarayan; Hande, Shyamala Handattu; Mohammed, Ciraj Ali; Subramaniam, Barathi

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the personal and professional development (PPD) module in the undergraduate medical curriculum in Melaka Manipal Medical College, India. PPD hours were incorporated in the curriculum. A team of faculty members and a faculty coordinator identified relevant topics and students were introduced to topics such as medical humanities, leadership skills, communication skills, ethics, professional behavior, and patient narratives. The module was evaluated using a prevalidated course feedback questionnaire which was administered to three consecutive batches of students from March 2011 to March 2013. To analyze faculty perspectives, one to one in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted by the coordinators with faculty members who conducted the PPD classes. Analysis of the course feedback form revealed that majority (80%) of students agreed that the module was well prepared and was "highly relevant" to the profession. Faculty found the topics new and interdisciplinary and there was a sense of sharing responsibility and workload by the faculty. PPD modules are necessary components of the curriculum and help to mould students while they are still acquiescent as they assume their roles as doctors of the future. PMID:26838576

  4. Evaluation of HVS models in the application of medical image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cavaro-Menard, C.; Le Callet, P.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, four of the most widely used Human Visual System (HVS) models are applied on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images for signal detection task. Their performances are evaluated against gold standard derived from radiologists' majority decision. The task-based image quality assessment requires taking into account the human perception specificities, for which various HVS models have been proposed. However to our knowledge, no work was conducted to evaluate and compare the suitability of these models with respect to the assessment of medical image qualities. This pioneering study investigates the performances of different HVS models on medical images in terms of approximation to radiologist performance. We propose to score the performance of each HVS model using the AUC (Area Under the receiver operating characteristic Curve) and its variance estimate as the figure of merit. The radiologists' majority decision is used as gold standard so that the estimated AUC measures the distance between the HVS model and the radiologist perception. To calculate the variance estimate of AUC, we adopted the one-shot method that is independent of the HVS model's output range. The results of this study will help to provide arguments to the application of some HVS model on our future medical image quality assessment metric.

  5. Evaluation of a personal and professional development module in an undergraduate medical curriculum in India

    PubMed Central

    Komattil, Ramnarayan; Hande, Shyamala Handattu; Mohammed, Ciraj Ali; Subramaniam, Barathi

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the personal and professional development (PPD) module in the undergraduate medical curriculum in Melaka Manipal Medical College, India. PPD hours were incorporated in the curriculum. A team of faculty members and a faculty coordinator identified relevant topics and students were introduced to topics such as medical humanities, leadership skills, communication skills, ethics, professional behavior, and patient narratives. The module was evaluated using a prevalidated course feedback questionnaire which was administered to three consecutive batches of students from March 2011 to March 2013. To analyze faculty perspectives, one to one in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted by the coordinators with faculty members who conducted the PPD classes. Analysis of the course feedback form revealed that majority (80%) of students agreed that the module was well prepared and was "highly relevant" to the profession. Faculty found the topics new and interdisciplinary and there was a sense of sharing responsibility and workload by the faculty. PPD modules are necessary components of the curriculum and help to mould students while they are still acquiescent as they assume their roles as doctors of the future. PMID:26838576

  6. Dietary Supplements and Health Aids - A Critical Evaluation Part 2 - Macronutrients and Fiber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubick, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 of this evaluation of dietary supplements and health aids (SE 533 788) focused on various therapeutic claims made for vitamins and minerals. This part examines health-promoting claims made for selected macronutrients and fiber. Macronutrients examined include selected proteins, amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates, and lipids. (JN)

  7. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 505 - Management Control Evaluation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Management Control Evaluation Checklist G Appendix G to Part 505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Pt. 505, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 505 - Management Control Evaluation Checklist

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Management Control Evaluation Checklist G Appendix G to Part 505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Pt. 505, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  9. Changing medical students' perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?

    PubMed

    Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Baumann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey). We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254) for 2013 and 52% (179) for 2014. Students' overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive) post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (P<0.001). There was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981) and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956). We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years. PMID:26924629

  10. Methods for Evaluating Practice Change Toward a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Palmer, Raymond F.; Ferrer, Robert L.; Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; Stewart, Elizabeth E.; Wood, Robert; Davila, Marivel; Stange, Kurt C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Understanding the transformation of primary care practices to patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) requires making sense of the change process, multilevel outcomes, and context. We describe the methods used to evaluate the country’s first national demonstration project of the PCMH concept, with an emphasis on the quantitative measures and lessons for multimethod evaluation approaches. METHODS The National Demonstration Project (NDP) was a group-randomized clinical trial of facilitated and self-directed implementation strategies for the PCMH. An independent evaluation team developed an integrated package of quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate the process and outcomes of the NDP for practices and patients. Data were collected by an ethnographic analyst and a research nurse who visited each practice, and from multiple data sources including a medical record audit, patient and staff surveys, direct observation, interviews, and text review. Analyses aimed to provide real-time feedback to the NDP implementation team and lessons that would be transferable to the larger practice, policy, education, and research communities. RESULTS Real-time analyses and feedback appeared to be helpful to the facilitators. Medical record audits provided data on process-of-care outcomes. Patient surveys contributed important information about patient-rated primary care attributes and patient-centered outcomes. Clinician and staff surveys provided important practice experience and organizational data. Ethnographic observations supplied insights about the process of practice development. Most practices were not able to provide detailed financial information. CONCLUSIONS A multimethod approach is challenging, but feasible and vital to understanding the process and outcome of a practice development process. Additional longitudinal follow-up of NDP practices and their patients is needed. PMID:20530398

  11. Assessing Medicare Part D Claim Completeness Using Medication Self-reports: The Role of Veteran Status and Generic Drug Discount Programs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Stearns, Sally C.; Thudium, Emily M.; Alburikan, Khalid A.; Rodgers, Jo Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medicare Part D claims are commonly used for research, but missing claims could compromise their validity. This study assessed two possible causes of missing claims: veteran status and Generic Drug Discount Programs (GDDP). Methods We merged medication self-reports from telephone interviews in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) with Part D claims for six medications (three were commonly in GDDP in 2009). Merged records (4,468) were available for 2,905 ARIC participants enrolled in Part D. Multinomial logit regression provided estimates of the association of concordance (self-report & Part D, self-report only, or Part D only) with veteran and GDDP status, controlling for participant socio-demographics. Results Sample participants were 74±5 years of age, 68% white and 63% female; 19% were male veterans. Compared to females, male veterans were 11% (95% CI: 7%–16%) less likely to have matched medications in self-report & Part D and 11% (95% CI: 7%–16%) more likely to have self-report only. Records for GDDP versus non-GDDP medications were 4% (95% CI: 1%–7%) more likely to be in self-report & Part D and 3% (95% CI: 1%–5%) less likely to be in Part D only, with no difference in self-report only. Conclusions Part D claims were more likely to be missing for veterans, but claims for medications commonly available through GDDP were more likely to match with self-reports. While researchers should be aware of the possibility of missing claims, GDDP status was associated with a higher rather than lower likelihood of claims being complete in 2009. PMID:25793271

  12. [The influence of various personality traits in the choice of medical specialization: evaluation using EPI].

    PubMed

    Torre, E; Borla, E; Stroppiana, E

    1991-01-01

    Personality data obtained from 78 medical students at the University of Turin were analysed using the Eysenck Personality Inventory, a 69-question psychometric test which evaluates levels of extroversion, neuroticism and psychoticism. Results were analysed by standard deviation and controlled with Student's test. With regard to extroversion, a contrast was found between aspiring surgeons and gynecologists who tended to be extroverts, and aspiring psychiatrists who tended to be introverts. A similar contrast was also found between two groups in terms of psychotism: aspiring surgeons tended to be less psychotic and aspiring pediatricians tended to be more psychotic. In conclusion, it is possible to hypothesise that the personality traits influence, in synergy with other factors, the choice of medical specialisation. PMID:2056893

  13. An innovative calibration based integral photography rendering algorithm for medical application and its evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guowen; Zhang, Xinran; Fan, Zhencheng; Liao, Hongen

    2015-08-01

    Autostereoscopic has long been proposed to fulfill medical display in image-guided surgery and clinical education to provide more intuitive position information of clinical interest zone thus improving surgery safety and accuracy. As one category of flexible autostereoscopic 3D display, computer generated integral photography (CGIP) has been studied in medical application by many researches for its convenience and cost-efficiency. However, IP still suffers from inaccurate light field reconstruction, which limits its practicality in surgery. In this paper, we propose and apply a flexible fish-eye model based micro lens array (MLA) distortion calibration method and pre-distorted retracing rendering algorithm to render elemental image array (EIA) of CGIP. Furthermore, we also evaluate light field of the proposed algorithm in depth cue, and signal noise ratio of IP images by phantom experiment. PMID:26737227

  14. An evaluation of drug promotional literatures published in scientific medical journals

    PubMed Central

    Vachhani, Pooja M.; Solanki, Manish N.; Desai, Mira K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation and comparison of ethical standards of published drug promotional literatures (DPLs) between different Indian and non-Indian scientific medical journals regarding compliance to the World Health Organization (WHO) and International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMAs) guidelines. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, observational study was carried out at pharmacology department. DPLs published in Indian and non-Indian scientific medical journals available at central library of medical college during the period of 6 months were collected according to selection criteria. DPLs were evaluated and compared for compliance to ethical standards of drug promotion laid by the WHO and IFPMA. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results: Out of total 178 DPLs, 103 DPLs were from Indian journals and 75 DPLs were from non-Indian journals. When compared regarding compliance to all the 11 ethical criteria of WHO, no significant difference was found between DPLs published in Indian and non-Indian journals. However, DPLs from indian journals contained significantly less information regarding dosage regimen (P = 0.0096), adverse drug reactions (P = 0.0028), warnings (P = 0.0104) and major drug interactions (P < 0.0001) as compared to non-Indian journals. Compliance to all the five IFPMA criteria was significantly higher in DPLs of non-Indian journals (88%) than Indian journals (39%) (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Noncompliance to ethical standards of WHO and IFPMA guidelines is more common in DPLs of Indian journals as compared to non-Indian journals. Thus strict implementation of regulatory measures regarding DPLs published in Indian medical journals is recommended. PMID:27413355

  15. Portfolio as a tool to evaluate clinical competences of traumatology in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Santonja-Medina, Fernando; García-Sanz, M Paz; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco; Bó, David; García-Estañ, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates whether a reflexive portfolio is instrumental in determining the level of acquisition of clinical competences in traumatology, a subject in the 5th year of the degree of medicine. A total of 131 students used the portfolio during their clinical rotation of traumatology. The students’ portfolios were blind evaluated by four professors who annotated the existence (yes/no) of 23 learning outcomes. The reliability of the portfolio was moderate, according to the kappa index (0.48), but the evaluation scores between evaluators were very similar. Considering the mean percentage, 59.8% of the students obtained all the competences established and only 13 of the 23 learning outcomes (56.5%) were fulfilled by >50% of the students. Our study suggests that the portfolio may be an important tool to quantitatively analyze the acquisition of traumatology competences of medical students, thus allowing the implementation of methods to improve its teaching. PMID:26929675

  16. Influences of faculty evaluating system on educational performance of medical school faculty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The promotion of educators is challenged by the lack of accepted standards to evaluate the quality and impact of educational activities. Traditionally, promotion is related to research productivity. This study developed an evaluation tool for educational performance of medical school faculty using educator portfolios (EPs). Methods: Design principles and quantitative items for EPs were developed in a consensus workshop. These principles were tested in a simulation and revised based on feedback. The changes of total educational activities following introduction of the system were analyzed. Results: A total of 71% faculty members answered the simulation of the system and the score distributed widely (mean±standard deviation, 65.43±68.64). The introduction of new system significantly increased the total educational activities, especially in assistant professors. Conclusion: The authors offer comprehensive and practical tool for enhancing educational participation of faculty members. Further research for development of qualitative evaluation systems is needed. PMID:27363501

  17. An eclectic model for evaluating web-based continuing medical education courseware systems.

    PubMed

    Curran, V R

    2000-09-01

    World Wide Web and compact disc-read only memory technologies have introduced new prospects for delivering continuing medical education (CME) to rural and remote physicians. However, evidence concerning the effectiveness of these technologies in providing CME, and approaches to their evaluation, is limited. The rationale for this study was to design a model for evaluating the effectiveness of computer-mediated CME courseware. An eclectic, evaluation-planning matrix was designed by selecting various concepts from the literature and was used in planning and developing the evaluation model. The model was field-tested by evaluating a computer-mediated courseware program on dermatological office procedures, and a meta-evaluation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the evaluation methods and procedures. The findings suggest that the model was useful in collecting data to inform decision making and to improve the instructional product. The field test results revealed that computer-mediated instruction was effective in delivering CME at a distance. PMID:11067194

  18. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  19. Test de Evaluacion de Conocimientos Medicos-CIIPME (Test of Evaluation of Medical Knowledge-CIIPME). Publication No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfici, C.; And Others

    The purpose of this research is to build a test for the evaluation of the knowledge needed by medical students before entering clinical courses in medical school. The criterion for this was provided by teachers in both the pre-clinical and clinical subjects. The Pilot instrument consisted of 335 items that covered 8 sections. Each one of these…

  20. Computer-Assisted, Programmed Text, and Lecture Modes of Instruction in Three Medical Training Courses: Comparative Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deignan, Gerard M.; And Others

    This report contains a comparative analysis of the differential effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI), programmed instructional text (PIT), and lecture methods of instruction in three medical courses--Medical Laboratory, Radiology, and Dental. The summative evaluation includes (1) multiple regression analyses conducted to predict…

  1. Gender perspective in medicine: a vital part of medical scientific rationality. A useful model for comprehending structures and hierarchies within medical science

    PubMed Central

    Risberg, Gunilla; Hamberg, Katarina; Johansson, Eva E

    2006-01-01

    Background During the past few decades, research has reported gender bias in various areas of clinical and academic medicine. To prevent such bias, a gender perspective in medicine has been requested, but difficulties and resistance have been reported from implementation attempts. Our study aimed at analysing this resistance in relation to what is considered good medical research. Method We used a theoretical model, based on scientific competition, to understand the structures of scientific medicine and how they might influence the resistance to a gender perspective in medicine. The model was originally introduced to discuss how pluralism improves rationality in the social sciences. Results The model provided a way to conceptualise different fields of research in medicine: basic research, applied research, medical philosophy, and 'empowering' research. It clarified how various research approaches within medicine relate to each other, and how they differ and compete. It also indicated why there might be conflicts between them: basic and applied research performed within the biomedical framework have higher status than gender research and other research approaches that are performed within divergent research paradigms. Conclusion This hierarchy within medical research contributes to the resistance to a gender perspective, causing gender bias and making medical scientific rationality suboptimal. We recommend that the theoretical model can be applied in a wider medical context when different and hierarchically arranged research traditions are in conflict. In this way, the model might contribute to shape a medical community where scientific pluralism is acknowledged to enlarge, not to disturb, the scientific rationality of medicine. PMID:16928283

  2. Critical Elements in the Medical Evaluation of Suspected Child Physical Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Lenora M.; Keenan, Heather T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research has described variability in medical evaluation of suspected abuse. The objective of this study was to identify, through expert consensus, required and highly recommended elements of a child abuse pediatrics (CAP) evaluation for 3 common presentations of suspected physical abuse in children aged 0 to 60 months. METHODS: Twenty-eight CAPs recruited from 2 national organizations formed the expert panel for this modified Delphi Process. An initial survey was developed for each presentation based on demographics, history of present illness, past medical, family and social history, laboratory, radiology, and consultation elements present in at least 10% of CAP consultations collected for a larger study. CAPs ranked each element on a 9-point scale then reviewed and discussed summary results through a project blog over 3 rounds. Required and highly recommended elements were defined as elements ranked as 9 and 8, respectively, by ≥75% of experts after the final round. RESULTS: From 96 elements in the initial surveys, experts identified 30 Required elements and 37 Highly Recommended elements for CAP evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage, 21 Required and 33 Highly Recommended elements for CAP evaluation of long bone fracture, and 18 Required and 16 Highly Recommended elements for CAP evaluation of isolated skull fracture. CONCLUSIONS: This guideline reflects expert consensus and provides a starting point for development of child abuse assessment protocols for quality improvement or research. Additional research is required to determine whether this guideline can reduce variability and/or improve reliability in the evaluation and diagnosis of child physical abuse. PMID:26101359

  3. New Tools for Systematic Evaluation of Teaching Qualities of Medical Faculty: Results of an Ongoing Multi-Center Survey

    PubMed Central

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Bos, Albert P.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i) the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii) the instruments' potential for differentiating between faculty, and (iii) the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to reliably use the instruments. Methods and Materials Multicenter cross-sectional survey among 546 residents and 629 medical faculty representing 29 medical (non-surgical) specialty training programs in the Netherlands. Two instruments—one completed by residents and one by faculty—for measuring teaching qualities of faculty were developed. Statistical analyses included factor analysis, reliability and validity exploration using standard psychometric methods, calculation of the numbers of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to achieve reliable assessments and variance components and threshold analyses. Results A total of 403 (73.8%) residents completed 3575 evaluations of 570 medical faculty while 494 (78.5%) faculty self-evaluated. In both instruments five composite-scales of faculty teaching qualities were detected with high internal consistency and reliability: learning climate (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85 for residents' instrument, 0.71 for self-evaluation instrument, professional attitude and behavior (0.84/0.75), communication of goals (0.90/0.84), evaluation of residents (0.91/0.81), and feedback (0.91/0.85). Faculty tended to evaluate themselves higher than did the residents. Up to a third of the total variance in various teaching qualities can be attributed to between-faculty differences. Some seven residents' evaluations per faculty are needed for assessments to attain a reliability level of 0.90. Conclusions The instruments for evaluating teaching qualities of medical faculty appear to yield reliable and valid data

  4. Evaluating digital libraries in the health sector. Part 2: measuring impacts and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Rowena

    2004-03-01

    This is the second part of a two-part paper which explores methods that can be used to evaluate digital libraries in the health sector. Part 1 focuses on approaches to evaluation that have been proposed for mainstream digital information services. This paper investigates evaluative models developed for some innovative digital library projects, and some major national and international electronic health information projects. The value of ethnographic methods to provide qualitative data to explore outcomes, adding to quantitative approaches based on inputs and outputs is discussed. The paper concludes that new 'post-positivist' models of evaluation are needed to cover all the dimensions of the digital library in the health sector, and some ways of doing this are outlined. PMID:15023204

  5. Insurance status and admission to hospital for head injuries: are we part of a two-tiered medical system?

    PubMed

    Svenson, J E; Spurlock, C W

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between insurance status and use of resources for inpatient care. We sought to assess whether insurance status influences decisions regarding the evaluation and treatment of head injured patients in the emergency department (ED). Head injured patients were identified from ED data from 4 hospitals reporting to the Kentucky Emergency Medical Services Information System. Multiple regression analysis using admission, ED length of stay, and ED charges as outcome variables was then performed. From 216,137 ED visits there were 8,591 (4%) head injured patients identified from the database. Eliminating those with revisits, transfers to another hospital in the database, and isolated facial lacerations, there were 3,821 cases. Controlling for age, hospital, race, primary diagnosis, and indicators of severity of the injury, insurance status was significantly associated with hospital admission. Those uninsured were the least likely to be admitted (OR 0.41; 95% CI (0.31, 0.50), whereas those with public insurance had an intermediate probability (OR 0.50 95% CI (0.37, 0.68) as compared with those with private insurance. Similarly, ED charges were lower for Medicaid patients than insured patients ($880) and tended to be slightly lower for uninsured patients ($1,043) than insured patients ($1,141) (P =.001). Length of stay in the ED was shorter for publicly insured patients (179 minutes) than uninsured (186 minutes) and privately insured patients (192 minutes) (P =.001). The extent of evaluation and admission for head injured patients is associated with insurance status. This creates a dual standard of care for patients. Practitioners should work to standardize the evaluation of patients independent of paying status. PMID:11146011

  6. Preliminary Study at the Medical University of Southern Africa on Student Self-Assessment as a Means of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henbest, Ronald J.; Fehrsen, G. Sam

    1985-01-01

    A study of faculty and student attitudes toward medical student self-evaluation and comparison of faculty and student evaluations of student performance revealed that the opportunity for self-evaluation was both useful and appreciated. Faculty and student ratings correlated closely. (MSE)

  7. Defining the Attributes Expected of Graduating Veterinary Medical Students, Part 2: External Evaluation and Outcomes Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Donal A.; Osburn, Bennie I.; Schumacher, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether graduates of the University of California's veterinary program were meeting 62 attributes previously determined to represent desired educational outcomes. Found positive results, along with a need to improve outcomes in private practice management, work expectations, and surgical capabilities. (EV)

  8. Evaluation of a commercial electronic medical record (EMR) by primary care physicians 5 years after implementation.

    PubMed

    Kaelber, David; Greco, Peter; Cebul, Randall D

    2005-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are gaining increasing prominence in the delivery of healthcare, although the focus is primarily on deploying EMRs. Relatively little research has studied the post-implementation of commercial EMRs. Here we present the results of a web-based survey of all the primary care clinicians in our university affiliated, tertiary care health system. The survey evaluated primary care clinician demographics, usage, and ideas for enhancement of the EpicCare EMR, five year after its initial deployment throughout our healthcare system. PMID:16779289

  9. Evaluation of a Commercial Electronic Medical Record (EMR) by Primary Care Physicians 5 Years after Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Kaelber, David; Greco, Peter; Cebul, Randall D

    2005-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are gaining increasing prominence in the delivery of healthcare, although the focus is primarily on deploying EMRs. Relatively little research has studied the post-implementation of commercial EMRs. Here we present the results of a web-based survey of all the primary care clinicians in our university affiliated, tertiary care health system. The survey evaluated primary care clinician demographics, usage, and ideas for enhancement of the EpicCare EMR, five year after its initial deployment throughout our healthcare system. PMID:16779289

  10. The Analysis of Health Research System Evaluation in Medical Sciences Universities

    PubMed Central

    Djalalinia, Sh; Peykari, N; Owlia, P; Eftekhari, M Baradaran; Habibi, E; Falahat, K; Mojarrab, Sh; Malekafzali, H; Ghanei, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Based on Iran by 2025 defined vision, we must to receive the first grade of science position in south western Asian region. Thus we need to have a comprehensive evaluation program. Methods: A comprehensive WHO Health Research System Analysis (HRSA)- based evaluation system was developed to evaluate the HRS in Iran. This article has explored the results of the five-year evaluation (2003–2008) and aims to introduce this method to other developing countries. Here we explore the results of research performance evaluation from 2002 to 2010 and by comparing the results with previous available information, we reveal the probable role of this method in research promotion and proposed approach to facilitate and expedite achieving the prospects for goals of health research based on the visions of Iran by 2025. Results: All of the indicators of stewardship and capacity building axes are received to their predefined levels. Moreover all of the medical science university research policies are based on their strategic plannings which are extracted from national visions of Iran by 2025. Most of the predefined goals in knowledge production domain had a significant grow trend but for more growth for commitments they should be closely follow. Conclusion: We developed an HRS-based comprehensive evaluation program to our national vision as well as our regional and international research competition. PMID:23865018

  11. Development and evaluation of an instrument to assess medical students' cultural attitudes.

    PubMed

    Robins, L S; Alexander, G L; Wolf, F M; Fantone, J C; Davis, W K

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of an instrument designed to assess medical students' comfort with a range of sociocultural issues and intercultural experiences. Each survey item obliged students to reflect on their own sociocultural identities and academic status in relation to others', and to judge how comfortable they would be interacting across perceived boundaries based on sociocultural identity and academic status. More than 90% of University of Michigan first-year medical students (n=153) completed the survey just before classes began. Principal components analysis of the survey's 26 items identified 7 interpretable factors or subscales; the Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the 7 subscales and the total scale ranged from .73 to .92. T-tests were used to investigate differences in average ratings among student subgroups (based on gender and ethnicity). To assess the magnitude of the effect of the differences between groups, effect size was computed for each of the means comparisons. Psychometric analyses indicated that this survey was both reliable and valid for assessing students' cultural attitudes. Further, analyses by gender and ethnic subgroup identified meaningful ratings differences in men's and women's reported comfort levels. Our findings suggest that this instrument is useful for assessing students' openness to developing cultural awareness and competence. Educators at other medical schools may find this instrument useful as a needs assessment tool for planning educational programs designed to increase students' cultural competence. PMID:17598290

  12. Decision-analytic modeling to evaluate benefits and harms of medical tests: uses and limitations.

    PubMed

    Trikalinos, Thomas A; Siebert, Uwe; Lau, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The clinical utility of medical tests is measured by whether the information they provide affects patient-relevant outcomes. To a large extent, effects of medical tests are indirect in nature. In principle, a test result affects patient outcomes mainly by influencing treatment choices. This indirectness in the link between testing and its downstream effects poses practical challenges to comparing alternate test-and-treat strategies in clinical trials. Keeping in mind the broader audience of researchers who perform comparative effectiveness reviews and technology assessments, the authors summarize the rationale for and pitfalls of decision modeling in the comparative evaluation of medical tests by virtue of specific examples. Modeling facilitates the interpretation of test performance measures by connecting the link between testing and patient outcomes, accounting for uncertainties and explicating assumptions, and allowing the systematic study of tradeoffs and uncertainty. The authors discuss challenges encountered when modeling test-and-treat strategies, including but not limited to scarcity of data on important parameters, transferring estimates of test performance across studies, choosing modeling outcomes, and obtaining summary estimates for test performance data. PMID:19734441

  13. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields in a Hospital for Safe Use of Electronic Medical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Ren; Fujisaki, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Ryoji; Hirose, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Establishment of electromagnetic compatibility is important in use of electronic medical equipment in hospitals. To evaluate the electromagnetic environment, the electric field intensity induced by electromagnetic radiation in broadcasting spectra coming from outside the hospital was measured in a new hospital building before any patients visited the hospital and 6 months after the opening of the hospital. Various incoming radio waves were detected on the upper floors, with no significant difference in measured levels before and after opening of the hospital. There were no cellphone terminal signals before the hospital opened, but these signals were strongly detected at 6 months thereafter. Cellphone base stations signals were strongly detected on the upper floors, but there were no signals at most locations in the basement and in the center of the building on the lower floors. A maximum electrical intensity of 0.28 V/m from cellphone base stations (2.1 GHz) was detected at the south end of the 2nd floor before the hospital opened. This value is lower than the EMC marginal value for general electronic medical equipment specified in IEC 60601-1-2 (3 V/m). Therefore, electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment is unlikely in this situation. However, cellphone terminal signals were frequently detected in non-base station signal areas. This is a concern, and understanding signal strength from cellphone base stations at a hospital is important for promotion of greater safety. PMID:26643076

  14. Recommendations for a Mixed Methods Approach to Evaluating the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Parker, Donna R.; Brown, Joanna; Walker, Judith; Eaton, Charles B.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE There is a strong push in the United States to evaluate whether the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model produces desired results. The explanatory and contextually based questions of how and why PCMH succeeds in different practice settings are often neglected. We report the development of a comprehensive, mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation set for researchers, policy makers, and clinician groups. METHODS To develop an evaluation set, the Brown Primary Care Transformation Initiative convened a multidisciplinary group of PCMH experts, reviewed the PCMH literature and evaluation strategies, developed key domains for evaluation, and selected or created methods and measures for inclusion. RESULTS The measures and methods in the evaluation set (survey instruments, PCMH meta-measures, patient outcomes, quality measures, qualitative interviews, participant observation, and process evaluation) are meant to be used together. PCMH evaluation must be sufficiently comprehensive to assess and explain both the context of transformation in different primary care practices and the experiences of diverse stakeholders. In addition to commonly assessed patient outcomes, quality, and cost, it is critical to include PCMH components integral to practice culture transformation: patient and family centeredness, authentic patient activation, mutual trust among practice employees and patients, and transparency, joy, and collaboration in delivering and receiving care in a changing environment. CONCLUSIONS This evaluation set offers a comprehensive methodology to enable understanding of how PCMH transformation occurs in different practice settings. This approach can foster insights about how transformation affects critical outcomes to achieve meaningful, patient-centered, high-quality, and cost-effective sustainable change among diverse primary care practices. PMID:25755039

  15. Improving the transition from medical school to internship – evaluation of a preparation for internship course

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the impact of a new 'Preparation for Internship’ (PRINT) course, which was developed to facilitate the transition of University of New South Wales (UNSW) medical graduates from Medical School to Internship. Methods During a period of major curricular reform, the 2007 (old program) and 2009 (new program) cohorts of UNSW final year students completed the Clinical Capability Questionnaire (CCQ) prior to and after undertaking the PRINT course. Clinical supervisors’ ratings and self-ratings of UNSW 2009 medical graduates were obtained from the Hospital-based Prevocational Progress Review Form. Results Prior to PRINT, students from both cohorts perceived they had good clinical skills, with lower ratings for capability in procedural skills, operational management, and administrative tasks. After completing PRINT, students from both cohorts perceived significant improvement in their capability in procedural skills, operational management, and administrative tasks. Although PRINT also improved student-perceived capability in confidence, interpersonal skills and collaboration in both cohorts, curriculum reform to a new outcomes-based program was far more influential in improving self-perceptions in these facets of preparedness for hospital practice than PRINT. Conclusions The PRINT course was most effective in improving students’ perceptions of their capability in procedural skills, operational management and administrative tasks, indicating that student-to-intern transition courses should be clinically orientated, address relevant skills, use experiential learning, and focus on practical tasks. Other aspects that are important in preparation of medical students for hospital practice cannot be addressed in a PRINT course, but major improvements are achievable by program-wide curriculum reform. PMID:24485072

  16. [Evaluation of the medical value of a drug. A necessity for the Transparency Commission].

    PubMed

    Avouac, B

    1992-01-01

    The marketing approval (AMM) is based on criteria of pharmaceutical quality, efficacy and safety of use. Before marketing, the data are collected by means of double-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trials that compare the study product to a reference product. A post-AMM assessment is needed to define the increase of the medical benefit (ASMR) and the therapeutic value of the new drugs. The quantification of the ASMR is essential for registration on the list of drugs reimbursable for those who benefit from Social Security. The evaluation of the therapeutic value and the nature of the affection treated are the criteria upon which the reimbursement ratio is chosen. After marketing, the reevaluation of the medical benefit and the drugs' usefulness may be compared to the treatment's net medical cost (direct + indirect cost--avoided cost) in cost/utility or cost/benefit studies. The Transparency Commission has worked out a scale of assessment of the ASMR which will orient recommendation, or non-recommendation, of registration on the list of reimbursable drugs as well as price fixing proposals. In the future, the Transparency Commission is to strengthen its position regarding the good use of the drug through a better prescriber information system. Thanks to the pharmaco-epidemiology and the pharmaco-vigilance data, the Transparency Commission will be able to guarantee the post-marketing follow-up of the drugs. The examination of the products' conditions of use, the reevaluation of the treatment's advantages based on the utility studies and the epidemiological surveys, and the cost-benefit studies will contribute to a medical control of health spending linked to drug consumption. PMID:1523604

  17. Evaluation of media for differentiating nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria of medical significance.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, G L

    1969-09-01

    An evaluation was made of media and tests used for differentiating nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria encountered in medical bacteriology in order to determine those diagnostic procedures most useful in identifying these bacteria. The organisms examined included Alcaligenes faecalis, A. odorans var. viridans, Moraxella duplex (Mima polymorpha var. oxidans), Acinetobacter anitratum (Herellea vaginicola), A. lwoffi (Mima polymorpha), Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida, P. maltophilia, P. pseudomallei, P. stutzeri, P. alcaligenes, and atypical strains of P. aeruginosa. The media and tests evaluated included Sellers' medium; Hugh and Leifson's OF medium; acid production from 10% lactose infusion agar; gluconate oxidation; starch, aesculin, and Tween 80 hydrolysis; lysine decarboxylase, arginine dihydrolase, deoxyribonuclease, and tyrosinase activity; tolerance to triphenyl tetrazolium chloride, cetrimide, cadmium sulfate, 2.5% and 6.5% sodium chloride, and pH 5.6; utilization of glucose, acetamide, and malonate. PMID:4907000

  18. Increasing medical team cohesion and leadership behaviors using a 360-degree evaluation process.

    PubMed

    Tumerman, Marc; Carlson, Leanne M Hedberg

    2012-02-01

    Current national health care issues of affordability, quality, and accessibility have prompted the development of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) and Patient-Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs). Components of ACOs and PCMHs call for increased capacities in areas of teamwork, engagement, and physician leadership skills and behaviors. Three hundred sixty degree feedback evaluation processes have been established in corporate environments as effective for increasing capacities in these areas. Recently, health care organizations have begun to adopt the use of such tools with positive outcomes. This article presents a case study of the development and implementation of a 360-degree evaluation process at a family medicine clinic. We also discuss the challenges, successes, and lessons learned along the way. PMID:22533214

  19. Applying the clinical adoption framework to evaluate the impact of an ambulatory electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis; Partridge, Colin; Randhawa, Gurprit; Bowen, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Clinical Adoption (CA) Framework to evaluate the impact of a recently deployed electronic medical record (EMR) in a Canadian healthcare organization. The CA Framework dimensions evaluated were EMR quality, use and net benefits at the micro level; and people, organization and implementation at the meso level. The study involved clinical and support staff from two ambulatory care clinics, and managers and technical staff from the organization. A number of issues were identified at both levels of the CA Framework that had affected EMR adoption in the two clinics. Some perceived benefits in care coordination and efficiency were reported despite challenges that arose from early deployment decisions. There were five lessons that could be applied to other ambulatory care settings. The CA Framework has proved useful in making sense of ways that EMR can add value to the organization. PMID:23388247

  20. Preparticipation medical evaluation in professional sport in the UK: theory or practice?

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, C W; Ojelade, E O; Taylor, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the level of pre‐employment, pre‐season, and post‐injury medical evaluation of players undertaken within UK professional team sports. Design A postal, whole population survey. Setting Elite professional sports teams in England. Population Six groups comprising the following clubs: professional football (Premiership, 15 of 20; Championship, 22 of 24), rugby union (Premiership, 9 of 12; Division 1, 11 of 14), rugby league (Super League, 6 of 11) and cricket (County, 12 of 18). Main outcome measures Number (percentage) of clubs recording players' medical history and undertaking medical examinations of players' cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems at pre‐employment, pre‐season and post‐injury. Results The overall response to the survey was 74%, with a range from 55% to 92% among groups. Almost 90% of football (Premiership and Championship) and rugby union (Premiership) clubs took a pre‐employment history of players' general health, cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems, but fewer than 50% of cricket and rugby union (Division 1) clubs recorded a history. The majority of football (Premiership and Championship) and rugby union (Premiership) clubs implemented both cardiovascular and musculoskeletal examinations of players before employment. Fewer than 25% of clubs in any of the groups implemented neurological examinations of players at pre‐employment, although 100% of rugby union (Premiership) and rugby league clubs implemented neurological testing during pre‐season. Conclusions None of the sports implemented best practice guidelines for the preparticipation evaluation of players at all stages of their employment. Departures from best practice guidelines and differences in practices between clubs within the same sport leave club physicians vulnerable if their players sustain injuries or ill health conditions that could have been identified and avoided through the

  1. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  2. Evaluating Medical Students' Skills in Obtaining Informed Consent for HIV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Geppert, Cynthia; McCarty, Teresita; Obenshain, S Scott

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate fourth-year medical students' abilities to obtain informed consent or refusal for HIV testing through a performance-based evaluation method. DESIGN Student competence was assessed in a standardized patient interaction in which the student obtained informed consent or refusal for HIV testing. A previously validated 16-item checklist was completed by the standardized patient. A subset was independently reviewed and scored by a faculty member to calculate interrater reliability for this report. Student feedback on the assessment was elicited. SETTING School of Medicine at the University of New Mexico. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS All senior medical students in the class of 2000 were included. INTERVENTIONS A 10-minute standardized patient interaction was administered within the context of a formal comprehensive performance assessment. MEASUREMENTS and MAIN RESULTS Seventy-nine students participated, and most (96%) demonstrated competence on the station. For the 15 specific items, the mean score was 25.5 out of 30 possible points (range, 13 to 30; SD, 3.5) on the checklist. A strong positive correlation (rs = .79) was found between the total score on the 15 Likert-scaled items and the score in response to the global item, “I would return to this clinician” (mean, 3.5; SD, 1.0). Scores given by the standardized patients and the faculty rater were well correlated. The station was generally well received by students, many of whom were stimulated to pursue further learning. CONCLUSIONS This method of assessing medical students' abilities to obtain informed consent or refusal for HIV testing can be translated to a variety of clinical settings. Such efforts may help in demonstrating competence in performing key ethics skills and may help ensure ethically sound clinical care for people at risk for HIV infection. PMID:12542585

  3. The Vast Majority Of Medicare Part D Beneficiaries Still Don't Choose The Cheapest Plans That Meet Their Medication Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Zhang, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    The Medicare Part D program allows beneficiaries to choose among Part D plans administered by different health plans in order to encourage market competition and give beneficiaries more flexibility. Currently around 40–50 Part D plans are available per region. When faced with so many options, do beneficiaries generally choose the least expensive plan? Using 2009 Part D data, we found that only 5.2% of beneficiaries chose the cheapest plan. Nationwide, beneficiaries on average spent $368 more annually than they would have spent under the cheapest plan available in their region, given their medication needs. Beneficiaries often overprotected themselves by paying higher premiums for plan features they did not need, such as generic drug coverage in the coverage gap. Our findings suggest that beneficiaries need more targeted assistance from the government to choose plans, for example, a customized letter indicating three top plans based on beneficiaries’ medication needs. PMID:23048107

  4. Vocational Evaluation and Work Adjustment Bulletin; Vol. 8, Special Edition: Vocational Evaluation Project Final Report Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Evaluation and Work Adjustment Association, Washington, DC.

    The first of three parts of the Vocational Evaluation Project final report contains an editorial, two task force reports, and brief summaries of the seven task force reports which comprise the final report. The editorial summarizes the project's purpose, its activities for the three years of its existence, and its results, and describes the task…

  5. Evaluation of dense collagen matrices as medicated wound dressing for the treatment of cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Helary, Christophe; Abed, Aicha; Mosser, Gervaise; Louedec, Liliane; Letourneur, Didier; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud-Guille, Marie Madeleine; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous chronic wounds are characterized by an impaired wound healing which may lead to infection and amputation. When current treatments are not effective enough, the application of wound dressings is required. To date, no ideal biomaterial is available. In this study, highly dense collagen matrices have been evaluated as novel medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds. For this purpose, the structure, mechanical properties, swelling ability and in vivo stability of matrices concentrated from 5 to 40 mg mL(-1) were tested. The matrix stiffness increased with the collagen concentration and was associated with the fibril density and thickness. Increased collagen concentration also enhanced the material resistance against accelerated digestion by collagenase. After subcutaneous implantation in rats, dense collagen matrices exhibited high stability without any degradation after 15 days. The absence of macrophages and neutrophils evidenced their biocompatibility. Subsequently, dense matrices at 40 mg mL(-1) were evaluated as drug delivery system for ampicillin release. More concentrated matrices exhibited the best swelling abilities and could absorb 20 times their dry weight in water, allowing for an efficient antibiotic loading from their dried form. They released efficient doses of antibiotics that inhibited the bacterial growth of Staphylococcus Aureus over 3 days. In parallel, they show no cytotoxicity towards human fibroblasts. These results show that dense collagen matrices are promising materials to develop medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:26218128

  6. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries. PMID:23949935

  7. National rankings as a means of evaluating medical school library programs: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Matheson, N W; Grefsheim, S F

    1981-07-01

    A comparative study was undertaken to assess the reasons for the low rankings received by George Washington University Medical Center library in the Annual Statistics for Medical School Libraries in the United States and Canada. Although internal studies showed the library was successfully satisfying user needs and meeting its primary objectives, the rankings, which include the traditional measures of quality used by accrediting bodies, indicated the contrary. Three hypotheses were postulated to account for the discrepancy. In a matched group of similar libraries: (1) the rankings of an individual library would differ from the national rankings; (2) clustering the variables would change the rankings; and (3) libraries with similar staff size would tend to rank in the same quartile in service and resource variables. All hypotheses were invalidated. Further tests led to the conclusion that the Annual Statistics and other traditional measures of quality are inappropriate and inaccurate methods for evaluating library programs, since they only measure resource allocations and not the effectiveness of those allocations. Alternative evaluation methods are suggested. PMID:7248592

  8. Development and evaluation of an ODL course on Medical Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Pallikarakis, N

    2005-09-01

    Recent developments in the field of Biomedical Engineering have led to considerable improvement in health care delivery, but also impose continuous change and improvement in education and training schemes of its professionals, in order to assure appropriate front-line knowledge, competencies and skills. Open and distance learning provides a very effective means for continuous education and training purposes. Image processing may be used as an attractive case for exploring the Collaborative Learning Model (CLM) paradigm in Open Distance Learning (ODL). An on-line course on Medical Image Processing, following the principles of collaborative learning, has been developed and evaluated. Each concept of the course is available in three levels of complexity. The first level shows only a very general description, actually the main idea. If the user is interested to continue, a second level is accessible, where the concept is explained in a more detailed manner. Moreover, for some concepts requiring complicated mathematical proofs, a third level is available. The course has been used at the European Course on Biomedical Engineering organized by the Department of Medical Physics, University of Patras, Greece, and was positively evaluated by the students. PMID:16087386

  9. Diagnostic agreement when comparing still and video imaging for the medical evaluation of child sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Killough, Emily; Spector, Lisa; Moffatt, Mary; Wiebe, Jan; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Anderst, Jim

    2016-02-01

    Still photo imaging is often used in medical evaluations of child sexual abuse (CSA) but video imaging may be superior. We aimed to compare still images to videos with respect to diagnostic agreement regarding hymenal deep notches and transections in post-pubertal females. Additionally, we evaluated the role of experience and expertise on agreement. We hypothesized that videos would result in improved diagnostic agreement of multiple evaluators as compared to still photos. This was a prospective quasi-experimental study using imaging modality as the quasi-independent variable. The dependent variable was diagnostic agreement of participants regarding presence/absence of findings indicating penetrative trauma on non-acute post-pubertal genital exams. Participants were medical personnel who regularly perform CSA exams. Diagnostic agreement was evaluated utilizing a retrospective selection of videos and still photos obtained directly from the videos. Videos and still photos were embedded into an on-line survey as sixteen cases. One-hundred sixteen participants completed the study. Participant diagnosis was more likely to agree with study center diagnosis when using video (p<0.01). Use of video resulted in statistically significant changes in diagnosis in four of eight cases. In two cases, the diagnosis of the majority of participants changed from no hymenal transection to transection present. No difference in agreement was found based on experience or expertise. Use of video vs. still images resulted in increased agreement with original examiner and changes in diagnostic impressions in review of CSA exams. Further study is warranted, as video imaging may have significant impacts on diagnosis. PMID:26746111

  10. Concept of using a benchmark part to evaluate rapid prototype processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cariapa, Vikram

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual benchmark part for guiding manufacturers and users of rapid prototyping technologies is proposed. This is based on a need to have some tool to evaluate the development of this technology and to assist the user in judiciously selecting a process. The benchmark part is designed to have unique product details and features. The extent to which a rapid prototyping process can reproduce these features becomes a measure of the capability of the process. Since rapid prototyping is a dynamic technology, this benchmark part should be used to continuously monitor process capability of existing and developing technologies. Development of this benchmark part is, therefore, based on an understanding of the properties required from prototypes and characteristics of various rapid prototyping processes and measuring equipment that is used for evaluation.

  11. Dynamic evaluation of CMAQ part II: Evaluation of relative response factor metrics for ozone attainment demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Kristen M.; Dolwick, Patrick; Hogrefe, Christian; Simon, Heather; Timin, Brian; Possiel, Norm

    2015-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides guidelines on the use of air quality models for projecting whether an emission reduction strategy will lead to future pollutant levels that are at or below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The EPA's guidance document for ozone attainment demonstrations recommends an attainment test for the 8-h ozone NAAQS based on using the ratio of output from "future" and "base" model simulations through the calculation of location-specific Relative Response Factors (RRF). The 2007 guidance document as well as other related studies have recommended the use of retrospective evaluation studies in order to evaluate the ability of an air quality model to represent a change in air quality (dynamic evaluation) rather than relying solely on operational evaluation of model predictions under base line conditions. Here simulations from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system were conducted for 2002 and 2005, a time period characterized by significant emissions reductions associated with the EPA's Nitrogen Oxides State Implementation Plan Call (NOx SIP Call) as well as mobile sources. These simulations were used to evaluate the performance of different forms of the RRF metric for projecting 2002 to 2005 against 2005 observed ozone levels. The evaluation study showed that the current form of the RRF calculation is generally well designed for predicting the future 8-hr ozone "design value" metric used for determining attainment. Specifically, the methodology of using air quality model simulations in a relative sense provided better estimates of future ozone design values than using the modeled future year simulation alone. Alternative forms of the RRF metric were found to be very similar to the current methodology in terms of evaluation metrics. However, alternative RRF metrics were sensitive to the number of days used in the calculation of the RRF. Approaches which used more days in the RRF calculation

  12. One Family's Journey: Medical Home and the Network of Supports It Offers Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Part Two--Care Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondrad, Monica; Zehr, Bonnie; Hanna, Christine; Rote, Vicki; Jain, Sweety

    2007-01-01

    The Medical Home series follows fictional parents Amita and Samir and their premature daughter, Anjali. In Part Two, Amita and Samir bring Anjali home from the hospital, contact the care coordinator who will be responsible for Anjali's care, and go to their first appointment with the pediatrician. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which the…

  13. Evaluation of a novel nutrition education intervention for medical students from across England

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sumantra; Udumyan, Ruzan; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Thompson, Ben; Lodge, Keri-Michele; Douglas, Pauline; Sharma, Poonam; Broughton, Rachel; Smart, Sandra; Wilson, Rick; Gillam, Stephen; Fisher, Ilana; Gandy, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Problems such as hospital malnutrition (∼40% prevalence in the UK) may be managed better by improving the nutrition education of ‘tomorrow's doctors’. The Need for Nutrition Education Programme aimed to measure the effectiveness and acceptability of an educational intervention on nutrition for medical students in the clinical phase of their training. Design An educational needs analysis was followed by a consultative process to gain consensus on a suitable educational intervention. This was followed by two identical 2-day educational interventions with before and after analyses of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP). The 2-day training incorporated six key learning outcomes. Setting Two constituent colleges of Cambridge University used to deliver the above educational interventions. Participants An intervention group of 100 clinical medical students from 15 medical schools across England were recruited to attend one of two identical intensive weekend workshops. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure consisted of change in KAP scores following intervention using a clinical nutrition questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included change in KAP scores 3 months after the intervention as well as a student-led semiqualitative evaluation of the educational intervention. Results Statistically significant changes in KAP scores were seen immediately after the intervention, and this was sustained for 3 months. Mean differences and 95% CIs after intervention were Knowledge 0.86 (0.43 to 1.28); Attitude 1.68 (1.47 to 1.89); Practice 1.76 (1.11 to 2.40); KAP 4.28 (3.49 to 5.06). Ninety-seven per cent of the participants rated the overall intervention and its delivery as ‘very good to excellent’, reporting that they would recommend this educational intervention to colleagues. Conclusion Need for Nutrition Education Programme has highlighted the need for curricular innovation in the area of clinical health nutrition in

  14. Medical management of chronic liver diseases in children (part I): focus on curable or potentially curable diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H F; Kamal, Naglaa M

    2011-12-01

    The management of children with chronic liver disease (CLD) mandates a multidisciplinary approach. CLDs can be classified into 'potentially' curable, treatable non-curable, and end-stage diseases. Goals pertaining to the management of CLDs can be divided into prevention or minimization of progressive liver damage in curable CLD by treating the primary cause; prevention or control of complications in treatable CLD; and prediction of the outcome in end-stage CLD in order to deliver definitive therapy by surgical procedures, including liver transplantation. Curative, specific therapies aimed at the primary causes of CLDs are, if possible, best considered by a pediatric hepatologist. Medical management of CLDs in children will be reviewed in two parts, with part I (this article) specifically focusing on 'potentially' curable CLDs. Dietary modification is the cornerstone of management for galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, and certain glycogen storage diseases, as well as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. It is also essential in tyrosinemia, in addition to nitisinone [2-(nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione] therapy, as well as in Wilson disease along with copper-chelating agents such as D-penicillamine, triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Zinc and antioxidants are adjuvant drugs in Wilson disease. New advances in chronic viral hepatitis have been made with the advent of oral antivirals. In children, currently available drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection are standard interferon (IFN)-α-2, pegylated IFN-α-2 (PG-IFN), and lamivudine. In adults, adefovir and entecavir have also been licensed, whereas telbivudine, emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, clevudine, and thymosin α-1 are currently undergoing clinical testing. For chronic hepatitis C virus infection, the most accepted treatment is PG-IFN plus ribavirin. Corticosteroids, with or without azathioprine, remain the basic

  15. Costs and Their Assessment to Users of a Medical Library, Part I: An Overview of Services, Users, and Budgeting of a Medical Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bres, E.; And Others

    This study investigated ways in which the costs of a library's direct and indirect services can be equitably allocated to its heterogeneous group of institution users. It was conducted from October 1, 1974 to March 31, 1977. The final report is divided into four parts, each describing a separate issue. Part I discusses the general administrative…

  16. Field evaluations of residual pesticide applications and misting system on militarily relevant materials against medically important mosquitoes in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A key strategy to reduce insect-borne disease is to reduce contact between disease vectors and hosts. In the current study, residual pesticide application and misting system were applied on militarily relevant materials and evaluated against medically important mosquitoes. Field evaluations were car...

  17. Development and evaluation of a pliable biological valved conduit. Part II: Functional and hemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H W; Witzel, T H; Hata, C; Tu, R; Shen, S H; Lin, D; Noishiki, Y; Tomizawa, Y; Quijano, R C

    1993-04-01

    Many congenital cardiac malformations may require a valved conduit for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In spite of many endeavors made in the last 25 years, the clinical results of right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with currently available valved conduits are still not satisfactory. Specific problems encountered clinically include suboptimal hemodynamic performance, conduit kinking or compression, and fibrous peeling from the luminal surface. To address these deficiencies, we undertook the development of a biological valved conduit: a bovine external jugular vein graft with a retained native valve cross-linked with a diglycidyl ether (DE). This study, using a canine model, was to evaluate the functional and hemodynamic performance of this newly developed valved conduit. Three 14 mm conduits, implanted as bypass grafts, right ventricle to pulmonary artery, were evaluated. The evaluation was conducted with a noninvasive color Doppler flow mapping system at pre-implantation, immediately post implantation, one- and three-months post implantation, and prior to retrieval (five-months post implantation). The two-dimensional tomographic inspection of the leaflet motion at various periods post implantation showed that the valvular leaflets in the DE treated conduit was quite pliable. No cardiac failure or valvular dysfunction was observed in any of the studied cases. The color Doppler flow mapping study demonstrated that the valve in the DE treated conduit was competent, with no conduit kinking or compression observed in any of the three cases. The spectral Doppler velocity study evidenced that the transvalvular pressure gradients of the DE treated conduit were minimal as compared to those of the currently available conduits. In conclusion, from the functional and hemodynamic performance points of view, this newly developed valved conduit is superior to those currently available. PMID:8325697

  18. Analysis of induced radionuclides in replacement parts and liquid wastes in a medical cyclotron solely used for production of 18F for [18F]FDG.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Ishigure, N; Ogata, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2013-04-01

    Radioactivities produced in replacement parts and liquid wastes in a medical cyclotron used to produce (18)F for [(18)F]FDG with 10MeV protons were analyzed. Nineteen radionuclides were found in the replacement parts and liquid wastes. Among them, long-lived (56)Co in the Havar foils is critical in terms of radioactive waste management. The estimated dose level of exposure for the operating staff during the replacement of parts was around 310μSv/y, which is smaller than the recommended dose limit for workers. PMID:23419430

  19. Considerations in the Evaluation of Potential Efficacy of Medications for Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: An Editorial.

    PubMed

    Egli, M; White, D A; Acri, J B

    2016-01-01

    The societal burden created by alcohol and drug use disorders is estimated to be on the order of hundreds of billions of dollars, creating a need for effective medications to reduce use and prevent relapse. While there are FDA-approved medications to facilitate abstinence and prevent relapse for some indications including, alcohol, tobacco, and opiate use disorders, there are no approved treatments for other abused substances, including cocaine, methamphetamine, and cannabis, leaving these critical medical needs unmet. The development of such medications has fallen largely to the government with efforts spearheaded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse. Both agencies have medication development programs with preclinical components that include the standardized evaluation of compounds using animal models. This chapter describes the rationale and considerations involved in the use of such models, including reinstatement of drug self-administration. PMID:27055609

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 385 - Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... months. Recordable accident, as defined in 49 CFR 390.5, means an accident involving a commercial motor... evaluate the carrier's compliance with the vehicle regulations. Recordable accident information is also... management controls and usually higher than average accident rates. (f) Parts of the FMCSRs and the...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 385 - Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria A Appendix A to Part 385 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Pt. 385,...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 385 - Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... months. Recordable accident, as defined in 49 CFR 390.5, means an accident involving a commercial motor... evaluate the carrier's compliance with the vehicle regulations. Recordable accident information is also... management controls and usually higher than average accident rates. (f) Parts of the FMCSRs and the...

  3. An Approach to Obtaining Student Evaluation of University Teaching; Part II - A Full Operating Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Jerry; And Others

    This document includes a detailed presentation of the full administration and operation of PATS (The Physics and Astronomy Teaching Survey) currently used by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Maryland. This report complements Part I, which gave a general presentation of the problems involved in obtaining such evaluation,…

  4. AN INTEGRATED RESEARCH AGENDA TO EVALUATE TAP WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS AND HUMAN HEALTH: PART 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Integrated Research Agenda to Evaluate Tap Water Disinfection Byproducts and Human Health: Part I

    Michele Lynberg1, David Ashley 2, Pauline Mendola3, J. R. Nuckols4, Kenneth Cantor5, Benjamin Blount 2, Philip Singer6, Charles Wilkes7, Lorraine Backer1, and Peter Langlo...

  5. Adolescents in Child Training (Project ACT); Summative Evaluation Report; [Parts 1 and 2].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Joan R.; Puryear, Gwendolyn R.

    The evaluation report examines three ACT demonstration projects (Adolescents in Child Training) in San Antonio, Chicago, and Little Rock designed to involve adolescents in child training through the classroom and actual field experience. Part 1 of the report describes the three projects with respect to their contextual, conceptual, and programatic…

  6. Evaluating interactive computer-based scenarios designed for learning medical technology.

    PubMed

    Persson, Johanna; Dalholm, Elisabeth Hornyánszky; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    The use of medical equipment is growing in healthcare, resulting in an increased need for resources to educate users in how to manage the various devices. Learning the practical operation of a device is one thing, but learning how to work with the device in the actual clinical context is more challenging. This paper presents a computer-based simulation prototype for learning medical technology in the context of critical care. Properties from simulation and computer games have been adopted to create a visualization-based, interactive and contextually bound tool for learning. A participatory design process, including three researchers and three practitioners from a clinic for infectious diseases, was adopted to adjust the form and content of the prototype to the needs of the clinical practice and to create a situated learning experience. An evaluation with 18 practitioners showed that practitioners were positive to this type of tool for learning and that it served as a good platform for eliciting and sharing knowledge. Our conclusion is that this type of tools can be a complement to traditional learning resources to situate the learning in a context without requiring advanced technology or being resource-demanding. PMID:24898339

  7. The Partnership of Medical Genetics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery When Evaluating Craniofacial Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela E

    2015-12-01

    A medical geneticist who has an interest in craniofacial anomalies forms a natural partnership with an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, which facilitates patient care. Using complementary diagnostic and therapeutic skills, the search for a recognizable pattern can lead to a syndrome diagnosis. After the initial examination, there is usually genetic testing to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Once established, care coordination and genetic counseling can be provided for the parents and the patient. Enrolling the patient into a research study could be helpful to understand the diagnosis but, in some circumstances, might not have immediate clinical relevance. A multidisciplinary craniofacial team is generally necessary for long-term management. This article discusses illustrative patients evaluated from 2007 through 2011 with the senior oral and maxillofacial surgeon at the Massachusetts General Hospital (Leonard B. Kaban, DMD, MD). These include single patients with the Nablus mask-like facies syndrome and auriculo-condylar syndrome and a series of 20 patients with Gorlin syndrome followed by a multispecialty team. A successful collaboration between a medical geneticist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon optimizes the treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies. PMID:26608141

  8. Characterization of a pressure measuring system for the evaluation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Bonnaire, Rébecca; Verhaeghe, Marion; Molimard, Jérôme; Calmels, Paul; Convert, Reynald

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possible use of four "FSA" thin and flexible resistive pressure mapping systems, designed by Vista Medical (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), for the measurement of interface pressure exerted by lumbar belts onto the trunk. These sensors were originally designed for the measurement of low pressure applied by medical devices on the skin. Two types of tests were performed: standard metrology tests such as linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, reproducibility and drift, and specific tests for this application such as curvature, surface condition and mapping system superposition. The linear regression coefficient is between 0.86 and 0.98; hysteresis is between 6.29% and 9.41%. Measurements are repeatable. The location, time and operator, measurement surface condition and mapping system superposition have a statistically significant influence on the results. A stable measure is verified over the period defined in the calibration procedure, but unacceptable drift is observed afterward. The measurement stays suitable on a curved surface for an applied pressure above 50 mmHg. To conclude, the sensor has acceptable linearity, hysteresis and repeatability. Calibration must be adapted to avoid drift. Moreover, when comparing different measurements with this sensor, the location, the time, the operator and the measurement surface condition should not change; the mapping system must not be superimposed. PMID:25515227

  9. Evaluation of PHBHHx and PHBV/PLA fibers used as medical sutures.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Hu, Zhiwei; Ren, Mengda; Ding, Changkun; Chen, Peng; Gu, Qun; Wu, Qiong

    2014-02-01

    Two types of fibers were prepared by using bio-based materials: a mono-filament made from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) and a multi-filament made from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and polylactic acid (PLA) blend. The two fibers were evaluated for mechanical properties, biocompatibility and degradability for the potential application as medical sutures. The PHBHHx fiber showed remarkable biocompatibility by H.E. Stainning, with very little impact to the surrounding tissues. The degradation of the fiber was observed by SEM after implantation for 36 weeks, and the major degradation product was detected after 96 weeks. Consistently, the PHBHHx fiber maintained more than half of the mechanical properties after 96 weeks. The other fiber was prepared by twisting PHBV/PLA blend strands to a bunch, and showed high biocompatibility and relatively high degradability. The bunched structure loosed after 36 weeks of implantation. These low-cost and easily prepared fibers have great potential in medical applications, since they could avoid the formation of fibrous capsule, reduce the size of scar, and degrade into non-toxic and even beneficial products. PMID:24178983

  10. Iliad and Medical HouseCall: evaluating the impact of common sense knowledge on the diagnostic accuracy of a medical expert system.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhaddou, O.; Lambert, J. G.; Morgan, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Diagnostic expert systems are gaining acceptance among physicians. Recently, a comparative study of the performance of four major commercial diagnostic programs demonstrated that the information they produce contains a certain amount of irrelevancy that the trained physician ignores. Medical HouseCall is a consumer health information expert system based on a medical expert system for physicians, Iliad. To enhance the usefulness of Medical HouseCall to health care consumers, we are interested in significantly reducing the amount of irrelevancy contained in the diagnostic differential list. Testing with over 470 'textbook' cases revealed that a large part of the irrelevancy can be eliminated by adding universal and medical 'common sense' knowledge. Using four performance measures, we compared, on a subset of cases, the differential lists from two versions of the program: the refined knowledge base (1995) and an older version (1994) 'pre-common sense'. The results suggest that the performance of a diagnostic expert system can be significantly improved with the addition of common sense knowledge. PMID:8563388

  11. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Prototype of a Learning Electronic Medical Record System

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew J.; Cooper, Gregory F.; Hochheiser, Harry; Clermont, Gilles; Visweswaran, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are capturing increasing amounts of data per patient. For clinicians to efficiently and accurately understand a patient’s clinical state, better ways are needed to determine when and how to display EMR data. We built a prototype system that records how physicians view EMR data, which we used to train models that predict which EMR data will be relevant in a given patient. We call this approach a Learning EMR (LEMR). A physician used the prototype to review 59 intensive care unit (ICU) patient cases. We used the data-access patterns from these cases to train logistic regression models that, when evaluated, had AUROC values as high as 0.92 and that averaged 0.73, supporting that the approach is promising. A preliminary usability study identified advantages of the system and a few concerns about implementation. Overall, 3 of 4 ICU physicians were enthusiastic about features of the prototype. PMID:26958296

  12. Using natural experiments to evaluate population health interventions: new Medical Research Council guidance.

    PubMed

    Craig, Peter; Cooper, Cyrus; Gunnell, David; Haw, Sally; Lawson, Kenny; Macintyre, Sally; Ogilvie, David; Petticrew, Mark; Reeves, Barney; Sutton, Matt; Thompson, Simon

    2012-12-01

    Natural experimental studies are often recommended as a way of understanding the health impact of policies and other large scale interventions. Although they have certain advantages over planned experiments, and may be the only option when it is impossible to manipulate exposure to the intervention, natural experimental studies are more susceptible to bias. This paper introduces new guidance from the Medical Research Council to help researchers and users, funders and publishers of research evidence make the best use of natural experimental approaches to evaluating population health interventions. The guidance emphasises that natural experiments can provide convincing evidence of impact even when effects are small or take time to appear. However, a good understanding is needed of the process determining exposure to the intervention, and careful choice and combination of methods, testing of assumptions and transparent reporting is vital. More could be learnt from natural experiments in future as experience of promising but lesser used methods accumulates. PMID:22577181

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Information Technology Tools to Support the Asthma Medical Home.

    PubMed

    Matiz, L Adriana; Robbins-Milne, Laura; Krause, M Christine; Peretz, Patricia J; Rausch, John C

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of information technology tools on the outcomes of children with asthma in the medical home. A registry was established for children aged 4 to 18 years with an ICD-9 code for asthma. Changes to the electronic health record included modifications to notes, care plans, and orders. A retrospective analysis of emergency department and in-patient utilization for a cohort of patients was conducted from July 2009 through June 2013. Of the study population (n = 1217), 65% had a classification of asthma severity and 63% were risk-stratified. Seventy percent had a control assessment at least once. Care plan use increased from 5% to 22% and enrollment in care coordination increased from 0.1% to 4%. After 3 years, there was a reduction of emergency department and inpatient admissions for asthma (P < .05 and P < .005, respectively). The implementation of information technology tools was associated with improved asthma outcomes. PMID:26195588

  14. Development and validation of a tool to evaluate the quality of medical education websites in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alyusuf, Raja H.; Prasad, Kameshwar; Abdel Satir, Ali M.; Abalkhail, Ali A.; Arora, Roopa K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The exponential use of the internet as a learning resource coupled with varied quality of many websites, lead to a need to identify suitable websites for teaching purposes. Aim: The aim of this study is to develop and to validate a tool, which evaluates the quality of undergraduate medical educational websites; and apply it to the field of pathology. Methods: A tool was devised through several steps of item generation, reduction, weightage, pilot testing, post-pilot modification of the tool and validating the tool. Tool validation included measurement of inter-observer reliability; and generation of criterion related, construct related and content related validity. The validated tool was subsequently tested by applying it to a population of pathology websites. Results and Discussion: Reliability testing showed a high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92), high inter-observer reliability (Pearson's correlation r = 0.88), intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.85 and κ =0.75. It showed high criterion related, construct related and content related validity. The tool showed moderately high concordance with the gold standard (κ =0.61); 92.2% sensitivity, 67.8% specificity, 75.6% positive predictive value and 88.9% negative predictive value. The validated tool was applied to 278 websites; 29.9% were rated as recommended, 41.0% as recommended with caution and 29.1% as not recommended. Conclusion: A systematic tool was devised to evaluate the quality of websites for medical educational purposes. The tool was shown to yield reliable and valid inferences through its application to pathology websites. PMID:24392243

  15. An evaluation of University of Cape Town medical students’ community placements in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenthal, Virginia; Irlam, James; London, Leslie; Keikelame, Johannah

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Fourth-year medical students at the University of Cape Town (UCT) work closely with stakeholders in community teaching sites to conduct community-based research projects and follow-up health promotion interventions during their Public Health training. Objectives This study evaluated the placements as a learning experience from the perspectives of past students and community stakeholders. Methods A total of 32 projects were randomly selected out of 232 projects undertaken during 2006, 2008 and 2009. Two students and a stakeholder involved with each project were sampled. A standardised survey was emailed to students and in-depth interviews were held with stakeholders. Results Fifty two per cent of 64 students and 57% of 25 stakeholders responded. Most students felt that the placements enhanced their academic experience and confidence in research skills, and were an effective form of learning. Perceived challenges included time constraints and, for a minority, inadequately prepared settings and stakeholders. Stakeholders felt that the placements empowered the communities and prepared students for the realities of working as a medical professional. They viewed students as a valuable resource and believed that student projects addressed important community myths and health problems. Recommendations from students and stakeholders included more time for the Public Health block, follow-up interventions for greater continuity, and better alignment of projects with stakeholder programmes. Conclusion The evaluation reveals both the importance and challenges of community placements and identifies areas of improvement. Despite the limited duration of the placements, they offered valuable community-based learning experiences for the students and worthwhile benefits for the communities.

  16. Preparing for palliative medicine; evaluation of an education programme for fourth year medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Mason, S R; Ellershaw, J E

    2008-09-01

    Prompted by directives from the GMC, 'care of the dying' is identified as 'core curricula' for undergraduate medical education. However, there are many technical and interpersonal challenges faced in learning the practice of palliative medicine. Accordingly, the design and delivery of education programmes need to be both carefully considered and evaluated. Using Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory as a driver, appropriate methodology for evaluating a novel education programme in palliative medicine was drafted. A pre- and post-survey of an education programme and palliative care placement for fourth year medical undergraduate students from Liverpool University (n = 216) was completed using a composite questionnaire containing; i) Self-efficacy in Palliative Care Scale (SEPC) and ii) Thanatophobia Scale. Both scales have shown reliability and validity within the sample population. Additionally, a randomly selected Focus Group was conducted to provide qualitative information on the students' experience. A total of 139 pre- and post-questionnaires (64%) were completed. Analysis identified significant improvements in perceived efficacy (SEPC Communication t = -16.41, P < 0.001; SEPC Patient Management t = -22.31, P < 0.001; SEPC Multidisciplinary Teamwork t = -15.56, P < 0.001). Significant improvements in thanatophobia were also recorded (z = -7.51, P < 0.001) although some interesting anomalies were noted. This study demonstrates that considered and appropriately structured clinical education has been shown to significantly improve students' belief in their ability to practice palliative medicine and to improve their attitude towards care. In accordance with the study's theoretical driver, it is reasonable to propose that the engaged active learning will have a positive effect on the future care of dying patients. PMID:18715966

  17. Evaluation of long-term maintenance of a large medical knowledge base.

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, D A; Giuse, N B; Miller, R A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effects of long-term maintenance activities on existing portions of a large internal medicine knowledge base. DESIGN: Five physicians who were not among the original developers of the knowledge base independently updated a total of 15 QMR disease profiles; each updated submission was modified by a review of group serving as the "gold standard, " and the pre- and post-study versions of each updated disease profile were compared. MEASUREMENTS: Numbers and types of changes, defined as any difference between the original version and the final version of a disease profile; reason for each change; and bibliographic references cited by the physicians as supporting evidence. RESULTS: A total of 16% of all entries were modified by the updating process; up to 95% of the entries in a disease profile were affected. The two most common modifications were changes to the frequency of an entry, and creation of a new entry. Laboratory findings were affected much more often than were history, symptom, or physical exam findings. The dominant reason for changes was appearance of new evidence in the medical literature. The literature cited ranged from 1944 to the present. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides an evaluation of the rate of change within the QMR medical knowledge base due to long-term maintenance. The results show that this is a demanding activity that may profoundly affect certain portions of a knowledge base, and that different types of knowledge (e.g., simple laboratory vs expensive or invasive laboratory findings) are affected by the process in different ways. PMID:7496879

  18. Formulation development and evaluation of medicated chewing gum of anti-emetic drug

    PubMed Central

    Paradkar, Mansi; Gajra, Balaram; Patel, Bhautik

    2015-01-01

    Context: Medicated chewing gum (MCG) of Domperidone Maleate (DM) was developed by direct compression method with the goal to achieve quick onset of action and to improve patient compliance. Objective: Formulation development of MCG of DM and optimization of the formulation by screening of different excipients. Material and methods: MCG containing DM was prepared by screening different concentrations of sweeteners, flavouring agents, softening agents, lubricants and anti-adherents by changing one variable at a time. Performance evaluation was carried out by evaluating size, shape, thickness, taste, scanning electron microscopy, texture analysis, in vivo drug release study, ex vivo buccal permeation study and by studying statistical analysis for quality. Results and discussion: The statistical analysis showed significant improvement in organoleptic properties such as chewable mass, product taste, product consistency, product softness, total flavour lasting time and pharmaceutical properties like micromeritic properties after incorporation of appropriate excipients in an optimum amount in final optimized MCG formulation. In vivo drug release study showed 97% DM release whereas ex vivo buccal permeation study through goat buccal mucosa exhibited 11.27% DM permeation within 15 min indicating its potential for increasing bioavailability by decreasing time of onset. The optimized formulation showed good surface properties and the peak load required for drug release was found to be acceptable for crumbling action. Conclusion: The developed formulation of medicated chewing gum can be a better alternative to mouth dissolving and conventional tablet formulation. It may be proved as a promising approach to improve the bioavailability as well as to improve patient compliance. PMID:27013908

  19. Injuries to the shoulder in the throwing athlete. Part two: evaluation/treatment.

    PubMed

    Meister, K

    2000-01-01

    In part one of this three-part series (March/April 2000), I concentrated on summarizing the biomechanics of the normal throwing shoulder and the pathophysiology of injury. A classification of injury was presented that was based on the principles contained in that article. Part two of this series will focus on the evaluation and treatment of injuries, expanded from an understanding of the principles learned in part one. The ability to perform a skillful examination, and thus develop an accurate diagnosis, is the foundation for treatment. Fortunately, many difficulties encountered in a thrower's shoulder can be treated with a nonoperative approach. However, in instances where conservative measures fail, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of injury and the development of improved surgical techniques are leading to more accurate diagnoses and more successful rates of return of the athlete to a premorbid level of activity. PMID:10921657

  20. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 57 - Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. C... by the CSC in determining the medically related disability that results in a child's need for special education and related services, and oversees an EDIS evaluation used in determining a child's need...

  1. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 57 - Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. C... by the CSC in determining the medically related disability that results in a child's need for special education and related services, and oversees an EDIS evaluation used in determining a child's need...

  2. Evaluating professionalism in medical undergraduates using selected response questions: findings from an item response modelling study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Professionalism is a difficult construct to define in medical students but aspects of this concept may be important in predicting the risk of postgraduate misconduct. For this reason attempts are being made to evaluate medical students' professionalism. This study investigated the psychometric properties of Selected Response Questions (SRQs) relating to the theme of professional conduct and ethics comparing them with two sets of control items: those testing pure knowledge of anatomy, and; items evaluating the ability to integrate and apply knowledge ("skills"). The performance of students on the SRQs was also compared with two external measures estimating aspects of professionalism in students; peer ratings of professionalism and their Conscientiousness Index, an objective measure of behaviours at medical school. Methods Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to analyse both question and student performance for SRQs relating to knowledge of professionalism, pure anatomy and skills. The relative difficulties, discrimination and 'guessabilities' of each theme of question were compared with each other using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Student performance on each topic was compared with the measures of conscientiousness and professionalism using parametric and non-parametric tests as appropriate. A post-hoc analysis of power for the IRT modelling was conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results Professionalism items were less difficult compared to the anatomy and skills SRQs, poorer at discriminating between candidates and more erratically answered when compared to anatomy questions. Moreover professionalism item performance was uncorrelated with the standardised Conscientiousness Index scores (rho = 0.009, p = 0.90). In contrast there were modest but significant correlations between standardised Conscientiousness Index scores and performance at anatomy items (rho = 0.20, p = 0.006) though not skills (rho = .11, p = .1). Likewise, students with high peer

  3. Summative service and stakeholder evaluation of an NHS-funded community Pharmacy Emergency Repeat Medication Supply Service (PERMSS)

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Hamde; Nazar, Zachariah; Simpson, Jill; Yeung, Andre; Whittlesea, Cate

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Service and stakeholder evaluation of an NHS-funded service providing out-ofhours (OOH) emergency repeat medications to patients self-presenting at community pharmacies. Setting Community pharmacies across the North East of England accredited to provide this service. Participants Patients self-presenting to community pharmacies during OOH periods with emergency repeat medication supply requests. Intervention Community pharmacists assessed each request for clinical appropriateness and when suitable provide an emergency repeat medication supply, with additional pharmaceutical advice and services if required. Primary outcomes Number of emergency repeat medication supplies, time of request, reason for access, medication(s), pharmaceutical advice and services provided. Secondary outcomes were community pharmacist and patient satisfaction. Results A total of 2485 patients were managed across 227 community pharmacies (15 December 2014 to 7 April 2015). Most patients presented on Saturdays, with increased activity over national holidays. Older age was associated with increased service use. Of the 3226 medications provided, 439 were classified as high risk. Patients found this service easy to access and were willing to access the community pharmacy in the future for medication-related issues. In the absence of this service, 50% of patients would have missed their medication(s) until they saw their doctor and a further 46% would have accessed an alternative service. The cost of National Health Service (NHS) service(s) for patients who would have accessed an alternative OOH service was estimated as 37 times that of the community pharmacy service provided. Community pharmacists were happy to provide this service despite increased consultation times and workload. Conclusions Community pharmacists were able to manage patients’ OOH requests for emergency repeat medication and patients were happy with the service provided. Since the service cost was favourable when

  4. Evaluation of a joint Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics international course in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Curioso, Walter H; Hansen, Jacquelyn R; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Garcia, Patricia J; Wolf, Fredric M; Fuller, Sherrilynne; Holmes, King K; Kimball, Ann Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background New technologies that emerge at the interface of computational and biomedical science could drive new advances in global health, therefore more training in technology is needed among health care workers. To assess the potential for informatics training using an approach designed to foster interaction at this interface, the University of Washington and the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia developed and assessed a one-week course that included a new Bioinformatics (BIO) track along with an established Medical/Public Health Informatics track (MI) for participants in Peru. Methods We assessed the background of the participants, and measured the knowledge gained by track-specific (MI or BIO) 30-minute pre- and post-tests. Participants' attitudes were evaluated both by daily evaluations and by an end-course evaluation. Results Forty-three participants enrolled in the course – 20 in the MI track and 23 in the BIO track. Of 20 questions, the mean % score for the MI track increased from 49.7 pre-test (standard deviation or SD = 17.0) to 59.7 (SD = 15.2) for the post-test (P = 0.002, n = 18). The BIO track mean score increased from 33.6 pre-test to 51.2 post-test (P < 0.001, n = 21). Most comments (76%) about any aspect of the course were positive. The main perceived strength of the course was the quality of the speakers, and the main perceived weakness was the short duration of the course. Overall, the course acceptability was very good to excellent with a rating of 4.1 (scale 1–5), and the usefulness of the course was rated as very good. Most participants (62.9%) expressed a positive opinion about having had the BIO and MI tracks come together for some of the lectures. Conclusion Pre- and post-test results and the positive evaluations by the participants indicate that this first joint Bioinformatics and Medical/Public Health Informatics (MI and BIO) course was a success. PMID:18194533

  5. Evaluation of a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system at a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate discrepancies between general practitioners' paper medication orders and pharmacy-prepared electronic medication administration charts, back-up paper charts and dose-administration aids, as well as delays between prescribing, charting and administration, at a 90-bed residential aged care facility that used a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system. Methods A cross-sectional audit of medication orders, medication charts and dose-administration aids was performed to identify discrepancies. In addition, a retrospective audit was performed of delays between prescribing and availability of an updated electronic medication administration chart. Medication administration records were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether discrepancies and delays led to medication administration errors. Results Medication records for 88 residents (mean age 86 years) were audited. Residents were prescribed a median of eight regular medicines (interquartile range 5-12). One hundred and twenty-five discrepancies were identified. Forty-seven discrepancies, affecting 21 (24%) residents, led to a medication administration error. The most common discrepancies were medicine omission (44.0%) and extra medicine (19.2%). Delays from when medicines were prescribed to when they appeared on the electronic medication administration chart ranged from 18min to 98h. On nine occasions (for 10% of residents) the delay contributed to missed doses, usually antibiotics. Conclusion Medication discrepancies and delays were common. Improved systems for managing medication orders and charts are needed. What is known about the topic? Hybrid paper-electronic medication management systems, in which prescribers' orders are transcribed into an electronic system by pharmacy technicians and pharmacists to create medication administration charts, are increasingly replacing paper-based medication management systems in Australian residential aged care

  6. Performance evaluation of Al-Zahra academic medical center based on Iran balanced scorecard model

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Bakhsh, Roghayeh Mohammadi; Gangi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Growth and development in any country's national health system, without an efficient evaluation system, lacks the basic concepts and tools necessary for fulfilling the system's goals. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is a technique widely used to measure the performance of an organization. The basic core of the BSC is guided by the organization's vision and strategies, which are the bases for the formation of four perspectives of BSC. The goal of this research is the performance evaluation of Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Iran BSC model. Materials and Methods: This is a combination (quantitative–qualitative) research which was done at Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. The research populations were hospital managers at different levels. Sampling method was purposive sampling in which the key informed personnel participated in determining the performance indicators of hospital as the BSC team members in focused discussion groups. After determining the conceptual elements in focused discussion groups, the performance objectives (targets) and indicators of hospital were determined and sorted in perspectives by the group discussion participants. Following that, the performance indicators were calculated by the experts according to the predetermined objectives; then, the score of each indicator and the mean score of each perspective were calculated. Results: Research findings included development of the organizational mission, vision, values, objectives, and strategies. The strategies agreed upon by the participants in the focus discussion group included five strategies, which were customer satisfaction, continuous quality improvement, development of human resources, supporting innovation, expansion of services and improving the productivity. Research participants also agreed upon four perspectives for the Al-Zahra hospital BSC. In the patients and community

  7. Drug use evaluation of cefepime in the first affiliated hospital of Bengbu medical college: a retrospective and prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cefepime is a fourth generation cephalosporin antimicrobial. Its extended antimicrobial activity and infrequent tendency to engender resistance make it popular for the treatment of infections. However, proper use of cefepime has not been studied adequately. In this study, we used a retrospective cohort and a prospective cohort to evaluate the usage pattern, adverse effects and cost-effectiveness of cefepime by conducting a drug use evaluation (DUE) program in the First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College, Anhui, China. Methods The DUE criteria for cefepime were established by applying literature review and expert consultation, an effective method to promote interventions that will improve patient outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of drug therapy. According to the criteria, we performed a cross-sectional retrospective (cycle A) study on 96 hospitalized patients who received cefepime treatment and a prospective (cycle B) study on 111 hospitalized patients with cefepime treatment intervention. After identifying problems with usage and completing a cefepime use evaluation for cycle A, 2 months of educational intervention among professionals were given and a more effective and rational system of cefepime use was set up. During the 2 months, the lectures were arranged and attendance of prescribers was required. Results The data from cycle A showed that the biggest problem was irrational prescription of cefepime; bacterial culture and drug sensitivity tests for cefepime were also not carried out. Following 2 months of educational intervention among professionals, the results for cycle B showed that the correct indication rate was 94.59%, compared with 84.38% in cycle A. Use of bacterial culture and sensitivity tests also improved, by 88.29% in cycle B compared with 65.22% in cycle A. Compared with cycle A, the significantly improved items (P < 0.05) in cycle B were blood examination, liver function monitoring, renal function monitoring, dose and

  8. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  9. BEME Guide no 3: systematic searching for evidence in medical education--Part 1: Sources of information.

    PubMed

    Haig, Alex; Dozier, Marshall

    2003-07-01

    Searching for evidence to inform best practice in medical education is a complex undertaking. With very few information sources dedicated to medical education itself, one is forced to consult a wide range of often enormous sources--and these are dedicated to either medicine or education, making a medical education search all the more challenging. This guide provides a comprehensive overview of relevant information sources and methods (including bibliographic databases, grey literature, hand searching and the Internet) and describes when they should be consulted. The process of constructing a search is explained: identifying and combining core concepts, using Boolean algebra and search syntax, limiting results sets, and making best use of databases' controlled vocabularies. This process is illustrated with images from search screens and is followed by numerous examples designed to reinforce skills and concepts covered. The guide has been developed from the ongoing experience gained from the systematic searches conducted for the Best Evidence Medical Education Collaboration, and concludes by looking ahead to initiatives that will shape future searching for medical education evidence. PMID:12893544

  10. A Qualitative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Simulation as a Training Method in Implementation of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chelton, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adoption of electronic medical records has been gradual in part due to physician concerns that its use in the exam room will interfere with the physician-patient relationship. Studies demonstrate their concern to be loss of eye contact with the patient and that entering information into the computer in the presence of the patient will…

  11. Development and evaluation of an interactive electronic laboratory manual for cooperative learning of medical histology.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Kirkley, Debbie L; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of an interactive computer-based laboratory manual, created to facilitate the teaching and learning of medical histology. The overarching goal of developing the manual is to facilitate self-directed group interactivities that actively engage students during laboratory sessions. The design of the manual includes guided instruction for students to navigate virtual slides, exercises for students to monitor learning, and cases to provide clinical relevance. At the end of the laboratory activities, student groups can generate a laboratory report that may be used to provide formative feedback. The instructional value of the manual was evaluated by a questionnaire containing both closed-ended and open-ended items. Closed-ended items using a five-point Likert-scale assessed the format and navigation, instructional contents, group process, and learning process. Open-ended items assessed student's perception on the effectiveness of the manual in facilitating their learning. After implementation for two consecutive years, student evaluation of the manual was highly positive and indicated that it facilitated their learning by reinforcing and clarifying classroom sessions, improved their understanding, facilitated active and cooperative learning, and supported self-monitoring of their learning. PMID:23408507

  12. Evaluating Learning among Undergraduate Medical Students in Schools with Traditional and Problem-Based Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess knowledge and skills in a respiratory physiology course in traditional versus problem-based learning (PBL) groups in two different medical schools. Two different undergraduate medical schools were selected for this study. The first medical school followed the traditional [lecture-based learning (LBL)] curriculum, and the…

  13. A Method of Deriving Definitions of Specific Medical Competencies: a Framework for Curriculum Planning and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, David H.

    1987-01-01

    Definitions of specific medical competencies to be acquired by medical students in the course of their studies may be derived from the juxtaposition of a list of generic competencies with a list of appropriate subject areas. The operation of the method is demonstrated in relation to the curriculum of The Beer Sheva Medical School, Israel.…

  14. An Evaluation on Medical Education, Research and Development of AYUSH Systems of Medicine through Five Year Plans of India

    PubMed Central

    Dehury, Ranjit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Indian system of medicine has its origin in India. The system is currently renamed as AYUSH, an acronym for Ayurveda, Yoga & Naturopathy, Unani, Sidha and Homeopathy. These are the six Indian systems of medicine prevalent and practiced in India and in few neighboring Asian countries. Objective The primary objective of this review was to gain insight in to the prior and existing initiatives which would enable reflection and assist in the identification of future change. Materials and Methods A review was carried out based on the five year plan documents, obtained from the planning commission web portal of Govt. of India, on medical education, research and development of AYUSH systems of medicine. Results Post independence, the process of five year planning took its birth with the initiation of long term planning in India. The planning process embraced all the social and technology sectors in it. Since the beginning of five year planning, health and family welfare planning became imperative as a social sector planning. Planning regarding Indian Systems of Medicine became a part of health and family welfare planning since then. During the entire planning process a progressive path of development could be observed as per this evaluation. A relatively sluggish process of development was observed up to seventh plan however post eighth plan the growth took its pace. Eighth plan onwards several innovative development processes could be noticed. Despite the relative developments and growth of Indian systems of medicine these systems have to face lot of criticism and appraisal owing to their various characteristic features. In the beginning the system thrived with great degree of uncertainty, as described in 1st five year plan, however progressed ahead with a vision to be a globally accepted system, as envisaged in 11th five year plan. Conclusion A very strong optimistic approach in spreading India’s own medical heritage is the need of the hour. The efforts

  15. Development and evaluation of a community immersion program during preclinical medical studies: a 15-year experience at the University of Geneva Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Chastonay, P; Zesiger, V; Klohn, A; Soguel, L; Mpinga, E K; Vu, NV; Bernheim, L

    2013-01-01

    Background Significant changes in medical education have occurred in recent decades because of new challenges in the health sector and new learning theories and practices. This might have contributed to the decision of medical schools throughout the world to adopt community-based learning activities. The community-based learning approach has been promoted and supported by the World Health Organization and has emerged as an efficient learning strategy. The aim of the present paper is to describe the characteristics of a community immersion clerkship for third-year undergraduate medical students, its evolution over 15 years, and an evaluation of its outcomes. Methods A review of the literature and consensus meetings with a multidisciplinary group of health professionals were used to define learning objectives and an educational approach when developing the program. Evaluation of the program addressed students’ perception, achievement of learning objectives, interactions between students and the community, and educational innovations over the years. Results The program and the main learning objectives were defined by consensus meetings among teaching staff and community health workers, which strengthened the community immersion clerkship. Satisfaction, as monitored by a self-administered questionnaire in successive cohorts of students, showed a mean of 4.4 on a five-point scale. Students also mentioned community immersion clerkship as a unique community experience. The learning objectives were reached by a vast majority of students. Behavior evaluation was not assessed per se, but specific testimonies show that students have been marked by their community experience. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations (eg, students teaching other students), new developments in the curriculum (eg, partnership with the University of Applied Health Sciences), and interaction between students and the community (eg, student development of a website for

  16. Evaluation of selected ex-reactor accidents related to the tritium and medical isotope production mission at the FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, D.A.

    1997-11-17

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been proposed as a production facility for tritium and medical isotopes. A range of postulated accidents related to ex-reactor irradiated fuel and target handling were identified and evaluated using new source terms for the higher fuel enrichment and for the tritium and medical isotope targets. In addition, two in-containment sodium spill accidents were re-evaluated to estimate effects of increased fuel enrichment and the presence of the Rapid Retrieval System. Radiological and toxicological consequences of the analyzed accidents were found to be well within applicable risk guidelines.

  17. [Discussion on Quality Evaluation Method of Medical Device During Life-Cycle in Operation Based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Caixian; Zheng, Kun; Shen, Yunming; Wu, Yunyun

    2016-01-01

    The content related to the quality during life-cycle in operation of medical device includes daily use, repair volume, preventive maintenance, quality control and adverse event monitoring. In view of this, the article aims at discussion on the quality evaluation method of medical devices during their life cycle in operation based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The presented method is proved to be effective by evaluating patient monitors as example. The method presented in can promote and guide the device quality control work, and it can provide valuable inputs to decisions about purchase of new device. PMID:27197489

  18. Geriatric forensics - Part 2 “Prevalence of elder abuse and their potential forensic markers among medical and dental patients”

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Khurshid A.; Garg, Rishabh; Kumar, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Aims: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Settings and Design: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and thirty two elderly subjects in the age range 40-60 years were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine the existence of elder abuse. The subjects were investigated and examined for weight, nutrition and hydration, vital signs, habits, existing visual and auditory capabilities, medications, disclosure of wills/deeds, signs of depression, and documented cleanliness. The mini-mental state examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Clock drawing test, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were used to determine the potential forensic markers. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values in percentage were determined by dividing the number of determined subjects by the total number of subjects for that parameter. Results: About 37% in medical and 41% in dental OPDs were found to have suffered from abuse, mostly in the age group 60-70 years. Females received more abuse and a combination of son and daughter-in-law constituted most abusers. Various potential markers of elder abuse and neglect investigated among the elder abuse victims included depression (89%), signs of improper feeding (83%), changes in personal hygiene (69%), need for medical/dental treatment (78%), medication misuse (67%), changes in wills/deeds (26%), decubiti (10%), bruises (17%), skin tears (27%), and confusion (23%). Conclusions: Elder abuse exists in one or more forms in both medical and dental OPDs among both males and females in all age groups. PMID:26816460

  19. [The development of the Japanese pharmaceutical industry (part 7). Histories of medical advertisements from Taisho Era till Showa Era].

    PubMed

    Takehara, J; Yamada, H

    1999-01-01

    Medical advertisements in newspapers have been used quite often as a means of sales promotion since the Meiji Era. Medical advertisements were quantitatively the leading advertisements in Japanese newspapers from the Taisho Era to early in the Showa Era. When World War II broke out, the quanity of advertisements in newspapers decreased markedly. After the war ended, the quantity of radio commercials for medicine increased quite rapidly. In the 1960s, however, pharmaceutical companies were criticized for over-promoting and improperly using medicines. PMID:11624347

  20. Is Wikipedia a reliable learning resource for medical students? Evaluating respiratory topics.

    PubMed

    Azer, Samy A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to critically evaluate the accuracy and readability of English Wikipedia articles on the respiratory system and its disorders and whether they can be a suitable resource for medical students. On April 27, 2014, English Wikipedia was searched for articles on respiratory topics. Using a modified DISCERN instrument, articles were independently scored by three assessors. The scoring targeted content accuracy, frequency of updating, and quality of references. The readability of articles was measured using two other instruments. The mean DISCERN score for the 40 articles identified was 26.4±6.3. Most articles covered causes, signs and symptoms, prevention, and treatment. However, several knowledge deficiencies in the pathogenesis of diseases, investigations needed, and treatment were observed. The total number of references for the 40 articles was 1,654, and the references varied from 0 to 168 references, but several problems were identified in the list of references and citations made. The readability of articles was in the range of 9.4±1.8 to 22.6±10.7 using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level instrument and 10.0±2.6 to 19.6±8.3 using the Readability Coleman-Liau index. A strong correlation was found between the two instruments (r2=0.744, P<0.001). The agreement between the assessors had mean κ scores in the range of 0.712-0.857. In conclusion, despite the effort placed in creating Wikipedia respiratory articles by anonymous volunteers (wikipedians), most articles had knowledge deficiencies, were not accurate, and were not suitable for medical students as learning resources. PMID:25727464