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Sample records for medical physics education

  1. Radiation Oncology Physics and Medical Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, Dan

    2011-10-01

    Medical physics, an applied field of physics, is the applications of physics in medicine. Medical physicists are essential professionals in contemporary healthcare, contributing primarily to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases through numerous inventions, advances, and improvements in medical imaging and cancer treatment. Clinical service, research, and teaching by medical physicists benefits thousands of patients and other individuals every day. This talk will cover three main topics. First, exciting current research and development areas in the medical physics sub-specialty of radiation oncology physics will be described, including advanced oncology imaging for treatment simulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and biologically-optimized radiation treatment. Challenges in patient safety in high-technology radiation treatments will be briefly reviewed. Second, the educational path to becoming a medical physicist will be reviewed, including undergraduate foundations, graduate training, residency, board certification, and career opportunities. Third, I will introduce the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which is the professional society that represents, advocates, and advances the field of medical physics (www.aapm.org).

  2. MO-E-18C-06: Enriching Medical Physics Education By Visualizing The Invisible

    SciTech Connect

    Sprawls, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To enhance the understanding of medical physics concepts and develop higher levels of learning relating to invisible physics phenomena such as radiation. To provide medical physics educators in all countries of the world with understanding of knowledge structures in the human brain, the different levels of learning, and the types of knowledge required for higher level functions such as problem solving, creative innovations, and applied clinical applications. To provide medical physics educators with an open access resource (tool) that they can use in their teaching activities to enrich and elevate the level of learning for their students, residents, etc. with respect to the invisible realm of medical physics. Methods: An experienced clinical medical physicist and educator has created and provided with open access three complementary web-based resources to achieve the purposes described above. One is a module focusing on the medical physics learning process with respect to mental knowledge structures, how they relate to outcomes and applications, and learning activities that are required to develop the required knowledge structures. The second is an extensive set of visuals that educators can use in their activities (classes, small group discussions, etc.) to visualize the invisible. The third is an interactive online simulation where learners can adjust factors and visually observe changes in x-radiation.These resources are available online at www.BLINDED FOR REVIEW . Results: Medical physics education, especially for non-physicists, is becoming much more interesting and useful especially with respect to invisible radiation. The global impact is that medical imaging professionals can be more effective in optimizing x-ray imaging procedures and risk management when they have knowledge levels that enhance problem solving, innovation, and creativity. Conclusion: Medical physics educators in all institutions can be much more effective and efficient in the sharing of their knowledge and experience when enhanced with high-quality visuals.

  3. MEDICAL EDUCATION Professional Organizations

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    MEDICAL EDUCATION Professional Organizations: Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME) Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions (ACEHP) Society for Academic Continuing Medical

  4. MO-C-9A-01: Effective Medical Physics Educational Activities: Models and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sprawls, P

    2014-06-15

    Medical physics is learned in a combination of activities including classroom sessions, individual study, small-group collaborative problem solving, and direct experience in the laboratory or clinical environment. Each type of learning activity is characterized by its effectiveness in producing the desired knowledge for the learner and the cost in terms of resources and human effort required providing it. While learning and teaching is a human activity, modern technology provides a variety of tools that can be used to enhance human performance. The class or conference room is the common setting for educational sessions in both academic institutions and continuing education conferences and programs such as those sponsored by the AAPM. A major value of a class/conference room program is efficiency by bringing a group of learners together to share in a common learning experience under the guidance of one or more experienced learning facilitators (lecturers or presenters). A major challenge is that the class/conference room is separated from the real world of medical physics. The design of an educational activity needs to take into consideration the desired outcomes with respect to what the learners should be able to do. The distinction is that of being able to apply the knowledge to perform specific physics functions rather than just knowing and being able to recall facts, and perhaps do well on written examinations. These are different types of knowledge structures within the human brain and distinctly different learning activities to develop each. Much of medical physics education, especially at the post-graduate and continuing education level, is for the purpose of enhancing the ability of physicists and other related professionals to perform applied procedures and tasks and requires specific types of knowledge.In this session we will analyze various learning activity models, the values and limitations of each, and how they can be used in medical physics education. An example we will use is optimizing CT image quality and dose which is an important topic for medical physicists, radiologists and residents, along with technologists. The knowledge structure for this is best developed by a combination of learning activities including class/conference discussions, individual study and review, and direct observation and interaction in the clinical setting under the direction of a knowledgeable leader.The function of the human brain will be considered with respect to learning experiences that contribute to effective medical physics knowledge structures. The characteristics of various types of educational activities will be compared with respect to their effectiveness for producing desired outcomes along with their limitations. Emphasis will be given to the design of highly-effective classroom/conference presentations, and activities will be demonstrated with an emphasis on using technology to enhance human performance of both learners and the learning facilitators. Learning Objectives: Develop and provide highly effective medical physics educational sessions. Use technology to enhance human performance in the educational process. Identify and analyze various models of educational activities Select and use educational activities that contribute value to the medical physics profession.

  5. Pre-Medical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has examined the science and mathematics competencies that the graduating physician will need, and has asked which of these should be achieved during undergraduate study. The recommendations emphasize competency -- what the learner should be able to ``do'' at the end of the learning experience -- rather than dictating specific courses. Because the scientific content of modern medical practice is evolving, new science competencies are desirable for the entering medical student. An example is statistics, an increasingly prominent foundation for database and genomic analysis but which is not yet uniformly recommended as preparation for medical school. On the other hand, the committee believes that the value of a broad liberal arts education is enduring, and science coursework should not totally consume a premedical student's time. Thus if we recommend new areas of science and mathematics competency for pre-meds, we must find other areas that can be trimmed or combined. Indeed, at present there are some science topics mandated for premedical study, which may not be essential. For these reasons, the committee aims to state premedical recommendations in ways that can be met either through traditional disciplinary courses, or through innovative and/or interdisciplinary courses. Finally, we acknowledge that practice of medicine requires grounding in scientific principles and knowledge and in the practice of critical inquiry. These principles may be learned and practiced in undergraduate study through work in the physical sciences, as well as in biology, and such multidisciplinary training should be encouraged.

  6. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Bortfeld, T; Ngoma, T; Odedina, F; Morgan, S; Wu, R; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    In response to a world in which cancer is a growing global health challenge, there is now a greater need for US Medical Physicists and other Radiation Oncology professionals across institutions to work together and be more globally engaged in the fight against cancer. There are currently many opportunities for Medical Physicists to contribute to alleviating this pressing need, especially in helping enhance access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence across international boundaries, particularly for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), which suffer from a drastic shortage of accessible knowledge and quality training programs in radiotherapy. Many Medical Physicists are not aware of the range of opportunities that even with small effort could have a high impact. Faculty at the two CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics Programs in New England: the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Harvard Medical School have developed a growing alliance to increase Access to Medical Physics Education/training and Research Excellence (AMPERE), and facilitate greater active involvement of U.S. Medical Physicists in helping the global fight against cancer and cancer disparities. In this symposium, AMPERE Alliance members and partners from Europe and Africa will present and discuss the growing global cancer challenge, the dearth of knowledge, research, and other barriers to providing life-saving radiotherapy in LMIC, mechanisms for meeting these challenges, the different opportunities for participation by Medical Physicists, including students and residents, and how participation can be facilitated to increase AMPERE for global health. Learning Objectives: To learn about the growing global cancer challenge, areas of greatest need and limitations to accessing knowledge and quality radiotherapy training programs, especially in LMIC; To learn about the range of opportunities for Medical Physicists, including students and residents, to work together in global health to help increase AMPERE and alleviate the growing global burden of cancer; To present and discuss a new model for harmonizing Medical Physics Training across countries and how this model (UMass and Heidelberg) could be extended to LMIC in collaboration with the IAEA; To highlight a new platform and program for facilitating contributions by Medical Physicists to increase AMPERE towards the elimination of global cancer disparities. Challenges in Cancer Control in Africa Twalib A. Ngoma, MD, Professor, Executive Director, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Cancer care in Africa is beset by lack of attention, political will, cancer registries, cancer plans, human resources, financial resources and treatment facilities.. As a result of this, cancer patients in Africa are far more likely to die of their disease than those in developed countries. According to data from the WHO 750,000 new cancer cases occur in Africa every year and this number is predicted to rise by 70% by 2020. To make matters worse, an estimated 75% of cancer patients in Africa have advanced or incurable cancers at diagnosis making palliative care the most realistic approach to their management. Furthermore, Cancer prevention is nearly nonexistent, cancer detection is rare and treatment usually comes too late and is inefficient. The overall mortality-to-incidence ratio for men with cancer in the Africa is 0.75 compared with 0.54 in the developed world while the ratios for women in Africa, is 0.65 compared with 0.45 for women in the developed world. There is also limited access to radiotherapy. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), whilst developed countries usually have one radiotherapy machine per 250,000 people, most African nations have only one machine per ten million people. The above numbers are alarming and speak for themselves. The only solution to improve this alarming situation is to address the major challenges which African countries face in provision of cancer services which include but not limited to lack of cancer registries, lack of funding

  7. INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE The central mission of a medical school is to educate. INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE "I wear my research hat when treating patients so I

  8. History of Medical Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical

  9. Long-Term Effect of a Short Interprofessional Education Interaction between Medical and Physical Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sytsma, Terin T.; Haller, Elizabeth P.; Youdas, James W.; Krause, David A.; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2015-01-01

    Medicine is increasingly focused on team-based practice as interprofessional cooperation leads to better patient care. Thus, it is necessary to teach teamwork and collaboration with other health care professionals in undergraduate medical education to ensure that trainees entering the workforce are prepared to work in teams. Gross anatomy provides…

  10. Inclusion in Physical Education: From the Medical Model to Social Constructionism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this discussion is to explore assumptions that have informed constructions of disability and to challenge these as socially constituted judgments that influence the way teachers think and act in general physical education. A secondary purpose is to introduce social constructionism as a discourse that potentially reshapes…

  11. Postdoctoral Opportunities in Medical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2006-04-01

    The medical physicist is a professional who specializes in the application of the concepts and methods of physics to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Medical physicists identify their primary discipline to be radiation therapy (78%), medical imaging (16%), nuclear medicine (3%), or radiation safety (2%). They state their primary responsibility to be clinical (78%), academic (9%), research (4%), etc. Correspondingly, medical physicists reveal their primarily employment to be a private hospital (42%), university hospital (32%), physicist's service group (9%), physician's service group (9%), industry (5%), and government (3%). The most frequent job of medical physicists is clinical radiation therapy physicist, whose clinical duties include: equipment acquisition, facility design, commissioning, machine maintenance, calibration and quality assurance, patient treatment planning, patient dose calculation, management of patient procedures, development of new technology, radiation safety, and regulatory compliance. The number of medical physicists in the United States can be estimated by the number of members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which has increased 5.5% annually since 1969, currently being 5,000. New positions plus retirements create a current need >300 new medical physicists per year, which exceeds supply. This is supported by the steady growth in average salaries, being 100,000 for PhDs entering the field and reaching 180,000. Graduate programs alone cannot meet demand, and physicists entering the field through postdoctoral training in medical physics remain important. Details of postdoctoral research programs and medical physics residency programs will provide direction to physics PhD graduates interested in medical physics. [The AAPM, its annual Professional Information Report, and its Public Education Committee are acknowledged for information contributing to this presentation.

  12. Graduate Medical Education Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    and Quality of Care Education 21 House Office Appointments to Committees 21-26 Resident Participation in QIGraduate Medical Education 2011-2012 Annual Report #12;Table of Contents Pages WSU Graduate Medical Education Statement of Commitment 3-4 GMEC Organizational Chart 5 WSU Graduate Medical Education Mission

  13. The Medicalization of Education: A Historiographic Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrina, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author described eight, distinct practices through which schools were medicalized during the last decade of the 19th century and the first three decades of the 20th century. The medicalization of education was summarized in expanding definitions of educational hygiene, encompassing mental, neoscholastic, physical, and school…

  14. 2015 Medical Education Day Abstract Award Undergraduate Medical Education Research

    E-print Network

    Assessing item quality in open-book online readiness assessment exercises using student feedback and item2015 Medical Education Day Abstract Award Recipients Undergraduate Medical Education Research for Undergraduate Medical Education Impact of the Resident-as-Teacher Video Series in Preparing Students

  15. Blended Learning in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pedagogical advancements in medical education across the globe have gained the attention of academicians for the preparation of well-educated and competent physicians to address the healthcare issues facing today. The integration of technology into medical pedagogy has proved effective in many ways. This has made the medical education

  16. Electives in Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Santosh; Zayapragassarazan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Modern curricula have both compulsory portions and electives or portions chosen by students. Electives have been a part of graduate and postgraduate general higher education. Electives are included in various standards for graduate medical education and are also included in proposed Medical Council of India Regulations on Graduate Medical

  17. Faculty of Science Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Science Medical Physics If you like physics and mathematics, but want a career in the rapidly expanding health sciences, then this honours BSc is for you. www.uwindsor.ca/physics Medical Physics opens the way to exciting new possibilities for career opportunities in the applications

  18. MEDRIS: The Problem Oriented Electronic Medical Record in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Sami F.; Robert, Shanthi; Trace, David; Prakash, Sanjeev; Naeymi-Rad, Frank; Barnett, David; Pannicia, Gregory; Hammergren, David; Carmony, Lowell; Evens, Martha

    1990-01-01

    MEDRIS (The Medical Record Interface System) is an object oriented HyperCard interface designed to help physicians enter patient information as comfortably and naturally as possible. It can function as a stand alone system producing its own reports or serve as an interface to a medical expert system (e.g., MEDAS). MEDRIS plays an important role in the clinical education of medical students at the Chicago Medical School. MEDRIS portrays an intuitive, graphically oriented system that will provide a learning environment for the problem oriented medical record (POMR) that forms the basis of the structure of the history and physical exam. The enthusiasm shown by the medical students for this project has garnered support for including MEDRIS in the curriculum of the Introduction to Clinical Medicine course this semester. MEDRIS, developed using HyperCard, can be used as a tool not only for teaching POMR and physical diagnosis, but also computer literacy.

  19. Physical Education 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    of this study was to explore and analyze Texas secondary agricultural education teachers' attitudes toward diversity inclusion in Texas secondary agricultural education programs. Using a web-based questionnaire, the researcher employed a nonproportional...

  20. Shifting Paradigms of Research in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, David M.; Edwards, Janine C. Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Medical educators debate which models of scientific research should be applied to problems in academic medicine. The reigning model was derived from the first scientific revolution of Newtonian physics. The emerging model is grounded in the second scientific revolution of Einstein's quantum physics. (Author/MSE)

  1. Fifteenth Annual Report: 2012 The Medical Education CommissionTHE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    1 Fifteenth Annual Report: 2012 The Medical Education CommissionTHE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMISSION_____________________________________________________ 7 GME in Louisiana ____________________________________________________ 8 Medical Education Type: 200 -2012 National Data ______________________________ 10 Louisiana Graduate Medical Education

  2. Bachelor of Education in Physical Education

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    , recreational officers, community educators, personal trainers and sport coaches. What you can teach2015 Bachelor of Education in Physical Education College of Education EDUCATION Physical Education. #12;2 Bachelor of Education in Physical Education The Bachelor of Education (Physical Education

  3. Ethnographies across Virtual and Physical Spaces: A Reflexive Commentary on a Live Canadian/UK Ethnography of Distributed Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummons, Jonathan; Macleod, Anna; Kits, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on an ongoing ethnography of distributed medical education (DME) provision in Canada in order to explore the methodological choices of the researchers as well as the wider pluralisation of ethnographic frameworks that is reflected within current research literature. The article begins with a consideration of the technologically…

  4. Physical Education ! Teaching Materials!

    E-print Network

    Burg, Theresa

    -9! Quality Lesson Plans for Secondary Physical Education 796.07 Lod Gr. EC-12! Quality Lesson Plans for Secondary Physical Education 796.07 Lod Gr. EC-12! Quality Lesson Plans for Secondary Physical Education 796Physical Education ! Teaching Materials! !!! ! 1. PROGRAMS OF STUDY ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !P.E. Program

  5. THE ACADEMY at HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL MEDICAL EDUCATION DAY

    E-print Network

    Schrag, Daniel

    Medical Education Day Abstract Award 2015 1) Assessing item quality in open-book online readiness14 TH THE ACADEMY at HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL MEDICAL EDUCATION DAY BOOK OF ABSTRACTS TUESDAY OCTOBER 27, 2015 11:00AM TO 5:30PM TOSTESON MEDICAL EDUCATION CENTER #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MEDICAL EDICATION

  6. INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT TO GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    of the quality of education provided to residents/fellows at all participating institutions, as wellPage 23 INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT TO GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION mission the commitment to provide excellent medical education, research endeavors, and medical care

  7. The physically disabled medical student.

    PubMed

    Stiens, S

    1987-01-01

    Previous literature on physically disabled medical students is reviewed, and its implications are examined. Although they encounter significant obstacles to their acceptance into medical school due to stereotyped attitudes, environmental barriers, and recent legal decisions, these students are nevertheless applying to and successfully completing medical school. Common coping strategies for students with mobility, visual, and hearing impairments are briefly outlined. PMID:2962981

  8. Understanding Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ken

    2008-01-01

    This easy-to-use introduction explores all of the contemporary issues and enduring themes in physical education, focusing on the United Kingdom but incorporating a global dimension. The wide range of topics covered include: (1) the requirements of National Curriculum Physical Education; (2) the current "state" of physical education; (3) the…

  9. Understanding Educational Reforms: Physics Education Research

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    / approaches · Investigating education scientifically · Far more to our classes than what is traditionallyUnderstanding Educational Reforms: Impacts of Physics Education Research Steven Pollock Physics under Grant No. REC 0448176, CAREER: Physics Education and Contexts of Student Learning. Any opinions

  10. Faculty of Science Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    courses for credit, summer placements and volunteer activities. Our students work with experts in such diverse fields as Biophysics and Medical Physics; Acoustic Microscopy and Materials Characterization; Nanoscale Electronics; Quantum Control and Quantum Computing; and Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. #12

  11. Curriculum in Canadian Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, J. Wendell

    1963-01-01

    In general, its teaching curriculum reflects the history of a medical school's interaction with a series of pressures, such as the staggering advance of scientific knowledge and the social demand for greater security against hazards to the welfare of entire populations. Secondary consequences include the isolation of the scientist and loss of the overall view; decline in interest in teaching; depersonalization of medical care; hospital-centred instruction and loss of contact with the viewpoint of the community at the very time that it is demanding more attention. Compensating trends include: increasing confidence in scientific methods, team-work in teaching, the project method of teaching, comprehensive care clinics, and research in educational methods. The conclusion favours medical education that is devoted to the educational needs of the student, to the health needs of the individual patient and of the community, and to the advancement of knowledge and understanding. PMID:20327473

  12. MO-E-18C-05: Global Health Catalyst: A Novel Platform for Enhancing Access to Medical Physics Education and Research Excellence (AMPERE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ngwa, W; Moreau, M; Asana, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a platform for catalyzing collaborative global Cancer Care Education and Research (CaRE), with a prime focus on enhancing Access to Medical Physics Education and Research Excellence (AMPERE) Methods: An analysis of over 50 global health collaborations between partners in the U.S. and low and middle income countries (LMIC) in Africa was carried out to assess the models of collaborations in Education and Research and relative success. A survey was carried out with questions including: the nature of the collaboration, how it was initiated, impact of culture and other factors, and recommendations for catalyzing/enhancing such collaborations. An online platform called Global Health Catalyst was developed for enhancing AMPERE. Results: The analysis yielded three main models for global health collaborations with survey providing key recommendations on how to enhance such collaborations. Based on this, the platform was developed, and customized to allow Medical Physicists and other Radiation oncology (RadOnc) professionals interested in participating in Global health to readily do so e.g. teach an online course module, participate in training Medical Physicists or other RadOnc health professionals in LMIC, co-mentor students, residents or postdocs, etc. The growing list of features on the platform also include: a feature to enable people to easily find each other, form teams, operate more effectively as partners from different disciplines, institutions, nations and cultural backgrounds, share tools and technologies, obtain seed funding to develop curricula and/or embark upon new areas of investigation, and participate in humanitarian outreach: remote treatment planning assistance, and participation in virtual Chart Rounds, etc. Conclusion: The developed Global Health Catalyst platform could enable any Medical Physicist or RadoOnc professional interested in global health to readily participate in the Education/training of next generation RadOnc professionals and global health leaders, and enhance AMPERE, especially for LMIC.

  13. Fostering Professionalism in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Shrank, William H; Reed, Virginia A; Jernstedt, G Christian

    2004-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on developing professionalism in medical school graduates. Unfortunately, the culture of academic medical centers and the behaviors that faculty model are often incongruent with our image of professionalism. The need for improved role modeling, better assessment of student behavior, and focused faculty development is reviewed. We propose that the incentive structure be adjusted to reward professional behavior in both students and faculty. The third-year medicine clerkship provides an ideal opportunity for clinician-educators to play a leading role in evaluating, rewarding, and ultimately fostering professionalism in medical school graduates. PMID:15242476

  14. CHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Medical Education Specialization

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    , scientific and resource pressures, medical schools increasingly require staff with degrees in medicalCHS Graduate Student Competencies & Requirements in Medical Education Specialization Requirements MSc Medical Education PhD Medical Education Description As a result of several social, educational

  15. GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION VISITING RESIDENT APPLICATION FORM

    E-print Network

    GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION VISITING RESIDENT APPLICATION FORM COMPLETED BY THE RESIDENT Name:_____________ Sex:____ NPI:_____________________ Name of Current Sponsoring Institution #:______________ Email: _______________________ Sex: ____ NPI: ______________ _ Medical School

  16. Implementing Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Online physical education, although seemingly an oxymoron, appears to be the wave of the future at least for some students. The purpose of this article is to explore research and options for online learning in physical education and to examine a curriculum, assessment, and instructional model for online learning. The article examines how physical

  17. (09)UC/05 BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/11 Bachelor of Science (Honours) Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    (09)UC/05 ­ BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/11 Bachelor of Science (Honours) Medical Physics 2005 Calendar, pages 348 and 681 (09)UC/05 ­ BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/1 Section A 1. Purpose of proposal To provide a better pathway for PhD students in Medical Physics, a BSc(Hons) degree in Medical Physics

  18. Pediatric hospitalists and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) is moving toward becoming an American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) subspecialty, roughly a decade after its formal inception in 2003. Education has played a central role as the field has evolved. Hospitalists are needed to educate trainees, medical students, residents, fellows, and nurse practitioner and physician assistant students in inpatient pediatric practice. Continuous professional development is needed for hospitalists currently in practice to augment clinical skills, such as providing sedation and placing peripherally inserted central catheter lines, and nonclinical skills in areas such as quality improvement methodology, hospital administration, and health service research. To address the educational needs of the current and future state of PHM, additional training is now needed beyond residency training. Fellowship training will be essential to continue to advance the field of PHM as well as to petition the ABP for specialty accreditation. Training in using adult educational theory, curriculum, and assessment design are critical for pediatric hospitalists choosing to advance their careers as clinician-educators. Several venues are available for gaining advanced knowledge and skill as an educator. PHM clinician-educators are advancing the field of pediatric education as well as their own academic careers by virtue of the scholarly approach they have taken to designing and implementing curricula for unique PHM teaching situations. PHM educators are changing the educational paradigm to address challenges to traditional education strategies posed by duty hour restrictions and the increasing drive to shorten the duration of the hospitalization. By embracing learning with technology, such as simulation and e-learning with mobile devices, PHM educators can address these challenges as well as respond to learning preferences of millennial learners. The future for PHM education is bright. PMID:24977677

  19. THE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMISSION STATE OF LOUISIANA

    E-print Network

    THE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMISSION STATE OF LOUISIANA EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT: 2004 #12;#12;Announcement The Medical Education Commission has ch t presentation. The website is the expanded version, with color at a State Level: Physicians in Louisiana in 2001 and 2006. 998; 91:914-918. The Medical Education Comm

  20. M.D. With Distinction in Medical Education Page 1 MD with Distinction in Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    M.D. With Distinction in Medical Education Page 1 MD with Distinction in Medical Education Goals and Objectives The MD with Distinction in Medical Education Program provides UTHSCSA medical students with an opportunity to spend part of their medical school career participating in activities focused on different

  1. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education

  2. Phenomenology and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Physical education is often justified within the curriculum as academic study, as a worthwhile activity on a par with other academic subjects on offer and easy to assess. Part of the problem has been that movement studies in physical education are looked upon as disembodied and disconnected from its central concerns which are associated with…

  3. Paraeducators in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piletic, Cindy; Davis, Ronald; Aschemeier, Amy

    2005-01-01

    Paraeducators have long been employed in the classroom, but their services have not yet been fully put to use in the gymnasium. With the ever-increasing number of physically and mentally challenged students enrolled in general education classes, paraeducators are becoming an essential part of any physical education class. This article explores the…

  4. Compendium of Military Allied Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    To improve the effectiveness of allied health education in both civilian and military programs, the U. S. Department of Defense and the AMA Council on Medical Education's Advisory Committee on Education for the Allied Professions and Services sponsor a Subcommittee on Military Allied Medical Education. One objective of this Subcommittee is AMA…

  5. CRC Handbook of Medical Physics, vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Waggener, R.G.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Shalek, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this work, the care and testing of measurement and diagnostic instruments are described in detail. Difficulties encountered with therapeutic and diagnostic calibrations are explored and solutions are suggested. VOLUME III Physics Teaching for Radiologic Technologists, Physics Teaching for Diagnostic Radiology Residents, Physics Teaching for Nuclear Medicine Residents, Physics Teaching for Radiotherapy Residents, Degree Programs in Medical Physics, Radiobiology Teaching, Non-Degree Medical Physics Training and American Board of Radiology Certifications, Radioactivity and Production of Medical Isotopes, Practical Medical Physics Consulting, Radiologic Terminology, Nuclear Medicine Imaging Techniques, Description of Radiotherapy Procedures, Medical Applications of Ultrasonography and Thermography, Glossary of Medical and Anatomical Terms Used in Medical Physics, Equipment List for Medical Physics and Acquisition Priority. Bibliography of Reference Materials. Index.

  6. Feedback in clinical medical education.

    PubMed

    Ende, J

    1983-08-12

    In the setting of clinical medical education, feedback refers to information describing students' or house officers' performance in a given activity that is intended to guide their future performance in that same or in a related activity. It is a key step in the acquisition of clinical skills, yet feedback is often omitted or handled improperly in clinical training. This can result in important untoward consequences, some of which may extend beyond the training period. Once the nature of the feedback process is appreciated, however, especially the distinction between feedback and evaluation and the importance of focusing on the trainees' observable behaviors rather than on the trainees themselves, the educational benefit of feedback can be realized. This article presents guidelines for offering feedback that have been set forth in the literature of business administration, psychology, and education, adapted here for use by teachers and students of clinical medicine. PMID:6876333

  7. Courses in Physics in Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Provides information concerning programs in medical physics, radiation biology, and radiation physics at eight British medical colleges. Each institution is separately listed, and the provided information typically includes program descriptions, graduate programs, and main branches of research. (MLH)

  8. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer 

    E-print Network

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30

    The rising desire for individualized medical physics models has sparked a transition from the use of tangible phantoms toward the employment of computational software for medical physics applications. One such computational ...

  9. Careers in Medical Physics The ACPSEM

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    Careers in Medical Physics #12;The ACPSEM The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine is a not-for-profit professional association of members who have careers in medical physics and in biomedical engineering. Mission: To advance services and professional standards in medical

  10. Alcohol and Drug Abuse in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galanter, Marc, Ed.

    This book presents the state of the art of American medical education in alcohol and drug abuse, and is the culmination of a four-year collaborative effort among the medical school faculty of the Career Teacher Program in Alcohol and Drug Abuse. The first part contains reports, curricula, and survey data prepared for the medical education

  11. Medical Readers' Theater: Relevance to Geriatrics Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna; Cho, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Medical Readers' Theater (MRT) is an innovative and simple way of helping medical students to reflect on difficult-to-discuss topics in geriatrics medical education, such as aging stereotypes, disability and loss of independence, sexuality, assisted living, relationships with adult children, and end-of-life issues. The authors describe a required…

  12. A Historical Perspective of Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcioglu, Huseyin; Bilge, Ugur; Unluoglu, Ilhami

    2015-01-01

    Even though there are significant developments in recent years in medical education, physicians are still needed reform and innovation in order to prepare the information society. The spots in the forefront of medical education in recent years; holistic approach in all processes, including health education, evidence-based medicine and…

  13. Physical Education as Porn!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper offers critical commentary on the culture of "performativity" that has dominated educational discourse over the last 20 years, affecting the way in which researchers, teachers, pupils and parents think and act toward Physical Education and sport (PESP) in schools. It is a culture that, in the UK, is likely to intensify in…

  14. Texas Medical Schools Beef Up Nutrition Education.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-01-01

    With lifestyle-related diseases on the rise, some medical schools help to arm future doctors with the nutrition knowledge they'll need. Texas medical schools and residency programs are getting ahead of the curve in addressing this public-health-meets-medical-education issue, with medical students often leading the charge. PMID:26536515

  15. Medical education in Turkey: past to future.

    PubMed

    Kurdak, Hatice; Altintas, Derya; Doran, Figen

    2008-01-01

    Although medical education in the Republic of Turkey appears to be relatively new, there is almost 500 years of background development within the Anatolian region. Turkey has faced many difficulties in its past and present times, related to its vast and diverse geography, its crowded population, and the many ethnic groups that constitute its population. As in many other countries throughout the world, medical education in Turkey has recently been debated, reviewed and renewed. This article gives a general overview of the history of medical education and the present situation in Turkish medical schools; the quality and professionalism of medical education within the medical system, from the perspectives of undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education; and an overview of the challenges and opportunities that presently exist. PMID:18946820

  16. Biostatistical and medical statistics graduate education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The development of graduate education in biostatistics and medical statistics is discussed in the context of training within a medical center setting. The need for medical researchers to employ a wide variety of statistical designs in clinical, genetic, basic science and translational settings justifies the ongoing integration of biostatistical training into medical center educational settings and informs its content. The integration of large data issues are a challenge. PMID:24472088

  17. Accelerator science in medical physics

    PubMed Central

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

  18. Interprofessional Education in Gross Anatomy: Experience with First-Year Medical and Physical Therapy Students at Mayo Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Steven S.; Yuan, Brandon J.; Lachman, Nirusha; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Krause, David A.; Hollman, John H.; Youdas, James W.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical practice is believed to improve outcomes in health care delivery. Integrating teaching and learning objectives through cross discipline student interaction in basic sciences has the potential to initiate interprofessional collaboration at the early stages of health care education. Student attitudes and…

  19. Space physics educational outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this Space Physics Educational Outreach project was to develop a laboratory experiment and classroom lecture on Earth's aurora for use in lower division college physics courses, with the particular aim of implementing the experiment and lecture at Saint Mary's College of California. The strategy is to teach physics in the context of an interesting natural phenomenon by investigating the physical principles that are important in Earth's aurora, including motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields, particle collisions and chemical reactions, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. As a by-product, the undergraduate students would develop an appreciation for naturally occurring space physics phenomena.

  20. Physics Instruction in European Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letic, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the curricula of medical schools in Europe in order to establish a formal representation of physics in the study of medicine. Information on the curricular representation of physics was gathered from the Internet presentations of medical schools. It was intended to explore at least 25% of medical schools in…

  1. Developing and Assessing Curriculum on the Physics of Medical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K.; Van Ness, Grace R.; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C.; Anderson, Elizabeth A.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre-health majors…

  2. Global minimum essential requirements in medical education.

    PubMed

    2002-03-01

    The process of globalization is increasingly evident in medical education and makes the task of defining global essential competences required by 'global physicians' an urgent matter. This issue was addressed by the newly established Institute for International Medical Education (IIME). The IIME Core Committee developed the concept of 'global minimum essential requirements' ('GMER') and defined a set of global minimum learning outcomes that medical school students must demonstrate at graduation. The 'Essentials' are grouped under seven broad educational domains with a set of 60 learning objectives. Besides these 'global competences', medical schools should add national and local requirements. The focus on student competences as outcomes of medical education should have deep implications for curricular content as well as the educational processes of medical schools. PMID:12098431

  3. Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders in…

  4. Evaluatioin paradigms in medical education.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zarrin Seema

    2006-04-01

    Medical education is regularly challenged with new and innovative ideas in the field of curricula, teaching learning processes and assessment. Evaluation of these approaches and techniques provide vital information regarding their subsequent use and application to enhance the quality of learning experiences for students. Therefore, it is essentially important to choose an evaluation approach/model that provide meaningful and valid information to concerned stakeholders. Here two major paradigm of evaluation i.e. scientific and naturalistic are discussed emphasizing on their use, strengths and limitations. It is concluded that no single paradigm is superior to other and it is finally left to the evaluator for making the ultimate choice depending on the purpose and questions that need to be answered through evaluation. PMID:16624196

  5. Physical Assaults Among Education Workers

    PubMed Central

    Tiesman, Hope M.; Hendricks, Scott; Konda, Srinivas; Hartley, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Enumerate and describe physical assaults occurring to Pennsylvania education workers. Methods A cross-sectional survey was mailed to a random sample of 6450 workers, stratified on gender, occupation, and region. Logistic regression was used to examine risk factors for physical assault. Results During the 2009–2010 school year, 309 of 2514 workers were assaulted 597 times. Special education teachers, urban workers, and those in their first 3 years of employment were at an increased risk. Most assaults did not lead to medical care or time away from work; however, those assaulted were significantly more likely to find work stressful, have low job satisfaction, and consider leaving the education field (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.5 [95% CI = 1.5 to 4.1]; AOR = 2.4 [95% CI = 1.5 to 3.9]; AOR = 10.7 [95% CI = 4.1 to 28.1]). Conclusions Although education workers experienced few serious physical assaults, the impact of this violence was considerable. PMID:24854254

  6. Medical Humanities - the Historical Significance and Mission in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Akihiro

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we consider the significance and mission of medical humanities in medical education from the following six viewpoints: (1) misunderstanding of the medical humanities; (2) its historical development; (3) the criteria for the ideal physician; (4) the contents of current Medical Humanities education; (5) the basic philosophy; and (6) its relation to medical professionalism. Medical humanities consists of the three academic components of bioethics, clinical ethics and medical anthropology, and it is a philosophy and an art which penetrate to the fundamental essence of medicine. The purpose of medical humanities is to develop one's own humanity and spirituality through medical practice and contemplation by empathizing with patients' illness narratives through spiritual self-awakening and by understanding the mutual healing powers of human relations by way of the realization of primordial life. The basic philosophy is "the coincidence of contraries". The ultimate mission of medical humanities is to cultivate physicians to educate themselves and have a life-long philosophy of devotion to understanding, through experience, the coincidence of contraries. PMID:26667195

  7. Child Psychiatry Curricula in Undergraduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Michael Gifford; Giesen, Femke; Walter, Garry

    2008-01-01

    A study to review the amount of time devoted to child psychiatry in undergraduate medical education is conducted. Results conclude that relatively low priority is given to child psychiatry in medical education with suggestions for international teaching standards on the subject.

  8. Montana State University WWAMI Medical Education Program

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Page -1- Montana State University WWAMI Medical Education Program E'14 Orientation Information which offers a combination of intellectual and moral interests found in no other profession, and not met education and life as a medical student. This information comes from faculty and students from previous

  9. Financing Medical Education by the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tim

    This document reviews programs and policy options for states concerned with methods of financing medical education. An introductory section considers the current climate for medical education and the health care workforce, noting the rapid movement to managed care and the need to increase the number of primary care physicians. The next section…

  10. Alternative Careers in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordham, Sheldon L.

    A program offering alternative career education for physical education majors is described. At the Chicago Circle campus of the University of Illinois, the School of Physical Education was recently granted college status and became the College of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. This move was responsive to the declining demand for…

  11. The Role of Medical Museums in Contemporary Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marreez, Yehia M. A-H.; Willems, Luuk N. A.; Wells, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great…

  12. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  13. Accreditation of Allied Medical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    Prepared by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association with the cooperation of collaborating organizations, this document is a collection of guidelines for accredited programs for medical assistants, nuclear medicine technology, orthopedic assistants, radiation therapy technology, and radiologic technologists. The…

  14. Marie Curie's contribution to Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Jean-Claude, Rosenwald; Nüsslin, Fridtjof

    2013-09-01

    On occasion of its 50th anniversary, the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) from now on is going to celebrate annually an International Day of Medical Physics for which the 7th November, the birthday of Marie Sklodowska Curie, a most exceptional character in science at all and a pioneer of medical physics, has been chosen. This article briefly outlines her outstanding personality, sketches her fundamental discovery of radioactivity and emphasizes the impact of her various achievements on the development of medical physics at large. PMID:23958429

  15. WE-E-19A-01: Globalization of Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M; Meghzifene, A; Tsapaki, V; Pipman, Y; Lief, E

    2014-06-15

    Following successful 2012–2013 International Professional Symposiums as a part of Annual AAPM meetings, representatives of AAPM and International Organization of Medical Physics (IOMP) suggested to make this tradiational Symposium a permanent part of Annual AAPM meetings in future. Following the tradition, this session includes presentations of representatives of AAPM, IOMP, European Federation of Medical Physics (EFOMP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP). The speakers will cover various aspects of International collaboration such as educational, professional, and scientific issues, as well as help to developing countries. With further developments of medicine and technology and increased communication with our colleagues overseas, Medical Physics becomes more and more global profession. Use of the same technology, significant progress in medical physics research and developing practical regulations worldwide makes it increasingly useful to organize global collaboration of medical physicists. Several international organizations are tasked to promote such collaboration and provide help to developing countries. Not all AAPM members are fully aware of these international efforts. It is very useful for medical physicists to know about success of our profession in other countries. Different schools present different approaches to the same problem, which allows to find the best solution. By communicating with colleagues overseas, one can learn more than from just reading scientific publications. At this session the attendees will receive a glimpse of International Medical Physics activities. Learning Objectives: Understand the globalization of Medical Physics profession and advantages of collaboration with foreign colleagues. See what role AAPM is playing in establishing contacts with colleagues overseas. Understand the role of IOMP and main directions of its activity. Learn about IAEA and how it helps developing countries. Learn about activity of EFOMP and how can help the global development of Medical Physics. Find out about ICTP and its educational programs.

  16. Memories of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Amy M.; Walls, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore college students' autobiographical memories of physical education (PE). Questionnaires were distributed to students enrolled in undergraduate Introduction to PE and Introduction to Communications courses. The 261 participants wrote about memories of PE. These students recalled events from Grades…

  17. Physical Education: Essential Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ken, Ed.; Hardman, Ken, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book is aimed primarily at under and postgraduate students pursuing entire programmes or discrete courses and modules in the broad area of physical education and sport in schools. It consists of a collection of what is considered to be essential readings in the sense that they are contributions from eminent authors on a breadth of salient…

  18. 78 FR 18990 - Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs... cooperative agreement applications for support for medical professionals' recruitment and continuing education... cooperative agreement is to enhance medical professional recruitment and continuing education...

  19. Graduate Medical Education Agreement of Appointment Wayne State University

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Graduate Medical Education Agreement of Appointment Wayne State University 201_ - 201_ WHEREAS Wayne State University Graduate Medical Education Program ("WSU" or "Sponsoring Institution" or "University") provides a Graduate Medical Education Program approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate

  20. biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering

    E-print Network

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris

    biophysics; photosynthetic energy harvesting and conversion; information processing; physical principles of renewable energy production, advanced prostheses, and environmental control and engineering. Editorbiological and medical physics, biomedical engineering For further volumes: http

  1. Reflections on Experimental Research in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    As medical education research advances, it is important that education researchers employ rigorous methods for conducting and reporting their investigations. In this article we discuss several important yet oft neglected issues in designing experimental research in education. First, randomization controls for only a subset of possible confounders.…

  2. Introduction to Education Bachelor of Education (Physical Education)

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    of quality teacher education and educational research. Innovative teacher training The College has been2016 Introduction to Education Education. Bachelor of Education (Physical Education) Bachelor Education Graduate 24 Frequently asked questions 25 Other UC publications 1 Welcome from the PVC 2 A history

  3. A Review of the Medical Education Literature for Graduate Medical Education Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Kenneth A.; Bates, Carol K.; Karani, Reena; Chheda, Shobhina G.

    2013-01-01

    Background A rapidly evolving body of literature in medical education can impact the practice of clinical educators in graduate medical education. Objective To aggregate studies published in the medical education literature in 2011 to provide teachers in general internal medicine with an overview of the current, relevant medical education literature. Review We systematically searched major medical education journals and the general clinical literature for medical education studies with sound design and relevance to the educational practice of graduate medical education teachers. We chose 12 studies, grouped into themes, using a consensus method, and critiqued these studies. Results Four themes emerged. They encompass (1) learner assessment, (2) duty hour limits and teaching in the inpatient setting, (3) innovations in teaching, and (4) learner distress. With each article we also present recommendations for how readers may use them as resources to update their clinical teaching. While we sought to identify the studies with the highest quality and greatest relevance to educators, limitation of the studies selected include their single-site and small sample nature, and the frequent lack of objective measures of outcomes. These limitations are shared with the larger body of medical education literature. Conclusions The themes and the recommendations for how to incorporate this information into clinical teaching have the potential to inform the educational practice of general internist educators as well as that of teachers in other specialties. PMID:24404262

  4. Postage stamps fading as medical education tool.

    PubMed

    Titford, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Postage stamps have often been used around the world to educate the general public and to promote programs and policies. Stamps with medical themes have also been used to educate the general public about different aspects of medicine. As a result of the newer methods of communication, however, fewer and fewer commemorative postage stamps are used and most members of the general public never see stamps with medical themes. This article reviews recently issued stamps of medical interest, and some other medical stamps that have been issued down through the years. Some stamps with connections to the South East United States are also discussed. PMID:19488002

  5. Professional Science Master in Medical Physics (PSMMP)

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Professional Science Master in Medical Physics (PSMMP) CAMPEP Accredited Department of Physics Florida atlantic University #12;T he Department of Physics offers the Professional Science Master, Chemistry, Computer Science or Engineering with a minor in Physics are considered. 2. At least a 3.0 (of a 4

  6. Tele-education as method of medical education.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Kulasin, Igor; Masic, Zlatan; Valjevac, Salih

    2009-01-01

    Development of computer networks and introduction and application of new technologies in all aspects of human activity needs to be followed by universities in their transformation on how to approach scientific, research, and education teaching curricula. Development and increased use of distance learning (DL) over the past decade have clearly shown the potential and efficiency of information technology applied in education. Use of information technology in medical education is where medical informatics takes its place as important scientific discipline which ensures benefit from IT in teaching and learning process involved. Definition of telemedicine as "use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance" covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (eHealth), telematics, but also tele-education. Web based medical education today is offered in different forms--from online lectures, online exams, web based continuous education programs, use of electronic libraries, online medical and scientific databases etc. Department of Medical Informatics of Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo has taken many steps to introduce distance learning in medical curricula--from organising professional--scientific events (congresses, workshop etc), organizing first tele-exam at the faculty and among first at the university, to offering online lectures and online education material at the Department's website (www.unsa-medinfo.org). Distance learning in medical education, as well as telemedicine, significantly influence health care in general and are shaping the future model of medical practice. Basic computer and networks skills must be a part of all future medical curricula. The impact of technical equipment on patient-doctor relationship must be taken into account, and doctors have to be trained and prepared for diagnosing or consulting patients by use of IT. Telemedicine requires special approach in certain medical fields--tele-consultation, tele-surgery, tele-radiology and other specific telemedicine applications should be introduced to the curricula. Telemedicine and distance learning are best suited for medical education and doctor-to-doctor consultation--first contact between doctor and a patient should stay face-to-face when possible. In this paper, we present the results of the project Introduction and Implementation of Distance Learning at the Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo and compare it with the following expected outcomes: development and integration of information technology in medical education; creation of flexible infrastructure which will enable access to e-learning to all students and teaching staff; improvement of digital literacy of academic population; ensuring high educational standards to students and teaching staff; helping medical staffto develop "life-long learning" approach in work and education. PMID:20380118

  7. Fostering Interprofessional Teamwork in an Academic Medical Center: Near-Peer Education for Students during Gross Medical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Richard K.; Pizzimenti, Marc A.; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Schwinn, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe student satisfaction with a near-peer interprofessional education (IPE) session for physical therapy and medical students. Ten senior physical therapy students worked in peer-groups to develop a musculoskeletal anatomy demonstration for first-semester medical students. Together with their classmates, they…

  8. A new pathway for medical education.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Stephen C; Buser, Boyd R; Hahn, Marc B; Crosby, John B; Cymet, Tyler; Mintz, Joshua S; Nichols, Karen J

    2013-11-01

    Physician education in the United States must change to meet the primary care needs of a rapidly transforming health care delivery system. Yet medical schools continue to produce a disproportionate number of hospital-based specialists through a high-cost, time-intensive educational model. In response, the American Osteopathic Association and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine established a blue-ribbon commission to recommend changes needed to prepare primary care physicians for the evolving system. The commission recommends that medical schools, in collaboration with their graduate medical education partners, create a new education model that is based on achievement of competencies without a prescribed number of months of study and incorporates the knowledge and skills needed for a twenty-first-century primary care practice. The course of study would occur within a longitudinal clinical training environment that allows for seamless transition from medical school through residency training. PMID:24191078

  9. Rural Medical Education: Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon R.; Bornstein, Stephen; Jong, Michael; Fleet, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    (Purpose) This report summarizes a synthesis of the literature related to the evidence, initiatives and approaches to rural/northern medical education, particularly its role in strengthening the medical workforce in rural areas. (Methodology) A literature review was conducted involving the literature databases MEDLINE (January 1990-March 2003),…

  10. Just imagine: new paradigms for medical education.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil B; Hull, Alan L; Young, James B; Stoller, James K

    2013-10-01

    For all its traditional successes, the current model of medical education in the United States and Canada is being challenged on issues of quality, throughput, and cost, a process that has exposed numerous shortcomings in its efforts to meet the needs of the nations' health care systems. A radical change in direction is required because the current path will not lead to a solution.The 2010 publication Educating Physicians: A Call for Reform of Medical School and Residency identifies several goals for improving the medical education system, and proposals have been made to reform medical education to meet these goals. Enacting these recommendations practically and efficiently, while training more health care providers at a lower cost, is challenging.To advance solutions, the authors review innovations that are disrupting higher education and describe a vision for using these to create a new model for competency-based, learner-centered medical education that can better meet the needs of the health care system while adhering to the spirit of the above proposals. These innovations include collaboration amongst medical schools to develop massive open online courses for didactic content; faculty working in small groups to leverage this online content in a "flipped-classroom" model; and digital badges for credentialing entrustable professional activities over the continuum of learning. PMID:23969368

  11. Medical education in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Walker, Bailus; Mouton, Charles

    2009-08-01

    This commentary is a reaction of medical educators and health practitioners to the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation's recently released report, Revisiting the Medical School Mission at a Time of Expansion. The report is a fresh assessment of what more medical schools must do to prepare students for 21st century challenges and opportunities to improve the health status of the population including underserved groups. PMID:19648693

  12. Modeling Manipulation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Jason I.

    2010-01-01

    As residents and medical students progress through their medical training, they are presented with multiple instances in which they feel they must manipulate the healthcare system and deceive others in order to efficiently treat their patients. This, however, creates a culture of manipulation resulting in untoward effects on trainees' ethical and…

  13. Emerging technologies in physics education

    E-print Network

    Zosia A. C. Krusberg

    2007-03-24

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies - Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools - are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting conceptual change, developing expert-like problem-solving skills, and achieving the goals of the traditional physics laboratory. Pedagogical methods to maximize the potential of each educational technology are suggested.

  14. A Linked Dataset of Medical Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietze, Stefan; Taibi, Davide; Yu, Hong Qing; Dovrolis, Nikolas

    2015-01-01

    Reusable educational resources became increasingly important for enhancing learning and teaching experiences, particularly in the medical domain where resources are particularly expensive to produce. While interoperability across educational resources metadata repositories is yet limited to the heterogeneity of metadata standards and interface…

  15. Graduate and medical education - 2000 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The author addresses the fate and future of Graduate and Medical Education. The dominant concern lies with the identification of a reliable and continuous source of funding for the education, training and research experience of the students. The problems and the needs are discussed along with some potential remedies.

  16. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, “learning at bedside,” aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education – their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education. PMID:23408471

  17. Properties of Publications on Anatomy in Medical Education Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc; Bolhuis, Sanneke; van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Kooloos, Jan; Laan, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Publications on anatomy in medical education appear to be largely anecdotal. To explore this, we investigated the literature on anatomy in medical education, aiming first to evaluate the contribution of the literature on anatomy in medical education to "best evidence medical education" (BEME) and second to evaluate the development of this…

  18. Education in the 80's: Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Celeste, Ed.; And Others

    In this collection of essays, theories are presented on the present and future status of physical education instruction. The essay in the first chapter explores the idea that, to function or survive in a complex society, individuals must work to unify the mind and body. The second chapter emphasizes that physical education provides people with…

  19. Individual Education Programs for Adapted Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conatser, Phillip; Summar, Cliff

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504, least restrictive environment (LRE) relate to physical education placement and services. More specifically, the Individual Education Program (IEP) is explained with suggestions for initial screening, referral, and assessment. Ten levels of service…

  20. Career Opportunities in Medical Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendee, William R.; Siegel, Edward

    1977-01-01

    Surveys applications of physics in medicine, including the use of physical principles and techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, and the use of these concepts in preventive medicine and safe clinical environments. (MLH)

  1. Physical Education, Cognition and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Traditional analytical philosophy of education assigns a peripheral place to physical education, partly because orthodox epistemology finds its cognitive claims implausible. An understandable but dubious response to this state of affairs is the attempt to relocate physical education within the academic curriculum, with its characteristic emphasis…

  2. The Politics of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper, which was given as the Dudley Allen Sargent lecture at the 2012 conference of the National Association for Kinesiology and Physical Education in Higher Education, discusses the politics of physical education. It examines how both national politics and local/campus politics affect the discipline. Drawing from the history of national…

  3. Physical Education and Fostering Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosco, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Rather than presenting an academic paper, I wanted to simply examine my own perspective as a physical educator and classroom teacher and the importance of creating relationships with children. As a relatively new physical educator and recent Masters of Education graduate of the University of Toronto at OISE, but experienced classroom teacher…

  4. Teaching medical physics to general audiences.

    PubMed Central

    Amador, S

    1994-01-01

    By judiciously selecting topics and reading materials, one can teach a full semester course on medical physics appropriate for college students not majoring in the natural sciences. This interdisciplinary field offers an opportunity to teach a great deal of basic physics at the freshman level in the context of explaining modern medical technologies such as ultrasound imaging, laser surgery, and positron emission tomography. This article describes one such course which combines lectures, outside visitors, varied readings, and laboratories to convey a select subset of physical principles and quantitative problem-solving skills. These resources are also valuable for enriching the standard freshman physics sequence for premedical students. PMID:8075355

  5. Health Occupations Education: Medical Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Jamee Reid

    These medical assistant instructional materials include 28 instructional units organized into sections covering orientation; anatomy and physiology, related disorders, disease, and skills; office practices; and clinical practices. Each unit includes eight basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for teachers, information…

  6. Physical Education, Grades K-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, CT.

    GRADES OR AGES: K-8. SUBJECT MATTER: Physical education. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into two parts, one each for grades K-4 and 5-8, each with the same format. The guide is xeroxed and spiral bound with a paper cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: General objectives for physical education are developed in the…

  7. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies--Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools--are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting…

  8. Quality Assurance in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Wilson, Wesley J.

    2012-01-01

    In an economic and political climate marked by the continued reduction of physical education programs, the authors believe that advocacy is now a professional responsibility that all physical educators have a duty to perform. Despite support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010), the National Association for Sport and Physical

  9. Beyond 'clinical'?: four-dimensional medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, S; Zwi, A

    1994-01-01

    Medical education is in crisis. Undergraduates experience an excessive burden of information, develop attitudes to learning that are based on passive acquisition of knowledge than on curiosity and exploration, and suffer from progressive disenchantment with medicine. There is also a serious problem of providing adequate clinical experience for medical students at existing teaching sites, largely because of reduction in bed numbers, increased patient throughput and clinical specialization. This problem was identified over a decade ago in London but has not been solved by the merger of medical schools. A recent survey in one London teaching hospital showed underemployment of students and limited patient contact. A review of clinical clerkships in an Australian medical school revealed that one-third of teachers were perceived as unconcerned, discouraging, derogatory or hostile, and only one-half were rated as effective educators. One consequence has been the development of a wide-ranging debate on changing medical education. Traditionalists have diminishing room for manoeuvre in defence of existing educational practices, as cautious bodies like the General Medical Council (GMC) opt for fundamental reform. PMID:7932461

  10. Cartesian Dualism and Physical Education: Epistemological Incompatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Saul

    Two questions arise in examining the implications of physical education: Is physical education an education of the physical? and Is physical education an education through the physical? In these two questions there are two distinct points of view, two different ways of understanding the meaning, scope, and aim of education, two conceptions of man,…

  11. Scientism vs humanism in medical education.

    PubMed

    Doran, G A

    1983-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that there is an ideological acceptance of science in the general community. This paper reviews some of the evidence to suggest that a form of scientism (i.e. the belief that only the current scientific method of the natural sciences can fruitfully be used in the pursuit of knowledge) has pervaded the practise of medicine and medical education. It argues for exposure of medical students to the humanistic growth-model of medicine and illness as well as the traditional disease-model. It is suggested also that the entrenchment of the disease model in medical education is a direct and inevitable result of the entrenchment of scientific method in medicine, to the point where such method is ideologically accepted in medical practice. PMID:6658489

  12. Development of an Asset Map of Medical Education Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiaanse, Mary E.; Russell, Eleanor L.; Crandall, Sonia J.; Lambros, Ann; Manuel, Janeen C.; Kirk, Julienne K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical education research is gaining recognition as scholarship within academic medical centers. This survey was conducted at a medium-sized academic medical center in the United States. The purpose of the study was to learn faculty interest in research in medical education, so assets could be used to develop educational scholarship…

  13. Physical disability among American medical students.

    PubMed

    Wu, S S; Tsang, P; Wainapel, S F

    1996-01-01

    The present survey aimed to assess the prevalence and nature of physical disabilities among medical school graduates and to investigate the academic performance of these new physicians with disabilities. A questionnaire was sent to the deans of student affairs of each of the then existing 128 United States and Puerto Rican medical schools, addressing the profiles of students with physical disabilities in the 1987 through 1990 graduating classes. Seventy-seven (60%) United States and Puerto Rican medical schools responded to the questionnaire, of which 67 were able to complete it. A total of 67 students with physical disabilities (40 males and 27 females) were reported. Three of the 67 students were excluded from the study because their conditions did not match our definition of physical disability. The remaining 64 students (38 males and 26 females), ranging from 0 to 10 per school, comprised 0.19% of the 33,138 students who graduated from the 67 medical schools during these 4 academic yr. The disabilities represented by the 64 students encompassed a wide spectrum of etiologies, including neurologic (39%), musculoskeletal (20%), medical-surgical (13%), visual (13%), and auditory (9%) problems. The majority of students with disabilities had above average (36%) to average (48%) academic standings. The actual prevalence of medical students with disabilities might be higher than reported because of the underreporting of the less noticeable types of disabilities. PMID:8663924

  14. Beyond accreditation: excellence in medical education.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun

    2014-01-01

    Medical school accreditation is a relatively new phenomenon in Korea. The development of an accreditation body and standards for a two-tiered "Must" and "Should" system in 1997 eventually led to the implementation of a third "Excellence" level of attainment. These standards were conceived out of a desire to be able to first recognize and promote outstanding performance of medical schools, second to provide role models in medical education, and furthermore to preview the third level as potential components of the pre-existing second level for the next accreditation cycle. It is a quality-assurance mechanism that, while not required for accreditation itself, pushes medical schools to go beyond the traditional requirements of mere pass-or-fail accreditation adequacy, and encourages schools to deliver an unprecedented level of medical education. The Association for Medical Education in Europe developed its own third-tier system of evaluation under the ASPIRE project, with many similar goals. Due to its advanced nature and global scope, the Korean accreditation body has decided to implement the ASPIRE system in Korea as well. PMID:24050749

  15. Sexual health innovations in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, E; Pugnaire, M P; Jonassen, J A; O'Dell, K; Clay, M; Hatem, D; Carlin, M

    2003-10-01

    Recent national and global initiatives have drawn attention to the importance of sexual health to individuals' well-being. These initiatives advocate enhancement of efforts to address this under-represented topic in health professions curricula. University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) has undertaken a comprehensive effort to develop an integrated curriculum in sexual health. The UMMS project draws upon the expertise of a multidisciplinary faculty of clinicians, basic scientists, a medical ethicist, and educators. This article describes the project's genesis and development at UMMS, and reports on three innovations in sexual health education implemented as part of this endeavor. PMID:14551577

  16. The programs and context of medical education in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Angel M

    2006-12-01

    There are 29 medical schools in Argentina (this number has increased rapidly in the last decade) offering a 6-year curriculum that usually consists of 3 years of basic science, 2 years of clinical sciences, and one internship year. Annually, 5,000 physicians graduate from these programs. Admission requirements vary depending on each university's policy. Some do not have entry requirements; others require a course, usually on the basics of mathematics, biology, chemistry or physics, and some introduction to social and humanistic studies. Each year, there are approximately 12,000 first-year medical students attending the 29 schools, which suffer a high dropout rate during the first years because of vocational problems or inability to adapt to university life. Some schools have massive classes (over 2,000 students), which makes it difficult for the schools to perfect their teaching. The number of full-time faculty members is low, and some of them have appointments at more than one medical school. Residency programs offer an insufficient number of places, and fewer than 50% of the graduates can obtain a residency position because of strict admission requirements. Coordination between the Ministry of Health, representing the health care system, and the Ministry of Education, representing the medical education system, needs to be improved. Despite the problems of medical education in Argentina, the movement to improve the education of health care workers is growing. The author offers two recommendations to help accomplish this goal. PMID:17122474

  17. Integrating Physical Education, Math, and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Greg M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of education is to help students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to solve the problems that occur in real-life situations. One of the most touted methods for achieving this goal is through curriculum integration. Physical education students can benefit from an integrated curriculum. NASPE's (National Association tar Sport…

  18. Physical Education & Outdoor Education: Complementary but Discrete Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter; McCullagh, John

    2011-01-01

    The Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER) includes Outdoor Education (OE) as a component of Physical Education (PE). Yet Outdoor Education is clearly thought of by many as a discrete discipline separate from Physical Education. Outdoor Education has a body of knowledge that differs from that of Physical

  19. Microethics in medical education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, KP; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    “Microethics” is an avant-garde in the field of ethics. When the term “ethics” is brought into discussion in medical education or clinical practice, it customarily points to the traditional ethics, that is, biomedical ethics that deals with the ethical issues faced during unaccustomed or rare clinical circumstances. In contrast, microethics is a continuous ethical science existing in the physician-patient interaction that happens each day in every physician's clinical liaison. These ethical issues of everyday importance need to be introduced in the ethics training programs of medical institutions to provide insight and thereby promoting improvement in medical care and outcome.

  20. Microethics in medical education and practice.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, K P; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    "Microethics" is an avant-garde in the field of ethics. When the term "ethics" is brought into discussion in medical education or clinical practice, it customarily points to the traditional ethics, that is, biomedical ethics that deals with the ethical issues faced during unaccustomed or rare clinical circumstances. In contrast, microethics is a continuous ethical science existing in the physician-patient interaction that happens each day in every physician's clinical liaison. These ethical issues of everyday importance need to be introduced in the ethics training programs of medical institutions to provide insight and thereby promoting improvement in medical care and outcome. PMID:26629449

  1. Physical Education in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve; Sanders, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the incidence and quality of physical activity instruction during early childhood. Although the positive effect of physical activity on the cognitive, social, and physical development of young children is generally acknowledged, there is little emphasis nationally on ensuring appropriate physical educational experiences…

  2. University Supervision within Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Steven C.; Grenier, Michelle; Channell, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Physical education teacher education (PETE) students are given opportunities in "early field experiences" (EFEs) to observe and assist experienced teachers in schools. Typically, students are then required to do some autonomous teaching, to give them practical experience in the real world of local schools. Ultimately students will move on to…

  3. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    ScienceCinema

    Finkelstein, Noah [University of Colorado, Colorado, USA

    2009-09-01

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  4. Educating Scientifically: Advances in Physics Education Research

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Noah

    2007-05-16

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  5. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Noah

    2007-05-16

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  6. Why Preschoolers Need Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2011-01-01

    NAEYC, the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, and the US Department of Health and Human Services all recommend that preschool programs offer physical education. There are many reasons why. First, young children form healthy habits early in life. Before entering elementary school they learn to brush their teeth, bathe…

  7. Using Humor in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David; Christenson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Humor can be extremely beneficial in everyday life, whether giving or receiving it. It can be used to lighten the mood, give encouragement, or make corrections. Humor in physical education is no exception. Physical educators can use humor as a teaching tool and to create an environment for students to acquire the knowledge to practice a lifetime…

  8. Alternative Careers in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Charlotte

    Several alternate definitions of "physical education" can be presented to illustrate the fact that changes in name or definition open the way to new opportunities and new ways of thinking of career options. Traditional definitions of physical education have limited it to a profession of teaching in the traditional school system normal children…

  9. Mastery Learning in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annarino, Anthony

    This paper discusses the design of a physical education curriculum to be used in advanced secondary physical education programs and in university basic instructional programs; the design is based on the premise of mastery learning and employs programed instructional techniques. The effective implementation of a mastery learning model necessitates…

  10. Islamic Principles and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Karen; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Based on interviews with five Islamic respondents, this paper investigates stricter Islamic parents' difficulties with certain assumptions and practices of Australian education, particularly health and physical education. Concerns about modesty and separation of sexes conflict with central aims based on equal educational opportunities and equality…

  11. Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

  12. Is It Physical Education or Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, 2005

    2005-01-01

    With heightened attention on childhood obesity prevention efforts, there seems to be some confusion between the terms "physical education" and "physical activity." Often the words are used interchangeably but they differ in important ways. Understanding the difference between the two is critical to understanding why both contribute to the…

  13. Introducing medical students to careers in medical education: the student track at an annual medical education conference.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret; Suzuki, Mari; Arepalli, Sruthi; Schroth, Scott; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Few avenues exist to familiarize medical students with careers as clinician-educators, and the clinician-educator career pathway has not been well defined. In this article, the authors describe how they integrated a career-oriented student track into the 2011 Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) annual retreat to introduce students to careers in medical education. Annual education conferences are principal sources of educational scholarship, networking, collaboration, and information sharing; as such, they represent attractive venues for early exposure to the culture of medical education. The authors' goal in creating the NEGEA conference student track was to excite students about careers in medical education by providing them with an array of opportunities for active involvement in both student-specific and general conference activities.The authors draw from their experience to provide a guide for recruiting student participants to career-building student tracks. They also offer a guide for developing future student tracks, based on their experience and grounded in social cognitive career theory. Although their focus is on medical education, they believe these guides will be useful for educators planning a conference-based student track in any field. PMID:23807107

  14. Trends and the future of postgraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    Harden, R M

    2006-01-01

    Where is the present flurry of activity in medical education leading and what sort of future is envisaged? This paper looks at trends in postgraduate medical education. Four themes and two trends for each theme have been identified. The themes are: the postgraduate medical curriculum, the application of learning technologies, assessment of competence, and professionalism in medical education. The trends are: outcome based education and a unitary approach to medical education; the use of simulators and e?learning; competency and performance based assessment, and portfolios and self assessment; and training the trainer and best evidence medical education. Any limitations in implementing change will likely result from a lack of imagination in those planning postgraduate medical education and their ability to bring about the necessary changes. To avoid a growing gap developing between what is possible educationally and what is delivered, it is clear that we need a new paradigm for postgraduate medical education. PMID:16988312

  15. Medical Informatics Education & Research in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Chouvarda, I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This paper aims to present an overview of the medical informatics landscape in Greece, to describe the Greek ehealth background and to highlight the main education and research axes in medical informatics, along with activities, achievements and pitfalls. Methods With respect to research and education, formal and informal sources were investigated and information was collected and presented in a qualitative manner, including also quantitative indicators when possible. Results Greece has adopted and applied medical informatics education in various ways, including undergraduate courses in health sciences schools as well as multidisciplinary postgraduate courses. There is a continuous research effort, and large participation in EU-wide initiatives, in all the spectrum of medical informatics research, with notable scientific contributions, although technology maturation is not without barriers. Wide-scale deployment of eHealth is anticipated in the healthcare system in the near future. While ePrescription deployment has been an important step, ICT for integrated care and telehealth have a lot of room for further deployment. Conclusions Greece is a valuable contributor in the European medical informatics arena, and has the potential to offer more as long as the barriers of research and innovation fragmentation are addressed and alleviated. PMID:26123910

  16. Medical Ethics Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Ellen; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews the 25-year history of undergraduate medical ethics education. Alternatives to the traditional model that focus more directly on students' personal values, attitudes, and behavior, are discussed. Three incipient trends are identified: everyday ethics, student ethics, and macro-ethics. Specific course and curricula are used as…

  17. Medical Terminology: Prefixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (prefixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to prefixes, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an…

  18. Medical Terminology: Suffixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (suffixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to the module topic, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. The first two learning…

  19. Vanquishing Virtue: The Impact of Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, Jack; Williams, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that North American medical education favors an explicit commitment to traditional values of doctoring--empathy, compassion, and altruism--but a tacit commitment to behaviors grounded in an ethic of detachment, self-interest, and objectivity. Explores differing ways (conflation, deflation, and maintaining of values) that students respond…

  20. Characterizing Computer Systems Used in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Church, V. E.; Tidball, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The diversity in computer systems used in medical education is described, and the lack of consistant classifications and comparisons noted. A classification scheme based on those characteristics specific to the development and presentation of instructional software is proposed. A graphic system profile approach is used to ensure clarity, while categorization of users and desirable features provides breadth and precision of coverage.

  1. UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACULTY OF MEDICINE & DENTISTRY

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACULTY OF MEDICINE & DENTISTRY FOR CLINICAL ELECTIVE Clinical, University of Alberta 1-002 Katz Group Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 Phone: 780.492.6350 Fax: 780.492.9531 Clinical Email: electives@med.ualberta.ca #12;

  2. UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACULTY OF MEDICINE & DENTISTRY

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION FACULTY OF MEDICINE & DENTISTRY FOR CLINICAL ELECTIVE Clinical, University of Alberta 1-002 Katz Group Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 Phone: 780.492.6350 Fax: 780.492.9531 Clinical Email: electives@ualberta.ca #12;

  3. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  4. Montana State University 1 WWAMI Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    the basic and clinical sciences, and includes rural health care at an early time in medical education Medicine, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurology, OB/GYN, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Surgery Bozeman/GYN, Pediatrics & Psychiatry Kalispell: Family Medicine, OB/GYN, Surgery Lewistown: Family Medicine Libby: Family

  5. Continuing Medical Education: Use of systemic

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    therapy after successful macular surgery in eyes with macular edema due to idiopathic macular epiretinal (ILM) peeling for macular edema due to ERM were included in this single center trial. Patients were rContinuing Medical Education: Use of systemic steroid after successful macular surgery in eyes

  6. Use of Silicon Detectors in Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-09-25

    In this document I will review the characteristics and applications of silicon detectors in Medical Physics. I will cover the activities done by some research mexican groups working with silicon detectors (Silicon Strip and PIN detectors) as devices for digital imaging supported by some Monte Carlo simulations and X-ray units parameters valuation devices for quality control. In the end I will give some perspectives on the future of these scientific activities as important contributions in the development of the area of Medical Physics around the world.

  7. Preventive Pediatrics in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Read, John H.

    1963-01-01

    Knowledge of the intricacies of child growth and development and the complexities of family and community dynamics are invaluable for an adequate appraisal of the health needs of the child and for a responsible discharge of professional service. An attempt to incorporate these principles into a medical curriculum is illustrated by a specific method of teaching preventive pediatrics successfully employed over the past five years at the University of British Columbia. First-year students are assigned families and instructed and supervised in observation, examination and interviewing techniques relevant to the normal child. The second-year program is focused on specific individual and family problems of interpersonal relations and elaborates on counselling and other preventive techniques. Research projects are undertaken by the students. By the third year the program is integrated into the tradetional hospital setting, with additive exposure to the functioning of community health and welfare services. PMID:13973393

  8. MedicalPhysicsWeb PHYSICS IN MEDICINE & BIOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    MedicalPhysicsWeb PHYSICS IN MEDICINE & BIOLOGY Oct 11, 2010 D K Nagesha et al 2010 Phys. Med. Biol efficiency of IGRT can be further enhanced by biological in-situ dose painting (BIS-IGRT) of radiosensitizers for biological in-situ image-guided radio therapy (BIS-IGRT) Page 1 of 2Radiosensitizer-eluting nanocoatings

  9. 78 FR 11213 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ...standards and guidelines for physical qualifications of operators...vessels, medical examiner education, and medical research...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...c) medical examiner education; and (d) medical...nvic/ Medical and Physical Guidelines for...

  10. 78 FR 52779 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ...standards and guidelines for physical qualifications of operators...vessels, medical examiner education, and medical research...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...c) medical examiner education; and (d) medical...nvic/ Medical and Physical Guidelines for...

  11. 77 FR 20834 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ...standards and guidelines for physical qualifications of operators...vessels, medical examiner education, and medical research...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...vessels; medical examiner education; and medical research...nvic/. Medical and Physical Guidelines for...

  12. Medical specialty boards can help measure graduate medical education outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Carek, Peter; Holmboe, Eric S; Puffer, James C; Warm, Eric J; Phillips, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    U.S. graduate medical education (GME) training institutions are under increasing scrutiny to measure program outcomes as a demonstration of accountability for the sizeable funding they receive from the federal government. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is a potential agent of measuring GME accountability but has no interaction with physicians after residency training is completed. American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) member boards interact with physicians throughout their careers through maintenance of certification (MOC) and are a potential source of valuable data on physician competency and quality of care, both of which could be used to measure GME accountability.The authors propose that ABMS boards and the ACGME deepen their existing relationship to better assess residency training outcomes. ABMS boards have a wealth of data on physicians collected as a by-product of MOC and business operations. Further, many ABMS boards collect practice demographics and scope-of-practice information through MOC enrollment surveys or recertification examination questionnaires. These data are potentially valuable in helping residencies know what their graduates are doing in practice. Part 4 of MOC generally involves assessment of the quality of care delivered in practice, and ABMS boards could share these deidentified data with the ACGME and residency programs to provide direct feedback on the practice outcomes of graduates.ABMS member boards and the ACGME should broaden their long-standing relationship to further develop shared roles and data-sharing mechanisms to better inform residencies and the public about GME training outcomes. PMID:24871232

  13. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor. 412.322 Section 412.322...Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data. CMS...

  14. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor. 412.322 Section 412.322...Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data. CMS...

  15. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor. 412.322 Section 412.322...Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data. CMS...

  16. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor. 412.322 Section 412.322...Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data. CMS...

  17. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor. 412.322 Section 412.322...Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data. CMS...

  18. The Value of Performance in Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2013-01-01

    The current philosophical paradigm in higher education, where theory transcends practice, consigns physical education to the bottom of a hierarchy of educational content (Kretchmar, 2005). Leaders of physical education teacher education programs are left with three difficult choices: (a) accept physical education's lowly position in the…

  19. Physical Education, Liberal Education and the Leaving Certificate Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the conceptualization of physical education as a Leaving Certificate Examination subject and the place of physical education in a liberal education. Special attention is given to the conceptual evolution of physical education and its intrinsic educational values and to the developments in the idea of a liberal education over…

  20. Science Education Research vs. Physics Education Research: A Structural Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to introduce physics education research (PER) to researchers in other fields. Topics include discussion of differences between science education research (SER) and physics education research (PER), physics educators, research design and methodology in physics education research and current research traditions and…

  1. Educational programs in US medical schools.

    PubMed

    Jonas, H S; Etzel, S I; Barzansky, B

    1991-08-21

    One noteworthy finding for the 1990-1991 academic year is the increasing number of applicants to medical school, coupled with stabilization in the credentials of accepted applicants. This increase appears to be reversing the downward trend of the 1980s. The percentages of women and total minority students in the entering class increased from the previous year. The prevalence of instructional formats such as problem-based learning and computer-assisted instruction illustrates that medical schools are willing to experiment with educational innovation. A number of schools are in the process of curriculum review, which may lead to important changes. The financial support offered by private foundations interested in curriculum innovation, for some, will be an added stimulus for change. While the majority of medical schools continue to require that students take the examinations and the subject tests of the NBME, evaluation formats that test clinical skills are receiving increased attention. The number of schools using multiple station examinations (often with standardized patients) is rising. The impact of the new US Medical Licensing Examination on medical school curricula should be analyzed in the future. Although steady increases have been reported in the number of medical school faculty members, especially clinical faculty, there is little information about how these faculty members apportion their time between teaching, research, and patient care. The assumption is that the increases are primarily driven by medical schools' need to provide clinical services, which are a source of income. Another explanation for faculty increases could relate to the need for more faculty involvement in educational innovations such as problem-based learning and new methods of clinical skills evaluation, which are relatively more faculty-intensive. Continued monitoring of the growth in clinical faculty will be necessary, as will more careful analysis of how medical school faculty spend their time. Since medical school faculty who have heavy involvements in teaching frequently do not receive appropriate recognition or reward, it will also be interesting to examine the effectiveness of diverse incentives used by the schools to reward teaching faculty. An appropriate reward system for teaching is important if undergraduate medical education is to command a high priority in institutions awarding the doctor of medicine degree. PMID:1870221

  2. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  3. Quality assurance of medical education: a case study from Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Schirlo, Christian; Heusser, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    In the light of ongoing changes and challenges in the European health systems which also have significant implications for undergraduate medical education, the present paper describes the accreditation of medical education programmes in Switzerland focussing on undergraduate medical education. A summary of the methodology used is provided and first experiences as well as future perspectives are discussed in the light of the aim to achieve continuous quality assurance and improvement in medical education. PMID:21818193

  4. Alternatives in Medical Education: Non-Animal Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Peggy, Ed.

    The technology explosion in medical education has led to the use of computer models, videotapes, interactive videos, and state-of-the-art simulators in medical training. This booklet describes alternatives to using animals in medical education. Although it is mainly intended to describe products applicable to medical school courses, high-quality,…

  5. A Bi-national Perspective on Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escovitz, Gerald H.; Davis, Dave

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a review and comparison of qualitative improvements in the organization, needs assessment, educational methodology, evaluation, and research in continuing medical education in the United States and Canada. Accreditation, medical schools, medical societies and specialty boards, and health care systems and continuing medical

  6. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  7. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  8. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  9. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  10. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  11. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  12. An Overview of Undergraduate Physiology Education in Turkish Medical Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkanci, Z. Dicle; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    Physiology education, which occupies an important place in undergraduate medical education, exhibits diversities across the world. Since there was no specific source of information about physiology education in Turkish medical faculties, the authors aimed to evaluate the general status of undergraduate physiology teaching of medical students in…

  13. Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform -Involve -Enable

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform - Involve - Enable Revised 3/14/14 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Name (Last, First, M________________________ Date:________ ResetPrint Save #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform

  14. Computer Games and Virtual Environments for Medical Education and

    E-print Network

    Scacchi, Walt

    Computer Games and Virtual Environments for Medical Education and Research Walt Scacchi Institute #12;Game-based VW simulator interfaces for immersive medical education: a spectrum of cost vs realism,000 vs. $5,000,000 #12;Game-based VW simulator interfaces for immersive medical education: low-cost vs

  15. Medicare Financing of Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Eugene C; Liebow, Mark; Srinivasan, Malathi; Parish, David; Wolliscroft, James O; Fein, Oliver; Blaser, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen ongoing debate regarding federal support of graduate medical education, with numerous proposals for reform. Several critical problems with the current mechanism are evident on reviewing graduate medical education (GME) funding issues from the perspectives of key stakeholders. These problems include the following: substantial interinstitutional and interspecialty variations in per-resident payment amounts; teaching costs that have not been recalibrated since 1983; no consistent control by physician educators over direct medical education (DME) funds; and institutional DME payments unrelated to actual expenditures for resident education or to program outcomes. None of the current GME reform proposals adequately address all of these issues. Accordingly, we recommend several fundamental changes in Medicare GME support. We propose a re-analysis of the true direct costs of resident training (with appropriate adjustment for local market factors) to rectify the myriad problems with per-resident payments. We propose that Medicare DME funds go to the physician organization providing resident instruction, keeping DME payments separate from the operating revenues of teaching hospitals. To ensure financial accountability, we propose that institutions must maintain budgets and report expenditures for each GME program. To establish educational accountability, Residency Review Committees should establish objective, annually measurable standards for GME program performance; programs that consistently fail to meet these minimum standards should lose discretion over GME funds. These reforms will solve several long-standing, vexing problems in Medicare GME funding, but will also uncover the extent of undersupport of GME by most other health care payers. Ultimately, successful reform of GME financing will require “all-payer” support. PMID:11972725

  16. The Will in Physical Education

    E-print Network

    Robbins, Charles Lenoidae

    1903-01-01

    ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection The Will in Physical Education 1903 by Charles Lenoidae Robbins This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries’ Center...

  17. Defending diversity: affirmative action and medical education.

    PubMed Central

    DeVille, K

    1999-01-01

    Affirmative action programs of all types are under attack legally and politically. Although medical schools have not been specifically targeted, their affirmative action programs, like others in higher education, are potentially in danger. This article examines the current legal status of affirmative action in medical education and concludes that a refurbished defense of such programs is essential if they are to survive impending judicial and political scrutiny. An analysis of existing case law and available evidence suggests that a carefully reinvigorated diversity argument is the tactic most likely to pass constitutional muster, as well as the justification most likely to blunt growing public and political opposition to admissions policies that take race and ethnicity into consideration. PMID:10432920

  18. Twelve Tips for teaching medical professionalism at all levels of medical education.

    PubMed

    Al-Eraky, Mohamed Mostafa

    2015-11-01

    Review of studies published in medical education journals over the last decade reveals that teaching medical professionalism is essential, yet challenging. According to a recent Best Evidence in Medical Education (BEME) guide, there is no consensus on a theoretical or practical model to integrate the teaching of professionalism into medical education. The aim of this article is to outline a practical manual for teaching professionalism at all levels of medical education. Drawing from research literature and author's experience, Twelve Tips are listed and organised in four clusters with relevance to (1) the context, (2) the teachers, (3) the curriculum, and (4) the networking. With a better understanding of the guiding educational principles for teaching medical professionalism, medical educators will be able to teach one of the most challenging constructs in medical education. PMID:25776227

  19. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists. PMID:20953107

  20. Content Knowledge for Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedentop, Daryl

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the definition of content knowledge for physical education, suggesting that teacher educators have largely given up the historic content knowledge of the field, thus eliminating the possibility of developing a serious body of pedagogical content knowledge for teaching. The paper examines the root problem in defining pre-professional…

  1. Black Physical Educators and Utilitarianism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coursey, Leon N.

    The contributions of black professional personnel to the field of physical education are enumerated and described. The careers of Anita J. Turner, Edwin B. Henderson, and Albert J. Overly in particular are examined. The ability of a minority group to provide significant leadership in an educational field is discussed, and the challenge still…

  2. Comprehensive Physical Education Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamiya, Artie

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Wake County Public School System (North Carolina) received $1.3 million as one of 237 national winners of the $70 million federal Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) Grant competition. The PEP Grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and provides monies to school districts able to demonstrate the…

  3. Critical Thinking in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Changes in American education require that teachers are evaluated more often, and expectations increasingly include teaching to develop critical thinking skills. This article uses Bloom's taxonomy in describing ways physical educators can include critical thinking in their lessons, both to enhance their teaching and to meet expectations of…

  4. Computer science education for medical informaticians.

    PubMed

    Logan, Judith R; Price, Susan L

    2004-03-18

    The core curriculum in the education of medical informaticians remains a topic of concern and discussion. This paper reports on a survey of medical informaticians with Master's level credentials that asked about computer science (CS) topics or skills that they need in their employment. All subjects were graduates or "near-graduates" of a single medical informatics Master's program that they entered with widely varying educational backgrounds. The survey instrument was validated for face and content validity prior to use. All survey items were rated as having some degree of importance in the work of these professionals, with retrieval and analysis of data from databases, database design and web technologies deemed most important. Least important were networking skills and object-oriented design and concepts. These results are consistent with other work done in the field and suggest that strong emphasis on technical skills, particularly databases, data analysis, web technologies, computer programming and general computer science are part of the core curriculum for medical informatics. PMID:15063372

  5. Metaphysics and medical education: taking holism seriously.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bruce

    2013-06-01

    Medical education is now suffused with concepts that have their source outside the traditional scientific and medical disciplines: concepts such as holism, connectedness and reflective practice. Teaching of these, and other problematic concepts such as medical uncertainty and error, has been defined more by the challenge they pose to the standard model rather than being informed by a strong positive understanding. This challenge typically involves a critical engagement with the idea of objectivity, which is rarely acknowledged as an inherently metaphysical critique. Consequently, these ideas prove to be difficult to teach well. I suggest that the lack of an integrating, positive narrative is the reason for teaching difficulty, and propose that what is needed is an explicit commitment to teach the metaphysics of medicine, with the concept of holism being the fulcrum on which the remaining concepts turn. An acknowledged metaphysical narrative will encompass the scientific realism that medical students typically bring to their tertiary education, and at the same time enable a bigger picture to be drawn that puts the newer and more problematic concepts into context. PMID:23692231

  6. Physical Education Performance Outcomes and Cognitive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    This article intends to inform physical education teachers about the current research describing the relationship between physical education performance outcomes as identified by the national physical education standards (i.e., regular participation in physical activity, physical fitness, motor competence; National Association of Physical

  7. Medical Education 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1929, No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, N. P.

    1929-01-01

    This bulletin reports on the status of medical education in the United States for the years 1926-1928. During the past two years the number of medical schools recognized by the American Medical Association has been reduced from 80 to 74. Reports to the American Medical Association show that the enrollment of medical students has increased from…

  8. Continuing medical education for life: eight principles.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, S; Baron, J; Elstein, A S; Hammond, W P; Holzman, G B; Marlow, B; Taggart, M S; Schulkin, J

    1999-12-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is being pressured to change in response to increasing and changing educational needs of practicing physicians, fostered by technical innovations, evolution of practice styles, and the reorganization of health care delivery. Leadership in the reform of CME falls primarily to the medical specialty societies in light of their traditional responsibilities for accrediting CME and maintaining professional standards. To address the need for reform, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in 1997 organized a conference to assemble CME program administrators from several medical specialties and academicians with expertise in postgraduate learning. At the conference, issues facing CME were examined. The authors, who were conference participants, state and explain eight principles that emerged from conference discussions. (For example: "Educational activities should be supportive of and coordinated with the transition to evidence-based medicine.") The principles reflect the interspecialty and interdisciplinary consensus achieved by the conference participants and can serve as useful guideposts for educators as they work to improve CME in their institutions. The authors conclude by noting the need for a more systematic and rigorously analytic approach, where CME content is determined according to assessed needs and CME is evaluated by measuring outcomes; for this to happen, CME educators and faculty must be brought up to date through training, including the use of problem-based learning. CME must also instill collegiality, interaction, and collaboration into the learning environment instead of being a solitary learning activity. Finally, CME must not only emphasize the acquisition of knowledge but also instruct physicians in the process of decision making to help them better use their knowledge as they make clinical judgments. PMID:10619003

  9. Physical Activity and Health: Does Physical Education Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.; O'Neill, Jennifer R.; McIver, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Physical education has been an institution in American schools since the late 19th century, and today almost all American children are exposed to physical education classes. It has often been claimed that physical education provides important benefits to public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine if physical education increases…

  10. Harvard Medical School Dean for External Education Role and Responsibilities

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    , to increase the global reach of HMS education and to bring high quality content Harvard Medical School Dean for External Education Role and Responsibilities The dean for external education serves as the HMS academic leader

  11. Virtual reality in medical education and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, Laurie A.; Bell, Brad; Sullivan, Tim; Voss, Mark; Payer, Andrew F.; Goza, Stewart Michael

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)/LinCom Corporation, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB), and the Galveston Independent School District (GISD) have teamed up to develop a virtual visual environment display (VIVED) that provides a unique educational experience using virtual reality (VR) technologies. The VIVED end product will be a self-contained educational experience allowing students a new method of learning as they interact with the subject matter through VR. This type of interface is intuitive and utilizes spatial and psychomotor abilities which are now constrained or reduced by the current two dimensional terminals and keyboards. The perpetual challenge to educators remains the identification and development of methodologies which conform the learners abilities and preferences. The unique aspects of VR provide an opportunity to explore a new educational experience. Endowing medical students with an understanding of the human body poses some difficulty challenges. One of the most difficult is to convey the three dimensional nature of anatomical structures. The ideal environment for addressing this problem would be one that allows students to become small enough to enter the body and travel through it - much like a person walks through a building. By using VR technology, this effect can be achieved; when VR is combined with multimedia technologies, the effect can be spectacular.

  12. Refocusing medical education reform: beyond the how.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Marla; Williams, David; Rhee, Kyu

    2015-02-01

    Integration of the basic and clinical sciences has been at the heart of medical education reform efforts for nearly a century. Neither the rate nor magnitude of actual progress suggests that reform is anywhere near completion, which presents a challenge to educators to seek ways to overcome significant obstacles to change. Robin Hopkins and colleagues, authors of the Perspective in this issue of Academic Medicine that has prompted this invited Commentary, are among those proposing interesting and useful answers to why integration has not been better achieved. This Commentary affirms the importance of finding better ways to accomplish curricular reform, while contending that real curricular reform must move well beyond the integration of basic and clinical sciences. Drawing from the 2014 report of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Commission to Build a Healthier America, the authors cite evidence of significant disparities and growing health challenges facing Americans today. They discuss three key recommendations from the report: attending to early childhood experiences, providing healthy choices within communities, and, particularly, rethinking the education of health professionals. Next, the authors detail the implications of these recommendations for medical education, stressing both the urgency and importance of moving to adopt these as directions for real reform that will address today's health care challenges. PMID:25140530

  13. The Medical and Nursing Education Partnership Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Goosby, Eric P.; von Zinkernagel, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The Medical and Nursing Education Partnership Initiatives (MEPI and NEPI) are innovative approaches to strengthening the academic and clinical training of physicians and nurses in Sub-Saharan African countries, which are heavily burdened by HIV/AIDS. Begun in 2010 by PEPFAR with the National Institutes of Health, investments in curricula, innovative learning technologies, clinical mentoring, and research opportunities are providing a strong base to advance high-quality education for growing numbers of urgently needed new physicians and nurses in these countries. The MEPI and NEPI focus on strengthening learning institutions is central to the vision for expanding the pool of health professionals to meet the full range of a country's health needs. A robust network of exchange between education institutions and training facilities, both within and across countries, is transforming the quality of medical education and augmenting a platform for research opportunities for faculty and clinicians, which also serves as an incentive to retain professionals in the country. Excellence in patient care and a spirit of professionalism, core to MEPI and NEPI, provide a strong foundation for the planning and delivery of health services in participating countries. PMID:25072578

  14. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME. PMID:25748973

  15. Prevalence of Physical Disability and Accommodation Needs among Students in Physical Therapy Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Martha R.; Peterson, Cathryn A.; Gibbs, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Most research on graduate students with disabilities (SWDs) has focused on medical education. The purposes of this study were to: (1) estimate the prevalence of students with physical disabilities (SWPDs) in physical therapy programs, (2) identify common types of physical disabilities, (3) document the types of accommodations requested by SWPDs,…

  16. Secondary Physical Education Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Designed for use as a teaching aid only, this instructional guide provides secondary physical education teachers with a basis and direction for realizing those instructional objectives concerned with the development of motor skills and physical fitness. The content of the bulletin reflects an increased emphasis on individualization and student…

  17. GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE (GMEC) The Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) is a standing committee of the School of

    E-print Network

    establishes and implements policies regarding the quality of education in the work environment for residents is responsible for establishing and implementing policies and procedures regarding the quality of educationPage 32 GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE (GMEC) The Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC

  18. Substance misuse teaching in undergraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 12,000 hospital admissions in the UK result from substance misuse, therefore issues surrounding this need to be addressed early on in a doctor’s training to facilitate their interaction with this client group. Currently, undergraduate medical education includes teaching substance misuse issues, yet how this is formally integrated into the curriculum remains unclear. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 17 key members of staff responsible for the whole or part of the undergraduate medical curriculum were conducted to identify the methods used to teach substance misuse. Using a previously devised toolkit, 19 curriculum co-ordinators then mapped the actual teaching sessions that addressed substance misuse learning objectives. Results Substance misuse teaching was delivered primarily in psychiatry modules but learning objectives were also found in other areas such as primary care placements and problem-based learning. On average, 53 teaching sessions per medical school focused on bio-psycho-social models of addiction whereas only 23 sessions per medical school focused on professionalism, fitness to practice and students’ own health in relation to substance misuse. Many sessions addressed specific learning objectives relating to the clinical features of substance dependence whereas few focused on iatrogenic addiction. Conclusions Substance misuse teaching is now inter-disciplinary and the frequent focus on clinical, psychological and social effects of substance misuse emphasises the bio-psycho-social approach underlying clinical practice. Some areas however are not frequently taught in the formal curriculum and these need to be addressed in future changes to medical education. PMID:24533849

  19. Developing and Assessing Curriculum on the Physics of Medical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K.; Van Ness, Grace R.; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C.; Anderson, Elizabeth A.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre–health majors at Portland State University, we aim to teach fundamental physical concepts, such as light absorption and emission and atomic energy levels, through analysis of biological systems and medical devices. The activities address the properties of electromagnetic waves as they relate to the interaction with biological tissue and make links between physics and biomedical applications such as microscopy or laser eye surgery. We report on the effect that engaging students in tasks with actual medical equipment has had on their conceptual understanding of light and spectroscopy. These initial assessments indicate that students’ understanding improves in some areas as a result of taking the course, but gains are not uniform and are relatively low for other topics. We also find a promising “nonshift” in student attitudes toward learning science as a result of taking the course. A long-term goal of this work is to develop these materials to the extent that they can eventually be imported into an introductory curriculum for life sciences majors. PMID:23737632

  20. The social contract challenge in medical education.

    PubMed

    Wasylenki, D; Byrne, N; McRobb, B

    1997-07-01

    Medical education has been criticized for loss of touch with the health needs of society. A social contract implies that medical schools, their students and teaching staff have certain rights and privileges in return for serving society. Commitment to this important reciprocal relationship makes it necessary to ensure that medical students gain understanding of the basic health needs of the communities they will serve. Health, Illness and the Community (HIC) is a mandatory course in the first and second years of the curriculum at the University of Toronto. Its goal is to provide students with community learning experiences by involving over 300 community agencies as learning sites. The course takes place one half-day per week throughout first and second year. All 177 students initially work with patients in their homes and in public health units and related agencies. Students are then assigned to agencies using health determinants and health promotion strategies. In the second year, each student selects an agency in the community, and carries out for the entire year a major project focused on the interaction of a health problem with a social issue. This educational initiative has been received well by community agencies and patients. Teaching staff have been enthusiastic and students have performed very well. A major obstacle has been the negative attitudes of some students to community-based learning, but these appear to be improving with time. Involving multiple agencies as learning sites is a feasible method for enabling students to learn about community health needs. PMID:9488839

  1. Medical education reimagined: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Prober, Charles G; Khan, Salman

    2013-10-01

    The authors propose a new model for medical education based on the "flipped classroom" design. In this model, students would access brief (~10 minute) online videos to learn new concepts on their own time. The content could be viewed by the students as many times as necessary to master the knowledge in preparation for classroom time facilitated by expert faculty leading dynamic, interactive sessions where students can apply their newly mastered knowledge.The authors argue that the modern digitally empowered learner, the unremitting expansion of biomedical knowledge, and the increasing specialization within the practice of medicine drive the need to reimagine medical education. The changes that they propose emphasize the need to define a core curriculum that can meet learners where they are in a digitally oriented world, enhance the relevance and retention of knowledge through rich interactive exercises, and facilitate in-depth learning fueled by individual students' aptitude and passion. The creation and adoption of this model would be meaningfully enhanced by cooperative efforts across medical schools. PMID:23969367

  2. Graduate Medical Education: Its Role in Achieving a True Medical Education Continuum.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrener, Carol A; Ast, Cori; Kirch, Darrell G

    2015-09-01

    Nearly half a century ago, Lowell T. Coggeshall recommended, through what has come to be known as the Coggeshall Report, that physician education-medical school (or undergraduate medical education [UME]), residency training (or graduate medical education [GME]), and continuing medical education (CME)-be "planned and provided as a continuum." While the dream of a true continuum remains unfulfilled, recent innovations focused on defining and assessing meaningful outcomes at last offer the anchor for the creation of a seamless, flexible, and ongoing pathway for the preparation of physicians. Recent innovations, including a widely accepted competency framework and entrustable professional activities (EPAs), provide key tools for creating a continuum. The competency framework is being leveraged in UME, GME, and CME and is serving as the foundation for the continuum. Learners and those who assess them are increasingly relying on observable behaviors (e.g., EPAs) to determine progress. The GME community in the United States and Canada has played-and continues to play-a leading role in the creation of these tools and a true medical education continuum. Despite some systemic challenges to implementation (e.g., premedical learner formation, time-in-step requirements), the GME community is already operationalizing these tools as a basis for other innovations that are improving transitions across the continuum (e.g., competency-based progression of residents). The medical education community's greatest responsibility in the years ahead will be to build on these efforts in GME-joining together to learn from one another and develop a continuum that serves the public and the profession. PMID:26177531

  3. Resources for Medical Education: Finding the Right Prescription

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Holly J.

    2010-01-01

    What are the resources necessary to provide the highest quality education for medical students? This is the essential question which must be answered before a medical school can make a rational decision about the number of students to have in each class. In deciphering an objective way to determine the class size of a medical school, this paper explores the principles of medical education, accrediting organizations institutional expectations in providing a medical education program, and the author's personal experiences. The central tenets of a quality medical education include: learning by doing, student-centered learning, and the transmission of the attitudes, values and behaviors of the medical profession. This paper considers how these core components of medical education can be achieved and what resources are necessary to ensure that all students are appropriately supported. PMID:20697551

  4. 46 CFR 12.15-5 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.15-5 Section 12.15... REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department § 12.15-5 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and medical requirements for an endorsement as QMED are found in § 10.215 of...

  5. 46 CFR 12.15-5 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.15-5 Section 12.15... REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department § 12.15-5 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and medical requirements for an endorsement as QMED are found in § 10.215 of...

  6. 46 CFR 12.15-5 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.15-5 Section 12.15... REQUIREMENTS FOR RATING ENDORSEMENTS Qualified Member of the Engine Department § 12.15-5 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and medical requirements for an endorsement as QMED are found in § 10.215 of...

  7. Values of Physical Education, Recreation, and Sports for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    The pamphlet cites opinions of professionals, philosophers, and handicapped persons to discuss the value of physical education, recreation, and sports for the handicapped. Addressed are such aspects as definitions of the handicapped, impaired, and disabled; medical opinions; benefits beyond the physical; and integration into regular school and…

  8. Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

  9. Minimum Essential Requirements and Standards in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtczak, Andrzej; Schwarz, M. Roy

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the definition of standards in general, and proposes a definition of standards and global minimum essential requirements for use in medical education. Aims to serve as a tool for the improvement of quality and international comparisons of basic medical programs. Explains the IIME (Institute for International Medical Education) project…

  10. World Trends in Medical Education: Faculty, Students, and Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Elizabeth

    This analysis of changing trends in medical education demonstrates that, despite differences in methodology, current problems and future directions are strikingly similar throughout the world. Based on the 1969 International Macy Conference on Changing Patterns in Medical Education in the World, the book includes reports from leading medical

  11. The Demand for Medical Education: An Augmented Human Capital Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Robert; Price, Jamie

    1998-01-01

    Examines investment and consumption features of the demand for medical education, using medical application data over the 1948 to 1994 time period. Examines a variant of a pure human capital (investment) model and a model augmented by consumption and demographic variables, using medical education data. A static human capital model best forecasts…

  12. On the Cost of Educating a Medical Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.; Korn, David

    1997-01-01

    Reviews studies of costs of medical education and looks at trends and issues in medical school cost containment. Finds curricular trends are tending to increase costs, and proposals to restructure medical education to reduce costs are generally maneuvers to transfer cost responsibility to other entities. Sees minimal opportunities for cost…

  13. Ethnographic edutainment for transformative medical education: Thailand.

    PubMed

    Woratanarat, Thira

    2014-01-01

    Transformative learning is a most important issue in medical education. Ethnographic edutainment is a concept that consists of reward, competition, and motivation strategies, which are more effective in engaging with learners. First-year medical students (N = 321) were included in this study during the Doctor and Society course at Chulalongkorn University in 2011. Four preset learning objectives were set and participants assigned a term group project with clouding technologies. The deliverables and the attitude toward this method were evaluated. Nineteen of 20 (95%) groups achieved all objectives. Females rated higher scores for this activity than males (P < 0.001). Statistically significant differences were found between lecture-based sessions and field visit sessions as well as ethnographic edutainment activity sessions and other types (P < 0.01). The results were consistent in both male and female groups. Ethnographic edutainment can be well-accepted with higher satisfaction than some other types of teaching. PMID:25416434

  14. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  15. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  16. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  17. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  18. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN...

  19. On Whose Shoulders We Stand: Lessons from Exemplar Medical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Anderson, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The hiring of educators in medical schools (faculty who study the educational process and prepare others to become educators) has been one of the most successful educational innovations ever. Starting in 1954, through a collaboration between the Schools of Medicine and Education at the University of Buffalo, the innovation has spread to over half…

  20. Alcohol Medical Scholars Program--A Mentorship Program for Improving Medical Education regarding Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Karin J.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hernandez-Avila, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alcohol Medical Scholars Program (AMSP) is designed to improve medical education related to substance use disorders (SUDs) through mentorship of junior, full-time academic faculty from medical schools across the United States. Scholarship focuses on literature review and synthesis, lecture development and delivery, increasing SUD education in…

  1. Whither (Whether) Medical Humanities? The Future of Humanities and Arts in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of "Journal for Learning through the Arts" focuses on the uses of literature and arts in medical education. The introductory article addresses current debate in the field of medical humanities (MH), namely the existential question of what is the purpose of integrating humanities/arts in medical education; and then examines how…

  2. Accreditation of Medical Education in China: Accomplishments and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    As an external review mechanism, accreditation has played a positive global role in quality assurance and promotion of educational reform. Accreditation systems for medical education have been developed in more than 100 countries including China. In the past decade, Chinese standards for basic medical education have been issued together with…

  3. Cost in Medical Education: One Hundred and Twenty Years Ago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    The first full paper that is dedicated to cost in medical education appears in the "BMJ" in 1893. This paper "The cost of a medical education" outlines the likely costs associated with undergraduate education at the end of the nineteenth century, and offers guidance to the student on how to make financial planning. Many lessons…

  4. Special Education Terminology Every Physical Education Teacher Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columna, Luis; Lieberman, Lauren J.; Lytle, Rebecca; Arndt, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    An initial step to demonstrate commitment and professional behaviors is to be knowledgeable in the terminology used by special education colleagues, and to share with them common terminology used in physical education settings. Adapted physical education (APE) and general physical education (GPE) teachers need to know terminology used by…

  5. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Kristopher E.B.; Duncan, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  6. Quality Physical Education: A Commentary on Effective Physical Education Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term "quality teaching" rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the…

  7. Medical physics in developing countries: looking for a better world.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, H

    2008-01-01

    Medical physics has been identified as one of the key areas that need to be developed to improve healthcare. However, the level achieved in developing countries represents a stark contrast to the level that exists in Western Europe or North America. The challenge for developing countries is to build the required infrastructures, to acquire the equipment, to attract highly qualified professionals and to develop education and training programs and political policies for effective and accessible care within budgetary constraints. The state-of-the-art technological developments in medical physics cannot be viewed as a uniform reality all over the world. There is, of course, a wide difference in emphasis and approach when dealing with developing countries, compared to developed nations. As quality assurance and cost-benefit guidelines in the practice of radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging are being developed and debated in developed countries, the perspectives of the availability and standards of healthcare taken for granted in these countries stand in stark contrast to the level administered in developing countries. In this contribution, the overall situation of medical physics in developing countries and the barriers to improvement are discussed, and some possible solutions and ways to bridge the gap between developed and developing countries are suggested. PMID:21614313

  8. University of Utah School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    University of Utah School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education 50 North Medical Drive Salt Lake of Utah School of Medicine Sponsored by University of Utah School of Medicine Office of Continuing Medical of Geriatrics & Gerontology University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School Barbara Bates-Jensen, PhD, RN, CWOCN

  9. Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; ter Haar, Elizabeth; Bhat, Srinidhi Subraya; McCoy, Christopher Eric; Denmark, T. Kent; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly evolving. With the paradigm shift to small-group didactic sessions and focus on clinically oriented case-based scenarios, simulation training has provided educators a novel way to deliver medical education in the 21st century. The field continues to expand in scope and practice and is being incorporated into medical school clerkship education, and specifically in emergency medicine (EM). The use of medical simulation in graduate medical education is well documented. Our aim in this article is to perform a retrospective review of the current literature, studying simulation use in EM medical student clerkships. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of simulation in teaching basic science, clinical knowledge, procedural skills, teamwork, and communication skills. As simulation becomes increasingly prevalent in medical school curricula, more studies are needed to assess whether simulation training improves patient-related outcomes. PMID:22224138

  10. Research in Medical Education: Proceedings of the Fortieth Annual Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Medicine, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Contains the proceedings of 2001's Research in Medical Education Conference, including 37 papers in 12 categories. The conference addressed topics such as medical students in patient care, faculty development, and student assessment. (EV)

  11. Successful strategies for integrating bedside ultrasound into undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Palma, James K

    2015-04-01

    Nearly all physician specialties currently utilize bedside ultrasound, and its applications continue to expand. Bedside ultrasound is becoming a core skill for physicians; as such, it should be taught during undergraduate medical education. When ultrasound is integrated in a longitudinal manner beginning in the preclerkship phase of medical school, it not only enhances teaching the basic science topics of anatomy, physiology, and pathology but also ties those skills and knowledge to the clerkship phase and medical decision-making. Bedside ultrasound is a natural bridge from basic science to clinical science. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine is currently in its fourth year of implementing an integrated ultrasound curriculum in the school of medicine. In our experience, successful integration of a bedside ultrasound curriculum should: align with unique focuses of a medical schools' mission, simplify complex anatomy through multimodal teaching, correlate to teaching of the physical examination, solidify understanding of physiology and pathology, directly link to other concurrent content, narrow differential diagnoses, enhance medical decision-making, improve procedural skills, match to year-group skillsets, develop teaching and leadership abilities, and have elective experiences for advanced topics. PMID:25850144

  12. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  13. Canadian Medical Education Statistics, 1980/81 = Statistiques Relatives a l'enseignement Medical au Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Canadian Medical Colleges, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Data for 1980-1981 pertaining to medical education in Canada are presented. Information about Canadian medical schools, population of Canada by province and distribution of medical school openings, tuition, payment scales for post-M.D. clinical trainees, clinical clerkship stipends, and numbers of Canadian medical schools offering instruction in…

  14. Medical Students’ Perception of Their Educational Environment

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Preethi G; Menezes, Vishma; Srikanth; Subramanian, Atreya M.; Shenoy, Jnaneshwara P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Students’ perception of the environment within which they study has shown to have a significant impact on their behavior, academic progress and sense of well-being. This study was undertaken to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning environment in an Indian medical school following traditional curricula and to study differences, if any, between the students according to the stages of medical education, i.e., the pre-clinical and clinical stages. Methodology: In the present study, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) inventory was administered to undergraduate medical students of first (n = 227), third (n = 175), fifth (n = 171) and seventh (n = 123) semesters. Scores obtained were expressed as mean ± Standard Deviation (SD) and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s test. P-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean DREEM score for our medical school was 123/200.The first-year students were found to be more satisfied with learning environment (indicated by their higher DREEM score) compared to other semester students. Progressive decline in scores with each successive semester was observed. Evaluating the sub-domains of perception, the registrars in all semesters had a more positive perception of learning (Average mean score: 29.44), their perception of course organizers moved in the right direction (Average mean score: 26.86), their academic self-perception was more on the positive side (Average mean score: 20.14), they had a more positive perception of atmosphere (Average mean score: 29.07) and their social self-perception could be graded as not too bad (Average mean score: 17.02). Conclusion: The present study revealed that all the groups of students perceived their learning environment positively. However, a few problematic areas of learning environment were perceived such as: students were stressed more often; they felt that the course organizers were authoritarian and emphasized factual learning. Implementing more problem-based learning, student counseling and workshops on teaching-learning for educators might enable us to remedy and enrich our learning environment. PMID:24596737

  15. Assessment and Grading in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the basis for assessing and grading students in physical education. Although students should dress appropriately for physical education, be physically active during class time, and improve their fitness (e.g., mile-run time), these items are typically not included in the physical education content standards. The vast…

  16. Infusing Health-Related Physical Fitness in Physical Education Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulger, Sean M.; Mohr, Derek J.; Carson, Linda M.; Wiegand, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the infusion of a health-related physical fitness education strand into the physical education teacher education curriculum at West Virginia University, also discussing the role of health-related physical fitness in teacher preparation and explaining the infused curricular approach to physical education teacher education (sample infused…

  17. Review of Session 6: Medical Physics

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    Medical physics is very important in carbon ion radiotherapy, as it is in conventional radiotherapy using X-rays and in estimation of exposed dose in the space environment. High-energy ion beams such as carbon beams have physical characteristics such as the Bragg curve, high LET, and nuclear reactions producing fragmentations. Therefore, understanding these properties well is essential for further development of carbon radiotherapy and manned space activity. We invited, therefore, the following six presentations relevant to issues ranging from the measurement of fragmentations, lineal energy distributions using the microdosimetric approach, and neutron dose with active beam delivery of carbon-ion therapy, to the depth–dose distribution of various ions inside a human head phantom.

  18. Academic Language in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on defining academic language in physical education and provides a step-by-step approach designed to help preservice and inservice teachers understand and incorporated academic language into their lesson planning. It provides examples of discipline-specific vocabulary, language functions, syntax, and discourse, aiming to…

  19. Physical Education and Captive Wildlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Vicki

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simulation game that can be incorporated into physical education classes for intermediate and junior high school students. The lesson, titled "The Capture Game," focuses on the problems of capture, transportation, and captivity of wild animals. Background information, teacher preparation suggestions, student activity and wrap-up…

  20. Recreational Games for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Recreational games can be incorporated into physical education programs to encourage play and activity among students during their leisure time. Students can play their own games during recess, before or after school, during intramural programs, or in their neighborhood with family and friends. This article describes five such games namely:…

  1. Questionable Supervision by Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Gimbert, Tonya L.

    2013-01-01

    According to Court records, student Pedro Godoy (Godoy) filed a suit against the school district (Central Islip Union Free School District) and teacher Otis R. Scerbo (Scerbo), seeking to recover damages for personal injuries allegedly sustained by Godoy while participating in a game of floor hockey during physical education class. Scerbo (the…

  2. Curriculum theory in physical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Ann E.

    1989-03-01

    Primary current concerns of curriculum theorists in sport and physical education relate to clarification of value orientations underlying curricular decision-making, selection and statement of curriculum goals, identification and organization of programme content, and the process of curriculum change. Disciplinary mastery is the most traditional value orientation and that which is most frequently found in practice. Curriculum theorists have identified four other value orientations for study: social reconstruction, self-actualization, learning process, and ecological validity. Health-related fitness and the development of motor skills have long been the primary goals of physical education. In recent years, however, curriculum specialists have begun to assign higher priorities to goals of personal integration and challenge, of social development and multicultural understanding. There is general agreement that human movement activities constitute the subject-matter of the sport and physical education curriculum. Differences exist, however, as to how learning activities should be selected for particular programmes. The current trend in seeking better understanding of content is toward studying the operational curriculum with particular attention to the historical and social contexts. An important contemporary focus is the need to translate short-term results into lifestyle changes. The curriculum in sports and physical education should be viewed as a multitude of possibilities.

  3. What's New in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Argues that physical educators must reevaluate their sports-focused approach, which sometimes provides only two minutes of movement (on average per student) in an hour-long class of softball. Maintains that every lesson plan should include a fitness element (walking, jogging, circuit training). (SR)

  4. Peer Assessments in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Randall

    2004-01-01

    Peer assessments are recommended for overcoming the difficulties that teachers have with providing individual feedback and assessing student progress in physical education classes. A peer assessment can be used as a learning task (in a progression) or a formative assessment. A peer assessment is a variation of peer teaching, an instructional…

  5. Vocal Health for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Josh; McColl, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that teachers are often at risk for vocal disease and are more likely to change occupations because of their voice problems compared to non-teachers. Physical educators are especially at risk for voice problems due to the intense daily demands of voice projection. Chronic abuse can cause swelling and inflammation of the…

  6. The Significance of Physical Education Content: "Sending the Message" in Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2012-01-01

    Mind-body dualism has likely influenced how many view human beings and their behavior--mind (i.e., thinking) is elevated over body (i.e., performing)--even in Physical Education Teacher Education. The problem is that such a perspective makes physical education content (i.e., dance, games, play, and sport) subsidiary to more "intellectual" or…

  7. Physical Education Teacher Education: Creating a Foundation to Increase the Status of Physical Education in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Karen Pagnano

    2011-01-01

    Physical education teacher education (PETE) programs have contributed to the marginalization of physical education in three significant ways. First, the nature of content knowledge is contested. Is content knowledge disciplinary knowledge, or is movement the content knowledge of our field? Second, PETE has failed to produce a critical mass of K-12…

  8. Let's Make Physical Education More Physical and More Educational

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Charles Arthur; Bellar, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, physical education has a stereotypical image as being neither very physical nor educational. NASPE [National Standards for Physical Education] Standard 2 indicates that students in physical education classes should be able to demonstrate understanding and movement concepts, principles, and tactics as they apply to physical activity.…

  9. 78 FR 18990 - Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...promoting education in the medical disciplines, honoring traditional healing principles and restoring the balance of mind, body and spirit. Offer educational programs, services and activities that motivate AI/AN students to remain in the...

  10. Physical Activity Levels during Adventure-Physical Education Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehris, Jeffrey; Myers, Elizabeth; Whitaker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Adventure-physical education has been proposed to promote adolescents' physical development, but little is known about physical activity levels during such lessons. Using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time, we observed students' (ages 11-14 years) physical activity levels in co-educational classes during 43 adventure-physical

  11. 46 CFR 10.215 - Medical and physical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... complete annual medical exams and, unless exempt per 46 CFR 16.220, pass annual chemical tests for... conducted by a licensed medical doctor in accordance with the physical exam requirements in 46 CFR 402.210... impairs judgment or reaction time. Examples of physical impairment or medical conditions that could...

  12. 46 CFR 10.215 - Medical and physical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... complete annual medical exams and, unless exempt per 46 CFR 16.220, pass annual chemical tests for... conducted by a licensed medical doctor in accordance with the physical exam requirements in 46 CFR 402.210... impairs judgment or reaction time. Examples of physical impairment or medical conditions that could...

  13. 46 CFR 10.215 - Medical and physical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... complete annual medical exams and, unless exempt per 46 CFR 16.220, pass annual chemical tests for... conducted by a licensed medical doctor in accordance with the physical exam requirements in 46 CFR 402.210... impairs judgment or reaction time. Examples of physical impairment or medical conditions that could...

  14. 46 CFR 10.215 - Medical and physical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... complete annual medical exams and, unless exempt per 46 CFR 16.220, pass annual chemical tests for... conducted by a licensed medical doctor in accordance with the physical exam requirements in 46 CFR 402.210... impairs judgment or reaction time. Examples of physical impairment or medical conditions that could...

  15. [Integration of the Internet into medical education].

    PubMed

    Taradi, Suncana Kukolja

    2002-01-01

    The Internet promises dramatic changes in the way we learn and teach, the way we interact as a society. Networked technologies introduce interactivity and multimedia into the educational process. The student of the 21st century will use his/her PC as a learning station, as a tutoring system, as an information provider and as a communication center. Therefore the passive classroom (teacher-centered teaching) will evolve into active studio learning (student-centered learning). This will be achieved by new teaching techniques and standards of quality. The role of the new generation of educators is to create exploratory learning environments that offer a wide range of views on many subject areas and encourage active lifelong learning. This will be achieved by 1) placing courseware on the web where it can be accessed by remote students and by 2) finding and reviewing teaching materials obtained from www for possible integration into the local lecture material. The paper suggests strategies for introducing medical educators to networked teaching. PMID:12038098

  16. Medical Education Literature We are in the process of automating a search of the medical literature to

    E-print Network

    Blackwell, Keith

    Medical Education Literature We are in the process of automating a search of the medical literature to highlight Academy members' new medical education publications. This search process is going to take a little of the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: A way forward for medical education. Acad Med 2012

  17. Becoming a medical educator: motivation, socialisation and navigation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite an increasing concern about a future shortage of medical educators, little published research exists on career choices in medical education nor the impact of specific training posts in medical education (e.g. academic registrar/resident positions). Medical educators at all levels, from both medical and non-medical backgrounds, are crucial for the training of medical students, junior doctors and in continuing professional development. We explored the motivations and experiences of junior doctors considering an education career and undertaking a medical education registrar (MER) post. Methods Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with junior doctors and clinicians across Queensland Health. Framework analysis was used to identify themes in the data, based on our defined research questions and the medical education workforce issues prompting the study. We applied socio-cognitive career theory to guide our analysis and to explore the experience of junior doctors in medical education registrar posts as they enter, navigate and fulfil the role. Results We identified six key themes in the data: motivation for career choice and wanting to provide better education; personal goals, expectations and the need for self-direction; the influence of role models; defining one’s identity; support networks and the need for research as a potential barrier to pursuing a career in/with education. We also identified the similarities and differences between the MERs’ experiences to develop a composite of an MER’s journey through career choice, experience in role and outcomes. Conclusions There is growing interest from junior doctors in pursuing education pathways in a clinical environment. They want to enhance clinical teaching in the hospitals and become specialists with an interest in education, and have no particular interest in research or academia. This has implications for the recruitment and training of the next generation of clinical educators. PMID:24885740

  18. Funding of medical education: the need for transparency.

    PubMed

    Dacre, Jane; Walsh, Kieran

    2013-12-01

    Medical education is vital to the future of healthcare provision. It is also expensive. We should ensure that the funding spent on medical education is spent in the most cost-effective way possible and delivers the best possible returns on our investment. Budgets that have been allocated to medical education should be spent on this and not on research or clinical care. Educational budgets should be transparent - so that their use and misuse are clear. We should develop a culture of lifelong learning and continually make explicit that future healthcare professionals need investment in their education to maintain the quality and safety of healthcare delivery. PMID:24298104

  19. Computational/HPC Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Rubin H.

    1997-08-01

    The Physics group in NACSE (an NSF Metacenter Regional Alliance) has developed a variety of materials to be used in computational physics education and to assist working scientists and engineers. Our emphasis is to exploit Web technology to better teach about and improve the use of HPC resources in physics. We will demonstrate multimedia, interactive Web tutorials (Physics, Problem Solving with Computers>http://nacphy.physics.orst.edu/ (Wiley, 1997). Also demonstrated will be tutorials to assist physicists with visualizations, HPC library use, PVM, and, in particular, Coping with Unix, an Interactive Survival Kit for Scientists. These latter tutorials use some special Web technology (Webterm) we developed which makes it possible to connect to a remote Unix machine and follow the lessons from any Web browser supporting Java --- even browsers on non-Unix computers such as PCs or Macs.

  20. Evaluating the impact of the humanities in medical education.

    PubMed

    Wershof Schwartz, Andrea; Abramson, Jeremy S; Wojnowich, Israel; Accordino, Robert; Ronan, Edward J; Rifkin, Mary R

    2009-08-01

    The inclusion of the humanities in medical education may offer significant potential benefits to individual future physicians and to the medical community as a whole. Debate remains, however, about the definition and precise role of the humanities in medical education, whether at the premedical, medical school, or postgraduate level. Recent trends have revealed an increasing presence of the humanities in medical training. This article reviews the literature on the impact of humanities education on the performance of medical students and residents and the challenges posed by the evaluation of the impact of humanities in medical education. Students who major in the humanities as college students perform just as well, if not better, than their peers with science backgrounds during medical school and in residency on objective measures of achievement such as National Board of Medical Examiners scores and academic grades. Although many humanities electives and courses are offered in premedical and medical school curricula, measuring and quantifying their impact has proven challenging because the courses are diverse in content and goals. Many of the published studies involve self-selected groups of students and seek to measure subjective outcomes which are difficult to measure, such as increases in empathy, professionalism, and self-care. Further research is needed to define the optimal role for humanities education in medical training; in particular, more quantitative studies are needed to examine the impact that it may have on physician performance beyond medical school and residency. Medical educators must consider what potential benefits humanities education can contribute to medical education, how its impact can be measured, and what ultimate outcomes we hope to achieve. PMID:19642151

  1. Students' perceptions of physical education objectives

    E-print Network

    Avery, Marybell; Lumpkin, Angela

    1987-01-01

    This study surveyed 2559 students enrolled in the physical education program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to determine which physical education objectives students considered to be most and least important and to assess...

  2. Pediatric hospitalists in medical education: current roles and future directions.

    PubMed

    Heydarian, Cyrus; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2012-05-01

    As the field of pediatric hospital medicine has evolved, pediatric hospitalists have become increasingly involved in medical student and resident education--providing direct education during clinical rotations, developing novel curricula to meet the demands of the new educational environment, occupying leadership roles in medical education, and more. The literature suggests that hospitalists possess the essential skills for teaching effectively, yet most hospitalists feel that additional training beyond residency is necessary to refine their knowledge and skills in education and in other essential domains. Several pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and continuing medical education activities have been developed in the last decade to meet this growing need. The recent publication of the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies will help define the roles and expectations of practicing pediatric hospitalists, and will serve as a framework for future curriculum development in both graduate and continuing medical education. PMID:22483082

  3. Physical Education Curriculum Reform in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yli-Piipari, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The Finnish education system has received worldwide attention due to the top academic performance of Finnish school students. Physical education, as an integral part of the Finnish education curriculum, potentially contributes to the overall success. The purpose of this article is to summarize Finnish physical education reform during the past…

  4. 78 FR 9899 - National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and...

  5. ' 7 --' 2 ..."-`" 2543 Vol.7 No.2 Apirl-June 2000 PSU Medical Education Newsletter

    E-print Network

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    ªï'Ë 7 ©--'Ë 2 ¥Õ¡..."¬-¡`ÿ"¬ 2543 Vol.7 No.2 Apirl-June 2000 PSU Medical Education Newsletter "·æ»÷°...",, À-- «...,,À¡à" 1st national conference on medical education "Medical Education in Millennium" °"µ on Medical Education, "Medical Education in Millennium", wa organized at the Faculty of Medicine, PSU. About

  6. Education and research in medical optronics in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demongeot, Jacques; Fleute, M.; Herve, T.; Lavallee, Stephane

    2000-06-01

    First we present here the main post-graduate courses proposed in France both for physicians and engineers in medical optronics. After we explain which medical domains are concerned by this teaching, essentially computer assisted surgery, telemedicine and functional exploration. Then we show the main research axes in these fields, in which new jobs have to be invented and new educational approaches have to be prepared in order to satisfy the demand coming both from hospitals (mainly referent hospitals) and from industry (essentially medical imaging and instrumentation companies). Finally we will conclude that medical optronics is an important step in an entire chain of acquisition and processing of medical data, capable to create the medical knowledge a surgeon or a physician needs for diagnosis or therapy purposes. Optimizing the teaching of medical optronics needs a complete integration from acquiring to modeling the medical reality. This tendency to give a holistic education in medical imaging and instrumentation is called `Model driven Acquisition' learning.

  7. 46 CFR 13.125 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 13.125 Section 13.125... TANKERMEN General § 13.125 Physical and medical requirements. Each applicant for an original tankerman endorsement shall meet the physical requirements of § 10.215 of this chapter, excluding paragraph (d)(2)...

  8. 46 CFR 12.25-20 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.25-20 Section 12.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-20 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and...

  9. 46 CFR 12.25-20 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.25-20 Section 12.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-20 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and...

  10. 46 CFR 12.25-20 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 12.25-20 Section 12.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN... Member of the Engine Department § 12.25-20 Physical and medical requirements. The physical and...

  11. Medical Typewriting; Business Education: 7705.32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schull, Amy P.

    This guide describes a course designed to prepare students for employment as medical records clerks capable of handling all types of medical forms and reports, and using and spelling medical terminology correctly. The need for medical typists is critical. The guide contains enrollment guidelines, performance objectives (i.e., type medical

  12. THE ACADEMIC MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    1 THE ACADEMIC MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION THE DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY NUTRITION AND EXERCISE SCIENCES in Physical Education The Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences offers programs in Family and Consumer Sciences, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, and Physical Education with several specializations

  13. Teacher Evaluations of Standardized Physical Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloeppel, Tiffany; Hodges-Kulinna, Pamela; Cothran, Donetta

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the use of structured physical education curricular models in physical education settings. The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' perspectives of various physical education curricular models. Teacher participants ranged from those involved in very structured curricular programs, to teachers that chose…

  14. Teaching for Student Learning in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The goal of teaching is learning, and learning in physical education requires more than activity for children to achieve. This article highlights and discusses research that focuses on teaching in physical education, with a particular emphasis on motor skill learning and on student attitudes toward physical education. It presents a brief…

  15. Uncovering the Secrets: Homophobia in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayvazo, Shiri; Sutherland, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Studies examining the discourse on issues related to sexual orientation in physical education reveal that the physical education setting is an environment where heterosexism, heteronormativity, and homophobia subsist fervently. The purpose of this article is to review the growing research that has been conducted on homophobia in physical education

  16. The Case for Daily Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to a recent study, only 56 percent of high school students participate in physical education, and the percentage of schools requiring physical education has progressively dropped. The goal of providing daily physical education to all K-12 students in the United States presents challenges such as budgetary issues, less time for other…

  17. Bully Prevention in the Physical Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Brett; Gulbrandson, Kim; Herman-Ukasick, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Bullying takes on many forms and occurs in all classrooms, and the activities found in physical education often provide fertile ground for these behaviors. For example, dodgeball is often played in physical education settings, even though the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance has clearly stated that dodgeball…

  18. Physical Education, Politics, and SPEAK Out! Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David; Kopp, Rachael; Skidmore, Lauren; Williams, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of politics in the lives of physical educators. Politics affects many decisions that are made about physical education programs (PEPs). In public schools, politics can affect the number of certified physical education teachers, available facilities, class sizes, and number of days per week that students go to…

  19. Preparation of Adapted Physical Educators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbin, Jeffrey A.

    This report describes achievements and activities of a federally supported project to prepare physical educators in Oregon to provide adapted physical education programs to students with disabilities. During the project, 28 students were prepared to be adapted physical education specialists at the masters degree level at Oregon State University.…

  20. Physical Education in a Changing Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, William H.

    This book is written for undergraduate students in physical education. The text emphasizes the development of physical education and sport, separately and together, including the problems that have resulted. Philosophy is stressed and the area of ethics and ethical problems relating to physical education is discussed. The book is divided into six…

  1. Physical Educators' Technology Competencies and Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Marianne L.; Goc Karp, Grace; Miao, Hui; Perlman, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine K-12 physical education teachers' perceptions of ability and usage of technology. Physical educators (n = 114) completed the Physical Education Technology Usage Survey assessing their perceived technology competency, how and why they utilize technology, challenges they face in implementing technology, and…

  2. [Formation of medical education in North Korea: 1945-1948].

    PubMed

    Heo, Yun-Jung; Cho, Young-Soo

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on the formation of medical education in North Korea from 1945 to 1948 in terms of the centralization of medical education, and on the process and significance of the systemization of medical education. Doctors of the past trained under the Japanese colonial system lived and worked as liberalists. More than half of these doctors who were in North Korea defected to South Korea after the country was liberated. Thus the North Korean regime faced the urgent task of cultivating new doctors who would 'serve the state and people.' Since the autumn of 1945, right after national liberation, Local People's Committees organized and implemented medical education autonomously. Following the establishment of the Provisional People's Committee of North Korea, democratic reform was launched, leading to the centralized administration of education. Consequently, medical educational institutions were realigned, with some elevated to medical colleges and others shut down. The North Korean state criticised the liberalistic attitude of doctors and the bureaucratic style of health administration, and tried to reform their political consciousness through political inculcation programs. The state also grant doctors living and housing privileges, which show its endeavor to build 'state medicine'. By 1947, a medical education system was established in which the education administration was put in charge of training new doctors while the health administration was put in charge of nurturing and retraining health workers. In this way, the state was the principal agent that actively established a centralized administrative system in the process of the formation of medical education in North Korea following national liberation. Another agent was deeply involved in this process - the faculty that was directly in charge of educating the new doctors. Studying the medical faculty remains another research task for the future. By exploring how the knowledge, generational experience, socio-political consciousness and world views adopted by these teachers during the colonial era were manifested in their pedagogy after national liberation will shed more light on the 'prototype' of North Korean medical education. PMID:25223221

  3. 3 Centre for Medical Education 4 Life Sciences Building

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    3 Centre for Medical Education 4 Life Sciences Building 6 Report from Admissions 7 Mc. The initia- tives in the Centre for Medical Education will continue our commitment to curricular development of you who continue to be the foundation of our support. It is your gifts, financial and moral, that help

  4. DEPARTMENTS OF CLINICAL SCIENCES AND MEDICAL EDUCATION College of Medicine

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    1 APPENDIX B DEPARTMENTS OF CLINICAL SCIENCES AND MEDICAL EDUCATION College of Medicine University: BIRTHDATE: (OPTIONAL) BIRTHPLACE: (OPTIONAL) EDUCATION: Undergraduate: College attended, dates (month, year), degree, date of degree Graduate/Medical School: College or school attended (inclusive months, years: e

  5. Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-01-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

  6. Medical Education and the Physician Workforce of Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Mosawi, Aamir Jalal

    2008-01-01

    The lack of resources in a country experiencing decades of successive wars, blockade, administrative corruption, and poor governance led to deteriorated standards throughout medical education. Although professional certification programs exist, continuing medical education accreditation and credit systems are required to monitor and certify the…

  7. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Allied Medical Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in the allied medical disciplines in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals and terminology of accreditation of allied medical programs in Canada,…

  8. Promoting Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Trainees Addressing Siloed Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, Robert Li; Christodoulou, Joanna; Goldman, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Professional siloing within medical institutions has been identified as a problem in medical education, including resident training. The authors discuss how trainees from different disciplines can collaborate to address this problem. Method: A group of trainees from psychiatry, developmental medicine, neurology, and education came…

  9. Graduate Medical Education and Residents 1) Business Manager Responsibilities

    E-print Network

    Graduate Medical Education and Residents 1) Business Manager Responsibilities 2) Individual · Business Managers' Responsibilities for Resident and Medical Student Education o Assist program director with the Resident/Fellow management process Program directors will develop monthly schedules by the 15th

  10. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor. 412.322 Section 412.322 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data....

  11. Medicine for Somewhere: The Emergence of Place in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Brian M.; Daynard, Kim; Greenwood, David

    2014-01-01

    Until recently medical education has been largely silent on those aspects of the physician's life, both professional and unprofessional, that differ from place to place. This has contributed to health inequity through an undersupply of health care workers to many communities. A growing movement for social accountability in medical education

  12. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION POLICY POLICY for residents transferring to an other program. (Revised May 2002) 1 N.B. The Albert Einstein College on Graduate Medical Education of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine has established written policies

  13. ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION POLICY POLICY approved in lieu of an additional COGME policy. Revised: Sept. 2004 N.B. The Albert Einstein College on Graduate Medical Education of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine has established written policies

  14. Reform of Medical Education. The Effect of Student Unrest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    This book contains proceedings of a colloquium convened to discuss the reform of medical education, specifically student pressures for such reform. The participants included students and faculty from 11 countries. Papers were presented and followed by panel discussions. The topics covered reviews and analyses of medical education in Latin America,…

  15. Assessing Dance in Elementary Physical Education. Assessment Series--Assessing Dance in Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Theresa Purcell; Cone, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    "Assessing Dance in Elementary Physical Education" is a special edition of the NASPE Assessment Series for K-12 Physical Education. Elementary school physical educators finally have a book that can help them plan assessments for dance, an important part of a comprehensive physical education curriculum. Through dance, students develop their motor…

  16. The Government-Medical Education Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Califano, Joseph A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Issues addressed in this speech to the Association of American Medical Colleges include: oversupply of doctors, geographic maldistribution, demographic changes needed by medical schools, federal strategies, medical ethics, preventive medicine, and the economics of health care.

  17. Four Models of Medical Education about Elder Mistreatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Dyer, Carmel B.; Kerzner, Lawrence J.; Mosqueda, Laura; Murphy, Carole

    2002-01-01

    Describe four models of incorporating elder-mistreatment curriculum and collaboration with adult protective services into geriatrics medical education. Draws on efforts at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey--Robert Wood Johnson Medical School; the University of California, Irvine College of Medicine; Hennepin County Medical

  18. Summary of Closed Circuit Television Activities in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    This 1967 summary of closed circuit television (CCTV) activities in medical education presents descriptive information on 35 different medical institutions in Great Britain. Specific data on CCTV are offered by institution, equipment, and uses under each medical field: anatomy, anaesthetics, geriatrics, medicine, obstretrics and gynaecology,…

  19. Surgeons as Medical School Educators: An Untapped Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubert, Lisa M.; Way, David; DePhilip, Robert; Tam, Marty; Bishop, Julie; Jones, Kenneth; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive experience teaching residents, surgeons are an untapped resource for educating medical students. We hypothesized that by involving surgeons as teachers earlier in the medical school curriculum, medical students' interest in surgery will increase and their opinions of surgeons will improve. Five programs designed to involve…

  20. Service Learning in Medical Education: Project Description and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Although medical education has long recognized the importance of community service, most medical schools have not formally nor fully incorporated service learning into their curricula. To address this problem, we describe the initial design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a service-learning project within a first-year medical

  1. Economic analysis in medical education: definition of essential terms.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-10-01

    Medical education is expensive. There is a growing interest in the subject of cost and value in medical education. However, in the medical education literature, terms are sometimes used loosely - and so there is a need for basic grounding in the meaning of commonly used and important terms in medical education economics. The purpose of this article is to define some terms that are frequently used in economic analysis in medical education. In this article, terms are described, and the descriptions are followed by a worked example of how the terms might be used in practice. The following terms are described: opportunity cost, total cost of ownership, sensitivity analysis, viewpoint, activity-based costing, efficiency, technical efficiency, allocative efficiency, price and transaction costs. PMID:25072235

  2. Competency-based medical education in two Sub-Saharan African medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Olapade-Olaopa, E Oluwabunmi; Kiguli, Sarah; Chen, Candice; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Ogunniyi, Adesola O; Mukwaya, Solome; Omaswa, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively little has been written on Medical Education in Sub-Saharan Africa, although there are over 170 medical schools in the region. A number of initiatives have been started to support medical education in the region to improve quality and quantity of medical graduates. These initiatives have led to curricular changes in the region, one of which is the introduction of Competency-Based Medical Education (CBME). Institutional reviews This paper presents two medical schools, Makerere University College of Health Sciences and College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, which successfully implemented CBME. The processes of curriculum revision are described and common themes are highlighted. Both schools used similar processes in developing their CBME curricula, with early and significant stakeholder involvement. Competencies were determined taking into consideration each country’s health and education systems. Final competency domains were similar between the two schools. Both schools established medical education departments to support their new curricula. New teaching methodologies and assessment methods were needed to support CBME, requiring investments in faculty training. Both schools received external funding to support CBME development and implementation. Conclusion CBME has emerged as an important change in medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa with schools adopting it as an approach to transformative medical education. Makerere University and the University of Ibadan have successfully adopted CBME and show that CBME can be implemented even for the low-resourced countries in Africa, supported by external investments to address the human resources gap. PMID:25525404

  3. The Association's Scientific Journal is MEDICAL PHYSICS Member Society of the American Institute of Physics and the International Organization of Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    The Association's Scientific Journal is MEDICAL PHYSICS Member Society of the American Institute of Physics and the International Organization of Medical Physics American Association of Physicists-Kettering Cancer Center 1275 York Avenue Medical Physics Rm S-1136B New York, NY 10021 Phone: 212-639-6807 Fax: 212

  4. Expected Benefits of Streamlining Undergraduate Medical Education by Early Commitment to Specific Medical Specialties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbassat, Jochanan; Baumal, Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education is too long; it does not meet the needs for physicians' workforce; and its content is inconsistent with the job characteristics of some of its graduates. In this paper we attempt to respond to these problems by streamlining medical education along the following three reforms. First, high school graduates would be…

  5. A Position Statement from the National Association for Sport and Physical Education: Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Schools play an important role in public health, and the physical, mental, and social benefits of regular physical activity for youth are well documented. Leading public health, medical, and educational organizations have made important physical activity recommendations for school-aged youth. The National Association for Sport and Physical

  6. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ("Radiation protection") defining norms and requirements for "assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment," and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of specialists in the field. Facing new challenges, society becomes aware of the fact that education represents the real solution to escalade them. Nuclear physics plays an important role in ensuring energetic resources for the near future and in reducing greenhouse effects. On the other hand, especially nuclear physics will permit to solve the enigma of universe birth. As in any other field, development involves continuous education and knowledge upgrading for all categories carrying out nuclear activities. For radiation protection workers and specialists, periodically refreshment courses are mandatory, in compliance with the national and international specific requirements.

  7. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    SciTech Connect

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-21

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ('Radiation protection') defining norms and requirements for 'assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment', and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of specialists in the field. Facing new challenges, society becomes aware of the fact that education represents the real solution to escalade them. Nuclear physics plays an important role in ensuring energetic resources for the near future and in reducing greenhouse effects. On the other hand, especially nuclear physics will permit to solve the enigma of universe birth. As in any other field, development involves continuous education and knowledge upgrading for all categories carrying out nuclear activities. For radiation protection workers and specialists, periodically refreshment courses are mandatory, in compliance with the national and international specific requirements.

  8. Deliver, mail, or fax form to: Department of Graduate Medical Education -Stanford University Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    that apply*): Leave Start Date Leave End Date Bereavement Family Leave (Unpaid) Jury Duty Medical Leave is not required for the three weeks of paid time off per year or the week of educational leave routinely granted (Paid) Medical Leave (Non Pregnancy/State Disability) Medical Leave (Pregnancy/State Disability

  9. Electronic Medical Records and Their Impact on Resident and Medical Student Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Craig R.; Nguyen, Hien H.; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Electronic medical records (EMRs) are becoming prevalent and integral tools for residents and medical students. EMRs can integrate point-of-service information delivery within the context of patient care. Though it may be an educational tool, little is known about how EMR technology is currently used for medical learners. Method: The…

  10. Growth trends in medical specialists education in Iran; 1979 - 2013.

    PubMed

    Simforoosh, Nasser; Ziaee, Seyed Amir Mohsen; Tabatabai, Shima H

    2014-11-01

    Over the past 35 years Iran had significant quantitative progress in postgraduate medical education; and growth in specialist's physician workforce supply. Health and medical education policy makers have struggled with many issues related to physician supply, such as determining the sufficient number of physicians workforce and the appropriate number to train; establishing new medical schools; the diversity of specialty programs; efforts to increase the supply of physicians in specialty level in remote and rural areas; and the growing number of female physicians and its impact on health services. After establishment of Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME) in Iran, expansion of medical specialty education was a priority. Since then, great advances have been made in training of new specialty programs. Despite of these brilliant advances during the last decades in Iran, there has been no integrated and comprehensive documentation of previous and current growth trend, yet. To understand where Iranian physician supply and specialty training is headed, we examined the Iranian medical specialist's trends from 1979 to 2013 in a national study by support of Iranian academy of medicine. This paper documents the growth trend of medical specialist's workforce over the past 35 years. Examining the health manpower growth trends allow health and medical education policy makers to plan innovative strategies for the purposeful development of postgraduate medical education to ensure that in future there would be sufficient physicians supply, with the right skills, in the right places in response to population demands. PMID:25365619

  11. A critical review of the core medical training curriculum in the UK: A medical education perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gkotsi, Despoina; Panteliou, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    Summary This paper represents a systematic evaluation of the Core Medical Training Curriculum in the UK. The authors critically review the curriculum from a medical education perspective based mainly on the medical education literature as well as their personal experience of this curriculum. They conclude in practical recommendations and suggestions which, if adopted, could improve the design and implementation of this postgraduate curriculum. The systematic evaluation approach described in this paper is transferable to the evaluation of other undergraduate or postgraduate curricula, and could be a helpful guide for medical teachers involved in the delivery and evaluation of any medical curriculum PMID:25057366

  12. The Changing Medical Care System: Some Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Spencer

    1986-01-01

    The medical care system is undergoing widespread and significant changes. Individual hospitals may be disappearing as mergers, acquisitions, and a variety of multi-institutional arrangements become the dominant form and as a host of free-standing medical enterprises spread out into the community. (MLW)

  13. A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

  14. The Current State of Medical Education in Chinese Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosik, Russell Oliver; Huang, Lei; Cai, Qiaoling; Xu, Guo-Tong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Li; Tang, Wen; Chen, Qi; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Today's doctor is as much a humanist as a scientist. Medical schools have responded to this change by introducing a variety of courses, most notably those concerning the humanities and ethics. Thus far, no one has examined the extent of use of these subjects in Chinese medical schools. The goal of this study is to determine how many and in…

  15. Building on a Base: Applying Physics Education

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Building on a Base: Applying Physics Education Research to Physics Teaching S.J. Pollock CU Boulder (With thanks to N. Finkelstein!) Thanks for support from: Pew/Carnegie CASTL, NSF CCLI NSF STEM-TP PhysTec #12;Overview · Physics Education Research (PER) Rapid growth, subfield of physics · A Physicist

  16. WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS CLUB SPORTS POLICY AGREEMENT games only, and to only those rugby team members who have received medical clearance from Wesleyan to postpone or cancel practices and home contests due to inclement weather. Once a practice or game

  17. Radioisotope Production for Medical and Physics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mausner, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Radioisotopes are critical to the science and technology base of the US. Discoveries and applications made as a result of the availability of radioisotopes span widely from medicine, biology, physics, chemistry and homeland security. The clinical use of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis is the largest sector of use, with about 16 million procedures a year in the US. The use of ^99Mo/^99mTc generator and ^18F make up the majority, but ^201Tl, ^123I, ^111In, and ^67Ga are also used routinely to perform imaging of organ function. Application of radioisotopes for therapy is dominated by use of ^131I for thyroid malignancies, ^90Y for some solid tumors, and ^89Sr for bone cancer, but production of several more exotic species such as ^225Ac and ^211At are of significant current research interest. In physics ^225Ra is of interest for CP violation studies, and the actinides ^242Am, ^249Bk, and ^254Es are needed as targets for experiments to create superheavy elements. Large amounts of ^252Cf are needed as a fission source for the CARIBU experiment at ANL. The process of radioisotope production is multidisciplinary. Nuclear physics input based on nuclear reaction excitation function data is needed to choose an optimum target/projectile in order to maximize desired isotope production and minimize unwanted byproducts. Mechanical engineering is needed to address issues of target heating, induced mechanical stress and material compatibility of target and claddings. Radiochemists are involved as well since chemical separation to purify the desired final radioisotope product from the bulk target and impurities is also usually necessary. Most neutron rich species are produced at a few government and university reactors. Other radioisotopes are produced in cyclotrons in the commercial sector, university/hospital based facilities, and larger devices at the DOE labs. The landscape of US facilities, the techniques involved, and current supply challenges will be reviewed.

  18. Self-Determination in Medical Education: Encouraging Medical Educators to Be More like Blues Artists and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Heather; Williams, Geoffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, medical education has focused largely on medical students' intellectual development, mostly ignoring the broader psychological milieu of medical practice. This chasm can result in practitioners who are less likely to process their emotions and/or support their patient's needs, and more likely to experience burnout. Self-determination…

  19. Reimagining professional competence in physical education

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    Physical educators have critical roles to play in assisting communities and schools to increase physical activity for all citizens. They can assist classroom teachers in increasing physical activity in the academic school day and can serve as school wellness directors to increase the amount of physical activity students and school staff members receive during the day. Additionally, physical educators can implement innovative approaches to physical education curricula to enhance students’ opportunities to be active and to learn concepts to assist them to be physically active now and for a lifetime. When implementing evidence-based approaches to physical education, teachers need to teach the curriculum coherently and with fidelity. New programs such as Science, PE, & Me! and the Science of Healthful Living provide opportunities for students to examine the effects of exercise on their bodies in a physically active, learning-oriented approach to physical education.

  20. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. 422.324 Section...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time...

  1. 75 FR 14447 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ...Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance...Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). Dates and Times...on challenges facing graduate medical education in the coming decade. The...

  2. 76 FR 30950 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance...Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). Date and Time...Purpose: The Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) was authorized...

  3. 76 FR 64952 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance...Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education. Dates and Times: November...Purpose: The Council on Graduate Medical Education (``The Council'')...

  4. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. 422.324 Section...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time...

  5. 75 FR 79006 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance...Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). Dates and Times...various aspects of graduate medical education, Bureau of Health...

  6. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. 422.324 Section...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time...

  7. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. 422.324 Section...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time...

  8. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. 422.324 Section...MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time...

  9. Dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rakhshaan; Rehman, Rehana; Baig, Mukhtiar; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Mariam; Syed, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine adherence to dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from January to July 2011 among 820 students of private and public medical colleges in Karachi, Pakistan. Results: Overall, medical students scored low in dimensions of physical wellness. Private medical colleges students were fond of vigorous activities such as aerobics and swimming, whereas public medical colleges students were involved in moderate intensity activities such as walking and use of stairs (p<0.0001). Private students reported to consume more fast food (p=0.0001), had less sleep (p=0.0001), but attended regular annual medical checkups (p=0.009) as compared with their public institute counterparts. Safe practices such as avoidance of tobacco were almost the same. Conclusion: Comprehensive adherence to all dimensions of physical wellness was lacking among medical students. PMID:25987122

  10. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits.

    PubMed

    Sleath, Betsy; Blalock, Susan J; Carpenter, Delesha M; Muir, Kelly W; Sayner, Robyn; Lawrence, Scott; Giangiacomo, Annette L; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Tudor, Gail; Goldsmith, Jason; Robin, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients' visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before. PMID:24868450

  11. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    PubMed Central

    Sleath, Betsy; Blalock, Susan J.; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Muir, Kelly W.; Sayner, Robyn; Lawrence, Scott; Giangiacomo, Annette L.; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Tudor, Gail; Goldsmith, Jason; Robin, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients' visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before. PMID:24868450

  12. Popularity of Russian information sources of medical education.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Irina V; Arseniev, Sergey B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the popularity of information sources of medical educational sites , medical information portal , medical portal for students <6years.net>, electronic library of medical literature , and . Three sites (, and <6years.net>) provide sources of medical literature, educational videos, medical histories, medical papers and medical popular literature. And three other sites (, and ) provide sources for electronic medical books on various subjects. Using on-line programs Alexa and Cy-pr we have analyzed the website's rating and identified the main data and time-varying data of the sites. Calculated Alexa Rank rating was determined for each site. Our study has shown that the most popular information sources of medical education among the six studied sites for Russian users is ; the site is at the second place referring to the Alexa Rank rating and the site is at the second place referring to the citation index in Yandex. The most popular medical site of electronic medical books is . PMID:25000015

  13. A New Vision for Distance Learning and Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Ronald M.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) are taking place at a time of significant developments in educational thinking and new learning technologies. Such developments allow today's CME providers to better meet the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing education: convenience, relevance, individualization, self-assessment,…

  14. Status of neurology medical school education

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran I.; Isaacson, Richard S.; Safdieh, Joseph E.; Finney, Glen R.; Sowell, Michael K.; Sam, Maria C.; Anderson, Heather S.; Shin, Robert K.; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of ?4 weeks, p = 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p = 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44% of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied,” but more than half experienced “burnout” and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support. PMID:25305155

  15. 76 FR 77546 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee; Vacancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...vessels; medical examiner education; and medical research...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...vessels; medical examiner education; and medical...

  16. 78 FR 21134 - Merchant Mariner Medical Advisory Committee; Vacancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...vessels; medical examiner education; and medical research...and guidelines for the physical qualifications of operators...vessels; medical examiner education; and medical...

  17. Medical dramas on television: a brief guide for educators.

    PubMed

    Hirt, C; Wong, K; Erichsen, S; White, J S

    2013-01-01

    The popularity of medical television dramas is well-established and medical educators are beginning to recognize the power of medical media as a potential tool for education. The purpose of this study was to view a number of medical dramas and consider their potential use in medical education. A total of 177 episodes from eight popular television medical dramas produced between 1990 and 2009 were systematically viewed and analyzed and a brief guide was developed for each drama. The dramas analyzed contained a wealth of material applicable to medical education. In our experience, each drama may be best suited to a particular educational use: for example, clips from "ER" and "Scrubs" offer more examples of teaching and learning than "House" and "Grey's Anatomy", which are perhaps better suited for topics on ethics or team work. We hope that this brief guide will encourage others to consider integrating this material into their teaching, and to explore how television drama may be used most effectively in medical education. PMID:23228106

  18. Educational Value and Models-Based Practice in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, David

    2013-01-01

    A models-based approach has been advocated as a means of overcoming the serious limitations of the traditional approach to physical education. One of the difficulties with this approach is that physical educators have sought to use it to achieve diverse and sometimes competing educational benefits, and these wide-ranging aspirations are rarely if…

  19. Instructional Framework for Fitness Education in Physical Education. Guidance Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education's (NASPE) Fitness Education Project team gathered insights from professionals across the country who have worked on national and state physical education standards and district curriculum materials; from content and pedagogy specialists; and from current literature to provide what follows:…

  20. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 10. PT/OT QPCB Task Sort for Physical and Occupational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 10 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties in physical and occupational therapy. (BT)

  1. Building Faculty Community: Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration

    PubMed Central

    Edler, Alice A.; Dohn, Ann; Davidson, Heather A.; Grewal, Daisy; Behravesh, Bardia; Piro, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford Hospital and Clinics has developed a professional training program for program directors. This paper outlines the goals, structure, and expected outcomes for the one-year Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration program. Background The skills necessary for leading a successful Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) training program require an increased level of curricular and administrative expertise. To meet the ACGME Outcome Project goals, program directors must demonstrate not only sophisticated understanding of curricular design but also competency-based performance assessment, resource management, and employment law. Few faculty-development efforts adequately address the complexities of educational administration. As part of an institutional-needs assessment, 41% of Stanford program directors indicated that they wanted more training from the Department of Graduate Medical Education. Intervention To address this need, the Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration program will provide a curriculum that includes (1) readings and discussions in 9 topic areas, (2) regular mentoring by the director of Graduate Medical Education (GME), (3) completion of a service project that helps improve GME across the institution, and (4) completion of an individual scholarly project that focuses on education. Results The first fellow was accepted during the 2008–2009 academic year. Outcomes for the project include presentation of a project at a national meeting, internal workshops geared towards disseminating learning to peer program directors, and the completion of a GME service project. The paper also discusses lessons learned for improving the program. PMID:21975722

  2. 46 CFR 13.125 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 13.125 Section 13.125 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN CERTIFICATION OF TANKERMEN General § 13.125 Physical and medical requirements. Each applicant for an original...

  3. 46 CFR 13.125 - Physical and medical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physical and medical requirements. 13.125 Section 13.125 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN CERTIFICATION OF TANKERMEN General § 13.125 Physical and medical requirements. Each applicant for an original...

  4. Creating the Hereafter for Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Charlotte L.

    The problem of career opportunities in physical education does not lie in the absence or dearth of job openings but in the image the profession has of itself. The basic change required of physical educators is an awakening to the possibility and necessity of educating groups other than the traditional seventh to twelfth grades. In addition,…

  5. Who Needs Philosophy in Physical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavallini, M. Felicia

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the invaluable contribution of philosophy in physical education can mean the difference between a "roll out the ball" mentality and one that will change the lives of students forever. What good is an educated mind if it is housed in an unfit body? The more that physical education teachers in training understand the critical role they…

  6. Implementing Physical Best in Higher Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Suzan F.; Martinez, Ray D.

    2007-01-01

    Since the emphases of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs can be linked to quality K-12 instruction, embedding Physical Best (PB) materials into existing PETE curricula can be a practical means of addressing the obesity crisis in the public schools. The PB program is a comprehensive, health-related fitness education program that…

  7. Developing Your Child's Physical Education IEP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate physical education is a mandated part of a child's Individual Educational Program (IEP). It is not optional, nor should parents want it to be optional. This is the time in the day for the child to develop in a variety of ways that are very important to healthy living for the rest of his or her life. The purpose of physical education is…

  8. Purposes of Physical Education - Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPlante, Marilyn

    The emphasis in physical education appears to be changing toward a more humanistic education to counteract a dehumanizing trend with the emphasis on mechanization, efficiency, and technological innovation. This paper includes the results from a small survey of physical educators representing five groups: (1) curriculum theorists, (2) researchers,…

  9. Educating through the Physical--Rationale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eldar, Eitan; Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    Social competence is essential for successful performance in school and life. Siedentop (1980) suggested that physical education settings and related activities may serve as useful vehicles for improving pro-social skills and values. Physical education literature draws a clear distinction between educating about, in, and through movement (Arnold,…

  10. Physical Education and Physical Activity: A Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guedes, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Although many recent studies have shown that the lack of physical activity is one of the major causes of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease among children and adolescents, few studies have shown the connection between the lack of physical education and the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle. However, it is clear that physical education

  11. Positive Youth Development through Physical Activity: Opportunities for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As physical educators continue to advocate for school-based PE, they should also consider ways to extend their work into community settings in an effort to ensure that all kids have an opportunity to develop physical literacy. This article describes how positive youth development programs can provide an opportunity for physical educators to engage…

  12. Trading Places: From Physical Education Teachers to Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Ashley; Fletcher, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in research on becoming teacher educators, yet little is known about becoming physical education teacher educators (PETE). Responding to concerns about the current state of doctoral PETE programs and inadequate preparation of novice teacher educators, this paper explores our transition from high school teaching…

  13. Physical Activity and Environmental Influences during Secondary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Bik C.; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Louie, Lobo

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity engagement during physical education is important for many reasons, including developing physical fitness and movement skills and promoting health. Much more is known about physical activity in elementary than secondary schools. We examined physical activity and how it was influenced by instructor-related and environmental…

  14. The current status of education and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs in Japan: a survey by the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yamada, Syogo

    2015-07-01

    To standardize educational programs and clinical training for medical physics students, the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification (JBMP) began to accredit master's, doctorate, and residency programs for medical physicists in 2012. At present, 16 universities accredited by the JBMP offer 22 courses. In this study, we aimed to survey the current status of educational programs and career paths of students after completion of the medical physicist program in Japan. A questionnaire was sent in August 2014 to 32 universities offering medical physicist programs. The questionnaire was created and organized by the educational course certification committee of the JBMP and comprised two sections: the first collected information about the university attended, and the second collected information about characteristics and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs from 2008 to 2014. Thirty universities (16 accredited and 14 non-accredited) completed the survey (response rate 94 %). A total of 209, 40, and 3 students graduated from the master's, doctorate, and residency programs, respectively. Undergraduates entered the medical physicist program constantly, indicating an interest in medical physics among undergraduates. A large percentage of the students held a bachelor's degree in radiological technology (master's program 94 %; doctorate program 70 %); graduates obtained a national radiological technologist license. Regarding career paths, although the number of the graduates who work as medical physicist remains low, 7 % with a master's degree and 50 % with a doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. Our results could be helpful for improving the medical physicist program in Japan. PMID:25939869

  15. The Neglected Disease in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Constance

    1985-01-01

    Medical schools are finally teaching about alcoholism, a disease implicated in 20-50 percent of hospital admissions and which is a problem in the medical profession itself. Recent discoveries on identifying/treating alcoholism have helped to change attitudes and lead to model problems for medical students at Johns Hopkins and Dartmouth. (DH)

  16. Role of anaesthesiologists in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C

    2000-12-01

    Although anaesthesia and intensive care medicine are postgraduate subjects, few would deny the value of exposing medical undergraduates to clinical training in these areas. The present review addresses developments in medical undergraduate training curricula, and the specific benefits that can be provided for medical students, at all stages of training, by anaesthesiologists working in operating theatres, intensive care units and pain clinics. PMID:17016371

  17. [The revelation from three international medical education standards to education of physician-patient communication].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Sun, Hui-Qiang; Shao, Qi; Deng, Yan-Nan

    2010-12-01

    The ability of manipulating physician-patient communication is of great significance in medical practice and undoubtedly needed to be developed during medical education. The importance and request of physician-patient communication in medical education has been definitely prescribed in three international standards stipulated respectively by three international medical education organizations. In this article, the author attempted to reveal the deficiency of Chinese medical education on physician-patient communication by studying the three international standards as mentioned. And some measures had also been recommended to improve the conditions: setting up physician-patient communication curriculums among students; emphasizing the training of the skills in internship during undergraduate study period; adding physician-patient communication contents in the Practice Physician Qualification Test; and so on. The improvement of communication skills in basic medical education is the primary part for the progress of whole medical area. Supported by Teaching Reform Project of Shandong University (Grant No.200954,2009174,2009226). PMID:21431271

  18. Reframing medical education to support professional identity formation.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Boudreau, J Donald; Snell, Linda; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-11-01

    Teaching medical professionalism is a fundamental component of medical education. The objective is to ensure that students understand the nature of professionalism and its obligations and internalize the value system of the medical profession. The recent emergence of interest in the medical literature on professional identity formation gives reason to reexamine this objective. The unstated aim of teaching professionalism has been to ensure the development of practitioners who possess a professional identity. The teaching of medical professionalism therefore represents a means to an end.The principles of identity formation that have been articulated in educational psychology and other fields have recently been used to examine the process through which physicians acquire their professional identities. Socialization-with its complex networks of social interaction, role models and mentors, experiential learning, and explicit and tacit knowledge acquisition-influences each learner, causing them to gradually "think, act, and feel like a physician."The authors propose that a principal goal of medical education be the development of a professional identity and that educational strategies be developed to support this new objective. The explicit teaching of professionalism and emphasis on professional behaviors will remain important. However, expanding knowledge of identity formation in medicine and of socialization in the medical environment should lend greater logic and clarity to the educational activities devoted to ensuring that the medical practitioners of the future will possess and demonstrate the qualities of the "good physician." PMID:25054423

  19. Commentary: Flexner and Dutch medical education: a misinterpretation?

    PubMed

    Custers, Eugène J F M

    2010-11-01

    Abraham Flexner's 1910 report, Medical Education in the United States and Canada, was hardly noticed in the Netherlands, and though his 1925 book, Medical Education: A Comparative Study, was extensively discussed in the Dutch Medical Journal, it did not and could not affect medical education in the Netherlands. Until the 1970s, the medical curriculum in the Netherlands consisted of four phases: the propaedeutic year (premedical sciences), two preclinical years, two theoretical clinical years, and one-and-a-half to two years of clerkships. When in the 1970s interest in curriculum innovation arose in the Netherlands, it was based on developments in North America that challenged "Flexnerian" norms in medical education. As hardly anyone in the Netherlands cared to study Flexner's work closely, his name became synonymous with the conventional curriculum just as it had in North America. However, the Dutch conventional curriculum was quite different from the American conventional curriculum, so attributing its origins to Flexner's work was a serious misrepresentation. In this commentary, the author clarifies common misconceptions about the history of Dutch medical education and argues that the curriculum as Flexner saw it differed considerably from the Dutch medical curriculum a century ago. PMID:20980851

  20. Emotional intelligence as a crucial component to medical education

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary focus of this review was to discover what is already known about Emotional Intelligence (EI) and the role it plays within social relationships, as well as its importance in the fields of health care and health care education. This article analyzes the importance of EI in the field of health care and recommends various ways that this important skill can be built into medical programs. Methods Information was gathered using various database searches including EBSCOHOST, Academic Search Premier and ERIC. The search was conducted in English language journals from the last ten years. Descriptors include: Emotional Intelligence, medical students and communication skills, graduate medical education, Emotional Intelligence and graduate medical education, Emotional Intelligence training programs, program evaluation and development. Results Results of the study show a direct correlation between medical education and emotional intelligence competencies, which makes the field of medical education an ideal one in which to integrate further EI training. Conclusions The definition of EI as an ability-based skill allows for training in specific competencies that can be directly applied to a specialized field. When EI is conceptualized as an ability that can be taught, learned, and changed, it may be used to address the specific aspects of the clinician–patient relationship that are not working well. For this reason, teaching EI should be a priority in the field of medical education in order to better facilitate this relationship in the future. PMID:26638080

  1. Autonomy support for autonomous motivation in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Kusurkar, Rashmi A.; Croiset, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students often study only to fare well in their examinations or pursue a specific specialty, or study only those topics that they perceive to be useful in medical practice. The motivation for study in these cases comes from external or internal pressures or from the desire to obtain rewards. Self-determination theory (SDT) classifies this type of motivation as controlled motivation and the type of motivation that comes from genuine interest or personal value as autonomous motivation. Autonomous motivation, in comparison with controlled motivation, has been associated with better learning, academic success, and less exhaustion. SDT endorses autonomous motivation and suggests that autonomy support is important for autonomous motivation. The meaning of autonomy is misinterpreted by many. This article tries to focus on how to be autonomy-supportive in medical education. Discussion Autonomy support refers to the perception of choice in learning. Some of the ways of supporting autonomy in medical education are small group teaching, problem-based learning, and gradual increase in responsibility of patients. Autonomy-supportive teaching behavior is not a trait and can be learned. Autonomy support in medical education is not limited to bringing in changes in the medical curriculum for students; it is about an overall change in the way of thinking and working in medical schools that foster autonomy among those involved in education. Research into autonomy in medical education is limited. Some topics that need to be investigated are the ideas and perceptions of students and teachers about autonomy in learning. Conclusion Autonomy support in medical education can enhance autonomous motivation of students for medical study and practice and make them autonomy-supportive in their future medical practice and teaching. PMID:25953033

  2. Elementary Physical Education and Math Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrancesco, Charmaine; Casas, Betty

    2004-01-01

    Physical education programs are essential to holistic development of children, because learning occurs within several domains. In addition to addressing the psychomotor objectives related to physical development, many physical education curriculums include learning objectives geared toward facilitating the cognitive development of children. One…

  3. The Stress Process in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2007-01-01

    Negative stress in physical education can reduce a student's enjoyment of physical activity and destroy the individual's desire to be a lifelong mover. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of stress in physical education. Stress is defined as a substantial imbalance between the demand of a situation and the individual's capability…

  4. Adapted Physical Education Program. 1968 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Public Schools, PA. Office of Research.

    A program was introduced in 1965 to provide individualized physical education for students in grades 1 through 12 who could not participate in regular physical education programs. Twenty-one schools and 1,640 students with a variety of conditions participated. The most frequent limitations of participants were low physical fitness, overweight, and…

  5. Physical Education Waivers and Young Adult Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Derrick

    2010-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the relationship between physical activity of young adults who were granted waivers from high school physical education versus those who completed courses in states requiring physical education teacher certification, with curriculum standards and credit requirements for graduation. University students from three…

  6. A Future for Undergraduate Physics Education?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenberg, Donald

    2013-03-01

    About two years ago, the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council created a Committee on Undergraduate Physics Education (UPE), with support from the National Science Foundation. The Committee was given the task to identify ``the goals and challenges facing undergraduate physics education,'' and ``how best practices for undergraduate physics education can be implemented on a widespread and sustained basis.'' The Committee was also asked to ``assess the status of physics education research (PER)'' and to ``discuss how PER can assist in accomplishing the goal of improving undergraduate physics education best practices and education policy.'' This presentation will report the Committee's findings and recommendations, the latter aimed at audiences ranging from individual physics faculty to departmental and university-wide leadership, and professional societies and funding agencies. The Committee's challenge was daunting. We are experiencing revolutionary changes in higher education, driven by new education technologies and demands for broader and deeper STEM education for more students in more fields. Only a relatively small fraction of undergraduates take physics courses. Nevertheless, half a million undergraduates enroll in at least one physics course in every academic year. PER has become a productive research field with the potential for major contributions to the improvement of undergraduate STEM education generally. Yet, in many--probably most-institutions UPE remains persistently traditional. We all have much to do!

  7. Department of Dental Education PHYSICAL EXAMINATION FORM

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    Department of Dental Education PHYSICAL EXAMINATION FORM Dear Healthcare Provider, ____________________________ is preparing for a career in Dental Education. For the safety and protection of our students and the patients before having any dental treatment? Yes ___________ (please explain

  8. Physical Education Teacher Education on the Education Market--Who's Defining What Physical Education Teachers Need to Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karhus, Svein

    2010-01-01

    Background: A major consequence of the neo-liberal ideology underpinning recent reforms in higher education in the Western world has been the significant increase in the competitiveness of institutions to recruit students in the marketplace of education and to keep them. Accordingly bachelor degrees relating to physical education teacher education

  9. Cracks and crevices: globalization discourse and medical education.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Brian David; Maniate, Jerry M; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad; Segouin, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    Globalization discourse, and its promises of a 'flat world', 'borderless economy' and 'mobility of ideas and people', has become very widespread in all fields. In medical education this discourse is underpinned by assumptions that medical competence has universal elements and that medical education can therefore develop 'global standards' for accreditation, curricula and examinations. Yet writers in the field other than medicine have raised a number of concerns about an overemphasis on the economic aspects of globalization. This article explores the notion that it is time to study and embrace differences and discontinuities in goals, practices and values that underpin medical competence in different countries and to critically examine the promises-realized or broken-of globalization discourse in medical education. PMID:19877863

  10. E-Learning as New Method of Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2008-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Distance learning refers to use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance and covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (e-health), telematics, telemedicine, tele-education, etc. For the need of e-health, telemedicine, tele-education and distance learning there are various technologies and communication systems from standard telephone lines to the system of transmission digitalized signals with modem, optical fiber, satellite links, wireless technologies, etc. Tele-education represents health education on distance, using Information Communication Technologies (ICT), as well as continuous education of a health system beneficiaries and use of electronic libraries, data bases or electronic data with data bases of knowledge. Distance learning (E-learning) as a part of tele-education has gained popularity in the past decade; however, its use is highly variable among medical schools and appears to be more common in basic medical science courses than in clinical education. Distance learning does not preclude traditional learning processes; frequently it is used in conjunction with in-person classroom or professional training procedures and practices. Tele-education has mostly been used in biomedical education as a blended learning method, which combines tele-education technology with traditional instructor-led training, where, for example, a lecture or demonstration is supplemented by an online tutorial. Distance learning is used for self-education, tests, services and for examinations in medicine i.e. in terms of self-education and individual examination services. The possibility of working in the exercise mode with image files and questions is an attractive way of self education. Automated tracking and reporting of learners’ activities lessen faculty administrative burden. Moreover, e-learning can be designed to include outcomes assessment to determine whether learning has occurred. This review article evaluates the current status and level of tele-education development in Bosnia and Herzegovina outlining its components, faculty development needs for implementation and the possibility of its integration as official learning standard in biomedical curricula in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Tele-education refers to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance knowledge and performance. Tele-education in biomedical education is widely accepted in the medical education community where it is mostly integrated into biomedical curricula forming part of a blended learning strategy. There are many biomedical digital repositories of e-learning materials worldwide, some peer reviewed, where instructors or developers can submit materials for widespread use. First pilot project with the aim to introduce tele-education in biomedical curricula in Bosnia and Herzegovina was initiated by Department for Medical Informatics at Medical Faculty in Sarajevo in 2002 and has been developing since. Faculty member’s skills in creating tele-education differ from those needed for traditional teaching and faculty rewards must recognize this difference and reward the effort. Tele-education and use of computers will have an impact of future medical practice in a life long learning. Bologna process, which started last years in European countries, provide us to promote and introduce modern educational methods of education at biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Cathedra of Medical informatics and Cathedra of Family medicine at Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo started to use Web based education as common way of teaching of medical students. Satisfaction with this method of education within the students is good, but not yet suitable for most of medical disciplines at biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:24109154

  11. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  12. Virtual seminars for disseminating medical nutrition education curriculum ideas.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, K; Poehlman, G; Jobe, A

    2000-06-01

    There is a need and a desire for educators working toward implementation of nutrition in medical schools and residency programs to share ideas and materials. The World Wide Web enables computer-mediated communications through which a medical nutrition curriculum could be discussed; however, existing formats lack focus and structure. In January 1999, a virtual seminar that focused on nutrition education in medical schools and residency programs was conducted. The seminar, titled "Making Room for Nutrition Education, was sponsored by organizations that have active medical nutrition educators. The seminar included 5 topics discussed over a 4-d period. The transcript was made available at http://www.preventivenutrition. com. There were 119 registered participants. Responses to a postseminar questionnaire were positive; there was interest in an ongoing series of virtual seminars. PMID:10837278

  13. Measuring Effectiveness for Best Evidence Medical Education: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive; Thomas, Hywel; Bullock, Alison; Eynon, Rebecca; Wall, David

    2001-01-01

    Identifies five levels of effectiveness: outcomes, behavior, learning, reaction, and participation, and discusses these levels within the context of research evidence for education within the medical profession. (Contains 33 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. Global health education in U.S. Medical schools

    E-print Network

    Khan, Omar A.; Guerrant, Richard; Sanders, James; Carpenter, Charles; Spottswood, Margaret; Jones, David S.; O’Callahan, Cliff; Brewer, Timothy F.; Markuns, Jeffrey F.; Gillam, Stephen; O’Neill, Joseph; Nathanson, Neal; Wright, Stephen

    2013-01-18

    Abstract Interest in global health (GH) among medical students worldwide is measurably increasing. There is a concomitant emphasis on emphasizing globally-relevant health professions education. Through a structured literature review, expert...

  15. Physics Education activities sponsored by LAPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora Ley, Cesar E.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we present the first activities of the Latin-American Physics Education Network (LAPEN) organized by representatives of Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Uruguay, Peru and Spain. These activities include Seminars, Congress, Postgraduate Programs on Physics Education and several publications. The creation of LAPEN has been inspired and warranted by members of the International Commission on Physics Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. LAPEN was constituted in the International Meeting on Teaching Physics and Training Teachers (RIEFEP 2005) which was held in Matanzas, Cuba in November 2005. The creation of LAPEN was also warranted by the General Assembly of the IX Inter-American Conference on Physics Education held in San José, Costa Rica from 3 to 7 July 2006, and by the ICPE Committee in the International Conference on Physics Education 2006 at Tokyo, Japan. LAPEN has a Coordinator Committee integrated by a President, a Vice-president and an Executive Secretary.

  16. Perspectives in medical education--1. Reflections on the state of medical education in Japan.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Harsha

    2006-06-01

    The current shortcomings in Japanese medical education are highlighted by identifying four major areas of concern, based on the author's personal observations at Keio University Hospital. The first of these is a woeful lack of clinical skills among Japanese medical students and residents. This lack springs directly from the complete absence of any bedside clinical instruction, which constitutes the second area of concern. The third is the attitude of faculty towards teaching as a burden that detracts and diverts them from their primary goal of academic advancement through research. Finally, there is no recognition of the value of a problem-based approach to teaching clinical medicine, so that clinical problem-solving skills have atrophied to the point of near-extinction in the current generation of Japanese physicians. The promise of problem-based learning (PBL) provides a crucial starting point for efforts to change the system. PBL emphasizes the importance of an integrated approach to clinical problems, and a reliance on critical thinking--the basis of primary care. This contrasts with the selective and highly specialized approach to disease, and reliance on sophisticated technology, which are hallmarks of specialty care. The effort to reform medical education will fail without visionary leadership and without the willingness to confront the truth, as unpleasant as it may seem to be. Both these crucial elements exist at Keio University at this critical juncture. It is this happy confluence that emboldens the author to hope that the future of reform is in good hands at this august institution. PMID:16823259

  17. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  18. Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

    1995-01-01

    Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

  19. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sexual Dysfunction in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Sallie; Wittmann, Daniela; Balon, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Addressing sexual health concerns in medical practice has been an emerging concept for the past two decades. However, there have been very few educational opportunities in medical training that would prepare future physicians for such a responsibility. Since assessing and treating sexual problems requires knowledge that encompasses many…

  20. Undergraduate Medical Education Accreditation as a Driver of Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Frank A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the accreditation of medical education programs that lead to the Doctor of Medicine degree in the United States and Canada. We identify select accreditation standards that relate directly to the preparation of medical school graduates, as required for the supervised practice of medicine in residency training and for developing the…

  1. Transforming Vietnam's Medical Education through E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churton, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The costs for providing medical school education and services in Vietnam's universities continue to increase. Through a collaborative project between the Government of the Netherlands and Vietnam's Ministry of Health, a five year experimental program to develop in-country capacity and reduce the dependence upon a foreign medical service delivery…

  2. The Significance of Scientific Capital in UK Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Caragh

    2011-01-01

    For decades, debates over medical curriculum reform have centred on the role of science in medical education, but the meaning of "science" in this domain is vague and the persistence of the debate has not been explained. Following Bourdieu, this paper examines struggles over legitimate knowledge and the forms of capital associated with science in…

  3. Rasch Analysis of Professional Behavior in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, R.; Verhulst, S. J.; Roberts, N. K.; Dorsey, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of students' "consumer feedback" to assess faculty behavior and improve the process of medical education is a significant challenge. We used quantitative Rasch measurement to analyze pre-categorized student comments listed by 385 graduating medical students. We found that students differed little with respect to the number of…

  4. Problems and Challenges in Medical Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Sribas; Sahai, Manjari

    2015-01-01

    As India marches towards an exciting new future of growth and progress, medical education will play a pivotal role in crafting a sustained development agenda. The idea of creating a healthy society is no longer a debatable luxury; its significance has been grasped by policy shapers worldwide. In a developing nation like India, medical services…

  5. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  6. Medical Education in Indonesia: Primary Care and Community Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smilkstein, Gabriel

    1982-01-01

    Indonesia's efforts to improve its qualitative and quantitative participation in community health activities are discussed. Student and faculty problems in the community health program at Udayana University Medical School in Bali are cited. Knowledge gained from Indonesian programs should be examined by American medical educators for use in…

  7. Health Maintenance Organizations and Medical Education: Breaking the Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gordon T.

    1990-01-01

    Health maintenance organizations (HMOs) medical directors and academics (N=450) explored the barriers to and incentives for cooperation between academic medical centers (AMCs) and HMOs in clinical education. AMCs need to be prepared to offer meaningful academic and financial inducements to attract HMOs to participate in teaching. (Author/MLW)

  8. Cost in medical education: one hundred and twenty years ago.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-10-01

    The first full paper that is dedicated to cost in medical education appears in the BMJ in 1893. This paper "The cost of a medical education" outlines the likely costs associated with undergraduate education at the end of the nineteenth century, and offers guidance to the student on how to make financial planning. Many lessons can be gleaned from the paper about the cost and other aspects of nineteenth century medical education. Cost is viewed almost exclusively from the domain of the male gender. Cost is viewed not just from the perspective of a young man but of a young gentleman. There is a strong implication that medicine is a club and that you have to have money to join the club and then to take part in the club's activities. Cost affects choice of medical school and selection into schools. The paper places great emphasis on the importance of passing exams at their first sitting and progressing through each year in a timely manner-mainly to save costs. The subject of cost is viewed from the perspective of the payer-at this time students and their families. The paper encourages the reader to reflect on what has and has not changed in this field since 1893. Modern medical education is still expensive; its expense deters students; and we have only started to think about how to control costs or how to ensure value. Too much of the cost of medical education continues to burden students and their families. PMID:25134666

  9. Challenges for medical educators: Results of a survey among members of the German association for medical education

    PubMed Central

    Huwendiek, Sören; Hahn, Eckhart G.; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Nikendei, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the increasing interest in medical education in the German-speaking countries, there is currently no information available on the challenges which medical educators face. To address this problem, we carried out a web-based survey among the members of the Association for Medical Education (Gesellschaft für medizinische Ausbildung, GMA). Methods: A comprehensive survey was carried out on the need for further qualifications, expertise and the general conditions of medical educators in Germany. As part of this study, the educators were asked to list the three main challenges which they faced and which required urgent improvement. The results were analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 147 of the 373 members on the GMA mailing list (response rate: 39%). The educators named a total of 346 challenges and emphasised the following areas: limited academic recognition for engagement in teaching (53.5% of educators), insufficient institutional (31.5%) and financial support (28.4%), a curriculum in need of reform (22.8%), insufficient time for teaching assignments (18,9%), inadequate teacher competence in teaching methods (18.1%), restricted faculty development programmes (18.1%), limited networking within the institution (11.0%), lack of teaching staff (10.2%), varying preconditions of students (8.7%), insufficient recognition and promotion of medical educational research (5.5%), extensive assessment requirements (4.7%), and the lack of role models within medical education (3.2%). Conclusion: The medical educators found the biggest challenges which they faced to be limited academic recognition and insufficient institutional and financial support. Consequently, improvements should be implemented to address these issues. PMID:24062818

  10. [Death education for medical personnel utilizing cinema].

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Chae

    2012-09-25

    Death and dying is an ultimate process that every human being must experience. However, in these days we do not like to think or discuss about death and dying. Actually, hatred and denial is the usual feeling when we encounter death and dying. Dying is more than a biological occurrence. It is a human, social, and spiritual event, but the spiritual dimension of patients is too often neglected. Whether death is viewed as a "wall" or as a "door" can have significantly important consequences for how we live our lives. Near death experience is one of the excellent evidences to prove that there should be spiritual component being separated from the human physical body when we experience death. People have called it soul, spirit, or nonlocal consciousness. Caregivers need to recognize and acknowledge the spiritual component of patient care. Learning about death and dying helps us encounter death in ways that are meaningful for our own lives. Among the several learning tools, utilizing cinema with its audio and visual components can be one of the most powerful learning tools in death education. PMID:23018534

  11. Incorporating Environmental Health into Pediatric Medical and Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Leyla Erk; Roberts, James; Rogers, Bonnie; Love, Rebecca; Etzel, Ruth; Paulson, Jerome; Witherspoon, Nsedu Obot; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric medical and nursing education currently lacks the environmental health content necessary to appropriately prepare pediatric health care professionals to prevent, recognize, manage, and treat environmental-exposure–related disease. Leading health institutions have recognized the need for improvements in health professionals’ environmental health education. Parents are seeking answers about the impact of environmental toxicants on their children. Given the biologic, psychological, and social differences between children and adults, there is a need for environmental health education specific to children. The National Environmental Education and Training Foundation, in partnership with the Children’s Environmental Health Network, created two working groups, one with expertise in medical education and one with expertise in nursing education. The working groups reviewed the transition from undergraduate student to professional to assess where in those processes pediatric environmental health could be emphasized. The medical education working group recommended increasing education about children’s environmental health in the medical school curricula, in residency training, and in continuing medical education. The group also recommended the expansion of fellowship training in children’s environmental health. Similarly, the nursing working group recommended increasing children’s environmental health content at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing nursing education levels. Working groups also identified the key medical and nursing organizations that would be important in leveraging these changes. A concerted effort to prioritize pediatric environmental health by governmental organizations and foundations is essential in providing the resources and expertise to set policy and provide the tools for teaching pediatric environmental health to health care providers. PMID:15579423

  12. What are the implications of implementation science for medical education?

    PubMed Central

    Price, David W.; Wagner, Dianne P.; Krane, N. Kevin; Rougas, Steven C.; Lowitt, Nancy R.; Offodile, Regina S.; Easdown, L. Jane; Andrews, Mark A. W.; Kodner, Charles M.; Lypson, Monica; Barnes, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Derived from multiple disciplines and established in industries outside of medicine, Implementation Science (IS) seeks to move evidence-based approaches into widespread use to enable improved outcomes to be realized as quickly as possible by as many as possible. Methods This review highlights selected IS theories and models, chosen based on the experience of the authors, that could be used to plan and deliver medical education activities to help learners better implement and sustain new knowledge and skills in their work settings. Results IS models, theories and approaches can help medical educators promote and determine their success in achieving desired learner outcomes. We discuss the importance of incorporating IS into the training of individuals, teams, and organizations, and employing IS across the medical education continuum. Challenges and specific strategies for the application of IS in educational settings are also discussed. Conclusions Utilizing IS in medical education can help us better achieve changes in competence, performance, and patient outcomes. IS should be incorporated into curricula across disciplines and across the continuum of medical education to facilitate implementation of learning. Educators should start by selecting, applying, and evaluating the teaching and patient care impact one or two IS strategies in their work. PMID:25911282

  13. Physics and the revised Medical College Admission Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilborn, Robert C.

    2014-05-01

    Physics has played an important role in the preparation of future physicians and other health professionals for more than 100 years. Almost all pre-health students take a year of college-level physics as part of their preparation for medical, dental, and pharmacy school. In particular, the widely-used Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) contains a significant number of questions that require physics knowledge and skills. This paper describes the changes in the MCAT to be implemented in 2015, the role of physics in the revised MCAT, and implications for introductory physics courses for the life sciences.

  14. Improving undergraduate medical education about pain assessment and management: A qualitative descriptive study of stakeholders’ perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Ware, Mark A; Posel, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain is one of the most common reasons for individuals to seek medical advice, yet it remains poorly managed. One of the main reasons that poor pain management persists is the lack of adequate knowledge and skills of practicing clinicians, which stems from a perceived lack of pain education during the training of undergraduate medical students. OBJECTIVE: To identify gaps in knowledge with respect to pain management as perceived by students, patients and educators. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were generated through six focus groups with second- and fourth-year medical students, four focus groups with patients and individual semistructured interviews with nine educators. All interviews were audiotaped and an inductive thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 70 individuals participated in the present study. Five main themes were identified: assessment of physical and psychosocial aspects of pain; clinical management of pain with pharmacology and alternative therapies; communication and the development of a good therapeutic relationship; ethical considerations surrounding pain; and institutional context of medical education about pain. CONCLUSION: Participating patients, students and pain experts recognized a need for additional medical education about pain assessment and management. Educational approaches need to teach students to gather appropriate information about pain, to acquire knowledge of a broad spectrum of therapeutic options, to develop a mutual, trusting relationship with patients and to become aware of their own biases and prejudice toward patients with pain. The results of the present study should be used to develop and enhance existing pain curricula content. PMID:23985579

  15. Physical Education Teachers' and University Teacher Educators' Perceptions regarding Coeducational vs. Single Gender Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant M.; Hannon, James C.; Knowles, Curt

    2012-01-01

    Since Title IX was enacted in the United States in 1972, Physical Education (PE) classes have become coeducational. This may be because educational leaders interpret Title IX to require coeducational-only classes. Research, however, indicates that for some students, coeducation classes may not be the most appropriate learning environment. The…

  16. Suggested Guidelines for Teaching Undergraduate History of Physical Education and Sport in a Physical Education Teacher Education Program. Guidance Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Don; Lumpkin, Angela; Park, Roberta; Thomas, Robert; Morgenegg, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Studying the historical antecedents of physical education and sport typically forms part of the curriculum of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs in U.S. colleges and universities. These courses commonly use a survey model, briefly examining the development of organized physical education and sport practices and programs from…

  17. Council of Medical Specialty Societies: Committed to Continuing Medical Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Walter J.

    2005-01-01

    The Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) recognizes the need for continuing medical education (CME) reform and intends to be actively engaged in that process. While recognizing that CME reform must involve many organizations, the CMSS and particularly the 23 societies that make up the CMSS are in a position to affect many of the needed…

  18. Medical Education for Women in Great Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzker, Edythe

    Prior to 1858, the women in Great Britain were denied the right to attend courses in the medical curricula that were prerequisites to the practicing of medicine in that country. The movement to permit women to study and practice medicine was spearheaded by Sophia Jex-Blake when she sought admission to the medical classes in the University of…

  19. "Teaching as a Competency": competencies for medical educators.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Li, Su-Ting T; Meyers, Fredrick J; Pratt, Daniel D; Collins, John B; Braddock, Clarence; Skeff, Kelley M; West, Daniel C; Henderson, Mark; Hales, Robert E; Hilty, Donald M

    2011-10-01

    Most medical faculty receive little or no training about how to be effective teachers, even when they assume major educational leadership roles. To identify the competencies required of an effective teacher in medical education, the authors developed a comprehensive conceptual model. After conducting a literature search, the authors met at a two-day conference (2006) with 16 medical and nonmedical educators from 10 different U.S. and Canadian organizations and developed an initial draft of the "Teaching as a Competency" conceptual model. Conference participants used the physician competencies (from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education [ACGME]) and the roles (from the Royal College's Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists [CanMEDS]) to define critical skills for medical educators. The authors then refined this initial framework through national/regional conference presentations (2007, 2008), an additional literature review, and expert input. Four core values grounded this framework: learner engagement, learner-centeredness, adaptability, and self-reflection. The authors identified six core competencies, based on the ACGME competencies framework: medical (or content) knowledge; learner- centeredness; interpersonal and communication skills; professionalism and role modeling; practice-based reflection; and systems-based practice. They also included four specialized competencies for educators with additional programmatic roles: program design/implementation, evaluation/scholarship, leadership, and mentorship. The authors then cross-referenced the competencies with educator roles, drawing from CanMEDS, to recognize role-specific skills. The authors have explored their framework's strengths, limitations, and applications, which include targeted faculty development, evaluation, and resource allocation. The Teaching as a Competency framework promotes a culture of effective teaching and learning. PMID:21869655

  20. Current status and future trends of medical physics in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin Nieto, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical Physics is an area that applies the principles of physics to medicine, particularly in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases using ionizing and nonionizing radiation. The main attractive of medical physics is that it has a direct impact on the quality and safety of medical care in humans; this social component with direct implications for the population is of high value for Mexico. This paper describes the concepts of medical physics, trends and the current status of this discipline as a profession, which is directly related to the efforts of clinical research. It is also described what is, in my opinion, the future of medical physics in Mexico, emphasizing the fact that this field requires a substantial boost from universities and hospitals to recruit highly qualified young medical physicists and the support from government agencies such as Secretaria de Salud, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado through clinical research projects that allow the necessary evolution of medical physics into the hospital setting.

  1. Understanding and Addressing Cognitive Bias in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershberger, Paul J.; Markert, Ronald J.; Part, Howard M.; Cohen, Steven M.; Finger, William W.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on research and educational findings using the Inventory of Cognitive Biases in Medicine (ICBM). The ICBM was administered to medical students as well as practicing physicians and susceptibility to cognitive bias was found to be substantial among both groups. Concludes that educational strategies in the classroom and clinical settings may…

  2. Learning Environment in Medical Schools Adopting Different Educational Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Rukban, Mohammad Othman; Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen

    2010-01-01

    Faculty of Medicine, King Fahad Medical City (KFMC) has adopted a problem based learning (PBL) curriculum. This study investigates the educational environment in the school; it also compares the educational environment prevailing in problem based learning curriculum with that of conventional and outcome based curricula. A cross sectional study…

  3. The Role of Self-Concept in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Li, Bingyi; Wilson, Ian; Craven, Rhonda G.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has acknowledged the importance of self-concept for adolescents' academic behaviour, motivation and aspiration, but little is known about the role of self-concept underpinning the motivation and aspiration of higher education students in a specialised field such as medical education. This article draws upon a programme of…

  4. Medical Assistant: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newport News Public Schools, VA.

    This task analysis guide is designed to be used in combination with the "Health Occupations Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the Medical Assistant program in Virginia. The task analysis guide contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the specific courses…

  5. Continuing Veterinary Medical Education: Responsibilities, Support and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, E. Dean; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Advanced Studies Committee of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges addresses these questions: What are the responsibilities of the school of veterinary science department in continuing education? How should continuing education be funded? What are the appropriate mechanisms for recognizing or rewarding faculty participation…

  6. Cardiopulmonary Disease in Newborns: A Study in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A film describing tachypea as an early manifestation of congenital heart disease was shown to physicians and nurses at 27 hospitals during regular continuing medical education activities. Findings from pre-test and post-test data show that need-oriented educational programs can measurably improve the quality of patient care. (Author/LBH)

  7. Assessment in Medical Education; What Are We Trying to Achieve?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena; O'Flynn, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Within the arena of medical education, it is generally acknowledged that assessment drives learning. Assessment is one of the most significant influences on a student's experience of higher education and improving assessment has a huge impact on the quality of learning (Liu, N. and Carless, D, 2006). Ideally we want to enhance student's capacity…

  8. Dear Members of the HMS Medical Education We had a wonderful response to our recent bi-

    E-print Network

    Blackwell, Keith

    Dear Members of the HMS Medical Education Community, We had a wonderful response to our recent bi to the start of the Medical Education Day sessions (RSVP here). In addition to Medical Education Day (this year schedule of events this year ranging from Medical Education Grand Rounds to Inter Hospital Collaborative

  9. In Search of Coherence: A View from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education has developed a position paper, a set of recommendations, and next steps in the reform of continuing medical education (CME). The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) sets standards for and accredits residency programs in graduate medical education and is not directly…

  10. Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Competition in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephen; O'Donovan, Toni M.

    2013-01-01

    The discourse of competitive sport is, and has been, a defining feature of physical education for many years. Given the privileged and dominant position competition holds in physical education curricula, it is concerning that competitive physical education remains steeped in traditional pedagogies and that these pedagogies are constrained by…

  11. Sports injuries in physical education teacher education students.

    PubMed

    Goossens, L; Verrelst, R; Cardon, G; De Clercq, D

    2014-08-01

    Sports injuries could be highly detrimental to the career of a physical education teacher education (PETE) student. To enable the development of future sports injury prevention programs, sports injuries in 128 first-year academic bachelor PETE students were registered prospectively during one academic year. Common risk factors for sports injuries, taken from the literature, were also evaluated by means of logistic regression analysis. We found an incidence rate of 1.91 and an injury risk of 0.85, which is higher than generally found in a sports-active population. Most injuries involved the lower extremities, were acute, newly occurring injuries, and took place in non-contact situations. More than half of all injuries lead to an inactivity period of 1 week or more and over 80% of all injuries required medical attention. A major part of these injuries happened during the intracurricular sports classes. Few differences were seen between women and men. A history of injury was a significant risk factor (P?=?0.018) for the occurrence of injuries, and performance of cooling-down exercises was significantly related to a lower occurrence of ankle injuries (P?=?0.031). These data can inform future programs for the prevention of sports injuries in PETE students. PMID:23379854

  12. Roller Skating and Interdisciplinary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice; Sluder, J. Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Today, more than 23 million children and adolescents are obese or overweight in the United States. Physical educators strive to find appropriate, yet fun activities to encourage and increase physical activity. Introducing students to a variety of activities can promote family involvement in physical activity and create lifelong physical activity…

  13. General practitioners' continuing medical education within and outside their practice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. A.; Allery, L. A.; Harding, K. G.; Hayes, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    To study continuing medical education 96 out of 101 general practitioners chosen at random from the list held by a family practitioner committee were interviewed. The results provided little evidence of regular attendance at local postgraduate centre meetings, though practice based educational meetings were common. Thirty one of the general practitioners worked in practices that held one or more practice based educational meetings each month at which the doctors provided the main educational content. Performance review was undertaken in the practices of 51 of the general practitioners, and 80 of the doctors recognised its value. The general practitioners considered that the most valuable educational activities occurred within the practice, the most valued being contact with partners. They asked for increased contact with hospital doctors. The development of general practitioners' continuing medical education should be based on the content of the individual general practitioner's day to day work and entail contact with his or her professional colleagues. PMID:2504381

  14. Programed Instruction in Health Education and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Cyrus; Evaul, Thomas W.

    This book contains eight chapters by several different authors, most of them professors of health or physical education. Focus is on applications and implications of programed instruction for professionals in the health and physical education fields. "Overview of Programed Instruction" defines programing, its development and implications for…

  15. Iowa Physical Education Guidelines for Students Receiving Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This resource guide is intended to aid in the development of physical education programs to meet the motor, social, and recreational needs of students with disabilities. Two brief chapters on legislation review federal regulations, Iowa law, and Iowa rules for special education and special education administration. Next, the four steps in…

  16. 78 FR 52537 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ...following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). Date and Time: September...or excesses, issues relating to foreign medical school graduates, the nature and financing of medical education training, and the...

  17. 77 FR 38071 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...public. Purpose: The Council on Graduate Medical Education (the Council), created in 1986...or excesses, issues relating to foreign medical school graduates, the nature and financing of medical education training, and the...

  18. 78 FR 27407 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ...public. Purpose: The Council on Graduate Medical Education provides advice and recommendations...or excesses, issues relating to foreign medical school graduates, the nature and financing of medical education training, and the...

  19. Graduate Medical Education Mission Statement The Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (VCUHS) is committed to excellence

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    Graduate Medical Education Mission Statement The Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (VCUHS) is committed to excellence in graduate medical education (GME). The Virginia Commonwealth University Health System is an urban, comprehensive academic medical center in central Virginia established

  20. Internet Resources for Curriculum Development in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Patricia A; Kern, David E

    2004-01-01

    Curriculum development in medical education should be a methodical and scholarly, yet practical process that addresses the needs of trainees, patients, and society. To be maximally efficient and effective, it should build upon previous work and use existing resources. A conventional search of the literature is necessary, but insufficient for this purpose. The internet provides a rich source of information and materials. This bibliography is a guide to internet resources that are of use to curriculum developers, organized into 1) medical accreditation bodies, 2) topic-oriented resources, 3) general educational resources within medicine, and 4) general education resources beyond medicine. PMID:15109332

  1. An update on master's degrees in medical education.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Richard; Murnaghan, Lucas; Collins, John; Pratt, Dan

    2005-12-01

    Planning and implementing educational programs in medicine optimally requires a background in educational theory and practice. An avenue of training open to such practitioners is a master's degree in medical education. A single 1998 report lists the programs known at that time and information about them remains scarce. The authors have re-examined all current programs offering master's degrees in medical or health sciences education in the English-speaking world, including the Netherlands. The authors contacted the programs identified in the 1998 report to establish how many were still in operation. The search was extended using Pubmed and other search engines. A further verification targeted a selected sample of 10 prominent US medical schools. Twenty-one currently operating programs were identified: six in the US, eight in the UK, three in Canada, three in Australia and one in Holland. Seven of nine original master's programs were still in existence. URLs, website and other logistical information about each program are tabled. A master's degree in medical or health sciences education is the most specific method for medical faculty to obtain a credentialed grounding in educational theory and practice. The authors provide up-to-date contact information for current programs and summarize other related essential logistical data. PMID:16451888

  2. [Health Literacy and patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Eva Maria; Spörhase, U

    2015-09-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany has a long tradition. It is covered by the statutory sickness funds and pension schemes, and is aimed at the prevention of work disability and need for nursing care due to chronic conditions. Chronically ill but health-literate patients - patients capable of making good health-related decisions, or of participating strongly in this decision making - have better health outcomes. To enhance health literacy and participation, medical rehabilitation relies heavily on patient education. This article describes health literacy from the perspective of educational research, outlines the basics of learning principles, and draws conclusions for developing patient education programmes in medical rehabilitation. Implementing a constructivist learning paradigm promotes changes within the trainer team and within the rehabilitation institution - turning it into a health-literate health care organisation. Health literacy in medical rehabilitation is aimed at neither turning the patient into a physician nor replacing evidence-based recommendations through subjective preferences. Medical rehabilitation reaches patients best by using modern health education programmes based on findings from education research, theoretically founded and directed towards building competencies. Furthermore, an educationally qualified training team and a rehabilitation institution are essential in enabling formal and informal learning processes. PMID:26153473

  3. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  4. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  5. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  6. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  7. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  8. Increasing the Value of Physical Education in Schools and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Thaddeus J.; Moosbrugger, Michelle; Brockmeyer, Gretchen

    2011-01-01

    Many of the numerous innovations in physical education have the potential to enhance the status of physical education and physical educators. For example, curriculum models such as experiential education and sport education have reshaped content, learning outcomes, and assessment in physical education. In addition, these models are redefining how…

  9. Transforming educational accountability in medical ethics and humanities education toward professionalism.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; Kirch, Darrell G; Brigham, Timothy P; Barzansky, Barbara M; Wear, Stephen; Carrese, Joseph A; Fins, Joseph J; Lederer, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Effectively developing professionalism requires a programmatic view on how medical ethics and humanities should be incorporated into an educational continuum that begins in premedical studies, stretches across medical school and residency, and is sustained throughout one's practice. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education National Conference on Medical Ethics and Humanities in Medical Education (May 2012) invited representatives from the three major medical education and accreditation organizations to engage with an expert panel of nationally known medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This article, based on the views of these representatives and their respondents, offers a future-tense account of how professionalism can be incorporated into medical education.The themes that are emphasized herein include the need to respond to four issues. The first theme highlights how ethics and humanities can provide a response to the dissonance that occurs in current health care delivery. The second theme focuses on how to facilitate preprofessional readiness for applicants through reform of the medical school admission process. The third theme emphasizes the importance of integrating ethics and humanities into the medical school administrative structure. The fourth theme underscores how outcomes-based assessment should reflect developmental milestones for professional attributes and conduct. The participants emphasized that ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that promote professionalism should be taught with accountability, flexibility, and the premise that all these traits are essential to the formation of a modern professional physician. PMID:25539516

  10. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  11. Implementing Active Homework in Secondary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Ours, Elizabeth; Scrabis-Fletcher, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade, physical education has gone through some tough times. Between increased pressures to succeed on standardized testing, which has resulted in increased classroom time and decreased time in the gym, and tight budgets, children are not getting the quality physical education they deserve. The "2012 Shape of the Nation…

  12. Primary Teachers, Policy, and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrie, Kirsten; lisahunter,

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges arising for primary school teachers who have responsibility for teaching physical education (PE) and who are working in particularly complex and contestable policy contexts. In New Zealand provision of physical education is identified as occurring amidst multiple, and not necessarily compatible, sets of…

  13. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184…

  14. High School Students' Physical Education Conceptual Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Suzan F.

    2004-01-01

    The value of conceptual physical education knowledge has long been acknowledged (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1969; Kneer, 1981; NASPE, 1995) yet has not been formally measured or assessed. Seven multiple choice tests with established validity and reliability (Ayers, 2001b) were used to assess the concepts…

  15. Physical Education and Recreation in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, M. L.; Van Vliet, M. L.

    Physical education and research programs, and recreational and athletic facilities, in Yugoslavia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and the U.S.S.R. are examined by two faculty members from the University of Alberta. This publication is an abridgement of their report on European approaches to physical education and recreation, giving their…

  16. Ideas for Secondary School Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Patricia E., Ed.

    This book contains descriptions of secondary school physical education programs. The programs described fall into the following categories: (1) career/leadership programs, (2) contract/individualized instruction programs, (3) elective physical education programs, (4) motivational programs, (5) outdoor/environmental programs, (6)…

  17. Physical Education: Primary Matters, Secondary Importance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Considerable literature has been written over the last decade which indicates that the National Curriculum for Physical Education in England and Wales is being delivered ineffectively in primary schools. This paper discusses the key issues currently faced within primary PE and identifies why within Physical Education, primary matters appear to be…

  18. The Physical Educator and Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Felicia F.

    1984-01-01

    The physical education teacher is in an advantageous position to observe a student who may have anorexia nervosa. Severe weight loss, hyperactivity, body image delusion, and amenorrhea are symptoms of this behavior disorder. Implications for the physical education teacher and athletic coach are offered. (DF)

  19. Bring Snowshoes into Your Physical Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarallo, Mary Jo

    2004-01-01

    The author discusses the integration of snow sports, particularly snowshoeing into the physical education programs by school districts. Here, the author discusses the fitness benefits gained by students in snowshoeing. Among other things, the author mentions that information on how to integrate snow sports into a physical education program is…

  20. Sport and Physical Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharoni, Heziah

    1994-01-01

    Despite its small population, challenged economy, and rapid political development, Israel has been able to grow and achieve in sport and physical education. Israel's unique system fosters children gifted in sports, elite athletes, and persons with disabilities. Research and planning sport and physical education facilities are central to Israel's…

  1. Physical Education Catch of the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenoschok, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, a Physical Education Grants Initiative was launched by the Future Fisherman Foundation, Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation, American Association for Leisure and Recreation, and National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), as a way for schools to bring the fishing and boating experience to America's youths.…

  2. Quality Physical Education. NASPE Resource Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A quality physical education program provides learning opportunities, appropriate instruction, meaningful and challenging content, and student and program assessment. In addition, a quality physical education improves mental alertness, academic performance, and readiness and enthusiasm for learning in the nation's youth. This brief provides a list…

  3. Developing Quality Physical Education through Student Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisette, Jennifer L.; Placek, Judith H.; Avery, Marybell; Dyson, Ben; Fox, Connie; Franck, Marian; Graber, Kim; Rink, Judith; Zhu, Weimo

    2009-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) is committed to providing teachers with the support and guiding principles for implementing valid assessments. Its goal is for physical educators to utilize PE Metrics to measure student learning based on the national standards. The first PE Metrics text provides teachers with…

  4. Helping New Teachers Liven up Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Amanda; Elliott, Steve

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer strategies to help beginner physical education teachers increase the tempo of their classes. Most of these ideas are applicable to any physical education setting and grade level. After incorporating some of these strategies into daily lesson plans beginner teachers should see an increase in student energy levels…

  5. Homework in Physical Education: Benefits and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Benjamin Edward; Lynott, Francis John, III.

    2015-01-01

    This article identifies homework as an underutilized strategy in physical education. It reviews the benefits associated with the use of homework in the physical education setting, and provides guidelines for the effective implementation of this strategy. The guidelines include practical application examples and define structured active homework…

  6. Physical Education Teachers' Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Hayri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine physical education teachers' organizational commitment levels. The sample consisted of 204 physical education teachers working in the city center of Konya in the 2011 to 2012 academic year. The respondents were randomly selected in this research. Data collected for this research by using the Scale for…

  7. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  8. Remote Video Supervision in Adapted Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke; Bishop, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Supervision for beginning adapted physical education (APE) teachers and inservice general physical education teachers who are learning to work with students with disabilities poses a number of challenges. The purpose of this article is to describe a project aimed at developing a remote video system that could be used by a university supervisor to…

  9. Physical Educators as Teachers of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Debra A.; Deeney, Theresa A.

    2006-01-01

    In the wake of No Child Left Behind, school districts increasingly are being held accountable for demonstrating improved student achievement in English language literacy. This article discusses the current state of literacy in the nation, why physical education teachers need to promote literacy practices, and creative ways that physical education

  10. Using Positive Behavior Support in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Alice M.; Hinton, Vanessa; Rudisill, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Physical educators are constantly seeking ways to improve their teaching effectiveness and to manage the ever-increasing challenges they face, such as large classes, inadequate equipment, lack of support for children with special needs, and more. Teachers in special education and general education were introduced to Response to Intervention (RTI)…

  11. The Wonders of Literature in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautmann, Joanne

    1982-01-01

    Asserting that great literature is one of the best sources for illuminations of reality, and of many medical subjects, Trautmann analyzes Joyce Carol Oates' novel "Wonderland" to distill the insights it can offer to students of medicine. (SK)

  12. The Use of Narrative in Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Arjmand, Susan

    2012-01-01

    competency in cross- cultural communication. It includescompetence and on cross-cultural communication in medicalCross-cultural competence can be defined as those learned skills that help us understand cultural differences and ease communication

  13. Medical Education in Peoples's Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, John A. D.; Yingang, Lin

    1987-01-01

    The three types of physicians trained in the People's Republic of China (practitioners in Chinese medicine, traditional Mongolian medicine, and western-style medicine) and the design of the medical schools and programs are discussed. (MSE)

  14. 78 FR 52537 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education... education training, and the development of performance measures and longitudinal evaluation of...

  15. Sheila W. Chauvin, M. Ed., Ph. D., Director Office of Medical Education Research and Development

    E-print Network

    , faculty members, staff, and learners across the medical education continuum to facilitate high quality to excellence and scholarship in the following four domains: 1. Medical education research, assessment, assessment and evaluation, individual and organizational development, and overall educational excellence

  16. The Person: A Missing Dimension in Medical Care and Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Weston, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Medical education needs to move beyond the biomedical model to redress the balance between the two great historical traditions in medicine: the reductionistic and the whole person approaches. Students need to understand the distinctions between disease as an abstract concept and illness as an experience lived by their patients. They need to approach the study of both the sciences and the humanities with a rigorous, thoughtful, and balanced approach, and learn to integrate these understandings and to apply them to the care of sick persons. Medical education should be more than vocational training: it must be a liberal education. The missing dimension in medical education is the person, both the person of the patient and the person of the student. The experiences of both are the very foundations of learning, growth, and healing. PMID:21253070

  17. Medical Asepsis, Research, and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Patricia M.; Crow, Sue

    1977-01-01

    Emphasizes the need that continuing education programs for nurses in hospitals orient newly employed graduate nurses specifically to infection control measures as carried out in that institution and then to reinforce these learnings by regular planned programs. Points out ways that those responsible for inservice nursing education can facilitate…

  18. Podiatric Medical Education: The Physical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Abe

    1979-01-01

    A gross inventory of the teaching and clinical learning resources of the five U.S. colleges of podiatric medicine is described. A descriptive breakdown is provided along with illustrations of facilities. Some categories included in space allocation data are instructional staff, administrative staff, laboratory, outpatient clinic, learning…

  19. EFOMP project on the role of biomedical physics in the education of healthcare professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruana, Carmel J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Aurengo, A.; Dendy, P. P.; Karenauskaite, V.; Malisan, M. R.; Meijer, J. H.; Mornstein, V.; Rokita, E.; Vano, E.; Wucherer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The policy statements describing the role of the medical physicist (and engineer) published by organizations representing medical physics (and engineering) in Europe include the responsibility of providing a contribution to the education of healthcare professionals (physicians and paramedical professions). As a consequence, medical physicists and engineers provide educational services in most Faculties of Medicine / Health Science in Europe. In 2005, the EFOMP council took the decision to set up a Special Interest Group to develop the role of the medical physics educator in such faculties and to work with other healthcare professional groups to produce updated European curricula for them. The effort of the group would provide a base for the progress of the role, its relevance to contemporary healthcare professional education and provide input for future EFOMP policy documents regarding this important aspect of the role of the medical physicist. The present communication will present the group, summarise its latest research and indicate future research directions.

  20. Does HOPSports Promote Youth Physical Activity in Physical Education Classes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Stephanie T.; Shores, Kindal A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how a technological intervention, HOPSports (HOPS), impacted youth physical activity (PA) in a physical education (PE) class. Research indicates rising levels of youth television watching and video game use, physical inactivity, and related overweight. One approach to increase youth PA is to use technology-based…

  1. "LET US Play": Maximizing Physical Activity "in" Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Webster, Collin; Beets, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Schools have been identified as a promising setting for increasing youth physical activity levels because of their broad reach and the amount of time youth spend in attendance. Specifically, physical education is one key time during the school day where youth can accumulate health-enhancing levels of physical activity. Indicators of quality…

  2. Physical Education Facilities. Educational Facilities Review Series Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baas, Alan M.

    Current thinking on elementary and secondary school physical education emphasizes motivating young people to develop habits of physical exercise and expression that will persist into adulthood. To help foster such a lifetime commitment, athletic programs must provide a range of opportunities for students to realize their particular physical

  3. Side Effects of Immunosuppressant Medications as They Affect Physical Fitness: A Physical Therapist's Point of View

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Effects of Immunosuppressant Medications as they Affect Physical Fitness: A Physical Therapist's Point of View Martha Walker, ... KEEP Healthy Screening at the NBC4 Health and Fitness Expo Jan 09, 2016 Washington, DC Your Kidneys ...

  4. "The Wonders of Physics" Educational Materials

    E-print Network

    Yavuz, Deniz

    "The Wonders of Physics" Educational Materials Thank you for requesting the enclosed video of "The Wonders of Physics." This video is one of a series containing slightly overlapping material as shown of Physics. In addition, there are a number of accompanying materials which might interest you. A 13-page

  5. The Landscape of Elementary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Kim C.; Locke, Lawrence F.; Lambdin, Dolly; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2008-01-01

    Elementary school physical education has repeatedly been shaped by the forces of history. Presently, concerns about the obesity epidemic and the low levels of physical activity in children are exerting a major influence on curriculum. Whereas building physical fitness has been a dominant influence during wartime, the focus today is on (a)…

  6. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  7. The Use of Narrative in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arjmand, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A course was designed for medical students in which literature and writing exercises were used to promote reflection on cross-cultural patient encounters. Students were encouraged to consider Kleinman's principles of open-ended questioning as the basis for enhancing these patient conversations and were prompted to develop skills in close reading…

  8. Outcomes Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leslie S.; Turnwald, Grant H.; Meldrum, James B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's use of outcomes assessment (OA) as part of the accreditation review process for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Discusses its nine OA survey instruments and use of resulting data during accreditation. (EV)

  9. Transfer of Student Learning in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vimla L.; Cranton, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Transfer of learning among the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains and among three clinical disciplines (medicine, pediatrics, and surgery) was examined in the final year of a medical student clerkship program. A model based on ethnographic analysis followed by performance measurement was used. (Author/MLW)

  10. Enhancing medical students’ education and careers in global surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin-Tardif, Alexandre; Butler-Laporte, Guillaume; Vassiliou, Melina; Khwaja, Kosar; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Razek, Tarek; Deckelbaum, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary With surgical conditions being significant contributors to the global burden of disease, efforts aimed at increasing future practitioners’ understanding, interest and participation in global surgery must be expanded. Unfortunately, despite the increasing popularity of global health among medical students, possibilities for exposure and involvement during medical school remain limited. By evaluating student participation in the 2011 Bethune Round Table, we explored the role that global surgery conferences can play in enhancing this neglected component of undergraduate medical education. Study results indicate high rates of student dissatisfaction with current global health teaching and opportunities, along with high indices of conference satisfaction and knowledge gain, suggesting that global health conferences can serve as important adjuncts to undergraduate medical education. PMID:25078923

  11. Enhancing medical students' education and careers in global surgery.

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Tardif, Alexandre; Butler-Laporte, Guillaume; Vassiliou, Melina; Khwaja, Kosar; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Razek, Tarek; Deckelbaum, Dan L

    2014-08-01

    With surgical conditions being significant contributors to the global burden of disease, efforts aimed at increasing future practitioners' understanding, interest and participation in global surgery must be expanded. Unfortunately, despite the increasing popularity of global health among medical students, possibilities for exposure and involvement during medical school remain limited. By evaluating student participation in the 2011 Bethune Round Table, we explored the role that global surgery conferences can play in enhancing this neglected component of undergraduate medical education. Study results indicate high rates of student dissatisfaction with current global health teaching and opportunities, along with high indices of conference satisfaction and knowledge gain, suggesting that global health conferences can serve as important adjuncts to undergraduate medical education. PMID:25078923

  12. Medical education and disability discrimination: the law and future implications.

    PubMed

    Helms, L B; Helms, C M

    1994-07-01

    Students with disabilities who are preparing for careers in health care have been in the forefront of those bringing suit under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990 broadened discrimination statutes and renewed attention to students with disabilities in medical education. Based on an analysis of the statutes and case law, the courts in conjunction with medical educators may be expected to refine policies to identify (1) when physicians with disabilities are otherwise qualified; (2) what the essential tasks performed by physicians are; (3) what accommodations to disabled students are reasonable; and (4) how communications about disabilities between program administrators, faculty, and students should be carried out. To ensure that physicians with disabilities are welcome and productive members of the profession, policy must expand from the legal foundation by means of proactive planning and evaluation to minimize the risks of litigation and enhance the environment of medical education. PMID:8018258

  13. AMTEC: a cooperative effort in medical technology education.

    PubMed

    Beiermann, M K; Coggeshall, M; Gavin, M L; Laughlin, P; Palermo, J; Torrey, J A; Weidner, J

    1978-04-01

    A committee in the St. Louis Metropolitan area has been established to promote communication and cooperation among the area's existing hospital-based programs in medical technology. Area Medical Technology Education Coordinators (AMTEC) was established three years ago primarily to facilitate the administrative functions of medical technology education and to serve as an instrument for the exchange of ideas. Its primary undertaking has been the central processing of applications to the area programs, as an aid in the admission process. In addition, a continuing education program sponsored by the committee has been established, and various "curriculum sharing" activities have been sponsored for the students enrolled in the schools. Future plans for the committee include sponsoring an on-going evaluation process of graduates by employers, and establishing a criterion-referenced question pool. The authors describe the experiences of the committee to date and plans for the implementation of future goals. PMID:645768

  14. Improving medical education in Kenya: an international collaboration*†

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a partnership between the University of Nairobi College of Health Sciences (CHS) Library and the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL). The libraries are collaborating to develop best practices for the CHS Library as it meets the challenge of changing medical education information needs in a digital environment. The collaboration is part of a Medical Education Partnership Initiative. The library project has several components: an assessment of the CHS Library, learning visits in the United States and Kenya, development of recommendations to enhance the CHS Library, and ongoing evaluation of the program's progress. Development of new services and expertise at the CHS Library is critical to the project's success. A productive collaboration between the HS/HSL and CHS Library is ongoing. A successful program to improve the quality of medical education will have a beneficial impact on health outcomes in Kenya. PMID:24860265

  15. A Profile of the Introduction to Adapted Physical Education Course within Undergraduate Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piletic, Cindy K.; Davis, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the profile, content, delivery mechanism, and application of teaching standards, National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) and Adapted Physical Education National Standards (APENS), within the Introduction to Adapted Physical Education (APE) course for college/university PETE preparation…

  16. To What Extent Does Continuing Professional Education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) Affect Physicians Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kathleen A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent is there an understanding among physicians as to how continuing professional education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) affect physicians practice? To address the question, focus groups were used to begin a process of identifying the components within each type of education so that…

  17. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new media technology in medical education. Significant gender differences in game play experience and attitudes may represent male video game design bias that stresses male cognitive aptitudes; medical educators hoping to create serious games that will appeal to both men and women must avoid this. PMID:20576125

  18. The "Physically Educated" Person: Physical Education in the Philosophy of Reid, Peters and Aristotle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacAllister, James

    2013-01-01

    This article will derive a definition and account of the physically educated person, through an examination of the philosophy of Andrew Reid, Richard Peters and Aristotle. Initially, Reid's interpretation of Peters' views about the educational significance of practical knowledge (and physical education) will be considered. While it will…

  19. Medical students as sexual health peer educators: who benefits more?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A prospective study was conducted to evaluate the impact of an educational reproductive health program on medical student peer educators and the secondary school pupils whom they taught. Methods The Marseille School of Medicine and ten public secondary schools participated in the study. Medical students were recruited and trained as peer educators to promote sexual health in the secondary schools. The medical students and secondary school pupils were evaluated before and after education program. The main outcome measure was the sexual health knowledge score on a 20-item questionnaire (maximum score 20). Results A total of 3350 students attended the peer-led course conducted by 107 medical students. The medical students’ score increased significantly before and after the course (from 15.2?±?1.8 to 18.3?±?0.9; p?medical students was significantly higher than that of the males. The overall knowledge increase was not significantly different between medical students and secondary school pupils (mean 3.1?±?1 and 5.7?±?4 respectively; p?>?0.05). Conclusions The program was effective in increasing the knowledge of medical students as well as secondary school pupils. Male sexual health knowledge should be reinforced. PMID:25099947

  20. Medical education on cannabis and cannabinoids: Perspectives, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ware, M A; Ziemianski, D

    2015-06-01

    The global regulatory landscape regarding the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids is changing rapidly. This has considerable impact on health care professionals who currently receive little or no education on issues regarding medical cannabis. We propose a 'cannabis curriculum' that covers the spectrum of historical, botanical, physiological, clinical and legal issues to allow health care professionals to engage in meaningful discussions with their patients and colleagues around this stigmatized and controversial subject. PMID:25728558

  1. Sustained programs in physics teacher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    For over a decade, physics teacher education programs have been transformed at a number of institutions around the country through support from the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers. In 2012-2013, PhysTEC supported an independent study on the sustainability of its sites after project funding ends. The study sought to measure the extent to which programs have been sustained and to identify what features should be prioritized for building sustainable physics teacher education programs. Most PhysTEC legacy sites studied have sustained their production of physics teachers. A few sites studied have thriving physics teacher education programs, that is, programs that have continued to substantially increase their production of teachers since the PhysTEC award. All of the studied sites that sustained their production of physics teachers have a champion of physics teacher education and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment. The necessity of the champion was known from the Report of the Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics (T-TEP report) and borne out by this study. The necessity of institutional motivation and commitment is a finding of this study. At some sites, PhysTEC support has precipitated an institutional focus on physics teacher education, leveraging other resources (including both awards and personnel) benefiting physics teacher education. The study also documented the sustainability of components of physics teacher education programs, such as recruitment, early teaching experiences, and a teacher in residence. Sustained components tend to be those that have direct benefit to undergraduates in the physics department, whereas less-sustained components seem to be those that primarily benefit secondary teachers. The number of sustained components does not appear to correspond to teacher production; that is, sites that have sustained more (or fewer) components do not produce larger (or smaller) numbers of teachers. This result further supports the finding that the presence of the champion and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment are the key features of successful physics teacher education programs.

  2. The Importance of Ethnic Cultural Competency in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cultural competency in physical education is unmistakable. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) has identified elements of cultural competency within both the National Standards for Physical Education and the National Standards and Guidelines for Physical Education Teacher Education. Although there…

  3. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures. PMID:24804914

  4. Formative Accreditation: Complying with Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Emery A.

    2007-01-01

    Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accreditation has had an important role in improving medical education as well as in verifying the quality of education in the nation's medical schools. In this manner, it also serves the interests of the public. Every eight years, medical schools undergo an accreditation process to determine whether…

  5. Medical education in the Sudan: its strengths and weaknesses.

    PubMed

    Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2007-11-01

    The history of medical education in the Sudan is both long and interesting. It began in 1924 and has passed through several different phases and stages. Despite numerous difficulties and constraints along the way, vast experience has been gained and many achievements made, all of which have had positive impacts on the health system in the Sudan and the Region. This paper aims to share the experiences and lessons that have emerged from the journey of medical education in the Sudan, and explores the future need for continuing support and dialogue from international colleagues to maintain momentum. PMID:18158664

  6. Properties of publications on anatomy in medical education literature.

    PubMed

    Vorstenbosch, Marc; Bolhuis, Sanneke; van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Kooloos, Jan; Laan, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Publications on anatomy in medical education appear to be largely anecdotal. To explore this, we investigated the literature on anatomy in medical education, aiming first to evaluate the contribution of the literature on anatomy in medical education to "best evidence medical education" (BEME) and second to evaluate the development of this literature toward more "best evidence" between 1985 and 2009. Four databases were searched for publications on anatomy in medical education published between 1985 and 2009, resulting in 525 references. Hundred publications were characterized by five variables (journal category, paper subject, paper category, author perspective, and paper perspective). Statements from these publications were characterized by two variables (category and foundation). The publications contained 797 statements that involved the words "anatomy," "anatomical," or "anatomist." Forty-five percent of the publications contained no explicit research question. Forty percent of the statements made were about "teaching methods" and 17% about "teaching content," 8% referred to "practical value," and 10% to "side effects" of anatomy education. Ten percent of the statements were "positional," five percent "traditional," four percent "self-evident," and two percent referred to "quality of care." Fifty-six percent of the statements had no foundation, 17% were founded on empirical data, and 27% by references. These results substantiated the critical comments about the anecdotal nature of the literature. However, it is encouraging to see that between 1985 and 2009 the number of publications is rising that these publications increasingly focus on teaching methods and that an academic writing style is developing. This suggests a growing body of empirical literature about anatomy education. PMID:21400671

  7. The necessity of social medicine in medical education.

    PubMed

    Westerhaus, Michael; Finnegan, Amy; Haidar, Mona; Kleinman, Arthur; Mukherjee, Joia; Farmer, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Research and clinical experience reliably and repeatedly demonstrate that the determinants of health are most accurately conceptualized as biosocial phenomena, in which health and disease emerge through the interaction between biology and the social environment. Increased appreciation of biosocial approaches have already driven change in premedical education and focused attention on population health in current U.S. health care reform. Medical education, however, places primary emphasis on biomedicine and often fails to emphasize and educate students and trainees about the social forces that shape disease and illness patterns. The authors of this Commentary argue that medical education requires a comprehensive transformation to incorporate rigorous biosocial training to ensure that all future health professionals are equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to practice social medicine. Three distinct models for accomplishing such transformation are presented: SocMed's monthlong, elective courses in Northern Uganda and Haiti; Harvard Medical School's semester-long, required social medicine course; and the Lebanese American University's curricular integration of social medicine throughout its entire four-year curriculum. Successful implementation of social medicine training requires the institutionalization of biosocial curricula; the utilization of innovative, engaging pedagogies; and the involvement of health professions students from broad demographic backgrounds and with all career interests. The achievement of such transformational and necessary change to medical education will prepare future health practitioners working in all settings to respond more proactively and comprehensively to the health needs of all populations. PMID:25406609

  8. Using Technology to Meet the Challenges of Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Guze, Phyllis A

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly changing, influenced by many factors including the changing health care environment, the changing role of the physician, altered societal expectations, rapidly changing medical science, and the diversity of pedagogical techniques. Changes in societal expectations put patient safety in the forefront, and raises the ethical issues of learning interactions and procedures on live patients, with the long-standing teaching method of "see one, do one, teach one" no longer acceptable. The educational goals of using technology in medical education include facilitating basic knowledge acquisition, improving decision making, enhancement of perceptual variation, improving skill coordination, practicing for rare or critical events, learning team training, and improving psychomotor skills. Different technologies can address these goals. Technologies such as podcasts and videos with flipped classrooms, mobile devices with apps, video games, simulations (part-time trainers, integrated simulators, virtual reality), and wearable devices (google glass) are some of the techniques available to address the changing educational environment. This article presents how the use of technologies can provide the infrastructure and basis for addressing many of the challenges in providing medical education for the future. PMID:26330687

  9. Using Technology to Meet the Challenges of Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Guze, Phyllis A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly changing, influenced by many factors including the changing health care environment, the changing role of the physician, altered societal expectations, rapidly changing medical science, and the diversity of pedagogical techniques. Changes in societal expectations put patient safety in the forefront, and raises the ethical issues of learning interactions and procedures on live patients, with the long-standing teaching method of “see one, do one, teach one” no longer acceptable. The educational goals of using technology in medical education include facilitating basic knowledge acquisition, improving decision making, enhancement of perceptual variation, improving skill coordination, practicing for rare or critical events, learning team training, and improving psychomotor skills. Different technologies can address these goals. Technologies such as podcasts and videos with flipped classrooms, mobile devices with apps, video games, simulations (part-time trainers, integrated simulators, virtual reality), and wearable devices (google glass) are some of the techniques available to address the changing educational environment. This article presents how the use of technologies can provide the infrastructure and basis for addressing many of the challenges in providing medical education for the future. PMID:26330687

  10. Nutrition education in medical school: a time of opportunity1234

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Linda; Rock, Cheryl L; Edwards, Marilyn S; Bales, Connie W; Kohlmeier, Martin; Akabas, Sharon R

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education has undergone significant changes in development of new curricula, new pedagogies, and new forms of assessment since the Nutrition Academic Award was launched more than a decade ago. With an emphasis on a competency-based curriculum, integrated learning, longitudinal clinical experiences, and implementation of new technology, nutrition educators have an opportunity to introduce nutrition and diet behavior–related learning experiences across the continuum of medical education. Innovative learning opportunities include bridging personal health and nutrition to community, public, and global health concerns; integrating nutrition into lifestyle medicine training; and using nutrition as a model for teaching the continuum of care and promoting interprofessional team-based care. Faculty development and identification of leaders to serve as champions for nutrition education continue to be a challenge. PMID:24646826

  11. Continuing education for medical students: a library model

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Stephanie M.; Engwall, Keith; Mi, Misa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The research assessed a three-year continuing medical education–style program for medical students in a Midwestern academic medical library. Methods A mixed methods approach of a survey and two focus groups comparing attendees versus non-attendees assessed the program. Results Eleven students participated in the focus groups. Attendance was driven by topic interest and lunch. Barriers included lack of interest, scheduling, location, and convenience. Conclusions Although attendance was a challenge, students valued opportunities to learn new skills. This study showcases a reproducible method to engage students outside the curriculum. PMID:26512222

  12. Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.

    2011-01-01

    "Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs" was written to assist adapted and general physical educators who are dedicated to ensuring that the physical and motor needs of all their students are addressed in physical education. While it is anticipated that adapted physical educators, where available, will typically…

  13. Student-Centered Physical Education on a Shoestring Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Sheri M.

    2013-01-01

    Nationwide, only 56% of students attended physical education class on one or more days per week, and only 33% of students attended physical education daily in 2009. Physical educators have the responsibility to create positive experiences in physical education, as well as to develop physical skills and feelings of self-efficacy in their students.…

  14. Medical Education Research Funding Opportunity 2012 NEGEA Call for Collaborative Research Proposals

    E-print Network

    Blackwell, Keith

    Medical Education Research Funding Opportunity 2012 NEGEA Call for Collaborative Research Proposals The Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) supports and encourages scholarship in medical education Other Avenues for Medical Education Scholarship, and The Journal Submission and Review Process) and all

  15. Improving Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Education for Medical Students: An Inter-Organizational Collaborative Action Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geraldine S.; Stock, Saundra; Briscoe, Gregory W.; Beck, Gary L.; Horton, Rita; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Liu, Howard Y.; Rutter, Ashley Partner; Sexson, Sandra; Schlozman, Steven C.; Stubbe, Dorothy E.; Stuber, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A new Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Medical Education (CAPME) Task Force, sponsored by the Association for Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP), has created an inter-organizational partnership between child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) educators and medical student educators in psychiatry. This paper…

  16. National Fund for Medical Education: New Priorities for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freymann, John Gordon

    1981-01-01

    Projects that the National Fund for Medical Education will fund in the 1980s include advances in medical education to help contain health care costs; educational programs to improve doctor patient relationships; promotion of careers in medical education and research; and integration of new subjects into the curriculum. (JMD)

  17. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined. PMID:25637457

  18. Big data in medical informatics: improving education through visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Vaitsis, Christos; Nilsson, Gunnar; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    A continuous effort to improve healthcare education today is currently driven from the need to create competent health professionals able to meet healthcare demands. Limited research reporting how educational data manipulation can help in healthcare education improvement. The emerging research field of visual analytics has the advantage to combine big data analysis and manipulation techniques, information and knowledge representation, and human cognitive strength to perceive and recognise visual patterns. The aim of this study was therefore to explore novel ways of representing curriculum and educational data using visual analytics. Three approaches of visualization and representation of educational data were presented. Five competencies at undergraduate medical program level addressed in courses were identified to inaccurately correspond to higher education board competencies. Different visual representations seem to have a potential in impacting on the ability to perceive entities and connections in the curriculum data. PMID:25160372

  19. The Medical Education Commission report 2005 and 2006: Katrina kinetics change Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Perry G; Pinsky, William; Amedee, Ronald; Braun, Kurt; Hilton, Charles; Chesson, Andrew; Guidry, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    The destructive and disruptive force of Hurricane Katrina was an enormous challenge to Graduate Medical Education (GME) in Louisiana. Before Katrina hit, GME was successful, prospering, steady, and productive in the state professional workforce, provision of clinical care, and economic development. That GME survived as well as it did, especially in the hardest hit institutions in New Orleans, is indeed remarkable, and greatly assisted by all other GME institutions in LA and across the U.S. As documented in this report, hits taken resulted in some loss and redistribution. The last two matches are compared, 2005 to 2006, and although both filled after the scramble, '06 is smaller. The year before Katrina (2004 to 2005) data on GME are included, and 2005 to 2006 will be posted when available. The approximate loss (16%) and redistribution scenarios are presented. National trends are also noted, as primary care specialties are less in the national match, even as a national response is begun to increase the short supply of physicians. PMID:17539491

  20. Problem-based learning in continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azri, Hilal; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) in continuing medical education. Data sources PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ERIC databases were searched for randomized controlled trials published in English from January 2001 to May 2011 using key words problem-based learning, practice-based, self-directed, learner-centered, and active learning, combined with continuing medical education, continuing professional development, post professional, postgraduate, and adult learning. Study selection Randomized controlled trials that described the effects of PBL on knowledge enhancement, performance improvement, participants’ satisfaction, or patients’ health outcomes were selected for analysis. Synthesis Fifteen studies were included in this review: 4 involved postgraduate trainee doctors, 10 involved practising physicians, and 1 had both groups. Online learning was used in 7 studies. Among postgraduate trainees PBL showed no significant differences in knowledge gain compared with lectures or non–case-based learning. In continuing education, PBL showed no significant difference in knowledge gain when compared with other methods. Several studies did not provide an educational intervention for the control group. Physician performance improvement showed an upward trend in groups participating in PBL, but no significant differences were noted in health outcomes. Conclusion Online PBL is a useful method of delivering continuing medical education. There is limited evidence that PBL in continuing education would enhance physicians’ performance or improve health outcomes. PMID:24522680