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1

Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering Department of Life Science and Medical Research Instruction  

E-print Network

Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience Master's Program Doctoral Program Research Instruction Application Code Name of Supervisor Program AO Summary of Research Instruction Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering

Kaji, Hajime

2

Life-Science Research within US Academic Medical Centers  

PubMed Central

Context Besides the generic “basic” vs. “applied” labels, little information is known about the types of life-science research conducted within academic medical centers (AMC). Objective To determine the relative proportion, characteristics, funding, and productivity of AMC faculty by the type of research they conduct. Design Mailed survey conducted in 2007 of life sciences faculty at the 50 universities with medical schools that received the most NIH funding in 2004. Response rate was 74% (n=2,168) Setting and Participants Faculty affiliated with a medical school or teaching hospital who had published at least one research article in the previous three years. Main outcome measures Type of research (basic, translational, clinical trials, health services research/clinical epidemiology, multimode, other); total funding; industry funding; publications; professional activities; patenting behavior; and industry relationships. Results Nearly one in four (23.4%) of AMC research faculty exclusively conduct basic research. In comparison, translational researchers, clinical trial investigators, and health services research/clinical epidemiologists each comprise roughly ten percent of AMC staff. While principal investigators garnered a mean of $410,755 in total annual research funding, nearly one-fifth of all AMC research faculty are unfunded, a proportion that ranges from 11.5% for basic researchers to 46.8% for health services researchers (p<0.01). The average AMC faculty member received $33,417 in industry-sponsored funding, with most of this money concentrated among clinical trial ($110,869) and multimode ($59,916) principal investigators. Compared to basic science researchers, translational, clinical trial, and multimode researchers are significantly more likely to report a relationship with industry and that these relationships contributed to their most important scientific work (p<0.01 for all comparisons). Conclusions These data document many of the stresses in the research arena, especially those of the clinician-researcher. National R&D funding policies should reflect priorities for encouraging the right balance of life-science investigations. PMID:19724044

Campbell, Eric G

2013-01-01

3

The future of pure medical science: The need for a new specialist professional research system  

E-print Network

Editorial The future of Ã?pureÃ? medical science: The need for a new specialist professional research system Summary Over recent decades, medical research has become mostly an Ã?appliedÃ? science which greater benefit if they turn out to be true. The domination of medical research by applied criteria means

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

4

Social science research on medical technology: Utility and limitations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policies could be better devised and better implemented if greater use were made of the social sciences. However, the social sciences have quite often not produced knowledge adequate to permit resolution of pressing social problems. An example of both of these statements is found in the area of policies toward medical technology. Medical technology has become a major public policy

H. David Banta

1983-01-01

5

Research in Medical Education: Balancing Service and Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the latter part of the 1990's, the English-speaking medical education community has been engaged in a debate concerning the types of research that should have priority. To shed light on this debate and to better understand its implications for the practice of research, 23 semi-structured interviews were conducted with "influential figures"…

Albert, Mathieu; Hodges, Brian; Regehr, Glenn

2007-01-01

6

MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2012  

E-print Network

MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2012 Student Affairs Division Graduate School of Medicine Kobe University #12;General Subjects General Basic Subjects Core Lecture/Core Practice 1 Trends in Medical Research Lectures Trends Series 2 Trends SeriesGCOE 3 Trends Topics 4 Special Lecture Special English 5 Research

Banbara, Mutsunori

7

MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2013  

E-print Network

MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2013 Student Affairs Division Graduate School of Medicine Kobe University #12;General Subjects General Basic Subjects Core Lecture/Core Practice 1 Trends in Medical Research Lectures Trends Series 2 Trends SeriesGCOE 3 Trends Topics 4 Special Lecture Special English 5 Research

Banbara, Mutsunori

8

MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2014  

E-print Network

MEDICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS 2014 Student Affairs Division Graduate School of Medicine Kobe University #12;General Subjects General Basic Subjects Core Lecture/Core Practice 1 Trends in Medical Research Lectures Trends Series 2 Trends Topics 3 Special Lecture Special English 4 Research Proposal 5 Writing

Banbara, Mutsunori

9

IU HEALTH ARNETT ONCOLOGICAL SCIENCES CENTER MEDICAL RESEARCH ADVOCATE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

. IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE Early detection is a key in significantly decreasing deaths from colon cancer a cure for cancer is the goal of cancer researchers everywhere. The participation of cancer patients in clinical trials is essential to advancing cancer research; however, the decision to participate

Ginzel, Matthew

10

[Development of interest in research on the quality of life in medical sciences].  

PubMed

Quality of life is an interdisciplinary concept, defined and used in the work by representatives of the medical sciences and the humanities. In the era of continuous development of medicine, physicians are increasingly able to treat and the gradual lengthening of life. Subjective assessment of health status of the patient has made in recent years, more and more important. Health evaluation of the patient makes a special role in the healing process and is indispensable in assessing the effectiveness of therapy. Hence arose the need to initiate research on the quality of life. The article discusses methods of determining quality of life, that are used in medical sciences. It also includes a summary of trends in the use of quality of life investigations in medical sciences. A review of research methods quality of life, which are used in medical science. In addition, analyzes the contents of the database "Medline" using password "quality of life". The article presents the types of questionnaires examining quality of life, recommended by the panel of experts, and are listed and briefly characterized the basic quality of life questionnaires to general and specific. In particular, the review provides a list of principal quality of life diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, in disorders and mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. The article also includes information about the requirements associated with the reliability of the questionnaire, and provides information on the possible acquisition and use of research tools with ready-made MAPI Institute. This paper presents apparent in recent decades the development of medical research using the assessment of quality of life related to health. It is the use of validated questionnaires, so that the results of the tests were reliable and reproducible, which increases their value. PMID:23230728

Kukielczak, Anna

2012-01-01

11

Research self-efficacy among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Research self-efficacy if the people's judgment of their abilities in order to organize and conduct meaningful research in different formats. The aim of this study is to determinate the rate of research self-efficacy among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on Research Self-efficacy Scale. Materials and Methods: The method of this study is an applied survey method. Statistical population is all students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and the sample size was calculated to be 361 samples based on Krejcie and Morgan table. Random sampling method was used with equal number of samples from every department. Data collection tool is Salehi et al. questionnaire (with 7 dimensions) with Likert scale (5 grades). Its validity and reliability were confirmed by Psychology and Research Method experts and Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.84) respectively. Data gathering method was direct visit to each department. The data was then analyzed using t-test and one-tailed ANOVA using SPSS 16 software. Results: The finding showed that among research self-efficiency dimensions research ethics dimension had the highest and quality research dimension had the lowest means. Furthermore comparing the research self-efficacy scores with demographic characteristics suggests that there is no significant difference between total score of research self-efficacy of different departments, genders or educational degrees (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Since the score of most of the research self-efficacy dimensions were, lower than average, holding periodical workshops, inclusion of necessary courses in the educational plan, forcing student to perform research activity such as writing articles in lower educational levels and improvement of research culture for students with the help of experienced professors are some of practical solutions, which can lead to increasing the motivation of the students for conducting efficient research.

Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Kazempour, Zahra; Taheri, Behjat

2015-01-01

12

Is It Science? A Study of the Attitudes of Medical Trainees and Physicians toward Qualitative and Quantitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the degree of acceptance of qualitative research by medical trainees and physicians, and explored the causes for any differences in their support of qualitative versus quantitative research. Thirty-two individuals at four levels of medical training were studied. Eight philosophers of science served for construct validation.…

Goguen, Jeannette; Knight, Melanie; Tiberius, Richard

2008-01-01

13

Clinical and Translational Research Capacity Building Needs in Minority Medical and Health Science Hispanic Institutions  

PubMed Central

A preliminary needs assessment was conducted among faculty and students of three minority medical and health science institutions comprising the Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium (PRCTRC). The Web-based survey was focused on evaluating the training interests in the clinical and translational research core areas and competencies developed by the National Institutes of Health-Clinical and Translational Sciences Award. The survey was the result of a team effort of three PRCTRC key function's leaderships: Multidisciplinary Training and Career Development, Tracking and Evaluation and Community Research and Engagement. The questionnaire included 45 items distributed across five content areas including demographics, research training needs, training activities coordination and knowledge about the services offered by the PRCTRC. Analysis of research needs includes a sample distribution according to professor, assistant/associate professor and graduate students. The thematic area with highest response rate among the three groups was: “Identify major clinical/public health problems and relevant translational research questions,” with the competency “Identify basic and preclinical studies that are potential testable clinical research hypothesis.” These preliminary results will guide the training and professional development of the new generation of clinical and translational researchers needed to eliminate health disparities. PMID:24841800

Estapé-Garrastazu, Estela S; Noboa-Ramos, Carlamarie; De Jesús-Ojeda, Lizbelle; De Pedro-Serbiá, Zulmarie; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Camacho-Feliciano, Delia M

2014-01-01

14

Clinical and translational research capacity building needs in minority medical and health science Hispanic institutions.  

PubMed

A preliminary needs assessment was conducted among faculty and students of three minority medical and health science institutions comprising the Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium (PRCTRC). The Web-based survey was focused on evaluating the training interests in the clinical and translational research core areas and competencies developed by the National Institutes of Health-Clinical and Translational Sciences Award. The survey was the result of a team effort of three PRCTRC key function's leaderships: Multidisciplinary Training and Career Development, Tracking and Evaluation and Community Research and Engagement. The questionnaire included 45 items distributed across five content areas including demographics, research training needs, training activities coordination and knowledge about the services offered by the PRCTRC. Analysis of research needs includes a sample distribution according to professor, assistant/associate professor and graduate students. The thematic area with highest response rate among the three groups was: "Identify major clinical/public health problems and relevant translational research questions," with the competency "Identify basic and preclinical studies that are potential testable clinical research hypothesis." These preliminary results will guide the training and professional development of the new generation of clinical and translational researchers needed to eliminate health disparities. PMID:24841800

Estapé-Garrastazu, Estela S; Noboa-Ramos, Carlamarie; De Jesús-Ojeda, Lizbelle; De Pedro-Serbiá, Zulmarie; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Camacho-Feliciano, Delia M

2014-10-01

15

Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.  

PubMed

Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft. PMID:25608440

Smith, Frank L

2014-12-01

16

Study on Research Anxiety Among Faculty Members of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Introduction: One of the most common anxieties in higher education is research anxiety. The purpose of this study was to determine the research anxiety level among the faculty members of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS). Methods: this was survey- analytical study. The stratified random sampling method was used and a sample of 212 people was selected. For data collection was used a questionnaire. Data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical (T Test, ANOVA and LSD) statistics. Findings: The average anxiety research in IUMS was about 3.27 ±0.536. Among factors, highest scores in descending order are related to lack of timely payment of fees (3.97±0.961), the long approval process of proposals and research project reporting (3.86.±0.99) and lack of research efficiency on the part of faculty (3.70±1.00). The lowest scores were related to having insufficient funds to conduct research (2.67±1.08), another’s understanding of inability for researching (2.84±1.192), and unfriendly behavior from journals and research center staffs (2.89±0.802). Conclusion: The mean level of research anxiety among faculty members of IUMS was found higher than average. So it’s essential that authorities pay greater attention to the factors that cause research anxiety. PMID:25685076

Ashrafi-rizi, Hasan; Zarmehr, Fateme; Bahrami, Susan; Ghazavi-Khorasgani, Zahra; Kazempour, Zahra; Shahrzadi, Leila

2014-01-01

17

Medical research: assessing the benefits to society  

E-print Network

May 2006 Medical research: assessing the benefits to society A report by the UK Evaluation Forum, supported by the Academy of Medical Sciences, Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust. #12;The the aims and ethos of medical sciences with particular emphasis on excellence in research and training

Rambaut, Andrew

18

An International Basic Science and Clinical Research Summer Program for Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to…

Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N.; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; AlKukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K.

2012-01-01

19

Virtual microscopy in medical research: Open European Nephrology Science Center (OpEN.SC)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The amount and heterogeneity of data in biomedical research, notably in transnational research, requires new methods for the collection, presentation and analysis of information. Important data from laboratory experiments as well as patient trials are available as images. Thus, the integration and processing of image data represent a crucial component of information systems in biomedical research. The Charité Medical School in Berlin has established a new information service center for kidney diseases and transplantation (Open European Nephrology Science Centre - OpEN.SC) together with the German Research Agency (DFG). The aims of this project are (i) to improve the availability of raw data, (ii) to establish an infrastructure for clinical trials, (iii) to monitor the occurrence of rare disease patterns and (iv) to establish a quality assurance system. Major diagnostic procedures in medicine are based on the processing and analysis of image data. In diagnostic pathology, the availability of automated slide scanners provide the opportunity to digitize entire microscopic slides. The processing, presentation and analysis of these image data are called virtual microscopy. The integration of this new technology into the OpEN.SC system and the link to other heterogeneous data of individual patients represent a major technological challenge. Thus, new ways in communication between clinical and scientific partners have to be established and will be promoted by the project. The technological basis of the repository are web services for a scalable and adaptable system. HL7 and DICOM are considered the main medical standards of communication.

Schrader, Thomas; Beil, Michael; Schmidt, Danilo; Dietel, Manfred; Lindemann, Gabriela

2007-03-01

20

Molecules, magic and forgetful fruit flies: the supernatural science of medical gas research  

PubMed Central

Medical gas research often involves the study of molecules under extraphysiologic conditions, that is, conditions that do not exist in nature. This "supernatural" nature of medical gas research sometimes produces results that appear to be almost "magic" to those schooled in traditional physiology "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic". -Arthur C. Clarke PMID:22146602

2011-01-01

21

National Institute of General Medical Sciences  

MedlinePLUS

... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

22

Animal Testing Medical Research  

E-print Network

Animal Testing In Medical Research Past, present and future. Marte Thomassen Ellen Trolid Tonje Arondsen Marit Gystøl #12;ZO-8091 Forsøksdyrlære Animal experiments in medical research NTNU ­ Norges.............................................................................................................................. 2 2. ETHICS IN ANIMAL TESTING

Bech, Claus

23

[Medical writers in medical research.  

PubMed

Larger research units often comprise persons of several professions in order to secure a high level of efficiency and quality in the different tasks. In Denmark, employees with special competencies within the field of writing and publication are rarely used in research units. The purpose of this study was to present the advantages and challenges associated with the involvement of medical writers in academic environments. PMID:23952980

Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Danielsen, Anne Kjærgaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

2013-08-19

24

Trends in health sciences library and information science research: an analysis of research publications in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1991 to 2007*  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study analyzed trends in research activity as represented in the published research in the leading peer-reviewed professional journal for health sciences librarianship. Methodology: Research articles were identified from the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association (1991–2007). Using content analysis and bibliometric techniques, data were collected for each article on the (1) subject, (2) research method, (3) analytical technique used, (4) number of authors, (5) number of citations, (6) first author affiliation, and (7) funding source. The results were compared to a previous study, covering the period 1966 to 1990, to identify changes over time. Results: Of the 930 articles examined, 474 (51%) were identified as research articles. Survey (n?=?174, 37.1%) was the most common methodology employed, quantitative descriptive statistics (n?=?298, 63.5%) the most used analytical technique, and applied topics (n?=?332, 70%) the most common type of subject studied. The majority of first authors were associated with an academic health sciences library (n?=?264, 55.7%). Only 27.4% (n?=?130) of studies identified a funding source. Conclusion: This study's findings demonstrate that progress is being made in health sciences librarianship research. There is, however, room for improvement in terms of research methodologies used, proportion of applied versus theoretical research, and elimination of barriers to conducting research for practicing librarians. PMID:19626146

Gore, Sally A.; Nordberg, Judith M.; Palmer, Lisa A.

2009-01-01

25

Pharmacology SchoolofMedicalSciences  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Pharmacology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12; Introduction - Year 4 Introduction Pharmacology is concerned primarily with the characterisation of the properties, the Scientific Civil Service and Hospitals. Alternatively, it may lead on to non-research or non-pharmacological

Levi, Ran

26

Space Station medical sciences concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current life sciences concepts relating to Space Station are presented including the following: research, extravehicular activity, biobehavioral considerations, medical care, maintenance of dental health, maintaining health through physical conditioning and countermeasures, protection from radiation, atmospheric contamination control, atmospheric composition, noise pollution, food supply and service, clothing and furnishings, and educational program possibilities. Information on the current status of Soviet Space Stations is contained.

Mason, J. A. (editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (editor)

1984-01-01

27

University of Puerto Rico MEDICAL SCIENCES CAMPUS  

E-print Network

University of Puerto Rico MEDICAL SCIENCES CAMPUS San Juan, Puerto Rico Institutional Review Board RESEARCH USING HUMAN BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS Policies and Procedure May, 2000 #12;University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus San Juan, Puerto Rico Institutional Review Board RESEARCH USING HUMAN BIOLOGICAL

Quirk, Gregory J.

28

Understanding Medical Research  

MedlinePLUS

... hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study seem ... a randomized controlled clinical trial? Where was the research done? If a new treatment was being tested, ...

29

Funding for medical care research.  

PubMed

Funding for medical care research in the interrelated fields of health services research, clinical decision-making, clinical epidemiology, the medical humanities and social sciences, and medical education has been unstable, and relatively little is available in the form of investigator-initiated grants. Stable funding for these fields is important to society and critical to the healthy development of academic general internal medicine. Strategies to augment funding can include political interventions to increase support for the National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment and to secure designated funds within the National Institutes of Health. Public funding is also needed for career development awards in these fields. Research support also could be enhanced by establishing a consortium of foundations interested in funding investigator-initiated grants through open competition, by developing a mechanism for reviewing proposals from small foundations, by developing consortia in the private sector to support focused research, and by developing endowments to support research. PMID:3559775

Shapiro, M F; Larson, E B

1987-01-01

30

HFE Briefing: Prepared by Academy of Medical Sciences, Medical Research Council, Royal Society and Wellcome Trust and supported by the Association of Medical Research Charities  

E-print Network

for research. Further information about the need for stem cell research, sources of stem cells and the need of stem cell and embryo research will be able to continue their work under the tightly towards clinical benefits and attract skilled scientists and international investment in stem cell

Rambaut, Andrew

31

Faculty of Science Medical Physics  

E-print Network

Faculty of Science Medical Physics If you like physics and mathematics, but want a career in the rapidly expanding health sciences, then this honours BSc is for you. www.uwindsor.ca/physics Medical in Medical Physics lays the foundation for an exciting and rewarding career in Medical Physics. Rigorous

32

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program  

E-print Network

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medical Research creative, research-oriented medical, dental, and veterinary students to the intramural campus of the NIH and provides the opportunity for future clinician-scientists and medical researchers to carry out research

Bushman, Frederic

33

University of Puerto Rico Medical Science Campus  

E-print Network

University of Puerto Rico Medical Science Campus Human Research Subjects Protection Office Main Building, 2nd Floor, Suite A-236A San Juan, Puerto Rico 00956 IRBWISE ACCOUNT REQUEST PERSONAL INFORMATION

Quirk, Gregory J.

34

Medical Computing Science at the University of Aberdeen  

E-print Network

obtaining an increasingly important role in medical research, as well as in primary and secondary care, clinical research, medical imaging, medical decision-support and protocol-based care, it seems inevitableMedical Computing Science at the University of Aberdeen Department of Computing Science

Lucas, Peter

35

Medical School Research Pipeline: Medical Student Research Experience in Psychiatry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors discuss the importance of introducing research training in psychiatry and neurosciences to medical students. Methods: A review of existing models of research training in psychiatry with focus on those providing research training to medical students is presented. Results: Two research-training models for medical students that…

Balon, Richard; Heninger, George; Belitsky, Richard

2006-01-01

36

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program  

E-print Network

1 NIH Medical Research Scholars Program · A comprehensive, year-long residential research enrichment program for medical, dental, and veterinary students · NIH Intramural Research Program in Bethesda' personal interests and career goals NIH Medical Research Scholars Program -1 · Blends elements of two

Bushman, Frederic

37

Handbook of Research on Distributed Medical  

E-print Network

Handbook of Research on Distributed Medical Informatics and E-Health Athina A. Lazakidou University by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 701 E. Chocolate Avenue, Suite 200 Hershey PA 17033 on distributed medical informatics and e-health / Athina A. Lazakidou and Konstantinos M. Siassiakos, editors. p

Kent, University of

38

From the NIH Director: The Value of Medical Research  

MedlinePLUS

... note that modern medical science, based on molecular biology, only began in earnest with the discovery of ... of medical research. After 50 years of molecular biology and genetic research, we realize that you don' ...

39

Medical Research System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Based on Johnson Space Flight Center's development of a rotating bioreactor cell culture apparatus for Space Shuttle medical research, Johnson Space Flight Center engineers who worked on the original project formed a company called Synthecon, with the intention of commercializing the bioreactor technology. Synthecon grows three dimensional tissues in the bioreactor. These are superior to previous two-dimensional tissue samples in the study of human cell growth. A refined version of the Johnson Space Center technology, Synthecon's Rotary Cell Culture System includes a cell culture chamber that rotates around a horizontal axis. The cells establish an orbit that approximates free fall through the liquid medium in the chamber. The technology has significant applications for cancer research and treatment as well as AIDS research.

1993-01-01

40

Wellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Academy of Medical Sciences -Team Science Consultation  

E-print Network

and medical research to come together. 4. We recognise the importance of team science. Effective networks the consideration that the Academy of Medical Sciences is giving to this topic. This will help to ensureWellcome Trust CONSULTATION RESPONSE Academy of Medical Sciences - Team Science Consultation

Rambaut, Andrew

41

Faculty School of Pharmacy Medical Sciences Campus  

E-print Network

Pharmaceutical Analysis Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Education & Specialty Certification PhD, University of Puerto Rico, Post Doctoral Chemistry, Medical University of South Carolina. Joseph Bloom, Ph.D. Research Areas and Active Projects Research interests are: Pharmaceutical analysis applying different analytical

Quirk, Gregory J.

42

[Information flow between medical and social sciences].  

PubMed

In order to reveal impacts of natural and social sciences on each other, the authors examined connections between fields of medical and social sciences using a search for references and citations of scientific publication. 1. The largest affinity between the medical and social sciences was found between neurosciences and psychology, but there was a significant affinity between clinical sciences and general social sciences, as well. 2. The example of General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes" suggests that in the period 2001-2010 the share of references to social sciences was significantly increased. In the meantime, social science papers in the same topics contained references to Clinical Medicine papers in a constantly high percentage. 3. In the sample under study, the age distribution of social science papers in the references did not differ significantly from that of the other sources. 4. Share of references to social science papers was found to be extremely high among Hungarian General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes". This finding still requires clarification, nevertheless, since e.g. it was not supported by an institutional comparison including the largest Hungarian medical research university. 5. The intensity of the reference/citation mediated information flows between the Hungarian Medical Journal, Orvosi Hetilap and social sciences appears to be in accordance with the current international trends. PMID:25528322

Schubert, András; Somogyi, Anikó

2014-12-28

43

Ethics in medical research and publication.  

PubMed

To present the basic principles and standards of Ethics in medical research and publishing, as well as the need for continuing education in the principles and ethics in science and publication in biomedicine. An analysis of relevant materials and documents, sources from the published literature. Investing in education of researches and potential researches, already in the level of medical schools. Educating them on research ethics, what constitutes research misconduct and the seriousness of it repercussion is essential for finding a solution to this problem and ensuring careers are constructed on honesty and integrity. PMID:25317288

Masic, Izet; Hodzic, Ajla; Mulic, Smaila

2014-09-01

44

Ethics in Medical Research and Publication  

PubMed Central

To present the basic principles and standards of Ethics in medical research and publishing, as well as the need for continuing education in the principles and ethics in science and publication in biomedicine. An analysis of relevant materials and documents, sources from the published literature. Investing in education of researches and potential researches, already in the level of medical schools. Educating them on research ethics, what constitutes research misconduct and the seriousness of it repercussion is essential for finding a solution to this problem and ensuring careers are constructed on honesty and integrity. PMID:25317288

Masic, Izet; Hodzic, Ajla; Mulic, Smaila

2014-01-01

45

Corrections MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

that "S.A.L. is the inventor on world-wide patents for the use of memantine and NitroMemantine for neurodegenerative disorders; Y.W. is also a named inventor on the patents for NitroMemantine. Per Harvard University's Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, which licensed the drug memantine (Namenda) to Forest Laboratories, Inc

Newman, Eric A.

46

Medical Sciences Division report for 1993  

SciTech Connect

This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Not Available

1993-12-31

47

A Course in Medical Research Study Design and Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A course to familiarize medical students with the principles of good medical research study design and analysis focuses on three types of studies: clinical trials, laboratory science, and epidemiology and biostatistics. (MSE)

Linskey, Mark E.; And Others

1987-01-01

48

“HTLV-I Infection” Twenty-Year Research in Neurology Department of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL) and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL) disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM) in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP) in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment) of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years. PMID:24470862

Shoeibi, Ali; Etemadi, Mohammdmahdi; Moghaddam Ahmadi, Amir; Amini, Mona; Boostani, Reza

2013-01-01

49

The pathogenesis of fraud in medical science.  

PubMed

Using a recent case of research fraud as a basis, this article examines the pathogenesis of fraud in medical science and suggests some remedies. Among causative factors are the "pre-med syndrome," the extraordinary size of science (which makes supervision of young investigators difficult), and competition, both professional and economic. Remedies include more careful selection of personnel, reduction of excessively large research groups, and closer examination of work at all levels--the laboratory, the academic department, and the institution. Each institution should have in place mechanisms to investigate research fraud when it is uncovered. PMID:3946954

Petersdorf, R G

1986-02-01

50

Evidence-based medicine at the intersection of research interests between academic health sciences librarians and medical educators: a review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objectives: In 2008, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries established an Education Research Task Force (ERTF) to plan research addressing research priorities outlined in key Association of American Medical Colleges reports. ERTF members conducted a literature review to describe the state of collaborative research at the intersection of medical education and health sciences librarianship. Analysis of initial results revealed instruction in evidence-based medicine (EBM) was a shared interest and is thus the focus of this review. Methods: Searches on EBM teaching programs were conducted, and results were posted to a shared online citation management service. Individual articles were assessed and assigned metadata describing subject matter, scope, and format. Results: Article analysis identified key themes. Most papers were descriptive narratives of curricular development. Evaluation studies were also prominent and often based on student satisfaction or self-reported competency. A smaller number of controlled studies provide evidence of impacts of librarian involvement in EBM instruction. Conclusions: Scholarship of EBM instruction is of common interest between medical educators and health sciences librarians. Coauthorship between the groups and distribution of literature points to a productive collaboration. An emerging literature of controlled studies measuring the impact of cross-disciplinary efforts signals continued progress in the arena of EBM instruction. PMID:23133324

Dorsch, Josephine L.; Perry, Gerald (Jerry)

2012-01-01

51

Biotechnology SchoolofMedicalSciences  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Biotechnology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12;BSc (Hons) Biotechnology · Introduction · Degree Aims and Outcomes · General Enquiries · General Requirements · Industrial Requirements Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 Introduction Biotechnology is the use of organisms to perform

Levi, Ran

52

Pharmacology SchoolofMedicalSciences  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Immunology and Pharmacology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12 and chronic inflammatory diseases. Immunology with pharmacology is therefore concerned primarily. The degree of Immunology & Pharmacology at Aberdeen is an exciting and original new programme which

Levi, Ran

53

Microbiology SchoolofMedicalSciences  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Microbiology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12;BSc (Hons) Microbiology · Introduction · Degree Aims and Outcomes · General Enquiries · General Requirements · Industrial Requirements Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 Introduction Microbiology is the study of all microscopic

Levi, Ran

54

Medical Research: Considering a Career in Medical Research  

MedlinePLUS

... Medicine® Academic Medicine ® , the AAMC's monthly, peer-reviewed journal, is an international forum for the exchange of ideas and information important to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Read Academic Medicine Considering a Career in Medical Research It is an exciting time to pursue a ...

55

Dystonia Medical Research Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

... of Dystonia Research Research News Funding Programs Current Research Dystonia Coalition About DMRF Mission People Dystonia Dialogue DMRF Insights Blog For the Media Connect Contact Us Privacy Policy Support Groups Calendar

56

Medical Products Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ventrex Laboratories, Inc. develops, manufactures and markets a line of medical diagnostic assays based on biochemical techniques, in particular immunochemical techniques. Their products are sold worldwide to hospitals and medical laboratories for use in testing blood samples and other biological fluids. Analysis of a patient's body fluids, compared with normal values, aids a physician in confirming or otherwise diagnosing a suspected disease condition. NERAC's rapid information retrieval has provided Ventrex invaluable up-to-date information, and has permitted large scale savings. NERAC's service was particularly important in the development of a new product in the company's Ventre/Sep line, which is used in radioimmunoassays.

1982-01-01

57

The Relevance of Basic Medical Science to Medical Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Author believes the Council of Academic Societies is in a unique position to bring together concerned experts to formulate new patterns of representation of basic medical science in modern medical centers. (Editor)

Tosteson, D. C.

1970-01-01

58

Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson's strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program's point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include

Tetyana Antimirova

2006-01-01

59

The rate commitment to ISO 214 standard among the persian abstracts of approved research projects at school of health management and medical informatics, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Commitment to abstracting standards has a very significant role in information retrieval. The present research aimed to evaluate the rate of Commitment to ISO 214 Standard among the Persian abstracts of approved research projects at School of Health Management and Medical Informatics, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study used a researcher-made checklist to collect data, which was then analyzed through content analysis. The studied population consisted of 227 approved research projects in the School of Health Management and Medical Informatics, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences during 2001-2010. The validity of the checklist was measured by face and content validity. Data was collected through direct observations. Statistical analyzes including descriptive (frequency distribution and percent) and inferential statistics (Chi-square test) were performed in SPSS-16. Results: The highest and lowest commitment rates to ISO 214 standard were in using third person pronouns (100%) and using active verbs (34/4%), respectively. In addition, the highest commitment rates to ISO 214 standard (100%) related to mentioning third person pronouns, starting the abstract with a sentence to explain the subject of the research, abstract placement, and including keyword in 2009. On the other hand, during 2001-2003, the lowest commitment rate was observed in reporting research findings (16/7%). Moreover, various educational groups differed significantly only in commitment to study goals, providing research findings, and abstaining from using abbreviations, signs, and acronyms. Furthermore, educational level of the corresponding author was significantly related with extracting the keywords from the text. Other factors of ISO 214 standard did not have significant relations with the educational level of the corresponding author. Conclusions: In general, a desirable rate of commitment to ISO 214 standard was observed among the Persian abstracts of approved research projects at the School of Health Management and Medical Informatics of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. However, commitment rates differed between years. In addition, commitment to ISO 214 standard was not significantly related with educational group and level. PMID:25013829

Papi, Ahmad; Khalaji, Davoud; Rizi, Hasan Ashrafi; Shabani, Ahmad; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

2014-01-01

60

Medical Research for All Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Current Issue Past Issues Medical Research for All Americans Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents ... improvements to the health and well being of all Americans. Starting on page 10, our special section ...

61

Biochemistry SchoolofMedicalSciences  

E-print Network

the behaviour of these molecules and explain how they give rise to familiar biological properties of both us, in demand in biological and medical research. They also find careers in healthcare, as well as in food of complex arrays of molecules interacting with one another. Biochemistry attempts to understand

Levi, Ran

62

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics and Dentistry and Faculty of Science Western University Western University, one of Canada's leading research

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

63

Air pollution and medical research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sixth annual air pollution medical research conference was sponsored by the California State Department of Public Health, and was held in San Francisco during January 1963. Participants were scientists involved in research on air pollution and officials who are concerned with air pollution control and public health. The main topics of the meetings were: trends in air pollution and

J. R. Goldsmith

1963-01-01

64

Research Plan for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research  

E-print Network

Research Plan for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research BETHESDA, MD MARCH.............................................................................................................................................................................5 National Advisory Board on Medical Rehabilitation Research...............................................................................................................................................18 Conceptual Model of the Rehabilitation Process.......................................................................................

Rau, Don C.

65

Information Warehouse for Medical Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data warehousing imposes itself as an attractive solution for centralizing and analyzing high quality data. In the medical\\u000a research field, this technology can be used to validate assumptions and to discover trends on large amount of patient data.\\u000a However, like other scientific complex data, medical data and especially raw sensor data need to be processed before becoming\\u000a interpretable. The selection

Anne Tchounikine; Maryvonne Miquel; André Flory

2001-01-01

66

MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY 603 POPULATION HEALTH SCIENCES 603  

E-print Network

MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY 603 OR POPULATION HEALTH SCIENCES 603 CLINICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH MICROBIOLOGY.D. Professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Chief the material presented in the handouts. Note: Students in Medical Microbiology 603 may take the American

Sheridan, Jennifer

67

76 FR 44593 - Identifying the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Science and Research Needs...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CDER's Science and Research Needs.'' This...identify regulatory science needs that, if...challenges underlying medical product development...additional regulatory science efforts. More recently...strategic science and research agenda. To begin...and prioritized topics from their...

2011-07-26

68

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT Student: Program: Immunology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: PLEASE RETURN TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Immunology Program Administrator Modell Center Harvard Medical

Mekalanos, John

69

Workshop organized by The Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University  

E-print Network

Workshop organized by The Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University SIRIRUNGSI, Dean, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University - Jakkapan SIRITHUNYALUG and Chiang Mai University Franco-Thai Research & Education program: achievements and perspectives

70

Five Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Decades of Discovery: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents It ... anniversary of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), known to many as NIH's "basic research ...

71

The effective factors on library anxiety of students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The efficient use of libraries can be an important factor in determining the educational quality of Universities. Therefore, investigation and identification of factors affecting library anxiety becomes increasingly necessary. The purpose of this research is to determine the factors effecting library anxiety of students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was an applied survey research using Bostick's Library Anxiety questionnaire as data gathering tool. The statistical population consisted of all students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (15011 students) with the sample size of 375 using stratified random sampling. The validity of data gathering tool was confirmed by experts in the library and information science and its reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.92). Descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (t-test and ANOVA) were used for data analysis using SPSS 18 software. Results: Findings showed that the mean of library anxiety score was 2.68 and 2.66 for students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Shiraz University of Medical Sciences respectively which is above average (2.5). Furthermore, age and gender had no meaningful effect on the library anxiety of students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, but gender had a meaningful effect on library anxiety of students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences while age had no such effect. Conclusion: The results showed that the mean of factors effecting library anxiety in students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences is higher than average and therefore not satisfactory and only factors relating to feeling comfortable in the library is lower than average and somewhat satisfactory. PMID:25250358

Ashrafi-rizi, Hasan; Sajad, Maryam Sadat; Rahmani, Sedigheh; Bahrami, Susan; Papi, Ahmad

2014-01-01

72

The ethics and science of medicating children.  

PubMed

Prescriptions for psychiatric drugs to children and adolescents have skyrocketed in the past 10 years. This article presents evidence that the superior effectiveness of stimulants and antidepressants is largely a presumption based on an empirical house of cards, driven by an industry that has no conscience about the implications of its ever growing, and disturbingly younger, list of consumers. Recognizing that most mental health professionals do not have the time, and sometimes feel ill-equipped to explore the controversy regarding pharmacological treatment of children, this article discusses the four fatal flaws of drug studies to enable critical examination of research addressing the drugging of children. The four flaws are illustrated by the Emslie studies of Prozac and children, which offer not only a strident example of marketing masquerading as science, but also, given the recent FDA approval of Prozac for children, a brutal reminder of the danger inherent in not knowing how to distinguish science from science fiction. The authors argue that an ethical path requires the challenge of the automatic medical response to medicate children, with an accompanying demand for untainted science and balanced information to inform critical decisions by child caretakers. PMID:15706694

Sparks, Jacqueline A; Duncan, Barry L

2004-01-01

73

Review of ANU Health and Medical Sciences  

E-print Network

and medical research and education is central to these achievements. At a national reporting level, Australia and medical research and education are essential. For this reason, in line with all world-class Universities days, the John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) has built a strong international reputation

Botea, Adi

74

Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241 Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

Ahle, Larry

2007-10-01

75

Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science  

SciTech Connect

Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

Ahle, L E

2007-09-17

76

Medical students showcase research projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The serotonergic system1 and hypertension, Dupuytren’s disease2 and the antibiotic treatment of head and neck infection were just some of the research projects presented by fourth year Medicine students and PHD candidates at the inaugural Notre Dame Medical Student Showcase on the Fremantle Campus.\\u000aInitiated by Fremantle School of Medicine Associate Dean (Preclinical), Professor Kathryn Hird, the Showcase provided final

Leigh Dawson

2011-01-01

77

The Computational Sciences. Research  

E-print Network

SciencesResearchTheme Draft copy: 12 October 2006 #12;research is also performed in Physics & Astronomy, Chemistry and Earth Sciences. For example, Applied Mathematics has a strong presence in non-linear dynamicsThe Computational Sciences. Research activities range from the theoretical foundations

Christensen, Dan

78

Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Department of Computational Biology, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tok Entrance Examination Guide  

E-print Network

in applied researches in the life sciences. Topics to be addressed include medical applications with the aimDepartment of Medical Genome Sciences, Department of Computational Biology, Graduate School of Medical Genome Sciences Department of Computational Biology Department of Medical Genome Sciences

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

79

Library and information science practitioners and research  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a continuing need for more and better research in the field of library and information science (LIS). However, many LIS practitioners are not heavily involved in research. To add to our knowledge of practitioners’ involvement in research, 1,444 questionnaires were sent to members of the American Library Association, the American Society for Information Science and Technology, the Medical

Ronald R. Powell; Lynda M. Baker; Joseph J. Mika

2002-01-01

80

National Institute of General Medical Sciences: Science Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences' (NIGMS) Science Education website brings together award-winning booklets on topics like cell biology and genetics, their in-house magazine, interactive games, and a scientific image gallery for those who hold science close to their heart. First-time visitors will notice that there are two primary areas here: "Publications" and "School Resources". The "Publications" area includes "Findings" (their in-house magazine) and the very helpful "Biomedical Beat" news digest. This digest is published monthly, and it contains research news and educational updates from the NIGMS. The "School Resources" area includes interactive games that deal with Nobel Prize winners and proteins, along with suggestions on how to most effectively use the resources here with different grade levels.

81

Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Then & Now Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans Past Issues / Summer ... to the country's continuing commitment to long-term medical research and scientific advancement, the ills, which afflicted Roosevelt, ...

82

Epidemiology of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias in individuals referred to the haematology research centre, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from 2006 to 2011.  

PubMed

Hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias are the most frequent genetic hereditary disorders with an increasing global health burden, especially in low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to determine the epidemiologic pattern of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias in individuals referred to the Haematology Research Centre, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, which is the most important referral center in Southern Iran during 2006 to 2011. The most frequent abnormality was ?-thalassemia (?-thal) minor (24.0%), followed by ?-thalassemia (?-thal) trait (10.0%), hemoglobin (Hb) S trait (4.0%) and Hb D-Punjab trait (4.0%). Because this center is a referral center, we detected a higher prevalence compared to the normal population; however, these data could help policymakers and health service providers to better programming for prevention of births affected with Hb disorders. PMID:24941048

Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ramzi, Mani; Zakerinia, Maryam; Nourani Khojasteh, Habib; Haghshenas, Mansour; Rezaei, Narges; Moayed, Vida; Rezaei, Alireza; Karimi, Mehran

2014-01-01

83

Context Thesaurus for the Extraction of Metadata from Medical Research Papers  

E-print Network

{sports, medical, science, politics}. If a given document, contains the attribute term, research, and also the term, medical, then we could extract the attribute- value pair, research=medical, for use as metadataContext Thesaurus for the Extraction of Metadata from Medical Research Papers Michael Shepherd

Shepherd, Mike

84

National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR)  

E-print Network

National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) 20th Anniversary Scientific Symposium N S T I T U T ES O F H E A LT H Research for a Lifet me YEARS #12;#12;National Center for Medical anniversary of the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR): NCMRR has had a fabulous 20

Rau, Don C.

85

A Tool for Medical Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

California Measurements, Inc.'s PC-2 Aerosol Particle Analyzer, developed by William Chiang, a former Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer, was used in a study to measure the size of particles in the medical environment. Chiang has a NASA license for the JPL crystal oscillator technology and originally built the instrument for atmospheric research. In the operating room, it enabled researchers from the University of California to obtain multiple sets of data repeatedly and accurately. The study concluded that significant amounts of aerosols are generated during surgery when power tools are employed, and most of these are in the respirable size. Almost all contain blood and are small enough to pass through surgical masks. Research on the presence of blood aerosols during oral surgery had similar results. Further studies are planned to determine the possibility of HIV transmission during surgery, and the PC-2H will be used to quantify blood aerosols.

1992-01-01

86

Education research Primary Science  

E-print Network

Education research Primary Science Survey Report December 2011 #12;Primary Science Survey Report, Wellcome Trust 1 Background In May 2009 Key Stage 2 science SATs (Standard Assessment Tests) were abolished fiasco might occur, where the results were delayed and their quality questioned. The loss of science SATs

Rambaut, Andrew

87

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE  

E-print Network

PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK Revised 2009 **Subject to Change** #12;WELCOME TO THE MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE PROGRAM This handbook has been prepared as an additional resource for UNH Medical Laboratory Science to help you with problems, whether personal or academic in nature. This handbook should be kept throughout

New Hampshire, University of

88

Medical Sciences Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education report for 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research programs from the medical science division of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) are briefly described in the following areas: Biochemistry, cytogenetics, microbiology, center for epidemiologic research, radiation medicine, radiation internal dose information center, center for human reliability studies, facility safety, occupational medicine, and radiation emergency assistance center/training site.

Not Available

1992-12-31

89

Summaries of research projects for fiscal years 1996 and 1997, medical applications and biophysical research  

SciTech Connect

The Medical Applications and Biophysical Research Division of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research supports and manages research in several distinct areas of science and technology. The projects described in this book are grouped by the main budgetary areas: General Life Sciences (structural molecular biology), Medical Applications (primarily nuclear medicine) and Measurement Science (analytical chemistry instrumentation), Environmental Management Science Program, and the Small Business Innovation Research Program. The research funded by this division complements that of the other two divisions in the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER): Health Effects and Life Sciences Research, and Environmental Sciences. Most of the OBER programs are planned and administered jointly by the staff of two or all three of the divisions. This summary book provides information on research supported in these program areas during Fiscal Years 1996 and 1997.

NONE

1998-02-01

90

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM TO BE SUBMITTED PRIOR OR PRINT LEGIBLY. STUDENT: DMS PROGRAM AFFILIATION: Immunology Program CURRENT PHONE: CURRENT EMAIL ON IMMUNOLOGY, MODELL CENTER, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL Grades and credit for rotations will not be assigned unless

Mekalanos, John

91

Emotional Intelligence in Medical Laboratory Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In…

Price, Travis

2013-01-01

92

Analyzing Medical Processes Dept. of Computer Science  

E-print Network

Sciences]: Health Keywords finite-state verification, model checking, medical processes, property that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice each year in US hospitals from preventable medical errors. There is am- ple anecdotal evidence

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

93

VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DISSERTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT STUDENT SHOULD: Virology Dissertation Advisor: Year G.S.A.S.: ADVISORY COMMITTEE: SIGNATURES: 1. Chair: 2. 3. 4. Today TO PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR: Virology Program Administrator TMEC-346 Harvard Medical School 617-432-1977 YES

Knipe, David M.

94

Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Research News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For breaking news of interest to the medical research community, see this news metasite from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. From enzymes to viral infections, or RNA to muscle fibers, this page serves up all the medical research news that's fit to print.

95

Where medical science and human behaviour meet.  

PubMed Central

Although we may be wrong about the details, we should try to imagine what the future holds for hospital consultants. The days of the independent consultant in the same post for 30 years are over, and there will be a change from "the" consultant to a few tiers of senior staff. Patients will increasingly demand to see specialists, so more specialists will be needed. As patients and their advocates become better informed the traditional rationing of clinical care to patients in Britain, such as restricting access to specialists, cannot continue. There is a current trend for evidence based health care, but the idea that each element of medical practice can be dictated by systematic evidence based research will prove to be naïve--such research informs practice rather than dictates it. Science will continue to act as the guide to medical practice but specialists will not be turned into a set of logical operators running programs designed by health planners. Images p851-a p852-a PMID:7711626

Rees, J.

1995-01-01

96

Medical education research: is participation fair?  

PubMed

Medical researchers and ethicists emphasise the importance of equity, fairness and justice in general medical research participation. No individual or group should be over-represented or under-represented in research-there should be fair participation. Thus far little thought has been given to fair participation in medical education research. There is no evidence based answer as to whether vulnerable groups are ever exploited in medical education research, or whether other individuals or groups are overlooked. However the heavy reliance on undergraduate learners as subjects for medical education research creates two key threats to the fairness of that research. First, there is a risk that undergraduate learners, as a potentially vulnerable population, may be exploited in research settings. Often the faculty carrying out medical education research will be the same faculty that are responsible for delivering medical education and assessing medical students' competencies. It is possible as a result that medical students might feel pressured to participate in research. Second, there is a risk that other important groups of learners may be inadequately represented. Much medical education research is carried out on undergraduates and relatively little on those who have been doing CPD for many years. Thus much of our research concentrates on only a small proportion of medical learning. The relatively small amount of research carried out on those doing continuing professional development (CPD) is probably because of the difficulties of recruiting and retaining this group of learners in research programmes. Both risks threaten the integrity and usefulness of the resulting research product. Unfair participation in medical education research programmes could have serious repercussions for learners at all levels. PMID:24846349

Walsh, Kieran

2014-11-01

97

Wave propagation software, computational science, and reproducible research  

E-print Network

Wave propagation software, computational science, and reproducible research Randall J. Le for more reproducibility in computational research. Sample applications discussed include medical on the topic of software development and its relation to mathematics, and on computational science

LeVeque, Randy

98

TITLE: RESEARCH AND HIPAA CLINICAL AND MEDICAL RECORDS Columbia University Medical Center will administer and conduct medical records research  

E-print Network

TITLE: RESEARCH AND HIPAA CLINICAL AND MEDICAL RECORDS POLICY: Columbia University Medical Center will administer and conduct medical records research activities in accordance with city, state, and federal laws Individuals conducting or assisting with research activities will follow existing Columbia University Medical

Columbia University

99

. RESEARCH PAPER . SCIENCE CHINA  

E-print Network

. RESEARCH PAPER . SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences January 2013, Vol. 56 012104:1­012104:10 doi: 10.1007/s11432-012-4616-5 c Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012 info, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; 2Beijing Aerospace Control Center, Beijing 100094, China; 3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation,  

E-print Network

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation, including SENSE Research School December 2007 #12; QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Quality,byphotocopy- ingorbyanyothermeanswiththepermissionofQANUifthesourceismentioned. #12;3QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Table of contents

Utrecht, Universiteit

101

Research Component - Natural Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research component in the natural sciences does not have to be changed. Ninety-three percent of the students surveyed by Ann Heiss for her book "The Challenge to the Graduate Schools" felt that the research component of the natural sciences contributed to their scientific development, and 85 percent felt that it was intellectually stimulating.…

Cooke, Donald

102

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Science Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Freshman or AS degree)  

E-print Network

-Gynecology Sonography I 3 C RIS 44083 Pathophysiology for Medical Imaging 3 C RIS 44098 Research in Medical ImagingRoadmap: Radiologic Imaging Science ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Freshman or AS degree Credit Hours] HED 14020 Medical Terminology 3 General Electives (lower division) 10 Not required

Sheridan, Scott

103

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Science Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Freshman or AS degree)  

E-print Network

in Medical Imaging 3 C RIS 44098 Research in Medical Imaging 3 C Fulfills experiential learningRoadmap: Radiologic Imaging Science ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Freshman or AS degree Credit Hours] HED 14020 Medical Terminology 3 General Electives (lower division) 10 Not required

Sheridan, Scott

104

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-print Network

-Gynecology Sonography I 3 C RIS 44083 Pathophysiology in Medical Imaging 3 C RIS 44098 Research in Medical Imaging 3Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS courses. RIS 34040 Patient Management in Diagnostic Medical Sonography 3 C RIS 34042 Abdominal

Sheridan, Scott

105

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

3 C RIS 44083 Pathophysiology in Medical Imaging 3 C RIS 44098 Research in Medical Imaging 3 CRoadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic in Radiologic Technology; fulfills Kent Core Additional HED 14020 Medical Terminology 3 Fulfilled in the AAS

Sheridan, Scott

106

Knowledge Translation for Research Utilization: Design of a Knowledge Translation Model at Tehran University of Medical Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The present study aimed to generate a model that would provide a conceptual framework for linking disparate components of knowledge translation. A theoretical model of such would enable the organization and evaluation of attempts to analyze current conditions and to design interventions on the transfer and utilization of research

Majdzadeh, Reza; Sadighi, Jila; Nejat, Saharnaz; Mahani, Ali Shahidzade; Gholami, Jaleh

2008-01-01

107

Medical operations and life sciences activities on space station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space station health maintenance facilities, habitability, personnel, and research in the medical sciences and in biology are discussed. It is assumed that the space station structure will consist of several modules, each being consistent with Orbiter payload bay limits in size, weight, and center of gravity.

Johnson, P. C. (editor); Mason, J. A. (editor)

1982-01-01

108

Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose  

E-print Network

Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose #12;Cover: SMYSP students proudly for SATs, writing their college essays, and learning about financial aid. · Research projects: Students students, faculty, health and education professionals, and alumni of the program who serve as role models

Puglisi, Joseph

109

The 'medical humanities' in health sciences education in South Africa.  

PubMed

A new masters-level course, 'Medicine and the Arts" will be offered in 2014 at the University of Cape Town, setting a precedent for interdisciplinary education in the field of medical humanities in South Africa. The humanities and social sciences have always been an implicit part of undergraduate and postgraduate education in the health sciences, but increasingly they are becoming an explicit and essential component of the curriculum, as the importance of graduate attributes and outcomes in the workplace is acknowledged. Traditionally, the medical humanities have included medical ethics, history, literature and anthropology. Less prominent in the literature has been the engagement with medicine of the disciplines of sociology, politics, philosophy, linguistics, education, and law, as well as the creative and expressive arts. The development of the medical humanities in education and research in South Africa is set to expand over the next few years, and it looks as if it will be an exciting inter-disciplinary journey. PMID:24893537

Reid, S

2014-02-01

110

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care  

E-print Network

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care Research for Professional Research ethics and the role of Ethics Committees The role of NICE The Data Protection Act. Good and Medical Sciences School of Health and Social Care T: +44 (0) 1483 684505 F: +44 (0) 1483 686736 E: postreg

Doran, Simon J.

111

Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform -Involve -Enable  

E-print Network

#12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2013 / 2014 Inform - Involve - Enable revised 6/04/13 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Please click medical education responsibilities II. Summary of medical education research experience III. Summary

Finley Jr., Russell L.

112

Research at UCC Computer Science Research Activity  

E-print Network

www.ucc.ie Research at UCC Computer Science #12;Research Activity Computer Science has an active and business. Research in Computer Science is driven by a vibrant and growing IT industry and is the key and research laboratories. Computer Science at UCC has played a pivotal role in the economic development

Schellekens, Michel P.

113

Transition of Research into Medical Practice  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the process of transforming medical research into practical medicine for astronauts and for every day people. Several examples of medical practices that started in space medical research and then were proved useful in other settings: Actigraphy, bone density scanning, the use of Potassium Citrate as a countermeasure used to lessen the risk of kidney stone formation, and ultrasound uses in remote and telemedicine,

Polk, James D.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

2010-01-01

114

The medical research paper: Structure and functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies into the organization of information in the medical research paper have tended to present accounts of the structure of information in sections in isolation. The structure of information in all sections of the medical research paper was investigated using Swales' (1981, 1990) genre-analysis model. An eleven-move schema was identified, out of which nine were found to be “normally required”

Kevin Ngozi Nwogu

1997-01-01

115

Protecting Patients' Rights in Medical Research Networks  

E-print Network

Protecting Patients' Rights in Medical Research Networks Pommerening K, Becker R, Reng CM, Debold P approved this concept. Integrate Health Care and Medical Research To advance diagnostic and therapeutic to rules of ethics and professional discretion as well as national and international data protection laws

Pommerening, Klaus - Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics & Fachbereich 08

116

Contributions of empirical research to medical ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Empirical research pertaining to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), clinician behaviors related to do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and substituted judgment suggests potential contributions to medical ethics. Research quantifying the likelihood of surviving CPR points to the need for further philosophical analysis of the limitations of the patient autonomy in decision making, the nature and definition of medical futility, and the relationship between futility

Robert A. Pearlman; Steven H. Miles; Robert M. Arnold

1993-01-01

117

c Indian Academy of Sciences RESEARCH NOTE  

E-print Network

of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, 88179­55786, Iran 3 Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medical Science, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran 14115­111, Iran 4 Tehran Medical Genetics Laboratory, No. 297

Boyer, Edmond

118

Emotional intelligence in medical laboratory science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in medical laboratory science, as perceived by laboratory administrators. To collect and evaluate these perceptions, a survey was developed and distributed to over 1,400 medical laboratory administrators throughout the U.S. during January and February of 2013. In addition to demographic-based questions, the survey contained a list of 16 items, three skills traditionally considered important for successful work in the medical laboratory as well as 13 EI-related items. Laboratory administrators were asked to rate each item for its importance for job performance, their satisfaction with the item's demonstration among currently working medical laboratory scientists (MLS) and the amount of responsibility college-based medical laboratory science programs should assume for the development of each skill or attribute. Participants were also asked about EI training in their laboratories and were given the opportunity to express any thoughts or opinions about EI as it related to medical laboratory science. This study revealed that each EI item, as well as each of the three other items, was considered to be very or extremely important for successful job performance. Administrators conveyed that they were satisfied overall, but indicated room for improvement in all areas, especially those related to EI. Those surveyed emphasized that medical laboratory science programs should continue to carry the bulk of the responsibility for the development of technical skills and theoretical knowledge and expressed support for increased attention to EI concepts at the individual, laboratory, and program levels.

Price, Travis

119

Science Mentoring Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has created a website that provides access to their research on science mentoring. The goal of the site is to "provide guidelines and resources for developing high quality research and evaluation studies for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) career and workforce mentoring. " On the site's homepage, visitors can find links to research on these guidelines, resources for STEM mentoring, and announcements about upcoming awards and funding opportunities. Visitors interested in designing STEM research and evaluation studies should definitely check out the "Research" tab near the top of the page. The first suggestion provided is to review the literature, and they include links to the suggested readings, such as "Mentoring Report" and "Mentoring: Lessons Learned and Research Questions". Links are also provided for the additional steps suggested for designing a study, which may be of interest to those in the field of psychometrics and related fields.

120

Medical research misconduct need regulatory reforms.  

PubMed

The medical research misconduct has become a global problem. Except from countries like the USA, China, and Germany the exact figures of misconduct are not available. The research misconduct include fabricating the data, falsifying data, and plagiarism. The irresponsible research practices are publishing research data more than once, conflicts of interest is not declared, selective reporting of data and including an author who has not contributed at all and many more. About 2% of scientists have been found to admit the fabricating the data and 33% researchers were involved in irresponsible research practices. There is no formal regulatory programs available to monitor the research projects. Few developed countries like the USA, Germany, and China tried to develop programs which can monitor the medical research misconduct. There is a need to develop a regulatory system at national and institutional level to regulate the research activity to ensure that good ethical and scientific standards are practiced by medical researchers. PMID:25364140

Bedi, Neeraj

2014-10-01

121

SchoolofMedicalSciences BSc (Hons) Immunology  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Immunology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12;BSc (Hons) Immunology · Introduction · Degree Aims and Outcomes · General Enquiries · General Requirements · Industrial Requirements Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 Introduction Immunology developed as the study of how the body

Levi, Ran

122

Evolutionary Thinking in the Medical Sciences  

E-print Network

Evolutionary Thinking in the Medical Sciences Stephen C Stearns, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Evolutionary thinking in medicine draws both on the phylogenetic history of Homo sapiens resistance to drugs, so the implications for drug design and treatment are critical. Vaccinating a population

123

University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus  

E-print Network

University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus School of Medicine Division of Biomedical. Opportunities for Combine M.D./Ph.D. Studies 95 Mayo Foundation and University of Puerto Rico Integrated MD-PhD The MD-PhD Program at the University of Puerto Rico-School of Medicine VIII. Multidisciplinary Tracts 105

Quirk, Gregory J.

124

SchoolofMedicalSciences BSc (Hons) Genetics  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Genetics Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12;BSc (Hons) Genetics's hair colour. Genetics is concerned with explaining the behaviour of such inherited characteristics, in terms of the underlying genetic machinery that turns a single cell (the fertilised egg) into a fly

Levi, Ran

125

VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

VIROLOGY PROGRAM DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM TO BE SUBMITTED PRIOR OR PRINT LEGIBLY. STUDENT: DMS PROGRAM AFFILIATION: Virology Program CURRENT PHONE: CURRENT EMAIL if needed, the Rotation Supervisor's signature as well) to: PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR, THE COMMITTEE ON VIROLOGY

Knipe, David M.

126

Accelerator science in medical physics  

PubMed Central

The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

2011-01-01

127

Research School of Computer Science  

E-print Network

1 Research School of Computer Science Student Handbook #12;2 © The Australian National University 2013 Research School of Computer Science College of Engineering and Computer Science The Australian effectively in the Research School of Computer Science, ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science. Our

Botea, Adi

128

Human Sciences Research Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Human Sciences Research Council provides news and research in South African social sciences, including economics, social analysis, education, and governance. The site posts weekly media releases on contemporary topics; recent working papers; and "published findings" on such topics as Children's Rights in South Africa, Human Rights and Democratization, and pending social legislation. (A search engine is provided for these materials, but wasn't accessible when we visited.) The site also gives some annotated links to prime databases for further research on South Africa. Note: the site's book-length publications generally must be ordered online.

129

Medical technology advances from space research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

Pool, S. L.

1972-01-01

130

Research of medical gases in Poland  

PubMed Central

Research of medical gases is well established in Poland and has been marked with the foundation of several professional societies. Numerous academic centers including those dealing with hyperbaric and diving medicine conduct studies of medical gases, in vast majority supported with intramural funds. In general, Polish research of medical gases is very much clinical in nature, covering new applications and safety of medical gases in medicine; on the other hand there are several academic centers pursuing preclinical studies, and elaborating basic theories of gas physiology and mathematical modeling of gas exchange. What dominates is research dealing with oxygen and ozone as well as studies of anesthetic gases and their applications. Finally, several research directions involving noble gas, hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide for cell protection, only begin to gain recognition of basic scientists and clinicians. However, further developments require more monetary spending on research and clinical testing as well as formation of new collective bodies for coordinating efforts in this matter. PMID:23916016

2013-01-01

131

Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology (Medical Sciences Graduate Program)  

E-print Network

Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology (Medical Sciences Graduate Program) GRADUATE PROGRAM Coordinator - Responsibilities .....................................................12 3.6 Medical Sciences ..............................................................................18 4.5 Ethics and Academic Integrity Training Requirement

MacMillan, Andrew

132

A current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship  

PubMed Central

Objective: The article offers a current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship. Narrative: The authors: (1) discuss how definitions of medical informatics have changed in relation to health sciences librarianship and the broader domain of information science; (2) compare the missions of health sciences librarianship and health sciences informatics, reviewing the characteristics of both disciplines; (3) propose a new definition of health sciences informatics; (4) consider the research agendas of both disciplines and the possibility that they have merged; and (5) conclude with some comments about actions and roles for health sciences librarians to flourish in the biomedical information environment of today and tomorrow. Summary: Boundaries are disappearing between the sources and types of and uses for health information managed by informaticians and librarians. Definitions of the professional domains of each have been impacted by these changes in information. Evolving definitions reflect the increasingly overlapping research agendas of both disciplines. Professionals in these disciplines are increasingly functioning collaboratively as “boundary spanners,” incorporating human factors that unite technology with health care delivery. PMID:15858622

Perry, Gerald J.; Roderer, Nancy K.; Assar, Soraya

2005-01-01

133

The Research Year Medical students and odontology students at the Faculty of Health at Aarhus University can apply for  

E-print Network

The Research Year Medical students and odontology students at the Faculty of Health at Aarhus and medical science research, resulting in a report and an oral defence. In order to get enrolled institution may be included as part of the research year. Specific information for medical students Medical

134

Research School of Computer Science  

E-print Network

1 Research School of Computer Science Student Handbook #12;2 © The Australian National University 2012 Research School of Computer Science College of Engineering and Computer Science The Australian effectively in the Research Research School of Computer Science, ANU College of Engineering and Computer

Botea, Adi

135

Medical ethics as practiced by students, nurses and faculty members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Assuming any social role has obligations and fulfilling the related responsibilities has ethical aspects that must be addressed carefully. Each role requires extensive training, which usually takes place in university institutions. Ethics is applied in at least three academic areas, including: a) in education of students' personal growth, b) in patient care, and c) in university communion in population-based health care. Given the importance of this issue in the moral domain, this study examines the correlation among the students, nurses and teacher's opinions regarding principles of medical ethics at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a descriptive-analytic and cross-sectional study conducted in 2010. The participants of this research consisted of all medical students, nurses in public hospitals, and faculty members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. For validity evaluation, the expert panel method and for reliability evaluation, test-retest method was used. Results: Based on the medical ethics’ scores in these three groups, there was a significant relationship between the mean scores of student-nurses and employed nurses, but there was no significant relationship between those of student-faculties. Also the mean score of the students was the highest in medical ethics. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a list of virtues and moral characteristics of medical staff and found out the method of practicing medical ethics in everyday life of students to improve the moral reasoning of teachers, nurses and students. Moreover, medical ethics, with the presentation of specific criteria for ethical behavior in various domains of human life, especially in dealing with patients, can help practice ethical values in the medical community. PMID:25587553

BAZRAFCAN, LEILA; NABEIEI, PARISA; SHOKRPOUR, NASRIN; MOADAB, NEDA

2015-01-01

136

Snake oil and venoms for medical research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some think that using derivatives of snake venom for medical purposes is the modern version of snake oil but they are seriously misjudging the research potentials of some of these toxins in medicines of the 2000's. Medical trials, using some of the compounds has proven their usefulness. Several venoms have shown the possibilities that could lead to anticoagulants, helpful in

H. D. Wolpert

2011-01-01

137

2010 Computer Science | 55 Computer Science Research  

E-print Network

2010 Computer Science | 55 Computer Science Research Groups While individual academics are expert in a particular field of research, the Department as a whole has particular strengths within Computer Science models of computation. Related research subjects include biology, combinatorics, logic, and theoretical

Goodman, James R.

138

University of Glasgow COURSE IN FORENSIC MEDICAL SCIENCES  

E-print Network

University of Glasgow COURSE IN FORENSIC MEDICAL SCIENCES 2014 - 15 please turn over Information range of topics within the general theme of forensic medical sciences. The emphasis is on medical aspects of forensic practice, but with important contributions in forensic science and the legal process

Glasgow, University of

139

Fire-related medical science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacecraft fire safety may be improved by the use of a fire-retardant atmosphere in occupied spaces. Low concentrations of oxygen can protect humans from fire damage by reducing the rate and spread of combustion, but care must be taken to avoid the hypoxic effects of oxygen-lean atmospheres. Crews can live and work in 11 percent oxygen if barometric pressure were adjusted to maintain the partial pressure of oxygen above 16 kPa. Eleven percent oxygen should prevent most types of fires, since 15 percent oxygen retards the combustion of paper and 13 percent oxygen extinguishes pentane flames. Test results indicate that seated humans can perform mental tasks in atmospheres containing 11.5 percent oxygen. Although this strategy of fire safety is under consideration for submarines, it could be adapted to spacecraft once operational procedures define a maximum hyperbaric pressure and fire research defines the effects of reduced oxygen concentrations on combustion in low gravity environments.

Knight, Douglas R.

1987-01-01

140

Proof and Policy from Medical Research Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

When judging the benefits and harms of health care and predicting patient prognosis, clinicians, researchers, and others must consider many types of evidence. Medical research evidence is part of the required knowledge base, and practitioners of evidence-based medicine must attempt to integrate the best available clinical evidence from systematic research with health professionals' expertise and patients' rights to be informed

Cynthia D. Mulrow; Kathleen N. Lohr

2001-01-01

141

Reflections on Experimental Research in Medical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As medical education research advances, it is important that education researchers employ rigorous methods for conducting and reporting their investigations. In this article we discuss several important yet oft neglected issues in designing experimental research in education. First, randomization controls for only a subset of possible confounders.…

Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

2010-01-01

142

Library and Information Science Education for the New Medical Environment and the Age of Integrated Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews factors that are changing ways in which medical librarians and health information specialists are educated. Employment sites for medical librarians are listed; current faculty and coursework at library and information science programs in the United States and Canada are discussed; doctoral research is described; and medical informatics is…

Detlefsen, Ellen Gay

1993-01-01

143

A Revolution in Progress: Human Genetics and Medical Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The DeWitt Stetten, Jr., Museum of Medical Research at the National Institutes of Health presents this online version of the new exhibit, "A Revolution in Progress," which offers a comprehensive look at genetic research and its contribution to medical science. Readers can really cover some ground with this Web site, with pages upon pages devoted to a wide range of topics including genetic diseases, genes and drugs, the Human Genome Project, ethics and genetics, and more. Not overly familiar with genetic concepts? The Genetic Basics area of the site provides a solid and easy-to-follow introduction to the field. There is also a cartoon guide to genetics for kids.

144

[Who finances medical research in Chile?].  

PubMed

To identify those institutions granting medical research in Chile, every issue of Revista Médica de Chile published between 1987 and 1994 was reviewed, under the assumption that a vast majority (over 70%) of papers released by Chilean authors in topics of internal medicine and related subspecialties would have been submitted for publication in this journal. This assumption was based in the solid prestige of Revista Médica de Chile among Chilean physicians and investigators: it is one of the oldest medical journals in the world (founded in 1872) and its inclusion in the most important international indexes (e.g. Index Medicus, Current Contents) qualifies it in the "mainstream literature". Papers classified as "Original Articles", "Clinical Experiences", "Review Articles", "Public Health", "Case Reports", "Clinical Laboratory", "Special Articles" and "Medical Education" were screened for acknowledgment of financial support beyond the resources needed for routine clinical work. Among 1,528 manuscripts published, 344 were "Original Articles" and 61.3% of them acknowledged special financial support. Five hundred and one manuscripts were "Clinical Experiences" and 21.5% of them received special financial support; similar proportions were detected in "Review Articles" and "Public Health" topics. The institution ranked as providing support most often was the "Fondo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnología" (FONDECYT), a governmental fund that assigns resources to research in all areas of science and technology through a peer-reviewed nationwide annual contest. FONDECYT was identified as provider of financial support to 45.2% of the "Original Articles" and "Clinical Experiences"; Chilean universities were mentioned by 33.6% and other entities (including pharmaceutical companies, other national and foreign organizations) by 23.1%. The University of Chile was the main Chilean university mentioned in the acknowledgments. The proportion of papers receiving special financial support was lower in Revista Médica de Chile than in three leading journals from developed countries (70% of Articles published in Annals of Internal Medicine, 74% in Lancet and 78% in The New England Journal of Medicine) but this proportion has been steadily increasing since 1987. The increase has been due only to FONDECYT and it would be unreasonable to expect that this institution will maintain such an expansion indefinitely. Therefore, Chilean investigators should attract more resources from the universities, the pharmaceutical companies and other non-governmental institutions. PMID:8733315

Reyes, H; Kauffmann, R; Goic, A

1995-10-01

145

Ethnomedical science and African medical practice.  

PubMed

The ethnomedical sciences are ethnobotany, ethnobiology, ethnopharmacology and phytotherapy. These fields are concerned with medicinal plants only, and the traditional medicines are mostly used. The author has extended the ethnomedical sciences by using traditional medicines in ethnomedicine, bacteriology, ethnobotany, and biochemistry, and thus ethnomedical sciences can be studied by a modern approach. The traditional doctors play a significant part in health care. They have both black and white patients, and they treat about 60%-70% of black patients in the country. Though they have been treating patients for many years, the patients' employers do not accept traditional doctors' medical certificates when they go back to work after treatment. In this case they first go to the traditional doctor for treatment and then go to an academically qualified medical practitioner solely because they need a medical certificate for their employers. Traditional doctors have been practising for centuries. In this country they are known as inyanga or ngaka and these designations mean doctor. Umthakathi or moloi means witch. Witchdoctor translates as Inyanga-mthakathi of ngaka-moloi. PMID:2493558

Matthe, D S

1989-01-01

146

Science fiction\\/science fact: medical genetics in news stories  

Microsoft Academic Search

News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent

Alan Petersen; Alison Anderson; Stuart Allan

2005-01-01

147

Medical Students’ Research – Facilitators and Barriers  

PubMed Central

Background: Undergraduate research in medicine is important to expose and encourage the students towards the newer advances and research practices. The present study was taken up in a medical institute to assess the perception of the medical faculty about research undertaken by the medical undergraduates, and identifying the barriers faced by them in training undergraduate students for research. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire on perceptions, barriers and limitations towards undergraduate research was distributed to 105 participants included in the study. The responses of the participants were collected on a five point Likert scale and analysed using spss version 11.5. Results: There was a strong agreement among the faculty about students’ interest in carrying out research (95.1%), and that they had gained knowledge to design, conduct, present and publish their research from the projects undertaken by them (90.2%). Among the barriers for training undergraduate research, time consumption was perceived as a barrier by the participating medical teachers (37.7%) followed by lack of motivation and commitment among students (19.7%). Time constraint was the commonest reason for the faculty in not guiding undergraduate research (39.0%). A larger proportion of medical teachers suggested that incentives for students and teachers (62.7%) and frequent workshops for students related to undergraduate research (61.8%) are likely to encourage the students and teachers and thus, improve the scenario. Conclusion: It is suggested to address certain important issues like reducing the workload of faculty engaged in undergraduate research, and conducting frequent research methodology workshops for the under graduate students to improvise the standards of undergraduate research. PMID:25654016

Unnikrishnan, B; Holla, Ramesh; Kumar, Nithin; Rekha, T; Mithra, Prasanna; Kulkarni, Vaman; Reshmi, B

2014-01-01

148

Teaching Science through Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the objectives of the science curriculum and the teacher's responsibility of passing through not only the required material, but also skills. Suggests that in order to improve teaching and learning skills, new strategies, such as teaching and learning through research must be utilized. Presents four examples of teaching and learning…

Hugerat, Muhamad; Zidani, Saleem; Kurtam, Naji

2003-01-01

149

The Medical Research Model: No Magic Formula  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the No Child Left Behind Act and the What Works Clearinghouse, the federal government has attempted to establish guidelines for the type of education research that U.S. schools should consider in selecting instructional programs and resources. The government's clear preference for the medical model--a powerful research design in such fields as…

Kingsbury, G. Gage

2006-01-01

150

[Medical research ethics 50 years after Nuremberg].  

PubMed

50 years ago, in Nuremberg, 23 German doctors were accused of crimes against humanity. The anniversary is a solemn reminder of the dark origins of medical research ethics. Many researchers today believe that the medical experiments carried out under Hitler "vaccinated" postwar researchers against abuse. A review of the practices of postwar research shows that the "vaccination" had limited effect and that there is no reason to believe that the events which took place under Hitler were unique and will never happen again. After the war various measures were introduced to protect research subjects: informed consent, self regulation and independent research ethics committees. The measures have undoubtedly limited the abuse of subjects substantially. Nevertheless, in the Armed Forces, where abuse has been most rampant after the war, informed consent is not always practised and independent review is seldom carried out. With the support of grant institutions, journals and industry the protection of research subjects can be improved. It is recommended that medical faculties arrange an annual commemoration of the victims of medical research in order to raise consciousness and awareness among teachers and students. PMID:9456583

Ruyter, K W

1997-12-10

151

UCL DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICAL SCIENCE Mission Statement for Research  

E-print Network

of the Department of Statistical Science is to identify, develop and apply the sound statistical foundationsUCL DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICAL SCIENCE Mission Statement for Research The research mission essential for advances in the physical, social, environmental and medical sciences. In pursuit

Guillas, Serge

152

Patterns and trends of medical student research  

PubMed Central

Background Our study describes the change in the research output, trends and content of published research involving medical students over the last century. Methods Pubmed® and Scopus® were searched for keywords ‘Medical Student’ in the affiliation field. The search results were combined in Endnote® and duplicate entries removed and the multiple variables described below were assessed. Results The combined searches after excluding duplicates yielded 416 results and 66 articles were excluded. There was an exponential increase in medical student research from 1980–2010. Medical student was the first author in 170 (48.6%) studies and 55 studies were authored by a single medical student. The 3 most common areas of research in descending order were Psychiatry (n?=?26, 7.4%), General Medicine (n?=?24, 6.9%) and Medical Education (n?=?21, 6%). The commonest type of articles, in descending order were review articles (n?=?48, 13.7%), Cross sectional studies (n?=?47, 13.4%) and Case reports (n?=?43, 12.3. The majority of these articles (n?=?207, 59.1%) have never been cited subsequently. The trend of increasing number of articles was seen equally among all article types, fields and countries. Conclusions There is an exponential increase in articles by medical students but the majority of articles have not been cited. The numbers of medical student authors per publication have remained static while the total numbers of authors have increased. The proportions in the type of articles, fields of study and country of origin have largely remained static. Publishers and authors should strive to enhance the quality and quantity of data available in indexing services. PMID:24373230

2013-01-01

153

Educating the Public About Research Funded by the National Institutes of Health Using a Partnership Between an Academic Medical Center and Community-based Science Museum  

PubMed Central

The NIH roadmap has among its goals, to promote studies designed to improve public understanding of biomedical and behavioral science, and to develop strategies for promoting collaborations between scientists and communities toward improving the public’s health. Here, we report findings on the impact of a partnership between the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) designed to inform the public about health research being conducted in Oregon, which was linked to a 17-week traveling exhibition of BodyWorlds3. Measures included the public’s understanding of health knowledge, attitudes, intended health behaviors, and visitor experience in their interactions with OHSU experts/volunteers, which were collected using exit surveys administered verbally. Nine hundred fifty-three surveys were included in analyses. Among those who felt that health behavior change was relevant to them, 67.4% of smokers (n = 133) intended to change their smoking behavior, 58.6% (of 677) intended to change their eating habits, 60.3% (of 667) intended to change their exercise routine, and 47% (of 448) intended to change their dental care habits. Forty-six percent of these visited the OHSU research exhibits (n = 437), and responded to how the exhibit changed their understanding about and openness to participate in health research. Greater than 85% had a much improved understanding of NIH research at OHSU and >58% reported they would be willing to participate in future research studies at OHSU. In conclusion, research partnerships between academic institutions and community-based museums appear to be viable ways to inform the public about research, stimulate their interest as future participants, and possibly influence their intention to improve health behaviors. PMID:19350373

Bunce, Arwen; Perrin, Nancy; Howarth, Linda C.; Griest, Susan; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William E.

2009-01-01

154

Briefing on the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill prepared by the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Medical Research Council, Royal Society and Wellcome Trust, and supported by the Association of Medical  

E-print Network

to examine the long-term effects on patients and their children. Outstanding Issues We believe of amendments tabled at Report Stage, that will ensure new legislation does not excessively constrain or limit for use of existing holdings of cells and cell lines to create embryos or ISEs for research · Special

Rambaut, Andrew

155

Religious beliefs, knowledge about science and attitudes towards medical genetics.  

PubMed

The use of genetics in medical research is one of the most important avenues currently being explored to enhance human health. For some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be at minimum worrying and at most repugnant. In particular, religious doctrines are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. The key ingredient for acceptance of genetics, on the other hand, is prototypically assumed to be scientific literacy - familiarity and understanding of the critical facts and methods of science. However, this binary opposition between science and religion runs counter to what is often found in practice. In this paper, we examine the association between religiosity, science knowledge and attitudes to medical genetics amongst the British public. In particular, we test the hypothesis that religion acts as a 'perceptual filter' through which citizens acquire and use scientific knowledge in the formation of attitudes towards medical genetics in various ways. PMID:23838683

Allum, Nick; Sibley, Elissa; Sturgis, Patrick; Stoneman, Paul

2014-10-01

156

Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

Antimirova, Tetyana

2006-12-01

157

Spacelab Life Sciences Research Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document describes some of the life sciences research that was conducted on Spacelab missions. Dr. Larry Young, Director of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, provides an overview of the Life Sciences Spacelabs.

Sulzman, Frank; Young, Laurence R.; Seddon, Rhea; Ross, Muriel; Baldwin, Kenneth; Frey, Mary Anne; Hughes, Rod

2000-01-01

158

APPENDIX D PART 2 DEPARTMENTS OF CLINICAL SCIENCES AND MEDICAL EDUCATION  

E-print Network

APPENDIX D ­ PART 2 DEPARTMENTS OF CLINICAL SCIENCES AND MEDICAL EDUCATION College of Medicine Evaluation Other Than University Student · Evaluation and Outcome Assessment: · Other 2. Research contract. The current end date of the contract is ___________________. Overall, based on your performance

Van Stryland, Eric

159

76 FR 10911 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Research Centers in Wound Healing. Date: March 22, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications....

2011-02-28

160

Nanoscale Science Research Centers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation, given by Dr. S. Tom Picraux, focuses on the integration of nanotechnology into science and everyday life. The given definition of this process is stated as "combining diverse nanomaterials together into composite structures across length scales into nanosystems to discover, understand, and design material with novel properties and performance." The site also addresses the different nanotechnological research centers located throughout the United States and how they play a pivotal role in the future of the technology.

Picraux, S. Tom

161

Research in computer science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Synopses are given for NASA supported work in computer science at the University of Virginia. Some areas of research include: error seeding as a testing method; knowledge representation for engineering design; analysis of faults in a multi-version software experiment; implementation of a parallel programming environment; two computer graphics systems for visualization of pressure distribution and convective density particles; task decomposition for multiple robot arms; vectorized incomplete conjugate gradient; and iterative methods for solving linear equations on the Flex/32.

Ortega, J. M.

1985-01-01

162

Research in computer science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various graduate research activities in the field of computer science are reported. Among the topics discussed are: (1) failure probabilities in multi-version software; (2) Gaussian Elimination on parallel computers; (3) three dimensional Poisson solvers on parallel/vector computers; (4) automated task decomposition for multiple robot arms; (5) multi-color incomplete cholesky conjugate gradient methods on the Cyber 205; and (6) parallel implementation of iterative methods for solving linear equations.

Ortega, J. M.

1986-01-01

163

Quantum Science Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A division of Hewlett-Packard (HP) laboratories is investigating the applications of quantum science in "molecular-scale electronics." The team of researchers is trying to push the fundamental limits of size and efficiency, with focuses on technology that HP anticipates will emerge more than a decade from now. Six presentations, mostly describing the progress and results of various experiments, are given in the research section of the Web site. A particularly interesting presentation discusses the motivation for nanotechnology and self-assembled structures. Of the eleven staff members listed on the publications page, only Pavel Kornilovich has papers that can be directly accessed.

164

Contributions of empirical research to medical ethics.  

PubMed

Empirical research pertaining to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), clinician behaviors related to do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders and substituted judgment suggests potential contributions to medical ethics. Research quantifying the likelihood of surviving CPR points to the need for further philosophical analysis of the limitations of the patient autonomy in decision making, the nature and definition of medical futility, and the relationship between futility and professional standards. Research on DNR orders has identified barriers to the goal of patient involvement in these life and death discussions. The initial data on surrogate decision making also points to the need for a reexamination of the moral basis for substituted judgment, the moral authority of proxy decision making and the second-order status of the best interests standard. These examples of empirical research suggest that an interplay between empirical research, ethical analysis and policy development may represent a new form of interdisciplinary scholarship to improve clinical medicine. PMID:8259527

Pearlman, R A; Miles, S H; Arnold, R M

1993-09-01

165

Guide to Research and Fellowship Opportunities for Perelman Medical Students  

E-print Network

Guide to Research and Fellowship Opportunities for Perelman Medical Students If you are a first: Medical students typically choose to do research between the first and second year of Medical School a full year of research. Year Out Research: Medical students who have completed their third year

Bushman, Frederic

166

CENTER FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION (CMI) Early-Stage Medical Technology Research and Development  

E-print Network

CENTER FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION (CMI) Early-Stage Medical Technology Research and Development Round-2. The University of Pittsburgh's Center for Medical Innovation (CMI) (Center for Medical Innovation preproposals for early-stage medical technology research and development. Purpose: The Pilot Funding Program

Sibille, Etienne

167

78 FR 16679 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy Council; Request for Comments  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). These...identify and address medical policy issues that...Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug...coordination of medical policy development...Director for Clinical Science, the Director of...specific policy topics under...

2013-03-18

168

Medical Amnesty Policies: Research is Needed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the issues surrounding medical amnesty policies in higher education beginning with the background of such policies, a summary of the current debate regarding the policies, and a discussion of research related to helping behaviors among college students. Due to the negative consequences of alcohol misuse, many student affairs…

Oster-Aaland, Laura; Eighmy, Myron A.

2008-01-01

169

Analysis of serial measurements in medical research  

Microsoft Academic Search

In medical research data are often collected serially on subjects. The statistical analysis of such data is often inadequate in two ways: it may fail to settle clinically relevant questions and it may be statistically invalid. A commonly used method which compares groups at a series of time points, possibly with t tests, is flawed on both counts. There may,

J. N. S. Matthews; D. G. Altman; M. J. Campbell; P. Royston

1990-01-01

170

HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH STRATEGIC REVIEW  

E-print Network

with the Health System, Including Allied Health And Primary Health Care 17 Theme Three: Scale, Scope engagement with the health system including Allied Health and Primary Health Care 28 Scale, scopeHEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH STRATEGIC REVIEW ISSUES PAPER 29 OCTOBER 2012 #12;#12;CONTENTS The Vice

Viglas, Anastasios

171

Innovative methods for making behavioral science relevant to medical education.  

PubMed

Thousands of psychologists teach in U.S. medical schools, and these psychologists are responsible for ensuring that the medical students they train are aware of the ways in which research findings from the behavioral and social sciences can enhance the practice of medicine. In addition, it is imperative that physicians appreciate the limits of their own ability to treat psychological and psychiatric problems and know when to refer to mental health professionals. This brief article is based on a talk given by the author at the 2007 American Psychological Association (APA) convention after receiving the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) Ivan Mensh Award for Distinguished Achievement in Teaching. The paper draws on the personal experiences of the author after three decades spent teaching behavioral science to medical students, and it introduces readers to the reasoning behind many of the decisions made in planning and developing each of the author's four editions of the medical school text Behavior and Medicine. PMID:19104972

Wedding, Danny

2008-06-01

172

MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Biological & Medical 121 Biological, Medical Devices  

E-print Network

MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Biological & Medical 121 Biological, Medical Devices and Systems........................................................................................143 #12;122 Biological & Medical MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 #12;MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 Biological & Medical 123 Vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, blood ox- ygenation, cardiac output

Reif, Rafael

173

Brain science, addiction and drugs An Academy of Medical Sciences working group report  

E-print Network

Brain science, addiction and drugs An Academy of Medical Sciences working group report chaired;Brain science, addiction and drugs An Academy of Medical Sciences working group report chaired by Professor Sir Gabriel Horn FRS FRCP May 2008 #12;BRAin SCienCe, AddiCtion And dRuGS 2 Acknowledgements

Cambridge, University of

174

Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.  

PubMed

An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future. PMID:23317516

Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

2013-05-01

175

JAMA Patient Page: Basic Science Research  

MedlinePLUS

... of Health and Human Services VALUE OF BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCH Basic science research can help in a ... dedicated to basic science and translational research. Basic Science Research JAMA PATIENT PAGE The JAMA Patient Page ...

176

Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Medical Research Research Results in the News: A Users Guide ... day — you hear about a new result of medical research on television or read about it in the ...

177

Science Anxiety: Research and Action  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Science anxiety has been shown to seriously impede student learning. This chapter will describe research done on science anxiety and will explain specific actions that college science teachers can take to build the confidence of their students. This free selection includes the Table of Contents, Preface, Endorsement of the Society for College Science Teachers, and Introduction.

Jeffry V. Mallow

2006-01-01

178

Location Science Research: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document presents a broad review of facility location and location science research. The goal of this report is not to provide an exhaustive list of location science topics (an undertaking far beyond the scope of a single journal article), but rather to provide the reader with a more general review of the location science research landscape. This document starts

Trevor S. Hale; Christopher R. Moberg

2003-01-01

179

Cognitive Sciences Program Research Opportunities  

E-print Network

Cognitive Sciences Program Research Opportunities Students pursuing undergraduate degrees in cognitive science are encouraged to engage in research related activities at some point during their time and knowledge, skills/experience, and motivation. The Cognitive Science Program offers four options for students

Indiana University

180

Correlation Research of Medical Security Management System Network Platform in Medical Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objective-The related research of medical security management system network in medical practice. Methods-Establishing network platform of medical safety management system, medical security network host station, medical security management system(C/S), medical security management system of departments and sections, comprehensive query, medical security disposal and examination system. Results-In medical safety management, medical security management system can reflect the hospital medical security problem, and can achieve real-time detection and improve the medical security incident detection rate. Conclusion-The application of the research in the hospital management implementation, can find hospital medical security hidden danger and the problems of medical disputes, and can help in resolving medical disputes in time and achieve good work efficiency, which is worth applying in the hospital practice.

Jie, Wang; Fan, Zhang; Jian, Hao; Li-nong, Yu; Jun, Fei; Ping, Hao; Ya-wei, Shen; Yue-jin, Chang

181

How Well Establishment of Research Plans Can Improve Scientific Ranking of Medical Universities  

PubMed Central

Background: As a developing country, Iran has not had a substantial share in global science production activities; however, this country has recently been the forth country in the world regarding research output publications, and biomedical research has played a crucial role in achieving this honorable position. Objectives: In this paper, we aimed to introduce the strategies employed at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences of Iran, to enhance scientific research output of this university. Patients and Methods: The present study used the qualitative content analysis technique. The Research deputies and the head of research centers of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences were the research subjects. The main researcher conducted all the interviews. The participants were all authorities of the university. Sampling continued until data saturation. After speaking with 16 participants, the interviews yielded no new information, and no new categories or subcategories were added to the previous ones. Deep and semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions were used to collect data. Results: Diplomacies employed to promote research, organizing educational classes, and foundation of infrastructural organizations for research and true surveillance of research programs were the main characteristics of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences research strategies. Conclusions: Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences is a military university of limited resources that has won several awards in the recent years, and has been categorized as one of the leading first ranked medical universities in Iran; a position quite higher than several other larger universities of the country. We recommend more enhanced strategies for other universities.

Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Izadi, Morteza; Aslani, Jafar; Ghanei, Mostafa

2015-01-01

182

Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.  

PubMed

News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be. PMID:16610136

Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

2005-12-01

183

Infection Research Colloquium Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre  

E-print Network

Infection Research Colloquium Jurjen Tel Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre The potency ______________________________________________________________________________________ Erlangen Center for Infection Research Contributing Research Consortia: Collaborative Research Center 643 Spokesman: Prof. Dr. G. Schuler Research Training Group 1071 Spokesman: Prof. Dr. B. Fleckenstein Research

Fiebig, Peter

184

Research In Science and Engineering Jointly sponsored by  

E-print Network

Research In Science and Engineering Jointly sponsored by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and the UMDNJ-Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Learn more about RISE at http://rise.rutgers.edu Summer reSearchSummer reSearch at Robert Wood Johnson

Chen, Kuang-Yu

185

WORLD MEDICAL ASSOCIATION DECLARATION OF HELSINKI Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects  

E-print Network

1 WORLD MEDICAL ASSOCIATION DECLARATION OF HELSINKI Ethical Principles for Medical Research of Helsinki as a statement of ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects, including first consideration," and the International Code of Medical Ethics declares that, "A physician shall act

Pfeifer, Holger

186

DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (DMS) ACADEMIC RULES AND GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

's academic advisor or dissertation advisor: these may include graduate level courses towards the Ph.D. degree and further approved by the Division of Medical Sciences. Each 300-level course, as well as any courses1 DIVISION OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (DMS) ACADEMIC RULES AND GUIDELINES 2011-2012 REGISTRATION All

Lahav, Galit

187

..() B.Sc. (Medical Science) (1) 132 364-101  

E-print Network

Behavior II Medical Ethics II 311-331 Endocrine System and Metabolism 4 388-371 Human Life Cycle 4 367 and 1 COMPRE I Comprehensive Examination I - Medical Ethics I 13 19 4 388-491 Introduction 2-1 () ..() B.Sc. (Medical Science) (1) 132 364-101 1. 30 3 (4)311-211 1.1 (6

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

188

Medical interface research at the HIT Lab  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Human Interface Technology Laboratory (HIT Lab) is a multi-disciplinary research and development lab whose work centers\\u000a on novel approaches to human interface technology. Lab researchers represent a wide range of disciplines from across the University\\u000a of Washington campus, including engineering, medicine, education, social sciences, architecture, and the design arts. We describe\\u000a here a representative sampling of past and current

Suzanne Weghorst; Eric J. Seibel; Peter Oppenheimer; Hunter G. Hoffman; Brian Schowengerdt; Thomas A. Furness

2008-01-01

189

Biology and medical research at the exascale.  

SciTech Connect

Advances in computational hardware and algorithms that have transformed areas of physics and engineering have recently brought similar benefits to biology and biomedical research. Biological sciences are undergoing a revolution. High-performance computing has accelerated the transition from hypothesis-driven to design-driven research at all scales, and computational simulation of biological systems is now driving the direction of biological experimentation and the generation of insights.

Wolf, L.; Pieper, G. W. (CLS-CI); ( MCS)

2010-01-01

190

Medical school libraries' handling of articles that report invalid science.  

PubMed

In 1989-90 the authors conducted a nationwide study to examine how academic medical libraries handled articles that report invalid science and to determine the effectiveness of any policies implemented to limit the use of such articles. Ninety-five of the 127 medical school libraries the authors surveyed completed questionnaires analyzing policy and attitude issues. Eighty-four of these libraries manually reviewed the available copies they held of ten retracted articles. Of the 811 copies of the retracted, invalid articles reviewed, 742 (91.5%) were not tagged as being invalid. Seventy-nine percent of the libraries had tagged none of the retracted studies and only 16% had policies for managing articles that report invalid science. Academic librarians reflected a common attitude against perceived library censorship and emphasized the user's role in assuring validity. The nation's medical libraries, at least in part by intent, do not commonly identify or have policies to handle the invalid articles they hold. The authors conclude that biomedical researchers, clinicians, and teachers should not assume published studies held in libraries are inherently valid. The lack of stated policy and the disparate assumptions about the role libraries play in this area may perpetuate the use of invalid articles. PMID:1546986

Pfeifer, M P; Snodgrass, G L

1992-02-01

191

Development of an Asset Map of Medical Education Research Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Medical education research is gaining recognition as scholarship within academic medical centers. This survey was conducted at a medium-sized academic medical center in the United States. The purpose of the study was to learn faculty interest in research in medical education, so assets could be used to develop educational scholarship…

Christiaanse, Mary E.; Russell, Eleanor L.; Crandall, Sonia J.; Lambros, Ann; Manuel, Janeen C.; Kirk, Julienne K.

2008-01-01

192

Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences12  

PubMed Central

The tantalizing potential of nanotechnology is to fabricate and combine nanoscale approaches and building blocks to make useful tools and, ultimately, interventions for medical science, including nutritional science, at the scale of ?1–100 nm. In the past few years, tools and techniques that facilitate studies and interventions in the nanoscale range have become widely available and have drawn widespread attention. Recently, investigators in the food and nutrition sciences have been applying the tools of nanotechnology in their research. The Experimental Biology 2009 symposium entitled “Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences” was organized to highlight emerging applications of nanotechnology to the food and nutrition sciences, as well as to suggest ways for further integration of these emerging technologies into nutrition research. Speakers focused on topics that included the problems and possibilities of introducing nanoparticles in clinical or nutrition settings, nanotechnology applications for increasing bioavailability of bioactive food components in new food products, nanotechnology opportunities in food science, as well as emerging safety and regulatory issues in this area, and the basic research applications such as the use of quantum dots to visualize cellular processes and protein-protein interactions. The session highlighted several emerging areas of potential utility in nutrition research. Nutrition scientists are encouraged to leverage ongoing efforts in nanomedicine through collaborations. These efforts could facilitate exploration of previously inaccessible cellular compartments and intracellular pathways and thus uncover strategies for new prevention and therapeutic modalities. PMID:19939997

Srinivas, Pothur R.; Philbert, Martin; Vu, Tania Q.; Huang, Qingrong; Kokini, Josef L.; Saos, Etta; Chen, Hongda; Peterson, Charles M.; Friedl, Karl E.; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal; Hubbard, Van; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Miller, Nancy; Betz, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Johanna; Milner, John; Ross, Sharon A.

2010-01-01

193

Social Science Research Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1923 (and last reviewed by the Scout Report on November 3, 1998), the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent non-profit organization with ongoing research projects on every continent, most of which are designed to encourage innovation and to help social scientists engage broader constituencies. Some of the council's key interests include children and armed conflict, economic growth, international migration, and global security and cooperation. From the website, visitors can learn about the most recent project initiatives, which include the initiative on HIV / AIDS, social transformation and emergencies, and humanitarian action. Along with these recent initiatives, visitors may also read about the 30 thematic programs, which are organized into five broad program areas. Graduate students coming to the site will want to definitely take a look at the many fellowship and dissertation funding opportunities offered by the SSRC. Visitors may also browse through the SSRC quarterly publication, Items & Issues, which features essays, roundtables, and other writings by participants in SSRC-sponsored programs.

194

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until "the next revision to the web site this winter."

195

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until \\"the next revision to the web site this winter.\\"

196

Comparative Effectiveness Research: Medical Practice, Payments, and Politics: the Need to Retain Standards of Medical Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comparative effectiveness research (CER), once only the scientific interest of clinical and health services researchers who compared medical treaments, now has tumbled into the public arena. ( 1 ) Facing the need for drastic improvement in our nation’s healthcare delivery, Congress and the Obama Administration are looking to CER to improve and broaden the use of treatments in a cost-effective

Harry P. Selker

2009-01-01

197

SCHOOL SCIENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-print Network

development (TPD) #12;Areas of Work Curriculum development and evaluation Classroom interaction CognitiveSCHOOL SCIENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Jayashree Ramadas HBCSE Review, October 19, 2014 Grade IV students of Gram-Mangal school Vikramgad using the Small Science curriculum #12;School Science R&D 40 years

Shyamasundar, R.K.

198

All-Party Parliamentary Group on Medical Research  

E-print Network

3 All-Party Parliamentary Group on Medical Research Summer Reception 11 July 2012 How data saves on Medical Research includes MPs and peers from across the political parties. Established in December 2005, it provides a network for Parliamentarians with an interest in the medical research sector. The APPG

Rambaut, Andrew

199

Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform -Involve -Enable  

E-print Network

Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform - Involve - Enable Revised 3/14/14 1 Medical Education Research Scholars Program (MERSP) Application Cover Sheet Name (Last, First, M________________________ Date:________ ResetPrint Save #12;Medical Education Research Scholars Program 2014 /2015 Inform

Finley Jr., Russell L.

200

Regulation of financial conflicts of interest in medical practice and medical research: a damaging solution in search of a problem.  

PubMed

The free market, which includes most practicing physicians, publicly supported biomedical researchers, and private drug and device companies, has succeeded spectacularly in delivering new medical technologies to the public. Increased interactions between doctors (physicians and biomedical researchers), epitomized by the founding of the biotechnology revolution, have and can continue to accelerate this delivery. A powerful anti-commercial advocacy movement that has blossomed over the past 20 years threatens this momentum. This movement has succeeded in inverting reality by demonizing the market and by promoting distorted and damaging views of professionalism and of science. Most ominously, it has imposed onerous and counterproductive regulations on medical education and translational research. PMID:17259676

Stossel, Thomas P

2007-01-01

201

Earth System Science Research Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Earth System Science Research Course is a unique class implemented by Frederick County Public Schools. The course (ESSR) was designed in conjunction with NASA Education Specialists and is supported by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Students in this course have the opportunity to use data from cutting edge earth science experiments while researching their own topics and answering

J. P. Leck

2005-01-01

202

Neutron science research project in JAERI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A conception of Neutron Science Research Project (NSRP) has been proposed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) since 1994 for its future big science project. The project aims at exploring new basic science and nuclear energy science by using a high-intensity proton accelerator. NSRP is a complex composed of a powerful superconducting proton linac, the target systems which convert the proton beam to neutrons or other particles, and the facilities for scientific research programs. The proton linac is required to supply a high-intensity proton beam with an energy up to 1.5 GeV and an average current around 10 mA. The scientific research programs are as follows: In the area of basic science, structural biology and material science with slow neutron scattering method, neutron nuclear physics and spallation radioisotope physics, and in the area of nuclear energy science, the experimental feasibility studies of incineration for the nuclear waste transmutation and material developments with a neutron irradiation facility. Other scientific research programs are also proposed such as meson science for meson and muon physics, radioisotope production for medical use. Research and development (R&D) have been carried out for the components of the injector system of the proton linac; an ion source, an RFQ linac and a part of DTL linac. The conceptual design work and R&D activities for NSRP have started in the fiscal year, 1996. The first beam of 1.5 GeV and 1 mA is expected to be extracted from the proton linac by 2004 and finally a 10 mA is to be obtained in 2007 by reflecting the results of technological developments.

Suzuki, Y.; Oyama, Y.; Sasa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Yasuda, H.; Tone, T.; Takizuka, T.; Mizumoto, M.; Watanabe, N.; Mukaiyama, T.

1997-02-01

203

Between clinical medicine and the laboratory: medical research funding in France from 1945 to the present.  

PubMed

By focusing on funding methods, this paper considers the way in which medical research eventually led to the science-based medicine that is prevalent in France today. This process seems to have taken place in three stages during the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1940s and 1950s, two major events occurred. The first was the creation of a national health insurance fund in France, which opened up new reasons for, and ways of, funding medical research. The second was the development of antibiotics, which triggered a revival of clinical medicine. In the 1960s and 1970s, a proactive government science policy allowed the life sciences and medical research to come together in the wake of a burgeoning new science: molecular biology. Thus, in 1964, the creation of the National Health and Medical Research Institute (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale or INSERM), destined to "molecularize" medical research, was seen as the fulfillment of the government's ambitious research policy. Today, with medicine irreversibly embedded in scientific and technical rationality, health has become a major issue in modern societies. This paper therefore touches on some of the key features of biomedical research, including the revival of funding systems for clinical research and the development of a system of research grants that was made possible by patient organizations and the creation of new funding agencies. PMID:21037320

Esterle, Laurence; Picard, Jean-François

2011-10-01

204

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania  

E-print Network

Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Perelman School of Medicine at the University in academic medicine · To promote research and education in women's health Dual Mission To support in women's health: 1 award may be specific to CV research ­ Clinical, basic science or community · Open

Bushman, Frederic

205

Snake oil and venoms for medical research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some think that using derivatives of snake venom for medical purposes is the modern version of snake oil but they are seriously misjudging the research potentials of some of these toxins in medicines of the 2000's. Medical trials, using some of the compounds has proven their usefulness. Several venoms have shown the possibilities that could lead to anticoagulants, helpful in heart disease. The blood clotting protein from the taipan snake has been shown to rapidly stop excessive bleeding. The venom from the copperhead may hold an answer to breast cancer. The Malaysian pit viper shows promise in breaking blood clots. Cobra venom may hold keys to finding cures for Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. Rattlesnake proteins from certain species have produced blood pressure medicines. Besides snake venoms, venom from the South American dart frog, mollusks (i.e. Cone Shell Snail), lizards (i.e. Gila Monster & Komodo Dragon), some species of spiders and tarantulas, Cephalopods, mammals (i.e. Platypus & Shrews), fish (i.e. sting rays, stone fish, puffer fish, blue bottle fish & box jelly fish), intertidal marine animals (echinoderms)(i.e. Crown of Thorn Star Fish & Flower Urchin) and the Honeybee are being investigated for potential medical benefits.

Wolpert, H. D.

2011-04-01

206

Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research  

SciTech Connect

The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ``gold standards`` to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications.

Thomlinson, W.

1995-12-31

207

INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION  

E-print Network

mission the commitment to provide excellent medical education, research endeavors, and medical care, first science research opportunities will be encouraged in all areas where there are Graduate Medical EducationPage 26 INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT TO GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION

Oliver, Douglas L.

208

ADHD--To Medicate or Not? Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What does the research indicate are the effects of medicating or not medicating adolescents with ADHD? Many parents and health care providers are rethinking and questioning the long-term effects of medication on children. Whether or not to medicate adolescents with ADHD is a conundrum that many parents face. Some parents believe their child will…

Walker, Karen

2009-01-01

209

NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent  

Cancer.gov

Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal in educating and training the next generation of cancer research scientists and clinicians.

210

National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Eunice Kennedy Shriver's recent death serves as a reminder of her advocacy on behalf of those with mental retardation and her commitment to research about human development. The National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research is her legacy, born of her concern for her sister Rosemary's treatment, who was born mentally retarded and later lobotomized because of it, "Mrs. Eunice Kennedy set out to help the scientific community, policy makers, and the general public recognize the importance of such research [in itself and] as a bridge to understanding broader, more general aspects of human development, which would help all people." The website for the NCMRR has a number of available resources on the right side of the webpage, such as Funding Opportunities, Research Resources, and News Releases. Scientists interested in "Scientific Meetings, Conferences and Events", can find them by clicking on that very link on the left hand side of the page. "AtoZ Health and Human Development Topics", from AIDS to Turner Syndrome, can be found under the "Health Information" tab on the far left hand side of the page. "Clinical Research & Clinical Trials", "Health Education" and "Publications & Materials" can also be accessed under that tab.

211

Effectiveness of instructional computers in teaching basic medical sciences.  

PubMed

The present study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of computer-based PLATO IV basic medical science lessons. Effectiveness was operationalized in terms of increased performance on basic medical science examinations for those medical students who had used the lessons when compared to those students who had not. Usage of the PLATO lessons was quantified as 'minutes of use' of the relevant lessons. Data were gathered in 1976-77 from first-year medical students at two sites, both under the auspices of one college of medicine. Usage of PLATO lessons and subsequent performance on three subtests from three different examinations were analysed. The findings from the current study offer encouragement that use of PLATO basic medical science materials contribute to increased performance on subsequent examinations. PMID:384184

Essex, D L; Sorlie, W E

1979-05-01

212

Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS.

Thomlinson, W.

1997-08-01

213

Two h-Index Benchmarks for Evaluating the Publication Performance of Medical Informatics Researchers  

PubMed Central

Background The h-index is a commonly used metric for evaluating the publication performance of researchers. However, in a multidisciplinary field such as medical informatics, interpreting the h-index is a challenge because researchers tend to have diverse home disciplines, ranging from clinical areas to computer science, basic science, and the social sciences, each with different publication performance profiles. Objective To construct a reference standard for interpreting the h-index of medical informatics researchers based on the performance of their peers. Methods Using a sample of authors with articles published over the 5-year period 2006–2011 in the 2 top journals in medical informatics (as determined by impact factor), we computed their h-index using the Scopus database. Percentiles were computed to create a 6-level benchmark, similar in scheme to one used by the US National Science Foundation, and a 10-level benchmark. Results The 2 benchmarks can be used to place medical informatics researchers in an ordered category based on the performance of their peers. A validation exercise mapped the benchmark levels to the ranks of medical informatics academic faculty in the United States. The 10-level benchmark tracked academic rank better (with no ties) and is therefore more suitable for practical use. Conclusions Our 10-level benchmark provides an objective basis to evaluate and compare the publication performance of medical informatics researchers with that of their peers using the h-index. PMID:23079075

Arbuckle, Luk; Jonker, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kevin

2012-01-01

214

Fifteen years medical information sciences: the Amsterdam curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To inform the medical informatics community on the rational, goals, evolution and present contents of the Medical Information Sciences program of the University of Amsterdam and our achievements. Methods: We elaborate on the history of our program, the philosophy, contents and organizational structure of the present-day curriculum. Besides, we describe the various didactic approaches in the program and the

Monique W. M. Jaspers; Paul Fockens; Jan H. Ravesloot; Martien Limburg; Ameen Abu-hanna

2004-01-01

215

Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose  

E-print Network

Stanford Medical Youth Science Program Potential into Purpose #12;Cover: SMYSP students proudly application process, learning about financial aid, writing their college essays and learning SAT test are paired with student counselors, medical students, faculty, health and education professionals, and alumni

Ford, James

216

Social science education as a component of medical training  

Microsoft Academic Search

The broad view of health espoused by the World Health Organization is now generally accepted by medical educators. Implicit in the new paradigm is a recognition of multiple determinants of health and of shifting divisions of professional responsibilities among providers. As a consequence, the importance of social and behavioural science education as a foundation to medical training is increasingly appreciated.

S. M. MacLeod; H. N. McCullough

1994-01-01

217

NASA's Microgravity Science Research Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ongoing challenge faced by NASA's Microgravity Science Research Program is to work with the scientific and engineering communities to secure the maximum return from our Nation's investments by: assuring that the best possible science emerges from the science community for microgravity investigations; ensuring the maximum scientific return from each investigation in the most timely and cost-effective manner; and enhancing the distribution of data and applications of results acquired through completed investigations to maximize their benefits.

1996-01-01

218

Computing Life: National Institute of General Medical Sciences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Computers are embedded in much of what we do, whether it's a form of instant communication or the navigation of city streets via a GPS unit. Computers have also proved to be extremely useful to scientific researchers, a fact not lost on the people at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). The NIGMS has created this virtual online booklet titled "Computing Life" in order to inform young people about the various scientific and medical careers that are open to them and to educate people more generally about the role of computers in scientific inquiry and discovery. The homepage features a set of "Featured Topics" that contains video clips of researchers talking about their work, interactive games, and role-playing exercises. These intriguing topics include "Movie Mania", "The Next Top Protein Model", and "Made Possible By"". In the "Web Extras" area, visitors can watch short films (including a simulation of potential pandemic flu in the United States), listen and watch interviews, and take a crack at a crossword puzzle. Visitors who get hooked on the site may wish to sign up to receive updates via their RSS feed.

219

Designing medical informatics research and library--resource projects to increase what is learned.  

PubMed Central

Careful study of medical informatics research and library-resource projects is necessary to increase the productivity of the research and development enterprise. Medical informatics research projects can present unique problems with respect to evaluation. It is not always possible to adapt directly the evaluation methods that are commonly employed in the natural and social sciences. Problems in evaluating medical informatics projects may be overcome by formulating system development work in terms of a testable hypothesis; subdividing complex projects into modules, each of which can be developed, tested and evaluated rigorously; and utilizing qualitative studies in situations where more definitive quantitative studies are impractical. PMID:7719785

Stead, W W; Haynes, R B; Fuller, S; Friedman, C P; Travis, L E; Beck, J R; Fenichel, C H; Chandrasekaran, B; Buchanan, B G; Abola, E E

1994-01-01

220

Conflicts of interest in medical science: peer usage, peer review and 'CoI consultancy'.  

PubMed

In recent years, the perception has grown that conflicts of interest are having a detrimental effect on medical science as it influences health policy and clinical practice, leading medical journals to enforce self-declaration of potential biases in the attempt to counteract or compensate for the problem. Conflict of interest (CoI) declarations have traditionally been considered inappropriate in pure science since its evaluation systems themselves constitute a mechanism for eliminating the effect of individual biases. Pure science is primarily evaluated by 'peer usage', in which scientific information is 'replicated' by being incorporated in the work of other scientists, and tested by further observation of the natural world. Over the long-term, the process works because significant biases impair the quality of science, and bad science tends to be neglected or refuted. However, scientific evaluation operates slowly over years and decades, and only a small proportion of published work is ever actually evaluated. But most of modern medical science no longer conforms to the model of pure science, and may instead be conceptualized as a system of 'applied' science having different aims and evaluation processes. The aim of applied medical science is to solve pre-specified problems, and to provide scientific information ready for implementation immediately following publication. The primary evaluation process of applied science is peer review, not peer usage. Peer review is much more rapid (with a timescale of weeks or months) and cheaper than peer usage and (consequently) has a much wider application: peer review is a prospective validation while peer usage is retrospective. Since applied science consists of incremental advances on existing knowledge achieved using established techniques, its results can usually be reliably evaluated by peer review. However, despite its considerable convenience, peer review has significant limitations related to its reliance on opinion. One major limitation of peer review has proved to be its inability to deal with conflicts of interest, especially in a 'big science' context when prestigious scientists may have similar biases, and conflicts of interest are widely shared among peer reviewers. When applied medical science has been later checked against the slower but more valid processes of peer usage, it seems that reliance on peer review may allow damaging distortions to become 'locked-in' to clinical practice and health policy for considerable periods. Scientific progress is generally underpinned by increasing specialization. Medical journals should specialize in the communication of scientific information, and they have neither the resources nor the motivation to investigate and measure conflicts of interest. Effectively dealing with the problem of conflicts of interest in applied medical science firstly requires a more explicit demarcation between the communications media of pure medical science and applied medical science. Greater specialization of these activities would then allow distinctive aims and evaluation systems to evolve with the expectation of improved performance in both pure and applied systems. In future, applied medical science should operate with an assumption of bias, with the onus of proof on applied medical scientists to facilitate the 'data transparency' necessary to validate their research. Journals of applied medical science will probably require more rigorous processes of peer review than at present, since their publications are intended to be ready for implementation. But since peer review does not adequately filter-out conflicts of interest in applied medical science, there is a need for the evolution of specialist post-publication institutional mechanisms. The suggested solution is to encourage the establishment of independent 'CoI consultancy' services, whose role would be to evaluate conflicts of interest and other biases in published applied medical science prior to their implementation. Such services would be paid-for by the groups who intend to implement appl

Charlton, Bruce G

2004-01-01

221

Interdisciplinary Science Research and Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science history shows us that interdisciplinarity is a spontaneous process that is intrinsic to, and engendered by, research activity. It is an activity that is done rather than an object to be designed and constructed. We examine three vignettes from the history of science that display the interdisciplinary process at work and consider the…

MacKinnon, P. J.; Hine, D.; Barnard, R. T.

2013-01-01

222

Cooperative research in space sciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This grant covered the period from July 1989 through September 30, 1995. The research covered a number of topics in the general area of space science. Specific research topics included: (1) Solar astronomy - largely in support of the Ulysses project; (2) Space Science - largely in support of instrumentation for several NASA satellite projects; (3) Cometary astronomy; and (4) Planetary Astronomy - largely supporting the NASA Infrared Heterodyne instrument.

1995-01-01

223

Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Research Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine to improve patient care and safety. Feinberg provides 60 percent of all research across Northwestern

Apkarian, A. Vania

224

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT PFIZER INC. AND [ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER  

E-print Network

") for the conduct of collaborative preclinical and clinical research studies in the area of identificationCOLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT BETWEEN PFIZER INC. AND [ACADEMIC MEDICAL CENTER] THIS COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AGREEMENT (hereinafter "Agreement") is entered into by and between Pfizer Inc

Bandettini, Peter A.

225

Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran during 2010–2011. The research tool for data collection was a researcher-tailored questionnaire on political behaviors. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by seven management professors, and its reliability was tested by a pilot study using test-retest method which yielded a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.71. The respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire and express their perceptions and tendencies to engage in organizational behaviors. The collected data was read to and analyzed by IBM SPSS environment and correlation analytical methods. Overall, 729 respondents filled and returned the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 90%. Most of the respondents indicated that they had no tendency to engage in political behavior. Moreover, we found that there was a significant correlation between sex, higher education degrees, tenure and the employees’ tendency to engage in political behavior. The participants were not overtly political because of their personal belief, ethical values, and personal characters. Non-political and overtly political employees are both prejudicial for all organizations. Therefore, it seems that the medium rate of good political behavior is vital and prevalent in Iranian organizations. PMID:23908760

Dargahi, Hossein

2012-01-01

226

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

1995-08-01

227

Integrating Bioinformatics, Medical Sciences and Drug Discovery M. Madan Babu  

E-print Network

Integrating Bioinformatics, Medical Sciences and Drug Discovery M. Madan Babu Centre.com Bioinformatics Bioinformatics, a term coined for the applications of computer science in biology is now emerging with a theoretical conjecture only then turning to experiment to follow or test that hypothesis." Bioinformatics

Babu, M. Madan

228

Application of Basic and Medical Sciences in the Dental Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The historical basis for the application of basic and medical sciences in the dental curriculum is presented. Current issues are examined and future perspectives in applying biological sciences to clinical dentistry are explored. Some ideas for consideration in developing a more responsive curriculum are provided. (MLW)

DePaola, Dominick P.

1981-01-01

229

Veterans Administration support for medical research: opinions of the endangered species of physician-scientists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past three decades the Veter- ans Affairs (VA) Research program has evolved into a powerful, peer-reviewed funding mechanism for basic and translational research that has resulted in numer- ous important contributions to medical science and improvements in patient care. Continuity in VA Merit Review funding has fostered and nurtured the scientific careers of a large number of physician-scientists

STANLEY ZUCKER; JOHN C. CRABBE; GEORGE COOPER; FRED FINKELMAN; COREY LARGMAN; ROBERT W. MCCARLEY; LOUIS RICE; JANET RUBIN; BRUCE RICHARDSON; FREDERICK SEIL; GORDON L. SNIDER; ARTHUR A. VANDENBARK

2004-01-01

230

Authorship patterns in life sciences, preclinical basic and clinical research papers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper examines the multiple authorship in research papers in biomedical sciences from the more basic aspects to clinically oriented research. Seventeen journals were chosen for analysis — nine from the general and life sciences categories and eight from medical sciences group with clinical orientation. All these were high impact journals as per the Science Citation Index and come

K. Satyanarayana; K. V. Ratnakar

1989-01-01

231

Research opportunities in photochemical sciences  

SciTech Connect

The workshop entitled {open_quotes}Research Opportunities in Photochemical Sciences{close_quotes} was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Research (ER), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Division of Chemical Sciences. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado was requested by ER to host the workshop. It was held February 5-8, 1996 at the Estes Park Conference Center, Estes Park, CO, and attended by about 115 leading scientists and engineers from the U.S., Japan, and Europe; program managers for the DOE ER and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs also attended. The purpose of the workshop was to bridge the communication gap between the practioneers and supporters of basic research in photochemical science and the practioneers and supporters of applied research and development in technologies related to photochemical science. For the purposes of the workshop the definition of the term {open_quotes}photochemical science{close_quotes} was broadened to include homogeneous photochemistry, heterogeneous photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, photocatalysis, photobiology (for example, the light-driven processes of biological photosynthesis and proton pumping), artificial photosynthesis, solid state photochemistry, and solar photochemistry. The technologies under development through DOE support that are most closely related to photochemical science, as defined above, are the renewable energy technologies of photovoltaics, biofuels, hydrogen energy, carbon dioxide reduction and utilization, and photocatalysis for environmental cleanup of water and air. Individual papers were processed separately for the United states Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1996-07-01

232

Medical-Research Ethics under the Microscope.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the growing involvement between medical schools and medical industries and the ethical problems this situation poses. The main concern is that investigators may expose subjects to unnecessary risks because they are driven by financial motives. (SLD)

Mangan, Katherine

2003-01-01

233

Research of Medication Use during Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... Results of these studies give women and their healthcare providers better information on the safety or risk of using specific medications during pregnancy. This information supports their ability to make informed decisions about treatment options. Learning the Effects of Medication ...

234

The Secure Medical Research Workspace: An IT Infrastructure to Enable Secure Research on Clinical Data  

PubMed Central

Clinical data has tremendous value for translational research, but only if security and privacy concerns can be addressed satisfactorily. A collaboration of clinical and informatics teams, including RENCI, NC TraCS, UNC’s School of Information and Library Science, Information Technology Service’s Research Computing and other partners at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a system called the Secure Medical Research Workspace (SMRW) that enables researchers to use clinical data securely for research. SMRW significantly minimizes the risk presented when using of identified clinical data, thereby protecting patients, researchers, and institutions associated with the data. The SMRW is built on a novel combination of virtualization and data leakage protection and can be combined with other protection methodologies and scaled to production levels. PMID:23751029

Shoffner, Michael; Owen, Phillips; Mostafa, Javed; Lamm, Brent; Wang, Xiaoshu; Schmitt, Charles P.; Ahalt, Stanley C.

2013-01-01

235

The secure medical research workspace: an IT infrastructure to enable secure research on clinical data.  

PubMed

Clinical data have tremendous value for translational research, but only if security and privacy concerns can be addressed satisfactorily. A collaboration of clinical and informatics teams, including RENCI, NC TraCS, UNC's School of Information and Library Science, Information Technology Service's Research Computing and other partners at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a system called the Secure Medical Research Workspace (SMRW) that enables researchers to use clinical data securely for research. SMRW significantly minimizes the risk presented when using identified clinical data, thereby protecting patients, researchers, and institutions associated with the data. The SMRW is built on a novel combination of virtualization and data leakage protection and can be combined with other protection methodologies and scaled to production levels. PMID:23751029

Shoffner, Michael; Owen, Phillips; Mostafa, Javed; Lamm, Brent; Wang, Xiaoshu; Schmitt, Charles P; Ahalt, Stanley C

2013-06-01

236

Science & Research Agriculture & Food  

E-print Network

Manager Kino Experienced Evaluation Expert Sponsors Advertising Send us your press release EU Press & Industry Current Section EU policymaking: Rooted in science? Algae: The ultimate biofuel? Nanotechnology Strategy ALDE Nanoscience under the spotlight CEFIC EU CHEMICAL INDUSTRY EXPECTED TO GROW BY 9.5% in 2010

237

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food Science (Includes Pre-Medical/Dental Option)  

E-print Network

Chemical/Anal Prin Lab 2 ____ CHM 2230 Organic Chem Lab 2 _____ NFS 2210 Human Nutrition (221) 3 ____ NFS 2130 Intro Food Science (213) 3 _____ NFS 2220 Human Nutrition Lab 1 ____ NFS 2140 Intro Food ScienceBachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food Science (Includes Pre-Medical/Dental Option) Suggested

Berdichevsky, Victor

238

Current research in computer science (Research Session)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a feature session at ACM 72. At this session prominent and active people working in the area of computer science, its applications, or its supporting disciplines will state what they are doing, its importance to mankind, and its applications and prospects. The speakers will report on work in the following broad areas: artificial intelligence, industrial research, computer architecture,

John J. Donovan

1972-01-01

239

Journal of Research in Science and Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage for the Journal of Research in Science and Teaching, the official journal of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. The site publishes reports for science education researchers and practitioners on such issues as science teaching and learning and science education policy.

Wiley

240

Research report Effects of antidepressant medication on emotion regulation  

E-print Network

Research report Effects of antidepressant medication on emotion regulation in depressed patients depressive disorder Anti-depressant medication Emotion regulation Cognitive reappraisal Expressive suppression a b s t r a c t Background: Antidepressant medication (ADM) is thought to reduce depressive

Gross, James J.

241

The importance of research in undergraduate medical education.  

PubMed

Currently medical information flows at great speed, bombarding medical students. Students are unfamiliar with fundamental aspects of biomedical literature appraisal. We assert that research performed during medical school will help to reduce the gap between the information available and comprehension by the student. The goal of the present review is to expound the importance of performing research during the undergraduate medical years and the relevance of research in other fields of medicine. We performed a literature review searching MEDLINE with terms consistent with our objective. We discuss the conduct of research projects during medical school training. The analysis of the articles retrieved proves that research is feasible and that it is a critical process during the undergraduate period for medical students. PMID:25587714

Ávila, Mauricio José; Rodríguez-Restrepo, Andrea

2014-01-01

242

A Design Science Research Roadmap  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper proposes and synthesizes from previous design science (DS) methodological literature a structured and detailed\\u000a DS Roadmap for the conduct of DS research. The Roadmap is a general guide for researchers to carry out DS research by suggesting\\u000a reasonably detailed activities. Though highly tentative, it is believed the Roadmap usefully inter-relates many otherwise\\u000a seemingly disparate, overlapping or conflicting concepts.

Ahmad Alturki; Guy G. Gable; Wasana Bandara

2011-01-01

243

Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF)  

PubMed Central

Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here. Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third-party funds and the promotion of junior scientists. Conclusions: With the explicit recommendations presented in the current position paper, the AWMF suggests enhancements to the practice of evaluating medical research performance by faculties, ministries and research funding organizations. PMID:24971044

Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Brunner, Edgar; Hildenbrand, Sibylle; Loew, Thomas H.; Raupach, Tobias; Spies, Claudia; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

2014-01-01

244

Medical technology advances from space research.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA-sponsored medical R & D programs for space applications are reviewed with particular attention to the benefits of these programs to earthbound medical services and to the general public. Notable among the results of these NASA programs is an integrated medical laboratory equipped with numerous advanced systems such as digital biotelemetry and automatic visual field mapping systems, sponge electrode caps for electroencephalograms, and sophisticated respiratory analysis equipment.

Pool, S. L.

1971-01-01

245

The Integration of Behavioral Science Theory and Clinical Experience for Second-Year Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program is described that relates behavioral science research to cancer care, encourages frank discussion and objective analysis of oncology practice, and attempts to dispell the myth that cancer patients are not medically manageable. A wide range of teaching methods are used. (MSE)

Taylor, Kathryn M.; And Others

1983-01-01

246

Population Health Sciences/Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 650 Introduction to SAS Programming for Population Health  

E-print Network

1 Population Health Sciences/Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 650 Introduction to SAS using the DATA step and.Import Wizard. 4. Use SAS libraries to create and manage permanent SAS datasets and data steps to manage and analyze research data. 12. Understand the basis of using Macros in SAS 13. Use

Sheridan, Jennifer

247

Dissemination of Medical Information: Organizational and Technological Issues in Health Sciences Libraries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes five programs that have been significant to the evolution of biomedical communications in health sciences libraries over the last twenty years: the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM); Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS); National Research and Education Network (NREN); Unified Medical Language System…

Roderer, Nancy K.

1993-01-01

248

[Development of medical sciences in China].  

PubMed

Three periods or stages can be recognized in the development of medicine in China. The first one, being the indigenous medical practice, has its own philosophical approach and can therefore not simply be combined with Western medicine. The second period, in which medical missionaries introduced modern medicine was still a time of laissez-faire and pestilence. The third stage was ushered in by the liberation in 1949 and is characterized by the fact that the government no longer regards health as the private affair of the individual but as a task for the whole community. A number of endemic and epidemic diseases were conquered mainly through close cooperation between the population and medical workers. Success must be regarded as in an important part due to land reform and the eradication of famine. Further improvement in health care will depend to a great deal on improvement in living standards and a lessening of population pressure. As family planning meets resistance for economic and other reasons, only specific measures by the state can bring about a change in attitude. The progress in preventive measures is matched by advances in the technical aspects of medicine and especially too in medical education. PMID:6990277

Müller, H K

1980-02-01

249

Analyzing Medical Processes Dept. of Computer Science  

E-print Network

-state verification, Model checking, Medical processes, Property specifications 1. INTRODUCTION This paper describes or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit the Institute of Medicine (IOM) [31] es- timated that approximately 100,000 people die each year in US hospitals

Avrunin, George S.

250

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

251

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT Master of Medical Science  

E-print Network

-PA relationship, PAs exercise autonomy in medical decision-making and provide a broad range of diagnostic,000 ·Today- master's degree is entry-level education ·Sophisticated, standardized education and certification processes in place #12;DEFINITION OF A PA (1995) PAs are health professionals licensed to practice medicine

Dennett, Daniel

252

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT Master of Medical Science  

E-print Network

-PA relationship, PAs exercise autonomy in medical decision-making and provide a broad range of diagnostic is entry-level education ·Sophisticated, standardized education with accreditation & certification processes in place #12;DEFINITION OF A PA (1995) PAs are health professionals licensed to practice medicine

Dennett, Daniel

253

Applying the science of learning to medical education.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE The goal of this paper is to examine how to apply the science of learning to medical education. SCIENCE OF LEARNING The science of learning is the scientific study of how people learn. Multimedia learning - learning from words and pictures - is particularly relevant to medical education. The cognitive theory of multimedia learning is an information-processing explanation of how people learn from words and pictures. It is based on the idea that people have separate channels for processing words and pictures, that the capacity to process information in working memory is limited, and that meaningful learning requires appropriate cognitive processing during learning. SCIENCE OF INSTRUCTION The science of instruction is the scientific study of how to help people learn. Three important instructional goals are: to reduce extraneous processing (cognitive processing that does not serve an instructional objective) during learning; to manage essential processing (cognitive processing aimed at representing the essential material in working memory) during learning, and to foster generative processing (cognitive processing aimed at making sense of the material) during learning. Nine evidence-based principles for accomplishing these goals are presented. CONCLUSIONS Applying the science of learning to medical education can be a fruitful venture that improves medical instruction and cognitive theory. PMID:20604850

Mayer, Richard E

2010-06-01

254

Tissue simulating gel for medical research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A tissue simulating gel and a method for preparing the tissue simulating gel are disclosed. The tissue simulating gel is prepared by a process using water, gelatin, ethylene glycol, and a cross-linking agent. In order to closely approximate the characteristics of the type of tissue being simulated, other material has been added to change the electrical, sound conducting, and wave scattering properties of the tissue simulating gel. The result of the entire process is a formulation that will not melt at the elevated temperatures involved in hyperthermia medical research. Furthermore, the tissue simulating gel will not support mold or bacterial growth, is of a sufficient mechanical strength to maintain a desired shape without a supporting shell, and is non-hardening and non-drying. Substances have been injected into the tissue simulating gel prior to the setting-up thereof just as they could be injected into actual tissue, and the tissue simulating gel is translucent so as to permit visual inspection of its interior. A polyurethane spray often used for coating circuit boards can be applied to the surface of the tissue simulating gel to give a texture similar to human skin, making the tissue simulating gel easier to handle and contributing to its longevity.

Companion, John A. (Inventor)

1991-01-01

255

The Culture of Translational Science Research  

PubMed Central

We apply a symbolic interactionist framework and a qualitative methodology to the examination of the everyday reality of translational science research (TSR). This is a growing scientific movement that aims to facilitate the efficient application of basic research to clinical service design and delivery. We describe the emerging culture of translational research at a mid-size medical center that received a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. The stories related by scientists, clinicians, and students in interviews indicate that they make sense of the emerging inter- and cross-disciplinary, team-oriented culture of TSR through the refinement and redefinition of the significant symbols that inform their work while they attempt to master translational research by addressing the dilemmas it produces for them and their work. We see the strength, currency, adaptability, and energy of the core self-definition of “scientist” to be significant in shaping the emerging culture of translational research. We conclude by celebrating the value of interpretive ethnography for evaluation research. PMID:25685253

Kotarba, Joseph A.; Wooten, Kevin; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R.

2014-01-01

256

Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities  

PubMed Central

Background: Health sciences research (HSR) is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. Results: The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3), but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7). The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. Conclusion: The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

Anbari, Zohreh; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jadidi, Rahmatollah

2015-01-01

257

PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE Research Article  

E-print Network

. Both adults and children learned the words of the language. Moreover, the children performed as well children, who are unlikely to be engaged in explicit, conscious learning. However, little research has examined the characteristics of incidental learning pertinent to the process of children's language

Aslin, Richard N.

258

Science and Psychical Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

How can the methods of scientific research be applied to the subject of the spirit world, which is of such post-vital interest to us all? To do so under existing conditions is generally impossible and always difficult. Faraday wrote to a friend: ``I have been busy turning the tables on the table-turners.'' That statement was based on the results of

James Weir French

1926-01-01

259

The Oral History Program: II. Personal views of health sciences librarianship and the Medical Library Association.  

PubMed Central

The Medical Library Association Oral History Program uses accepted oral history techniques to collect and preserve interviews with members. The original taped interviews and transcripts are kept in the Medical Library Association archives and made available for research purposes; edited copies of the interviews are distributed through the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and members are encouraged to borrow and read the histories. Summaries of forty-three interviews provide personal views on health sciences librarianship and the Medical Library Association. PMID:9681172

McKenzie, D; Pifalo, V

1998-01-01

260

The Oral History Program: III. Personal views of health sciences librarianship and the Medical Library Association.  

PubMed Central

The Medical Library Association Oral History Program uses accepted oral history techniques to collect and preserve interviews with members. The original taped interviews and transcripts are kept in the Medical Library Association archives and made available for research purposes; edited copies of the interviews are distributed through the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and members are encouraged to borrow and read the histories. Summaries of forty-three interviews provide personal views on health sciences librarianship and the Medical Library Association. PMID:9803287

McKenzie, D; Pifalo, V

1998-01-01

261

An Innovative Portfolio of Research Training Programs for Medical Students  

PubMed Central

Medical student education continues to evolve, with an increasing emphasis on evidence-based decision making in clinical settings. Many schools are introducing scholarly programs to their curriculum in order to foster the development of critical thinking and analytic skills, encourage self-directed learning, and develop more individualized learning experiences. In addition, participation in rigorous scholarly projects teaches students that clinical care and research should inform each other, with the goal of providing more benefit to patients and society. Physician-scientists, and physicians who have a better appreciation of science, have the potential to be leaders in the field who will deliver outstanding clinical care, contribute new knowledge, and educate their patients. PMID:22418729

Zier, Karen; Wyatt, Christina; Muller, David

2013-01-01

262

Development and Evaluation of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation and Opportunities for Future Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As NASA develops missions to leave Earth orbit and explore distant destinations (Mars, Moon, Asteroids) it is necessary to rethink human spaceflight paradigms in the life sciences. Standards developed for low earth orbit human spaceflight may not be fully applicable and in-space research may be required to develop new standards. Preventative and emergency medical care may require new capabilities never before used in space. Due to spacecraft volume limitations, this work area may also be shared with various animal and plant life science research. This paper explores the prototype Medical Operations Workstation within the NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit and discusses some of the lessons learned from field analogue missions involving the workstation. Keywords: Exploration, medical, health, crew, injury emergency, biology, animal, plant, science, preventative, emergency.

Howard, Robert L., Jr.

2012-01-01

263

An International Perspective on Behavioral Science Education in Medical Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavioral sciences are taught in medical curricula around the world. In the current paper psychologists teaching in medical\\u000a schools in Australia, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States share their experience and\\u000a reflections. Whilst direct comparisons between countries are not made, the themes that are evident within and between accounts\\u000a are instructive. As behavioral scientists

Anna Chur-Hansen; John E. Carr; Christine Bundy; Juan Jose Sanchez-Sosa; Sombat Tapanya; Saeed H. Wahass

2008-01-01

264

Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application  

PubMed Central

Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

2013-01-01

265

Earth science research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The analysis of ground-truth data from the boreal forest plots in the Superior National Forest, Minnesota, was completed. Development of statistical methods was completed for dimension analysis (equations to estimate the biomass of trees from measurements of diameter and height). The dimension-analysis equations were applied to the data obtained from ground-truth plots, to estimate the biomass. Classification and analyses of remote sensing images of the Superior National Forest were done as a test of the technique to determine forest biomass and ecological state by remote sensing. Data was archived on diskette and tape and transferred to UCSB to be used in subsequent research.

Botkin, Daniel B.

1987-01-01

266

Materials Science Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microgravity materials processing experiments provide an opportunity to perform scientific research in an environment which allows one to observe various phenomena without the masking effects of gravity-driven convective flows, buoyancy, or contaminating influences of walled containers. Even for the most experienced scientists, it is still difficult to predict beforehand, whether or not microgravity experimentation can be successfully performed in space and achieve solutions to problems which are not attainable in 1 g. Consequently, experimentation in ground based facilities which are capable of simulating, in somewhat lesser time frames and to a lesser degree of microgravity, provides a unique low-cost approach to determine the feasibility of continuing research in a particular experiment. The utilization of these facilities in developing the full requirements for a space experiment does present a very cost-effective approach to microgravity experimentation. The Drop Tube Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides an excellent test bed for containerless processing experiments such as described here. These facilities have demonstrated for a number of years the capability to develop insight into space experiments involving containerless processing, rapid solidification, and wetting phenomena through the use of lower-cost ground facilities. Once sufficient data has been obtained, then a space-based experiment can be better defined.

Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Tom

1995-01-01

267

Teaching Toxicology as a Basic Medical Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 4-year effort at Yale University School of Medicine to teach toxicology as an elective basic science from the standpoint of organ-specific toxic effects is described. The objective of the successful multidisciplinary program is to prepare physicians to understand, recognize, and manage adverse effects from drugs and other environmental…

Gralla, Edward J.

1976-01-01

268

Research Ideas for Science Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book was developed for use in India and is adapted from "Ideas for Science Investigations" by Victor M. Showalter and Irwin L. Slesnick. It is a source book of ideas for student research projects. Three model projects are described, illustrating different approaches taken by three students to the investigation of the rise of sap in plants.…

Goyal, K. C.; Swami, Piyush

269

Computer Science Research in Finland  

E-print Network

Computer Science Research in Finland 2000­2006 Publications of the Academy of Finland 8 in Finland 2000­2006 International Evaluation Publications of the Academy of Finland 8/07 Members) Edita Prima, 2007 Academy of Finland in Brief The Academy's mission is to finance high

Kaski, Samuel

270

National Science Foundation research initiatives  

Microsoft Academic Search

NSF has been pioneer of new research activity and education reforms. To keep the pace with technology, new development dealing with changes in engineering and industry has been a concern. For example, the problem facing the power industry transmission systems are solved by a range of advanced methods, in science and technology. They range from information technology, computational intelligence, nano-technology,

J. A. Momoh; R. P. Khosla; R. Baheti

2002-01-01

271

Databases and political science research  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, librarians have not produced a study comparing databases that are appropriate for political science research. This study compares the coverage, content, and retrieval methods for nine databases. The study uses sampling to evaluate search results for six topics, providing relevancy percentages for each database. The article also reviews the types of documents cited in these samples, and provides

Thomas Schaffer

2001-01-01

272

Pre-Medical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has examined the science and mathematics competencies that the graduating physician will need, and has asked which of these should be achieved during undergraduate study. The recommendations emphasize competency -- what the learner should be able to ``do'' at the end of the learning experience -- rather than dictating specific courses. Because the scientific content of modern medical practice is evolving, new science competencies are desirable for the entering medical student. An example is statistics, an increasingly prominent foundation for database and genomic analysis but which is not yet uniformly recommended as preparation for medical school. On the other hand, the committee believes that the value of a broad liberal arts education is enduring, and science coursework should not totally consume a premedical student's time. Thus if we recommend new areas of science and mathematics competency for pre-meds, we must find other areas that can be trimmed or combined. Indeed, at present there are some science topics mandated for premedical study, which may not be essential. For these reasons, the committee aims to state premedical recommendations in ways that can be met either through traditional disciplinary courses, or through innovative and/or interdisciplinary courses. Finally, we acknowledge that practice of medicine requires grounding in scientific principles and knowledge and in the practice of critical inquiry. These principles may be learned and practiced in undergraduate study through work in the physical sciences, as well as in biology, and such multidisciplinary training should be encouraged.

Long, Sharon

2009-05-01

273

Maria Mayorga, Medical Researcher, 1952-present  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This biography and associated teaching material is part of a book of 20 life sciences modules designed to increase students' exposure both to female science role models and to hands-on, inquiry approach activities, as recommended by the National Science Education Standards. Modules are designed to drop easily into middle and high school life sciences curricula, not to "add on." Each module includes: a brief biography of a female science role model and hands-on, inquiry approach, and/or problem-solving life sciences activities with a multidisciplinary focus. Role models include both contemporary and historical women, women of color, and women with physical disabilities. Each activity is related to the work of the role model. Activity format includes suggestions for teachers, assessment ideas, and handouts for students.

PhD Marsha L Matyas (American Physiological Society Education)

2007-01-01

274

Computer Science Research at Langley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A workshop was held at Langley Research Center, November 2-5, 1981, to highlight ongoing computer science research at Langley and to identify additional areas of research based upon the computer user requirements. A panel discussion was held in each of nine application areas, and these are summarized in the proceedings. Slides presented by the invited speakers are also included. A survey of scientific, business, data reduction, and microprocessor computer users helped identify areas of focus for the workshop. Several areas of computer science which are of most concern to the Langley computer users were identified during the workshop discussions. These include graphics, distributed processing, programmer support systems and tools, database management, and numerical methods.

Voigt, S. J. (editor)

1982-01-01

275

MSRI: Mathematical Sciences Research Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI), which has been primarily funded since its inception in 1982 by the National Science Foundation, "exists to further mathematical research." With additional support and collaboration from other government agencies, private foundations, and academic and commercial sponsors, each year more than 1,000 mathematicians visit MSRI for mathematical programs and workshops. Along with detailed information of the many programs offered year-round, and contacts for members around the world, the highlight of the MSRI Website is its substantial MSRI Preprint Series (1995-2000) covering a wide variety of mathematical topics. Additionally, the site offers a huge archive of online video lectures and workshops (1993-2000). The video collection stores lectures on Hopf Algebras, the Future of Mathematical Communication, the Modularity of Elliptical Curves, Random Matrices, Algorithms, Technological and Mathematical Challenges for Understanding the Genome, and much more. Researchers wishing to apply for a visit to MSRI may obtain information at the Homepage.

276

Statistical Methods in Medical Research 2009; 18: 505526 Probabilistic models and machine learning in  

E-print Network

Statistical Methods in Medical Research 2009; 18: 505­526 Probabilistic models and machine learning that are based on inference. Although this review is not exhaustive, I believe the selected topics give a good of the main open problems in science today.1 A routine solution of this problem would be of tremendous

Hamelryck, Thomas

277

Self-medication among students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on Health Belief Model  

PubMed Central

Background: The prevalence of self-medication is high all over the world, especially in Iran. But there is a paucity of studies to explore self-medication activities among the university students. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine the self-medication among student in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Health Belief Model (HBM). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 197 medical students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences who were randomly chosen by a stratified random sampling method in 2009. The data were collected using a validated and reliable questionnaire based on HBM. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software (ver. 16). Descriptive and analytical statistics (independent t-test and test) were used. A two-tailed P value lower than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean and standard deviation of participants’ age was 22.00 ± 2.77 years. 67.3% of the sample consisted of females. The mean scores of knowledge, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, and perceived barrier were 80.36 ± 18.29, 40.92 ± 13.89, 61.48 ± 19.03, 59.11 ± 18.46, and 30.36 ± 12.40, respectively. According to the results, 84.98% of students had experienced self-medication at least for one disease during the past 6 months. Conclusions: The prevalence of self-medication in medical students is high and we can consider it as a health problem. So, we need educational interventions for the students, using HBM constructs. PMID:25540785

Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

2014-01-01

278

SchoolofMedicalSciences BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology  

E-print Network

BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology Degree Programme Guide 2014-15 SchoolofMedicalSciences #12;BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology · Introduction · Degree Aims and Outcomes · General Enquiries · General Requirements · Course Requirements Year 1 - Year 2 - Year 3 - Year 4 Introduction Molecular biology aims to understand

Levi, Ran

279

National Institute of General Medical Sciences APerfectMix  

E-print Network

plants for food and medicinal uses. Werner-Washburne watched locals create brilliantly colored purpleNational Institute of General Medical Sciences APerfectMix #12;FINDINGS | September 2003 3 By Alison Davis Biologist Maggie Werner-Washburne likes to mix things up. "I have done this all my life

Werner-Washburne, Maggie

280

Information literacy skills: Medical radiation science students and the internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical radiation science (MRS) professionals are required to maintain a high standard of knowledge and therefore need satisfactory information literacy skills. Information literacy skills are required to seek, evaluate and synthesise information sources. With the vast amount of information that can be accessed it is important to ensure students are taught how to identify and locate information sources and evaluate

Nadine Thompson; Sarah Lewis; Patrick Brennan; John Robinson

2009-01-01

281

NEW STUDENT CHECKLIST 2011 Medical Sciences Student Orientation: TBA  

E-print Network

NEW STUDENT CHECKLIST 2011 Medical Sciences Student Orientation: TBA Student Health Services Before you register, you will need to confirm that you are cleared with Student Health Services. You can go questions about your status with Student Health Services. Confirm Your Admission Offer It is important

Meyers, Steven D.

282

Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences Annual Report 2007  

E-print Network

;1 Biomaterials for the Therapy of Regenerative Medicine Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences #12 processing technology for regenerative medicine in vitro Cell- modulin ChM-I TeM TeM TeM 4. Regenerative repair of articular cartilage in vivo Institute for Frontier

Takada, Shoji

283

IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Special Libraries. Biological and Medical Science Libraries Section. Social Science Libraries Section. Papers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six of the nine papers in this collection focus on biological and medical science libraries; the remaining three are concerned with social science libraries. The papers on biological and medical science libraries appear first in this list: (1) "Standards for Medical and Health Care Libraries: Canada" (Jan Greenwood, Canada); (2) "Standards for…

International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

284

Study for Teaching Behavioral Sciences in Schools of Medicine, Volume III: Behavioral Science Perspectives in Medical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volume III of a study of teaching behavioral sciences in medical school presents perspectives on medical behavioral science from the viewpoints of the several behavioral disciplines (anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, economics, behavioral biology and medical education). In addition, there is a discussion of translating…

American Sociological Association, Washington, DC. Medical Sociology Council.

285

Towards the Reflexive Medical School: The Hidden Curriculum and Medical Education Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests that the agenda and culture of reform in UK medical schools should be underpinned by more interpretive and reflexive research paradigms. Illustrates how the key tensions inherent in the professional socialization of doctors--between "objectifying" and "humanizing"--construct and limit both the capacity to change medical schools and the…

Cribb, Alan; Bignold, Sarah

1999-01-01

286

Research in Science Education: An Interdisciplinary Perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The continuing goal of science education research is the generation of pedagogical knowledge that can be used to improve meaningful understanding of science concepts by students. Using present initiatives in science education as a foundation, the authors provide an overview of developments in cognitive science and instructional psychology and associated exemplary research findings and implications that provide researchers and practitioners with an interdisciplinary framework for improving the quality of school science instruction.

Michael R. Vitale

2006-01-01

287

ALA Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource provides an annotated list of print and electronic biomedical and health-related reference sources, including Internet resources and digital image collections. Readers will find relevant research, clinical, and consumer health information resources. The emphasis is on resources within the United States, with a few representative…

ALA Editions, 2011

2011-01-01

288

Corporate Disguises in Medical Science: Dodging the Interest Repertoire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Roughly 40% of the sizeable medical research and literature on recently approved drugs is "ghost managed" by the pharmaceutical industry and its agents. Research is performed and articles are written by companies and their agents, though apparently independent academics serve as authors on the publications. Similarly, the industry hires academic…

Sismondo, Sergio

2011-01-01

289

[Some aspects on medical research systems at the medical school in Belgrade].  

PubMed

The ongoing development of new technologies is rapidly expanding the number and/or quality of medical researches. In order to evaluate the situation in our country we analysed master - degree and doctoral thesis that have been done at the Belgrade Medical School in 1987., 1990. and 1994. year. These years have been chosen because of medical knowledge's known rate of exponential growth. According to the main tasks of medical research: data management system and data analyses, we classified medical researches in two major categories: prospective and retrospective. The crucial difference is whether or not the investigators collect new data for analyses. First has been discovered in 11 doctoral and 10 master theses out of 225 reviewed. Medical researchers use variety of different database management systems and statistical techniques to store, retrieve and analyse data. These were identified in respectively 23 percent and 24 percent. Beside these major research activities we were interested in usage of application programmes such as text processors or graphical packages that were found in 28 percent and 20 percent of analysed theses. In summary, technological advances in computer hardware and software have reduced the barriers to long - term storage and processing of rich biomedical data. The development of new techniques for analysing such a data also encourages the discovery and validation of new medical relationships. PMID:18193778

Marinkovi?, J; Babi?, D; Maksimovi?, R; Stanisavljevi?, D

1995-09-01

290

[Medical informatics in research, teaching and patient management].  

PubMed

The field of medical informatics in its current understanding is defined and criteria distinguishing this field from similar areas are provided. Special consideration is given to its position at a School of Medicine - in particular to the University of Vienna Medical School with the Vienna General Hospital as its teaching hospital. Demands for medical informatics and electronic data processing (EDP) in this extended field of activity come from four different sources: (1) research in medical informatics, (2) teaching of medical informatics as well as EDP training, (3) EDP service for research and teaching, and (4) EDP hospital operations to assist patient care. (Purely administrative EDP demands are not considered here.) It is shown that the different demands can be fulfilled by the usually available institutions involved in medical informatics and EDP at a School of Medicine. At many places these institutions are as follows: (1) a department or division of medical informatics with a possibly attached computer center dedicated to provide assistance in the area of research and teaching, (2) the computer center of the respective university the School of Medicine belongs to, (3) the computer center of the hospital-owned institution responsible for all EDP activities connected to patient care, and (4) external software companies and EDP training centers. To succeed in the development of an exhaustive, school-wide system of medical informatics and EDP that considers the different demands in research, teaching, and EDP hospital operations equally, close and well-suited coordination between the institutions involved is necessary. PMID:7871786

Adlassnig, K P

1995-01-01

291

Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

2010-01-01

292

Barriers to adherence with glaucoma medications: a qualitative research study  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeGlaucoma is initially asymptomatic, but untreated can result in progressive visual field loss and eventual blindness. With adequate therapy progression can be halted, but poor adherence with medical therapy is a significant issue requiring further research. The aim of the present study was to gain a better understanding of the obstacles to, and the motivations for, adherence with glaucoma medication

J Lacey; H Cate; D C Broadway

2009-01-01

293

RESEARCH Open Access Medical pre-hospital management reduces  

E-print Network

RESEARCH Open Access Medical pre-hospital management reduces mortality in severe blunt trauma for the patient of pre-hospital management by emergency physicians remains controversial because it may delay admission to hospital. This study aimed to compare the impact of medical pre-hospital management performed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

[Promoting research in a medical center--the management narrative].  

PubMed

Promoting research within a medical institute is a delicate balance between the importance of facilitating academia and maximizing resources towards the primary goal of a hospital--healing sick people. Shaare Zedek Medical Center have successfully adopted a "niche" approach to research in which the hospital invests in selected talented clinicians-scientists rather than futile expectation that all clinicians would be engaged in high impact research. Moreover, these research excellence centers are developing into a driving force to also foster research endeavors of other clinicians and residents in the hospital. In this special issue of Harefuah honoring Shaare Zedek investigators, 18 manuscripts included reflect the diversity of research projects performed in the medical center. We believe that this project will assist and encourage clinicians to be engaged in research, at all levels and disciplines. PMID:25654907

Halevy, Jonathan; Turner, Dan

2014-12-01

295

Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 8: Life sciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The functional program element for the life sciences facilities to operate aboard manned space stations is presented. The life sciences investigations will consist of the following subjects: (1) medical research, (2) vertebrate research, (3) plant research, (4) cells and tissue research, (5) invertebrate research, (6) life support and protection, and (7) man-system integration. The equipment required to provide the desired functional capability for the research facilities is defined. The goals and objectives of each research facility are described.

1971-01-01

296

Innovating from big science research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing scientific knowledge demands technological breakthroughs beyond industrial innovation activity. Using this as a\\u000a basic motivation for R&D collaboration between industry and big science, the paper reports a systematic approach to exploit\\u000a the technological treasures embedded in experimental basic research. Based on a systematic technology breakdown and mapping\\u000a of each technological trajectory with possible application areas, the method enables one

Ari-Pekka Hameri

1997-01-01

297

Professional Masters of Science in Medical Physics Advisory Board Tim R. Williams, MD Radiation Oncology, Medical Director "The Lynn Cancer  

E-print Network

@brrh.com Zoubir Ouhib, MS, DABR, Chief Medical Physicist Boca Raton Regional Hospital. zouhib@brrh.com Research Medical Center. misipela@comcast.net, Research Affiliate Associate Professor, Department of Physics. Manny R. Subramanian Ph.D., Director of Research and Development, Best Medical International manny

Fernandez, Eduardo

298

Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

2010-02-01

299

Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.  

PubMed

Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents. PMID:23605604

Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

2013-01-01

300

NanoNano--Robotics in Medical Applications:Robotics in Medical Applications: From Science Fiction to RealityFrom Science Fiction to Reality  

E-print Network

NanoNano--Robotics in Medical Applications:Robotics in Medical Applications: From Science Fiction to RealityFrom Science Fiction to Reality Constantinos Mavroidis, Ph.D., Professor Bio Nanorobotics) Nanomedicine: Application of nanotechnology in medicine. Nanotechnology refers to the science and engineering

Vaziri, Ashkan

301

Recruiting Physicians for a Continuing Medical Education Research Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the methods and results of a major effort to recruit physicians for a continuing medical education research study. Analyzes shortcomings in the recruitment process and offers suggestions for obtaining higher participation rates. (JOW)

Gerbert, Barbara; And Others

1984-01-01

302

Interior, looking corridor connecting 511 to 515 into Medical Research ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, looking corridor connecting 511 to 515 into Medical Research Library in 516. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Central Service Building, North of Building No. 511, East of corridor connecting Building 511 to Building 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

303

Then & Now: Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans  

MedlinePLUS

... Issues Then & Now Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... which afflict tens of millions of Americans of all ages. William Howard Taft—Then & Now Taft's Condition ...

304

Accelerating Medical Research using the Swift Workflow System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both medical research and clinical practice are starting to involve large quantities of data and to require large-scale computation, as a result of the digitiza- tion of many areas of medicine. For example, in brain research - the domain that we consider here - a single research study may require the repeated processing, using computationally demanding and complex applications, of

Tiberiu STEF-PRAUN; Ian FOSTER; Uri HASSON; Steven L. SMALL; Michael WILDE

305

[Ethics and medical research: principles, guidelines, and regulations].  

PubMed

The issue of ethics in medical research grew in importance at the end of World War II, after the Nuremberg Code. In this period, some cases in the United States had demonstrated the need for the establishment of rules and procedures in medical research. In this article, the authors discuss some ethical concepts and their philosophical basis, stressing aspects related to research. Ethics in medical research is based upon three items: peer approaches, subject informed consent, and confidentiality of individual obtained data. The authors also summarize the Brazilian laws and directives to follow the precepts and to control the process of ethical issues in research with human participants. Finally, they approach practical questions of the Informed Consent Form as a consequence of their experiences analyzing more than one thousand research projects per year as members of the Internal Review Board of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil. PMID:16082484

de Castilho, Euclides Ayres; Kalil, Jorge

2005-01-01

306

Plagiarism Policy for UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science Page 1 of 16  

E-print Network

Plagiarism Policy for UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science Page 1 of 16 Policy on Plagiarism for UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science University College Dublin Author: Dr Cliona Mc ..................................................................................... 13 #12;Plagiarism Policy for UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science Page 3 of 16 Summary

307

MIRASS: medical informatics research activity support system using information mashup network.  

PubMed

The advancement of information technology has facilitated the automation and feasibility of online information sharing. The second generation of the World Wide Web (Web 2.0) enables the collaboration and sharing of online information through Web-serving applications. Data mashup, which is considered a Web 2.0 platform, plays an important role in information and communication technology applications. However, few ideas have been transformed into education and research domains, particularly in medical informatics. The creation of a friendly environment for medical informatics research requires the removal of certain obstacles in terms of search time, resource credibility, and search result accuracy. This paper considers three glitches that researchers encounter in medical informatics research; these glitches include the quality of papers obtained from scientific search engines (particularly, Web of Science and Science Direct), the quality of articles from the indices of these search engines, and the customizability and flexibility of these search engines. A customizable search engine for trusted resources of medical informatics was developed and implemented through data mashup. Results show that the proposed search engine improves the usability of scientific search engines for medical informatics. Pipe search engine was found to be more efficient than other engines. PMID:24700079

Kiah, M L M; Zaidan, B B; Zaidan, A A; Nabi, Mohamed; Ibraheem, Rabiu

2014-04-01

308

Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) conducts and coordinates research projects that provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Program is divided into 6 major elements, which a) Provide the Program s knowledge and capabilities to conduct research, addressing the human health and performance risks. b) Advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures to the point of transfer to the customer programs and organizations. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is a partner with the HRP in developing a successful research program. 3

Barsten, Kristina

2010-01-01

309

School of Science Masters Research Scholarships 2013 SCHOOL OF SCIENCE MASTERS RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS  

E-print Network

School of Science Masters Research Scholarships 2013 SCHOOL OF SCIENCE MASTERS RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS BACKGROUND The Faculty of Science & Engineering will offer 10 School of Science Masters Research Scholarships in specific, predetermined areas of research. Each Scholarship is worth $5,000. Applicants should

Waikato, University of

310

The ethics of conducting graduate medical education research on residents.  

PubMed

The field of graduate medical education (GME) research is attracting increased attention and broader participation. The authors review the special ethical and methodological considerations pertaining to medical education research. Because residents are at once a convenient and captive study population, a risk of coercion exists, making the provision of consent important. The role of the institutional review board (IRB) is often difficult to discern because GME activities can have multiple simultaneous purposes, educational activities may go forward with or without a research component, and the subjects of educational research studies are not patients. The authors provide a road map for researchers with regard to research oversight by the IRB and also address issues related to research quality. The matters of whether educational research studies should have educational value for the study subject and whether to use individual information obtained when residents participate as research subjects are explored. PMID:23425981

Keune, Jason D; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Korndorffer, James R; Weinstein, Debra F; Smink, Douglas S

2013-04-01

311

Medical Student Research Programs Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine  

E-print Network

campus in Evanston, IBiS is uniquely situated to integrate the life sciences with other basic science, and translational research on the Chicago and Evanston campuses. Feinberg research space totals 650,000 square feet. Cross-campus networks expand student opportunities to work with experts in other disciplines. #12;Ph

Chisholm, Rex L.

312

NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

1973-01-01

313

Quality of publication ethics in the instructions to the authors of Iranian journals of medical sciences.  

PubMed

Providing a perfect instruction to authors can prevent most potential publication ethics errors. This study was conducted to determine the quality of ethical considerations in the instructions to the authors of Iranian research scientific journals of medical sciences (accredited by the Commission for Accreditation and Improvement of Iranian Medical Journals) in October 2011. Checklist items (n=15) were extracted from the national manual of ethics in medical research publications, and the validity of the manual of ethics was assessed. All the accredited Iranian journals of medical sciences (n=198) were entered into the study. The instructions to the authors of 160 accredited Iranian journals were available online and were reviewed. The ANOVA and Kendall Correlation coefficient were performed to analyze the results. A total of 76 (47.5%) of the 160 journals were in English and 84 (52.5%) were in Farsi. The most frequently mentioned items related to publication ethics comprised "commitment not to send manuscripts to other journals and re-publish manuscripts" (85%, 83.8%), "aim and scope" of the journal (81.9%), "principles of medical ethics in the use of human samples" (74.4%), and "review process" (74.4%). On the other hand, the items of "principles of advertising" (1.2%), "authorship criteria" (15%), and "integrity in publication of clinical trial results" (30.6%) were the least frequently mentioned ones. Based on the study findings, the quality of publication ethics, as instructed to the authors, can improve the quality of the journals. PMID:23645959

Salamat, Fatemeh; Sobhani, Abdol-Rasoul; Mallaei, Mahin

2013-03-01

314

Quality of Publication Ethics in the Instructions to the Authors of Iranian Journals of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Providing a perfect instruction to authors can prevent most potential publication ethics errors. This study was conducted to determine the quality of ethical considerations in the instructions to the authors of Iranian research scientific journals of medical sciences (accredited by the Commission for Accreditation and Improvement of Iranian Medical Journals) in October 2011. Checklist items (n=15) were extracted from the national manual of ethics in medical research publications, and the validity of the manual of ethics was assessed. All the accredited Iranian journals of medical sciences (n=198) were entered into the study. The instructions to the authors of 160 accredited Iranian journals were available online and were reviewed. The ANOVA and Kendall Correlation coefficient were performed to analyze the results. A total of 76 (47.5%) of the 160 journals were in English and 84 (52.5%) were in Farsi. The most frequently mentioned items related to publication ethics comprised “commitment not to send manuscripts to other journals and re-publish manuscripts” (85%, 83.8%), “aim and scope” of the journal (81.9%), “principles of medical ethics in the use of human samples” (74.4%), and “review process” (74.4%). On the other hand, the items of “principles of advertising” (1.2%), “authorship criteria” (15%), and “integrity in publication of clinical trial results” (30.6%) were the least frequently mentioned ones. Based on the study findings, the quality of publication ethics, as instructed to the authors, can improve the quality of the journals. PMID:23645959

Salamat, Fatemeh; Sobhani, Abdol-Rasoul; Mallaei, Mahin

2013-01-01

315

Genetic Research: Mining for Medical Treasures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

FASEB Breakthroughs in Bioscience article. "Knock-out" mice, in which specific genes have been inactivated, have been tremendously useful in helping researchers understand the genetic basis of disease. Moreover, "knock out" mice also serve as animal models for human diseases, allowing researchers to develop treatments and diagnostic tests for genetic diseases.

Cathryn M. Delude (The Writing Group)

2010-07-12

316

Remote Sensing Information Science Research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document is the final report summarizing research conducted by the Remote Sensing Research Unit, Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara under National Aeronautics and Space Administration Research Grant NAG5-10457. This document describes work performed during the period of 1 March 2001 thorough 30 September 2002. This report includes a survey of research proposed and performed within RSRU and the UCSB Geography Department during the past 25 years. A broad suite of RSRU research conducted under NAG5-10457 is also described under themes of Applied Research Activities and Information Science Research. This research includes: 1. NASA ESA Research Grant Performance Metrics Reporting. 2. Global Data Set Thematic Accuracy Analysis. 3. ISCGM/Global Map Project Support. 4. Cooperative International Activities. 5. User Model Study of Global Environmental Data Sets. 6. Global Spatial Data Infrastructure. 7. CIESIN Collaboration. 8. On the Value of Coordinating Landsat Operations. 10. The California Marine Protected Areas Database: Compilation and Accuracy Issues. 11. Assessing Landslide Hazard Over a 130-Year Period for La Conchita, California Remote Sensing and Spatial Metrics for Applied Urban Area Analysis, including: (1) IKONOS Data Processing for Urban Analysis. (2) Image Segmentation and Object Oriented Classification. (3) Spectral Properties of Urban Materials. (4) Spatial Scale in Urban Mapping. (5) Variable Scale Spatial and Temporal Urban Growth Signatures. (6) Interpretation and Verification of SLEUTH Modeling Results. (7) Spatial Land Cover Pattern Analysis for Representing Urban Land Use and Socioeconomic Structures. 12. Colorado River Flood Plain Remote Sensing Study Support. 13. African Rainfall Modeling and Assessment. 14. Remote Sensing and GIS Integration.

Clarke, Keith C.; Scepan, Joseph; Hemphill, Jeffrey; Herold, Martin; Husak, Gregory; Kline, Karen; Knight, Kevin

2002-01-01

317

Trends in Science Education Research, 1998: Taking the Annual Pulse of the Science Education Research Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains summaries of research in science education for the year 1998 and provides easy access to research findings and a critique of research efforts. Contents include: (1) "Science Education Research Published in Professional Journals" (Judith Sulkes Ridgway and Hyonyong Lee); (2) "Science Education Research Papers, Monographs, and…

McCann, Wendy Sherman, Ed.; Haury, David L., Ed.

318

ONE-YEAR MEDICAL STUDENT RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP  

E-print Network

. Sarnoff Fellows conduct one year of cardiovascular research at an institution, located within the United in relation to clinical toxicities; Fitness and evolution of HIV drug resistant mutants; Molecular

319

JAMA Patient Page: Supporting Medical Research  

MedlinePLUS

... conducted, the sponsor must obtain approval from an ethics review committee . Such committees are usually composed of ... of participants are protected. In the United States, ethics review committees for biomedical research are under Food ...

320

The role of social networking sites in medical genetics research.  

PubMed

Social networking sites (SNS) have potential value in the field of medical genetics as a means of research subject recruitment and source of data. This article examines the current role of SNS in medical genetics research and potential applications for these sites in future studies. Facebook is the primary SNS considered, given the prevalence of its use in the United States and role in a small but growing number of studies. To date, utilization of SNS in medical genetics research has been primarily limited to three studies that recruited subjects from populations of Facebook users [McGuire et al. (2009); Am J Bioeth 9: 3-10; Janvier et al. (2012); Pediatrics 130: 293-298; Leighton et al. (2012); Public Health Genomics 15: 11-21]. These studies and a number of other medical and public health studies that have used Facebook as a context for recruiting research subjects are discussed. Approaches for Facebook-based subject recruitment are identified, including paid Facebook advertising, snowball sampling, targeted searching and posting. The use of these methods in medical genetics research has the potential to facilitate cost-effective research on both large, heterogeneous populations and small, hard-to-access sub-populations. PMID:23554131

Reaves, Allison Cook; Bianchi, Diana W

2013-05-01

321

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute  

Cancer.gov

Founded in 1976 as the La Jolla Cancer Research Foundation, the Cancer Center first received its NCI-designation in 1981. The Center conducts paradigm-shifting, collaborative multidisciplinary basic research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of cancer, leading to new therapies that overcome cancer as a cause of human suffering and disease. Additionally, the Center is committed to educating and training the next generation of cancer scientists.

322

Mapping a research agenda for the science of team science  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increase in cross-disciplinary, collaborative team science initiatives over the last few decades has spurred interest by multiple stakeholder groups in empirical research on scientific teams, giving rise to an emergent field referred to as the science of team science (SciTS). This study employed a collaborative team science concept-mapping evaluation methodology to develop a comprehensive research agenda for the SciTS

William Trochim

2011-01-01

323

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science  

E-print Network

. The program will use cardiovascular disease broadly defined (to include obesity, diabetes, heart failure Program, directed by Ann Bonham, Executive Associate Dean for Research and Education in the School opportunities and courses with medical students, basic scientists, clinician scientists and clinician-educators

Nguyen, Danh

324

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science  

E-print Network

, diabetes, heart failure, stroke, etc) as a model for integrating an understanding of medical principles IMBS Training Program, directed by Ann Bonham, Executive Associate Dean for Research and Education and clinician-educators. The program will use cardiovascular disease broadly defined (to include obesity

Nguyen, Danh

325

RESEARCHER POSITIONS IN LIFE SCIENCES PERMANENT POSITIONS  

E-print Network

1 RESEARCHER POSITIONS IN LIFE SCIENCES PERMANENT POSITIONS SALARY: £33,668 ­ £59,510 per annum. Applications are open to researchers across the breadth of the NHM's activities in Life Sciences. We. The successful applicants will join a large science group that comprises a group of approximately 300 scientists

Ferrara, Katherine W.

326

Medical ethics, bioethics and research ethics education perspectives in South East europe in graduate medical education.  

PubMed

Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Macedonia and Montenegro were acquired and a total of 14 were analyzed. Teaching hours for medical ethics and/or bioethics and year of study in which the course is taught were also analyzed. The average number of teaching hours in medical ethics and bioethics is 27.1 h per year. The highest national average number of teaching hours was in Croatia (47.5 h per year), and the lowest was in Serbia (14.8). In the countries of the European Union the mean number of hours given to ethics teaching throughout the complete curriculum was 44. In South East Europe, the maximum number of teaching hours is 60, while the minimum number is 10 teaching hours. Research ethics topics also show a considerable variance within the regional medical schools. Approaches to teaching research ethics vary, even within the same country. The proposed model for education in this area is based on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Bioethics Core Curriculum. The model curriculum consists of topics in medical ethics, bioethics and research ethics, as a single course, over 30 teaching hours. PMID:23436144

Mijaljica, Goran

2014-03-01

327

An overview of ethnography in healthcare and medical education research.  

PubMed

Research in healthcare settings and medical education has relied heavily on quantitative methods. However, there are research questions within these academic domains that may be more adequately addressed by qualitative inquiry. While there are many qualitative approaches, ethnography is one method that allows the researcher to take advantage of relative immersion in order to obtain thick description. The purpose of this article is to introduce ethnography, to describe how ethnographic methods may be utilized, to provide an overview of ethnography's use in healthcare and medical education, and to summarize some key limitations with the method. PMID:21637319

Goodson, Leigh; Vassar, Matt

2011-01-01

328

An overview of ethnography in healthcare and medical education research  

PubMed Central

Research in healthcare settings and medical education has relied heavily on quantitative methods. However, there are research questions within these academic domains that may be more adequately addressed by qualitative inquiry. While there are many qualitative approaches, ethnography is one method that allows the researcher to take advantage of relative immersion in order to obtain thick description. The purpose of this article is to introduce ethnography, to describe how ethnographic methods may be utilized, to provide an overview of ethnography's use in healthcare and medical education, and to summarize some key limitations with the method. PMID:21637319

Vassar, Matt

2011-01-01

329

Mathematical Sciences Scientific Computing Research Environments (SCREMS)  

E-print Network

Mathematical Sciences Scientific Computing Research Environments (SCREMS) Project Summary Description 1. Overview, and Abstracts of Individual Research Projects Continuing advances in computer in research in computational mathematics, notably geometry (GANG1 ) and applied mathematics. In recent years

Sottile, Frank

330

Rate of Medical Errors in Affiliated Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Health care organizations are highly specialized and complex. Thus we may expect the adverse events will inevitably occur. Building a medical error reporting system to analyze the reported preventable adverse events and learn from their results can help to prevent the repeat of these events. The medical errors which were reported to the Clinical Governance’s office of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS) in years 2011-2012 were analyzed. Methods and Materials: This is a descriptive retrospective study in which 18 public hospitals were participated. The instrument of data collection was checklist that was designed by the Ministry of Health of Iran. Variables were type of hospital, unit of hospital, season, severity of event and type of error. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results: Of 317966 admissions 182 cases, about 0.06%, medical error reported of which most of the reports (%51.6) were from non- teaching hospitals. Among various units of hospital, the highest frequency of medical error was related to surgical unit (%42.3). The frequency of medical error according to the type of error was also evaluated of which the highest frequency was related to inappropriate and no care (totally 37%) and medication error 28%. We also analyzed the data with respect to the effect of the error on a patient of which the highest frequency was related to minor effect (44.5%). Conclusion: The results showed that a wide variety of errors. Encourage and revision of the reporting process will be result to know more data for prevention of them. PMID:25870528

Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Ranjbar, Mansour; Siamian, Hasan; Azar, Masoud Shayeste; Asghari, Zolikah; Motamed, Nima

2015-01-01

331

FOCUS Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research  

E-print Network

FOCUS Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Website: www and 5 awards annually ­ Range of study in women's health, defined broadly; 1 award may be specific to CV completing 3rd year- some flexibility · Funding for 6 months of mentored, intensive women's health research

Bushman, Frederic

332

Prevention Science 513 Research Methods in Prevention Science  

E-print Network

#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12; Prevention Science 513 Research Methods in Prevention Science Fall with a theoretical and practical foundation for understanding research methods, especially as they pertain This course is designed to: 1) Increase students' understanding of basic principles of research methods

Collins, Gary S.

333

Medical student perceptions of a behavioural and social science curriculum  

PubMed Central

Background In 2006, Oregon Health & Science University began implementing changes to better integrate mental health and social science into the curriculum by addressing the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) 2004 recommendation for the inclusion of six behavioural and social science (BSS) domains: health policy and economics, patient behaviour, physician–patient interaction, mind–body interactions, physician role and behaviour, and social and cultural issues. Methods We conducted three focus groups with a purposive sample of 23 fourth-year medical students who were exposed to 4 years of the new curriculum. Students were asked to reflect upon the adequacy of their BSS training specifically as it related to the six IOM domains. The 90-minute focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analysed. Results Students felt the MS1 and MS2 years of the curriculum presented a strong didactic orientation to behavioural and social science precepts. However, they reported that these principles were not well integrated into clinical care during the second two years. Students identified three opportunities to further the inclusion of BSS in their clinical training: presentation of BSS concepts prior to relevant clinical exposure, consistent BSS skills mentoring in the clinical setting, and improving cultural congruence between aspects of BSS and biomedicine. Conclusions Students exposed to the revised BSS curriculum tend to value its principles; however, modelling and practical training in the application of these principles during the second two years of medical school are needed to reinforce this learning and demonstrate methods of integrating BSS principles into practice. PMID:23205062

2011-01-01

334

Meta-analysis in medical research  

PubMed Central

The objectives of this paper are to provide an introduction to meta-analysis and to discuss the rationale for this type of research and other general considerations. Methods used to produce a rigorous meta-analysis are highlighted and some aspects of presentation and interpretation of meta-analysis are discussed. Meta-analysis is a quantitative, formal, epidemiological study design used to systematically assess previous research studies to derive conclusions about that body of research. Outcomes from a meta-analysis may include a more precise estimate of the effect of treatment or risk factor for disease, or other outcomes, than any individual study contributing to the pooled analysis. The examination of variability or heterogeneity in study results is also a critical outcome. The benefits of meta-analysis include a consolidated and quantitative review of a large, and often complex, sometimes apparently conflicting, body of literature. The specification of the outcome and hypotheses that are tested is critical to the conduct of meta-analyses, as is a sensitive literature search. A failure to identify the majority of existing studies can lead to erroneous conclusions; however, there are methods of examining data to identify the potential for studies to be missing; for example, by the use of funnel plots. Rigorously conducted meta-analyses are useful tools in evidence-based medicine. The need to integrate findings from many studies ensures that meta-analytic research is desirable and the large body of research now generated makes the conduct of this research feasible. PMID:21487488

Haidich, A B

2010-01-01

335

Alzheimer's Disease: Research Advances and Medical Reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alzheimer's disease was the eighth-leading cause of death in 2001. There is no cure and no effective treatment. Alzheimer's disease presents policy- makers with several challenges, including the level of funding and direction of fed- erally funded research, as well as the cost pressures on Medicare and Medicaid of long-term care. These challenges will increase in intensity as demographic changes,

Erica Seiguer; Mary Mahon

2005-01-01

336

Medical students and research: Is there a current discrepancy between education and demands?  

PubMed Central

This article refers to a correspondence letter recently published in The Lancet, describing successful student-led research initiatives in Latin America, which were introduced because of low support from universities and governments. As a final-year medical student with keen interest in science, the topic of student engagement in research activities caught my interest. Literature shows that while junior doctors are required to perform research on their own and face intense pressure to publish, formal training in principles of research and scientific writing is often neglected by medical schools. This contrast is worrying, as the progression of the medical profession and the quality of patient care depend on high-quality research and on future generations of physician-scientists being both enthusiastic and competent. Hence, this article summarizes suggestions to increase both students' research proficiency and participation in scientific activities, and offers a critical view on this important topic, as medical schools without curricular research education and without active student integration should urgently consider revising their policies. PMID:24872850

Mileder, Lukas Peter

2014-01-01

337

Research paradigms in computer science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the ramifications of four influential definitions of computer science: 1. Computer science is the study of phenomena related to computers, Newell, Perlis and Simon, 1967 2. Computer science is the study of algorithms, Knuth, 1968 3. Computer science is the study of information structures, Wegner, 1968, Curriculum 68 4. Computer science is the study and management of

Peter Wegner

1976-01-01

338

Physical sciences research plans for the International Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The restructuring of the research capabilities of the International Space Station has forced a reassessment of the Physical Sciences research plans and a re-targeting of the major scientific thrusts. The combination of already selected peer-reviewed flight investigations with the initiation of new research and technology programs will allow the maximization of the ISS scientific and technological potential. Fundamental and applied research will use a combination of ISS-based facilities, ground-based activities, and other experimental platforms to address issues impacting fundamental knowledge, industrial and medical applications on Earth, and the technology required for human space exploration. The current flight investigation research plan shows a large number of principal investigators selected to use the remaining planned research facilities. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Trinh, E. H.

2003-01-01

339

Patient perceptions on the subject of medical research  

PubMed Central

While performing medical research we often spend little time addressing patient’s views on how research participants perceive the trial will affect their own condition. This manuscript identifies various ways in which the field of medicine must approach the important subject of patient’s outlook. The described approach is vital to succeed at achieving meaningful patient’s involvement in research. PMID:25378954

Ventolini, Gary; Goodwin, Breanna; Woody, Courtney

2014-01-01

340

Medical Image Segmentation Xiaolei Huang  

E-print Network

Medical Image Segmentation Xiaolei Huang Computer Science and Engineering Department, Lehigh is of immense practical importance in medical informatics. Medical images, such as Computed Axial Tomography in EHR clinical management systems. Research efforts have been devoted to processing and analyzing

Huang, Xiaolei

341

21 CFR 801.125 - Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis. 801...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING...Use § 801.125 Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and...

2011-04-01

342

21 CFR 801.125 - Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis. 801...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING...Use § 801.125 Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and...

2012-04-01

343

21 CFR 801.125 - Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis. 801...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING...Use § 801.125 Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and...

2013-04-01

344

21 CFR 801.125 - Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 false Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and analysis. 801...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING...Use § 801.125 Medical devices for use in teaching, law enforcement, research, and...

2014-04-01

345

Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the…

Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine A.; Churchill, Susan L.; Green, Denise O'Neil; Garrett, Amanda L.

2008-01-01

346

Teaching Primary Science: How Research Helps  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The very first edition of "Primary Science Review" included an article entitled "Teaching primary science--how research can help" (Harlen, 1986), which announced that a section of the journal would be for reports of research and particularly for teachers reporting their classroom research. The intervening 24 years have seen momentous change in…

Harlen, Wynne

2010-01-01

347

Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the design options and procedures that accompany this methodological choice. Discussions

Vicki L. Plano Clark; Catherine A. Huddleston-Casas; Susan L. Churchill; Denise ONeil Green; Amanda L. Garrett

2008-01-01

348

Advancing Research on Undergraduate Science Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special issue of "Journal of Research in Science Teaching" reflects conclusions and recommendations in the "Discipline-Based Education Research" (DBER) report and makes a substantial contribution to advancing the field. Research on undergraduate science learning is currently a loose affiliation of related fields. The…

Singer, Susan Rundell

2013-01-01

349

Applied Science and Research Applications: Recent Research Reports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains abstracts of new technical reports and other documents resulting from research supported by the directorate for Applied Science and Research Applications of the National Science Foundation. Research reports from current programs include work in the areas of public policy and regulation; public service delivery and urban…

National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Applied Science and Research Applications.

350

A systems approach to the promotion and implementation of medical translational research at the University of Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine is seeking ways to improve its system for conducting Translational Research (TR), in order to improve its proposal for a National Institute of Health (NIH) Clinical & Translational Science Award (CTSA), a grant designed to guide medical research institutions throughout the USA into transforming their approaches to conducting TR. To that end,

Jacob L. Ablowitz; Thomas D. Calhoun; Matthew R. Farmer; Daniel W. Liechty; Michael L. McCoy; James A. Potts; Brion A. Shaw; Christopher C. Thomas; Douglas P. Weber; Steve Y. Yang

2008-01-01

351

Medical Engineering & Physics 33 (2011) 840848 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

Medical Engineering & Physics 33 (2011) 840­848 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Medical and Design, Brunel University, Uxbridge, UK c Medical Physics Group, Department of Cardiovascular Science-scale Microcirculation Endothelium Wall shear stress Glycocalyx a b s t r a c t We discuss, from the perspective of basic

Pontrelli, Giuseppe

352

Forensic medical evaluations of child maltreatment: a proposed research agenda.  

PubMed

Physicians play an important role in the forensic evaluation of suspected child abuse and neglect. There has been considerable progress in the medical field, helping distinguish findings related to maltreatment from other conditions or circumstances. Nevertheless, important questions remain. This article covers several of these questions and proposes a research agenda concerning five main topics: sexual abuse, neglect, fractures, abusive head trauma, and physicians work in interdisciplinary settings. The suggestions are hardly inclusive, but offer suggestions the authors think are priorities, and ones that research could reasonably address. By providing some background to gaps in our knowledge, this paper should be of interest to a broader audience than just medical professionals. PMID:25224781

Dubowitz, Howard; Christian, Cindy W; Hymel, Kent; Kellogg, Nancy D

2014-11-01

353

From the Office of Medical Education Research and Development (OMERAD). . . . . New Places, New Opportunities, New Ideas in Medical Education Series  

E-print Network

From the Office of Medical Education Research and Development (OMERAD). . . . . New Places, New contact the Office of Medical Education Research and Development at 568-2140 or email omerad Opportunities, New Ideas in Medical Education Series A Webcast Audio Seminar Series available through

354

Recruiting Underserved Mothers to Medical Research: Findings from North Carolina  

PubMed Central

Representative samples are required for ethical, valid, and useful health research. Yet, recruiting participants, especially from historically underserved communities, can be challenging. This paper presents findings from in-depth interviews with 40 mothers about factors that might influence their willingness to participate or allow their children to participate in medical research. Saliency analysis organizes the findings. Frequent and important salient themes about research participation included concerns that it might cause participants harm, hope that participants might gain a health benefit, and recognition that time and transportation resources could limit participation. Ultimately, we propose that a theoretical model, such as the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), will facilitate more systematic evaluation of effective methods for recruitment and retention of participants in medical research. Future research should explore the utility of such a model for development of effective recruitment and retention strategies. PMID:24185171

Spears, Chaya R.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; O’Neill, Jenna L.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Howard, Timothy D.; Feldman, Steven R.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2014-01-01

355

Basic and Applied Science Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, is an accelerator-based national user facility for research in basic and applied science using four experimental areas. LANSCE has two areas that provide neutrons generated by the 800-MeV proton beam striking tungsten target systems. A third area uses the proton beam for radiography. The fourth area uses 100 MeV protons to produce medical radioisotopes. This paper describes the four LANSCE experimental areas, gives nuclear science highlights of the past operating period, and discusses plans for the future.

Lisowski, Paul W.

2005-05-01

356

Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.  

PubMed

The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within the scope of external quality assurance, but also in the exchange of special diagnosis data among international research networks. In summary, the acknowledged standard for a quality management system to ensure quality assurance is the very generic standard ISO 9001.Health Phys. 103(2):221-225; 2012. PMID:22951484

Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

2012-08-01

357

Information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular disease patients in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background: Patients, as one of the most prominent groups requiring health-based information, encounter numerous problems in order to obtain these pieces of information and apply them. The aim of this study was to determine the information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular patients who were hospitalized in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a survey research. The population consisted of all patients with cardiovascular disease who were hospitalized in the hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences during 2012. According to the statistics, the number of patients was 6000. The sample size was determined based on the formula of Cochran; 400 patients were randomly selected. Data were collected by researcher-made questionnaire. Two-level descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used for analysis. Results: The data showed that the awareness of the probability to recover and finding appropriate medical care centers were the most significant informational needs. The practitioners, television, and radio were used more than the other informational resources. Lack of familiarity to medical terminologies and unaccountability of medical staff were the major obstacles faced by the patients to obtain information. The results also showed that there was no significant relationship between the patients’ gender and information-seeking behavior, whereas there was a significant relationship between the demographic features (age, education, place of residence) and information-seeking behavior. Conclusion: Giving information about health to the patients can help them to control their disease. Appropriate methods and ways should be used based on patients’ willingness. Despite the variety of information resources, patients expressed medical staff as the best source for getting health information. Information-seeking behavior of the patients was found to be influenced by different demographic and environmental factors. PMID:25250349

Zamani, Maryam; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Afshar, Mina; Shahrzadi, Leila; Zadeh, Akbar Hasan

2014-01-01

358

USGS Alaska Science Center, Biological Science Office: Research Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides information about the research programs of the USGS Alaska Science Center - Biological Science Office (ASC-BSO). The programs are divided into several categories including Ecosystems & Habitats, Mammals, Technical Programs, Fish and Fisheries, and Birds. Links connect to research information about numerous program subcategories like Coastal and Marine, Sea Otters, Loons, Fisheries Projects, and more. The site also links to background information about the ASC-BSO, job listings, staff contact information, and the Alaska Science Center Publications Database.

359

Research facility access & science education  

SciTech Connect

As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

Rosen, S.P. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Physics Dept.

1994-10-01

360

International student exchange and the medical curriculum: evaluation of a medical sciences translational physiology course in Brazil.  

PubMed

The objective of the present study was to conduct a short-term international course on translational physiology for medical students from Wright State University and the University of Iowa. The goals were to 1) provide students with an exposure to the academic, cultural, and medical environments in Brazil; 2) promote awareness of the global medical community; and 3) provide an academic course focused on translational physiology. An evaluation of the students was conducted to determine whether such a short-term course might be useful in the medical curriculum. The 2-wk course was held in the summer of 2005 at the University of São Paulo School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, for 23 American students. The program included presentations of basic and clinical topics, meetings with medical students, and clinical presentations. The program finished with student attendance at a scientific meeting sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hypertension. Student surveys evaluated issues related to perceived treatment, Brazilian medical school environment, culture and personal attributes, and career aspirations. The international Medical Sciences Translational Physiology course for medical students provided a brief, but intense, experience. It gave students a picture of the medical environment in Brazil and an appreciation for the differences and similarities in cultures. Most students reported that it was a positive experience that would be beneficial to their careers. In conclusion, a short-term international course provides an efficient means for medical students to experience aspects of global medical science. PMID:16912146

Morris, Mariana; Jones, T David; Rocha, Maria Jose Alves; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W; Salgado, Helio C; Johnson, Alan Kim; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Michelini, Lisete C; Goldstein, David L

2006-09-01

361

Large Enrollment 1 Research in Science Education  

E-print Network

is through hands-on activities. Yet many universities provide for future teachers science coursesLarge Enrollment 1 From: Research in Science Education: Reform in Undergraduate Science Teaching. A particularly large challenge is to provide appropriate higher education experiences for those future teachers

Zollman, Dean

362

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science  

E-print Network

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has problem. It is generally accepted that as sciences move into the tera- and peta-scale regimes that one

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

363

Science Selections. Accounts of Ongoing Scientific Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is intended to present science teachers with an opportunity to communicate to students the idea that science is an ongoing and never-ending process. The booklet contains supplemental materials, valuable as enrichment materials. A selection of ongoing research in the biological sciences, physics and astronomy, oceanography,…

Kornberg, Warren, Ed.

364

Research in Continuing Medical Education. An Historical Review (and) Response.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes an historical review of continuing medical education (CME) in the United States from 1909, when the Blackburn Plan began, to the post-World War II era, with the growth of instructional technology. Two earlier studies that reviewed evaluation research in CME are discussed. Lloyd's brief response disputes some of Abrahamson's points. (SK)

Abrahamson, Stephen; Lloyd, John S.

1984-01-01

365

Asynchronous Remote Medical Consultation for Ghana Intel Research  

E-print Network

Asynchronous Remote Medical Consultation for Ghana Rowena Luk Intel Research 2150 Shattuck Ave Ghana and draws on three key design principles (social networks as a framework on which to build in southern Ghana. Author Keywords Telemedicine, social networking, organizational interfaces, developing

Aoki, Paul M.

366

Medical workstations for applied imaging and graphics research  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a medical workstation for the efficient implementation of research ideasrelated to image processing and computer graphics. Based on standard hardware platformsthe software system encompasses two major components: A turnkey applicationsystem provides a functionality kernel for a broad community of clinical users workingwith digital imaging devices, including methods of noise suppression, interactive andautomatic segmentation, 3D surface reconstruction and multi-modal...

Hans-heino Ehricke; Thomas Grunert; Thomas Buck; Wolfgang Straßer; Rupert Kolb; Martin Skalej

1994-01-01

367

Senator Arlen Specter: Backing Medical Research and Battling Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... a long-time supporter and proponent of medical research. Recently, he underwent his second round of chemotherapy to stop the recurrence of a form of lymphoma. But he hasn't let cancer slow him down. He recently spoke to NIH MedlinePlus ... and his own experience in fighting cancer. MedlinePlus : ...

368

THE WE CARE FUND FOR MEDICAL INNOVATION AND RESEARCH  

E-print Network

for medical innovation and research Why we care Patients with cancer, organ failure, and complications from bring the best healthcare to Wisconsin. "Faced with pancreas and heart surgery, it was comforting and beyond. Mission To be a national leader in the education and development of the next generation

369

RESEARCH Open Access Impact of emergency medical helicopter  

E-print Network

RESEARCH Open Access Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university Trauma Abstract Introduction: The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport

370

Information and its role in medical and pharmaceutical science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is a record of the lecture at the Lecturer Meeting for Scientific and Technical Information, which was held as one of the events of Science and Technology Week in 1989. Lecturer explains how the scientific information takes part in research and how researchers make use of it, based on his own experience. He states that the information is especially important in R & D and creative research, by showing the case of studies in the chironomidmidges as an example. Referring to the researches being conducted outside of large cities, he states that online service have eliminated the regional differences in obtaining scientific information and gave researchers much more time for carring out their own research works. Finally, he expects that floppy disk will become popular as one of the information media in the future.

Sassa, Manabu

371

Database management for life sciences research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The life sciences provide a rich application domain for data management research, with a broad diversity of problems that can make a significant difference to progress in life sciences research. This article is an extract from the Report of the NSF Workshop on Data Management for Molecular and Cell Biology, edited by H. V. Jagadish and Frank Olken. The workshop

H. V. Jagadish; Frank Olken

2004-01-01

372

Recent Research in Science Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features recent research in science teaching and learning. It presents three current articles of interest in life sciences education, as well as more general and noteworthy publications in education research. URLs are provided for the abstracts or full text of articles. For articles listed as "Abstract available," full text may be…

Allen, Deborah

2012-01-01

373

Advancing global health through regulatory science research: summary of the Global Summit on Regulatory Science Research and Innovation.  

PubMed

As a first step in the implementation of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Pathway to Global Product Safety and Quality (Anonymous, 2011), FDA's Office of International Programs (OIP) and the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) sponsored a Global Summit on Regulatory Science Research and Innovation. Through a series of presentations and panel discussions, the Global Summit participants explored how research could be used more effectively as a tool for advancing regulatory science, food safety, medical technologies, and public health. Speakers provided an overview of each of the components in the global regulatory-science research initiative, including scientific innovation and modernizing toxicology; and discussed how the integration of these components is needed to achieve the promise of regulatory science at the global level. All participants agreed with the formation of a Global Coalition of Regulatory Research Scientists who will work collaboratively to build knowledge, promote the development of regulatory science, discover novel ways to clearly define research needs, and improve public health. PMID:22342950

Slikker, William; Miller, Margaret Ann; Lou Valdez, Mary; Hamburg, Margaret A

2012-04-01

374

MEDICAL STUDENT RESEARCH FORUM AND POSTER DAY KECK SCHOOL OF MEDICINE  

E-print Network

MEDICAL STUDENT RESEARCH FORUM AND POSTER DAY KECK SCHOOL OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA The 2011 Medical Student Research Forum and Poster Day is an annual event which allows USC Medical and Robert Decker, Ph.D., Director of Medical Student Research Training, for their support and participation

Zhang, Li I.

375

Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research  

E-print Network

in Medical Professionalism is intended to support study and research related to medical ethics, medicoBoston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research 1 Research Funding/American Roentgen Ray Society Leonard Berlin Scholarship in Medical Professionalism The Leonard Berlin Scholarship

Spence, Harlan Ernest

376

Emotional intelligence and related factors in medical sciences students of an Iranian university  

PubMed Central

Background: Emotional intelligence has evolved lot of interest in a variety of fields. The aim of this study was to determine the emotional intelligence and its related factors among junior medical sciences students. Materials and Methods: The research design was a descriptive — analytic analysis. Based on a census sampling method, the emotional intelligence of 322 junior medical sciences students was evaluated using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory. This study was done from 2008 to 2009 in the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Results: The findings showed that 48.1% and 22.4% of students had effective functioning and enhanced skills in emotional intelligence, respectively, while 29.5% of them needed some interventions in order to enhance the emotional intelligence. The study revealed that the students required intervention in every composite of emotional intelligence. In addition, emotional intelligence was correlated with gender, psychiatric history of the student and his/her family, experience of stressful life events, interest in the field of study, grade of study, and marital status. Conclusions: The results of the present study have shown that the students need some interventions to improve their emotional intelligence. PMID:24834092

Lolaty, Hamideh Azimi; Tirgari, Abdolhakim; Fard, Jabbar Heydari

2014-01-01

377

Space Life Sciences Research and Education Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1969, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), a private, nonprofit corporation, has worked closely with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to advance space science and technology and to promote education in those areas. USRA's Division of Space Life Sciences (DSLS) has been NASA's life sciences research partner for the past 18 years. For the last six years, our Cooperative Agreement NCC9-41 for the 'Space Life Sciences Research and Education Program' has stimulated and assisted life sciences research and education at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) - both at the Center and in collaboration with outside academic institutions. To accomplish our objectives, the DSLS has facilitated extramural research, developed and managed educational programs, recruited and employed visiting and staff scientists, and managed scientific meetings.

Coats, Alfred C.

2001-01-01

378

Visualization analysis of research hotspots based on CiteSpace II: taking medical devices as an example  

PubMed Central

Biomedical engineering has been one of the hottest fields in biology and engineering. As an important branch, the medical device has achieved significant progress in the past decades. As a useful method in evaluative bibliometrics, mapping knowledge has been used to explore the trend of one field. In the present study, we retrieve literatures about the medical device from the Web of Science™ (2004–2013), and acquire 26,793 related records, then analyze time range, region distribution, and main research directions of the literatures, and try to use keywords combined with mapping knowledge to explore the main trends of the medical device, and then aim to provide more information for medical device research. Through the study, we discover: 1) the publications regarding medical devices show an upward trend over the past decade in general; 2) the percentage of publications in the USA (38.49%) is the highest all over the world; 3) engineering (20.64%) is the hottest research direction, and takes up about one-fifth of the total publications; 4) the Journal of the American Medical Association and The New England Journal of Medicine are among the two journals that are the most highly cited, followed by Science and The Lancet; and 5) keywords of the medical device include in vitro, quality-of-life, outcomes, management, mortality, depression, and so on. With the help of mapping knowledge, we dig out some hot topics of medical devices and provide more information through trend analysis, and we discover that our findings are related to previous research and further research can enlarge the number of records and optimize the algorithm. We provide a systematic approach for researchers to keep abreast of the development and state of the research of medical devices. PMID:25368536

Liu, Dong-Dong; Liu, Sheng-Lin; Zhang, Jia-Hua

2014-01-01

379

10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for medical therapy and research and development facilities. 50.21...for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class...useful in the conduct of research and development activities of the...

2010-01-01

380

10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for medical therapy and research and development facilities. 50.21...for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class...useful in the conduct of research and development activities of the...

2011-01-01

381

Strategic Research Directions In Microgravity Materials Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) is moving aggressively to align programs, projects, and products with the vision for space exploration. Research in advanced materials is a critical element in meeting exploration goals. Research in low gravity materials science in OBPR is being focused on top priority needs in support of exploration: 1) Space Radiation Shielding; 2) In Situ Resource Utilization; 3) In Situ Fabrication and Repair; 4) Materials Science for Spacecraft and Propulsion Systems; 5) Materials Science for Advanced Life Support Systems. Roles and responsibilities in low gravity materials research for exploration between OBPR and the Office of Exploration Systems are evolving.

Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.; Wargo, Michael J.; Marzwell, Neville L.; Sanders, Gerald; Schlagheck, Ron; Semmes, Ed; Bassler, Julie; Cook, Beth

2004-01-01

382

Research at GeoSciences  

E-print Network

Designed and produced by Medical Illustration, Learning Technology Section, The University of Edinburgh following investment of £7.4 Million to commercialise subsurface electromagnetic imaging technology. MTEM Ltd (multi- transient electromagnetic technology) developed the leading edge technique to determine

383

The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.  

PubMed

In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually developing themselves; proper student selection and the creation of a culture of student/faculty partnerships in education and in building an international reputation and credibility by cooperating with reputable international universities and organizations. PMID:17122475

Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

2006-12-01

384

The (human) science of medical virtual learning environments  

PubMed Central

The uptake of virtual simulation technologies in both military and civilian surgical contexts has been both slow and patchy. The failure of the virtual reality community in the 1990s and early 2000s to deliver affordable and accessible training systems stems not only from an obsessive quest to develop the ‘ultimate’ in so-called ‘immersive’ hardware solutions, from head-mounted displays to large-scale projection theatres, but also from a comprehensive lack of attention to the needs of the end users. While many still perceive the science of simulation to be defined by technological advances, such as computing power, specialized graphics hardware, advanced interactive controllers, displays and so on, the true science underpinning simulation—the science that helps to guarantee the transfer of skills from the simulated to the real—is that of human factors, a well-established discipline that focuses on the abilities and limitations of the end user when designing interactive systems, as opposed to the more commercially explicit components of technology. Based on three surgical simulation case studies, the importance of a human factors approach to the design of appropriate simulation content and interactive hardware for medical simulation is illustrated. The studies demonstrate that it is unnecessary to pursue real-world fidelity in all instances in order to achieve psychological fidelity—the degree to which the simulated tasks reproduce and foster knowledge, skills and behaviours that can be reliably transferred to real-world training applications. PMID:21149363

Stone, Robert J.

2011-01-01

385

competency Course Objective 1 1a Apply appropriate reproductive medical science knowledge to patient care.  

E-print Network

medical science knowledge to patient care. 2 1c,1d Recognize and incorporate current clinical and translational sciences into delivery of obsteric and gynecologic patient care. 3 1e Describe current knowledge of disease prevention, risk factor

Myers, Lawrence C.

386

Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Careers Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents ... to technicians and therapists. The NIH Office of Science Education has a Web site that lists and ...

387

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional in radiologic technology; successfully completed the certification exam for the American Registry of Radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

388

Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

Barr, S.H. (ed.)

1984-08-01

389

Medical relevance of UK-funded non-human primate research published from January 1997 to July 2012  

PubMed Central

In 2012, the Bateson Review of research using non-human primates (NHPs) recommended the commissioning of a working group to identify and follow-up the results of UK-funded NHP research of potential benefit for human health (Recommendation 4), but the Medical Research Council (MRC) has postponed implementation of the recommendation. Information on results and potential benefits of NHP research therefore remains unavailable. To fill this gap in knowledge, this study identified all published NHP research studies funded by the MRC, Wellcome Trust and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) from January 1997 to July 2012 and assessed full texts for medical relevance. In total, 284 papers were identified, of which 51 (18%) involved invasive NHP research, compared to 176 (61%) which used NHP tissue and cell lines, indicating a shift in research emphasis from invasive whole animal to cell-based research. Of these studies, 98 (35%) were medically relevant, of which 22 had potential therapeutic or public health applications. The relatively low proportion of medical studies together with the small number of applied studies raises questions over the level of investment in medical research and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer from basic to applied research. Implementation of the Bateson Review’s Recommendation 4 would address these questions. PMID:24739383

2014-01-01

390

Undergraduate Science Research: A Comparison of Influences and Experiences between Premed and Non-Premed Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most students participating in science undergraduate research (UR) plan to attend either medical school or graduate school. This study examines possible differences between premed and non-premed students in their influences to do research and expectations of research. Questionnaire responses from 55 premed students and 80 non-premed students were…

Pacifici, Lara Brongo; Thomson, Norman

2011-01-01

391

The Research Dynamic: A Professional Development Model for Secondary School Science Teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay summarizes the author's 10 years of experience at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation mentoring secondary school science teachers during 8-wk Summer Research Insti- tutes. The summary is presented as a learning model, which we call the research dynamic. This model consists of three interlocked components: specified ignorance, peer interactions, and gateway experiments. Specified ignorance is based on the

Philip M. Silverman

2009-01-01

392

Mapping a research agenda for the science of team science.  

PubMed

An increase in cross-disciplinary, collaborative team science initiatives over the last few decades has spurred interest by multiple stakeholder groups in empirical research on scientific teams, giving rise to an emergent field referred to as the science of team science (SciTS). This study employed a collaborative team science concept-mapping evaluation methodology to develop a comprehensive research agenda for the SciTS field. Its integrative mixed-methods approach combined group process with statistical analysis to derive a conceptual framework that identifies research areas of team science and their relative importance to the emerging SciTS field. The findings from this concept-mapping project constitute a lever for moving SciTS forward at theoretical, empirical, and translational levels. PMID:23223093

Falk-Krzesinski, Holly J; Contractor, Noshir; Fiore, Stephen M; Hall, Kara L; Kane, Cathleen; Keyton, Joann; Klein, Julie Thompson; Spring, Bonnie; Stokols, Daniel; Trochim, William

2011-06-01

393

Mapping a research agenda for the science of team science  

PubMed Central

An increase in cross-disciplinary, collaborative team science initiatives over the last few decades has spurred interest by multiple stakeholder groups in empirical research on scientific teams, giving rise to an emergent field referred to as the science of team science (SciTS). This study employed a collaborative team science concept-mapping evaluation methodology to develop a comprehensive research agenda for the SciTS field. Its integrative mixed-methods approach combined group process with statistical analysis to derive a conceptual framework that identifies research areas of team science and their relative importance to the emerging SciTS field. The findings from this concept-mapping project constitute a lever for moving SciTS forward at theoretical, empirical, and translational levels. PMID:23223093

Falk-Krzesinski, Holly J; Contractor, Noshir; Fiore, Stephen M; Hall, Kara L; Kane, Cathleen; Keyton, Joann; Klein, Julie Thompson; Spring, Bonnie; Stokols, Daniel; Trochim, William

2012-01-01

394

Virginia Tech College of Science Faculty Positions in Interdisciplinary Science/Science Education Research  

E-print Network

education at Virginia Tech will be looked upon favorably. Further information can be found at www.scienceVirginia Tech College of Science Faculty Positions in Interdisciplinary Science/Science Education.vt.edu/isc), which serves to build strong research and educational partnerships across the sciences and mathematics

Virginia Tech

395

Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East.  

PubMed

Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such challenges. Business-type government controlled universities are not the solution for overcoming the challenges facing higher education and research programs in the Middle East.During the last decade, Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development has attracted six branch campuses of American Institutions of higher learning to the Education City in Qatar, a 2500-acre area, which is rapidly becoming a model of integrating higher education and research in the region. Not-for profit, time-tested education institutions from abroad in public-private partnership with local organizations offer favorable conditions to build robust research programs in the region. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) of Cornell University is an example such an institution. It is the first and only medical school in Qatar.WCMC-Q's interwoven education, research and public health based framework lays a sturdy foundation for developing and implementing translational medicine research programs of importance to the State of Qatar and Middle Eastern nations. This approach is yielding positive results. Discoveries from this program should influence public policy in a positive fashion toward reducing premature mortality and morbidity due to diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer, examples of health conditions commonly encountered in Qatar. PMID:21272322

Chouchane, Lotfi; Mamtani, Ravinder; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud M; Ameduri, Marco; Sheikh, Javaid I

2011-01-01

396

Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such challenges. Business-type government controlled universities are not the solution for overcoming the challenges facing higher education and research programs in the Middle East. During the last decade, Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development has attracted six branch campuses of American Institutions of higher learning to the Education City in Qatar, a 2500-acre area, which is rapidly becoming a model of integrating higher education and research in the region. Not-for profit, time-tested education institutions from abroad in public-private partnership with local organizations offer favorable conditions to build robust research programs in the region. Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) of Cornell University is an example such an institution. It is the first and only medical school in Qatar. WCMC-Q's interwoven education, research and public health based framework lays a sturdy foundation for developing and implementing translational medicine research programs of importance to the State of Qatar and Middle Eastern nations. This approach is yielding positive results. Discoveries from this program should influence public policy in a positive fashion toward reducing premature mortality and morbidity due to diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer, examples of health conditions commonly encountered in Qatar. PMID:21272322

2011-01-01

397

Children's Hospital Medical Center  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY COMMONS Children's Hospital Medical Center Children's Hospital Medical Research Center Complex Radiation Safety HealthProfessions Building WherryHall Veterans Affairs Medical Center VAMC VAMC ShrinersHospital forChildren Shriners Garage Cincinnati Dept of Health LoganHall Medical Sciences Building

Papautsky, Ian

398

Teaching medical students basic neurotransmitter pharmacology using primary research resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We designed a seminar where small groups of students worked on different neurotransmitters before contributing information to a plenary session. Student feedback suggested that when the information was largely novel, students learned considerably more. Crucially, this improvement in knowledge was seen even when they had not directly studied a particular transmitter in their work groups, suggesting a shared learning experience. Moreover, the majority of students reported that using primary research papers was easy and useful, with over half stating that they would use them in future study.

2010-10-01

399

Research objectives for the applied mathematical sciences research subprogram  

SciTech Connect

This document describes areas of research in applied mathematics and computer science that are important to the Department of Energy. The interest of the Department of all aspects of computational science has increased because of recent advances in supercomputer technology and because of the impact of these performance machines in several mission programs of DOE. This interest prompted the creation of the Scientific Computing Staff (SCS), which reports directly to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (OER). The Applied Mathematical Science Research (AMSR) subprogram of the SCS attempts to meet the immediate needs for supercomputer access by research programs supported by the department's Office of Energy Research and to meet the long-range computational research needs of the Department. Specific research areas include analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, and advanced computing concepts. (DWL)

Not Available

1986-07-01

400

In search of the soul in science: medical ethics' appropriation of philosophy of science in the 1970s.  

PubMed

This paper examines the deployment of science studies within the field of medical ethics. For a short time, the discourse of medical ethics became a fertile ground for a dialogue between philosophically minded bioethicists and the philosophers of science who responded to Thomas Kuhn's challenge. In their discussion of the validity of Kuhn's work, these bioethicists suggested a distinct interpretation of Kuhn, emphasizing the elements in his account that had been independently developed by Michael Polanyi, and propelling a view of science that retreated from idealizations of scientific method without sacrificing philosophical realism. Appropriating Polanyi, they extended his account of science to biology and medicine. The contribution of Karl Popper to the debate on the applicability of philosophy of science to the issues of medical ethics provides the opportunity to discuss the ways in which political agendas of different epistemologies of science intertwined with questions of concern to medical ethics. PMID:19835265

Aronova, Elena

2009-01-01

401

Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research  

E-print Network

Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research 72 E Concord Street Boston, MA 02118 APRBUMC of the Associate Provost for Research Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research

Spence, Harlan Ernest

402

Validity and Reliability in Social Science Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, the author aims to provide novice researchers with an understanding of the general problem of validity in social science research and to acquaint them with approaches to developing strong support for the validity of their research. She provides insight into these two important concepts, namely (1) validity; and (2) reliability, and…

Drost, Ellen A.

2011-01-01

403

FACULTY RESEARCH GUIDE Computer Science Department  

E-print Network

1 FACULTY RESEARCH GUIDE 2012-13 Computer Science Department Carnegie Mellon University ©2011 are programming languages, parallel computing, and algorithms. In my research, I aim to raise the level Carnegie Mellon University #12;2 FOREWORD This file presents the current research interests of the faculty

Andrews, Peter B.

404

Science Education Research and Teacher Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Well-designed and thoughtful approaches to practitioner research can bring about very positive impacts to improve teaching and learning in science classrooms. Readers of highly-rated research also need to appreciate and understand research design, literature critique, appropriate data collection, methods of analysis, theoretical frameworks,…

Oversby, John; McGregor, Deb; Woodhouse, Fiona

2013-01-01

405

Accelerating Medical Research using the Swift Workflow System  

PubMed Central

Both medical research and clinical practice are starting to involve large quantities of data and to require large-scale computation, as a result of the digitization of many areas of medicine. For example, in brain research – the domain that we consider here – a single research study may require the repeated processing, using computationally demanding and complex applications, of thousands of files corresponding to hundreds of functional MRI studies. Execution efficiency demands the use of parallel or distributed computing, but few medical researchers have the time or expertise to write the necessary parallel programs. The Swift system addresses these concerns. A simple scripting language, SwiftScript, provides for the concise high-level specification of workflows that invoke various application programs on potentially large quantities of data. The Swift engine provides for the efficient execution of these workflows on sequential computers, parallel computers, and/or distributed grids that federate the computing resources of many sites. Last but not least, the Swift provenance catalog keeps track of all actions performed, addressing vital bookkeeping functions that so often cause difficulties in large computations. To illustrate the use of Swift for medical research, we describe its use for the analysis of functional MRI data as part of a research project examining the neurological mechanisms of recovery from aphasia after stroke. We show how SwiftScript is used to encode an application workflow, and present performance results that demonstrate our ability to achieve significant speedups on both a local parallel computing cluster and multiple parallel clusters at distributed sites. PMID:17476063

STEF-PRAUN, Tiberiu; CLIFFORD, Benjamin; FOSTER, Ian; HASSON, Uri; HATEGAN, Mihael; SMALL, Steven L.; WILDE, Michael; ZHAO, Yong

2009-01-01

406

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care  

E-print Network

Respiratory assessment Abdominal assessment Genito-urinary & sexual health assessment Treatment optionsFaculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care Introduction to Minor Illness to deliver safe practice. Pass/Refer Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health and Social Care

Doran, Simon J.

407

Decision-Making in Basic Medical Sciences ExaminationsSingle versus Multiple Cutoff Scores  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was prompted by concern that the criterion of an overall cutoff score on Basic Medical Sciences (BMS) examinations allows students to advance to their clinical training despite possible deficien cies in specific disciplines. To examine the validity of this concern, pass-fail decisions on four Basic Medical Sciences comprehensive examinations were compared with the passing criterion based on the

James Algina; Leon J. Gross

1979-01-01

408

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care  

E-print Network

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care Returning to Paramedic Ethics and Law Health Service landscape and policy Leadership and the multi-professional healthcare Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health and Social Care T: +44 (0) 1483 684505 F: +44 (0

Doran, Simon J.

409

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care  

E-print Network

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care Concepts of Advanced Practice-professional work Ethics, accountability and decision making in organisations Communities of practice Equality. Word Count: 1,000 words (40%) Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health and Social Care T

Doran, Simon J.

410

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Faculty of Health Sciences Medical School for International Health  

E-print Network

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Faculty of Health Sciences Medical School for International School of Graduate Medical Education Phoenix, AZ Surgery ­ Prelim. 2013 Memorial Hospital South Bend 2013 St. Elizabeth Medical Center Edgewood, KY Family Medicine 2013 St. Louis University School

Grishok, Alla

411

Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics 33 (2009) 333342 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics 33 (2009) 333­342 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/compmedimag Virtual multi, Athens, GA 30602, USA b Department of Plastic Surgery, The Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912

Robinson, Robert W.

412

Problem-Based Learning of Social Sciences and Humanities by Fourth-Year Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A required fourth-year course integrating the social sciences and humanities into the required clinical medical curriculum at Dartmouth Medical School is intended to prepare students to deal with the social and humanistic issues involved in medical practice, including law, ethics, economics, and social anthropology. (MSE)

Colby, Kathleen K.; And Others

1986-01-01

413

[The tasks and role of pathology among other medical sciences].  

PubMed

The results of discussion on the current state of pathology in medical science and practical hospital work are presented in this paper which is the author's report on the 2nd symposium of the societies of pathologists in socialist countries. Special attention is drawn to the significance of necropsies in comparing clinical and post-mortem diagnoses, the related numerical materials are provided. The decrease of necropsies of patients dying in hospitals in most countries of the world is noted, and the methods of getting rid of this are indicated both for scientific goals and health service. The increasing necessity of contacts between pathologists and clinicians is pointed out and the ways of realization of this important tool for further development of medicine are traced. The comparative data on the methods of training in pathology in many European countries and USA are presented. The paper is concluded by a review on the state of pathology in the GDR, measures taken by the GDR Ministry of Health and by the Society of GDR pathologists. The confidence is expressed in success of these measures in the process of realization by the GDR government of the X Party Congress and the 5th Plenum of the SUPG Decisions on the development of science and its effectiveness. PMID:6721703

David, G

1984-01-01

414

Social Science Research Serving Rural America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of articles provides an overview of some of the recent social science research projects performed by state agricultural experiment stations. The examples highlight social science's contribution to problem-solving in rural business, industry, farming, communities, government, education, and families. The following programs are…

Miron, Mary, Ed.

415

Research frontiers in the physical sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a prestigious generalist journal with a high scholarly reputation and a long influential history, the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (Series A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences), is an ideal vehicle for charting research frontiers across the physical sciences. It is the world's longest running scientific journal, and all issues since its foundation in 1665 are archived electronically

J. M. T. Thompson

2002-01-01

416

SCIENCE RESEARCH POLICY IN SOUTH AFRICA  

E-print Network

SCIENCE RESEARCH POLICY IN SOUTH AFRICA George F R Ellis A DISCUSSION DOCUMENT for the Royal Society of South Africa February 14, 2001 #12;i Preface This science policy discussion document has been written by Prof G F R Ellis (University of Cape Town) on behalf of the Royal Society of South Africa

Blake, Edwin

417

Recent Research in Science Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This feature is designed to point "CBE - Life Sciences Education" readers to current articles of interest in life sciences education as well as more general and noteworthy publications in education research. URLs are provided for the abstracts or full text of articles. For articles listed as "Abstract available," full text may…

Allen, Deborah

2014-01-01

418

Recent Research in Science Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This feature is designed to point "CBE-Life Sciences Education" readers to current articles of interest in life sciences education, as well as more general and noteworthy publications in education research. URLs are provided for the abstracts or full text of articles. This themed issue focuses on recent studies of concepts and…

Allen, Deborah

2013-01-01

419

Recent Research in Science Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is designed to point "CBE-Life Sciences Education" readers to current articles of interest in life sciences education as well as more general and noteworthy publications in education research. URLs are provided for the abstracts or full text of articles. For articles listed as "Abstract available," full text may be…

Allen, Deborah

2013-01-01

420

Clinical Research Fellowship in Joint Reconstruction at Rush University Medical Center -Orthogate Written by Rush Joints Research Fellowship  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Fellowship in Joint Reconstruction at Rush University Medical Center - Orthogate 2013 Dr. Craig Della Valle invites 3rd year medical students to apply for a Clinical Research with Rush orthopaedic residents and faculty. This research position is unique in that the medical student

Bushman, Frederic

421

RESEARCH ARTICLE Landscape sustainability science: ecosystem services  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Landscape sustainability science: ecosystem services and human well and strong sustainability, resilience, human well-being, and ecosystem services; (2) toexamine of understanding and improving the dynamic relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being in changing

Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

422

c Indian Academy of Sciences RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-print Network

c Indian Academy of Sciences RESEARCH ARTICLE Multidimensional analysis of Drosophila wing. In particular, temperature has attracted much attention because of its importance as an ecological feature evolutionary differentiation. In this study, using Drosophila melanogaster isofemale lines derived from wild

Debat, Vincent

423

Academic Science & Industrial Research, 1920-1975  

Cancer.gov

A Penny for your Quotes? Assessing the impact of Biological Resource Centers on Life Sciences Research Jeff Furman (Boston U & NBER) Scott Stern (Northwestern U & NBER) NCI's Biospecimen Best Practices Forum November 5, 2007 1 Motivation: Knowledge

424

The "Science of HRD Research": Reshaping HRD Research through Scientometrics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We explore opportunities for assessing and advancing Human Resource Development (HRD) research through an integrative literature review of scientometric theories and methods. Known as the "science of science," scientometrics is concerned with the quantitative study of scholarly communications, disciplinary structure and assessment and measurement…

Wang, Greg G.; Gilley, Jerry W.; Sun, Judy Y.

2012-01-01

425

University of Tokyo-Institute of Medical Science: Human Genome Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Human Genome Center was established in 1991 at the University of Tokyo's Institute of Medical Science. In pursuit of progress in the areas of human disease diagnosis, care, and prevention, the Center conducts genome research in Japan and participates in "international activities in database construction, mapping, and sequencing of the human genome." The Genome Center website contains links to its nine Laboratories which conduct research in the following areas: Genome Structure, Sequence Analysis, Molecular Medicine, and DNA Information Analysis, to name a few. Laboratory pages contain information about research, publications, staff, and services. The Center site also links to a number of databases and software tools including a database of Japanese Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (JSNP), Microbial Genome Database for Comparative Analysis (MBGD), PSI-BLAST, TFBIND (software for searching transcription factor binding sites), and more.

426

Action research to promote medical students' motivation in an English for Specific Purposes class.  

PubMed

Action research is an attempt to seek immediate solutions to the problems experienced in educational settings. In this type of research, teachers are the researchers who intend to make instant reforms to develop, and improve their teaching styles and reflect on pedagogical practices. The purpose of this study was to conduct an action research to tackle the problem of students' low motivation in English classes at the medical school of Iran University of Medical Sciences in fall 2010. Participants of this study were 98 third-semester ESP students of medicine. To reform the situation and promote students' motivation to participate in classes more actively and eagerly, the researchers changed the syllabus by applying Kemmis and McTaggart's (1988) cyclical model of action research, and adopting task-based teaching. Data was collected by means of interviews with both teachers and students to determine the changes to be made in the syllabus, classroom observations to monitor students' behavioral changes, and a questionnaire to assess students' attitudes towards the changes. This research study had a number of valuable outcomes the most important of which was a change in classroom behavior of the students. PMID:25130157

Dehnad, Afsaneh; Nasser, Hayedeh

2014-01-01

427

Life-sciences research opportunities in commercial suborbital space flight  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Commercial suborbital space flights will reach altitudes above 100 km, with 3-5 min of weightlessness bracketed by high-g launch and landing phases. The proposed frequency of these flights, and the large passenger population, present interesting opportunities for researchers in the life sciences. The characteristics of suborbital flight are between those of parabolic and orbital flights, opening up new scientific possibilities and easing the burden for obtaining access to 0g. There are several areas where these flights might be used for research in the life sciences: (1) operational research: preparation for “real” space flight, such as rehearsal of medical procedures, (2) applied research-to answer questions relevant to long-term space flight; (3) passenger health and safety-effects on passengers, relevant to screening and training; (4) basic research in physiological mechanisms-to address issues of fundamental science. We describe possible projects in each of these categories. One in particular spans several areas. Based on the anticipated suborbital flight profiles, observations from parabolic flight, and the wide range of fitness and experience levels of suborbital passengers, sensorimotor disturbances such as motion sickness and disorientation are major concerns. Protocols for pre-flight adaptation of sensorimotor responses might help to alleviate some of these problems, based on results from research in the initial flights. This would improve the passenger experience and add to the knowledge base relevant to space flight more generally.

Shelhamer, Mark

2014-11-01

428

Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions  

SciTech Connect

This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

1999-01-01

429

(09)UC/05 BSc(Hons) Medical Physics/11 Bachelor of Science (Honours) Medical Physics  

E-print Network

become the entry level requirement to the profession. In addition, medical physicists with Ph To provide a better pathway for PhD students in Medical Physics, a BSc(Hons) degree in Medical Physics students into the PhD degree. 2. Acceptability Support for the BSc(Hons) in Medical Physics was sought from

Hickman, Mark

430

Shadows amid sunshine: regulating financial conflicts in medical research.  

PubMed

Under brand new rules implementing the Physician Payments Sunshine Act (Sunshine Act), a wide range of financial relationships, including many research-related payments, between industry, physicians, and teaching hospitals will be publicly disclosed through comprehensive, standardized payment reporting. The Sunshine Act represents the latest in a series of regulatory attempts to address financial conflicts of interest that may bias research conduct and threaten subject safety. This article summarizes the major aspects of the Sunshine Act affecting medical research, how it interacts with existing laws and policies, and identifies important unresolved issues and implementation challenges that still lie ahead with the rollout of the legislation underway. The Sunshine Act primarily depends on disclosure as a regulatory tool. As such, its long-term impact remains open to question. Disclosure in this context may have limited utility given, among other reasons, uncertainty about who the intended recipients are and their ability to use the information effectively. Apart from the insufficiency of transparency, this article further explores how proportionality, fairness, and accountability considerations make optimal regulation of financial conflicts in medical research quite challenging. PMID:24493509

Saver, Richard S

2014-02-01

431

Cohort Profile: HAART Observational Medical Evaluation and Research (HOMER) Cohort.  

PubMed

Since 1986, antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been available free of charge to individuals living with HIV in British Columbia (BC), Canada, through the BC Centre of Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) Drug Treatment Program (DTP). The Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Observational Medical Evaluation and Research (HOMER) cohort was established in 1996 to maintain a prospective record of clinical measurements and medication profiles of a subset of DTP participants initiating HAART in BC. This unique cohort provides a comprehensive data source to investigate mortality, prognostic factors and treatment response among people living with HIV in BC from the inception of HAART. Currently over 5000 individuals are enrolled in the HOMER cohort. Data captured include socio-demographic characteristics (e.g. sex, age, ethnicity, health authority), clinical variables (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma HIV viral load, AIDS-defining illness, hepatitis C co-infection, mortality) and treatment variables (e.g. HAART regimens, date of treatment initiation, treatment interruptions, adherence data, resistance testing). Research findings from the HOMER cohort have featured in numerous high-impact peer-reviewed journals. The HOMER cohort collaborates with other HIV cohorts on both national and international scales to answer complex HIV-specific research questions, and welcomes input from external investigators regarding potential research proposals or future collaborations. For further information please contact the principal investigator, Dr Robert Hogg (robert_hogg@sfu.ca). PMID:24639444

Patterson, Sophie; Cescon, Angela; Samji, Hasina; Cui, Zishan; Yip, Benita; Lepik, Katherine J; Moore, David; Lima, Viviane D; Nosyk, Bohdan; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio Sg; Shannon, Kate; Wood, Evan; Hogg, Robert S

2015-02-01

432

Prevalence and Causes of Medical Absenteeism Among Staff (Case Study at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences: 2009-2010)  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Work absenteeism is a significant issue and can be observed in terms of human resources management. Given the importance of staff practices, which are anticipated in every organization, the role of each employee in this system and the implications of their absence as well as the importance of recovery time rest in fast recovery of staff and anticipated costs for their lost work days, thus this study is aimed to determine the extent and causes of medical absenteeism (sickness absence) of head staff of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Methods and Materials: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted using medical absenteeism (sickness absence) persons happened in 2010. Research population was included all records of staff working in central departments of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. There was no sampling due to the importance of the issue. Studied variables were included age, gender, employment status, employees’ education, name of the disease, physician specialty in issuing the medical absence paper, leave issuing reference and department, position of the employee, number of absence days, number of absences, number of annual leave days. Also, data were gathered using a checklist, then were entered into the SPSS software and got analyzed using descriptive statistics. In order to respect the confidentiality, name of the doctors and employees weren’t mentioned publicly. Results: Based on the results, 1200 employees were leaved the organization due to the sickness issue, which 957 (79.7%) of them were studied. The mean age for those employees was 39±7. Also, total average sick leave days and total sick leave days were 2±1 and 2571, respectively. 40.8 % ( 390 employees) were male and the rest were female. Moreover, 18.3% of sick leaves were issued for singles and the remained were for married employees. Regarding the employees’ education, 2% under diploma, 11.3% diploma, 7.8% upper diploma, 47.6% B.Sc., 14.6% MS.c and 15.85 had doctorate degree. Considering their position, 65%, 30.3%, 2.5% and 1.8% were experts, others, heads, and mangers, respectively. Furthermore, their employment status indicated that 62.3%, 18.1%, 16.8% and 2.8% of employees were employed in form of formal, short-term contract, long-term contract and other forms, respectively. Among the aspiratory diseases, 115 persons had got cold and 97 were infected to flu. The prevalence of other diseases was as follows: neck and back pain among the skeletal diseases (118 persons), fever and headache among the signs (71 persons) and diarrhea and vomiting among the infectious diseases (88 persons). Conclusion: According to the study results, due to the nature of staff work, physical problems, which are caused by doing mental works as well as low mobility, are rising among the employees. Of course, practicing ergonomic considerations, devoting hours in form of exercise break for staff can be effective in this regard. In order to address other diseases, vaster researches are needed with a concentration on exact reasons of work absenteeism. PMID:24511264

Mohseni Saravi, Beyamin; Kabirzadeh, Azar; Rezazadeh, Esmaiel; Khariki, Mohammad Fallah; Asgari, Zolaykha; Bagherian Farahabadi, Ebrahim; Motamed, Nima; Siamian, Hasan

2013-01-01

433

An advanced computer system for medical research by WILLIAM J. SANDERS, G. BREITBARD,  

E-print Network

An advanced computer system for medical research by WILLIAM J. SANDERS, G. BREITBARD, D. CUMMINS, R in 1959, with the purpose of more closely integrating medical research and educa- tion with the other of computing power, its distribution was such that the research needs of the medical school were not being

Wiederhold, Gio

434

Supplemental form for admission to the Master Programme in Medical Research  

E-print Network

Supplemental form for admission to the Master Programme in Medical Research For all applicants If you are accepted to the master programme in Medical Research you will during the first year (60. Applicants to the Medical Research programme therefore have to indicate the priority order of 3 choices

Uppsala Universitet

435

Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research  

E-print Network

is intended to support study and research related to medical ethics, medico-legal principles, patientBoston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research 1 Listed;Boston University Medical Campus Office of the Associate Provost for Research 2 AARS ­ The Roentgen Fund

Spence, Harlan Ernest

436

Science, Design, and Design Science: Seeking Clarity to Move Design Science Research Forward in Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the fundamental nature of science, design, hence design science and design research, with a view to determining a conceptualisation of design science that is useful in the discipline of information systems (IS). After reviewing several notions of design, the paper recommends a conceptualisation that involves a broad practice-based view of design, an inclusive conceptualisation of design science,

Judy McKay; Peter Marshall

437

Center for Science & Technology Policy Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR) was created in 2001 and their goal is "to improve how science and technology policies address societal needs, through research, education and service." Part of this goal is accomplished via their well-designed site, which features policy papers, news updates, and highlights from recent conferences and seminars sponsored under their direction. Visitors can click on the "CSTPR Multimedia Gallery", found on the left hand side of the homepage, to view presentations such as "Environmental Human Rights" and "Loving Science to Death: Problems at the Intersection of Science and Policy". Moving on, visitors shouldn't miss their newsletter, "Ogmius". Each edition contains highlights of recent research, news about Center events, and policy commentary. Scholars won't want to miss the "Publications" area, which features information about recently published books by Center affiliates and listings of their work in professional journals.

438

Remote Science Operation Center research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress in the following areas is discussed: the design, planning and operation of a remote science payload operations control center; design and planning of a data link via satellite; and the design and prototyping of an advanced workstation environment for multi-media (3-D computer aided design/computer aided engineering, voice, video, text) communications and operations.

Banks, P. M.

1986-01-01

439

Reproducible Research in Computational Science  

PubMed Central

Computational science has led to exciting new developments, but the nature of the work has exposed limitations in our ability to evaluate published findings. Reproducibility has the potential to serve as a minimum standard for judging scientific claims when full independent replication of a study is not possible. PMID:22144613

Peng, Roger D.

2012-01-01

440

Reproducible research in computational science.  

PubMed

Computational science has led to exciting new developments, but the nature of the work has exposed limitations in our ability to evaluate published findings. Reproducibility has the potential to serve as a minimum standard for judging scientific claims when full independent replication of a study is not possible. PMID:22144613

Peng, Roger D

2011-12-01

441

The prevalence and incidence of medical conditions in healthy pharmaceutical company employees who volunteer to participate in medical research  

PubMed Central

Aims Although clinical research in healthy volunteers is commonly performed there have been few studies of the value of the medical screening of subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and incidence of medical conditions found during the medical screening of ‘healthy’ subjects employed in a pharmaceutical company who volunteered to participate in medical research. Methods This was a retrospective study of the medical notes of all the subjects who volunteered for membership of the Zeneca Clinical Pharmacology Unit’s healthy volunteer panel over a 4 year period from 1990 to 1994. The prevalence of medical conditions found at presentation was determined. The incidence of medical conditions during the 4 year observation period was also ascertained. Medical screening included a full medical history and examination, clinical chemistry, haematology and urinalysis screens, pulmonary function tests, ECGs, 24 h ambulatory cardiac monitoring and a request for information from the volunteer’s General Practitioner. Results Prevalence-1293 subjects volunteered to join the panel of which 156 subjects (12%) were not accepted at presentation including 141 (10.9%) for medical reasons. The most medical common reasons were; previously diagnosed medical conditions (3.3%), cardiovascular abnormalities (1.9%), abnormal liver function tests (1.9%), anaemia (1.2%), hyperlipidaemia (1.1%), excess alcohol intake (0.6%) and thyroid disease (0.5%). Incidence—36 of the 1137 volunteers (0.8% per year) accepted onto the panel subsequently developed medical conditions of which the most common were; anaemia (0.29% per year), cardiovascular abnormalities (0.13% per year) and vasovagal syncope (0.13% per year). Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of medical screening before healthy volunteers participate in clinical research. PMID:10383556

Singh, S D; Williams, A J

1999-01-01

442

Research Services Humanities & Social Sciences  

E-print Network

Specialists Carly Banner, Dr Caroline Jenkins Research Contracts Specialists Sophie Barham, Dr Gavin Brown, Dr Barnby-Porritt Yash Patel, Sarah Kelly OXTREC Administrator: Jacqueline Gerencser Office Administrator

Melham, Tom

443

A journey in science: medical scientist in translation.  

PubMed

Real innovations in medicine and science are historic and singular; the stories behind each occurrence are precious. At Molecular Medicine we have established the Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine to document and preserve these histories. The monographs recount the seminal events as told in the voice of the original investigators who provided the crucial early insight. These essays capture the essence of discovery, chronicling the birth of ideas that created new fields of research; and launched trajectories that persisted and ultimately influenced how disease is prevented, diagnosed and treated. In this volume, the Cerami Award Monograph is by Göran K Hansson, MD, PhD, Karolinska Institute. A visionary in the field of cardiovascular research, this is the story of Dr. Hansson's scientific journey. PMID:25356751

Hansson, Göran K

2014-01-01

444

A Journey in Science: Medical Scientist in Translation  

PubMed Central

Real innovations in medicine and science are historic and singular; the stories behind each occurrence are precious. At Molecular Medicine we have established the Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine to document and preserve these histories. The monographs recount the seminal events as told in the voice of the original investigators who provided the crucial early insight. These essays capture the essence of discovery, chronicling the birth of ideas that created new fields of research; and launched trajectories that persisted and ultimately influenced how disease is prevented, diagnosed and treated. In this volume, the Cerami Award Monograph is by Göran K Hansson, MD, PhD, Karolinska Institute. A visionary in the field of cardiovascular research, this is the story of Dr. Hansson’s scientific journey. PMID:25356751

Hansson, Göran K

2014-01-01

445

NC Science & Engineering Fair Home Inspiring Innovation in Student Research  

E-print Network

NC Science & Engineering Fair Home Inspiring Innovation in Student Research NC Science-based science learning. NCSFF promotes science and engineering research by elementary, middle, and high school science and engineering fairs to showcase and celebrate student research and learning. Biogen Idec

Thaxton, Christopher S.

446

Trends of Science Education Research: An Automatic Content Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study used scientometric methods to conduct an automatic content analysis on the development trends of science education research from the published articles in the four journals of "International Journal of Science Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Research in Science Education, and Science Education" from 1990 to 2007. The…

Chang, Yueh-Hsia; Chang, Chun-Yen; Tseng, Yuen-Hsien

2010-01-01

447

Environmental Research Puts Science into Action  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new paradigm for student research should be articulations and collaborations with local governmental, academic, and civic entities. This will enable students to make lasting contributions to bettering their communities through scientific research, and to better understand the practical relevance of science. This article presents two such…

Zaikowski, Lori; Lichtman, Paul

2007-01-01

448

Water Sciences Research Facility Open Here Soon  

E-print Network

Water Sciences Research Facility Open Here Soon Water Center Director Comes Here From CSRS special circumstances, qualified individuals will have access to direct participation in laboratory, it is not a total water analysis facility, and researchers should be aware of the capabilities of the above

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

449

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science  

E-print Network

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment HDF5-FastQuery: An API for Simplifying Access to Data Storage, Retrieval, Indexing and Querying E. Wes Bethel* , Luke focuses on research and development activities that bridge a gap between fundamental data management

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

450

Engineering and Applied Science, Recent Research Reports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection contains abstracts of technical reports and journal articles resulting from research funded by the National Science Foundation. Included in the collection are abstracts arranged in several categories: (1) electrical, computer, and systems engineering; (2) civil and mechanical engineering; (3) applied research; (4) problem-focused…

National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate of Engineering and Applied Science.

451

Research Methods in the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is intended as a resource and an indispensable companion to welcome educators into the community of social science research. While it is recognized that some methodological frameworks are incompatible with others, the overarching premise of the book is to indicate how a wide range of researchers choose a methodology and methods which are…

Somekh, Bridget, Ed.; Lewin, Cathy, Ed.

2005-01-01

452

Science, democracy, and the right to research.  

PubMed

Debates over the politicization of science have led some to claim that scientists have or should have a "right to research." This article examines the political meaning and implications of the right to research with respect to different historical conceptions of rights. The more common "liberal" view sees rights as protections against social and political interference. The "republican" view, in contrast, conceives rights as claims to civic membership. Building on the republican view of rights, this article conceives the right to research as embedding science more firmly and explicitly within society, rather than sheltering science from society. From this perspective, all citizens should enjoy a general right to free inquiry, but this right to inquiry does not necessarily encompass all scientific research. Because rights are most reliably protected when embedded within democratic culture and institutions, claims for a right to research should be considered in light of how the research in question contributes to democracy. By putting both research and rights in a social context, this article shows that the claim for a right to research is best understood, not as a guarantee for public support of science, but as a way to initiate public deliberation and debate about which sorts of inquiry deserve public support. PMID:19434517

Brown, Mark B; Guston, David H

2009-09-01

453

Research councils facing new science and technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the question how research councils respond to emerging fields of science. Taking nanotechnology as its case, we compare the cases of responses of research councils in Finland, the Netherlands, Norway and Switzerland during the period 1990 - 2008. The case studies are based on extensive document study and 25 in depth interviews with relevant actors. The analysis

Barend van der Meulen

2010-01-01

454

Performance of the libraries in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on the EFQM model  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Performance measurement is inevitable for university libraries. Hence, planning and establishing a constant and up-to-date measurement system is required for the libraries, especially the university libraries. The primary studies and analyses reveal that the EFQM Excellence Model has been efficient, and the administrative reform program has focused on the implementation of this model. Therefore, on the basis of these facts as well as the need for a measurement system, the researchers measured the performance of libraries in schools and hospitals supported by Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, using the EFQM Organizational Excellence Model. Materials and Methods: This descriptive research study was carried out by a cross-sectional survey method in 2011. This research study included librarians and library directors of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (70 people). The validity of the instrument was measured by the specialists in the field of Management and Library Science. To measure the reliability of the questionnaire, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient value was measured (0.93). The t-test, ANOVA, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for measurements. The data were analyzed by SPSS. Results: Data analysis revealed that the mean score of the performance measurement for the libraries under study and between nine dimensions the highest score was 65.3% for leadership dimension and the lowest scores were 55.1% for people and 55.1% for society results. Conclusion: In general, using the ninth EFQM model the average level of all dimensions, which is in good agreement with normal values, was assessed. However, compared to other results, the criterion people and society results were poor. It is Recommended by forming the expert committee on criterion people and society results by individuals concerned with the various conferences and training courses to improve the aspects. PMID:25540795

Karimi, Saeid; Atashpour, Bahareh; Papi, Ahmad; Nouri, Rasul; Hasanzade, Akbar

2014-01-01

455

Ring Fenced Research: The Case of Computer-Assisted Learning in Health Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interdisciplinary research is being promoted in many quarters as the way forward, but "research islands" still persist. Taking computer-assisted learning (CAL) within health sciences as a case in point, this paper describes a detailed study of the references to source material within papers published in general medical, specific nursing and…

Jacobs, Gabriel; Ip, Barry

2005-01-01

456

Hispanic Behavioral Science Research: Recommendations for Future Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents major developments in Hispanic behavioral science research over the past decade, and provides recommendations for future research, organized into three broad categories: life span issues (childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and elderly, all including some education-related issues), delivery of mental health services, and prevention and…

Padilla, Amado M.; Lindholm, Kathryn J.

1984-01-01

457

Bioastronautics: optimizing human performance through research and medical innovations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A strategic use of resources is essential to achieving long-duration space travel and understanding the human physiological changes in space, including the roles of food and nutrition in space. To effectively address the challenges of space flight, the Bioastronautics Initiative, undertaken in 2001, expands extramural collaboration and leverages unique capabilities of the scientific community and the federal government, all the while applying this integrated knowledge to Earth-based problems. Integral to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions in space is the reduction of risk of medical complications, particularly during missions of long duration. Cumulative medical experience and research provide the ability to develop evidence-based medicine for prevention, countermeasures, and treatment modalities for space flight. The early approach applied terrestrial clinical judgment to predict medical problems in space. Space medicine has evolved to an evidence-based approach with the use of biomedical data gathered and lessons learned from previous space flight missions to systematically aid in decision making. This approach led, for example, to the determination of preliminary nutritional requirements for space flight, and it aids in the development of nutrition itself as a countermeasure to support nutritional mitigation of adaptation to space.

Williams, David R.

2002-01-01

458

The health sciences librarian in medical education: a vital pathways project task force  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The Medical Education Task Force of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians reviewed current and future roles of health sciences librarians in medical education at the graduate and undergraduate levels and worked with national organizations to integrate library services, education, and staff into the requirements for training medical students and residents. Methods: Standards for medical education accreditation programs were studied, and a literature search was conducted on the topic of the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education. Results: Expectations for library and information services in current standards were documented, and a draft standard prepared. A comprehensive bibliography on the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education was completed, and an analysis of the services provided by health sciences librarians was created. Conclusion: An essential role and responsibility of the health sciences librarian will be to provide the health care professional with the skills needed to access, manage, and use library and information resources effectively. Validation and recognition of the health sciences librarian's contributions to medical education by accrediting agencies will be critical. The opportunity lies in health sciences librarians embracing the diverse roles that can be served in this vital activity, regardless of accrediting agency mandates. PMID:19851492

Schwartz, Diane G.; Blobaum, Paul M.; Shipman, Jean P.; Markwell, Linda Garr; Marshall, Joanne Gard

2009-01-01

459

UCL SChooL of Life and MediCaL SCienCeS Creating knowledge, achieving impact  

E-print Network

UCL SChooL of Life and MediCaL SCienCeS Creating knowledge, achieving impact Population Health 4 #12;PREFACE UCL's School of Life and Medical Sciences encompasses arguably the greatest concentration the School. Sir John Tooke Vice-Provost (Health) and Head of the UCL School of Life and Medical Sciences. 1

Saunders, Mark

460

The Reorganization of Basic Science Departments in U.S. Medical Schools, 1980-1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Constructed a longitudinal database to examine how basic science departments have been reorganized at U.S. medical schools. Found that there were fewer basic science departments in the traditional disciplines of anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacology, and physiology in 1999 than in 1980. But as biomedical science has developed in an…

Mallon, William T.; Biebuyck, Julien F.; Jones, Robert F.

2003-01-01

461

Insulin analogues: an example of applied medical science.  

PubMed

Insulin analogues were developed to try and achieve more physiological insulin replacement from injection in the subcutaneous site. Their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics differ from human insulin when injected subcutaneously because of alterations in the amino acid sequence of the insulin molecule. The rapid-acting insulin analogues, lispro, aspart and glulisine, have a rapid onset of action and shorter duration of action because of changes to the B26-30 portion of insulin inhibiting formation of dimers and hexamers. They appear to improve postprandial glucose, incidence of hypoglycaemia and patient satisfaction and, when used in combination with basal insulin analogues, improve glycosylated haemoglobin in comparison to conventional insulin therapy. Additionally, they have been successfully used in children, pregnant women, in pump therapy and as part of premixed biphasic regimens. The two basal insulin analogues, glargine and detemir, developed by adjusting the isoelectric point and adding a fatty acid residue, respectively, have a protracted duration of action and a relatively smooth profile. Their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles have been assessed using euglycaemic clamp protocols. Both analogues have a longer duration of action, less of a peak of activity and a reduced variability with repeated injection. There is some evidence to suggest that detemir may have a slight hepatoselective effect. Clinical studies have shown a lower relative risk of hypoglycaemia and detemir appears to have a weight-sparing action. Insulin analogues represent a successful example of applied medical science. PMID:19120431

Sheldon, B; Russell-Jones, D; Wright, J

2009-01-01

462

Outcomes research: science and action  

PubMed Central

Outcomes research, which investigates the outcomes of health care practices, is intended to provide scientific evidence for clinical decision making and health care. This paper elucidates the goal and domains of outcomes research. Also it shows the potential and promise of outcomes research to provide a methodology to uncover what to do and how to do it, and enable the health care profession to achieve the right care, for the right patient, at the right time, the first time, every time, nothing more, and nothing less. PMID:23897783

Ting, Henry H.; Xiang, Mei-xiang; Wang, Jian-an

2013-01-01

463

Researchers Bring Local Science Into Classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need to communicate scientific research beyond academia is increasing concurrently with a growing emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K-12 education [Breiner et al., 2012]. Connecting scientists with K-12 educators who will share research with students in their classrooms is an effective method for broadening the audience for scientific research. However, establishing connections with teachers can be difficult, as there are few networking opportunities between these two groups without one directly contacting the other.

Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Ridge, Justin T.

2014-02-01

464

Analysis of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach  

PubMed Central

Background: Numerous researches conducted on about the quality of perception of media messages shows that the people are not passive receivers but they have the ability of understanding, interpreting and accepting or rejecting messages. In order to make clear the relationship of information and communication technologies with social changes and to gain a broader vision from this scope, sociological theories about information and communication technologies’ usage, especially appropriation approach can be very useful. So, keeping in mind the important role of Databases in the qualitative expansion of education, research, diagnosis, remedy and medical services presentation, this research was carried out with the aim of status determination of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach in 2012. Materials and Methods: This is an applicative research of an analytical-descriptive type, which was carried out by measurement approach. The statistical society of this research was composed of the academic staffs of the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences in 2012 and finally 390 academic staffs were selected according to the Cochran's formula were selected. The research tool are searcher's made questionnaire, which was composed of nine separate parts. Its validity was accepted by the specialists and its reliability was calculated and found to be 0.961 by Cronbakh's alpha. Results: Database appropriation score in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences with 65.020% was in a good status and data bases dis appropriation score with 71.484 was in a high status. Conclusion: According to the findings of this research, Librarians and politicians in this scope-with determination of the academic staff's positive and negative points in usage and appropriation would be capable of accurately diagnozing and analyzing the chances and challenges of the academic staffs members in using databases and would also be capable of achieving solutions and appropriate catalyzers of prolific usage and appropriation of databases. PMID:25077145

Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sohrabi, Mozaffar Cheshmeh; Zare, Firoozeh; Hassnazadeh, Akbar; Malekahmadi, Parisa

2014-01-01

465

Study of Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems Among Medical Students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences Loni, Western Maharashtra, India  

PubMed Central

Background: Good quality sleep and adequate amount of sleep are important in order to have better cognitive performance and avoid health problems and psychiatric disorders. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe sleep habits and sleep problems in a population of undergraduates, interns and postgraduate students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. Subject and Methods: Sleep habits and problems were investigated using a convenience sample of students from Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. The study was carried out during Oct. to Dec. 2011 with population consisted of total 150 medical students. A self-administered questionnaire developed based on Epworth Daytime Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used. Data was analyzed by using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0. Results: In this study, out of 150 medical students, 26/150 (17.3%) students had abnormal levels of daytime sleepiness while 20/150 (13.3%) were border line. Sleep quality in females was better than the male. Conclusion: Disorders related to poor sleep qualities are significant problems among medical students in our institution. Caffeine and alcohol ingestion affected sleep and there was high level of daytime sleepiness. Sleep difficulties resulted in irritability and affected lifestyle and interpersonal relationships. PMID:23634330

Giri, PA; Baviskar, MP; Phalke, DB

2013-01-01

466

Utilising improvement science methods to optimise medication reconciliation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn 2005, The Joint Commission included medication reconciliation as a National Patient Safety Goal to reduce medication errors related to omissions, duplications and interactions. Hospitals continue to struggle to implement successful programmes that meet these objectives.MethodsThe authors used improvement methods and reliability principles to develop and implement a process for medication reconciliation completion at admission at a large, paediatric medical

Christine M White; Pamela J Schoettker; Patrick H Conway; Maria Geiser; Jason Olivea; Raymond Pruett; Uma R Kotagal

2011-01-01

467

National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects designed especially for the purpose. Site includes: eligibility criteria; how-to instructions for preparing a proposal; instructions for managing an award; links to related REU sites; and abstracts of recent awards. To apply to an REU program at a specific institution, see the "REU Information for Students" link at the bottom of the page.

468

Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust response to the Review of the NHS research ethics committee system in England  

E-print Network

1 Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust response to the Review of the NHS research ethics committee system in England The Medical Research Council (MRC) and Wellcome Trust ("the Trust") welcome the Department of Health's review of the NHS research ethics committee (REC) system in England, and are pleased

Rambaut, Andrew

469

A research-oriented medical cost accounting system.  

PubMed

Prospective research into factors affecting health care costs for individual patients requires a hybrid information management system with some features usually associated with a medical billing package and other features common to research databases. Furthermore, data collection for such a project must often be done in the field where a portable computer is most convenient. A software program is described which has been developed to address these disparate needs. It allows classification by study protocol assignment and provides multiple summary formats for the assessment of costs. For example, charges can be stratified by specialty, by category of service (pharmacy, room, surgery, respiratory therapy, etc.), by magnitude of expense ('big' vs 'little' ticket items) and so forth. The system design described may prove useful to other investigators studying variation in health care costs. PMID:1937944

Langer, R D; Wark, R; Schneiderman, L J; Kaplan, R M; Anderson, J P; Chen, M

1991-01-01

470

Recent advances in hydrogen research as a therapeutic medical gas.  

PubMed

Recent basic and clinical research has revealed that hydrogen is an important physiological regulatory factor with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic protective effects on cells and organs. Therapeutic hydrogen has been applied by different delivery methods including straightforward inhalation, drinking hydrogen dissolved in water and injection with hydrogen-saturated saline. This review summarizes currently available data regarding the protective role of hydrogen, provides an outline of recent advances in research on the use of hydrogen as a therapeutic medical gas in diverse models of disease and discusses the feasibility of hydrogen as a therapeutic strategy. It is not an overstatement to say that hydrogen's impact on therapeutic and preventive medicine could be enormous in the future. PMID:20815764

Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Nakao, Atsunori

2010-09-01

471

The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: educational and science-related outcomes.  

PubMed

Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer Residential Program (SRP), a 25-year-old university-based biomedical pipeline program that reaches out to low-income and underrepresented ethnic minority high school students. Five annual surveys were used to assess educational outcomes and science-related experience among 96 SRP participants and a comparison group of 192 youth who applied but were not selected to participate in the SRP, using ~2:1 matching on sociodemographic and academic background to control for potential confounders. SRP participants were more likely than the comparison group to enter college (100.0 vs. 84.4 %, p = 0.002), and both of these matriculation rates were more than double the statewide average (40.8 %). In most areas of science-related experience, SRP participants reported significantly more experience (>twofold odds) than the comparison group at 1 year of follow-up, but these differences did not persist after 2-4 years. The comparison group reported substantially more participation in science or college preparatory programs, more academic role models, and less personal adversity than SRP participants, which likely influenced these findings toward the null hypothesis. SRP applicants, irrespective of whether selected for participation, had significantly better educational outcomes than population averages. Short-term science-related experience was better among SRP participants, although longer-term outcomes were similar, most likely due to college and science-related opportunities among the comparison group. We discuss implications for future evaluations of other biomedical pipeline programs. PMID:25096792

Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A

2015-05-01

472

Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985  

SciTech Connect

The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

Barr, S.H. (ed.)

1985-08-01

473

Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

1982-06-01

474

Science Research Facilities - Versatility for Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Station Science Lab Module (SLM) and its interfaces are designed to minimize complexity and maximize user accommodations. The facilities provided encompass life sciences research, the control of external payloads, the servicing of customer equipment, and general scientific investigations. The SLM will have the unprecedented ability to diagnose, service, and replace equipment while in orbit. In addition, the SLM will have significant operational advantages over previous spacecraft in terms of available volume, power, and crew interaction possibilities.

Giannovario, J. A.; Schelkopf, J. D.; Massey, K.; Solly, M.

1986-01-01

475

Science Learning Environments and Action Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A learning environment survey can be easily used in your science classroom to evaluate new instructional approaches, to spark enthusiasm, and to produce evidence showing that you are indeed becoming a reflective practitioner. Intellectual professional development should go beyond attending conferences and inservice training. This article will describe how you can successfully implement CLEAR (Classroom Learning Environment Action Research) as a strategy for improving your science teaching practice.

Catherine Martin-Dunlop

2006-09-01

476

Global change research: Science and policy  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

Rayner, S.

1993-05-01

477

Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

Knotek, M.L.

1994-01-01

478

Commentary: The Value of Science Research Projects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this month's Commentary, the value of science research projects is emphasized. The authors of this article have found that conservatively such projects could potentially have a positive impact on curricular requirements, regardless of the perception that science projects should be complex and difficult or that they should be limited only to students who continue their education beyond high school. They effectively illustrate the benefits of science projects as an alternative learning path for all students, where they acquire critical thinking skills and other components of inquiry-based instruction.

Al Frisby

2005-04-01

479

Visionlearning: Research Methods: The Practice of Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This instructional module introduces four types of research methods: experimentation, description, comparison, and modeling. It was developed to help learners understand that the classic definition of the "scientific method" does not capture the dynamic nature of science investigation. As learners explore each methodology, they develop an understanding of why scientists use multiple methods to gather data and develop hypotheses. It is appropriate for introductory physics courses and for teachers seeking content support in research practices. Editor's Note: Secondary students often cling to the notion that scientific research follows a stock, standard "scientific method". They may be unaware of the differences between experimental research, correlative studies, observation, and computer-based modeling research. In this resource, they can glimpse each methodology in the context of a real study done by respected scientists. This resource is part of Visionlearning, an award-winning set of classroom-tested modules for science education.

Anthony Carpi

480

Medical students’ perceptions and attitudes about family practice: a qualitative research synthesis  

PubMed Central

Background During the last decade medical students from most Western countries have shown little interest in family practice. Understanding the factors that influence medical students to choose family medicine is crucial. Objective To systematically review and synthesize published evidence about medical students’ attitudes and perceptions towards family practice. Methods A qualitative systematic review. The literature search was undertaken in July 2010 in PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses. Two authors independently selected the studies for their inclusion and assessed their quality. The selected studies were thoroughly read. Key themes and categories were identified. A matrix was created for allowing the comparison of each theme across studies. Results Ten studies were finally included. Seven broad themes were identified across them: 1) Scope and context of practice was a broad theme comprising linked sub-themes: perception of a varied specialty, broad practice, holistic perspective and flexibility that allows having a family; 2) Lower interest or intellectually less challenging: treating common disease, repetitive, quasi administrative job; 3) Influence of role models, either positive and negative, and society: negative comments from other professionals, peers and family; 4) Lower prestige; 5) Poor remuneration; 6) Medical school influences, being important both the length and quality of the exposure; 7) Post graduate training, where the shorter duration and the lower intensity were perceived as positive aspects. After identifying these seven key themes, were also looked into patterns in the distribution of these themes among studies. Conclusions Our qualitative review provides a comprehensive picture of medical students’ attitudes towards family practice in the available literature. In general, although some students find family medicine appealing, it is regarded as a career of low interest and prestige. More research is needed on the influence of role models, medical school and post graduate training. PMID:22909189

2012-01-01

481

Not a minor problem: involving adolescents in medical device design research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article outlines how adolescents are currently overlooked as a specific user group of medical devices and positions the contribution that ergonomics (human factors) can make in mitigating this issue. Details are provided of the current barriers to adolescent inclusion in medical device design research. The discussion then provides guidance and suggested strategies for researchers, clinical staff and medical device

Alexandra R. Lang; Jennifer L. Martin; Sarah Sharples; John A. Crowe; Elizabeth Murphy

2012-01-01

482

Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

1983-05-01

483

Physical Sciences Research Priorities and Plans in OBPR  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents viewgraphs of physical sciences research priorities and plans at the Office of Biological and Physical Sciences Research (OBPR). The topics include: 1) Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference; 2) Beneficial Characteristics of the Space Environment; 3) Windows of Opportunity for Research Derived from Microgravity; 4) Physical Sciences Research Program; 5) Fundamental Research: Space-based Results and

Eugene Trinh

2002-01-01

484

Research Integrity in Communication Sciences and Disorders.  

PubMed

PURPOSE: A joint program on "research on research integrity" sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) encouraged the examination of practices and policies promoting the responsible conduct of research (RCR). Our grant, Research Integrity in ASHA: Education and Publication (#NS44534), enabled ASHA's Research Integrity Grant Group (a) to identify patterns of teaching and learning in communication sciences and disorders graduate programs about specific topics of research integrity on the conduct of science, (b) to examine perceptions about concepts of research integrity as they apply to scientific journals within the discipline, and (c) to evaluate policies and practices established by ASHA to protect the integrity of published scientific work. METHOD: Historical and contemporary literature were reviewed, surveys were conducted, and ASHA policies were analyzed. CONCLUSION: This JSLHR supplement has been written with the aim of informing and inspiring scientists, students, research institutions, and professional societies to practice responsible research in the 21st century and beyond. PMID:21081678

Moss, Sharon E

2010-11-16

485

Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences Short Course in Breast Localisation and Simulation for Advanced  

E-print Network

Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences Short Course in Breast Localisation epidemiological and aetiological perspectives. The pre-treatment patient `work-up' and staging of breast cancer

Albrecht, David

486

78 FR 70311 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Place: Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road NW., Washington, DC 20015. Contact Person: Lisa A. Newman, SCD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences,...

2013-11-25

487

78 FR 28601 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...applications. Place: DoubleTree by Hilton Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Lisa A. Newman, SCD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences,...

2013-05-15

488

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care  

E-print Network

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care Women's Health and Wellbeing analyse an aspect of women's health care, specific to your own area of practice, from both a physical

Doran, Simon J.

489

75 FR 63497 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Wound Healing Center Grant. Date: November 9, 2010. Time: 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant...

2010-10-15

490

77 FR 59936 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...grant applications. Place: Marriott Courtyard 5520 Wisconsin Avenue Chevy Chase, MD 20815. Contact Person: Lisa A. Newman, SCD Scientific Review Officer Office of Scientific Review National Institute of General Medical Sciences National Institutes of...

2012-10-01

491

78 FR 8549 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Place: Marriott Courtyard Chevy Chase, 5520 Wisconsin Avenue, Chevy Chase, MD 20815. Contact Person: Lisa A. Newman, SCD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National...

2013-02-06

492

78 FR 67374 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Embassy Suites at the Chevy Chase Pavilion, 4300 Military Road NW., Washington, DC. Contact Person: Lisa A. Newman, SCD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National...

2013-11-12

493

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care  

E-print Network

Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences School of Health & Social Care Nurse Independent; policies, decision support systems and formulae; Continuing professional development - role of self and to act as supplementary prescribers. Professionally develop students in the higher education context

Doran, Simon J.

494

Science Nation: Virtual Reality Fires up Research Efforts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Media Convergence Laboratory (MCL) at the University of Central Florida is a place where engineers and artists combine their know-how for video games, virtual reality and a variety of military and commercial products. But there's now a much wider array of researchers discovering the benefits of this lab's toolbox. The Forest Fire project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), blends three seemingly unrelated disciplines: psychology, computer science and economics. The aim is to find out if a virtual reality presentation of wildfires might influence local residents to invest in prescribed burns and other protective efforts. Virtual reality and mixed reality (the blending of virtual content with real content) are now being used in a wide range of other scientific applications, including a growing number of medical therapies.

495

Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy: Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy (IGSP) is "dedicated to the study of life through scientific inquiry involving interdisciplinary research in genome sciences and policy." The Research section of the IGSP website links to descriptions of several focus areas such as Breast Cancer Genomics, Public Genomics & Intellectual Property, and Environmental Genomics. The site also links to information about the seven IGSP Centers including the Center for Models of Human Disease; the Center for Genome Ethics, Law, & Policy; The Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology; and more. Lists of recent research publications by primary author are available as well. In addition, site visitors will find information about a variety of IGSP resources including Sequence Data, Business & Funding Data, Research Software, and, in the near future, a Pharmacogenetics Database.

496

[Academy of medical sciences during the Great Patriotic War and first years after war].  

PubMed

In the article presented the history of foundation of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR and its activities during the World War Two and the early postwar years. According to the authors, the scientific development of many fundamental problems from domestic medicine experience during the war has retained its relevance in solving of the contemporary issues in health and medical science in modern Russia. PMID:25286578

Knopov, M Sh; Taranukha, V K

2014-06-01

497

Self-Experimentation and Its Role in Medical Research  

PubMed Central

Although experimentation involving human volunteers has attracted intense study, the matter of self-experimentation among medical researchers has received much less attention. Many questions have been answered only in part, or have been left unanswered. How common is this practice? Is it more common among certain nationalities? What have been the predominant medical fields in which self-experimentation has occurred? How dangerous an act has this proved to be? What have been the trends over time? What is the future likely to bring? From the available literature, I identified and analyzed 465 documented instances of this practice, performed over the course of the past 2 centuries. Most instances occurred in the United States. The peak of self-experimentation occurred in the first half of the 20th century. Eight deaths were recorded. A number of the investigators enjoyed successful careers, including the receipt of Nobel Prizes. Although self-experimentation by physicians and other biological scientists appears to be in decline, the courage of those involved and the benefits to society cannot be denied. PMID:22412227

Weisse, Allen B.

2012-01-01

498

Navigating Computer Science Research Through Waves of Privacy Concerns  

E-print Network

1 Navigating Computer Science Research Through Waves of Privacy Concerns: Discussions among of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213­3890 Abstract Computer Science research what privacy practices computer science researchers should adopt, if any. These issues are already very

499

Twelve Theses on Design Science Research in Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This essay discusses 12 theses for guiding design science research. They are aimed at strengthening the design science orientation\\u000a of Information Systems, clarifying future discourses on design science research aspects of the discipline, and giving some\\u000a further guidelines for design science research in Information Systems.

Juhani Iivari

500

COSEE New England Ocean Science Researcher Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Are you an ocean science researcher who would you like assistance engaging in educational outreach and achieving broader impacts? This site will help you connect with educators in order to build meaningful educational collaborations. The website includes resources, ideas, and tools for researchers to become effectively involved in education and outreach. The site also features information on upcoming workshops and activities that will foster effect programs.