Sample records for medical physics education

  1. Radiation Oncology Physics and Medical Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, Dan

    2011-10-01

    Medical physics, an applied field of physics, is the applications of physics in medicine. Medical physicists are essential professionals in contemporary healthcare, contributing primarily to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases through numerous inventions, advances, and improvements in medical imaging and cancer treatment. Clinical service, research, and teaching by medical physicists benefits thousands of patients and other individuals every day. This talk will cover three main topics. First, exciting current research and development areas in the medical physics sub-specialty of radiation oncology physics will be described, including advanced oncology imaging for treatment simulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and biologically-optimized radiation treatment. Challenges in patient safety in high-technology radiation treatments will be briefly reviewed. Second, the educational path to becoming a medical physicist will be reviewed, including undergraduate foundations, graduate training, residency, board certification, and career opportunities. Third, I will introduce the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which is the professional society that represents, advocates, and advances the field of medical physics (www.aapm.org).

  2. Long-term effect of a short interprofessional education interaction between medical and physical therapy students.

    PubMed

    Sytsma, Terin T; Haller, Elizabeth P; Youdas, James W; Krause, David A; Hellyer, Nathan J; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2015-07-01

    Medicine is increasingly focused on team-based practice as interprofessional cooperation leads to better patient care. Thus, it is necessary to teach teamwork and collaboration with other health care professionals in undergraduate medical education to ensure that trainees entering the workforce are prepared to work in teams. Gross anatomy provides an opportunity to expose students to interprofessional education (IPE) early in their training. The purpose of this study is to describe an IPE experience and report if the experience has lasting influence on the participating students. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) questionnaire was administered to first year medical (MD) and physical therapy (PT) students at Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences. Results demonstrated an openness on the part of the students to IPE. Interprofessional education experiences were incorporated into gross anatomy courses in both medical and PT curricula. The IPE experiences included a social event, peer-teaching, and collaborative clinical problem-solving sessions. These sessions enhanced gross anatomy education by reinforcing previous material and providing the opportunity to work on clinical cases from the perspective of two healthcare disciplines. After course completion, students again completed the RIPLS. Finally, one year after course completion, students were asked to provide feedback on their experience. The post-curricular RIPLS, similar to the pre-curricular RIPLS, illustrated openness to IPE from both MD and PT students. There were however, significant differences in MD and PT perceptions of roles and responsibilities. One-year follow-up indicated long-term retention of lessons learned during IPE. Anat Sci Educ 8: 317-323. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26040635

  3. Pre-Medical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has examined the science and mathematics competencies that the graduating physician will need, and has asked which of these should be achieved during undergraduate study. The recommendations emphasize competency -- what the learner should be able to ``do'' at the end of the learning experience -- rather than dictating specific courses. Because the scientific content of modern medical practice is evolving, new science competencies are desirable for the entering medical student. An example is statistics, an increasingly prominent foundation for database and genomic analysis but which is not yet uniformly recommended as preparation for medical school. On the other hand, the committee believes that the value of a broad liberal arts education is enduring, and science coursework should not totally consume a premedical student's time. Thus if we recommend new areas of science and mathematics competency for pre-meds, we must find other areas that can be trimmed or combined. Indeed, at present there are some science topics mandated for premedical study, which may not be essential. For these reasons, the committee aims to state premedical recommendations in ways that can be met either through traditional disciplinary courses, or through innovative and/or interdisciplinary courses. Finally, we acknowledge that practice of medicine requires grounding in scientific principles and knowledge and in the practice of critical inquiry. These principles may be learned and practiced in undergraduate study through work in the physical sciences, as well as in biology, and such multidisciplinary training should be encouraged.

  4. Physical education and the School Medical Service in England and Wales, 1907-1939.

    PubMed

    Welshman, J

    1996-04-01

    Historians who have examined physical education (PE) have rarely related PE to its wider social context. This article considers the development of PE in elementary schools in England and Wales between 1907 and 1939, and locates PE within the wider history of the School Medical Service. From 1907, local authorities appointed specialist staff, acquired playing fields, and sent their teachers on short vacation courses, while at a policy level the Chief Medical Officer, Sir George Newman, came to regard PE as a component of preventive medicine. In the interwar period, PE was greatly influenced by voluntary organizations, and by the physical training schemes set up by the continental dictatorships, and this culminated in the Physical Training and Recreation Act of 1937. However PE also illustrated many of the weaknesses of the School Medical Service, including striking regional variations in its provisions, and in the 1930s the emphasis on PE contrasted with the relative neglect of malnutrition. The article concludes by suggesting that the contrast between Sir George Newman's ambitious plans for PE as a branch of preventive medicine, and provision in most local authorities, illustrated the great gulf that could exist between rhetoric and reality. PMID:11613269

  5. History of Medical Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical

  6. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  7. PreMedical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon Long

    2009-01-01

    Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes

  8. Developing medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, C.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of undergraduate and postgraduate medical education, and suggests changing the educational methods used rather than rearranging the content of courses. A learner centred approach is described, and its applications to postgraduate medical education discussed. Some research and development implications are considered. PMID:8446554

  9. Physical Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Cherry

    2008-10-06

    Physical education is important to children and their developing bodies, both physical and mental. All children should get up off the couch and do some type of physical education. Students will understand and apply the health-enhancing benefits of physical activity and proper nutrition. Being healthy in physical activity and eating the right foods boost your ability to have fun and feel good about yourself. The President\\'s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports program is a great way to kids to get started at getting physically fit. They have listed their top 10 tips ...

  10. Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network SWOMEN Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network SWOMEN Contact: Charlotte Sikatori, Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network (SWOMEN, Pathology, Respirology, Plastic Surgery, Oncology, and ENT. There are many more ­ please feel free

  11. Sciencesand PhysicalEducation

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    · Technology Education · Physical Education and Sport Coaching · Health Education · Outdoor Education Technology Physical Education and Sport Coaching Health Outdoor & Environmental Education Olympic Studies Research Science Maths Technology Physical Education and Sport Coaching Health Outdoor & Environmental

  12. Continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Todd, D

    1987-04-01

    With the rapid advances in medical science and increasing complexities of patient care, the need for continuing medical education (CME) is widely accepted by the profession. CME follows general and higher professional training, and should be a life long process. Teaching hospitals and postgraduate professional institutions play vital roles in organising, promoting, and monitoring this activity. CME directorates should be established. University authorities must recognise the important role of medical teachers in postgraduate and continuing medical education, and the staff establishment and terms of service should be held regularly. Medical libraries should have easy borrowing facilities. Self-assessment and audio-visual material are particularly helpful to the busy practitioner and inexpensive local or regional journals of quality can provide pertinent and up-to-date information. All charges for attending scientific meetings and educational material should be tax deductible or subsidized. The effectiveness of CME is difficult to assess and participation is almost impossible to enforce. Much depends on the standard of medical practice wanted by society. Recertification of general practitioners or specialists poses many problems. On the other hand, completion of self-assessment programmes, active participation at medical meetings, contributions to scientific literature, and membership of medical societies with built-in peer review could be monitored and regularly used to evaluate professional status. PMID:3688816

  13. Postdoctoral Opportunities in Medical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2006-04-01

    The medical physicist is a professional who specializes in the application of the concepts and methods of physics to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Medical physicists identify their primary discipline to be radiation therapy (78%), medical imaging (16%), nuclear medicine (3%), or radiation safety (2%). They state their primary responsibility to be clinical (78%), academic (9%), research (4%), etc. Correspondingly, medical physicists reveal their primarily employment to be a private hospital (42%), university hospital (32%), physicist's service group (9%), physician's service group (9%), industry (5%), and government (3%). The most frequent job of medical physicists is clinical radiation therapy physicist, whose clinical duties include: equipment acquisition, facility design, commissioning, machine maintenance, calibration and quality assurance, patient treatment planning, patient dose calculation, management of patient procedures, development of new technology, radiation safety, and regulatory compliance. The number of medical physicists in the United States can be estimated by the number of members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which has increased 5.5% annually since 1969, currently being 5,000. New positions plus retirements create a current need >300 new medical physicists per year, which exceeds supply. This is supported by the steady growth in average salaries, being 100,000 for PhDs entering the field and reaching 180,000. Graduate programs alone cannot meet demand, and physicists entering the field through postdoctoral training in medical physics remain important. Details of postdoctoral research programs and medical physics residency programs will provide direction to physics PhD graduates interested in medical physics. [The AAPM, its annual Professional Information Report, and its Public Education Committee are acknowledged for information contributing to this presentation.

  14. Graduate Medical Education Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Education Statement of Commitment 3-4 GMEC Organizational Chart 5 WSU Graduate Medical Education Mission & Safety Committee GMEC Organizational Chart #12;6 WSU GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION MISSION & GMEC RESPONSIBILITIES Graduate Medical Education (GME) at Wayne State University (WSU) is an essential element

  15. Medical education: changes and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D; Ba, Denian

    2013-08-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  16. Asian medical education.

    PubMed

    Ongley, P A

    1989-05-01

    In order to address issues relating to medical education in Asia, consideration must be given to the many differences among Asian countries, including variations in sizes, populations, social and cultural backgrounds, histories, political systems, and stages of economic development. In most Asian countries, poverty is pervasive, and it is usually national in scope. This is often coupled with lack of government commitment to provide health facilities and health care for the entire population. Systems of medical education differ widely and are based mainly on those of the country of colonial domination; hence, the systems may reflect predominantly British, American, Japanese, or Dutch influence, among others. Although most medical schools in Asia have academic disciplines and admission standards similar to those of Western schools, there are sharp differences among countries in faculty salaries, faculty competence, academic standards, adequacy of staffing, and number of medical schools. Underlying conditions and influences that have contributed to the current status of medical education systems in Asia are discussed. PMID:2713021

  17. INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    of Northwestern's most important legacies. Financial Assistance Healthcare is personal. So, too, is the educational path an individual takes to become a vital contributor to the healthcare system. Northwestern efforts to recruit and retain preeminent faculty who want to be part of an academic medical center and

  18. continued next page... Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    in the healthcare scene. With the explosion of medical information and advances in medical technology, medical In this digital era of information explosion and rapid advances in medical sciences and medical technologyinside continued next page... Medical Education: Enhancing Learning in the Affective (Feeling

  19. New Media in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agocs, Laszlo; Modis, Laszlo

    1994-01-01

    A Hungarian medical school is providing its students the means for self-education by connecting a media center to its medical education units and engaging in an instructional system which features problem-based learning. (AEF)

  20. Blended Learning in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pedagogical advancements in medical education across the globe have gained the attention of academicians for the preparation of well-educated and competent physicians to address the healthcare issues facing today. The integration of technology into medical pedagogy has proved effective in many ways. This has made the medical education

  1. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  2. FIPSE: Changing Medical Education Forever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levison, Sandra P.; Straumanis, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) has played a central role in sponsoring innovations in the medical and health sciences, including landmark medical projects to integrate women's health issues into the medical curriculum and to use lay people in the teaching and evaluating of medical students. (EV)

  3. Bachelor of Education in Physical Education

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Physical. 2015 Bachelor of Education in Physical Education College of Education Education #12;2 Bachelor of Education in Physical Education The Bachelor of Education (Physical Education) and Bachelor of Education (Physical Education) with Honours has been developed from a qualification with an international

  4. Course Evaluation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Jennifer R.; Shea, Judy A.

    2007-01-01

    Course evaluation is integral to medical education. We discuss (1) distinctive features of medical education that impact on course evaluation, (2) a framework for course evaluations, (3) details that shape the evaluation process, (4) key measurement issues important to data gathering and interpretation, and (5) opportunities for expanding the…

  5. Faculty of Science Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Physics opens the way to exciting new possibilities for career opportunities in the applications, Enriching Programs The honours Medical Physics stream fits naturally into our internationally renowned in such diverse fields as Biophysics and Medical Physics; Acoustic Microscopy and Materials Characterization

  6. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  7. Ethnographies across Virtual and Physical Spaces: A Reflexive Commentary on a Live Canadian/UK Ethnography of Distributed Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummons, Jonathan; Macleod, Anna; Kits, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on an ongoing ethnography of distributed medical education (DME) provision in Canada in order to explore the methodological choices of the researchers as well as the wider pluralisation of ethnographic frameworks that is reflected within current research literature. The article begins with a consideration of the technologically…

  8. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    349 FACULTY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION, AND ATHLETICS King, Lawrence B., Lecturer, Donna M., Associate Professor and Associate Director of Physical Education, MEd, 1972, Pennsylvania, 1991, State University of New York at Binghamton: Health education, human sexuality. (1998) Thirer

  9. Medical Student Handbook Office of Medical Student Education

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    ..........................................................................................3 Medical Education Vision Statement........................................................................................................................................2 Mission, Vision and Goals..........................................................................................................................3 College of Medicine Mission Statement

  10. Understanding Educational Reforms: Physics Education Research

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    ­ Building on a base ­ Theoretical models & educational practices · Impacts ­ Introductory physics (resultsUnderstanding Educational Reforms: Impacts of Physics Education Research Steven Pollock Physics under Grant No. REC 0448176, CAREER: Physics Education and Contexts of Student Learning. Any opinions

  11. Philosophy and Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopelman, Loretta M.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that study of philosophy in medical school develops better physicians by teaching salient views of ethical, social, and conceptual problems arising in medical practice. Students learn to examine assumptions, broaden perspectives and gain self-knowledge, develop critical thinking skills, generate tolerance and skepticism about dogma,…

  12. Capacity utilisation in medical education.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-05-01

    It is uncertain as to whether medical schools are operating to their maximum capacity or whether they could further maximise their capacity. It is also uncertain what problems medical schools might run into by striving to drive maximum capacity utilisation. Certainly there is no shortage of reports on why and how medical education providers should scale up, and yet there is inadequate scholarship on how medical education might do this in practice. It makes economic sense for medical schools to operate at maximum efficient capacity and yet adverse effects might result if schools are driven too hard. The main casualty of nearing the maximum efficient capacity is likely to be staff and staff morale. Staff will start to suffer from stress as a result of continually working to their limits. It is better to get buy-in from staff before implementing major changes that might increase capacity utilisation. PMID:24848401

  13. Understanding Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ken

    2008-01-01

    This easy-to-use introduction explores all of the contemporary issues and enduring themes in physical education, focusing on the United Kingdom but incorporating a global dimension. The wide range of topics covered include: (1) the requirements of National Curriculum Physical Education; (2) the current "state" of physical education; (3) the…

  14. Medical Physics Graduate Program At An HBCU

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Gueye

    2006-01-01

    The Physics Department at Hampton University houses the first Medical Physics graduate program at a minority institution, and the first in the state of Virginia. Jointly established with the Eastern Virginia Medical School, the program requires students to take standard physics courses in addition to medical physics classes and clinical rotations performed at local hospitals. The associated medical physics research

  15. Professionalism in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  16. Medical Education and Disability Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fiona Kumari Campbell

    2009-01-01

    The biomedicalist conceptualization of disablement as a personal medical tragedy has been criticized by disability studies scholars for discounting the difference between disability and impairment and the\\u000a ways disability is produced by socio-environmental factors. This paper discusses prospects for partnerships between disability\\u000a studies teaching\\/research and medical education; addresses some of the themes around the necessity of critical disability\\u000a studies training

  17. Improving Medical Education: Improving Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugsley, Lesley; McCrorie, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Is medical education unique among all other educational disciplines? Why does it not seem to conform to the rules laid down by universities for every other faculty? We explore the ways in which particular elements pertaining to medical education have been perceived historically and consider the ways in which medical educators and students have…

  18. Medical health physics: a review.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Richard J

    2005-06-01

    Medical health physics is the profession dedicated to the protection of healthcare providers, members of the public, and patients from unwarranted radiation exposure. Medical health physicists must be knowledgeable in the principles of health physics and in the applications of radiation in medicine. Advances in medical health physics require the definition of problems, testing of hypotheses, and gathering of evidence to defend changes in health physics practice and to assist medical practitioners in making changes in their practices as appropriate. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples included in this review include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This review summarizes evidence that supports changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. Medical health physicists must continue to gather evidence to support intelligent but practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients as modalities and applications evolve in the practice of medicine. PMID:15891459

  19. Medical health physics: a review.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Richard J

    2004-05-01

    Medical health physics is the profession dedicated to the protection of healthcare providers, members of the public, and patients from unwarranted radiation exposure. Medical health physicists must be knowledgeable in the principles of health physics and in the applications of radiation in medicine. Advances in medical health physics require the definition of problems, testing of hypotheses, and gathering of evidence to defend changes in health physics practice and to assist medical practitioners in making changes in their practices as appropriate. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples included in this review include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This review summarizes evidence that supports changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. Medical health physicists must continue to gather evidence to support intelligent but practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients as modalities and applications evolve in the practice of medicine. PMID:15083140

  20. Implementing Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Online physical education, although seemingly an oxymoron, appears to be the wave of the future at least for some students. The purpose of this article is to explore research and options for online learning in physical education and to examine a curriculum, assessment, and instructional model for online learning. The article examines how physical

  1. Trends in Physics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, R. N.

    A review of the changes in physics education since 1930 includes the beginnings in very practical applied physics. Research-oriented physics received a major impetus from the technological explosion stimulated by World War II. Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) physics is seen as an outgrowth of rigorous training for research followed by even…

  2. Pediatric hospitalists and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) is moving toward becoming an American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) subspecialty, roughly a decade after its formal inception in 2003. Education has played a central role as the field has evolved. Hospitalists are needed to educate trainees, medical students, residents, fellows, and nurse practitioner and physician assistant students in inpatient pediatric practice. Continuous professional development is needed for hospitalists currently in practice to augment clinical skills, such as providing sedation and placing peripherally inserted central catheter lines, and nonclinical skills in areas such as quality improvement methodology, hospital administration, and health service research. To address the educational needs of the current and future state of PHM, additional training is now needed beyond residency training. Fellowship training will be essential to continue to advance the field of PHM as well as to petition the ABP for specialty accreditation. Training in using adult educational theory, curriculum, and assessment design are critical for pediatric hospitalists choosing to advance their careers as clinician-educators. Several venues are available for gaining advanced knowledge and skill as an educator. PHM clinician-educators are advancing the field of pediatric education as well as their own academic careers by virtue of the scholarly approach they have taken to designing and implementing curricula for unique PHM teaching situations. PHM educators are changing the educational paradigm to address challenges to traditional education strategies posed by duty hour restrictions and the increasing drive to shorten the duration of the hospitalization. By embracing learning with technology, such as simulation and e-learning with mobile devices, PHM educators can address these challenges as well as respond to learning preferences of millennial learners. The future for PHM education is bright. PMID:24977677

  3. Physics, Education and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondi, H.

    1975-01-01

    Examines the current low rate of enrollment in physics courses and cites some causes for this phenomenon. Questions the goals of physics education as these relate to the needs of society, and proposes changes. (CP)

  4. (09)UC/05 BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/11 Bachelor of Science (Honours) Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    (09)UC/05 ­ BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/11 Bachelor of Science (Honours) Medical Physics 2005 Calendar, pages 348 and 681 (09)UC/05 ­ BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/1 Section A 1. Purpose of proposal To provide a better pathway for PhD students in Medical Physics, a BSc(Hons) degree in Medical Physics

  5. Plagiarism in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Cole, Ariel Forrester

    2007-06-01

    The act of overt plagiarism by graduates of accredited residency programs represents a failure in personal integrity. It also indicates a lack of professionalism, one of the six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies for graduate medical education. A recent experience at one geriatric fellowship indicates that the problem of plagiarism may be more prevalent than previously recognized. A situation was discovered at the geriatric medicine fellowship at Florida Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program in Orlando, Fla, in which three of the personal statements included in a total of 26 applications to the fellowship in the past 2 years contained portions plagiarized from a single Web site. The aim in documenting this plagiarism is to raise awareness among medical educators about the availability of online sources of content and ease of electronic plagiarism. Some students and residents may not recognize copying other resources verbatim as plagiarism. Residency programs should evaluate their own need for education about plagiarism and include this in the training of the competency of professionalism. PMID:17549654

  6. H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 165 H. UCSF/FRESNO MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM BACKGROUND UCSF established a regional medical education program in Fresno in 1975 to provide training for doctors Medical Center, Fresno County Hospital, Fresno Community Hospital, Valley Medical Center and Kaiser

  7. Phenomenology and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Physical education is often justified within the curriculum as academic study, as a worthwhile activity on a par with other academic subjects on offer and easy to assess. Part of the problem has been that movement studies in physical education are looked upon as disembodied and disconnected from its central concerns which are associated with…

  8. Sonographer Continuing Medical Education Courses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Produced by GE Healthcare, these courses offer continuing education for sonographers. Courses range from the introductory (Basics of 3D/4D Ultrasound) to the specific (Carotid Duplex Imaging). Specific areas of the body are also covered, including imaging for the breast, uterus, and brain. Each course is supplemented with objectives, anatomy, images, bibliographies, and a quiz covering the content of the lesson. This is an exceptional resource for students and teachers in the fields of diagnostic medical sonography and ultrasound technology.

  9. Physical Education majors must be accepted to the College of Education Physical Education Teacher Education Program

    E-print Network

    Milchberg, Howard

    Association for Health Physical Education Recreation and Dance) activities. - Participation and/or makingPhysical Education majors must be accepted to the College of Education Physical Education Teacher Education Program Physical Education Admissions to College of Education Requirements 1. Completion of 45

  10. Medical Image Science: Applications Medical Physics/Biomedical Engineering 574

    E-print Network

    Walker, Thad G.

    Medical Image Science: Applications Medical Physics/Biomedical Engineering 574 1022 WIMR, 9-0090 Email: sfain@wisc.edu This course presents the application of medical imaging theory to problems in medical imaging science including: concepts of digital image processing, image reconstruction

  11. Physical Education Lesson Plans

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers a helpful collection of resources, especially lesson plans, for Physical Education teachers. The site is constructed and maintained by John Williams, a Physical Education Specialist at the Ayden Elementary School in Greenville, North Carolina. The site features over 100 user-submitted Physical Education lesson plans, organized by category (tag games, throwing/catching, assessments, etc.). As would be expected, the detail and quality of the submitted plans vary. All are accessed via pull-down menus, and a few are located off-site. Williams's main page offers over 400 (unannotated) links to health and PhysEd resources, organized by topic.

  12. Physical Education 2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Cherry

    2008-10-15

    Physical education is important to children and their developing bodies, both physical and mental. All children should get up off the couch and do some type of physical activity. Students will understand and apply the health-enhancing benefits of physical activity and proper nutrition. Being healthy in physical activity and eating the right foods boost your ability to have fun and feel good about yourself. The President\\'s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports program is a great way for kids to get started at getting physically fit. They have listed their top 10 tips ...

  13. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer 

    E-print Network

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30

    The rising desire for individualized medical physics models has sparked a transition from the use of tangible phantoms toward the employment of computational software for medical physics applications. One such computational ...

  14. Lecture skills in medical education.

    PubMed

    Golden, A S

    1989-01-01

    The lecture is the most common method of transmitting information in medical schools and continuing medical education. In recent years this educational method has received considerable criticism because of poor lecturers and poor learning. The major advantage of the lecture is the ability to teach pertinent up-to-date information in an efficient manner. The major limitation is the passivity of the method with the teacher speaking and the listener passively receiving the material with considerable opportunity to be bored. The effective techniques of lecturing are: 1) environment aids learning: 2) an introduction perks interest; 3) stating objectives helps audience to respond analytically; 4) outlining a lecture helps clear thinking; 5) non-verbal behavior increases learning; 6) use of voice shows interest and clarity; 7) content is understood if it fits objectives; 8) organized lecture fits the time available; 9) visual aids used should be clear and understandable; 10) a summary helps to retain what is learned; 11) closure should be upbeat and should restate objectives; 12) questions should be answered succinctly. The medical lecturer can improve his skills by studying them, rehearsing while being observed by colleagues and by performing a self-analysis of video-taped lectures. PMID:2583766

  15. Cyber-Physical Medical and Medication Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert M. K. Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Medical and medication devices are real-time systems with safety and timing requirements. They range from hard-real-time, embedded, and reactive systems such as pacemakers to soft-real-time, stand-alone medication dispensers. Many of these devices are already connected to computer networks, especially in hospital intensive-care units, so that patients' conditions detected by sensors can be monitored in real-time at remote computer stations nearby

  16. Montana State University WWAMI Medical Education Program

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    .D. Director, WWAMI Medical Education Program Assistant Dean, University of Washington School of MedicinePage -1- Montana State University WWAMI Medical Education Program E'14 Orientation Information & Student Handbook #12;Page -2- WELCOME TO MEDICAL SCHOOL! "Students of Medicine, Apprentices of the Guild

  17. Physical Education as Porn!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John

    2013-01-01

    Background: This paper offers critical commentary on the culture of "performativity" that has dominated educational discourse over the last 20 years, affecting the way in which researchers, teachers, pupils and parents think and act toward Physical Education and sport (PESP) in schools. It is a culture that, in the UK, is likely to intensify in…

  18. Physical Education as porn!

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Evans

    2012-01-01

    Background: This paper offers critical commentary on the culture of ‘performativity’ that has dominated educational discourse over the last 20 years, affecting the way in which researchers, teachers, pupils and parents think and act toward Physical Education and sport (PESP) in schools. It is a culture that, in the UK, is likely to intensify in the years ahead given Liberal-Conservative

  19. Roadmap: Physical Education Physical Education Licensure Bachelor of Science

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Physical Education ­ Physical Education Licensure ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-PEP-PEL] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies Education Minor [EDUC] College of Education, Health and Human Services Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3

  20. Roadmap: Physical Education Physical Education Licensure Bachelor of Science

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Physical Education ­ Physical Education Licensure ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-PEP-PEL] College of Education, Health and Human Services School of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Studies Education Minor [EDUC] College of Education, Health and Human Services Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3

  1. American Medical Education: Institutions, Programs, and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    This report presents information about the academic medical centers belonging to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and profiles American medical education generally. Following a brief introduction, a section on institutions and resources offers information on medical schools' financial support, faculties, and faculty practice…

  2. Space physics educational outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this Space Physics Educational Outreach project was to develop a laboratory experiment and classroom lecture on Earth's aurora for use in lower division college physics courses, with the particular aim of implementing the experiment and lecture at Saint Mary's College of California. The strategy is to teach physics in the context of an interesting natural phenomenon by investigating the physical principles that are important in Earth's aurora, including motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields, particle collisions and chemical reactions, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. As a by-product, the undergraduate students would develop an appreciation for naturally occurring space physics phenomena.

  3. Interprofessional Education in Gross Anatomy: Experience with First-Year Medical and Physical Therapy Students at Mayo Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Steven S.; Yuan, Brandon J.; Lachman, Nirusha; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Krause, David A.; Hollman, John H.; Youdas, James W.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical practice is believed to improve outcomes in health care delivery. Integrating teaching and learning objectives through cross discipline student interaction in basic sciences has the potential to initiate interprofessional collaboration at the early stages of health care education. Student attitudes and…

  4. Physical Education: The Forgotten Half.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donna Mae

    1988-01-01

    Argues that physical education should be given a more prominent place in a wholistic education. States the objectives of physical education as enhancing (1) fitness, (2) neuromuscular skills, (3) value development, and (4) intellect. (CH)

  5. American medical education at a crossroads.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Arthur M; Runge, Marschall S; N Garcia, Joe G; Rubenstein, Arthur H

    2015-04-29

    New medical-education models in which research plays a modest role could engender a two-tiered educational system, cause a reduction in the physician-scientist pipeline, and diminish the translation of biomedical advances. PMID:25925678

  6. Careers in Medical Physics The ACPSEM

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    of Medical Physics If you are interested in a career within the medical and health disciplines, consider employs physical concepts for the prevention,diagnosis and treatment of human disease. It is not a new areas which are Radiation Oncology,Nuclear Medicine,Radiology and Radiation Safety. What is Medical

  7. Department of Medical Physics University of Wisconsin

    E-print Network

    Walker, Thad G.

    Department of Medical Physics University of Wisconsin M a d i s o n Student Handbook Date of Publication: December 2013 Department of Medical Physics · University of Wisconsin · 1111 Highland Avenue ·1005 Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research · Madison, WI 53705-2275 #12;2 Policy In conformance

  8. What should medical educators understand about Cheating is not something that medical educators prefer to

    E-print Network

    Paulsson, Johan

    , MD I am an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Associate DirectorWhat should medical educators understand about cheating? Cheating is not something that medical this challenging topic for educators in all fields. Who's Who in the Harvard Medical School Academy Dara Brodsky

  9. Challenges and Opportunities Facing Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Densen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is at a crossroads. Although unique features exist at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education levels, shared aspects of all three levels are especially revealing, and form the basis for informed decision-making about the future of medical education. This paper describes some of the internal and external challenges confronting undergraduate medical education. Key internal challenges include the focus on disease to the relative exclusion of behavior, inpatient versus outpatient education, and implications of a faculty whose research is highly focused at the molecular or submolecular level. External factors include the exponential growth in knowledge, associated technologic (“disruptive”) innovations, and societal changes. Addressing these challenges requires decisive institutional leadership with an eye to 2020 and beyond—the period in which current matriculants will begin their careers. This paper presents a spiral-model format for a curriculum of medical education, based on disease mechanisms, that addresses many of these challenges and incorporates sound educational principles. PMID:21686208

  10. Standardizing and personalizing science in medical education.

    PubMed

    Lambert, David R; Lurie, Stephen J; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Ward, Denham S

    2010-02-01

    In the century since the initial publication of the Flexner Report, medical education has emphasized a broad knowledge of science and a fundamental understanding of the scientific method, which medical educators believe are essential to the practice of medicine. The enormous growth of scientific knowledge that underlies clinical practice has challenged medical schools to accommodate this new information within the curricula. Although innovative educational modalities and new curricula have partly addressed this growth, the authors argue for a systematic restructuring of the content and structure of science education from the premedical setting through clinical practice. The overarching goal of science education is to provide students with a broad, solid foundation applicable to medicine, a deep understanding of the scientific method, and the attitudes and skills needed to apply new knowledge to patient care throughout their careers. The authors believe that to accomplish this successfully, the following changes must occur across the three major stages of medical education: (1) a reshaping of the scientific preparation that all students complete before medical school, (2) an increase in individualized science education during medical school, and (3) an emphasis on knowledge acquisition skills throughout graduate medical education and beyond to assure lifelong scientific learning. As students progress through the educational continuum, the balance of standardized and personalized scientific knowledge will shift toward personalization. Greater personalization demands that physicians possess well-refined skills in information acquisition, interpretation, and application for optimal lifelong learning and effective clinical practice. PMID:20107368

  11. biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering

    E-print Network

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris

    of frontier research in physics, biology, chemistry, and medicine. The Biological and Medical Physics with textbooks, monographs, and reference works to address the growing need for information. Books in the seriesbiological and medical physics, biomedical engineering For further volumes: http://www.springer.com/series

  12. Memories of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Amy M.; Walls, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore college students' autobiographical memories of physical education (PE). Questionnaires were distributed to students enrolled in undergraduate Introduction to PE and Introduction to Communications courses. The 261 participants wrote about memories of PE. These students recalled events from Grades…

  13. Physics, Environmental Education Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project I-C-E, Green Bay, WI.

    This physics guide, for use at the senior high level, is one of a series of guides, K-12, that were developed by teachers to help introduce environmental education into the total curriculum. The guides are supplementary in design, containing a series of episodes (minilessons) that focus on student-centered activities with direct application of…

  14. Physical Education: Essential Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ken, Ed.; Hardman, Ken, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book is aimed primarily at under and postgraduate students pursuing entire programmes or discrete courses and modules in the broad area of physical education and sport in schools. It consists of a collection of what is considered to be essential readings in the sense that they are contributions from eminent authors on a breadth of salient…

  15. Healthism and Physical Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Kirk; Derek Colquhoun

    1989-01-01

    Health has become a symbolic category of considerable importance, expressing a range of notions relating to well?being, consumption and normality. A particular view of health as corporeal and individualistic has become pervasive within the new health consciousness, and school physical education represents one site among many where the ideology of healthism is produced. This paper draws on a study of

  16. Outdoor Physical Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheideman, Elton Dale

    2000-01-01

    Examines typical high school physical educational facility courts found in the Clark County School District (Las Vegas), an area noted for building or reconstructing over 950 courts over the past decade. Base materials and surfaces used are addressed. Photos are included. (GR)

  17. Marie Curie's contribution to Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Jean-Claude, Rosenwald; Nüsslin, Fridtjof

    2013-09-01

    On occasion of its 50th anniversary, the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) from now on is going to celebrate annually an International Day of Medical Physics for which the 7th November, the birthday of Marie Sklodowska Curie, a most exceptional character in science at all and a pioneer of medical physics, has been chosen. This article briefly outlines her outstanding personality, sketches her fundamental discovery of radioactivity and emphasizes the impact of her various achievements on the development of medical physics at large. PMID:23958429

  18. Roadmap: Physical Education -Health and Physical Education Bachelor of Science

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    PEP 15016 Development and Analysis of Target Games and Fielding Games 3 C HED 21030 Introduction to Health Educational Psychology 3 C HED 20000 Health Education for Early Childhood 3 C PEB Electives 2 C See note 1Roadmap: Physical Education - Health and Physical Education ­ Bachelor of Science [EH

  19. Reflections on Experimental Research in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    As medical education research advances, it is important that education researchers employ rigorous methods for conducting and reporting their investigations. In this article we discuss several important yet oft neglected issues in designing experimental research in education. First, randomization controls for only a subset of possible confounders.…

  20. The UCSF Academy of Medical Educators.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Molly; Irby, David M; Debas, Haile T

    2003-07-01

    The Academy of Medical Educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), was established in 2000 to (1) foster excellence in teaching, (2) support teachers of medicine, and (3) promote curricular innovation. A membership organization, it recognizes five categories of educational activity: direct teaching, curriculum development and assessment of learner performance, advising and mentoring, educational administration and leadership, and educational research. Excellent medical student teaching and outstanding accomplishment in one or more areas of educational activity qualify a teacher for membership. Candidates prepare a portfolio that is reviewed internally and by national experts in medical education. Currently 37 faculty members, 3% of the entire school of medicine faculty, belong to the academy. The academy's innovations funding program disburses one-year grants to support curricular development and comparisons of pedagogical approaches; through this mechanism, the academy has funded 20 projects at a total cost of $442,300. Three fourths of expended funds support faculty release time. Faculty development efforts include promotion of the use of an educator's portfolio and the establishment of a mentoring program for junior faculty members built around observation of teaching. The Academy of Medical Educators vigorously supports expanded scholarship in education; the academy-sponsored Education Day is an opportunity for educators to present their work locally. Recipients of innovations-funding program grants are expected to present their work in an appropriate national forum and are assisted in doing this through quarterly scholarship clinics. The Academy of Medical Educators has been well received at UCSF and is enhancing the status of medical education and teachers. PMID:12857682

  1. The Coming Influence of a Social Sciences Perspective on Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlov, Alvin R.

    1992-01-01

    Although medical education changes in response to advances in biological sciences and technology, changes in public health and attitudes outside medicine may have even more impact on medical education. Medical students need a foundation in both natural and social sciences to deal with the complex interrelationships between social and physical

  2. Tele-education as method of medical education.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Kulasin, Igor; Masic, Zlatan; Valjevac, Salih

    2009-01-01

    Development of computer networks and introduction and application of new technologies in all aspects of human activity needs to be followed by universities in their transformation on how to approach scientific, research, and education teaching curricula. Development and increased use of distance learning (DL) over the past decade have clearly shown the potential and efficiency of information technology applied in education. Use of information technology in medical education is where medical informatics takes its place as important scientific discipline which ensures benefit from IT in teaching and learning process involved. Definition of telemedicine as "use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance" covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (eHealth), telematics, but also tele-education. Web based medical education today is offered in different forms--from online lectures, online exams, web based continuous education programs, use of electronic libraries, online medical and scientific databases etc. Department of Medical Informatics of Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo has taken many steps to introduce distance learning in medical curricula--from organising professional--scientific events (congresses, workshop etc), organizing first tele-exam at the faculty and among first at the university, to offering online lectures and online education material at the Department's website (www.unsa-medinfo.org). Distance learning in medical education, as well as telemedicine, significantly influence health care in general and are shaping the future model of medical practice. Basic computer and networks skills must be a part of all future medical curricula. The impact of technical equipment on patient-doctor relationship must be taken into account, and doctors have to be trained and prepared for diagnosing or consulting patients by use of IT. Telemedicine requires special approach in certain medical fields--tele-consultation, tele-surgery, tele-radiology and other specific telemedicine applications should be introduced to the curricula. Telemedicine and distance learning are best suited for medical education and doctor-to-doctor consultation--first contact between doctor and a patient should stay face-to-face when possible. In this paper, we present the results of the project Introduction and Implementation of Distance Learning at the Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo and compare it with the following expected outcomes: development and integration of information technology in medical education; creation of flexible infrastructure which will enable access to e-learning to all students and teaching staff; improvement of digital literacy of academic population; ensuring high educational standards to students and teaching staff; helping medical staffto develop "life-long learning" approach in work and education. PMID:20380118

  3. Fostering Interprofessional Teamwork in an Academic Medical Center: Near-Peer Education for Students during Gross Medical Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Richard K.; Pizzimenti, Marc A.; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Schwinn, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe student satisfaction with a near-peer interprofessional education (IPE) session for physical therapy and medical students. Ten senior physical therapy students worked in peer-groups to develop a musculoskeletal anatomy demonstration for first-semester medical students. Together with their classmates, they…

  4. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 3.a: Levels of supervision for medical physicists in clinical training.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony; Clements, Jessica B; Halvorsen, Per H; Herman, Michael G; Martin, Melissa C; Palta, Jatinder; Pfeiffer, Douglas E; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Schueler, Beth A; Shepard, S Jeff; Fairobrent, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances. PMID:26103491

  5. Nutrition education in medical training: the need to reconsider the sacrosanctity of medical education in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, O E; Atinmo, T

    2008-09-01

    The "no controversy" status of the important role of nutrition in maintaining good health and disease management is becoming a gold standard in medical practice. Medical schools in developed countries and some in developing countries are beginning to renew interest in nutrition education for medical professionals. Despite difficulties envisaged in modifying the medical school curricula, it is inevitable that medical professionals need some basic nutrition knowledge appropriate for medical counselling in disease prevention and management. Cost effectiveness in providing health care services is now an important policy tool, which emphasizes preventive medical care. This is dependent on good nutrition education, which informs not only on food but healthcare and good environment. This article examines the need for nutrition education in medical schools, approaches that can be used to introduce nutrition education, using the available information from medical schools that have already integrated nutrition into their medical education curricula. It also identifies some of the barriers and strategies to overcome including specific actions for nutrition educators or whoever may be saddled with the responsibilities for initiating the development of nutrition curriculum for medical education. PMID:18982813

  6. Graduate Medical Education and Rural Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed that medical schools recruit students from rural areas, have them choose family practice, and train them in rural settings. Specific recommendations for improving content and context of rural medical care education are made, including merging internal medicine, family practice, and pediatrics as a single primary care specialty.…

  7. Continuing Medical Education: The Norwegian Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm, H. A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The Norwegian Medical Association is given responsibility for training and continuing medical education by the government. Government financial support enables the association to provide courses without support from the pharmaceutical industry. Current emphases include doctors as individual learners, as counselors, and as mentors. (SK)

  8. Rural Medical Education: Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon R.; Bornstein, Stephen; Jong, Michael; Fleet, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    (Purpose) This report summarizes a synthesis of the literature related to the evidence, initiatives and approaches to rural/northern medical education, particularly its role in strengthening the medical workforce in rural areas. (Methodology) A literature review was conducted involving the literature databases MEDLINE (January 1990-March 2003),…

  9. Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Guo, F R; Liu, C T; Lee, Y J; Chen, J H; Lin, C C; Hou, S M; Hsieh, B S

    1998-06-01

    National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services including mail, netnews, bulletin board systems (BBS), world wide web (WWW), gopher, ftp and local file servers. To implement an interactive learning environment, the authors first tried mail lists, newsgroups and BBS. Next an integrated learning system prototype on the WWW was developed to provide functions including online syllabus, discussion boards simulated to BBS, online talk, interactive case studies, virtual classroom with video on demand (VOD) and Internet medical resources. The results showed that after the medical students completed the required course of medical informatics and had good network access using a network to communicate with each other became a daily practice. In the future, the system will extend to the tutoring of clinical practice and continuing medical education. The authors expect a national medical education network and more international cooperation and exchange. PMID:9726493

  10. Modeling Manipulation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Jason I.

    2010-01-01

    As residents and medical students progress through their medical training, they are presented with multiple instances in which they feel they must manipulate the healthcare system and deceive others in order to efficiently treat their patients. This, however, creates a culture of manipulation resulting in untoward effects on trainees' ethical and…

  11. Emerging technologies in physics education

    E-print Network

    Zosia A. C. Krusberg

    2007-03-24

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies - Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools - are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting conceptual change, developing expert-like problem-solving skills, and achieving the goals of the traditional physics laboratory. Pedagogical methods to maximize the potential of each educational technology are suggested.

  12. Adapted Physical Education and Sport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph P. Winnick; Francis X. Short; Douglas Holden Collier; Lauren J. Lieberman; Cathy Houston-Wilson; Francis M. Kozub

    2005-01-01

    Editor, Joseph P. Winnick.Includes chapters by several College at Brockport faculty members:Francis X. Short. Measurement, assessment, and program evaluation ; Individualized education programs ; Health-related physical fitness and physical activity.Joseph P. Winnick. Introduction to adapted physical education and sport ; Program organization and management ; Perceptual-motor development.Douglas H. Collier. Instructional strategies for adapted physical education.Cathy Houston-Wilson. Pervasive developmental disorders ;

  13. The changing context of undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Parsell, G. J.; Bligh, J.

    1995-01-01

    It has long been recognised that intensive efforts are needed to reform medical education in order to meet the future needs of populations worldwide. Pressure for changes to the organisation, content and delivery of both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education has greatly increased in the last two decades. The experience of innovative medical schools, the emergence of learner-centred teaching methods and the implications of health-care reforms in North America and Britain are major factors influencing calls for change. The pace of change has accelerated to such an extent in recent years that progress towards widespread reform appears to be more attainable than ever before. This article provides an overview of the changing context of health-care, some patterns of existing medical education and some strategies for change. PMID:7567730

  14. Multicultural Understanding in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, William; Wayman, Landace

    This study compares the knowledge, attitudes, and current practices of physical education teachers in urban and rural areas, with regard to multicultural education. A mailed questionnaire was completed by 70 public school physical education teachers, 44 from rural Kansas and 26 from Detroit and Flint, Michigan. Of those responding to specific…

  15. The Politics of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper, which was given as the Dudley Allen Sargent lecture at the 2012 conference of the National Association for Kinesiology and Physical Education in Higher Education, discusses the politics of physical education. It examines how both national politics and local/campus politics affect the discipline. Drawing from the history of national…

  16. Physical Education and Fostering Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosco, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Rather than presenting an academic paper, I wanted to simply examine my own perspective as a physical educator and classroom teacher and the importance of creating relationships with children. As a relatively new physical educator and recent Masters of Education graduate of the University of Toronto at OISE, but experienced classroom teacher…

  17. Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform -Involve -Enable

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform - Involve - Enable revised 6/04/13 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Please click _______________________________ Date: ____________ Department Chair Signature: ______________________ Date: _____________ #12;Medical

  18. MEDICAL PHYSICS 567 THE PHYSICS OF DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Walker, Thad G.

    MEDICAL PHYSICS 567 THE PHYSICS OF DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY COURSE OUTLINE Fall 2013 Instructor Leidholdt, JM Boone. B. Introduction to Radiological Physics and Radiation Dosimetry, F.H. Attix C. Imaging's Introduction to the Physics of Diagnostic Radiology, 4th ed., Curry, et al. SUPPLEMENTAL READING REFERENCES E

  19. 1 | 2008 -Initial Physical Education Teacher Education Standards and Elements 2008 National Association for Sport and Physical Education

    E-print Network

    Milchberg, Howard

    1 | 2008 - Initial Physical Education Teacher Education Standards and Elements 2008 National Association for Sport and Physical Education Initial Physical Education Teacher Education Standards and Elements Source: (In press) NASPE (National Association for Sport and Physical Education). "2008 National

  20. Physical Education & Outdoor Education: complementary but discrete disciplines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Martin; John McCullagh

    2011-01-01

    The Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER) includes Outdoor Education (OE) as a component of Physical Education (PE). Yet Outdoor Education is clearly thought of by many as a discrete discipline separate from Physical Education. Outdoor Education has a body of knowledge that differs from that of Physical Education. This in turn has mandated that OE teachers

  1. A journey into medical physics as viewed by a physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul

    2007-03-01

    The world of physics is usually linked to a large variety of subjects spanning from astrophysics, nuclear/high energy physics, materials and optical sciences, plasma physics etc. Lesser is known about the exciting world of medical physics that includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. These physicists are typically based in hospital departments of radiation oncology or radiology, and provide technical support for patient diagnosis and treatment in a clinical environment. This talk will focus on providing a bridge between selected areas of physics and their medical applications. The journey will first start from our understanding of high energy beam production and transport beamlines for external beam treatment of diseases (e.g., electron, gamma, X-ray and proton machines) as they relate to accelerator physics. We will then embrace the world of nuclear/high energy physics where detectors development provide a unique tool for understanding low energy beam distribution emitted from radioactive sources used in Brachytherapy treatment modality. Because the ultimate goal of radiation based therapy is its killing power on tumor cells, the next topic will be microdosimetry where responses of biological systems can be studied via electromagnetic systems. Finally, the impact on the imaging world will be embraced using tools heavily used in plasma physics, fluid mechanics and Monte Carlo simulations. These various scientific areas provide unique opportunities for faculty and students at universities, as well as for staff from research centers and laboratories to contribute in this field. We will conclude with the educational training related to medical physics programs.

  2. MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN AFFILIATED HOSPITALS GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION TRAINING AGREEMENT

    E-print Network

    MEDICAL COLLEGE OF WISCONSIN AFFILIATED HOSPITALS GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION TRAINING AGREEMENT Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals, Inc., a Wisconsin corporation (hereinafter called AND RENEWAL MCWAH appoints Trainee and Trainee accepts appointment to the graduate medical training program

  3. Course Outline Course Medical Physics /BME 575: Diagnostic Ultrasound Physics

    E-print Network

    Walker, Thad G.

    in Tissue 7 27th March Ultrasound Scattering in Tissue 1st April Doppler Ultrasound 7 3rd April Doppler aperture annular array, 1979. Evans D, McDicken W, Skidmore R, and Woodcock J, Doppler Ultrasound Physics1 Course Outline Course Medical Physics /BME 575: Diagnostic Ultrasound Physics Session Spring 2014

  4. Trends and the future of postgraduate medical education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R M Harden

    2006-01-01

    Where is the present flurry of activity in medical education leading and what sort of future is envisaged? This paper looks at trends in postgraduate medical education. Four themes and two trends for each theme have been identified. The themes are: the postgraduate medical curriculum, the application of learning technologies, assessment of competence, and professionalism in medical education. The trends

  5. OFFICE FOR GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION RESIDENT/FELLOW MANUAL

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    OFFICE FOR GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION RESIDENT/FELLOW MANUAL FOR MEDICAL AND DENTAL PROGRAMS 2013-2014 http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/education/graduate-medical-education/applicant-eligibility-requirements/ http://intranet.urmc-sh.rochester.edu/residents/ Updated 3/26/2014 University of Rochester Medical

  6. Simulation and its role in medical education

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rashmi; Upadhyay, KK; Jaideep, CN

    2012-01-01

    Medical education is increasingly laying emphasis on a curriculum based on cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains of learning which were originally proposed nearly 50 years ago. These reforms are framed around best standards of care, error management and patient safety, patient autonomy, and resource allocation. There is a worldwide shift in the method of medical education towards experiential (‘hands-on’) medical learning; however, applying this concept to real patients is less acceptable to society and is subject to legal and ethical issues. Simulation is the artificial representation of a complex real-world process with sufficient fidelity with the aim to facilitate learning through immersion, reflection, feedback, and practice minus the risks inherent in a similar real-life experience. Medical simulation offers numerous potential strategies for comprehensive and practical training, and safer patient care. It is a technique, rather than just a technology that promotes experiential and reflective learning. It is also a key strategy to teach crisis resource management skills. Simulation can benefit the individual learner, the multidisciplinary team, and the hospital as a whole. In this review, the authors discuss the role of simulation in five situations namely undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, continuing medical education, disaster management, and military trauma management and dwell upon the experience of medical simulation in the Armed Forces. PMID:24623932

  7. Simulation and its role in medical education.

    PubMed

    Datta, Rashmi; Upadhyay, Kk; Jaideep, Cn

    2012-04-01

    Medical education is increasingly laying emphasis on a curriculum based on cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains of learning which were originally proposed nearly 50 years ago. These reforms are framed around best standards of care, error management and patient safety, patient autonomy, and resource allocation. There is a worldwide shift in the method of medical education towards experiential ('hands-on') medical learning; however, applying this concept to real patients is less acceptable to society and is subject to legal and ethical issues. Simulation is the artificial representation of a complex real-world process with sufficient fidelity with the aim to facilitate learning through immersion, reflection, feedback, and practice minus the risks inherent in a similar real-life experience. Medical simulation offers numerous potential strategies for comprehensive and practical training, and safer patient care. It is a technique, rather than just a technology that promotes experiential and reflective learning. It is also a key strategy to teach crisis resource management skills. Simulation can benefit the individual learner, the multidisciplinary team, and the hospital as a whole. In this review, the authors discuss the role of simulation in five situations namely undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, continuing medical education, disaster management, and military trauma management and dwell upon the experience of medical simulation in the Armed Forces. PMID:24623932

  8. Educational Resource Guide for Adapted Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciccaglione, Sue; Magliaro, Susan

    The guide is intended to provide information to adapted physical education instructors. An initial section introduces characteristics of the following handicapping conditions: autism, diabetes, emotional disturbance, learning disabilities, mental retardation, musculoskeletal disorders, neuromuscular disorders, seizure and convulsive disorders, and…

  9. Medical Physics Graduate Program At An HBCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, Paul

    2006-03-01

    The Physics Department at Hampton University houses the first Medical Physics graduate program at a minority institution, and the first in the state of Virginia. Jointly established with the Eastern Virginia Medical School, the program requires students to take standard physics courses in addition to medical physics classes and clinical rotations performed at local hospitals. The associated medical physics research primarily focuses on detectors development for absolute 3D dose distribution measurements (with accuracy better than ±100 microns), characterization of the uniformity or non-uniformity of Brachytherapy sources, and extraction of the 2D and 3D in-vivo dose maps for real time dose monitoring. Recent novel fundamental studies on the energy dependence of cancer cells to address, among others, mono-energetic Brachytherapy source treatments, reaction mechanisms associated with cancer cell destruction, and cancer genome identification have been launched. Each of the research conducted is strongly coupled to dedicated Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. After presenting this unique medical physics program, we will review results obtained from its research group.

  10. Physical Education in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve; Sanders, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the incidence and quality of physical activity instruction during early childhood. Although the positive effect of physical activity on the cognitive, social, and physical development of young children is generally acknowledged, there is little emphasis nationally on ensuring appropriate physical educational experiences…

  11. University Supervision within Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Steven C.; Grenier, Michelle; Channell, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Physical education teacher education (PETE) students are given opportunities in "early field experiences" (EFEs) to observe and assist experienced teachers in schools. Typically, students are then required to do some autonomous teaching, to give them practical experience in the real world of local schools. Ultimately students will move on to…

  12. Undergraduate Modules in Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    analyses; 8. understand the engineering effects of physical scale in the animal kingdom; 9. be able;3 · Fluid dynamics: classification of flow regimes, Navier Stokes equation, Poiseuille equation, Bernoulli

  13. Undergraduate Modules in Medical Physics

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    the engineering effects of physical scale in the animal kingdom; 9. be able to calculate hydrostatic pressure models. Fluid dynamics: classification of flow regimes, Navier Stokes equation, Poiseuille equation

  14. Medical ethics and education for social responsibility.

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The physician, said Henry Sigerist in 1940, has been acquiring an increasingly social role. For centuries, however, codes of medical ethics have concentrated on proper behavior toward individual patients and almost ignored the doctor's responsibilities to society. Major health service reforms have come principally from motivated lay leadership and citizen groups. Private physicians have been largely hostile toward movements to equalize the economic access for people to medical care and improve the supply and distribution of doctors. Medical practice in America and throughout the world has become seriously commercialized. In response, governments have applied various strategies to constrain physicians and induce more socially responsible behavior. But such external pressures should not be necessary if a broad socially oriented code of medical ethics were followed. Health care system changes would be most effective, but medical education could be thoroughly recast to clarify community health problems and policies required to meet them. Sigerist proposed such a new medical curriculum in 1941; if it had been introduced, a social code of medical ethics would not now seem utopian. An international conference might well be convened to consider how physicians should be educated to reach the inspiring goals of the World Health Organization. PMID:7405276

  15. Educating Scientifically: Advances in Physics Education Research

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Noah (University of Colorado) [University of Colorado

    2007-05-16

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  16. Educating Scientifically - Advances in Physics Education Research

    ScienceCinema

    Finkelstein, Noah [University of Colorado, Colorado, USA

    2009-09-01

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  17. Cooperative Learning in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.; Ratliffe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A methodology that has not received as much attention in the physical education setting as in other subject areas is cooperative learning. Cooperative learning has been used for many years in math, science, and history, but not until recently has the concept been applied to physical education. Research conducted on cooperative learning has shown…

  18. COPE: Computer Organized Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambdin, Dolly

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the need for and appropriate use of individual assessment in physical education and explains how computerized data management can combat the logistical difficulties of using the data. Describes project COPE (Computer Organized Physical Education), a computerized data management system for improving recordkeeping, planning, and…

  19. Physical Education Is Critically Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article presents excerpts from a new brochure available through the National Association for Sports and Physical Education. Here, the highlights of the comments from the surveys conducted by Opinion Research Corporation International of Princeton, NJ for the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) between 2000 and 2003,…

  20. Michigan Physics Education Standards- 2007

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This document from the Great Lakes Fuel Cell Education Partnership contains a brief outline of the state of Michigan's physics education standards for 2007. The document includes information about specific educational standards and how they may be taught in conjunction with units on renewable energies such as fossil fuels, wind energy, fuel cells and biofuels. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  1. 46 CFR 10.302 - Medical and physical requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical and physical requirements. 10.302 Section...OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MERCHANT MARINER CREDENTIAL Medical Certification § 10.302 Medical and physical requirements. (a) To...

  2. Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

  3. Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Michael J; Pageler, Natalie M; Kahana, Madelyn; Pantaleoni, Julie L; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education. PMID:23619078

  4. Medical Terminology: Prefixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (prefixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to prefixes, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an…

  5. Medical Terminology: Suffixes. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (suffixes) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to the module topic, a list of resources needed, and three learning experiences. The first two learning…

  6. Continuing medical education in oncology in europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Armand; A. Costa; J. Geraghty; N. O'Higgins; P. J. Broe; L. Holmberg; D. Th. Sleijfer

    1996-01-01

    A European Conference on Continuing Medical Education (CME) in Oncology was designed and organised in Dublin (Ireland), on 12th and 13th October 1995 by the European School of Oncology in collaboration with University College Dublin and with the financial support of the European Commission (Europe Against Cancer Programme). Two experts were invited from each Member State and all attended the

  7. Continuing Medical Education, Perspectives, Problems, Prognosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Robert K.

    Predicting that continuing medical education (CME) will be mandatory for doctors within five years, this book traces CME's historical antecedents, analyzes the forces arrayed for and against it, and offers guidelines for its realistic use in a broad program of improving health care. An examination is made of: the evolution of undergraduate and…

  8. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  9. From the Office of Medical Education Research and Development (OMERAD). . . . . New Places, New Opportunities, New Ideas in Medical Education Series

    E-print Network

    by the LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship and the Office of Medical EducationFrom the Office of Medical Education Research and Development (OMERAD). . . . . New Places, New Opportunities, New Ideas in Medical Education Series A Webcast Audio Seminar Series available through

  10. Tele-Immersive medical educational environment.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhuming; Dech, Fred; Silverstein, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Mary

    2002-01-01

    By combining teleconferencing, tele-presence, and Virtual Reality, the Tele-Immersive environment enables master surgeons to teach residents in remote locations. The design and implementation of a Tele-Immersive medical educational environment, Teledu, is presented in this paper. Teledu defines a set of Tele-Immersive user interfaces for medical education. In addition, an Application Programming Interface (API) is provided so that developers can easily develop different applications with different requirements in this environment. With the help of this API, programmers only need to design a plug-in to load their application specific data set. The plug-in is an object-oriented data set loader. Methods for rendering, handling, and interacting with the data set for each application can be programmed in the plug-in. The environment has a teacher mode and a student mode. The teacher and the students can interact with the same medical models, point, gesture, converse, and see each other. PMID:15458055

  11. Use of Silicon Detectors in Medical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-09-01

    In this document I will review the characteristics and applications of silicon detectors in Medical Physics. I will cover the activities done by some research mexican groups working with silicon detectors (Silicon Strip and PIN detectors) as devices for digital imaging supported by some Monte Carlo simulations and X-ray units parameters valuation devices for quality control. In the end I will give some perspectives on the future of these scientific activities as important contributions in the development of the area of Medical Physics around the world.

  12. Use of Silicon Detectors in Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel [Physics Department, Cinvestav, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2006-09-25

    In this document I will review the characteristics and applications of silicon detectors in Medical Physics. I will cover the activities done by some research mexican groups working with silicon detectors (Silicon Strip and PIN detectors) as devices for digital imaging supported by some Monte Carlo simulations and X-ray units parameters valuation devices for quality control. In the end I will give some perspectives on the future of these scientific activities as important contributions in the development of the area of Medical Physics around the world.

  13. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Physical education. 300.108 Section 300...Requirements § 300.108 Physical education. The State must ensure...following: (a) General. Physical education services, specially...

  14. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Keith Beckett, Chair

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Mark A.

    that participation in physical activity and sports are integral components of the culture in which we live arts education. Skills learned through physical activity and sport participation are valuable personal experiences and physical activity the values and standards of conduct inherent in participation in sport

  15. Caution Flags in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Lists several common physical fitness exercises that may cause more harm than good (both physically and emotionally). Physical educators must be aware of the dangers of certain exercises and activities. The article examines problems with inappropriate warmups, peer team selection, exercise as punishment, elimination games, and standing in line.…

  16. The Value of Performance in Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2013-01-01

    The current philosophical paradigm in higher education, where theory transcends practice, consigns physical education to the bottom of a hierarchy of educational content (Kretchmar, 2005). Leaders of physical education teacher education programs are left with three difficult choices: (a) accept physical education's lowly position in the…

  17. Physical Education, Liberal Education and the Leaving Certificate Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the conceptualization of physical education as a Leaving Certificate Examination subject and the place of physical education in a liberal education. Special attention is given to the conceptual evolution of physical education and its intrinsic educational values and to the developments in the idea of a liberal education over…

  18. Tactical Decision Competency of Preservice Physical Education Teacher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Skip M.; Coleman, Margo M.; Henninger, Mary L.; Carlson, Kristin B.

    2013-01-01

    The most recent publication of the "National Standards and Guidelines for Physical Education Teacher Education" (National Association for Sport and Physical Education [NASPE], 2009) requires physical education teacher education (PETE) programs to demonstrate that teacher candidates display both tactical knowledge and physical competence.…

  19. [The role of surgical education in pregraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Restrepo, José Félix

    2011-01-01

    Surgical education in pregraduate medicine is important because it is during this period where students acquire abilities that will allow them to make important future decisions when performing surgical procedures. Faculties of medicine make significant efforts to design innovative and rigorous curricula that will provide medical professionals with abilities to carryout medical procedures in a changing panorama of health systems as well as to provide scientific and technological advances. Intellectual and clinical proficiency, discipline, ethics and human values that a student acquires during pregraduate training and education will result in becoming a very efficient health professional. PMID:21477521

  20. Educational programs in US medical schools.

    PubMed

    Jonas, H S; Etzel, S I; Barzansky, B

    1991-08-21

    One noteworthy finding for the 1990-1991 academic year is the increasing number of applicants to medical school, coupled with stabilization in the credentials of accepted applicants. This increase appears to be reversing the downward trend of the 1980s. The percentages of women and total minority students in the entering class increased from the previous year. The prevalence of instructional formats such as problem-based learning and computer-assisted instruction illustrates that medical schools are willing to experiment with educational innovation. A number of schools are in the process of curriculum review, which may lead to important changes. The financial support offered by private foundations interested in curriculum innovation, for some, will be an added stimulus for change. While the majority of medical schools continue to require that students take the examinations and the subject tests of the NBME, evaluation formats that test clinical skills are receiving increased attention. The number of schools using multiple station examinations (often with standardized patients) is rising. The impact of the new US Medical Licensing Examination on medical school curricula should be analyzed in the future. Although steady increases have been reported in the number of medical school faculty members, especially clinical faculty, there is little information about how these faculty members apportion their time between teaching, research, and patient care. The assumption is that the increases are primarily driven by medical schools' need to provide clinical services, which are a source of income. Another explanation for faculty increases could relate to the need for more faculty involvement in educational innovations such as problem-based learning and new methods of clinical skills evaluation, which are relatively more faculty-intensive. Continued monitoring of the growth in clinical faculty will be necessary, as will more careful analysis of how medical school faculty spend their time. Since medical school faculty who have heavy involvements in teaching frequently do not receive appropriate recognition or reward, it will also be interesting to examine the effectiveness of diverse incentives used by the schools to reward teaching faculty. An appropriate reward system for teaching is important if undergraduate medical education is to command a high priority in institutions awarding the doctor of medicine degree. PMID:1870221

  1. Physical Activity and Health: Does Physical Education Matter?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell R. Pate; Jennifer R. ONeill; Kerry L. McIver

    2011-01-01

    Physical education has been an institution in American schools since the late 19th century, and today almost all American children are exposed to physical education classes. It has often been claimed that physical education provides important benefits to public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine if physical education increases students' physical activity levels, in the short and

  2. Physical Education Lifeline: Curriculum and Instruction Resource for Physical Education Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thissen-Milder, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Since 1923, Minnesota educators have been engaged in teaching and promoting Physical Education. In 2005, it has become apparent that the 2,500 physical education instructors in Minnesota are in need of a Best Practices document to support quality Physical Education. As a result, this manual has been developed to provide assistance to school…

  3. [International accreditation of medical school towards quality assurance of medical education].

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Toshimasa; Nara, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    An internationalization of practical medicine evoked international migrations of medical professionals. Since basic medical education is different among countries, the internationalization required international quality assurance of medical education. Global trend moves toward establishment of international accreditation system based on international standards. The World Federation for Medical Education proposed Global Standards for Quality Improvement as the international standards. Medical schools in Japan have started to establish program evaluation system. The standards which incorporated international standards have been published. The system for accreditation is being considered. An accreditation body, Japan Accreditation Council for Medical Education, is under construction. The accreditation is expected to enhance quality of education in Japan. PMID:24291905

  4. Using cognitive theory to facilitate medical education

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Educators continue to search for better strategies for medical education. Although the unifying theme of reforms was “increasing interest in, attention to, and understanding of the knowledge base structures”, it is difficult to achieve all these aspects via a single type of instruction. Methods We used related key words to search in Google Scholar and Pubmed. Related search results on this topic were selected for discussion. Results Despite the range of different methods used in medical education, students are still required to memorize much of what they are taught, especially for the basic sciences. Subjects like anatomy and pathology carry a high intrinsic cognitive load mainly because of the large volume of information that must be retained. For these subjects, decreasing cognitive load is not feasible and memorizing appears to be the only strategy, yet the cognitive load makes learning a challenge for many students. Cognitive load is further increased when inappropriate use of educational methods occurs, e.g., in problem based learning which demands clinical reasoning, a high level and complex cognitive skill. It is widely known that experts are more skilled at clinical reasoning than novices because of their accumulated experiences. These experiences are based on the formation of cognitive schemata. In this paper we describe the use of cognitive schemata, developed by experts as worked examples to facilitate medical students’ learning and to promote their clinical reasoning. Conclusion We suggest that cognitive load theory can provide a useful framework for understanding the challenges and successes associated with education of medical professionals. PMID:24731433

  5. Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) Policy on Accommodations for Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Graduate Medical Education Committee (GMEC) Policy on Accommodations for Disabilities will be required to provide medical verification of a medical condition that he or she believes is a disability Institutional Requirements Approved by GMEC 1/12/07 II.D.4.n Office of Graduate Medical Education West Virginia

  6. An Overview of Undergraduate Physiology Education in Turkish Medical Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkanci, Z. Dicle; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    Physiology education, which occupies an important place in undergraduate medical education, exhibits diversities across the world. Since there was no specific source of information about physiology education in Turkish medical faculties, the authors aimed to evaluate the general status of undergraduate physiology teaching of medical students in…

  7. Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform -Involve -Enable

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform - Involve - Enable Revised 3/14/14 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Name (Last, First, M________________________ Date:________ ResetPrint Save #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform

  8. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  9. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  10. 34 CFR 300.108 - Physical education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Physical education. 300.108 Section 300.108 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  11. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  12. Canadian medical education: 50 years of innovation and leadership.

    PubMed Central

    Dauphinee, W D

    1993-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, many Canadian medical educators have pursued ideas and visions, as individuals in the 1950s and 1960s and later in partnership with various national bodies. Relations between universities and national medical organizations have been productive in dealing with issues of postgraduate education and clinical assessment, in particular. From 1970 to 1990, strong education offices and formally trained educators led to many successes in the areas of research in cognition, continuing medical education and clinical assessment. Canadian medical education has now achieved international recognition for its work in all aspects of the continuum of the physician's education through vision, initiative and cooperation. PMID:8477386

  13. Medicare Financing of Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Eugene C; Liebow, Mark; Srinivasan, Malathi; Parish, David; Wolliscroft, James O; Fein, Oliver; Blaser, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen ongoing debate regarding federal support of graduate medical education, with numerous proposals for reform. Several critical problems with the current mechanism are evident on reviewing graduate medical education (GME) funding issues from the perspectives of key stakeholders. These problems include the following: substantial interinstitutional and interspecialty variations in per-resident payment amounts; teaching costs that have not been recalibrated since 1983; no consistent control by physician educators over direct medical education (DME) funds; and institutional DME payments unrelated to actual expenditures for resident education or to program outcomes. None of the current GME reform proposals adequately address all of these issues. Accordingly, we recommend several fundamental changes in Medicare GME support. We propose a re-analysis of the true direct costs of resident training (with appropriate adjustment for local market factors) to rectify the myriad problems with per-resident payments. We propose that Medicare DME funds go to the physician organization providing resident instruction, keeping DME payments separate from the operating revenues of teaching hospitals. To ensure financial accountability, we propose that institutions must maintain budgets and report expenditures for each GME program. To establish educational accountability, Residency Review Committees should establish objective, annually measurable standards for GME program performance; programs that consistently fail to meet these minimum standards should lose discretion over GME funds. These reforms will solve several long-standing, vexing problems in Medicare GME funding, but will also uncover the extent of undersupport of GME by most other health care payers. Ultimately, successful reform of GME financing will require “all-payer” support. PMID:11972725

  14. Teaching Science through Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David; Whitehurst, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Physical education can serve as a vehicle for teaching science and make student understanding of certain personal health-related science concepts meaningful. Describes activities involving the musculoskeletal system, the nervous system, and the cardiovascular system. (DKM)

  15. The Medical and Nursing Education Partnership Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Goosby, Eric P; von Zinkernagel, Deborah

    2014-08-01

    The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) and Nursing Education Partnership Initiative (NEPI) are innovative approaches to strengthening the academic and clinical training of physicians and nurses in Sub-Saharan African countries, which are heavily burdened by HIV/AIDS. Begun in 2010 by the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief with the National Institutes of Health, investments in curricula, innovative learning technologies, clinical mentoring, and research opportunities are providing a strong base to advance high-quality education for growing numbers of urgently needed new physicians and nurses in these countries. The MEPI and NEPI focus on strengthening learning institutions is central to the vision for expanding the pool of health professionals to meet the full range of a country's health needs. A robust network of exchange between education institutions and training facilities, both within and across countries, is transforming the quality of medical education and augmenting a platform for research opportunities for faculty and clinicians, which also serves as an incentive to retain professionals in the country. Excellence in patient care and a spirit of professionalism, core to MEPI and NEPI, provide a strong foundation for the planning and delivery of health services in participating countries. PMID:25072578

  16. Defending diversity: affirmative action and medical education.

    PubMed Central

    DeVille, K

    1999-01-01

    Affirmative action programs of all types are under attack legally and politically. Although medical schools have not been specifically targeted, their affirmative action programs, like others in higher education, are potentially in danger. This article examines the current legal status of affirmative action in medical education and concludes that a refurbished defense of such programs is essential if they are to survive impending judicial and political scrutiny. An analysis of existing case law and available evidence suggests that a carefully reinvigorated diversity argument is the tactic most likely to pass constitutional muster, as well as the justification most likely to blunt growing public and political opposition to admissions policies that take race and ethnicity into consideration. PMID:10432920

  17. Ohio Physics Education Standards- 2011

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This document from the Great Lakes Fuel Cell Education Partnership contains a brief outline of the state of Ohio's physics education standards for 2011. The document includes information about specific subjects and how they may be taught in conjunction with units on renewable energies such as solar energy, wind energy, fuel cells and biofuels. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  18. Physical Review Special Topics: Physics Education Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-10-16

    How do people learn about physics? It's an important topic, especially as many countries seek to train a new generation of physicists. The Physical Review Special Topics: Physics Education Research (PRST-PER) journal is committed to providing high quality research on the teaching and learning of physics. Visitors can scan through the journal's newer articles via Recent Papers, where they will find works like "Development and implications of technology in reform-based physics laboratories" and "What do students do when asked to diagnose their mistakes? Does it help them?" There are several hundred articles which visitors can scan through at their leisure or search by keyword. Finally, users can take a tour through the News, Announcements, and Editorials section of the site to learn about new site features and updates from the American Physics Society.

  19. Practitioners education on medical exposure justification.

    PubMed

    Avadanei, C; Rosca-Fartat, G; Stanescu, G

    2011-09-01

    The knowledge of practitioners on justification of the individual medical exposure was assessed during education and training programmes. A survey containing questions on this issue was used. The results show that the Good Practice Guide should be disseminated and studied by radiation protection training programmes and such kind of training must be extended to prescribers because they have to be involved in the justification process. PMID:21824873

  20. Metaphysics and medical education: taking holism seriously.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bruce

    2013-06-01

    Medical education is now suffused with concepts that have their source outside the traditional scientific and medical disciplines: concepts such as holism, connectedness and reflective practice. Teaching of these, and other problematic concepts such as medical uncertainty and error, has been defined more by the challenge they pose to the standard model rather than being informed by a strong positive understanding. This challenge typically involves a critical engagement with the idea of objectivity, which is rarely acknowledged as an inherently metaphysical critique. Consequently, these ideas prove to be difficult to teach well. I suggest that the lack of an integrating, positive narrative is the reason for teaching difficulty, and propose that what is needed is an explicit commitment to teach the metaphysics of medicine, with the concept of holism being the fulcrum on which the remaining concepts turn. An acknowledged metaphysical narrative will encompass the scientific realism that medical students typically bring to their tertiary education, and at the same time enable a bigger picture to be drawn that puts the newer and more problematic concepts into context. PMID:23692231

  1. Peer-Reviewed Reports of Innovative Approaches in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M. Brownell, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Presents 73 summaries of innovative approaches in medical education covering such topics as professionalism, culture and diversity, preclinical education, clinical education, evidence-based medicine, education in the community, longitudinal ambulatory care experiences, applications of computer technology, residents as teachers, graduate medical

  2. Directory of Credit-Granting Policies in Medical Laboratory Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee for Careers in Medical Technology, Bethesda, MD.

    Ways now exist for medical laboratory workers to advance up the educational career ladder, gaining credit for prior training and/or experience. A total of 369 Certified Medical Laboratory Assistant Schools, colleges with Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technicians programs, schools of Medical Technology, and colleges with baccalaureate Medical

  3. Physical Activity and Health: Does Physical Education Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.; O'Neill, Jennifer R.; McIver, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Physical education has been an institution in American schools since the late 19th century, and today almost all American children are exposed to physical education classes. It has often been claimed that physical education provides important benefits to public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine if physical education increases…

  4. Physical Education Curriculum Priorities: Evidence for Education and Skillfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Catherine D.

    2011-01-01

    One question facing kinesiologists today is how to implement findings from research into society, in this case, physical education. In this paper I examine the role of a balanced approach to educational physical education in promoting physical activity. I argue that limiting physical education to simple tasks that encourage students to workout at…

  5. Physical Education Curriculum Priorities: Evidence for Education and Skillfulness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine D. Ennis

    2011-01-01

    One question facing kinesiologists today is how to implement findings from research into society, in this case, physical education. In this paper I examine the role of a balanced approach to educational physical education in promoting physical activity. I argue that limiting physical education to simple tasks that encourage students to workout at target heart rate to expend calories is

  6. Friendship in Inclusive Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Helena; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.

    2009-01-01

    Social interaction and development of friendships between children with and without a disability are often proposed as potential outcomes of inclusive education. Physical activity specialists assert that exercise and sport environments may be conducive to social and friendship outcomes. This study investigated friendship in inclusive physical

  7. Changing Secondary School Physical Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence F. Locke

    1992-01-01

    Evidence suggests that many secondary school physical education programs fail to achieve their objectives. A disturbing number of students report associating required attendance with strong negative feelings about the class, physical activity, and themselves. Teachers report that workplace conditions do not allow any serious effort to provide instruction. The nature of these problems is such that neither improving instruction nor

  8. MEDICAL EDUCATION Medical Students Speak: A Two-Voice Comment on

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MEDICAL EDUCATION Medical Students Speak: A Two-Voice Comment on Learning Professionalism We are two medical students. For one of us, medical school is just beginning; for the other, it is important to understand how medical students today view professionalism and how such a construct

  9. Physical Education Teacher Educator's Attitudes toward and Understanding of Online Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daum, David Newman

    2012-01-01

    K-12 online physical education (OLPE) is as an educational opportunity in at least 22 states in the US (NASPE, 2006; 2010). Clearly, teachers play important roles in these online educational experiences, so gaining a better understanding of these teachers is critical. The purpose of this study was to examine physical education teacher…

  10. The 2014 Gordon Research Conference: Physics Research & Education: The Complex Intersection of Biology and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Mel; Lang, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The field of biological physics and the physics education of biology and medically oriented students have experienced tremendous growth in recent years. New findings, applications, and technologies in biological and medical physics are having far reaching consequences that affect and influence the science community, the education of future scientists and health-care workers, and the general population. As a result leaders in Physics Education Research have begun to focus their attention on the specific needs of students in the biological sciences, the different ways physicists and biologists view the nature of science and the interactions of scientists in these disciplines. In this poster we highlight some of these findings and pose questions for discussion. The Complex Intersection of Biology and Physics will be the topic of the next Gordon Research Conference on Physics Research and Education to be held in June 2014. The exact date and location are still to be determined.

  11. Credit Courses HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Fork, Richard

    Credit Courses HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Non-ProfitOrg. U.S.Postage PAID Huntsville,AL 35899,suchasleading,following,etiquette,and partnerdancing. HEaltH & PHYsical EDUcation 256.824.6007 · www.uah.edu/HPE Health&PhysicalEducation Spragins.824.6007. Health & Physical Education HEaltH anD PHYsical EDUcation crEDit coUrsEs #12;

  12. Resources for Medical Education: Finding the Right Prescription

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Holly J.

    2010-01-01

    What are the resources necessary to provide the highest quality education for medical students? This is the essential question which must be answered before a medical school can make a rational decision about the number of students to have in each class. In deciphering an objective way to determine the class size of a medical school, this paper explores the principles of medical education, accrediting organizations institutional expectations in providing a medical education program, and the author's personal experiences. The central tenets of a quality medical education include: learning by doing, student-centered learning, and the transmission of the attitudes, values and behaviors of the medical profession. This paper considers how these core components of medical education can be achieved and what resources are necessary to ensure that all students are appropriately supported. PMID:20697551

  13. Role of State Medical Boards in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David A.; Austin, Dale L.; Thompson, James N.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of physician competency prior to issuing an initial medical license has been a fundamental responsibility of medical boards. Growing public expectation holds that medical boards will ensure competency throughout a physician's career. The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) strongly supports the right of state medical boards to…

  14. Continuing medical education: the paradigm is changing.

    PubMed

    Manning, P R; DeBakey, L

    2001-01-01

    With the realization that lifelong learning is more than attending conferences, the potential for greatly expanding effective continuing medical education (CME) has never been more encouraging. Databases from groups and individual managed care practices and advances in information technology are providing major opportunities toward this goal by identifying specific information deficits and promoting practice-linked education. The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) standards, requiring audited Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) reports, are a step forward in the development of CME linked closely to practice. The optimal educational use of practice data to improve clinical outcomes will require research to determine the best methods. HEDIS standards will probably continue to deal with common problems of omission rather than with those caused by physicians' lack of knowledge, which will require other approaches. Development of these methods will provide rich opportunities for demonstration studies. The spectacular advances in information technology, especially the almost limitless capabilities of the Internet and electronic mail, offer boundless possibilities of information sources and enhanced communication among physicians about puzzling patients. The further implementation of the electronic medical record with computerized reminders and other clinical information delivered at the point of need will trigger major advances. An appealing user-friendly, practice-linked, and self-directed CME is on the horizon, promising to help the practicing physician optimize patient care. PMID:11291585

  15. Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

  16. "Physical Education Makes You Fit and Healthy". Physical Education's Contribution to Young People's Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairclough, S.; Stratton, G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess physical activity levels during high school physical education lessons. The data were considered in relation to recommended levels of physical activity to ascertain whether or not physical education can be effective in helping young people meet health-related goals. Sixty-two boys and 60 girls (aged 11-14…

  17. 'Soft and fluffy': medical students' attitudes towards psychology in medical education.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Stephen; Wallace, Sarah; Nathan, Yoga; McGrath, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Psychology is viewed by medical students in a negative light. In order to understand this phenomenon, we interviewed 19 medical students about their experiences of psychology in medical education. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were generated: attitudes, teaching culture, curriculum factors and future career path; negative attitudes were transmitted by teachers to students and psychology was associated with students opting for a career in general practice. In summary, appreciation of psychology in medical education will only happen if all educators involved in medical education value and respect each other's speciality and expertise. PMID:23988684

  18. Physical Education in Higher Education: Chaos Out of Order

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl M. Newell

    1990-01-01

    The last 25 years have witnessed significant changes in the field of physical education in higher education that include the “disciplinarization” of the field of study and the generation of a broader front of professional options for physical activity than the single focus of teacher training. The field of physical education in higher education has not displayed uniformity in reacting

  19. Preparing Physical Educators for the Role of Physical Activity Director

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Erwin, Heather; Castelli, Darla; Ernst, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Schools are expected to lead in physical activity promotion for youths. Specifically, physical educators are being asked to take on the role of the school physical activity director (PAD) and implement a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP). Quality physical education, classroom-based physical activity, recess and other activity…

  20. On Whose Shoulders We Stand: Lessons from Exemplar Medical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Anderson, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The hiring of educators in medical schools (faculty who study the educational process and prepare others to become educators) has been one of the most successful educational innovations ever. Starting in 1954, through a collaboration between the Schools of Medicine and Education at the University of Buffalo, the innovation has spread to over half…

  1. Assessment of the Undergraduate Medical Education Environment in a Large UK Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Fidelma; McAleer, Sean; Roff, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the undergraduate educational environment in a large UK medical school. Method: Prospective study using the already validated Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) questionnaire ("Appendix 1"). Setting: A large UK medical school. Participants: All medical students enrolled in the academic year 2002/2003. Main outcome…

  2. Administration's Overview: K-12 Physical Education. ABCD's of Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton.

    In September 2000, the Physical Education Kindergarten to Grade 12 Program of Studies was approved for implementation in Alberta, Canada. This program helps enable individuals to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to lead an active, healthy lifestyle. The four general outcomes are the ABCDs (Activity, Benefits Health,…

  3. Medical ethics, bioethics and research ethics education perspectives in South East Europe in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Mijaljica, Goran

    2014-03-01

    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Macedonia and Montenegro were acquired and a total of 14 were analyzed. Teaching hours for medical ethics and/or bioethics and year of study in which the course is taught were also analyzed. The average number of teaching hours in medical ethics and bioethics is 27.1 h per year. The highest national average number of teaching hours was in Croatia (47.5 h per year), and the lowest was in Serbia (14.8). In the countries of the European Union the mean number of hours given to ethics teaching throughout the complete curriculum was 44. In South East Europe, the maximum number of teaching hours is 60, while the minimum number is 10 teaching hours. Research ethics topics also show a considerable variance within the regional medical schools. Approaches to teaching research ethics vary, even within the same country. The proposed model for education in this area is based on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Bioethics Core Curriculum. The model curriculum consists of topics in medical ethics, bioethics and research ethics, as a single course, over 30 teaching hours. PMID:23436144

  4. An online interactive simulation system for medical imaging education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aditya Dikshit; Dawei Wu; Chunyan Wu; Weizhao Zhao

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a recently developed web-based medical imaging simulation system for teaching students or other trainees who plan to work in the medical imaging field. The increased importance of computer and information technology widely applied to different imaging techniques in clinics and medical research necessitates a comprehensive medical imaging education program. A complete tutorial of simulations introducing popular imaging

  5. Successful strategies for integrating bedside ultrasound into undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Palma, James K

    2015-04-01

    Nearly all physician specialties currently utilize bedside ultrasound, and its applications continue to expand. Bedside ultrasound is becoming a core skill for physicians; as such, it should be taught during undergraduate medical education. When ultrasound is integrated in a longitudinal manner beginning in the preclerkship phase of medical school, it not only enhances teaching the basic science topics of anatomy, physiology, and pathology but also ties those skills and knowledge to the clerkship phase and medical decision-making. Bedside ultrasound is a natural bridge from basic science to clinical science. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine is currently in its fourth year of implementing an integrated ultrasound curriculum in the school of medicine. In our experience, successful integration of a bedside ultrasound curriculum should: align with unique focuses of a medical schools' mission, simplify complex anatomy through multimodal teaching, correlate to teaching of the physical examination, solidify understanding of physiology and pathology, directly link to other concurrent content, narrow differential diagnoses, enhance medical decision-making, improve procedural skills, match to year-group skillsets, develop teaching and leadership abilities, and have elective experiences for advanced topics. PMID:25850144

  6. Medical Students' Impressions and Satisfactions from Medical Professional Skill Education Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ongel, Kurtulus; Mergen, Haluk; Kayacan, Hacer; Yildizhan, Alpaslan

    2008-01-01

    (Background) To help us understand the medical students' reflections about professional skill educations we conducted a study on medical students' conceptions of selected medical phenomena, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR. (Methods) The study was conducted in January 2008, using a sample consisting of medical students from one of the…

  7. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  8. Wrestling: Physical Education Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amdur, Lillian B., Ed.; Flom, Bernard S., Ed.

    This curriculum bulletin is designed as a guide for supervisors and physical education teachers concerned with organizing and administering instructional wrestling programs for boys in grades 7-12. Objectives, basic rules, and a scope and sequence chart are presented in the first chapter. The scope and sequence chart is included so that…

  9. Academic Language in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinou, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on defining academic language in physical education and provides a step-by-step approach designed to help preservice and inservice teachers understand and incorporated academic language into their lesson planning. It provides examples of discipline-specific vocabulary, language functions, syntax, and discourse, aiming to…

  10. Questionable Supervision by Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Gimbert, Tonya L.

    2013-01-01

    According to Court records, student Pedro Godoy (Godoy) filed a suit against the school district (Central Islip Union Free School District) and teacher Otis R. Scerbo (Scerbo), seeking to recover damages for personal injuries allegedly sustained by Godoy while participating in a game of floor hockey during physical education class. Scerbo (the…

  11. Relaxation in Physical Education Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coville, Claudia A.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical framework for incorporating relaxation instruction in the physical education curriculum is presented based on the assumption that relaxation is a muscular-skeletal skill benefitting general motor skill acquisition. Theoretical principles, a definition of relaxation, and an analysis of stages of skill development are also used in the…

  12. Physical Education. Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    This collection contains fifty physical education objectives, related sample items, and directions for administering and scoring, and is divided into four categories. The first measures movement skills: body awareness, perception, locomotion, axial skills, balance, and gross motor coordination in games and sports. The second category measures…

  13. Physical Education Teachers' Cultural Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Carson, Russell L.; Burden, Joe, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the common assumption that teachers of color (TOC) are more culturally competent than White teachers by assessing physical education teachers' cultural competency. A secondary purpose was to ascertain the possible differences in cultural competence levels of White teachers in diverse school settings versus…

  14. Authentic Assessment in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    1997-01-01

    Electronic portfolios allow teachers to authentically assess student performance. Examines the creation and use of electronic portfolios and describes three electronic portfolios based on HyperCard that can be used in physical education classes to monitor student health fitness, sport skills, and other performance standards, and allow students to…

  15. The Significance of Physical Education Content: "Sending the Message" in Physical Education Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler G.

    2012-01-01

    Mind-body dualism has likely influenced how many view human beings and their behavior--mind (i.e., thinking) is elevated over body (i.e., performing)--even in Physical Education Teacher Education. The problem is that such a perspective makes physical education content (i.e., dance, games, play, and sport) subsidiary to more "intellectual" or…

  16. Let's Make Physical Education More Physical and More Educational

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Charles Arthur; Bellar, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, physical education has a stereotypical image as being neither very physical nor educational. NASPE [National Standards for Physical Education] Standard 2 indicates that students in physical education classes should be able to demonstrate understanding and movement concepts, principles, and tactics as they apply to physical activity.…

  17. What is Physical Education? Physical Education aims to provide children and

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    for Sport, Physical Education and Health Sciences is located in a purpose-built building within the HolyroodWhat is Physical Education? Physical Education aims to provide children and young people a physically active life; · physically, morally, intellectually and socially within an educational context

  18. 78 FR 18990 - Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...promoting education in the medical disciplines, honoring traditional healing principles and restoring the balance of mind, body and spirit. Offer educational programs, services and activities that motivate AI/AN students to remain in the...

  19. Physical Activity Levels during Adventure-Physical Education Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehris, Jeffrey; Myers, Elizabeth; Whitaker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Adventure-physical education has been proposed to promote adolescents' physical development, but little is known about physical activity levels during such lessons. Using the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time, we observed students' (ages 11-14 years) physical activity levels in co-educational classes during 43 adventure-physical

  20. [Integration of the Internet into medical education].

    PubMed

    Taradi, Suncana Kukolja

    2002-01-01

    The Internet promises dramatic changes in the way we learn and teach, the way we interact as a society. Networked technologies introduce interactivity and multimedia into the educational process. The student of the 21st century will use his/her PC as a learning station, as a tutoring system, as an information provider and as a communication center. Therefore the passive classroom (teacher-centered teaching) will evolve into active studio learning (student-centered learning). This will be achieved by new teaching techniques and standards of quality. The role of the new generation of educators is to create exploratory learning environments that offer a wide range of views on many subject areas and encourage active lifelong learning. This will be achieved by 1) placing courseware on the web where it can be accessed by remote students and by 2) finding and reviewing teaching materials obtained from www for possible integration into the local lecture material. The paper suggests strategies for introducing medical educators to networked teaching. PMID:12038098

  1. Medically unexplained physical symptoms in emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, D T; Price, J R

    2006-01-01

    Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are physical symptoms for which no relevant organic pathology can be found. Patients with MUPS commonly present to the emergency department (ED) but are rarely considered in emergency medicine teaching or literature. Management of these patients is frequently more challenging than where there is an obvious organic pathology. This review provides the emergency physician with background knowledge regarding the classification and aetiology of MUPS. It then provides strategies for more effective management, such as exploring the contribution of psychosocial factors with patients, explaining negative test results, and providing reassurance and avoiding creating iatrogenic anxiety. Early recognition of the fact that symptoms may not result from organic disease and an appreciation of the role of psychosocial factors may improve outcomes by reducing unnecessary investigation and admission, and avoiding reinforcement that encourages further similar presentations and unhelpful coping mechanisms. PMID:16858088

  2. 'Physical education makes you fit and healthy'. Physical education's contribution to young people's physical activity levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Fairclough; G. Stratton

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess physical activity levels during high school physical education lessons. The data were considered in relation to recommended levels of physical activity to ascertain whether or not physical education can be effective in helping young people meet health-related goals. Sixty-two boys and 60 girls (aged 11-14 years) wore heart rate telemeters during physical

  3. Physics Education Technology: Interactive Physics Simulations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of interactive, research-based simulations introduces students to basic physical phenomena. The simulations cover a variety of topics: motion, sound, and waves; light and radiation; electricity, magnets, and circuits; chemistry; and many others. The simulations can be run from the web site or downloaded for later use, and are accompanied by a collection of lessons and activities that use them. There is also information on how to download and run the simulations and links to publications about the project and studies of the effectiveness of the simulations in teaching. Educators are also invited to contribute ideas for lesson or activities that use the simulations.

  4. Evaluating the impact of the humanities in medical education.

    PubMed

    Wershof Schwartz, Andrea; Abramson, Jeremy S; Wojnowich, Israel; Accordino, Robert; Ronan, Edward J; Rifkin, Mary R

    2009-08-01

    The inclusion of the humanities in medical education may offer significant potential benefits to individual future physicians and to the medical community as a whole. Debate remains, however, about the definition and precise role of the humanities in medical education, whether at the premedical, medical school, or postgraduate level. Recent trends have revealed an increasing presence of the humanities in medical training. This article reviews the literature on the impact of humanities education on the performance of medical students and residents and the challenges posed by the evaluation of the impact of humanities in medical education. Students who major in the humanities as college students perform just as well, if not better, than their peers with science backgrounds during medical school and in residency on objective measures of achievement such as National Board of Medical Examiners scores and academic grades. Although many humanities electives and courses are offered in premedical and medical school curricula, measuring and quantifying their impact has proven challenging because the courses are diverse in content and goals. Many of the published studies involve self-selected groups of students and seek to measure subjective outcomes which are difficult to measure, such as increases in empathy, professionalism, and self-care. Further research is needed to define the optimal role for humanities education in medical training; in particular, more quantitative studies are needed to examine the impact that it may have on physician performance beyond medical school and residency. Medical educators must consider what potential benefits humanities education can contribute to medical education, how its impact can be measured, and what ultimate outcomes we hope to achieve. PMID:19642151

  5. Evaluating educational preparation for a health education role in practice: the case of medication education.

    PubMed

    Latter, S; Rycroft-Malone, J; Yerrell, P; Shaw, D

    2000-11-01

    Current health care policy and practice contexts in the UK point to the importance of nurses' ability to make an effective contribution to educating patients about medication, as part of their role in health education and health promotion. Nurses' potential contribution to this important activity will inevitably be dependent on knowledge and skills acquired during preregistration and postregistration programmes of education. Against this backdrop, changes in pre and postregistration nurse education in the UK in the past decade highlight the importance and timeliness of evaluating the adequacy of educational preparation for a medication role. This paper reports on the findings from an evaluation of UK educational preparation for a medication education role in practice. A case study design was used to investigate current educational preparation at three education institutions. Multiple methods of data collection at each site involved focus group discussions with lecturers and practitioners, individual interviews with key personnel, nonparticipant observation of teaching sessions, postobservation interviews with students and curriculum analysis. Findings highlighted the importance of a number of dimensions of preparation for practice of such a role: the need for sufficient taught pharmacology; opportunities for application and integration of prerequisite knowledge and skills; the importance of practice-based learning; the need for an evidence-based curriculum, and the importance of clarifying outcomes and competencies required for a medication education role within pre and postregistration curricula. The paper concludes with a discussion and implications of the findings. PMID:11115014

  6. Strategies for recruiting medical students to physical medicine and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T P; Fenderson, D A; Kottke, F J

    1983-02-01

    Estimations that the incidence of need for health care among the chronically ill exceeds the need for acute episodic health care in the rest of the population indicate a misdirection of the focus of medical education. Estimates indicate not enough psychiatrists will be trained under the present program to meet the existing demands. Unless there can be some material increase in the number of psychiatrists trained, it appears that there will be extensive disability persisting because of lack of rehabilitation. Failure to expose medical students to rehabilitation, the lack of role models to demonstrate how a psychiatrist practices, and the less dramatic progress which occurs in rehabilitation all decrease the attractiveness of rehabilitation medicine for the medical student. The objective of this study was to develop suggestions for strategies to attract and recruit medical students into physical medicine and rehabilitation. The Regional Advisory Council of the Research and Training Center #2 at the University of Minnesota was asked to brainstorm as a group such suggestions. As a result 37 suggestions were generated which were grouped under 5 headings: A. Whom to recruit; B. Methods; C. Time and Place; D. Impediments; E. Advantages of a career in PM & R. Suggestions in each of the categories were then prioritized. PMID:6824424

  7. Pediatric hospitalists in medical education: current roles and future directions.

    PubMed

    Heydarian, Cyrus; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2012-05-01

    As the field of pediatric hospital medicine has evolved, pediatric hospitalists have become increasingly involved in medical student and resident education--providing direct education during clinical rotations, developing novel curricula to meet the demands of the new educational environment, occupying leadership roles in medical education, and more. The literature suggests that hospitalists possess the essential skills for teaching effectively, yet most hospitalists feel that additional training beyond residency is necessary to refine their knowledge and skills in education and in other essential domains. Several pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and continuing medical education activities have been developed in the last decade to meet this growing need. The recent publication of the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies will help define the roles and expectations of practicing pediatric hospitalists, and will serve as a framework for future curriculum development in both graduate and continuing medical education. PMID:22483082

  8. The Education Chief Resident in Medical Student Education: Indicators of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Brenda; Khavari, Andrew; Hart, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although residents are actively involved in teaching medical students, some students do not feel that they get adequate teaching from residents. The position of Education Chief Resident in Medical Student Education was developed to enhance the educational experience for the students, cultivate the academic skills of the education chief,…

  9. Physical Education Curriculum Reform in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yli-Piipari, Sami

    2014-01-01

    The Finnish education system has received worldwide attention due to the top academic performance of Finnish school students. Physical education, as an integral part of the Finnish education curriculum, potentially contributes to the overall success. The purpose of this article is to summarize Finnish physical education reform during the past…

  10. Education and research in medical optronics in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demongeot, Jacques; Fleute, M.; Herve, T.; Lavallee, Stephane

    2000-06-01

    First we present here the main post-graduate courses proposed in France both for physicians and engineers in medical optronics. After we explain which medical domains are concerned by this teaching, essentially computer assisted surgery, telemedicine and functional exploration. Then we show the main research axes in these fields, in which new jobs have to be invented and new educational approaches have to be prepared in order to satisfy the demand coming both from hospitals (mainly referent hospitals) and from industry (essentially medical imaging and instrumentation companies). Finally we will conclude that medical optronics is an important step in an entire chain of acquisition and processing of medical data, capable to create the medical knowledge a surgeon or a physician needs for diagnosis or therapy purposes. Optimizing the teaching of medical optronics needs a complete integration from acquiring to modeling the medical reality. This tendency to give a holistic education in medical imaging and instrumentation is called `Model driven Acquisition' learning.

  11. Medical Typewriting; Business Education: 7705.32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schull, Amy P.

    This guide describes a course designed to prepare students for employment as medical records clerks capable of handling all types of medical forms and reports, and using and spelling medical terminology correctly. The need for medical typists is critical. The guide contains enrollment guidelines, performance objectives (i.e., type medical

  12. THE ACADEMIC MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    E-print Network

    Engel, Robert

    1 THE ACADEMIC MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION THE DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY NUTRITION AND EXERCISE SCIENCES in Physical Education The Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences offers programs in Family and Consumer Sciences, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, and Physical Education with several specializations

  13. Physical Education, Politics, and SPEAK Out! Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David; Kopp, Rachael; Skidmore, Lauren; Williams, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of politics in the lives of physical educators. Politics affects many decisions that are made about physical education programs (PEPs). In public schools, politics can affect the number of certified physical education teachers, available facilities, class sizes, and number of days per week that students go to…

  14. Physical Educators' Technology Competencies and Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Marianne L.; Goc Karp, Grace; Miao, Hui; Perlman, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine K-12 physical education teachers' perceptions of ability and usage of technology. Physical educators (n = 114) completed the Physical Education Technology Usage Survey assessing their perceived technology competency, how and why they utilize technology, challenges they face in implementing technology, and…

  15. Bully Prevention in the Physical Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Brett; Gulbrandson, Kim; Herman-Ukasick, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Bullying takes on many forms and occurs in all classrooms, and the activities found in physical education often provide fertile ground for these behaviors. For example, dodgeball is often played in physical education settings, even though the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance has clearly stated that dodgeball…

  16. Preparation of Adapted Physical Educators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbin, Jeffrey A.

    This report describes achievements and activities of a federally supported project to prepare physical educators in Oregon to provide adapted physical education programs to students with disabilities. During the project, 28 students were prepared to be adapted physical education specialists at the masters degree level at Oregon State University.…

  17. Medical Education and the Physician Workforce of Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Mosawi, Aamir Jalal

    2008-01-01

    The lack of resources in a country experiencing decades of successive wars, blockade, administrative corruption, and poor governance led to deteriorated standards throughout medical education. Although professional certification programs exist, continuing medical education accreditation and credit systems are required to monitor and certify the…

  18. Patient Referrals: A Behavioral Outcome of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, J. Maurice; And Others

    1978-01-01

    One method for evaluating an aspect of physician practice behavior, patient referrals, resulting from continuing medical education programs on cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch is described. Data presented provide strong support for the effectiveness of continuing education in modifying physician practice behavior. (LBH)

  19. Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-01-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

  20. Foreword: Changing Perspectives on Sex and Gender in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eileen; Magrane, Diane; Donoghue, Glenda D.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces this theme issue dealing with women's health and medical education and discusses the distinction between sex, as biologically based differences, and gender, qualities that are culturally shaped. The current plurality of efforts in women's health provide a new organizational framework for medicine and changes in medical education. (SLD)

  1. Promoting Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Trainees Addressing Siloed Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, Robert Li; Christodoulou, Joanna; Goldman, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Professional siloing within medical institutions has been identified as a problem in medical education, including resident training. The authors discuss how trainees from different disciplines can collaborate to address this problem. Method: A group of trainees from psychiatry, developmental medicine, neurology, and education came…

  2. Social science education as a component of medical training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. MacLeod; H. N. McCullough

    1994-01-01

    The broad view of health espoused by the World Health Organization is now generally accepted by medical educators. Implicit in the new paradigm is a recognition of multiple determinants of health and of shifting divisions of professional responsibilities among providers. As a consequence, the importance of social and behavioural science education as a foundation to medical training is increasingly appreciated.

  3. Where does medical education stand in nurturing the 3Rs in medical students: responsibility, resilience and resolve?

    PubMed

    Eley, Diann S; Stallman, Helen

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decade, the medical education literature has recognized the need to develop a culture that nurtures wellbeing and resilience in students. However, the introduction of or increase in student fees precipitated a shift in higher education policies toward a consumer model of education. Importantly, it has altered the expectations of students and promoted a sense of "entitlement", rather than "striving" for something where success is not guaranteed. This model is consistent with materialism and status, and removed from intrinsic goals that are associated with mental and physical wellbeing. This article challenges medical educators to reconsider the current context of student learning and realign it with the graduate attributes needed to be a competent and responsible medical practitioner by enabling students to develop the 3Rs of resilience, responsibility and resolve. We propose that brave decisions and actions must be made by medical educators to provide students with opportunities to learn independence, self-management, and self-regulation and guarantee their role in helping medical students become resilient and responsible doctors of tomorrow. PMID:25072531

  4. Cognitive simulators for medical education and training.

    PubMed

    Kahol, Kanav; Vankipuram, Mithra; Smith, Marshall L

    2009-08-01

    Simulators for honing procedural skills (such as surgical skills and central venous catheter placement) have proven to be valuable tools for medical educators and students. While such simulations represent an effective paradigm in surgical education, there is an opportunity to add a layer of cognitive exercises to these basic simulations that can facilitate robust skill learning in residents. This paper describes a controlled methodology, inspired by neuropsychological assessment tasks and embodied cognition, to develop cognitive simulators for laparoscopic surgery. These simulators provide psychomotor skill training and offer the additional challenge of accomplishing cognitive tasks in realistic environments. A generic framework for design, development and evaluation of such simulators is described. The presented framework is generalizable and can be applied to different task domains. It is independent of the types of sensors, simulation environment and feedback mechanisms that the simulators use. A proof of concept of the framework is provided through developing a simulator that includes cognitive variations to a basic psychomotor task. The results of two pilot studies are presented that show the validity of the methodology in providing an effective evaluation and learning environments for surgeons. PMID:19269350

  5. Physical education activity program survey

    E-print Network

    Lumpkin, Angela; Avery, Marybell

    1986-01-01

    as most popular: (1) racquetball; (2) tennis and aerobic dance (tie); (4) jogging; (5) weight training; (6) snow skiing; (7) swimming; (8) skin and scuba diving and voUeyball (tie); (10) golf, martial arts, and bowling (tie); (13) social dance; and (14..., canoe- ing, backpacking, cycling, recreational sports, archery, yoga, track and field, and judo. In addition to the 1-year requirement of physical education, students indicated an interest in electing courses, with more than 25% of them desiring...

  6. Evaluating Decentralized Basic Science Medical Education:A Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Cullen; Charles W. Dohner; Roy Schwarz

    1981-01-01

    The Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho Program in Decentralized Medical Education began in 1971. Since that time, more than 400 students have participated in the University Phase of the program. This article presents a modelfor evaluating the basic science portion of the program in which the first year of medical school is taught at sites remote from the medical center

  7. Widening Participation in Medical Education: Challenging Elitism and Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boursicot, Kathy; Roberts, Trudie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we examine issues relating to the enduring nature of elitism and exclusion in medical education by exploring the changes in social and policy influences on the admission and inclusion of women and disabled people to undergraduate medical courses and the medical profession. The widening participation imperative in the United Kingdom…

  8. Service Learning in Medical Education: Project Description and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Although medical education has long recognized the importance of community service, most medical schools have not formally nor fully incorporated service learning into their curricula. To address this problem, we describe the initial design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a service-learning project within a first-year medical

  9. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avadanei, Camelia

    2010-01-01

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ("Radiation protection") defining norms and requirements for "assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment," and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of specialists in the field. Facing new challenges, society becomes aware of the fact that education represents the real solution to escalade them. Nuclear physics plays an important role in ensuring energetic resources for the near future and in reducing greenhouse effects. On the other hand, especially nuclear physics will permit to solve the enigma of universe birth. As in any other field, development involves continuous education and knowledge upgrading for all categories carrying out nuclear activities. For radiation protection workers and specialists, periodically refreshment courses are mandatory, in compliance with the national and international specific requirements.

  10. Learning to Embrace Nuclear Physics through Education

    SciTech Connect

    Avadanei, Camelia [Nuclear Training Centre (CPSDN), 'Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 407 Atomistilor Street, Magurele City, Ilfov County, P.O. Box MG 6, Post Code 077125 (Romania)

    2010-01-21

    Due to its achievements, nuclear physics is more and more present in life of every member of the society. Its applications in the medical field and in nuclear energy, as well as the advanced research, always pushing the limits of science towards micro cosmos and macro cosmos, are subjects frequently presented in the media. In addition to their invaluable benefits, these achievements involve also particular rules to prevent potential risks. These risks are also underlined by the media, often being presented in an unfriendly manner. Specialists in nuclear physics are familiar with these problems complying with the specific rules in order to reduce risks at insignificant levels. The development of a specific field ('Radiation protection') defining norms and requirements for 'assuring the radiological safety of the workers, population and environment', and its dynamics represent a proof of a responsible attitude regarding nuclear safety. Dedicated international bodies and experts analyze and rigorously evaluate risks in order to draw the right ways of managing activity in the field. The improvement of the formal and informal education of public regarding the real risks of nuclear applications is very important in order to understand and better assimilate some general rules concerning the use of these techniques, as well as for their correct perception, leading to an increase of interest towards nuclear physics. This educational update can be started even from elementary school and continued in each stage of formal education in adapted forms. The task of informing general public is to be carried out mainly by specialists who, unlike 30-40 years ago, can rely on a much more efficient generation of communications' mean. Taking into account the lack of interest for nuclear, an attractive way of presenting the achievements and future possibilities of nuclear physics would contribute to youth orientation towards specific universities in order to become next generation of specialists in the field. Facing new challenges, society becomes aware of the fact that education represents the real solution to escalade them. Nuclear physics plays an important role in ensuring energetic resources for the near future and in reducing greenhouse effects. On the other hand, especially nuclear physics will permit to solve the enigma of universe birth. As in any other field, development involves continuous education and knowledge upgrading for all categories carrying out nuclear activities. For radiation protection workers and specialists, periodically refreshment courses are mandatory, in compliance with the national and international specific requirements.

  11. Roadmap: School Health Education -Health and Physical Education -Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education 11570 Personal Health 3 C PEP 15010 Introduction to Physical Education, Fitness and Sport 3 C PEP Offered in spring only #12;Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor

  12. Research priorities in medical education in the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Amini, M; Kojuri, J; Lotfi, F; Karimian, Z; Abadi, A S H

    2012-07-01

    Ways are needed to effect quality improvement in medical education research in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). This study aimed to determine the principle themes and to draw up a list of priorities in medical education research in EMR. Using the nominal group technique with a group of 30 experts, a list of major themes in medical education research was prepared. In a 2-round Delphi survey the list was sent to another 47 experts in the Region with a questionnaire that included open questions about change and reform in medical education. In the final list of 20, the 5 highest priorities identified were: training physicians to be effective teachers; community-driven models for curriculum development; clinical teaching models; education about professionalism and ethics; and education for evidence-based medicine. Themes determined by this survey can help researchers in EMR to focus on priority areas in research. PMID:22891514

  13. Building on a Base: Applying Physics Education

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Building on a Base: Applying Physics Education Research to Physics Teaching S.J. Pollock CU BoulderTec #12;Overview · Physics Education Research (PER) Rapid growth, subfield of physics · A Physicist , Hake, ...) Curriculum (Washington, Maryland, Mazur, many...) Theoretical Frames (Redish, diSessa, many

  14. University of Craiova, Faculty of Physical education, Sports & Kinesiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rusu Ligia

    2011-01-01

    Lecture 26University of Craiova is one of the most important universities in Romania. It includes also Faculty of Physical Education, Sport and Kinesiology that prepare the future specialists in sport performance, trainers and sport rehabilitation. Most of the teachers of this faculty are sports medicine physicians and they have also medical activity in the Sport Medicine Department of Emergency Hospital

  15. The Effect of Medical Libraries on Medical Education: Evidence from Osun State, Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gboyega Adio; M. A. Akewukereke; Samual Olukayode Ibitoy Ibitoye

    2007-01-01

    The study assesses the affect of medical libraries on medical education. It explains vividly, the various constituents connected with value and effectiveness of information to medical practitioners, what to do and what doing them will mean in qualitative terms. In carrying out the research, a survey was conducted through the use of a self developed 24-item questionnaire which tried to

  16. Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heng-Shuen Chen; Fei-Ran Guo; Chien-Tsai Liu; Yue-Joe Lee; Jye-Horng Chen; Chia-Chin Lin; Sheng-Mou Hou; Bor-Shen Hsieh

    1998-01-01

    National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services

  17. The Changing Medical Care System: Some Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Spencer

    1986-01-01

    The medical care system is undergoing widespread and significant changes. Individual hospitals may be disappearing as mergers, acquisitions, and a variety of multi-institutional arrangements become the dominant form and as a host of free-standing medical enterprises spread out into the community. (MLW)

  18. Medical Education Literature We are in the process of automating a search of the medical literature to

    E-print Network

    Paulsson, Johan

    or techniques, with the potential to advance assessment in medical education or practice. Expected outcomesMedical Education Literature We are in the process of automating a search of the medical literature to highlight Academy members' new medical education publications. This search process is going to take a little

  19. PHYSICS TODAY--INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF "PHYSICS TODAY" REVIEWS THE STATUS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICS, AS WELL AS COLLEGE PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE. SECONDARY LEVEL PROJECTS INCLUDE PHYSICAL SCIENCE STUDY COMMITTEE PHYSICS, HARVARD PROJECT PHYSICS, THE ENGINEERING CONCEPTS CURRICULUM PROJECT, AND THE NUFFIELD PROJECT. THOSE AT THE COLLEGE LEVEL INCLUDE THE…

  20. Fostering interprofessional teamwork in an academic medical center: Near-peer education for students during gross medical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Shields, Richard K; Pizzimenti, Marc A; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Schwinn, Debra A

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe student satisfaction with a near-peer interprofessional education (IPE) session for physical therapy and medical students. Ten senior physical therapy students worked in peer-groups to develop a musculoskeletal anatomy demonstration for first-semester medical students. Together with their classmates, they demonstrated observation, palpation, and musculoskeletal assessment of the shoulder and scapular-thoracic articulation to medical student dissection groups in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. The medical students were encouraged to consider the synergistic function of shoulder structures and the potential impact of a selected pathology: rotator cuff injury. The session provided the medical students with an opportunity to integrate their new anatomical knowledge into a framework for clinical musculoskeletal evaluation. The experience offered senior physical therapy students an opportunity to work in teams with their peers, internalize and adapt to constructive feedback, and seek common ground with members of another profession. Both student groups reported a high degree of satisfaction with the sessions and expressed a desire for further interaction. These positive perceptions by student stakeholders have prompted us to consider additional IPE exchanges for the anatomy course in the upcoming school year. Given the positive outcome of this descriptive study, we now plan to systematically test whether near-peer IPE interactions can enhance the degree that students learn key anatomical concepts. Anat Sci Educ 8: 331-337. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:24888728

  1. Dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rakhshaan; Rehman, Rehana; Baig, Mukhtiar; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Mariam; Syed, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine adherence to dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from January to July 2011 among 820 students of private and public medical colleges in Karachi, Pakistan. Results: Overall, medical students scored low in dimensions of physical wellness. Private medical colleges students were fond of vigorous activities such as aerobics and swimming, whereas public medical colleges students were involved in moderate intensity activities such as walking and use of stairs (p<0.0001). Private students reported to consume more fast food (p=0.0001), had less sleep (p=0.0001), but attended regular annual medical checkups (p=0.009) as compared with their public institute counterparts. Safe practices such as avoidance of tobacco were almost the same. Conclusion: Comprehensive adherence to all dimensions of physical wellness was lacking among medical students. PMID:25987122

  2. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  3. What can we learn from narratives in medical education?

    PubMed

    Johna, Samir; Woodward, Brandon; Patel, Sunal

    2014-01-01

    Medical literature has demonstrated the effectiveness of narrative writing in enhancing self-reflection and empathy, which opens the door for deeper understanding of patients' experiences of illness. Similarly, it promotes practitioner well-being. Therefore, it is no surprise that narrative writing finds a new home in medical education. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), through its Outcome Project, established six core competencies that every residency program must teach. However, no specific pedagogies were suggested. We explored the role that narrative writing can play in reconciling the ACGME core competencies with daily encounters in medical education. Our study suggests a hidden wealth in reflective writing through narratives with a promising potential for application in medical education. Reflective writing may turn out to be an innovative tool for teaching and evaluating ACGME core competencies. PMID:24867554

  4. Sexual harassment in medical education: liability and protection.

    PubMed

    Recupero, Patricia Ryan; Heru, Alison M; Price, Marilyn; Alves, Jody

    2004-09-01

    The prevalence and frequency of sexual harassment in medical education is well documented. On the graduation questionnaire administered by the Association of American Medical Colleges in 2003, 15% of medical students reported experiences of mistreatment during medical school. On items that specifically address sexual mistreatment, over 2% of students reported experiencing gender-based exclusion from training opportunities, and unwanted sexual advances and offensive sexist comments from school personnel. Sexual harassment of medical trainees by faculty supervisors is obviously unethical and may also be illegal under education discrimination laws. In two cases in 1998 and 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court clarified that schools may be held liable under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 for the sexual harassment of their students. In 2001, the Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education released revised policy guidelines on sexual harassment that reflect the Supreme Court rulings. Medical school administrators should undertake formal assessments of the educational environment in their training programs as a first step toward addressing the problem of sexual harassment. The authors recommend that medical schools implement measures to both prevent and remedy sexual harassment in their training programs. These constructive approaches include applying faculty and student education, establishing a system for notification and response, and creating an institutional structure to provide continuous evaluation of the educational environment. PMID:15326003

  5. Guidelines Regarding Documentation of a Physical/Medical Disability

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Tim

    5/04 Guidelines Regarding Documentation of a Physical/Medical Disability The following guidelines accommodations. The documentation should include: · A clear statement of the medical diagnosis of the disability; · A description of treatments, medications, assistive devices/services currently prescribed or in use

  6. Education for Capability: An Example of Curriculum Change from Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, V. R.

    1984-01-01

    Case study of curriculum change in McMaster University's medical education program presents reasons, processes, and results of this change, with emphasis on education for capability. An approach to curriculum design for medical education is proposed, and questions are posed about defining needed competencies, fostering their development, and…

  7. Educating through the Physical--Rationale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eldar, Eitan; Ayvazo, Shiri

    2009-01-01

    Social competence is essential for successful performance in school and life. Siedentop (1980) suggested that physical education settings and related activities may serve as useful vehicles for improving pro-social skills and values. Physical education literature draws a clear distinction between educating about, in, and through movement (Arnold,…

  8. Physical Education and Sport: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Earle F., Ed.

    This book discusses the urgent need for a social relevance perspective for physical education and sport and is designed for students beginning professional preparation in physical education and sport, practitioners, or students wishing to round out their general education. An introductory statement, written by Laura J. Huelster, explores the…

  9. Power, Control and Status in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ian

    2003-01-01

    For most of the 20th century, Scottish teacher education in physical education, sport, and recreation were divided by gender and philosophy and provided by two specialist colleges. Analysis of the government's 1986 decision to merge the colleges focuses on the shift in power and control from the self-contained world of physical education to…

  10. New Models of Physics Instruction Based on Physics Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redish, Edward F.

    During the past 15 years, physics education research has revealed many surprising things about the difficulties introductory physics students have in learning physics. At the same time, the ongoing revolution in information technology has led to new tools for creating innovative educational environments. In response to these two developments, a…

  11. Positive Youth Development through Physical Activity: Opportunities for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As physical educators continue to advocate for school-based PE, they should also consider ways to extend their work into community settings in an effort to ensure that all kids have an opportunity to develop physical literacy. This article describes how positive youth development programs can provide an opportunity for physical educators to engage…

  12. Universities and medical schools: reflections on a half-century of Canadian medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Naimark, A

    1993-01-01

    After 50 years of accelerated development, universities and medical schools have entered a period of uncertainty and instability. The Flexnerian paradigm of medical education, rooted in biomedical science and conducted under the aegis of a university, reached its apotheosis by the late 1960s and the early 1970s. Fuelled by the introduction of comprehensive, government-sponsored health care insurance and advances in technology, the demand for health care professionals and for access to facilities increased sharply. Medical education, research and advanced clinical services expanded dramatically aided by the emergence of academic health sciences centres and accompanied by a wave of medical curriculum reform. Now medical schools must strike a dynamic balance in responding to the continued expansion of knowledge and technology, the demand for social equity and the exigencies of prolonged fiscal constraint. They must also balance the biological and sociological approaches to medicine in establishing the foundations for the future development of Canadian medical education. PMID:8477376

  13. A medical education as an investment: financial food for thought.

    PubMed

    Doroghazi, Robert M; Alpert, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    Every year that the training period can be shortened increases the value of a medical education. Tuition covers only a fraction of the cost of medical education, making the societal investment in older students less financially robust. Shortening training periods would immediately solve the shortage of residency training positions. With a few exceptions, a medical education is a good investment for women. We are skeptical of the proposals to address the skyrocketing student debt because they do not confront the primary problem. The best way to minimize debt is thrift, and the best way to make a career in medicine more desirable is to shorten the training time. PMID:24216147

  14. Role of anaesthesiologists in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C

    2000-12-01

    Although anaesthesia and intensive care medicine are postgraduate subjects, few would deny the value of exposing medical undergraduates to clinical training in these areas. The present review addresses developments in medical undergraduate training curricula, and the specific benefits that can be provided for medical students, at all stages of training, by anaesthesiologists working in operating theatres, intensive care units and pain clinics. PMID:17016371

  15. 77 FR 13206 - Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness, Training, and Access Authorization Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ...Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness, Training, and...the standards for medical, physical performance, training, and...occupational history, complete physical examination, vision testing...basic [[Page 13219

  16. PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH SECTION The Physics Education Research Section PERS publishes articles describing important results from

    E-print Network

    Heckler, Andrew F.

    PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH SECTION The Physics Education Research Section PERS publishes articles describing important results from the field of physics education research. Manuscripts should be submitted of the noncommutativity of the cross product. © 2010 American Association of Physics Teachers. DOI: 10.1119/1.3386587 I

  17. Infusing Health-Related Physical Fitness in Physical Education Teacher Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean M. Bulger; Derek J. Mohr; Linda M. Carson; Robert L. Wiegand

    2001-01-01

    Our growing appreciation for physical activity and its health-related henefits exemplifies the need for physical educators who are adequately prepared to Facilitate the development of the skills, knowledge, attitudes, and fitness levels that will enable a child to maintain a physically active lifestyle across the life span. Unfortunately, there is some evidence to suggest that physical education teacher education programs

  18. Roadmap: School Health Education -Health and Physical Education -Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical Education - Bachelor of Science in Education 11570 Personal Health 3 C PEP 15010 Introduction to Physical Education, Fitness and Sport 3 C PEP of Motor Skills 3 C Offered in spring only #12;Roadmap: School Health Education - Health and Physical

  19. Adapted Physical Education Program. 1968 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Public Schools, PA. Office of Research.

    A program was introduced in 1965 to provide individualized physical education for students in grades 1 through 12 who could not participate in regular physical education programs. Twenty-one schools and 1,640 students with a variety of conditions participated. The most frequent limitations of participants were low physical fitness, overweight, and…

  20. The Stress Process in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2007-01-01

    Negative stress in physical education can reduce a student's enjoyment of physical activity and destroy the individual's desire to be a lifelong mover. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of stress in physical education. Stress is defined as a substantial imbalance between the demand of a situation and the individual's capability…

  1. How The PTA Views Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Carol

    The Parent Teachers Association (PTA) has had a long interest in physical education. At the convention at which the PTA was founded, a major address was presented on the subject of "physical culture." After 80 years, the PTA is still concerned with the physical as well as mental education of children. A major concern is with the psychological…

  2. Medical Physics Practice Guideline 4.a: Development, implementation, use and maintenance of safety checklists.

    PubMed

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E; Evans, Suzanne; Ford, Eric C; Gaiser, James E; Hayden, Sandra E; Huffman, Kristina E; Johnson, Jennifer L; Mechalakos, James G; Stern, Robin L; Terezakis, Stephanie; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Pronovost, Peter J; Fairobent, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances. PMID:26103502

  3. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school physical education/recreation facilities, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  4. The Cost of Postgraduate Medical Education and Continuing Medical Education: Re-Examining the Status Fifty Years Back

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the cost and value of medical education is becoming increasingly important. However, this subject is not a new one. Fifty years ago, Mr. DH Patey, Dr. OF Davies, and Dr. John Ellis published a report on the state of postgraduate medical education in the UK. The report was wide-ranging, but it made a considerable mention of cost. In this short article, I have presented the documentary research that I conducted on their report. I have analyzed it from a positivist perspective and have concentrated on the subject of cost, as it appears in their report. The authors describe reforms within postgraduate medical education; however, they are clear from the start that the issue of cost can often be a barrier to such reforms. They state the need for basic facilities for medical education, but then outline the financial barriers to their development. The authors then discuss the costs of library services for education. They state that the "annual spending on libraries varies considerably throughout the country." The authors also describe the educational experiences of newly graduated doctors. According to them, the main problem is that these doctors do not have time to attend formal educational events, and that this will not be possible until there is "a more graduated approach to responsible clinical work," something which is not possible without financial investment. While concluding their report, the authors state that the limited money invested in postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education has been well spent, and that this has had a dual effect on improving medical education as well as the standards of medical care. PMID:25802685

  5. Physical Education Teacher Education on the Education Market--Who's Defining What Physical Education Teachers Need to Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karhus, Svein

    2010-01-01

    Background: A major consequence of the neo-liberal ideology underpinning recent reforms in higher education in the Western world has been the significant increase in the competitiveness of institutions to recruit students in the marketplace of education and to keep them. Accordingly bachelor degrees relating to physical education teacher education

  6. Medical students call for national standards in anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Farey, John E; Sandeford, Jonathan C; Evans-McKendry, Greg D

    2014-11-01

    The diminishing number of hours dedicated to formal instruction in anatomy has led to a debate within medical education as to the level required for safe clinical practice. We provide a review of the current state of anatomical education in Australian medical schools and state the case for national standards. In light of the review presented, council members of the Australian Medical Students' Association voted to affirm that consideration should be given to developing undergraduate learning goals for anatomy, providing a codified medical student position on the teaching of anatomy in Australian medical schools. Crucially, the position states that time-intensive methods of instruction such as dissection should be a rite of passage for medical students in the absence of evidence demonstrating the superiority of modern teaching methods. We believe the bodies with a vested interest in the quality of medical graduates, namely the Australian Medical Council, Medical Deans Australia & New Zealand, and the postgraduate colleges should collaborate and develop clear guidelines that make explicit the core knowledge of anatomy expected of medical graduates at each stage of their career with a view to safe clinical practice. In addition, Australian universities have a role to play in conducting further research into contemporary learning styles and the most efficacious methods of delivering anatomical education. PMID:24661596

  7. Defining Scholarly Activity in Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Erin C.; Roise, Adam; Barr, Daniel; Lynch, Douglas; Lee, Katherine Bao-Shian; Daskivich, Timothy; Dhand, Amar; Butler, Paris D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Scholarly activity is a requirement for accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. There is currently no uniform definition used by all Residency Review Committees (RRCs). A total of 6 of the 27 RRCs currently have a rubric or draft of a rubric to evaluate scholarly activity. Objective To develop a definition of scholarly activity and a set of rubrics to be used in program accreditation to reduce subjectivity of the evaluation of scholarly activity at the level of individual residency programs and across RRCs. Methods We performed a review of the pertinent literature and selected faculty promotion criteria across the United States to develop a structure for a proposed rubric of scholarly activity, drawing on work on scholarship by experts to create a definition of scholarly activity and rubrics for its assessment. Results The literature review showed that academic institutions in the United States place emphasis on all 4 major components of Boyer's definition of scholarship: discovery, integration, application, and teaching. We feel that the assessment of scholarly activity should mirror these findings as set forth in our proposed rubric. Our proposed rubric is intended to ensure a more objective evaluation of these components of scholarship in accreditation reviews, and to address both expectations for scholarly pursuits for core teaching faculty and those for resident and fellow physicians. Conclusion The aim of our proposed rubric is to ensure a more objective evaluation of these components of scholarship in accreditation reviews, and to address expectations for scholarly pursuits for core teaching faculty as well as those for resident and fellow physicians. PMID:24294446

  8. Assessing the Relationship Between Medical Education and Subsequent Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Christel A.

    1984-01-01

    The longitudinal study efforts at McMaster University's medical school are used to illustrate the problems that confront educators interested in studying the impact of a curriculum on the later professional activities of its graduates. (Author/MLW)

  9. Creation of a regional medical-nutrition education network.

    PubMed

    Feldman, E B; Borum, P R; DiGirolamo, M; Feldman, D S; Greene, J M; Leonard, S B; Morgan, S L; Moinuddin, J F; Read, M S; Weinsier, R L

    1989-01-01

    The Southeastern Regional Medical-Nutrition Education Network (SER-MEN) was developed to coordinate and improve nutrition education in a consortium of the medical schools in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina. SERMEN's central office is at the Medical College of Georgia with the testing office at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Students, faculty, and consultants in nutrition, education, and computer networking work together on projects on each campus that are coordinated and planned through semiannual meetings. A standardized examination was developed with the Nutrition Test-Item Bank to assess nutrition knowledge at various years of medical students from network schools. Each SERMEN school is connected to a microcomputer system at the central office that provides access to a data base of nutrition education and resources on each campus for developing curricula and syllabi. Funding has been provided by societies, foundations, and government agencies. PMID:2911995

  10. Introduction: Women's Health: A Catalyst for Reform of Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, Glenda D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses curriculum reform in medical education to ensure that women's health issues receive adequate attention. There has been remarkable progress in this area, but the reforms have not yet been translated into equitable care for women patients. (SLD)

  11. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  12. E-Learning as New Method of Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2008-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Distance learning refers to use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance and covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (e-health), telematics, telemedicine, tele-education, etc. For the need of e-health, telemedicine, tele-education and distance learning there are various technologies and communication systems from standard telephone lines to the system of transmission digitalized signals with modem, optical fiber, satellite links, wireless technologies, etc. Tele-education represents health education on distance, using Information Communication Technologies (ICT), as well as continuous education of a health system beneficiaries and use of electronic libraries, data bases or electronic data with data bases of knowledge. Distance learning (E-learning) as a part of tele-education has gained popularity in the past decade; however, its use is highly variable among medical schools and appears to be more common in basic medical science courses than in clinical education. Distance learning does not preclude traditional learning processes; frequently it is used in conjunction with in-person classroom or professional training procedures and practices. Tele-education has mostly been used in biomedical education as a blended learning method, which combines tele-education technology with traditional instructor-led training, where, for example, a lecture or demonstration is supplemented by an online tutorial. Distance learning is used for self-education, tests, services and for examinations in medicine i.e. in terms of self-education and individual examination services. The possibility of working in the exercise mode with image files and questions is an attractive way of self education. Automated tracking and reporting of learners’ activities lessen faculty administrative burden. Moreover, e-learning can be designed to include outcomes assessment to determine whether learning has occurred. This review article evaluates the current status and level of tele-education development in Bosnia and Herzegovina outlining its components, faculty development needs for implementation and the possibility of its integration as official learning standard in biomedical curricula in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Tele-education refers to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance knowledge and performance. Tele-education in biomedical education is widely accepted in the medical education community where it is mostly integrated into biomedical curricula forming part of a blended learning strategy. There are many biomedical digital repositories of e-learning materials worldwide, some peer reviewed, where instructors or developers can submit materials for widespread use. First pilot project with the aim to introduce tele-education in biomedical curricula in Bosnia and Herzegovina was initiated by Department for Medical Informatics at Medical Faculty in Sarajevo in 2002 and has been developing since. Faculty member’s skills in creating tele-education differ from those needed for traditional teaching and faculty rewards must recognize this difference and reward the effort. Tele-education and use of computers will have an impact of future medical practice in a life long learning. Bologna process, which started last years in European countries, provide us to promote and introduce modern educational methods of education at biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Cathedra of Medical informatics and Cathedra of Family medicine at Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo started to use Web based education as common way of teaching of medical students. Satisfaction with this method of education within the students is good, but not yet suitable for most of medical disciplines at biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:24109154

  13. Perceptions of Youth Obesity among Physical Educators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christy Greenleaf; Karen Weiller

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine (a) antifat attitudes among physical education teachers, (b) performance and ability\\u000a expectations for normal and overweight youth, and (c) perceptions of the problem of youth obesity and the role of schools\\u000a and physical education. Participants, 105 physical educators, completed a demographic and background questionnaire, the Antifat\\u000a Attitudes Scale (AFAS; Morrison & O’Connor),

  14. Physics Education activities sponsored by LAPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora Ley, Cesar E.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we present the first activities of the Latin-American Physics Education Network (LAPEN) organized by representatives of Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Uruguay, Peru and Spain. These activities include Seminars, Congress, Postgraduate Programs on Physics Education and several publications. The creation of LAPEN has been inspired and warranted by members of the International Commission on Physics Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. LAPEN was constituted in the International Meeting on Teaching Physics and Training Teachers (RIEFEP 2005) which was held in Matanzas, Cuba in November 2005. The creation of LAPEN was also warranted by the General Assembly of the IX Inter-American Conference on Physics Education held in San José, Costa Rica from 3 to 7 July 2006, and by the ICPE Committee in the International Conference on Physics Education 2006 at Tokyo, Japan. LAPEN has a Coordinator Committee integrated by a President, a Vice-president and an Executive Secretary.

  15. Corpus Curricula: Medical Education and the Voluntary Hospital Movement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Reinarz

    The centrality of hospitals to medical education is a relatively recent phenomenon in the history of medicine. Like many subjects\\u000a in the history of medicine, connections can be traced to the eighteenth century, if not earlier. In order to understand significant\\u000a changes in medical education, and especially in the field of anatomical instruction, one must look back even further, at

  16. The Yale Plan of Medical Education: the early years.

    PubMed Central

    Viseltear, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper considers the early years of the Yale Plan of Medical Education, which has come to be called the Yale System. It chronicles and analyzes the incremental development of the System and considers evaluations of the plan and modifications introduced over time. Also considered are external factors which influenced design and implementation. The paper covers the period of medical education at Yale from the 1920s to the early 1950s. PMID:3538682

  17. Continuing Medical Education (CME) www.princetonhcs.org A University Hospital Affiliate of UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    ­ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School The Office of Continuing Medical Education presents the Department by an Educational Grant through the Arnold & Katherine Snider Geriatric Endowment Fund through the PHCS Foundation

  18. Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have conducted work terms in the fields of experimental

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have, cancer centres, private industry and government ministries and agencies. Coop Jobs have Included: Medical Safety Student Assistant in Medical Imaging Examples of Medical & Health Physics Coop Work Term Duties

  19. Undergraduate Medical Education Accreditation as a Driver of Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Frank A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the accreditation of medical education programs that lead to the Doctor of Medicine degree in the United States and Canada. We identify select accreditation standards that relate directly to the preparation of medical school graduates, as required for the supervised practice of medicine in residency training and for developing the…

  20. Cartooning: a humorous approach to medical and health education.

    PubMed

    McDermott, T J

    1989-01-01

    This article explores the use of cartoons as valuable visual aids in medical and health education. Examples and descriptions are given of cartoons used in an instructional context for medical and allied health professions students, pediatric and adult patients, and hospital personnel. The article suggests content for effective cartoons, as well as basic guidelines for illustration style. PMID:2480951

  1. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sexual Dysfunction in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Sallie; Wittmann, Daniela; Balon, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Addressing sexual health concerns in medical practice has been an emerging concept for the past two decades. However, there have been very few educational opportunities in medical training that would prepare future physicians for such a responsibility. Since assessing and treating sexual problems requires knowledge that encompasses many…

  2. What are the implications of implementation science for medical education?

    PubMed Central

    Price, David W.; Wagner, Dianne P.; Krane, N. Kevin; Rougas, Steven C.; Lowitt, Nancy R.; Offodile, Regina S.; Easdown, L. Jane; Andrews, Mark A. W.; Kodner, Charles M.; Lypson, Monica; Barnes, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Derived from multiple disciplines and established in industries outside of medicine, Implementation Science (IS) seeks to move evidence-based approaches into widespread use to enable improved outcomes to be realized as quickly as possible by as many as possible. Methods This review highlights selected IS theories and models, chosen based on the experience of the authors, that could be used to plan and deliver medical education activities to help learners better implement and sustain new knowledge and skills in their work settings. Results IS models, theories and approaches can help medical educators promote and determine their success in achieving desired learner outcomes. We discuss the importance of incorporating IS into the training of individuals, teams, and organizations, and employing IS across the medical education continuum. Challenges and specific strategies for the application of IS in educational settings are also discussed. Conclusions Utilizing IS in medical education can help us better achieve changes in competence, performance, and patient outcomes. IS should be incorporated into curricula across disciplines and across the continuum of medical education to facilitate implementation of learning. Educators should start by selecting, applying, and evaluating the teaching and patient care impact one or two IS strategies in their work. PMID:25911282

  3. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  4. Andragogy and medical education: are medical students internally motivated to learn?

    PubMed

    Misch, Donald A

    2002-01-01

    Andragogy - the study of adult education - has been endorsed by many medical educators throughout North America. There remains, however, considerable controversy as to the validity and utility of adult education principles as espoused by the field's founder, Malcolm Knowles. Whatever the utility of andragogic doctrine in general education settings, there is reason to doubt its wholesale applicability to the training of medical professionals. Malcolm Knowles' last tenet of andragogy holds that adult learners are more motivated by internal than by external factors. The validity of this hypothesis in medical education is examined, and it is demonstrated that medical students' internal and external motivation are context-dependent, not easily distinguishable, and interrelate with one another in complex ways. Furthermore, the psychological motivation for medical student learning is determined by a variety of factors that range from internal to external, unconscious to conscious, and individual to societal. The andragogic hypothesis of increased internal motivation to learn on the part of adults in general, and medical trainees in particular, is rejected as simplistic, misleading, and counterproductive to developing a greater understanding of the forces that drive medical students to learn. PMID:12075147

  5. The Scylla and Charybdis of Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersdorf, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    Teaching hospitals are caught between two modi operandi of the 1980s--cost containment and competition. The major area of conflict faced by medical school faculty are the demands of clinical practice and research. Medical students originally motivated by idealistic concerns are seduced by the specialties and subspecialties. (MLW)

  6. Council of Medical Specialty Societies: Committed to Continuing Medical Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Walter J.

    2005-01-01

    The Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) recognizes the need for continuing medical education (CME) reform and intends to be actively engaged in that process. While recognizing that CME reform must involve many organizations, the CMSS and particularly the 23 societies that make up the CMSS are in a position to affect many of the needed…

  7. Using facebook for medical education: will students respond?

    PubMed

    Sood, S

    2015-02-01

    There is little information about the willingness of medical students to participate in Facebook for education. I analyzed my interactions with students for the past 14 months to estimate the quantity of student interaction. A Facebook Group was created. Students friend requests were accepted, but "friending" was never solicited. Questions were created around a clinical situation and posted. Forty questions were posted. 5/40 questions were about physics/chemistry. 24 questions focused on basic medical sciences. 11 questions were primarily about clinical medicine. In fourteen months, 533/810 (66%) college students joined the Group. In all, 163/533 students (30%) responded at least once. Half of all responses were comments; the rest were clicks on the "like" button. The average number of responses was 9.5 unique students/question. If participation is voluntary, and targeted students are large in number, one can expect about 66% of students to become members of a site, and about 30% of these to interact. For any given question posted on the site, about 2% of members will respond, regardless of the nature of question: clinically oriented or basic. PMID:26032536

  8. Achieving High Quality, Equitable Physical Education. Physical Education Concept Paper, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This paper addresses the concerns of physical educators who must implement coeducational programs in secondary school physical education. Title IX regulations which relate directly to physical education are presented as well as the Oregon Administrative Rules. The paper covers eight concepts of federal and state regulations that have direct impact…

  9. Physics and the revised Medical College Admission Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilborn, Robert C.

    2014-05-01

    Physics has played an important role in the preparation of future physicians and other health professionals for more than 100 years. Almost all pre-health students take a year of college-level physics as part of their preparation for medical, dental, and pharmacy school. In particular, the widely-used Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) contains a significant number of questions that require physics knowledge and skills. This paper describes the changes in the MCAT to be implemented in 2015, the role of physics in the revised MCAT, and implications for introductory physics courses for the life sciences.

  10. The 'McMaster Philosophy': An Approach to Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Victor R.; Barrows, Howard S.

    1974-01-01

    The faculty of medicine at McMaster University has an approach to medical education which includes self-directed, problem-based, and small-group tutorial learning. There is an emphasis on diagnostic evaluation, selective use of learning resources, and integrated learning and educational planning. (Editor/PG)

  11. Assessment in Medical Education; What Are We Trying to Achieve?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena; O'Flynn, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Within the arena of medical education, it is generally acknowledged that assessment drives learning. Assessment is one of the most significant influences on a student's experience of higher education and improving assessment has a huge impact on the quality of learning (Liu, N. and Carless, D, 2006). Ideally we want to enhance student's capacity…

  12. Students Are Not Customers: A Better Model for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Argues that the student-as-customer model of medical education has many failings that result in educationally dysfunctional interactions. Proposes a new model (based on Deming's 14 principles for quality in business) in which faculty are managers of instruction, students are learning workers, the product is successful learning, and the customers…

  13. Medical Assistant: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newport News Public Schools, VA.

    This task analysis guide is designed to be used in combination with the "Health Occupations Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the Medical Assistant program in Virginia. The task analysis guide contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the specific courses…

  14. Continuing Veterinary Medical Education: Responsibilities, Support and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, E. Dean; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Advanced Studies Committee of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges addresses these questions: What are the responsibilities of the school of veterinary science department in continuing education? How should continuing education be funded? What are the appropriate mechanisms for recognizing or rewarding faculty participation…

  15. A Three-Step Approach to Veterinary Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanaugh, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A formal education plan with two admission steps is outlined. Animal agriculture and the basic sciences are combined in a two-year middle stage. The medical education (third stage) that specifically addresses pathology and the clinical sciences encompasses three years. (Author/LBH)

  16. Cardiopulmonary Disease in Newborns: A Study in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A film describing tachypea as an early manifestation of congenital heart disease was shown to physicians and nurses at 27 hospitals during regular continuing medical education activities. Findings from pre-test and post-test data show that need-oriented educational programs can measurably improve the quality of patient care. (Author/LBH)

  17. Understanding and Addressing Cognitive Bias in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershberger, Paul J.; Markert, Ronald J.; Part, Howard M.; Cohen, Steven M.; Finger, William W.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on research and educational findings using the Inventory of Cognitive Biases in Medicine (ICBM). The ICBM was administered to medical students as well as practicing physicians and susceptibility to cognitive bias was found to be substantial among both groups. Concludes that educational strategies in the classroom and clinical settings may…

  18. In Search of Coherence: A View from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education has developed a position paper, a set of recommendations, and next steps in the reform of continuing medical education (CME). The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) sets standards for and accredits residency programs in graduate medical education and is not directly…

  19. Physical Education as an Aesthetic-Ethical Educational Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ávila da Costa, Luísa; McNamee, Michael; Lacerda, Teresa Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Commencing with a discussion of the various conceptions of education for the development of humanity, this essay articulates four essential vectors of educational processes--epistemic, ethical, aesthetic, and political, as they are instantiated in Physical Education. Drawing on philosophical literature, it is argued that the sporting activities…

  20. Consumer Needs in Physical Education and Athletics in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joanne

    1996-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the consumer needs in higher education from 1991-94 in the discipline of physical education and athletics. Using data from the Chronicle of Higher Education (1991-94), the study examined and categorized types of positions advertised. Requests for exercise physiologists ranked first, followed by pedagogy,…

  1. Instructional Liability in Physical Education Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drowatzky, John N.

    A summary is presented of some of the ways that judicial decisions and laws have an impact on higher education and on public education. The sources of legal obligation that impose duties and responsibilities on teachers are discussed. These are: common law, contractual obligations, state laws, and federal laws. The legal definitions are given of…

  2. The founding of the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J; Long, Timothy R; Rose, Steven H; Fye, W Bruce

    2015-02-01

    The Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (hereafter the Mayo Foundation), the precursor to the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, was incorporated in 1915. The Mayo Foundation, which was affiliated with the University of Minnesota Graduate School, aimed to establish a higher standard for training medical specialists. Together, the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Foundation pioneered a graduate medical education program that allowed residents to earn master's and PhD degrees in clinical medicine and surgery. Unlike elsewhere in the United States, the residency training program was not pyramidal. (In a pyramidal residency program, each training year, some residents are systematically eliminated to reduce the number of more senior trainees.) All those who started the Mayo Foundation residency program had an opportunity to finish depending on their own merits. Louis B. Wilson, the first director of the Mayo Foundation, became a major figure in graduate medical education in the 1920s and 1930s. Although the granting of graduate degrees in medicine and surgery stopped over time, Mayo Clinic ultimately became the largest site of graduate medical education in the world. PMID:25659241

  3. Global health education in U.S. Medical schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Interest in global health (GH) among medical students worldwide is measurably increasing. There is a concomitant emphasis on emphasizing globally-relevant health professions education. Through a structured literature review, expert consensus recommendations, and contact with relevant professional organizations, we review the existing state of GH education in US medical schools for which data were available. Several recommendations from professional societies have been developed, along with a renewed emphasis on competencies in global health. The implementation of these recommendations was not observed as being uniform across medical schools, with variation noted in the presence of global health curricula. Recommendations for including GH in medical education are suggested, as well as ways to formalize GH curricula, while providing flexibility for innovation and adaptation PMID:23331630

  4. Report of the AAMC Task Force on Industry Funding of Medical Education

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Report of the AAMC Task Force on Industry Funding of Medical Education to the AAMC Executive Council For consideration, June 18-19, 2008 Association of American Medical Colleges #12;The AAMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iii Chapter 1. Professionalism and Medical Education

  5. Transforming educational accountability in medical ethics and humanities education toward professionalism.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; Kirch, Darrell G; Brigham, Timothy P; Barzansky, Barbara M; Wear, Stephen; Carrese, Joseph A; Fins, Joseph J; Lederer, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Effectively developing professionalism requires a programmatic view on how medical ethics and humanities should be incorporated into an educational continuum that begins in premedical studies, stretches across medical school and residency, and is sustained throughout one's practice. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education National Conference on Medical Ethics and Humanities in Medical Education (May 2012) invited representatives from the three major medical education and accreditation organizations to engage with an expert panel of nationally known medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This article, based on the views of these representatives and their respondents, offers a future-tense account of how professionalism can be incorporated into medical education.The themes that are emphasized herein include the need to respond to four issues. The first theme highlights how ethics and humanities can provide a response to the dissonance that occurs in current health care delivery. The second theme focuses on how to facilitate preprofessional readiness for applicants through reform of the medical school admission process. The third theme emphasizes the importance of integrating ethics and humanities into the medical school administrative structure. The fourth theme underscores how outcomes-based assessment should reflect developmental milestones for professional attributes and conduct. The participants emphasized that ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that promote professionalism should be taught with accountability, flexibility, and the premise that all these traits are essential to the formation of a modern professional physician. PMID:25539516

  6. Current status and future trends of medical physics in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin Nieto, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical Physics is an area that applies the principles of physics to medicine, particularly in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases using ionizing and nonionizing radiation. The main attractive of medical physics is that it has a direct impact on the quality and safety of medical care in humans; this social component with direct implications for the population is of high value for Mexico. This paper describes the concepts of medical physics, trends and the current status of this discipline as a profession, which is directly related to the efforts of clinical research. It is also described what is, in my opinion, the future of medical physics in Mexico, emphasizing the fact that this field requires a substantial boost from universities and hospitals to recruit highly qualified young medical physicists and the support from government agencies such as Secretaria de Salud, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado through clinical research projects that allow the necessary evolution of medical physics into the hospital setting.

  7. MODERN MIRACLE MEDICAL MACHINES: PHYSICS INSTRUCTION FOR FUTURE MEDICAL STUDENTS

    E-print Network

    Zollman, Dean

    Physics Department, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601, USA Many project (http://web.phys.ksu.edu/vqm/) and are developing learning units that focus on applications and LASIK procedures. The project's Web site is http://web.phys.ksu.edu/mmmm/. 1 Introduction This project

  8. Use of Alcoholics Anonymous as Part of Medical School Education: Students’ and Educators’ Perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Marie Stack; Lisa G. Fore Arcand; Greg Briscoe

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover the utility, barriers, and experiences with the use of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a learning resource in the medical school curriculum. Methods: A third year medical student cohort and psychiatric educators group were queried about learned experiential lessons, attendance requirements, attitudes, and obstacles encountered. Results: Forty-three educators, whose familiarity with AA varied widely, responded to the survey.

  9. Lessons from the Physics Education Reform Movement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard Hake

    This site provides a summary of a survey of pretest and posttest data for 62 introductory physics courses attended by a total of 6542 students. Also included are 14 lessons from the physics education reform effort that may assist in the general upgrading of education and science literacy.

  10. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance…

  11. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184…

  12. Brown Bodies, Racialisation and physical education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Katie

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how school physical education (PE) can both reinforce stereotyped notions of the brown body as inherently physical while also allowing young people to gain educational success. Drawing on a critical ethnographic study of Maori and Pasifika (Pacific Island) youth in PE in New Zealand, the article explores how the academic…

  13. Inclusion and Burnout in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fejgin, Naomi; Talmor, Rachel; Erlich, Ilana

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between inclusion and burnout in physical education teaching. Data were collected from a sample of elementary school physical education (PE) teachers from all six districts in Israel. The research questionnaire included three parts: personal and occupational background, Friedman's Burnout index and work…

  14. Beyond the Limits of Technocratic Physical Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim McKay; Jennifer M. Gore; David Kirk

    1990-01-01

    As part of their quest to secure academic credibility, physical educators in Australia, Canada, Britain, and the United States have increasingly privileged empirical–analytical forms of research. We argue that this strategy has resulted in a montage of professional values and practices that we term technocratic physical education (TPE). We contend that TPE is based on ideologies of professionalism, scientism, and

  15. Quality Physical Education. NASPE Resource Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A quality physical education program provides learning opportunities, appropriate instruction, meaningful and challenging content, and student and program assessment. In addition, a quality physical education improves mental alertness, academic performance, and readiness and enthusiasm for learning in the nation's youth. This brief provides a list…

  16. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  17. Educational Gymnastics: Enhancing Children's Physical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Sam; Pagnano-Richardson, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all current physical education curriculum guides and textbooks include sections on learner outcomes based on the national standards for physical education, which often refer to gymnastics skills. Gymnastics is a perfect venue for teaching movement concepts, developing and maintaining overall body fitness, fostering personal and social…

  18. Appropriate Instructional Practices in Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Prithwi Raj

    2011-01-01

    Teaching and learning in physical education at the elementary level should be a time filled with excitement and fun for both teachers and students. Children by nature are inquisitive and bring an abundance of energy into the learning environment. Physical educators who are able to harness this student energy in positive ways are able to…

  19. Developmentally Appropriate Physical Education. A Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, Steve; Sanders, Steve

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of elementary physical education is poorly defined, and the public has low expectations and support for the field. The Developmentally Appropriate Physical Education Practices for Children rating scale emphasizes teaching practices that are appropriate to each student's age and ability. The paper describes use of the scale. (SM)

  20. Primary teachers, policy, and physical education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsten Petrie; lisahunter

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges arising for primary school teachers who have responsibility for teaching physical education (PE) and who are working in particularly complex and contestable policy contexts. In New Zealand provision of physical education is identified as occurring amidst multiple, and not necessarily compatible, sets of expectations, associated with government priorities, initiatives focusing on children’s health, sport,

  1. High School Students' Physical Education Conceptual Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Suzan F.

    2004-01-01

    The value of conceptual physical education knowledge has long been acknowledged (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1969; Kneer, 1981; NASPE, 1995) yet has not been formally measured or assessed. Seven multiple choice tests with established validity and reliability (Ayers, 2001b) were used to assess the concepts…

  2. Information-Technology Based Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    2001-04-01

    Developing countries emphasize expansion of the educated population but demand for quality improvement follows later. Current science education reform is driven in part by post cold war restructuring of the global economy and associated focus on the education of a more scientifically literate society, due to the industrial change from labor-intensive to high-technology type, and the societal change inherent in the present information era. Industry needs employees of broad and flexible background with inter disciplinary training, engineers with better physics training, and well trained physicists. Education researches have proved that active-learning based methods are superior to the traditional methods and the information technology (IT) has lot to offer in this. Use of IT for improving physics education is briefly discussed with prospects for collaboration in the Asia-Pacific region via Asian Physics Education Network (ASPEN), UNESCO University Foundation Course in Physics (UUFCP), etc.

  3. Medical Education in Peoples's Republic of China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, John A. D.; Yingang, Lin

    1987-01-01

    The three types of physicians trained in the People's Republic of China (practitioners in Chinese medicine, traditional Mongolian medicine, and western-style medicine) and the design of the medical schools and programs are discussed. (MSE)

  4. JAMA Patient Page: Continuing Medical Education

    MedlinePLUS

    ... doctors to learn about research results through CME. Evidence-based medicine is medical practice that is guided by ... Doctors and patients alike benefit from learning about evidence-based medicine guidelines. This is best done through CME ...

  5. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  6. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  7. 10 CFR 1046.11 - Medical and physical fitness qualification standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. 1046.11...Personnel § 1046.11 Medical and physical fitness qualification standards. (a...meet the applicable medical and physical fitness qualification standards as set forth...

  8. Evaluating a poetry workshop in medical education.

    PubMed

    Collett, T J; McLachlan, J C

    2006-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating how doing poetry could affect students' understanding of medical practice and at assessing the effectiveness of the evaluation method used. Qualitative research was carried out on the experiences of medical students participating in a poetry workshop, followed by some quantitative analysis. The study was conducted at Peninsula Medical School and St Ives, Cornwall, UK, with three medical students, a poet and a pathologist as participants. Data were collected by interviews, observation and web access. "Doing poetry" with a professional poet was found to assist communication between doctors and patients as it enhanced skills of observation, heightened awareness of the effect of language and fostered deep reflection. Poetry was also found to offer an outlet for medics and patients. The voluntary workshop attracted three participants; however, it might have had an effect on the wider student community because the poetry website received 493 hits in four months. Qualitative methods worked well as a tool for evaluation. "Doing poetry for poetry's sake" seemed to foster the development of skills related to empathy. The opportunity to do poetry should be made available to medical students as part of a wider arts and humanities programme. PMID:23674751

  9. Physics-Based Deformable Organisms for Medical Image Analysis

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, poten- tially overwhelming amounts of medical image data the introduction of snakes by Terzopoulos et al [6, 7]. In addition to physics-based explicit deformable models [8

  10. Roadmap: Physical Education -Health and Physical Education Bachelor of Science

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Development and Analysis of Target and Fielding Games 3 C HED 21030 Introduction to Health Education 3 C Psychology 3 C HED 20000 Health Education for Early Childhood 3 C PEB Electives 2 C See note 1 on page 3 See note 2 on page 3 HED 21050 Health Education Theories 3 C PEP 25033 Lifespan Motor Development 3 C

  11. Gendered specialities during medical education: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Alers, Margret; van Leerdam, Lotte; Dielissen, Patrick; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The careers of male and female physicians indicate gender differences, whereas in medical education a feminization is occurring. Our review aims to specify gender-related speciality preferences during medical education. A literature search on gender differences in medical students' speciality preferences was conducted in PubMed, Eric, Embase and Social Abstracts, and reference lists from January 2000 to June 2013. Study quality was assessed by critical appraisal. Our search yielded 741 hits and included 14, mostly cross-sectional, studies originating from various countries. No cohort studies were found. Throughout medical education, surgery is predominantly preferred by men and gynaecology, paediatrics and general practice by women. Internal medicine was pursued by both genders. The extent of gender-specific speciality preferences seemed related to the male-to-female ratio in the study population. When a population contained more male students gynaecology seemed even more preferred by women, while in a more feminine population, men more highly preferred surgery. Internationally, throughout medical education, gender-related speciality preferences are apparent. The extent might be influenced by the male-to-female ratio of a study population. Further research of the role of gender in career considerations of medical students on the future workforce is necessary. PMID:24980516

  12. Physical education, school physical activity, school sports and academic performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Trudeau; Roy J Shephard

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this paper is to review relationships of academic performance and some of its determinants to participation in school-based physical activities, including physical education (PE), free school physical activity (PA) and school sports. METHODS: Linkages between academic achievement and involvement in PE, school PA and sport programmes have been examined, based on a systematic review of currently

  13. Does HOPSports Promote Youth Physical Activity in Physical Education Classes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Stephanie T.; Shores, Kindal A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how a technological intervention, HOPSports (HOPS), impacted youth physical activity (PA) in a physical education (PE) class. Research indicates rising levels of youth television watching and video game use, physical inactivity, and related overweight. One approach to increase youth PA is to use technology-based…

  14. "LET US Play": Maximizing Physical Activity "in" Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Webster, Collin; Beets, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Schools have been identified as a promising setting for increasing youth physical activity levels because of their broad reach and the amount of time youth spend in attendance. Specifically, physical education is one key time during the school day where youth can accumulate health-enhancing levels of physical activity. Indicators of quality…

  15. Physical Culture, Physical Education and Relational Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Kirk

    1999-01-01

    This paper argues for the recovery of a notion of physical culture that can serve the purposes of relational analysis in social research. The recovery of the notion is undertaken through a brief etymology of the term, and through an historical overview of shifts in physical culture during the twentieth century. The recovered notion is described as one dimension of

  16. The moral development of medical students: a pilot study of the possible influence of medical education.

    PubMed

    Self, D J; Schrader, D E; Baldwin, D C; Wolinsky, F D

    1993-01-01

    Medicine endorses a code of ethics and encourages a high moral character among doctors. This study examines the influence of medical education on the moral reasoning and development of medical students. Kohlberg's Moral Judgment Interview was given to a sample of 20 medical students (41.7% of students in that class). The students were tested at the beginning and at the end of their medical course to determine whether their moral reasoning scores had increased to the same extent as other people who extend their formal education. It was found that normally expected increases in moral reasoning scores did not occur over the 4 years of medical education for these students, suggesting that their educational experience somehow inhibited their moral reasoning ability rather than facilitating it. With a range of moral reasoning scores between 315 and 482, the finding of a mean increase from first year to fourth year of 18.5 points was not statistically significant at the P < or = 0.05 level. Statistical analysis revealed no significant correlations at the P < or = 0.05 level between the moral reasoning scores and age, gender, Medical College Admission Test scores, or grade point average scores. Along with a brief description of Kohlberg's cognitive moral development theory, some interpretations and explanations are given for the findings of the study. PMID:8433656

  17. Reflective Practice in Physical Education and Physical Education Teacher Education: A Review of the Literature since 1995

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standal, Oyvind F.; Moe, Vegard F.

    2013-01-01

    Reflection and reflective practice are key concepts in the educational literature as well as in research on physical education (PE) and physical education teacher education (PETE). The purpose of this article is to review the current empirical knowledge base for reflection and reflective practice in PE and PETE from 1995 to 2011. The review…

  18. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  19. The Landscape of Elementary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Kim C.; Locke, Lawrence F.; Lambdin, Dolly; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2008-01-01

    Elementary school physical education has repeatedly been shaped by the forces of history. Presently, concerns about the obesity epidemic and the low levels of physical activity in children are exerting a major influence on curriculum. Whereas building physical fitness has been a dominant influence during wartime, the focus today is on (a)…

  20. Interactive Video Games in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Josh; Christie, Brett

    2007-01-01

    As the obesity epidemic in the United States spreads among children and teenagers, due in part to sedentary lifestyles, some physical education programs are using interactive video games to keep students engaged in physical activity. These innovative games make physical activity fun and challenging for both high- and low-skilled students. Although…

  1. The Financing of Graduate Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Medical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The financing and organization of the medical care field is seen as being in an evolutionary stage. It has progressed from an era when most physicians provided services as solo practitioners and patients paid expenses out-of-pocket to group practices and expenses paid by third parties. (MLW)

  2. Outcomes Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leslie S.; Turnwald, Grant H.; Meldrum, James B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's use of outcomes assessment (OA) as part of the accreditation review process for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Discusses its nine OA survey instruments and use of resulting data during accreditation. (EV)

  3. Assessing Continuing Medical Education Needs in New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Kantrowitz, Martin P.; Divasto, Peter V.; Starks, Ann M.; Counsellor, Aleksandra; Orgel, Linda

    1983-01-01

    In 1981 a decision was made by the University of New Mexico School of Medicine to create a new Office of Community Professional Education whose primary function was to create continuing medical education programs tailored to its constituency. To accomplish this, a needs assessment survey was distributed to a stratified random sample of members of the New Mexico Medical Society practicing throughout the state to determine preferred learning styles, locations of programs and times of year, as well as other determinants for attending such programs. The survey was received by 647 physicians and 469 returned them—a response rate of 72.4 percent. Conclusions reached as a result of the needs assessment will serve as a basis of policy formation for the delivery of continuing medical education at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. PMID:6837015

  4. Improving medical education in Kenya: an international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Alexa

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a partnership between the University of Nairobi College of Health Sciences (CHS) Library and the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL). The libraries are collaborating to develop best practices for the CHS Library as it meets the challenge of changing medical education information needs in a digital environment. The collaboration is part of a Medical Education Partnership Initiative. The library project has several components: an assessment of the CHS Library, learning visits in the United States and Kenya, development of recommendations to enhance the CHS Library, and ongoing evaluation of the program's progress. Development of new services and expertise at the CHS Library is critical to the project's success. A productive collaboration between the HS/HSL and CHS Library is ongoing. A successful program to improve the quality of medical education will have a beneficial impact on health outcomes in Kenya. PMID:24860265

  5. AMTEC: a cooperative effort in medical technology education.

    PubMed

    Beiermann, M K; Coggeshall, M; Gavin, M L; Laughlin, P; Palermo, J; Torrey, J A; Weidner, J

    1978-04-01

    A committee in the St. Louis Metropolitan area has been established to promote communication and cooperation among the area's existing hospital-based programs in medical technology. Area Medical Technology Education Coordinators (AMTEC) was established three years ago primarily to facilitate the administrative functions of medical technology education and to serve as an instrument for the exchange of ideas. Its primary undertaking has been the central processing of applications to the area programs, as an aid in the admission process. In addition, a continuing education program sponsored by the committee has been established, and various "curriculum sharing" activities have been sponsored for the students enrolled in the schools. Future plans for the committee include sponsoring an on-going evaluation process of graduates by employers, and establishing a criterion-referenced question pool. The authors describe the experiences of the committee to date and plans for the implementation of future goals. PMID:645768

  6. Sustained programs in physics teacher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherr, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    For over a decade, physics teacher education programs have been transformed at a number of institutions around the country through support from the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers. In 2012-2013, PhysTEC supported an independent study on the sustainability of its sites after project funding ends. The study sought to measure the extent to which programs have been sustained and to identify what features should be prioritized for building sustainable physics teacher education programs. Most PhysTEC legacy sites studied have sustained their production of physics teachers. A few sites studied have thriving physics teacher education programs, that is, programs that have continued to substantially increase their production of teachers since the PhysTEC award. All of the studied sites that sustained their production of physics teachers have a champion of physics teacher education and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment. The necessity of the champion was known from the Report of the Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics (T-TEP report) and borne out by this study. The necessity of institutional motivation and commitment is a finding of this study. At some sites, PhysTEC support has precipitated an institutional focus on physics teacher education, leveraging other resources (including both awards and personnel) benefiting physics teacher education. The study also documented the sustainability of components of physics teacher education programs, such as recruitment, early teaching experiences, and a teacher in residence. Sustained components tend to be those that have direct benefit to undergraduates in the physics department, whereas less-sustained components seem to be those that primarily benefit secondary teachers. The number of sustained components does not appear to correspond to teacher production; that is, sites that have sustained more (or fewer) components do not produce larger (or smaller) numbers of teachers. This result further supports the finding that the presence of the champion and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment are the key features of successful physics teacher education programs.

  7. Medical education on cannabis and cannabinoids: Perspectives, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ware, M A; Ziemianski, D

    2015-06-01

    The global regulatory landscape regarding the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids is changing rapidly. This has considerable impact on health care professionals who currently receive little or no education on issues regarding medical cannabis. We propose a 'cannabis curriculum' that covers the spectrum of historical, botanical, physiological, clinical and legal issues to allow health care professionals to engage in meaningful discussions with their patients and colleagues around this stigmatized and controversial subject. PMID:25728558

  8. Medical students as sexual health peer educators: who benefits more?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A prospective study was conducted to evaluate the impact of an educational reproductive health program on medical student peer educators and the secondary school pupils whom they taught. Methods The Marseille School of Medicine and ten public secondary schools participated in the study. Medical students were recruited and trained as peer educators to promote sexual health in the secondary schools. The medical students and secondary school pupils were evaluated before and after education program. The main outcome measure was the sexual health knowledge score on a 20-item questionnaire (maximum score 20). Results A total of 3350 students attended the peer-led course conducted by 107 medical students. The medical students’ score increased significantly before and after the course (from 15.2?±?1.8 to 18.3?±?0.9; p?medical students was significantly higher than that of the males. The overall knowledge increase was not significantly different between medical students and secondary school pupils (mean 3.1?±?1 and 5.7?±?4 respectively; p?>?0.05). Conclusions The program was effective in increasing the knowledge of medical students as well as secondary school pupils. Male sexual health knowledge should be reinforced. PMID:25099947

  9. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures. PMID:24804914

  10. Students learning from patients: let's get real in medical education.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-03-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of communication skills and empathy within a broad 'professionalism' framework. Paradoxically, while aiming to strengthen patient-student interactions, this approach tends to refocus on the role modelling of the physician, and opportunities for potentially deep collaborative working relationships between students and patients are missed. A radical overhaul of conventional doctor-led medical education may be necessary, that also challenges the orthodoxies of individualistic student-centred approaches, leading to an authentic patient-centred model that shifts the locus of learning from the relationship between doctor as educator and student to the relationship between patient and student, with expert doctor as resource. Drawing on contemporary poststructuralist theory of text and identity construction, and on innovative models of work-based learning, the potential quality of relationship between student and patient is articulated in terms of collaborative knowledge production, involving close reading with the patient as text, through dialogue. Here, a medical 'education' displaces traditional forms of medical 'training' that typically involve individual information reproduction. Students may, paradoxically, improve clinical acumen through consideration of silences, gaps, and contradictions in patients as texts, rather than treating communication as transparent. Such paradoxical effects have been systematically occluded or denied in traditional medical education. PMID:17075690

  11. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new media technology in medical education. Significant gender differences in game play experience and attitudes may represent male video game design bias that stresses male cognitive aptitudes; medical educators hoping to create serious games that will appeal to both men and women must avoid this. PMID:20576125

  12. What can I do with a degree in Physical Education?

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    government, the health and fitness industry, and sport coaching. A Physical Education degree is usefulWhat can I do with a degree in Physical Education? Education Planning your career Choosing a career.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Physical Education? Physical education focuses on the study of movement and its contribution

  13. Formative Accreditation: Complying with Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Emery A.

    2007-01-01

    Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accreditation has had an important role in improving medical education as well as in verifying the quality of education in the nation's medical schools. In this manner, it also serves the interests of the public. Every eight years, medical schools undergo an accreditation process to determine whether…

  14. [Medical education under the Revolution and the Empire].

    PubMed

    Legaye, Jean

    2014-01-01

    After the suppression of medical education during the French revolution in 1793, the lack of caregivers is dramatic, especially in the army. The medical education is therefore rehabilitated in 1794 in 3 (then 6) Health Schools, which will become Schools of Medicine and Faculties of Medicine, incorporated in 1808 into then Imperial University. During 3 years, the courses are theoretical and also based on a practical teaching on the patient. The defense of a thesis provides access to the title of doctor in medicine or surgery and allows practicing for all the pathologies on the entire territory of the Empire. Meanwhile, medical courses are given in military hospitals to train officers of health. They are dedicated for the service of the army and for minor diseases in rural areas. They are authorized to practice only in the department in which they were received. The inspectors general provide medical education directly in the military medical structures and conduct examinations about medical care. This type of career is illustrated by the biography of Surgeon Major François Augustin Legaÿ. PMID:25966540

  15. An overview of ethnography in healthcare and medical education research.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Leigh; Vassar, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Research in healthcare settings and medical education has relied heavily on quantitative methods. However, there are research questions within these academic domains that may be more adequately addressed by qualitative inquiry. While there are many qualitative approaches, ethnography is one method that allows the researcher to take advantage of relative immersion in order to obtain thick description. The purpose of this article is to introduce ethnography, to describe how ethnographic methods may be utilized, to provide an overview of ethnography's use in healthcare and medical education, and to summarize some key limitations with the method. PMID:21637319

  16. An overview of ethnography in healthcare and medical education research

    PubMed Central

    Vassar, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Research in healthcare settings and medical education has relied heavily on quantitative methods. However, there are research questions within these academic domains that may be more adequately addressed by qualitative inquiry. While there are many qualitative approaches, ethnography is one method that allows the researcher to take advantage of relative immersion in order to obtain thick description. The purpose of this article is to introduce ethnography, to describe how ethnographic methods may be utilized, to provide an overview of ethnography's use in healthcare and medical education, and to summarize some key limitations with the method. PMID:21637319

  17. Evaluation of the community-oriented medical education in two medical schools in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Azizi, F

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the extent and impact of community-oriented medical education in the Khartoum and Gezira medical schools in the Sudan. Competency of graduates 3-7 years after graduation and health indicators of the provinces of both medical schools were examined. Gezira had a more community-oriented curriculum although it was deficient in other aspects. The degree of partnership of both schools with the Ministry of Health and the community was weak and the schools' research programmes had no community orientation. Graduates had similar profiles of job satisfaction, community service, knowledge, attitudes and self-learning. Although Gezira had more emphasis on community medical education, graduates of both schools adapted themselves to the environment dictated by the health care delivery system and cultural values. PMID:15562751

  18. Do professional attitudes change during medical education?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Batenburg

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to measure students' professional attitudes, in particular the level of humaneness. The quality of humaneness was defined in terms of both patient-centredness and psychosocial orientation towards disease. Method: Medical students completed a questionnaire designed to survey professional attitudes. Measuring instruments consisted of the Doctor-Patient Scale and the Social Context Scale, both containing statements of the Likert-type.

  19. Report on the American Association of Medical Physics Undergraduate Fellowship Programs.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Avery, Stephen; Gueye, Paul; Sandison, George A

    2013-01-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) sponsors two summer undergraduate research programs to attract top performing undergraduate students into graduate studies in medical physics: the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship Program (SUFP) and the Minority Undergraduate Summer Experience (MUSE). Undergraduate research experience (URE) is an effective tool to encourage students to pursue graduate degrees. The SUFP and MUSE are the only medical physics URE programs. From 2001 to 2012, 148 fellowships have been awarded and a total of $608,000 has been dispersed to fellows. This paper reports on the history, participation, and status of the programs. A review of surveys of past fellows is presented. Overall, the fellows and mentors are very satisfied with the program. The efficacy of the programs is assessed by four metrics: entry into a medical physics graduate program, board certification, publications, and AAPM involvement. Sixty-five percent of past fellow respondents decided to pursue a graduate degree in medical physics as a result of their participation in the program. Seventy percent of respondents are currently involved in some educational or professional aspect of medical physics. Suggestions for future enhancements to better track and maintain contact with past fellows, expand funding sources, and potentially combine the programs are presented. PMID:23318397

  20. Nutrition education in medical school: a time of opportunity1234

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Linda; Rock, Cheryl L; Edwards, Marilyn S; Bales, Connie W; Kohlmeier, Martin; Akabas, Sharon R

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education has undergone significant changes in development of new curricula, new pedagogies, and new forms of assessment since the Nutrition Academic Award was launched more than a decade ago. With an emphasis on a competency-based curriculum, integrated learning, longitudinal clinical experiences, and implementation of new technology, nutrition educators have an opportunity to introduce nutrition and diet behavior–related learning experiences across the continuum of medical education. Innovative learning opportunities include bridging personal health and nutrition to community, public, and global health concerns; integrating nutrition into lifestyle medicine training; and using nutrition as a model for teaching the continuum of care and promoting interprofessional team-based care. Faculty development and identification of leaders to serve as champions for nutrition education continue to be a challenge. PMID:24646826

  1. Accreditation of Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Education: How Do the Standards Contribute to Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Deborah J.; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation organizations such as the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are charged with the difficult task of evaluating the educational quality of medical education programs in North America.…

  2. National Fund for Medical Education: New Priorities for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freymann, John Gordon

    1981-01-01

    Projects that the National Fund for Medical Education will fund in the 1980s include advances in medical education to help contain health care costs; educational programs to improve doctor patient relationships; promotion of careers in medical education and research; and integration of new subjects into the curriculum. (JMD)

  3. [Secondary Career Education Activities: Health and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford City Schools, VA.

    The guide is one of a series developed in a pilot project to integrate career education concepts with subject matter in secondary grades. The units are designed to reveal career orientation aspects of traditional topics within five major subject areas: English, social studies, mathematics, science, and health and physical education. The lesson…

  4. Physical Education Facilities for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Larry; Frederick, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    Physical education facilities at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio have been adapted for the recreational needs of handicapped students. Changes include a special exercise room, accessible locker and shower facilities, a pool area, and a wheelchair repair shop. (CJ)

  5. Medical students as human subjects in educational research

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Hopkins, Mary Ann; More, Frederick; Yavner, Steven; Pusic, Martin; Nick, Michael W.; Song, Hyuksoon; Ellaway, Rachel; Kalet, Adina L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Special concerns often arise when medical students are themselves the subjects of education research. A recently completed large, multi-center randomized controlled trial of computer-assisted learning modules for surgical clerks provided the opportunity to explore the perceived level of risk of studies where medical students serve as human subjects by reporting on: 1) the response of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) at seven institutions to the same study protocol; and 2) the thoughts and feelings of students across study sites about being research subjects. Methods From July 2009 to August 2010, all third-year medical students at seven collaborating institutions were eligible to participate. Patterns of IRB review of the same protocol were compared. Participation burden was calculated in terms of the time spent interacting with the modules. Focus groups were conducted with medical students at each site. Transcripts were coded by three independent reviewers and analyzed using Atlas.ti. Results The IRBs at the seven participating institutions granted full (n=1), expedited (n=4), or exempt (n=2) review of the WISE Trial protocol. 995 (73% of those eligible) consented to participate, and 207 (20%) of these students completed all outcome measures. The average time to complete the computer modules and associated measures was 175 min. Common themes in focus groups with participant students included the desire to contribute to medical education research, the absence of coercion to consent, and the low-risk nature of the research. Discussion Our findings demonstrate that risk assessment and the extent of review utilized for medical education research vary among IRBs. Despite variability in the perception of risk implied by differing IRB requirements, students themselves felt education research was low risk and did not consider themselves to be vulnerable. The vast majority of eligible medical students were willing to participate as research subjects. Participants acknowledged the time demands of their participation and were readily able to withdraw when those burdens became unsustainable. PMID:23443075

  6. Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs

    PubMed Central

    Ellaway, Rachel H.; Cooper, Gerry; Al-Idrissi, Tracy; Dubé, Tim; Graves, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research. PMID:24646440

  7. Medical Students’ Attitudes toward Abortion Education: Malaysian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Nai-peng; Yew, Siew-yong; Low, Wah-yun; Su’ut, Lela; Renjhen, Prachi; Huang, M. S. L.; Tong, Wen-ting; Lai, Siow-li

    2012-01-01

    Background Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students’ attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. Methods and Results A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students’ pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students’ attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. Conclusions Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights. PMID:23300600

  8. Prediction of Enjoyment in School Physical Education

    PubMed Central

    Gråstén, Arto; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Watt, Anthony; Yli-Piipari, Sami

    2012-01-01

    The specific aim of this study was to examine whether motivational climate, perceived physical competence, and exercise motivation predict enjoyment in school physical education within the same sample of adolescents across three years of secondary school. A sample of 639 students (girls = 296, boys = 343) aged between 13- to 15-years at the commencement of the study completed the Intrinsic Motivation Climate in Physical Education Questionnaire, Physical Self-Perception Profile, Physical Education Motivation Scale, and Physical Education Enjoyment Scale. Results derived from path analyses indicated that task-involving motivational climate predicted enjoyment in physical education via perceived physical competence and intrinsic motivation in both girls and boys. In particular, these results supported previous findings of Vallerand et. al (1997) with the self-determination theory and the achievement goal theory. Ego-involving climate was not a significant predictor either in girls or boys. The current results provide continuing support for the investigation of Vallerand's model in the physical education setting, and highlight that motivational climate is an area that requires further evaluation as a contributing factor in the improvement of physical education teaching. A better understanding of the role of motivational climate may assist efforts to promote children's and adolescents' perceived physical competence, intrinsic motivation, and enjoyment in the school physical education setting. Key pointsThe findings of the current study support existing suggestions of Vallerand’s (1997) model in which social factors mediated by a psychological mediator, and exercise motivation are related to positive consequences in the PE context.Task-involving motivational climate predicted PE enjoyment via perceived physical competence and intrinsic motivation with both girls and boys. Task-involving motivational climate in PE lessons at Grade 7 had a strong association with PE enjoyment via perceived physical competence and intrinsic motivation at Grade 9 for both girls and boys.Ego-involving climate did not fit either the data for the girls or boys, as PE lessons based on ego-involving motivational climate did not significantly influence on the level of PE enjoyment.The results of the current study and previous practical findings support task-involving teaching methods to promote adolescent’s PE enjoyment through secondary school years. School PE could be most effective if based on task-involving motivational climate, in which the main objective is increasing students’ perceived physical competence, intrinsic motivation, and enjoyment. PMID:24149199

  9. Mentoring in Physical Education: Issues and Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawer, Mick, Ed.

    These chapters describe partnerships and mentoring programs in the United Kingdom for initial teacher education. Part 1: The Context contains two chapters: "Partnerships in School-Based Training: The Implications for Physical Education" (Patricia Shenton and Elizabeth Murdoch); and "What Is Mentoring?" (Michael Taylor and Joan Stephenson). Part 2:…

  10. Physical Education Equipment Guidelines for Georgia Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    This document presents equipment needs for an adequate (as opposed to minimum) level of physical education programming at primary, middle, and secondary school levels. The "adequate" level is presented since minimal requirements are often considered by educators as being "adequate," and they accept the minimum as being a mean if only the minimum…

  11. Ohio Physical Science Education Standards- 2011

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This document from the Great Lakes Fuel Cell Education Partnership contains a brief outline of the state of Ohio's physical science education standards for 2011. The document includes information about specific subjects and how they may be taught in conjunction with units on renewable energies such as solar energy, wind energy, fuel cells and biofuels. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  12. Integrated Learning with Physical Education and Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Bidner, Sara; Edwards, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Integrated learning is well established in education, primarily in the classroom subjects. This article describes settings and ways for extending integrated instruction to physical education and music. Benefits of these connections include reinforcing content and better meeting the needs of students whose intelligences include the bodily…

  13. Class Management Behaviors of Effective Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbogast, Gary; Chandler, Judy P.

    2005-01-01

    All teachers desire to keep their students on task and focused on meeting lesson objectives. Classroom management, perhaps the most critical factor involved in a lesson's success, includes several considerations. In this article, the authors, who are physical education teacher educators themselves, discuss the five management practices, which they…

  14. Supporting Student Autonomy in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Dana; Webster, Collin A.

    2011-01-01

    The lack of motivation among students is a common challenge in physical education. Studies drawing on the self-determination theory consistently show that perceived autonomy facilitates adaptive motivation in students, which can lead to a wide range of desired educational outcomes. However, instructional strategies designed to support student…

  15. The Future of Physical Education and Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Charles A.

    1982-01-01

    Future physical educators must: (1) have proper credentials to establish jurisdiction over their domain; (2) help people to become responsible for their own health and fitness; (3) provide educational experiences for all people; and (4) make use of technological advances. (CJ)

  16. Physical-Education Facilities/Recreation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college physical education/recreation facilities considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting unique concepts and ideas. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm,…

  17. Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauer, Victor P.; Pangrazi, Robert P.

    This guide offers a functional, child-tested physical education program for elementary students. Chapters in the book discuss the following topics: (a) current educational and sociological trends; (b) rationale for the program; (c) guidelines for program planning; (d) organization for effective teaching; (e) basis of movement learning and…

  18. An evolving perspective on physical activity counselling by medical professionals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for many chronic conditions and a leading cause of premature mortality. An increasing proportion of adults worldwide are not engaging in a level of physical activity sufficient to prevent or alleviate these adverse effects. Medical professionals have been identified as potentially powerful sources of influence for those who do not meet minimum physical activity guidelines. Health professionals are respected and expected sources of advice and they reach a large and relevant proportion of the population. Despite this potential, health professionals are not routinely practicing physical activity promotion. Discussion Medical professionals experience several known barriers to physical activity promotion including lack of time and lack of perceived efficacy in changing physical activity behaviour in patients. Furthermore, evidence for effective physical activity promotion by medical professionals is inconclusive. To address these problems, new approaches to physical activity promotion are being proposed. These include collaborating with community based physical activity behaviour change interventions, preparing patients for effective brief counselling during a consultation with the medical professional, and use of interactive behaviour change technology. Summary It is important that we recognise the latent risk of physical inactivity among patients presenting in clinical settings. Preparation for improving patient physical activity behaviours should commence before the consultation and may include physical activity screening. Medical professionals should also identify suitable community interventions to which they can refer physically inactive patients. Outsourcing the majority of a comprehensive physical activity intervention to community based interventions will reduce the required clinical consultation time for addressing the issue with each patient. Priorities for future research include investigating ways to promote successful referrals and subsequent engagement in comprehensive community support programs to increase physical activity levels of inactive patients. Additionally, future clinical trials of physical activity interventions should be evaluated in the context of a broader framework of outcomes to inform a systematic consideration of broad strengths and weaknesses regarding not only efficacy but cost-effectiveness and likelihood of successful translation of interventions to clinical contexts. PMID:22524484

  19. Physical Activity in Physical Education: Are Longer Lessons Better?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicole J.; Monnat, Shannon M.; Lounsbery, Monica A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare physical activity (PA) outcomes in a sample of high school (HS) physical education (PE) lessons from schools that adopted "traditional" versus "modified block" schedule formats. Methods: We used the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) to conduct observations…

  20. Promoting Physical Activity through Physical Education: Increasing Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Lisa; Beighle, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how quality physical education can promote lifelong physical activity. One strategy for motivating students to be active is to get parents involved. Of the many possible sources of social support for children, parents are the most powerful. And, this remains true regardless of the age. This article provides strategies and…

  1. Improving Health-Enhancing Physical Activity in Girls' Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairclough, S.; Stratton, G.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an intervention to increase levels of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) during girls' physical education lessons. Two Year 7 classes (age 11-12 years) were randomly appointed to control and experimental groups. Both followed the same six-lesson unit of gymnastics with identical lesson…

  2. Videotape Production by Medical Educators: Some Practical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzner, Richard J.; Bittker, Thomas E.

    1973-01-01

    The authors explore four areas of practical difficulty for the medical educator undertaking the creation of his own videotaped teaching materials: (1) the mechanics of videotape production; (2) the subculture of the television production studio; (3) the reaction of health staff and patients to videotape production; and (4) the integration of…

  3. Consumer Health Education in a Medical School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Nancy H.

    1977-01-01

    Experience at the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey suggests that consumer health education can be incorporated into a medical school curriculum. It can be included in the existing courses in occupational medicine, behavioral sciences, and psychiatry and other preclinical and clinical areas. (LBH)

  4. Effective Learning & Teaching in Medical, Dental & Veterinary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John, Ed.; Huttly, Sharon, Ed.; Taylor, Ian, Ed.

    This collection of papers includes: (1) "Opportunities in Medical, Dental and Veterinary (MDV) Educational Development" (John Sweet); (2) "Culture, Collegiality, and Collaborative Learning" (George Brown, Madeline Rohin, and Michael Manogue); (3) "Communication Skills: On Being Patient-Centered" (Jeff Wilson); (4) "Curriculum" (John Sweet); (5)…

  5. Medical Terminology: Root Words. Health Occupations Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (root words) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to root words, a list of resources needed, procedures for using the module, a list of terminology used in the…

  6. The Future of Medical Education David G. Nichols, MD

    E-print Network

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    Taxonomy based on Precision Medicine: · Information Commons · Data repository on all patients · KnowledgeThe Future of Medical Education David G. Nichols, MD Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine "Moving Academic Medicine Forward" - A Conference in Honor of Edward D. Miller, MD June 11, 2012

  7. Simulation-Based Medical Education: An Ethical Imperative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Amitai; Wolpe, Paul Root; Small, Stephen D.; Glick, Shimon

    2003-01-01

    Describes simulation-based learning in medical education and presents four these that make a framework for simulations: (1) best standards of care and training; (2) error management and patient safety; (3) patient autonomy; and (4) social justice and resource allocation. (SLD)

  8. Children with Spina Bifida: Educational Implications of Their Medical Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korabek, Cynthia A.; Cuvo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    Many children with spina bifida present organic characteristics such as muscle weakness below the spinal lesion. These medical aspects are discussed with respect to their influence on teaching self-care and motor skills and reducing self-injurious behavior. Recommendations for educational programming are made. (Author/JDD)

  9. Syllabus in Medical Assisting: Health Occupations Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    The document presents a syllabus which would serve as a guideline for health occupations educators in establishing a course of study for training medical assistants which would meet New York State requirements and be acceptable for State credit. The syllabus is arranged in three columns: (1) minimum acceptable content of study which requires 80…

  10. Accountability for Graduate Medical Education: Report of an Unsuccessful Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Robert M.; Moore, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment is reported which utilized a professional medical care organization as the base for intern and resident education. The major reason for its failure was the rigidity of Medicare regulations. The data suggest the mechanism is feasible and could potentially obviate many problems of hospital-based programs. (Editor/JT)

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Continuing Medical Education Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansouri, Maliheh; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: We undertook a meta-analysis of the Continuing Medical Education (CME) outcome literature to examine the effect of moderator variables on physician knowledge, performance, and patient outcomes. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE and ERIC was conducted for randomized controlled trials and experimental design studies of CME…

  12. Research in Medical Education: Balancing Service and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Mathieu; Hodges, Brian; Regehr, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Since the latter part of the 1990's, the English-speaking medical education community has been engaged in a debate concerning the types of research that should have priority. To shed light on this debate and to better understand its implications for the practice of research, 23 semi-structured interviews were conducted with "influential figures"…

  13. Revisiting "Discrepancy Analysis in Continuing Medical Education: A Conceptual Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Based upon a review and analysis of selected literature, the author presents a conceptual model of discrepancy analysis evaluation for planning, implementing, and assessing the impact of continuing medical education (CME). The model is described in terms of its value as a means of diagnosing errors in the development and implementation of CME. The…

  14. The PA's role in medical research: implications for PA education.

    PubMed

    Morian, J P

    1986-03-01

    Physician assistant involvement in medical research is a desirable and appropriate expansion of the PA role and represents advancement for the profession as a whole. This article explores advantages and disadvantages, as well as possible ways that PA education can be improved to prepare PAs for the demands of research. PMID:10314624

  15. Academic Analytics in a Medical Curriculum: Enabling Educational Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmos, Martin; Corrin, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The developing field of academic analytics seeks to turn data from educational systems into actionable intelligence for the improvement of teaching and learning. This paper reports on the implementation of analytics in a new medical school with an integrated curriculum and clinical focus. Analytics addressed two challenges in the curriculum:…

  16. Evaluation of an Online Bioterrorism Continuing Medical Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical

  17. What can medical education learn from the neurobiology of learning?

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Michael J; Andrews, Linda; Armstrong, Elizabeth G; Aschenbrenner, Carol; Kass, Joseph S; Ogden, Paul; Schwartzstein, Richard; Viggiano, Thomas R

    2011-04-01

    The last several decades have seen a large increase in knowledge of the underlying biological mechanisms that serve learning and memory. The insights gleaned from neurobiological and cognitive neuroscientific experimentation in humans and in animal models have identified many of the processes at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels that occur during learning and the formation, storage, and recall of memories. Moreover, with the advent of noninvasive technologies to monitor patterns of neural activity during various forms of human cognition, the efficacy of different strategies for effective teaching can be compared. Considerable insight has also been developed as to how to most effectively engage these processes to facilitate learning, retention, recall, and effective use and application of the learned information. However, this knowledge has not systematically found its way into the medical education process. Thus, there are considerable opportunities for the integration of current knowledge about the biology of learning with educational strategies and curricular design. By teaching medical students in ways that use this knowledge, there is an opportunity to make medical education easier and more effective. The authors present 10 key aspects of learning that they believe can be incorporated into effective teaching paradigms in multiple ways. They also present recommendations for applying the current knowledge of the neurobiology of learning throughout the medical education continuum. PMID:21346504

  18. Curriculum Guidelines for Management of Medical Emergencies in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' revised guidelines for curriculum on managing medical emergencies give an introduction to the scope of the curriculum, describe educational goals and prerequisites, and outline the course content and structure, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, needed faculty, and continuing clinical…

  19. Affirmative action in medical education: a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Helms, L B; Helms, C M

    1998-03-01

    The use of affirmative action programs as part of the effort to increase the presence of minorities in medical education and the physician workforce has come under greater legal scrutiny. The authors describe the history of the legal theory behind affirmative action, giving examples from the evolving case law and from Department of Education guidelines. They identify legal pitfalls in the areas of admission and financial aid, including the categorization of students by race, racially disproportionate financial aid awards after accounting for need, racially disproportionate amounts of scholarships as opposed to loans, and, for public medical schools, differential treatment of out-of-state students based on race. Medical schools should be aware of this legal framework so that they can construct affirmative action programs that comply with the law while maintaining momentum toward diversification. PMID:9526449

  20. Medical education and informal teaching by nurses and midwives

    PubMed Central

    Huntington, Annette; Bogossian, Fiona; Leadbitter, Bernadette; Turner, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nurses and midwives to the education of medical colleagues in the clinical context. Methods The research design was a cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire. A subsample of 2906 respondents, from a total of 4763 nurses and midwives participating in a web-based study, had taught doctors in the 12 months prior to the survey. The questionnaire generated mainly categorical data analysed with descriptive statistics. Results In the group of respondents who taught doctors (n =2906), most provided informal teaching (92.9%, n=2677). Nearly a quarter (23.9%, n=695) self-rated the amount of time spent teaching as at least moderate in duration. The most common named teaching topics were documentation (74.8%, n=2005) and implementing unit procedures (74.3, n=1987), followed by medication charting (61.9%, n=1657) and choosing correct medications (55.8%, n=1493). Respondents felt their contributions were unrecognised by the doctors and students they taught (43.9%, n=1256). Conclusions Educational contributions while unrecognised could be considered positively by the respondents. However, discussion of teaching responsibilities is necessary to support the development of teaching protocols and supervision responsibilities as respondents reported teaching clinical medical tasks related to medications, consent and other skills within the medical domain. Study limitations include the nature of self-reported responses which cannot be validated and data drawn from a survey concluded in 2009. PMID:25341227

  1. Competency-based medical education: the wave of the future.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Nicolette; Nakajima, Amy; Kent, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is a new educational paradigm that will enable the medical education community to meet societal, patient, and learner needs of the 21st century. CBME offers a renewed commitment to both clinical and educational outcomes, a new focus on assessment and developmental milestones, a mechanism to promote a true continuum of medical education, and a method to promote learner-centred curricula in the context of accountability. Accountability is central to CBME, ensuring that graduating practitioners are well-rounded and competent to provide safe and effective patient care. The structure of CBME in obstetrics and gynaecology must be rooted in, and reflect, Canadian practice. Its development and implementation require an understanding of the principles that are the foundation of CBME, along with the involvement of the entire community of obstetricians and gynaecologists and other maternity care providers. We provide here an overview of the basic principles of teaching and learning and the theories underpinning CBME. PMID:26001689

  2. A New Instrument for Medical Decision Support and Education: The Stanford Health Information Network for Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Godin; Robert Hubbs; Bill Woods; Mark C. Tsai; Dev Nag; Thomas C. Rindfleisch; Parvati Dev; Kenneth L. Melmon

    1999-01-01

    The information needs of physicians are complex and ever increasing in a world of rapidly expanding medical knowledge and a practice environment where physicians are required to know and do more with shrinking resources. Current strategies for providing clinical decision support and continuing medical education have failed in part, because they have not provided timely, easy access to information that

  3. Quarked!--Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike--with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not…

  4. Management of Physical Education and Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotee, March; Bucher, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This book offers a solid foundation of management concepts, skills, and techniques that enable students to develop and test the leadership, decision-making, and problem-solving required for their role in the profession of physical education and sport. The thirteenth edition continues to focus on the management and administration of physical

  5. Education and Outreach in Particle Physics

    E-print Network

    R. Michael Barnett

    2011-09-30

    There are many varied programs of education and outreach in particle physics. This report for the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society 2001 meeting reviews the impact of these programs in general, and also gives several examples of ongoing programs with a primary focus on those in the US.

  6. Understanding Hemophilia. Implications for the Physical Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes hemophilia and ways to provide appropriate physical education experiences to children with hemophilia. The article focuses on what hemophilia is, how to treat hemophilia, benefits of physical activity, how to teach children with hemophilia, choosing and modifying sports and activities, and safety and emergency situations. (SM)

  7. What Can We Do about Physical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Vern; Vogel, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive K-8 physical education program should aim at developing a healthy lifestyle during childhood and adolescence and should include grade-level instructional components for various fundamental skills. Checklists can help identify program strengths and weaknesses. Two sidebars summarize benefits of physical activity and walking for…

  8. Experiences of Ninth Grade Physical Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Penelope A.

    Numerous studies exist that report the behaviors of elite athletes, but little research exists which describes the experiences of students within public school physical education classes. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences articulated by ninth graders participating (n=67) in their last semester of required physical

  9. The Ultimate Unit in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, Brent; Weaver, R. Glenn

    2011-01-01

    In order to promote physical activity among youth, students should be taught activities they enjoy, and have the opportunity to develop skill and proficiency. This approach might result in more individuals being physically active for a lifetime, and therefore, potentially reduce the risk and onset of many chronic diseases. As educators consider…

  10. Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

  11. Biomechanical Concepts for the Physical Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeyer, H. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The concepts and principles of biomechanics are familiar to the teacher of physical science as well as to the physical educator. The difference between the two instructors, however, is that one knows the language of science and the other provides an experientially rich environment to support acquisition of these concepts and principles. Use of…

  12. Retheorizing Sexual Harassment in Medical Education: Women Students' Perceptions at Five U.S. Medical Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Delese Wear; Julie M. Aultman; Nicole J. Borges

    2007-01-01

    Background: The literature consistently reports that sexual harassment occurs with regularity in medical education, mostly in clinical settings, and most of it goes unreported. Reasons for nonreporting include the fear of retaliation, a reluctance to be viewed as a victim, a fear that one is being “too sensitive,” and the belief that nothing will be done.Purpose: We wanted to examine

  13. National Correlations in Medical Technology Education. A Report of a Study of Medical Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Medical Technology Education, Memphis, TN.

    This study seeks to obtain baseline information about the relationships among medical technology education, certification, and job performance. The sample was 1,861 technologists who filed for the July 1962 certification examination. Information concerned: (1) performance in preclinical and clinical study, and in the certification examination, (2)…

  14. Quarked! - Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike-with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not introduced until high school or university.1,2 Many of these concepts can be made accessible to younger students when presented in a fun and engaging way. Informal science institutions are in an ideal position to communicate new and challenging science topics in engaging and innovative ways and offer a variety of educational enrichment experiences for students that support and enhance science learning.3 Quarked!™ Adventures in the Subatomic Universe, a National Science Foundation EPSCoR-funded particle physics education program, provides classroom programs and online educational resources.

  15. The NRC Study of Undergraduate Physics Education: The role, status and outlook for physics education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Paula

    2013-03-01

    The Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Academies formed the ``Committee on Undergraduate Physics Education, Research and Implementation'' in 2011 and charged it with producing a report that ``identifies the goals and challenges facing undergraduate physics education and identifies how best practices for undergraduate physics education can be implemented on a widespread and sustained basis.'' (Further information on the committee and its charge can be found at: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/BPA/BPA_059078.) The report is expected to be released in early 2013. This talk will address the committee's process, some of the findings, and their implications for physics education. The role of physics education research in driving innovation will be emphasized.

  16. [Exploration and analysis of the thought of medical education in the Shanghai New Chinese Medical College].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Shang, Li; Bing, Shoulan

    2014-11-01

    Shanghai New Chinese Medical College set up by Zhu Nanshan and his sons, Zhu Xiaonan and Zhu Hegao, was a medical college of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with the most innovative spirit in modern time. Its affiliated research institute held the principle of "realizing the scientific truth of TCM, training TCM advanced talents", marking the beginning of the pioneering of "scientific TCM". The educational plan, clinical research and academic organization based on "carrying forward the quintessence of Chinese culture, absorbing and digesting the new knowledge" showed a certain influence at home and abroad. The College advocated the combination of communicating with famous physicians and the study of theory, cultivation of students' organization and academic society, launching of journals, and organizing students' research associations was aiming at the satisfaction of the social needs and teaching orientation. Its running experience provided useful reference for modern TCM medical education. PMID:25620358

  17. Beliefs and Practices about Implementing Technology in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Donald E., II.

    2010-01-01

    There is little research in the field of physical education on whether technology can help decrease the level of childhood obesity in physical education classes or on why physical educators choose to use or not use technology in their programs. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine physical educators' beliefs and practices…

  18. Stories about Physical Education from Young People with Disabilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayley Fitzgerald; Annette Stride

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on young people with disabilities and mainstream physical education in England. Within this context there have been unprecedented levels of funding and resources directed towards physical education in order to support more inclusive physical education experiences for all young people, including those with disabilities. Physical education holds a unique place within the school curriculum; it is a

  19. Periodicities in societal systems behaviors: relationships of economies, generations, and technologies to reforms in medical education

    E-print Network

    Kinra, Reva Elaine

    2013-02-22

    As medical educators strive to produce qualified physicians who are able to meet societal needs, the medical education system must continually reform itself to meet the demands of that changing society. Understanding the interactions between...

  20. 77 FR 41431 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Impact of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...Impact of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the...Impact of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the...collected will allow continued assessment of the value of the training provided by the Office...

  1. Gamification as a tool for enhancing graduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, Christa R; Westfall, Andrew O; Rodriguez, J Martin; Dempsey, Donald M; Cherrington, Andrea; Roy, Brita; Patel, Mukesh; Willig, James H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The last decade has seen many changes in graduate medical education training in the USA, most notably the implementation of duty hour standards for residents by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education. As educators are left to balance more limited time available between patient care and resident education, new methods to augment traditional graduate medical education are needed. Objectives To assess acceptance and use of a novel gamification-based medical knowledge software among internal medicine residents and to determine retention of information presented to participants by this medical knowledge software. Methods We designed and developed software using principles of gamification to deliver a web-based medical knowledge competition among internal medicine residents at the University of Alabama (UA) at Birmingham and UA at Huntsville in 2012–2013. Residents participated individually and in teams. Participants accessed daily questions and tracked their online leaderboard competition scores through any internet-enabled device. We completed focus groups to assess participant acceptance and analysed software use, retention of knowledge and factors associated with loss of participants (attrition). Results Acceptance: In focus groups, residents (n=17) reported leaderboards were the most important motivator of participation. Use: 16?427 questions were completed: 28.8% on Saturdays/Sundays, 53.1% between 17:00 and 08:00. Retention of knowledge: 1046 paired responses (for repeated questions) were collected. Correct responses increased by 11.9% (p<0.0001) on retest. Differences per time since question introduction, trainee level and style of play were observed. Attrition: In ordinal regression analyses, completing more questions (0.80 per 10% increase; 0.70 to 0.93) decreased, while postgraduate year 3 class (4.25; 1.44 to 12.55) and non-daily play (4.51; 1.50 to 13.58) increased odds of attrition. Conclusions Our software-enabled, gamification-based educational intervention was well accepted among our millennial learners. Coupling software with gamification and analysis of trainee use and engagement data can be used to develop strategies to augment learning in time-constrained educational settings. PMID:25352673

  2. Ethical, Scientific, and Educational Concerns With Unproven Medications

    PubMed Central

    Pray, W. Steven

    2006-01-01

    Quackery (promotion of products that do not work or have not been proven to work) was once a commonly used term within the pharmacy and medical communities. However, an increasingly anti-scientific national climate culminated in passage of the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, which granted unprecedented legitimacy to “dietary supplements” that had not been scientifically proven to be effective and/or safe. In part, this was facilitated when professional pharmacy magazines and journals published advertisements and articles promoting these unproven medications. Gradually, pharmacy codes of ethics eliminated references to quackery, and some pharmacy organizations seemed to accept the unproven medications they once exhorted the pharmacist not to sell. The profession's shift in attitude toward unproven medications occurred as the medical community at large began to realize the value of evidence-based medicine. Academicians must resist pressure to present unproven therapies as realistic alternatives for medications with scientific proof of safety and efficacy. They must stress the value of evidence-based medicine and urge students and pharmacists to recommend only those medications with evidence-based proof of safety and efficacy. PMID:17332867

  3. Educational climate perception by preclinical and clinical medical students in five Spanish medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Gual, Arcadi; Escaneroi, Jesus; Tomás, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Elorudy, Marta; Virumbrales, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Gerardo; Arce, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate student's perceptions of Educational Climate (EC) in Spanish medical schools, comparing various aspects of EC between the 2nd (preclinical) and the 4th (clinical) years to detect strengths and weaknesses in the on-going curricular reform. Methods This study utilized a cross-sectional design and employed the Spanish version of the "Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure" (DREEM). The survey involved 894 2nd year students and 619 4th year students from five Spanish medical schools. Results The global average score of 2nd year students from the five medical schools was found to be significantly higher (116.2±24.9, 58.2% of maximum score) than that observed in 4th year students (104.8±29.5, 52.4% of maximum score). When the results in each medical school were analysed separately, the scores obtained in the 2nd year were almost always significantly higher than in the 4th year for all medical schools, in both the global scales and the different subscales. Conclusions The perception of the EC by 2nd and 4th year students from five Spanish medical schools is more positive than negative although it is significantly lower in the 4th  year. In both years, although more evident in the 4th year, students point out the existence of several important "problematic educational areas" associated with the persistence of traditional curricula and teaching methodologies. Our findings of this study should lead medical schools to make a serious reflection and drive the implementation of the necessary changes required to improve teaching, especially during the clinical period. PMID:26057355

  4. Quality assessment of medical education and use of information technology.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Ciric, Damir; Pulja, Artan; Kulasin, Igor; Pandza, Haris

    2009-01-01

    Extensive and fast advancements in biomedical sciences created a significant delay in receiving relevant and updated information in medical practice - physicians use old techniques and treat patients incorrectly. Bosnia and Herzegovina signed the Bologna Declaration on 18 September 2003, and in the light of this new approach to university education, and the process of joining The European Union, the authors set the following aims: to determine the current level of knowledge among medical students at the Medical Faculty of the University of Sarajevo, to determine the level of knowledge among medical students before their enrolment at the faculty, and to find out students opinion on their needs for further education. Students also left their suggestions on what should be changed in the curriculum. 203 students were included in the survey and results show that they demand more practical work, direct contact with patients and presentation of interesting clinical cases. Many of them use the internet as professional education means. Professional papers are rarely used. At present, the availability of learning material is insufficient at the faculty library. PMID:19745442

  5. The Use of Small Group Tutorials as an Educational Strategy in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Small group tutorials are an educational strategy that is growing in popularity in medical education. This is indicative of the movement from a traditional teacher centred approach to more student-centred learning, which is characterised by active participation and autonomous learning (Hedge et al, 2011). However, small group teaching is one of…

  6. Simulation-based medical education: an ethical imperative.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Amitai; Wolpe, Paul Root; Small, Stephen D; Glick, Shimon

    2003-08-01

    Medical training must at some point use live patients to hone the skills of health professionals. But there is also an obligation to provide optimal treatment and to ensure patients' safety and well-being. Balancing these two needs represents a fundamental ethical tension in medical education. Simulation-based learning can help mitigate this tension by developing health professionals' knowledge, skills, and attitudes while protecting patients from unnecessary risk. Simulation-based training has been institutionalized in other high-hazard professions, such as aviation, nuclear power, and the military, to maximize training safety and minimize risk. Health care has lagged behind in simulation applications for a number of reasons, including cost, lack of rigorous proof of effect, and resistance to change. Recently, the international patient safety movement and the U.S. federal policy agenda have created a receptive atmosphere for expanding the use of simulators in medical training, stressing the ethical imperative to "first do no harm" in the face of validated, large epidemiological studies describing unacceptable preventable injuries to patients as a result of medical management. Four themes provide a framework for an ethical analysis of simulation-based medical education: best standards of care and training, error management and patient safety, patient autonomy, and social justice and resource allocation. These themes are examined from the perspectives of patients, learners, educators, and society. The use of simulation wherever feasible conveys a critical educational and ethical message to all: patients are to be protected whenever possible and they are not commodities to be used as conveniences of training. PMID:12915366

  7. Physical Education for Health and Wellbeing: A Discourse Analysis of Scottish Physical Education Curricular Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvilly, Nollaig; Verheul, Martine; Atencio, Matthew; Jess, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the discourses associated with physical education in Scotland's "Curriculum for Excellence". We implement a poststructural perspective in order to identify the discourses that underpin the physical education sections of the "Curriculum for Excellence" "health and well-being"…

  8. Exhaled breath analysis: physical methods, instruments, and medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. L.; Domracheva, E. G.; Sobakinskaya, E. A.; Chernyaeva, M. B.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the analysis of exhaled breath, a rapidly growing field in noninvasive medical diagnostics that lies at the intersection of physics, chemistry, and medicine. Current data are presented on gas markers in human breath and their relation to human diseases. Various physical methods for breath analysis are described. It is shown how measurement precision and data volume requirements have stimulated technological developments and identified the problems that have to be solved to put this method into clinical practice.

  9. PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH SUBJECT GUIDE -I/S Accessing the general physical education curriculum for students with sensory

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH SUBJECT GUIDE - I/S Books: Accessing the general physical education: An Introduction to Health and Physical Education/ Ted Temertzoglou, Paul Challen GV341 .T45 2003 Foundations The Handbook of physical education / edited by David Kirk, Doune Macdonald and Mary O'Sullivan GV207.3 .H36

  10. Games for Multicultural Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kelle; Maeda, Julienne K.

    2012-01-01

    Students from diverse, multicultural families and backgrounds fill today's classrooms. Diversity encompasses ethnicity, gender, ability level, learning style, English language learners, socioeconomic status, and cultural values. Educators have a responsibility to offer inclusive curricula tailored to the needs of all students. Teaching…

  11. ‘Do as I say, not as I do’: Medical Education and Foucault's Normalizing Technologies of Self

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chrystal Jaye; Tony Egan; Sarah Parker

    2006-01-01

    Medical training as a process of professional socialization has been well explored within the fields of medical education, medical sociology and medical anthropology. Our contribution is to outline a bio-power, more specifically an anatomo-politics, of medical education. The current research aimed to explore perspectives on what is commonly termed the ‘hidden curriculum’. We conducted interviews with pre-clinical medical students, clinical

  12. Planning and Decision Making for Medical Education: An Analysis of Costs and Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Paul

    This paper clarifies the role of medical education in the large health care system, estimates the resources required to carry on medical education programs and the benefits that accrue from medical education, and answers a few fundamental policy questions. Cost estimates are developed on a program-by-program basis, using empirical economic…

  13. Offices of Research in Medical Education: Accomplishments and Added Value Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Mark A.; Dottl, Susan; Nowacek, George A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined how the Society of Directors of Research in Medical Education (SDRME) and offices of medical education (OMEs) have contributed to the research in medical education (RIME) efforts. Found that SDRME has sponsored literature reviews and collaborated with various national organizations. OMEs have served the needs of their institutions and…

  14. Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science SUPPORTING PHYSICAL THERAPY EDUCATION THROUGH SPONSORSHIP

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science SUPPORTING PHYSICAL THERAPY EDUCATION THROUGH SPONSORSHIP For more than 57 years the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science therapy education. Building on its strong foundation of physical therapy fundamentals, the Department

  15. Excellence in Physics Education Award Talk: Sharing Active Learning Strategies in the Developed and Developing Worlds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Sokoloff

    2010-01-01

    Since the first series of National Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) Institutes for Teachers of Physics in Summer, 1987, the Activity Based Physics Group (ABP) has presented numerous professional development institutes and workshops to thousands of high school, college and university faculty, sponsored by National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Education, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and others. An overview of these

  16. Why Your School Needs a Quality Physical Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Smith, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that all elementary schools should have a regular physical-education program for children with an emphasis on physical activity. Argues that principals should insist on a quality physical-education program. (PKP)

  17. Sport Education: physical education for the new millennium?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tristan Wallhead; Mary Osullivan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to establish what is currently known about the effect of the Sport Education (SE) curriculum model (Siedentop, 1994a) on various indices of student learning in physical education. A total of 62 peer-reviewed journal articles pertaining to the SE model were collected and separated into two broad categories of theoretical\\/application articles (n?=?34) and data-based empirical

  18. Financial dimensions of veterinary medical education: an economist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, James W

    2013-01-01

    Much discussion has transpired in recent years related to the rising cost of veterinary medical education and the increasing debt loads of graduating veterinarians. Underlying these trends are fundamental changes in the funding structure of higher education in general and of academic veterinary medicine specifically. As a result of the ongoing disinvestment by state governments in higher education, both tuition rates and academic programs have experienced a substantial impact across US colleges and schools of veterinary medicine. Programmatically, the effects have spanned the entire range of teaching, research, and service activities. For graduates, both across higher education and in veterinary medicine specifically, the impact has been steadily increasing levels of student debt. Although the situation is clearly worrisome, viable repayment options exist for these escalating debt loads. In combination with recent income and employment trends for veterinarians, these options provide a basis for cautious optimism for the future. PMID:23709105

  19. Adaptive and perceptual learning technologies in medical education and training.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Philip J

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in the learning sciences offer remarkable potential to improve medical education and maximize the benefits of emerging medical technologies. This article describes 2 major innovation areas in the learning sciences that apply to simulation and other aspects of medical learning: Perceptual learning (PL) and adaptive learning technologies. PL technology offers, for the first time, systematic, computer-based methods for teaching pattern recognition, structural intuition, transfer, and fluency. Synergistic with PL are new adaptive learning technologies that optimize learning for each individual, embed objective assessment, and implement mastery criteria. The author describes the Adaptive Response-Time-based Sequencing (ARTS) system, which uses each learner's accuracy and speed in interactive learning to guide spacing, sequencing, and mastery. In recent efforts, these new technologies have been applied in medical learning contexts, including adaptive learning modules for initial medical diagnosis and perceptual/adaptive learning modules (PALMs) in dermatology, histology, and radiology. Results of all these efforts indicate the remarkable potential of perceptual and adaptive learning technologies, individually and in combination, to improve learning in a variety of medical domains. PMID:24084310

  20. Complexity in graduate medical education: a collaborative education agenda for internal medicine and geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anna; Fernandez, Helen; Cayea, Danelle; Chheda, Shobhina; Paniagua, Miguel; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Day, Hollis

    2014-06-01

    Internal medicine residents today face significant challenges in caring for an increasingly complex patient population within ever-changing education and health care environments. As a result, medical educators, health care system leaders, payers, and patients are demanding change and accountability in graduate medical education (GME). A 2012 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) retreat identified medical education as an area for collaboration between internal medicine and geriatric medicine. The authors first determined a short-term research agenda for resident education by mapping selected internal medicine reporting milestones to geriatrics competencies, and listing available sample learner assessment tools. Next, the authors proposed a strategy for long-term collaboration in three priority areas in clinical medicine that are challenging for residents today: (1) team-based care, (2) transitions and readmissions, and (3) multi-morbidity. The short-term agenda focuses on learner assessment, while the long-term agenda allows for program evaluation and improvement. This model of collaboration in medical education combines the resources and expertise of internal medicine and geriatric medicine educators with the goal of increasing innovation and improving outcomes in GME targeting the needs of our residents and their patients. PMID:24557513

  1. Industry relations with emergency medicine graduate medical education programs.

    PubMed

    Kowalenko, Terry; Char, Douglas; Marco, Catherine; Asher, Shellie; Raja, Ali; Farrell, Sue; Sokolove, Peter E

    2009-10-01

    A panel of physicians from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Graduate Medical Education (GME), Ethics, and Industry Relations Committees were asked by the SAEM Board of Directors to write a position paper on the relationship of emergency medicine (EM) GME with industry. Using multiple sources as references, the team derived a set of guidelines that all EM GME training programs can use when interacting with industry representatives. In addition, the team used a question-answer format to provide educators and residents with a practical approach to these interactions. The SAEM Board of Directors endorsed the guidelines in June 2009. PMID:19799581

  2. One Health in the context of medical and veterinary education.

    PubMed

    McConnell, I

    2014-08-01

    This paper discusses how best to develop the educational platforms that can foster a wider appreciation of the importance of the One Health concept in medical and veterinary education. There are many compelling examples, from genetics to infectious diseases, where significant advances have been made in medicine and veterinary medicine by applying the principles of One Health, i.e. by recognising the interconnectedness between medicine, veterinary medicine and related sciences. In the medical and veterinary curriculum the objective should be to ensure that all opportunities are taken throughout preclinical and clinical teaching to incorporate the lessons which have been learned from the success stories in One Health. This will ensure that advances continue to be made and that a more pervasive and forward-looking scientific culture sustains One Health in the future. PMID:25707191

  3. A roundtable of innovative leaders in medical education.

    PubMed

    Neusy, André Jacques; Palsdottir, Bjorg

    2008-10-01

    In 2008, the Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC) created the Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet), bringing together schools in different parts of the world that share a core mission: to recruit students from, and produce physicians for, underserved communities. In determining the competencies such physicians will need, these schools also share an approach to medical education that looks beyond the traditional curriculum and seeks the involvement of communities and other stakeholders. Their input helps define the knowledge, skills, and attitudes around which new curriculum is built, and helps guide the selection of educational methodologies, taking into account context and resource constraints. The nascent THEnet now has a nucleus of eight member schools, each dedicated to fulfilling a strong social accountability mandate. The network is designed to assist them by providing a collaborative platform conducive to experimentation; dialogue; and creation and sharing of tools, experiences and evidence. It will also support systematic outcome evaluations, innovation, and joint research to strengthen the knowledge base on successful strategies for increasing the number and quality of doctors in neglected communities. By bringing these schools together, developing synergy among them and publishing their results, THEnet hopes to more broadly promote the transformation of medical education and medical practice into more socially accountable endeavors that improve health system equity and performance. Leaders from six of these innovative medical schools spoke with the Guest Editors of this issue of MEDICC Review, a conversation we bring you below. They are: Dr Juan Carrizo, Rector of the Latin American Medical School (ELAM), Cuba; Dr Fortunato L. Cristobal, founding Dean of the School of Medicine at Ateneo de Zamboanga University (AZU), the Philippines; Dr Pedro D?az, member of the National Academic Coordinating Committee of the National Training Program for Comprehensive Community Physicians (NTPCCP), Venezuela; Dr Richard Murray, Dean and Head of the School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University (JCU), Australia; Dr Roger Strasser, founding Dean of Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM), Canada; and Dr Paul Worley, Dean of Flinders University School of Medicine (FUSM), Australia. Erratum Neusy, AJ, Palsdottir, B. A Roundtable of Innovative Leaders in Medical Education. MEDICC Review. 2008;10(4):20-24. The correct website for the Ateneo de Zamboanga University School of Medicine in the Philippines is: http://som.adzu.edu.ph. PMID:21483332

  4. The HIV Epidemic and Medical Education. A Report of the AAMC Committee on AIDS and the Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This report examines the implications of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) epidemic for general professional education in medicine with a focus on the period of medical student education and the early years of residency training. Five sections are as follows: impact of the HIV epidemic on medical practice; issues for general professional…

  5. Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antimirova, Tetyana

    2006-12-01

    A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

  6. Radiation protection aspects of EMITEL Encyclopaedia of Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, M; Tabakov, S; Lewis, C; Tabakova, V; Thurston, J; Smith, P

    2015-07-01

    The Encyclopaedia of Medical Physics EMITEL was developed under the EU pilot project European Medical Imaging Technology e-Encyclopaedia for Lifelong Learning. This large reference material includes 3400 articles on 2100 pages supported by thousands of illustrations. All materials are available free at the website, www.emitel2.eu. The articles are grouped in seven categories-physics of: X-ray diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, radiation protection and general terms. The radiation protection part of EMITEL includes 450 articles. These were organised in several sub-groups including: nuclear and atomic physics; ionizing radiation interactions and biological effects; radiation detection and measurement; dosimetric quantities and units; and general radiation protection and international bodies. EMITEL project was developed over 3 y and attracted as contributors 250+ senior specialists from 35 countries. After its successful launching, EMITEL is actively used by thousands of professionals around the world. PMID:25848099

  7. Educating medical students in laboratory medicine: a proposed curriculum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian R; Aguero-Rosenfeld, Maria; Anastasi, John; Baron, Beverly; Berg, Anders; Bock, Jay L; Campbell, Sheldon; Crookston, Kendall P; Fitzgerald, Robert; Fung, Mark; Haspel, Richard; Howe, John Greg; Jhang, Jeffrey; Kamoun, Malek; Koethe, Susan; Krasowski, Matthew D; Landry, Marie L; Marques, Marisa B; Rinder, Henry M; Roberts, William; Schreiber, William E; Spitalnik, Steven L; Tormey, Christopher A; Wolf, Paul; Wu, Yan Yun

    2010-04-01

    As the 100th anniversary of the Flexner report nears, medical student education is being reviewed at many levels. One area of concern, expressed in recent reports from some national health care organizations, is the adequacy of training in the discipline of laboratory medicine (also termed clinical pathology). The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists appointed an ad hoc committee to review this topic and to develop a suggested curriculum, which was subsequently forwarded to the entire membership for review. The proposed medical student laboratory medicine curriculum defines goals and objectives for training, provides guidelines for instructional methods, and gives examples of how outcomes can be assessed. This curriculum is presented as a potentially helpful outline for use by medical school faculty and curriculum committees. PMID:20231605

  8. Implementation and Evaluation of a Medical Informatics Distance Education Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William R Hersh; Katherine Junium; Mark Mailhot; Patricia Tidmarsh

    2001-01-01

    ObjectiveGiven the need for continuing education in medical informatics for mid-career professionals, the authors aimed to implement and evaluate distance learning courses in this area.DesignThe authors performed a needs assessment, content and technology planning, implementation, and student evaluation.MeasurementsThe needs assessment and student evaluations were assessed using a combination of Likert scale and free-form questions.ResultsThe needs assessment indicated much interest in

  9. SU-E-E-06: Teaching Medical Physics in a Radiology Museum

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To enhance the learning process in the teaching of medical physics by providing a venue to experience the historical equipment and devices of radiology. Methods: We have created a museum by assembling a large collection of equipment and artifacts related to radiology and medical physics. As part of a learning-in-context educational approach, classes for a survey course in medical physics are held in the museum so that students are able to visually and tangibly experience the implements of radiology, while related topics are discussed. The students learn how x-ray equipment and techniques evolved throughout the years and they learn to appreciate the differences and similarities between current x-ray technology and that of the early days. The collection contains items dating from the era of the discovery of x-rays up to recent times and includes gas x-ray tubes, hand-held fluoroscopes, generators, spark-gap kV meters, stereoscopes, glass-plate radiographs, a photofluorographic unit, wood-interspaced grid, flat-panel detector, linear-accelerator klystron, and brachytherapy radium applicators, as well as an extensive library containing some of the seminal literature of the field so that students can delve deeper into the technology. In addition to the classes, guided tours are provided for radiologic-technology, bioengineering, physics and medical students, as well as group and individual tours for the general public. Results: Student course assessments have consistently included positive expressions of their experience in the museum. Numerous students have volunteered to assist with display preparation and have learned by researching the content. Many individuals have been attracted on a walk-in basis and have expressed a deep curiosity in the technology, with positive feedback. Conclusion: The museum and its artifacts have been invaluable in stimulating interest in the history and technology of medical physics. Students and visitors alike obtain a deeper appreciation of the contribution physics has made to medicine.

  10. Cuban medical education: aiming for the six-star doctor.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ileana Del Rosario; Fernández, José A; Durán, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Profound changes are under way in Cuban medical education. Some aspects of this transformation represent radical shifts, others a deepening of processes already in motion. Together, these changes reflect a progressive sense of urgency over the last four decades to: 1) scale up physician training to meet the needs of the whole population; 2) recruit and train scientifically prepared and socially committed students; and 3) match competencies, knowledge base, and scope of responsibilities to the concrete health needs of people in Cuba and other countries where these future physicians may serve. These three goals have guided successive innovations in Cuban medical education since the early 1960s, when the University of Havana Medical School was left with only 23 of its 161 professors - the rest either emigrating or in disagreement with academic and health care reforms designed to guarantee the right to health care. From a fee-for-service model catering mainly to individual patients, health care was being transformed into a universal public health system. This required decentralization of medical services - first to the rural areas of the country, which had essentially gone without - followed by development of a nationwide primary health care network. Thus, from the beginning, there was an urgent need to train many more physicians and to train physicians prepared for, and committed to, this new vision. PMID:21483329

  11. Formative assessment in undergraduate medical education: concept, implementation and hurdles.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Ayesha; Shamim, Muhammad Shahid; Aly, Syed Moyn; Chundrigar, Tariq; Alam, Shams Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    Formative assessment, described as "the process of appraising, judging or evaluating students' work or performance and using this to shape and improve students' competence", is generally missing from medical schools of Pakistan. Progressive institutions conduct "formative assessment" as a fleeting part of the curriculum by using various methods that may or may not include feedback to learners. The most important factor in the success of formative assessment is the quality of feedback, shown to have the maximum impact on student accomplishment. Inclusion of formative assessment into the curriculum and its implementation will require the following: Enabling Environment, Faculty and student Training, Role of Department of Medical Education (DME). Many issues can be predicted that may jeopardize the effectiveness of formative assessment including faculty resistance, lack of motivation from students and faculty and paucity of commitment from the top administration. For improvement in medical education in Pakistan, we need to develop a system considered worthy by national and international standards. This paper will give an overview of formative assessment, its implications and recommendations for implementation in medical institutes of Pakistan. PMID:24605718

  12. Ethics for medical educators: an overview and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arjun

    2010-07-01

    Ethics is the rule of right conduct or practice in a profession. The basic principles of ethics are beneficence, justice and autonomy or individual freedom. There is very minor demarcation between ethics and the law. The ethics is promulgated by the professional bodies. All are expected to guide the medical professional in their practice. Medical educators have dual ethical obligations: firstly, to the society at large which expects us to produce competent health professionals, and secondly, to the students under our care. The students observe and copy what their teacher does and his/her role modelling can be a gateway to a student's character building. Due to rapid increase in the number of medical colleges, privatization, and capitalism, ethical issue has become much more relevant and needs to discuss in detail. The present paper discusses the ethics for medical educators in detail with, basic principles, common breaches of ethics and fallacies due to wrong application of ethical principles, and the approach to ethics and methods by which we can prevent and avoid breach of ethics. PMID:21716861

  13. Department of Graduate Medical Education -Stanford University Medical Center 300 Pasteur Drive, Room HC435, Stanford, CA 94305-5207

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Medical Records BEFORE coming to the GME office. Call Chart Completion's office in Redwood City at: (650Department of Graduate Medical Education - Stanford University Medical Center 300 Pasteur Drive://gme.stanford.edu HOUSE STAFF CHECK OUT RECORD NOTE: This form must be completed and returned to the GME Office in order

  14. Should we educate about the risks of medication overuse headache?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is caused by the regular use of medications to treat headache. There has been a lack of research into awareness of MOH. We distributed an electronic survey to undergraduate students and their contacts via social networking sites. Analgesic use, awareness of MOH, perceived change in behaviour following educational intervention about the risks of MOH and preferred terminology for MOH was evaluated. Findings 485 respondents completed the questionnaire (41% having received healthcare training). 77% were unaware of the possibility of MOH resulting from regular analgesic use for headache. Following education about MOH, 80% stated they would reduce analgesic consumption or seek medical advice. 83% indicated that over the counter analgesia should carry a warning of MOH. The preferred terminology for MOH was painkiller-induced headache. Conclusions This study highlights the lack of awareness of MOH. Improved education about MOH and informative packaging of analgesics, highlighting the risks in preferred lay terminology (i.e. painkiller-induced headache), may reduce this iatrogenic morbidity and warrants further evaluation. PMID:24524380

  15. Sri Lankan health care provision and medical education: a discussion

    PubMed Central

    Paskins, Z

    2001-01-01

    My elective was spent at a teaching hospital in Galle, in Sri Lanka. My time was spent shadowing final year students in the specialties of general medicine and paediatrics. This period provided me with much food for thought in comparing and contrasting the health service in Sri Lanka with that of the UK and also considering the differences in the style of medical education. In addition, during my stay, I was able to gain some appreciation of the political and organisational problems faced by a country in the midst of a civil war.?In this report, I have attempted to integrate an account of my observations with a discussion of the thoughts and emotions that I experienced while working in a developing country. Studying in Sri Lanka facilitated my appreciation of facets of British health care and medical education that I had not previously considered. However, fewer resources do not necessarily mean poorer patient care: could Britain have something to learn from the Sri Lankan Health Service????Keywords: Sri Lanka; elective; medical education PMID:11161103

  16. The association between medical education accreditation and the examination performance of internationally educated physicians seeking certification in the United States.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Marta

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of graduates of international medical schools who seek Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates certification based on accreditation of their medical education programmes. For the self-selected population who took United States Medical Licensing Examinations during the study period (2006-2010), accreditation was associated with higher first-attempt pass rates on some examinations, especially for international medical graduates from schools located in the Caribbean region. In addition, certain essential accreditation standards were associated with better performance on all examinations. This study lends support to the value of medical education accreditation. PMID:25947650

  17. Special Physical Education: Adapted, Individualized, Developmental. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John M.

    This text on physical education for children and adolescents with disabilities attempts to bring together current research findings and best educational practices from the fields of adapted physical education, special education, psychology, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and therapeutic recreation. The book is organized into…

  18. Integrating Global Games in the Elementary Physical Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael K.; Buchanan, Alice M.

    2011-01-01

    Global education units are great motivators for activity in elementary physical education because they can bring freshness and excitement to a physical education program. Additionally, children are provided with the opportunity to learn just how much physical education interacts with the other academic subjects that they study. This article…

  19. The Physical Education and Sport Interface: Models, Maxims and Maelstrom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Clive C.

    2011-01-01

    Within many school contexts physical education and sport have historically been positioned as polemic, and while there has been plenty of rhetoric about physical education as well as sport within education, there has seldom been engaged debate or discussion about the relationship between physical education and sport in school settings. This…

  20. Particle Physics Outreach to Secondary Education

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; /Fermilab; Johansson, K.Erik; /Stockholm U.; Young, M.Jean

    2011-11-21

    This review summarizes exemplary secondary education and outreach programs of the particle physics community. We examine programs from the following areas: research experiences, high-energy physics data for students, informal learning for students, instructional resources, and professional development. We report findings about these programs' impact on students and teachers and provide suggestions for practices that create effective programs from those findings. We also include some methods for assessing programs.

  1. Wilderness Leadership for Physical Education Majors: The Current National Status of Wilderness Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Ping; Jewell, John; Davies, Nigel; Fletcher, Sue; McLaughlin, Erin; Workman, Gayle

    Outdoor/adventure education is a relatively new content area required by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for students majoring in physical education. Teacher preparation programs in physical education have yet to adopt a standardized curriculum. A survey was completed by 162 of the 536 physical education programs in…

  2. Sport Education: Promoting Team Affiliation Through Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Ann; Kirk, David; Kinchin, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    The development of feelings of identity, the sense of belonging to a team, and the growth of social skills are experiences that sport, if properly conducted, is well placed to offer (Siedentop, 1994). Evidence suggests that some characteristics of traditional, multiactivity forms of physical education work against realizing these goals (Locke,…

  3. Exergames for Physical Education Courses: Physical, Social, and Cognitive Benefits.

    PubMed

    Staiano, Amanda E; Calvert, Sandra L

    2011-06-01

    Digital games combining exercise with game play, known as exergames, can improve youths' health status and provide social and academic benefits. Exergame play increases caloric expenditure, heart rate, and coordination. Psychosocial and cognitive impacts of exergame play may include increased self-esteem, social interaction, motivation, attention, and visual-spatial skills. This article summarizes the literature on exergames, with a special emphasis on physical education courses and the potential of exergames to improve students' physical health, as well as transfer effects that may benefit related physical, social, and academic outcomes. PMID:22563349

  4. Medical student disaster medicine education: the development of an educational resource

    PubMed Central

    Domres, Bernd D.; Stahl, Wolfgang; Bauer, Andreas; Houser, Christine M.; Himmelseher, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Background Disaster medicine education is an enormous challenge, but indispensable for disaster preparedness. Aims We aimed to develop and implement a disaster medicine curriculum for medical student education that can serve as a peer-reviewed, structured educational guide and resource. Additionally, the process of designing, approving and implementing such a curriculum is presented. Methods The six-step approach to curriculum development for medical education was used as a formal process instrument. Recognized experts from professional and governmental bodies involved in disaster health care provided input using disaster-related physician training programs, scientific evidence if available, proposals for education by international disaster medicine organizations and their expertise as the basis for content development. Results The final course consisted of 14 modules composed of 2-h units. The concepts of disaster medicine, including response, medical assistance, law, command, coordination, communication, and mass casualty management, are introduced. Hospital preparedness plans and experiences from worldwide disaster assistance are reviewed. Life-saving emergency and limited individual treatment under disaster conditions are discussed. Specifics of initial management of explosive, war-related, radiological/nuclear, chemical, and biological incidents emphasizing infectious diseases and terrorist attacks are presented. An evacuation exercise is completed, and a mass casualty triage is simulated in collaboration with local disaster response agencies. Decontamination procedures are demonstrated at a nuclear power plant or the local fire department, and personal decontamination practices are exercised. Mannequin resuscitation is practiced while personal protective equipment is utilized. An interactive review of professional ethics, stress disorders, psychosocial interventions, and quality improvement efforts complete the training. Conclusions The curriculum offers medical disaster education in a reasonable time frame, interdisciplinary format, and multi-experiential course. It can serve as a template for basic medical student disaster education. Because of its comprehensive but flexible structure, it should also be helpful for other health-care professional student disaster education programs. PMID:20414376

  5. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    E-print Network

    2011-01-01

    Physical education and physical activity: results from the School Healthhealth policies and practices, indicated that 78% of schools required that students take physical education (Physical Education [18]. Each lesson was struc- tured and included three activity components: instant activities (IAs), health-

  6. The capability approach for medical education: AMEE Guide No. 97.

    PubMed

    Sandars, John; Sarojini Hart, Caroline

    2015-07-01

    The capability approach, with its origins in economic and human development work, has a focus on the freedom of persons to make choices about how they wish to lead a valued life. There has been increasing recognition within general education that the capability approach offers a theoretical and practical framework to both implement and evaluate educational interventions that are designed to increase social justice, such as widening participation. There is great potential for the capability approach to also offer medical education a creative way for changing and evaluating curricula, with an emphasis on the teacher facilitating students to achieve their potential by recognising their aspirations and challenging the constraining factors to achieve their aspirations. PMID:25697112

  7. A Training Program in Special Physical Education for SEA [State Education Agency] Directors of Physical Education and Special Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Washington, DC.

    The final report reviews achievements of a 30 month project to assist State Education Agencies (SEAs) in implementing physical education and recreation components of federal law (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973). To develop comprehensive special physical education SEA plans, competencies of SEA…

  8. Relationship among Medical Student Resilience, Educational Environment and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Tempski, Patricia; Santos, Itamar S.; Mayer, Fernanda B.; Enns, Sylvia C.; Perotta, Bruno; Paro, Helena B. M. S.; Gannam, Silmar; Peleias, Munique; Garcia, Vera Lucia; Baldassin, Sergio; Guimaraes, Katia B.; Silva, Nilson R.; da Cruz, Emirene M. T. Navarro; Tofoli, Luis F.; Silveira, Paulo S. P.; Martins, Milton A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Resilience is a capacity to face and overcome adversities, with personal transformation and growth. In medical education, it is critical to understand the determinants of a positive, developmental reaction in the face of stressful, emotionally demanding situations. We studied the association among resilience, quality of life (QoL) and educational environment perceptions in medical students. Methods We evaluated data from a random sample of 1,350 medical students from 22 Brazilian medical schools. Information from participants included the Wagnild and Young’s resilience scale (RS-14), the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire – short form (WHOQOL-BREF), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results Full multiple linear regression models were adjusted for sex, age, year of medical course, presence of a BDI score ? 14 and STAI state or anxiety scores ? 50. Compared to those with very high resilience levels, individuals with very low resilience had worse QoL, measured by overall (?=-0.89; 95% confidence interval =-1.21 to -0.56) and medical-school related (?=-0.85; 95%CI=-1.25 to -0.45) QoL scores, environment (?=-6.48; 95%CI=-10.01 to -2.95), psychological (?=-22.89; 95%CI=-25.70 to -20.07), social relationships (?=-14.28; 95%CI=-19.07 to -9.49), and physical health (?=-10.74; 95%CI=-14.07 to -7.42) WHOQOL-BREF domain scores. They also had a worse educational environment perception, measured by global DREEM score (?=-31.42; 95%CI=-37.86 to -24.98), learning (?=-7.32; 95%CI=-9.23 to -5.41), teachers (?=-5.37; 95%CI=-7.16 to -3.58), academic self-perception (?=-7.33; 95%CI=-8.53 to -6.12), atmosphere (?=-8.29; 95%CI=-10.13 to -6.44) and social self-perception (?=-3.12; 95%CI=-4.11 to -2.12) DREEM domain scores. We also observed a dose-response pattern across resilience level groups for most measurements. Conclusions Medical students with higher resilience levels had a better quality of life and a better perception of educational environment. Developing resilience may become an important strategy to minimize emotional distress and enhance medical training. PMID:26121357

  9. Physical Education at the Crossroads: An Examination of Physical Education Challenges, Changes, and Best Practices at Three Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Debra D.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative case study of how three liberal arts colleges rationalized and provided physical education courses despite a trend in higher education to reduce or eliminate physical education from the curriculum. Kalamazoo College, Bennett College for Women, and Barnard College for Women continue to provide physical education

  10. Teachers' perceptions of physical education within the K-6 personal development, health and physical education key learning area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter John Webster

    2001-01-01

    For many years educators have been concerned with the decline of physical education in schools. The concern for physical education has been outlined in articles by Alexander, Taggart and Medland (1993), Blanksby (1995), Crowley (1993), Evans (1993), Hickey (1992), Moore (1994) and Tumbull (1995) and was emphasised by the Senate Report on 'Physical And Sport Education', which was tabled in

  11. Brain Research Strategies for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Connie L.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to an article by the author published in the November/December 2003 issue of JOPERD, that examined the research supporting the idea that movement enhances cognitive learning. In this follow-up article the author shows how physical educators can apply this information, in a variety of ways. The following outlines some of…

  12. Numeracy in Health and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Colleen; Geiger, Vince; Goos, Merrilyn; Dole, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a teacher's Maths lesson that focuses on numeracy in health and physical education learning area. In the lesson, the students were learning about Directed Numbers, something they often struggle with and a topic where the teacher finds it hard to explain using real life situations when using addition and subtraction. The…

  13. Teaching Physical Education in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, David LeRoy; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the opportunity of teaching physical education at international schools. Common challenges (e.g., communication differences, adapting to the host culture, teaching individuals from various cultural backgrounds) and positive aspects (e.g., smart and engaged students, a positive learning environment for teachers, great…

  14. Student Learning and Motivation in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; Levesque-Bristol, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    In a previous "Advocacy in Action" article, Richards and Wilson (2012) discussed quality physical education (PE) as a precursor to advocacy. It was argued that, before PE teachers can be effective advocates, they must first develop a high-quality PE program for which to advocate. This article extends the points made by Richards and…

  15. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pišot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Štemberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,…

  16. Undergraduate Physical Education Programs: Issues and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A., Ed.

    Papers presented at the National Professional Preparation Conference in Physical Education were revised and expanded for publication in this monograph. In part I, two papers, "Professional Preparation Conferences: One More Time" (W. G. Anderson) and "Current Context and Future Curriculum" (M. J. Ellis), set the stage for a presentation of…

  17. Physical Education for the Inner City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridini, Leonard M.

    1971-01-01

    Argues that it is imperative to develop very early in an inner city child's education those physical skills that have a high potential for carry-on and carry-over value that these students can utilize during their leisure time; that if these skills are neglected to be taught, there is every possibility that the child will never be exposed to them…

  18. Physical Education for Handicapped Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sator, Rita A., Ed.

    Included in the daily program are listings of demonstration events, film showings, sports activities and session offerings. After a greeting from Jean Kennedy Smith for the Kennedy Foundation, the Special Olympics program is reviewed and ways are suggested for developing a local program. Discussed are new dimensions in physical education for the…

  19. Children's School December 2011 Physical Education Highlights

    E-print Network

    Children's School December 2011 Physical Education Highlights During the past month, our gym classes continued exercising with Sound Play, by Leon H. Burton and Takeo Kudo. First, the children had the children move creatively to the music. The goal of these exercises is for the children to create their own

  20. PLANNING THE INDOOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASE, GERALD J.; HICK, BASIL L.

    THIS PAMPHLET IS DESIGNED TO HELP ARCHITECTS AND LOCAL SCHOOL OFFICIALS IN THE PREPARATION OF PLANS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES IN NEW AND EXISTING BUILDINGS. FACILITIES MENTIONED INCLUDE--(1) GYMNASIUM, (2) SWIMMING POOL, (3) SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY ROOM, (4) DRESSING AND SHOWERING ROOMS, (5) TEAM ROOM, (6) EQUIPMENT DRYING ROOM, (7) LAUNDRY…

  1. PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SMALLEY, JEANNETTE

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES FOR USE IN GRADES ONE THROUGH SIX ARE ENUMERATED AND DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL. UNITS OF THE MANUAL WHICH ARE CONCERNED WITH SIDEWALK GAMES, SCHOOLROOM GAMES, BALL GAMES FOR GRADES ONE AND TWO, STUNTS AND STUNT GAMES, AND GAMES OF LOW ORGANIZATION ARE PRESENTED IN A FORMAT WHICH CONSISTS OF (1) A LISTING OF CRITERIA BY…

  2. Ohio Physical Educators' Perceived Professional Development Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovatter, Rhonda

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation describes research designed to investigate the influence of select teacher and school characteristics on the perceived professional development needs of in-service physical educators in the state of Ohio. Data were collected using a self-report survey instrument comprised of the Professional Development Needs…

  3. Classroom Teachers' Reflections on Teaching Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsangaridou, Niki

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore preservice classroom teacher reflection in a physical education teaching and learning environment and to describe how the teachers' reflections related to their practices. Two preservice classroom teachers voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected using observations, journals, documents, and…

  4. Ethnicity and Conflict in Physical Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bob Carroll; Graeme Hollinshead

    1993-01-01

    There has been little research dealing with the issues of teaching ethnic minority groups in physical education (PE), in particular that which takes the perceptions of teachers and their pupils as the focal point to examine the issues and conflicts. This research takes a social action perspective by studying Muslim children in a northern comprehensive school. The areas of conflict

  5. Small Schools Curriculum: Physical Education, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartl, David, Ed.; Hartl, Doris, Ed.

    The self-contained sections within the document (one for grades K-3, the other for grades 4-6) present objectives, activities, monitoring procedures and resources for the elementary physical education curriculum for Washington small school districts. Identical introductory materials describe the organization of Small Schools materials,…

  6. Using Dance Dance Revolution in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Josh; Zamora, Karra

    2005-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyles are often to blame for overweight and obesity, which is the second leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S. (USDHHS, 2001). While video games have historically been identified as the culprit of inactivity, new interactive video games make participants break a sweat. Some physical educators have begun integrating this…

  7. [Physical Education in the Out of Doors].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Peter; And Others

    Designed for instruction of emotionally handicapped children and youth, these two articles deal with concepts and activities of physical and health education with an outdoor emphasis. Objectives cited in the first article are teaching young people to: enjoy the out-of-doors; cooperate with others and share in common goals; develop skills for…

  8. Educational Software for Teaching Physics: Commercial Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjertsen, Margaret; Risley, John S.

    1987-01-01

    This document was developed to help teachers locate computer software to enhance the teaching of traditional physics at all educational levels. It contains a table listing approximately 900 packages. The table is organized by type of computer (Apple II, Atari, Commodore, IBM PC, Macintosh, and TRS-80) and is alphabetized first by publisher and…

  9. Using Technology in Elementary Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Melanie S.

    2001-01-01

    Provides several possibilities for incorporating different forms of technology into elementary physical education programs in order to satisfy technology requirements and enhance instruction. The suggestions include evaluating students or providing feedback using video cameras, analyzing freeze-frames using Polaroid cameras, and surfing the World…

  10. Physical Education and Health in Singapore Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Michael C.; Fry, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    As a school subject, physical education (PE) in Singapore took on its own shape with the introduction of a conceptual games teaching approach in response to the national government's "Thinking Schools, Learning Nation" policy of the late 1990s. With the recent media attention on hosting two main international events (Asian Youth Games and the…

  11. Physical Education and Health in Singapore Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael C. McNeill; Joan M. Fry

    2010-01-01

    As a school subject, physical education (PE) in Singapore took on its own shape with the introduction of a conceptual games teaching approach in response to the national government's ‘Thinking Schools, Learning Nation’ policy of the late 1990s. With the recent media attention on hosting two main international events (Asian Youth Games and the inaugural Youth Olympic Games), aspects of

  12. Physical Education As an Agent of Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles B. Corbin

    2002-01-01

    Much has changed since the days of Dudley Allen Sargent. Still, the purposes espoused by Sargent, and others who preceded us, are not so different from the purposes I see for our field today. Physical education has much to offer society and it is my belief that it can be an effective agent of change—especially in promoting the health of

  13. Practical Epistemologies in Physical Education Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quennerstedt, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    With a point of departure in a transactional understanding of epistemology, the purpose of this paper is to explore practical epistemologies in physical education (PE) by investigating how knowledge is produced and reproduced in students' and teachers' actions in PE practices posted as clips on the user-generated video-sharing website…

  14. The School Health Education Program (SHEP): medical students as health educators

    PubMed Central

    Naguwa, Gwen S

    2010-01-01

    Background The School Health Education Program (SHEP) is a collaboration of the John A. Burns School of Medicine and the State of Hawai‘i Department of Education that was founded to improve the health of Hawai‘i's youth. This program allows premedical and medical students (collectively referred to as “medical students” from here on) to serve as health educators for high school students in six priority areas of health education. Objectives To confirm the efficacy of this community health partnership program and to determine the factors resulting in its success. Methods A total of 1714 students from seven of Hawai‘i's public high schools were surveyed for improvement in their content knowledge and decision-making confidence after participating in SHEP presentations. A sub-group of 235 high school students were asked about their comfort level and trust in their interactions with medical students as compared to their health teachers. Results The knowledge content and confidence in decision making increased significantly after participation in SHEP activities (p<.0001). High school students were found to be more comfortable and more trusting in learning about health topics from medical students as compared to health teachers (p<.0001). Reasons given included the medical students' content knowledge as well as their presentation methods and positive attitude. Conclusions The unique dual role of medical students as future physicians and as students allowed them to retain their credibility as health educators while developing a strong rapport with the high school students. Through SHEP, medical students can gain valuable experience through researching and teaching health topics while high school students receive additional health knowledge through this teaching. PMID:20397504

  15. [Medical-legal issues of physical and pharmacological restraint].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L; Guija, Julio A; Ortega-Monasterio, Leopoldo

    2014-03-01

    The use of physical and pharmacological restraint is controversial but is currently accepted as inevitable. It is indicated for controlling behavioral disorders and psychomotor agitation that put patients and third parties at risk. Its indication should be medical, and we should opt for the least restrictive measure. Restraints represent a possible infringement of patients' fundamental rights and require understanding and strict respect for the medical-legal precepts by physicians and other practitioners involved in its application. This article reviews the current legal framework, as well as the medical-legal premises and aspects of applying restraints, with the objective of ensuring maximum respect for patients' rights and the appropriate legal safety in the activity of practitioners. PMID:24913750

  16. Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

  17. Health economics education in undergraduate medical training: introducing the health economics education (HEe) website.

    PubMed

    Oppong, Raymond; Mistry, Hema; Frew, Emma

    2013-01-01

    In the UK, the General Medical Council clearly stipulates that upon completion of training, medical students should be able to discuss the principles underlying the development of health and health service policy, including issues relating to health economics. In response, researchers from the UK and other countries have called for a need to incorporate health economics training into the undergraduate medical curricula. The Health Economics education website was developed to encourage and support teaching and learning in health economics for medical students. It was designed to function both as a forum for teachers of health economics to communicate and to share resources and also to provide instantaneous access to supporting literature and teaching materials on health economics. The website provides a range of free online material that can be used by both health economists and non-health economists to teach the basic principles of the discipline. The Health Economics education website is the only online education resource that exists for teaching health economics to medical undergraduate students and it provides teachers of health economics with a range of comprehensive basic and advanced teaching materials that are freely available. This article presents the website as a tool to encourage the incorporation of health economics training into the undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:24034906

  18. Features of MCNP6 Relevant to Medical Radiation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H. Grady III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29

    MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code for simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and more recently other fundamental particles and heavy ions. Over many years MCNP has found a wide range of applications in many different fields, including medical radiation physics. In this presentation we will describe and illustrate a number of significant recently-developed features in the current version of the code, MCNP6, having particular utility for medical physics. Among these are major extensions of the ability to simulate large, complex geometries, improvement in memory requirements and speed for large lattices, introduction of mesh-based isotopic reaction tallies, advances in radiography simulation, expanded variance-reduction capabilities, especially for pulse-height tallies, and a large number of enhancements in photon/electron transport.

  19. The essential role of medical ethics education in achieving professionalism: the romanell report.

    PubMed

    Carrese, Joseph A; Malek, Janet; Watson, Katie; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Green, Michael J; McCullough, Laurence B; Geller, Gail; Braddock, Clarence H; Doukas, David J

    2015-06-01

    This article-the Romanell Report-offers an analysis of the current state of medical ethics education in the United States, focusing in particular on its essential role in cultivating professionalism among medical learners. Education in ethics has become an integral part of medical education and training over the past three decades and has received particular attention in recent years because of the increasing emphasis placed on professional formation by accrediting bodies such as the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Yet, despite the development of standards, milestones, and competencies related to professionalism, there is no consensus about the specific goals of medical ethics education, the essential knowledge and skills expected of learners, the best pedagogical methods and processes for implementation, and optimal strategies for assessment. Moreover, the quality, extent, and focus of medical ethics instruction vary, particularly at the graduate medical education level. Although variation in methods of instruction and assessment may be appropriate, ultimately medical ethics education must address the overarching articulated expectations of the major accrediting organizations. With the aim of aiding medical ethics educators in meeting these expectations, the Romanell Report describes current practices in ethics education and offers guidance in several areas: educational goals and objectives, teaching methods, assessment strategies, and other challenges and opportunities (including course structure and faculty development). The report concludes by proposing an agenda for future research. PMID:25881647

  20. Developing medical educators – a mixed method evaluation of a teaching education program

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Marco; Kadmon, Martina; Kirschfink, Michael; Koch, Eginhard; Jünger, Jana; Strittmatter-Haubold, Veronika; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well accepted that medical faculty teaching staff require an understanding of educational theory and pedagogical methods for effective medical teaching. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 5-day teaching education program. Methods An open prospective interventional study using quantitative and qualitative instruments was performed, covering all four levels of the Kirkpatrick model: Evaluation of 1) ‘Reaction’ on a professional and emotional level using standardized questionnaires; 2) ‘Learning’ applying a multiple choice test; 3) ‘Behavior’ by self-, peer-, and expert assessment of teaching sessions with semistructured interviews; and 4) ‘Results’ from student evaluations. Results Our data indicate the success of the educational intervention at all observed levels. 1) Reaction: The participants showed a high acceptance of the instructional content. 2) Learning: There was a significant increase in knowledge (P<0.001) as deduced from a pre-post multiple-choice questionnaire, which was retained at 6 months (P<0.001). 3) Behavior: Peer-, self-, and expert-assessment indicated a transfer of learning into teaching performance. Semistructured interviews reflected a higher level of professionalism in medical teaching by the participants. 4) Results: Teaching performance ratings improved in students’ evaluations. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the success of a 5-day education program in embedding knowledge and skills to improve performance of medical educators. This multimethodological approach, using both qualitative and quantitative measures, may serve as a model to evaluate effectiveness of comparable interventions in other settings. PMID:24679671