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  1. 32 CFR 728.61 - Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medicare beneficiaries. 728.61 Section 728.61... § 728.61 Medicare beneficiaries. (a) Care authorized. Emergency hospitalization and other emergency... Disabled (Medicare) who reside in the 50 United States and the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico,...

  2. 32 CFR 728.61 - Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medicare beneficiaries. 728.61 Section 728.61... § 728.61 Medicare beneficiaries. (a) Care authorized. Emergency hospitalization and other emergency... Disabled (Medicare) who reside in the 50 United States and the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico,...

  3. 32 CFR 728.61 - Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medicare beneficiaries. 728.61 Section 728.61... § 728.61 Medicare beneficiaries. (a) Care authorized. Emergency hospitalization and other emergency... Disabled (Medicare) who reside in the 50 United States and the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico,...

  4. 32 CFR 728.61 - Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medicare beneficiaries. 728.61 Section 728.61... § 728.61 Medicare beneficiaries. (a) Care authorized. Emergency hospitalization and other emergency... Disabled (Medicare) who reside in the 50 United States and the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico,...

  5. MEDICARE CURRENT BENEFICIARY SURVEY (MCBS) DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) is a continuous, multipurpose survey of a nationally representative sample of aged, disabled, and institutionalized Medicare beneficiaries. MCBS, which is sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), is a comprehe...

  6. Effect of Medicare Advantage Payments on Dually Eligible Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Adam; Dowd, Bryan E.

    2005-01-01

    This study estimates the effect of Medicare Advantage (MA) payments and State Medicaid policies on the choice by Medicaid eligible Medicare beneficiaries to either join a MA plan, remain in the fee-for-service (FFS) and enroll in Medicaid (dually enrolled), or remain in FFS Medicare without joining Medicaid. Individual plan choice was modeled using a multinomial logit. The sample includes Medicaid-eligible Medicare beneficiaries (including specified low income Medicare beneficiaries [SLMBs] and qualified Medicare beneficiaries [QMBs]) drawn from the 2000 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). We find a $10 increase in monthly MA payment reduces the probability of dual enrollment by four percentage points, and FFS Medicare enrollment by 11 percentage points. PMID:17290630

  7. Health Insurance Knowledge Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Lauren A; Garfinkel, Steven A; Hibbard, Judith H; Keller, Susan D; Kilpatrick, Kerry E; Kosiak, Beth

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of new consumer information materials about the Medicare program on beneficiary knowledge of their health care coverage under the Medicare system. Data Source A telephone survey of 2,107 Medicare beneficiaries in the 10-county Kansas City metropolitan statistical area. Study Design Beneficiaries were randomly assigned to a control group and three treatment groups each receiving a different set of Medicare informational materials. The “handbook-only” group received the Health Care Financing Administration's new Medicare & You 1999 handbook. The “bulletin” group received an abbreviated version of the handbook, and the “handbook + CAHPS” group received the Medicare & You handbook plus the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans (CAHPS)® survey report comparing the quality of health care provided by Medicare HMOs. Beneficiaries interested in receiving information were oversampled. Data Collection Methods Data were collected during two separate telephone surveys of Medicare beneficiaries: one survey of new beneficiaries and another survey of experienced beneficiaries. The intervention materials were mailed to sample members in advance of the interviews. Knowledge for the treatment groups was measured shortly after beneficiaries received the intervention materials. Principal Findings Respondents' knowledge was measured using a psychometrically valid and reliable 15-item measure. Beneficiaries who received the intervention materials answered significantly more questions correctly than control group members. The effect on beneficiary knowledge of providing the information was modest for all intervention groups but varied for experienced beneficiaries only, depending on the intervention they received. Conclusions The findings suggest that all of the new materials had a positive effect on beneficiary knowledge about Medicare and the Medicare + Choice program. While the absolute gain in knowledge was modest, it was greater than

  8. Sources of drug coverage among Medicare beneficiaries with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Howell, Benjamin L; Powers, Christopher A; Weinhandl, Eric D; St Peter, Wendy L; Frankenfield, Diane L

    2012-05-01

    Despite extensive use of prescription medications in ESRD, relatively little is known about the participation of Medicare ESRD beneficiaries in the Part D program. Here, we quantitated the sources of drug coverage among ESRD beneficiaries and explored the Part D plan preferences of ESRD beneficiaries with regard to deductibles, coverage gaps, and monthly premiums. We obtained data on beneficiary sources of creditable coverage, characteristics of Part D plans, demographics, and residence from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Chronic Condition Data Warehouse and identified beneficiaries with ESRD from the US Renal Data System. We found that a substantial proportion (17.0%) of ESRD beneficiaries lacked a known source of creditable drug coverage in 2007 and 64.3% were enrolled in Part D. Of those enrolled, 72% received the Medicare Part D low-income subsidy. ESRD beneficiaries who enrolled in standalone Part D plans without the assistance of the low-income subsidy tended to prefer more comprehensive coverage options. In conclusion, more outreach is needed to ensure that beneficiaries who lack coverage obtain the coverage they need and that ESRD beneficiaries join the best plans for managing their disease and accompanying comorbid conditions. PMID:22402802

  9. 32 CFR 728.61 - Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 728.61 Medicare beneficiaries. (a) Care authorized. Emergency hospitalization and other emergency...) General provisions—(1) Limitations. Benefit payments for emergency services under Medicare can be made for... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL...

  10. Medicare Accountable Care Organizations: Beneficiary Assignment Update.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Thomas; MacKinney, A Clinton; Mueller, Keith J; Ullrich, Fred; Zhu, Xi

    2016-06-01

    This brief updates Brief No. 2014-3 and explains changes in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Accountable Care Organization (ACO) regulations issued in June 2015 pertaining to beneficiary assignment for Medicare Shared Savings Program ACOs. Overall, the regulatory changes are intended to (1) encourage ACOs to participate in two-sided risk contracts, (2) increase the likelihood that beneficiaries are assigned to the physician (and ACO) from whom they receive most of their primary care services, and (3) make it easier for Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) to participate in ACOs. Understanding ACO beneficiary assignment policies is critical for ACO in managing their panel of ACO providers and beneficiaries. PMID:27416650

  11. Medicare Beneficiary Satisfaction with Durable Medical Equipment Suppliers

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Thomas J.; Finkelstein, Eric A.; Bernard, Shulamit L.

    2001-01-01

    CMS has recently launched a series of initiatives to control Medicare spending on durable medical equipment (DME) and prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS). An important question is how these initiatives will affect beneficiary satisfaction. Using survey data, we analyze Medicare beneficiary satisfaction with DMEPOS suppliers in two Florida counties. Our results show that beneficiaries are currently highly satisfied with their DMEPOS suppliers. Beneficiary satisfaction is positively related to rapid delivery, training, dependability, and frequency of service. Results of our analysis can be used as baseline estimates in evaluating CMS initiatives to reduce Medicare payments for DMEPOS. PMID:12500367

  12. Medicare beneficiary satisfaction with durable medical equipment suppliers.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, T J; Finkelstein, E A; Bernard, S L

    2001-01-01

    CMS has recently launched a series of initiatives to control Medicare spending on durable medical equipment (DME) and prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS). An important question is how these initiatives will affect beneficiary satisfaction. Using survey data, we analyze Medicare beneficiary satisfaction with DMEPOS suppliers in two Florida counties. Our results show that beneficiaries are currently highly satisfied with their DMEPOS suppliers. Beneficiary satisfaction is positively related to rapid delivery, training, dependability, and frequency of service. Results of our analysis can be used as baseline estimates in evaluating CMS initiatives to reduce Medicare payments for DMEPOS. PMID:12500367

  13. Measuring Beneficiary Knowledge of the Medicare Program: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Carla M.; Terrell, Sherry A.; McCormack, Lauren A.; Berkman, Nancy D.

    2003-01-01

    Reliable measures of Medicare beneficiaries' program knowledge are necessary for credible program monitoring, evaluation, and public accountability. This study developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of two possible measures of beneficiary knowledge. One measure was based on self-reported knowledge, the other was a true/false quiz which requires beneficiaries to demonstrate their knowledge. We used data from the 1998 and 1999 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) to evaluate the reliability and construct validity of the indices. Overall, based on both content considerations and the psychometric analyses, the true/false quiz proved to be the more accurate and useful measure of beneficiaries' knowledge. PMID:14628404

  14. 42 CFR 435.1007 - Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Medicare beneficiaries. 435.1007 Section 435.1007 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Limitations on Ffp § 435.1007 Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries. (a..., medically needy beneficiaries, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries, subject to the restrictions...

  15. 42 CFR 435.1007 - Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Medicare beneficiaries. 435.1007 Section 435.1007 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Limitations on Ffp § 435.1007 Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries. (a..., medically needy beneficiaries, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries, subject to the restrictions...

  16. 42 CFR 435.1007 - Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Medicare beneficiaries. 435.1007 Section 435.1007 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Limitations on Ffp § 435.1007 Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries. (a..., medically needy beneficiaries, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries, subject to the restrictions...

  17. Assessing Medicare Beneficiaries' Readiness to Make Informed Health Plan Choices

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Deborah A.; Prochaska, James O.; Cummins, Carol O.; Terrell, Sherry; Miranda, David

    2001-01-01

    The Transtheoretical Model (TTM, the “stage model”) can guide development of programs to increase Medicare beneficiaries' readiness to make informed health plan choices. In this study, TTM staging algorithms were developed to assess readiness to engage in three types of informed choice: (1) learning about the Medicare program; (2) learning about Medicare health maintenance organizations (HMOs); and (3) reviewing different plan options. Stage of change based on all three algorithms is related to knowledge about the Medicare program and information-seeking. Findings provide evidence for the construct validity of the stage measures and for the applicability of the TTM to informed choice among beneficiaries. PMID:12500365

  18. Medicare's drug discount card program: beneficiaries' experience with choice.

    PubMed

    Hassol, Andrea; Wrobel, Marian V; Doksum, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    This article describes Medicare beneficiaries' experience with the choice among Medicare drug discount cards and is based primarily on surveys and focus groups with beneficiaries as well as interviews with other stakeholders. Although competition and choice have the potential to reduce cost and enhance quality in the Medicare Program, our findings highlight some of the challenges involved in making choice work in practice. Despite the unique and temporary nature of the drug discount card program, these findings have considerable relevance to the Part D drug benefit and to other Medicare initiatives that rely on choice. PMID:17722747

  19. Beneficiary price sensitivity in the Medicare prescription drug plan market.

    PubMed

    Frakt, Austin B; Pizer, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The Medicare stand-alone prescription drug plan (PDP) came into existence in 2006 as part of the Medicare prescription drug benefit. It is the most popular plan type among Medicare drug plans and large numbers of plans are available to all beneficiaries. In this article we present the first analysis of beneficiary price sensitivity in the PDP market. Our estimate of elasticity of enrollment with respect to premium, -1.45, is larger in magnitude than has been found in the Medicare HMO market. This high degree of beneficiary price sensitivity for PDPs is consistent with relatively low product differentiation, low fixed costs of entry in the PDP market, and the fact that, in contrast to changing HMOs, beneficiaries can select a PDP without disrupting doctor-patient relationships. PMID:19191252

  20. Medicare spending by beneficiaries with various types of supplemental insurance.

    PubMed

    Khandker, R K; McCormack, L A

    1999-06-01

    The authors analyzed Medicare spending by elderly noninstitutionalized Medicare beneficiaries with and without supplemental insurance such as Medigap, employer-sponsored plans, and Medicaid. Use of a detailed survey of Medicare beneficiaries and their Medicare health insurance claims enabled the authors to control for health status, chronic conditions, functional limitations, and other factors that explain spending variations across supplemental insurance categories. The authors found that supplemental insurance was associated with a higher probability and level of Medicare spending, particularly for Part B services. Beneficiaries with both Medigap and employer plans had the highest levels of spending ceteris paribus, suggesting a possible moral hazard effect of insurance. Findings from this study are discussed in the context of the overall financing of health care for the elderly. PMID:10373721

  1. Lower Rehospitalization Rates among Rural Medicare Beneficiaries with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.; Vyavaharkar, Medha; Glover, Saundra H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We estimated the 30-day readmission rate of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes, across levels of rurality. Methods: We merged the 2005 Medicare Chronic Conditions 5% sample data with the 2007 Area Resource File. The study population was delimited to those with diabetes and at least 1 hospitalization in the year. Unadjusted readmission…

  2. Predictors of Preventive Service Use Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Ozminkowski, Ronald J.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Shechter, David; Stapleton, David C.; Baser, Onur; Lapin, Pauline

    2006-01-01

    Despite Medicare coverage, receipt of clinical preventive services is suboptimal. Using multivariate regression analyses and Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) data for 2001, we estimated the relationship between the number of preventive services received in the 12-month recall period and: socioeconomics, plan type, health status, health risks, and ability to address daily needs. Results are nationally representative for the study year. With the exception of blood pressure and cholesterol screening, approximately one- to two-thirds of Medicare beneficiaries did not receive recommended preventive services. Strategies should be developed to ensure appropriate use of preventive services over time. PMID:17290645

  3. 42 CFR 435.1007 - Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Medicare beneficiaries. 435.1007 Section 435.1007 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Limitations on Ffp § 435.1007 Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries. (a..., medically needy recipients, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries, subject to the restrictions contained...

  4. How beneficiaries fare under the new Medicare drug bill.

    PubMed

    Moon, Marilyn

    2004-06-01

    The Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act (MMA) provides the largest benefit expansion in Medicare's history while enacting major changes to the program's structure. Offering $410 billion in new drug benefits will certainly help many beneficiaries now struggling with the costs of prescriptions, particularly those with low incomes. It is difficult to determine, however, whether beneficiaries will be better off in the long run. The drug benefits will not grow with the needs of beneficiaries, and other changes that prove to be unworkable or that place some beneficiaries at risk will create added costs. In the meantime, favorable treatment of private plans will create new inequities. Additional legislation and carefully crafted regulations could mitigate a number of these issues; in the meantime, they will require close scrutiny. PMID:15176395

  5. Characteristics of Medicare Advantage and Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries Upon Enrollment in Medicare at Age 65.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric A; Decker, Sandra L; Parker, Jennifer D

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has found differences in characteristics of beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare fee-for-service versus Medicare Advantage (MA), but there has been limited research using more recent MA enrollment data. We used 1997-2005 National Health Interview Survey data linked to 2000-2009 Medicare enrollment data to compare characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries before their initial enrollment into Medicare fee-for-service or MA at age 65 and whether the characteristics of beneficiaries changed from 2006 to 2009 compared with 2000 to 2005. During this period of MA growth, the greatest increase in enrollment appears to have come from those with no chronic conditions and men. PMID:27232684

  6. 42 CFR 424.507 - Ordering and referring covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for Medicare beneficiaries. 424.507 Section 424.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Requirements for Establishing and Maintaining Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.507 Ordering...

  7. 42 CFR 424.507 - Ordering and referring covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for Medicare beneficiaries. 424.507 Section 424.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Requirements for Establishing and Maintaining Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.507 Ordering...

  8. The morbidity of urethral stricture disease among male Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To date, the morbidity of urethral stricture disease among American men has not been analyzed using national datasets. We sought to analyze the morbidity of urethral stricture disease by measuring the rates of urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence among men with a diagnosis of urethral stricture. Methods We analyzed Medicare claims data for 1992, 1995, 1998, and 2001 to estimate the rate of dual diagnoses of urethral stricture with urinary tract infection and with urinary incontinence occurring in the same year among a 5% sample of beneficiaries. Male Medicare beneficiaries receiving co-incident ICD-9 codes indicating diagnoses of urethral stricture and either urinary tract infection or urinary incontinence within the same year were counted. Results The percentage of male patients with a diagnosis of urethral stricture who also were diagnosed with a urinary tract infection was 42% in 2001, an increase from 35% in 1992. Eleven percent of male Medicare beneficiaries with urethral stricture disease in 2001 were diagnosed with urinary incontinence in the same year. This represents an increase from 8% in 1992. Conclusions Among male Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with urethral stricture disease in 2001, 42% were also diagnosed with a urinary tract infection, and 11% with incontinence. Although the overall incidence of stricture disease decreased over this time period, these rates of dual diagnoses increased from 1992 to 2001. Our findings shed light into the health burden of stricture disease on American men. In order to decrease the morbidity of stricture disease, early definitive management of strictures is warranted. PMID:20167087

  9. 42 CFR 435.1007 - Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries. 435.1007 Section 435.1007 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Limitations on Ffp § 435.1007 Categorically needy, medically needy, and qualified Medicare beneficiaries....

  10. Will the care be there? Vulnerable beneficiaries and Medicare reform.

    PubMed

    Moon, M

    1999-01-01

    The Medicare program is on the verge of major change. The proof of the value of reforms will not rest in how well the program meets the needs of the healthy and wealthy, but rather in whether they preserve or improve upon protections for those who would not be well served by an unregulated private sector--persons with low incomes and/or substantial health problems. This paper examines four key issues: Which beneficiaries will likely be best served by a system oriented around choice; what role traditional Medicare should continue to play and what changes will be needed; what protections are necessary for persons with low and moderate incomes; and how these reforms could be incorporated into broader changes to make Medicare more viable over time. PMID:9926649

  11. Weighted Health Status in the Medicare Population: Development of the Weighted Index for the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (WHIMCBS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doctor, Jason N.; Chan, Leighton; MacLehose, Richard F.; Patrick, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Developed an approach to constructing an aggregate index of health at the population level with data from Medicare beneficiaries using the 1991 (n=12,667), 1995 (n=15,590), and 1997 (n=17,058) Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). Findings suggest that in addition to mortality, morbidity appears to play a significant role in years of healthy…

  12. Receipt of Glucocorticoid Monotherapy Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    YAZDANY, JINOOS; TONNER, CHRIS; SCHMAJUK, GABRIELA; LIN, GRACE A.; TRIVEDI, AMAL N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) improves outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is a nationally endorsed quality measure. We investigated the prevalence and predictors of receiving glucocorticoids alone for the treatment of RA in a nationwide sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Methods Among individuals ages ≥65 years with RA enrolled in the Part D prescription drug benefit in 2009, we compared those with ≥1 DMARD claim to those receiving glucocorticoid monotherapy, defined as no DMARD claim and an annual glucocorticoid supply of ≥180 days or an annual dose of ≥900 mg of prednisone or equivalent. We fit multivariable models to determine the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with glucocorticoid monotherapy. Results Of 8,125 beneficiaries treated for RA, 10.2% (n = 825) received glucocorticoids alone. Beneficiaries with low incomes were more likely to receive glucocorticoids alone (12.3%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 10.9–13.8% versus 9.4%; 95% CI 8.6–10.1%), as were those living in certain US regions. More physician office visits and hospitalizations were associated with glucocorticoid monotherapy. Individuals who had no contact with a rheumatologist were significantly more likely to receive glucocorticoids alone (17.5%; 95% CI 16.0–19.0% versus 8.5%; 95% CI 7.4–9.5% for those with no rheumatology visits versus 1–4 visits). Conclusion Approximately 1 in 10 Medicare beneficiaries treated for RA received glucocorticoids without DMARDs in 2009. Compared to DMARD users, glucocorticoid users were older, had lower incomes, were more likely to live in certain US regions, and were less likely to have seen a rheumatologist, suggesting persistent gaps in quality of care despite expanded drug coverage under Part D. PMID:25244314

  13. How Do the Experiences of Medicare Beneficiary Subgroups Differ between Managed Care and Original Medicare?

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N; Haviland, Amelia M; Orr, Nate; Hambarsoomian, Katrin; Cleary, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine whether disparities in health care experiences of Medicare beneficiaries differ between managed care (Medicare Advantage [MA]) and traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare. Data Sources 132,937 MA and 201,444 FFS respondents to the 2007 Medicare Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey. Study Design We defined seven subgroup characteristics: low-income subsidy eligible, no high school degree, poor or fair self-rated health, age 85 and older, female, Hispanic, and black. We estimated disparities in CAHPS experience of care scores between each of these groups and beneficiaries without those characteristics within MA and FFS for 11 CAHPS measures and assessed differences between MA and FFS disparities in linear models. Principal Findings The seven subgroup characteristics had significant (p<.05) negative interactions with MA (larger disparities in MA) in 27 of 77 instances, with only four significant positive interactions. Conclusion Managed care may provide less uniform care than FFS for patients; specifically there may be larger disparities in MA than FFS between beneficiaries who have low incomes, are less healthy, older, female, and who did not complete high school, compared with their counterparts. There may be potential for MA quality improvement targeted at the care provided to particular subgroups. PMID:21306370

  14. Risk of Musculoskeletal Injuries, Fractures, and Falls in Medicare Beneficiaries With Disorders of Binocular Vision

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Repka, Michael X.; Yu, Fei; Lum, Flora; Coleman, Anne L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Disorders of binocular vision are increasingly prevalent among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older. Visual impairment is a recognized risk factor for fractures. Despite the association of visual impairment and fracture risk, to our knowledge, no study has examined the influence that disorders of binocular vision (strabismus, amblyopia, diplopia, and nystagmus) may have on musculoskeletal injury and fracture risk in the elderly population. Objective To evaluate associations between disorders of binocular vision and musculoskeletal injury, fracture, and falls in the elderly. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective study of 10-year (2002-2011) musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall prevalence in a 5% random sample of Medicare Part B fee-for-service claims for beneficiaries with disorders of binocular vision. Participants included Medicare beneficiaries living in the general community who were 65 years or older with at least 1 year of Medicare Part B enrollment. Exposures Diagnosis of a disorder of binocular vision. Main outcomes and measures Ten-year prevalence of musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall in individuals with and without disorders of binocular vision. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, region of residence, systemic and ocular comorbidities, and duration of follow-up. Results There were 2 196 881 Medicare beneficiaries identified. Of these, 99 525 (4.5%) had at least 1 reported disorder of binocular vision (strabismus, 2.3%; diplopia, 2.2%; amblyopia, 0.9%; and nystagmus, 0.2%). During the 10-year study period, there were 1 272 948 (57.9%) patients with documented musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for the association between disorders of binocular vision and any of the 3 injury types was 2.23 (95% CI, 2.20-2.27; P < .001). The adjusted OR was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.25-1.29; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance Medicare beneficiaries with a disorder of

  15. The State of Diabetes Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries Living in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingarten, Joseph P.; Brittman, Susan; Hu, Wenrong; Przybyszewski, Chris; Hammond, Judith M.; FitzGerald, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Diabetes poses a growing health burden in the United States, but much of the research to date has been at the state and local level. Purpose: To present a national profile of diabetes care provided to Medicare beneficiaries living in urban, semirural, and rural communities. Methods: Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes aged 18-75 were…

  16. Self-Reported Cancer Screening among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries: A Rural-Urban Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Lin; Mohile, Supriya; Zhang, Ning; Fiscella, Kevin; Noyes, Katia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the rural-urban disparity of screening for breast cancer and colorectal cancer (CRC) among the elder Medicare beneficiaries and assessed rurality's independent impact on receipt of screening. Methods: Using 2005 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, we applied weighted logistic regression to estimate the overall rural-urban…

  17. Effect of Communication Disability on Satisfaction with Health Care: A Survey of Medicare Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Shumway-Cook, Anne; Ciol, Marcia A.; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Chan, Leighton

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the prevalence and characteristics of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries reporting a communication disability and the relationship between that disability and dissatisfaction with medical care. Method: A total of 12,769 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey respondents age 65 and older in 2001 were categorized by level of…

  18. New challenges to medicare beneficiary access to mAbs

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Precision binding of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to biological targets, their relative clinical success, and expansion of indications following initial approval, are distinctive clinical features. The relatively high cost of mAbs, together with the absence of a regulatory pathway to generics, stand out as distinctive economic features. Based on both literature review and primary data collection we enumerated mAb original approvals, supplemental indications and off-label uses, assessed payer formulary management of mAbs, and determined new challenges to Medicare beneficiary access to mAbs. We found that the FDA has approved 22 mAbs and 30 supplemental indications pertaining to the originally approved mAbs. In addition, there are 46 off-label use citations in officially recognized pharmaceutical compendia. Across Part B carriers and Part D plans, we found considerable variation in terms of coverage and conditions of reimbursement related to on- and off-label uses of mAbs. Our results point to four major challenges facing mAb developers, health care providers, Medicare beneficiaries, payers and policymakers. These include administrative price controls, coverage variation, projected shift from physician- to self-administered mAbs, and comparative effectiveness. We suggest more systematic use of “coverage with evidence development” as a means of optimally addressing these challenges. PMID:20046575

  19. Designing health insurance information for the Medicare beneficiary: a policy synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, B N

    1988-01-01

    Can Medicare beneficiaries make rational and informed decisions about their coverage under the Medicare program? Recent policy developments in the Medicare program have been based on the theory of competition in medical care. One of the key assumptions of the competitive model is the free flow of adequate information, enabling the consumer to make an informed choice from among the various sellers of a particular product. Options for Medicare beneficiaries in supplementing their basic Medicare coverage include the purchase of private supplementary insurance policies or enrollment in a Medicare HMO. These consumers, in a complex health insurance market, have only limited information available to them because many health plans do not make adequate comparable product information available. Moreover, since the introduction of the Medicare HMO option, the long-range plan for management of the Medicare budget has become based on the large-scale voluntary enrollment of beneficiaries into capitated health plans. The policy instrument that has been used to improve beneficiary decisions on how to supplement Medicare coverage is the informational or educational program. This synthesis presents findings regarding the relative effectiveness of different types of health insurance information programs for the Medicare beneficiary in an effort to promote practical use of the most effective types of information. PMID:3060450

  20. Do HMOs reduce preventable hospitalizations for Medicare beneficiaries?

    PubMed

    Basu, Jayasree; Mobley, Lee R

    2007-10-01

    This study assesses the association of HMO enrollment with preventable hospitalizations among the elderly in four states. Using 2001 hospital discharge abstracts for elderly Medicare enrollees (age 65 and above) residing in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Florida, and California), from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP-SID) database of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, we use a multivariate cross-sectional design with patient-level data for each state. Holding other factors such as demographics and illness severity constant, we find that in three out of four states, Medicare HMO patients had lower odds of a preventable admission versus marker admission than Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) patients. Moreover, in the two states with longest tenure and greatest Medicare HMO penetration, California and Florida, the reduction in preventable admissions among Medicare HMO patients was mainly concentrated among more ill patients. These findings add to the evidence that managed care outperforms traditional care among the elderly, rather than simply skimming off the healthiest populations. PMID:17881621

  1. A Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey-Based Investigation of Alternative Primary Care Models in Nursing Homes: Cost and Utilization Differences.

    PubMed

    Lee, A James; Gautam, Ramraj; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Abdallah, Lisa M; Remington, Ruth; Van Etten, Deborah; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    The current study used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey-Based (MCBS) Cost and Use files for 2006-2008 to investigate whether health care costs and service utilization of nursing home residents varied with nurse practitioner (NP) and physician assistant (PA) involvement, compared to the use of medical doctors (MDs) only. The sample included Medicare beneficiaries 65 and older residing in a nursing home for the entire study year (433 annual observations). A generalized estimating equations procedure was used to assess whether health care cost and utilization measures varied by cohort. Point estimates indicated that the annual per-person cost of non-institutional services (total medical cost less the cost of the nursing home itself) was $3,847 and $3,170 more for individuals in the MD-only and MD-dominant cohorts, respectively, compared to those in the NP/PA-dominant cohort. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(3):115-122.]. PMID:27054369

  2. Reductions in mortality among Medicare beneficiaries following the implementation of Medicare Part D.

    PubMed

    Semilla, April P; Chen, Fang; Dall, Timothy M

    2015-07-01

    Medicare Part D is a prescription drug program that provides seniors and disabled individuals enrolled in Medicare with outpatient drug coverage benefits. Part D has been shown to increase access to medicines and improve medication adherence; however, the effect of Part D on health outcomes has not yet been extensively studied. In this study, we used a published and validated Markov-based microsimulation model to quantify the relationships among medication use, disease incidence and severity, and mortality. Based on the simulation results, we estimate that since the implementation of Part D in 2006, nearly 200,000 Medicare beneficiaries have lived at least 1 year longer. Reductions in mortality have occurred because of fewer deaths associated with medication-sensitive conditions such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Improved access to medication through Medicare Part D helps patients improve blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose levels, which in turn can prevent or delay the onset of disease and the incidence of adverse health events, thus reducing mortality. PMID:26295437

  3. 75 FR 32480 - Funding Opportunity: Affordable Care Act Medicare Beneficiary Outreach and Assistance Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration on Aging Funding Opportunity: Affordable Care Act Medicare Beneficiary Outreach and Assistance Program Funding for Title VI Native American Programs Purpose of Notice: Availability of funding opportunity announcement. Funding Opportunity Title/Program Name: Affordable Care...

  4. Residential and Health Care Transition Patterns among Older Medicare Beneficiaries over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Masayo; Shaffer, Thomas; Arbaje, Alicia I.; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe annual care transition patterns across residential and health care settings and assess consistency in care transition patterns across years. Design and Methods: This retrospective cohort study used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2000-2005). The sample comprised beneficiaries aged 65 years and older (N = 57,684…

  5. Choice of Personal Assistance Services Providers by Medicare Beneficiaries Using a Consumer-Directed Benefit: Rural-Urban Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Van Nostrand, Joan F.; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of an experimental consumer-choice voucher benefit on the selection of independent and agency personal assistance services (PAS) providers among rural and urban Medicare beneficiaries with disabilities. Methods: The Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration enrolled 1,605 Medicare beneficiaries in 19…

  6. Depression and Ambulatory Care Sensitive Hospitalizations among Medicare Beneficiaries with Chronic Physical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the association between depression and hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (H-ACSC) among Medicare beneficiaries with chronic physical conditions. Methods We used a retrospective longitudinal design using multiple years (2002-2009) of linked fee-for-service Medicare claims and survey data from Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) data to create six longitudinal panels. We followed individuals in each panel for a period of three years; first year served as the baseline and subsequent two years served as the follow-up. We measured depression, chronic physical conditions and other characteristics at baseline and examined H-ACSC at two follow-up. We identified chronic physical conditions from survey data and H-ACSC and depression from fee-for-service Medicare claims.. We analyzed unadjusted and adjusted relationships between depression and the risk of H-ACSC with chi-square tests and logistic regressions. Results Among all Medicare beneficiaries, 9.3% had diagnosed depression. Medicare beneficiaries with depression had higher rates of any H-ACSC as compared to those without depression (13.6% vs 7.7%). Multivariable regression indicated that compared to those without depression, Medicare beneficiaries with depression were more likely to experience any H-ACSC. Conclusions Depression was associated with greater risk of H-ACSC, suggesting that healthcare quality measures may need to include depression as a risk-adjustment variable. PMID:24999083

  7. Variations Among Medicare Beneficiaries Living in Different Settings: Demographics, Health Status, and Service Use.

    PubMed

    Degenholtz, Howard B; Park, Mijung; Kang, Yihuang; Nadash, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Older people with complex health issues and needs for functional support are increasingly living in different types of residential care environments as alternatives to nursing homes. This study aims to compare the demographics and health-care expenditures of Medicare beneficiaries by the setting in which they live: nursing homes, residential care settings, and at home using data from the 2002 to 2010 Medicare Current Beneficiary Study (MCBS), a nationally representative survey of the Medicare population. All Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years or older who participated in the fall MCBS interview (years 2002-2010) and were alive for the full year (N = 83,507) were included in the sample. We found that there is a gradient in health status, physical and cognitive functioning, and health-care use and spending across settings. Minority elderly are overrepresented in facilities and underrepresented in alternative living settings. PMID:26269562

  8. Primary Care Utilization and Colorectal Cancer Outcomes Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Jeanne M.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Gonzalez, Eduardo C.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Chen, Ren; Love-Jackson, Kymia; Roetzheim, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary medical care may improve colorectal cancer (CRC) outcomes through increased use of CRC screening tests and earlier diagnosis. We examined the association between primary care utilization and CRC screening, stage at diagnosis, CRC mortality, and all-cause mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients, aged 67 to 85 years, diagnosed as having CRC between 1994 and 2005 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare–linked database. Association of the number of visits to primary care physicians (PCPs) in the 3- to 27-month period before the CRC diagnosis and CRC screening, early-stage diagnosis, CRC mortality, and all-cause mortality were examined using multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. Results The odds of CRC screening and early-stage diagnosis increased with increasing number of PCP visits (P<.001 for trend). Compared with persons having 0 or 1 PCP visit, patients with 5 to 10 visits had increased odds of ever receiving CRC screening at least 3 months before diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio, 2.60; 95% CI, 2.48-2.72) and early-stage diagnosis (1.35; 1.29-1.42). Persons with 5 to 10 visits had 16% lower CRC mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.80-0.88) and 6% lower all-cause mortality (0.94; 0.91-0.97) compared with persons with 0 or 1 visit. Conclusions Medicare beneficiaries with CRC have better outcomes if they have greater utilization of primary care before diagnosis. Revitalization of primary care in the United States may help strengthen the national efforts to reduce the burden of CRC. PMID:22025432

  9. Inpatient Utilization and Costs for Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Kathryn; Pelizzari, Pamela M.; Pyenson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the medical and economic burden of heart failure in the United States is already substantial, it will likely grow as the population ages and life expectancy increases. Not surprisingly, most of the heart failure burden is borne by individuals aged ≥65 years, many of whom are in the Medicare population. The population-based utilization and costs of inpatient care for Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure are not well understood by payers and providers. Objective To create a real-world view of utilization and costs associated with inpatient admissions, readmissions, and admissions to skilled nursing facilities among Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries with heart failure. Methods The study used the 2011 and 2012 Medicare 5% sample limited data set to perform a retrospective analysis of claims data. The look-back year that was used to identify certain patient characteristics was 2011, and 2012 was the analysis period for the study. Beneficiaries with heart failure were defined as those who had ≥1 acute inpatient, emergency department, nonacute inpatient, or outpatient claims in 2012 containing an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for heart failure. To be included in the study, beneficiaries with heart failure had to have eligibility for ≥1 months in 2012 and in all 2011 months, with Part A and Part B eligibility in all the study months, and no enrollment in an HMO (Medicare Advantage plan). Utilization of inpatient admissions, inpatient readmissions, and skilled nursing facility admissions in 2012 were reported for Medicare FFS beneficiaries with heart failure and for all Medicare FFS beneficiaries. The costs for key metrics included all allowed Medicare payments in 2012 US dollars. Results The 2012 Medicare FFS population for this study consisted of 1,461,935 patients (1,301,545 without heart failure; 160,390 with heart failure); the heart failure prevalence was 11%. The Medicare-allowed cost per

  10. The private health insurance choices of medicare beneficiaries: how much does price matter?

    PubMed

    Rice, Thomas; Jacobson, Gretchen; Cubanski, Juliette; Neuman, Tricia

    2014-12-01

    This article presents, critiques, and analyzes the influence of prices on insurance choices made by Medicare beneficiaries in the Medicare Advantage, Part D, and Medigap markets. We define price as health insurance premiums for the Medicare Advantage and Medigap markets, and total out-of-pocket costs (including premiums and cost sharing) for the Part D market. In Medicare Advantage and Part D, prices only partly explain insurance choices. Enrollment decisions also may be influenced by other factors such as the perceived quality of the higher-premium plans, better provider networks, lower cost-sharing for services, more generous benefits, and a preference for certain brand-name products. In contrast, the one study available on the Medigap market concludes that price appears to be associated with plan selection. This may be because Medigap benefits are fully standardized, making it easier for beneficiaries to compare alternative policies. The article concludes by discussing policy options available to Medicare. PMID:25371217

  11. Hospital Choice of Rural Medicare Beneficiaries: Patient, Hospital Attributes, and the Patient–Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wan-Tzu Connie; Porell, Frank W; Adams, E Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine how patient and hospital attributes and the patient–physician relationship influence hospital choice of rural Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Provider of Services (POS) file, American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and Medicare Hospital Service Area (HSA) files for 1994 and 1995. Study Design The study sample consisted of 1,702 hospitalizations of rural Medicare beneficiaries. McFadden's conditional logit model was used to analyze hospital choices of rural Medicare beneficiaries. The model included independent variables to control for patients' and hospitals' attributes and the distance to hospital alternatives. Principal Findings The empirical results show strong preferences of aged patients for closer hospitals and those of greater scale and service capacity. Patients with complex acute medical conditions and those with more resources were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospitals. Beneficiaries were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospital if they had no regular physician, had a shorter patient–physician tie, were dissatisfied with the availability of health care, and had a longer travel time to their physician's office. Conclusions The significant influences of patients' socioeconomic, health, and functional status, their satisfaction with and access to primary care, and their strong preferences for certain hospital attributes should inform federal program initiatives about the likely impacts of policy changes on hospital bypassing behavior. PMID:15533193

  12. 42 CFR 419.41 - Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. 419.41 Section 419.41 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM... Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. (a)...

  13. 42 CFR 419.41 - Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. 419.41 Section 419.41 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM... § 419.41 Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program...

  14. 42 CFR 419.41 - Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. 419.41 Section 419.41 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM... Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. (a)...

  15. 42 CFR 419.41 - Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. 419.41 Section 419.41 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM... § 419.41 Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program...

  16. 42 CFR 419.41 - Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... amounts and national Medicare program payment amounts. 419.41 Section 419.41 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM... § 419.41 Calculation of national beneficiary copayment amounts and national Medicare program...

  17. Psychometric properties of an instrument to assess Medicare beneficiaries' prescription drug plan experiences.

    PubMed

    Martino, Steven C; Elliott, Marc N; Cleary, Paul D; Kanouse, David E; Brown, Julie A; Spritzer, Karen L; Heller, Amy; Hays, Ron D

    2009-01-01

    Using data from 335,249 Medicare beneficiaries who responded to the 2007 Medicare Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey, along with data from 22 cognitive interviews, we investigated the reliability and validity of an instrument designed to assess beneficiaries' experiences with their prescription drug plans. Composite measures derived from the instrument had acceptable internal consistency and sufficient plan-level reliability to inform consumer choice, quality improvement, and payor oversight. These measures were positively associated with members' overall rating of the plan and their willingness to recommend the plan. Moreover, each was independently useful in predicting beneficiaries' global ratings of their plan. This instrument can be an important tool for helping beneficiaries to choose a plan that best meets their needs. PMID:19544934

  18. Following the Money: Factors Associated with the Cost of Treating High-Cost Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Reschovsky, James D; Hadley, Jack; Saiontz-Martinez, Cynthia B; Boukus, Ellyn R

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with the cost of treating high-cost Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources A national sample of 1.6 million elderly, Medicare beneficiaries linked to 2004–2005 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey respondents and local market data from secondary sources. Study Design Using 12 months of claims data from 2005 to 2006, the sample was divided into predicted high-cost (top quartile) and lower cost beneficiaries using a risk-adjustment model. For each group, total annual standardized costs of care were regressed on beneficiary, usual source of care physician, practice, and market characteristics. Principal Findings Among high-cost beneficiaries, health was the predominant predictor of costs, with most physician and practice and many market factors (including provider supply) insignificant or weakly related to cost. Beneficiaries whose usual physician was a medical specialist or reported inadequate office visit time, medical specialist supply, provider for-profit status, care fragmentation, and Medicare fees were associated with higher costs. Conclusions Health reform policies currently envisioned to improve care and lower costs may have small effects on high-cost patients who consume most resources. Instead, developing interventions tailored to improve care and lowering cost for specific types of complex and costly patients may hold greater potential for “bending the cost curve.” PMID:21306368

  19. Access to Oral Osteoporosis Drugs among Female Medicare Part D Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; McCullough, Jeffrey S.; Weaver, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Background For women living with osteoporosis, high out-of-pocket drug costs may prevent drug therapy initiation. We investigate the association between oral osteoporosis out-of-pocket medication costs and female Medicare beneficiaries’ initiation of osteoporosis drug therapy. Methods We used 2007 and 2008 administrative claims and enrollment data for a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Our study sample included age-qualified, female beneficiaries who had no prior history of osteoporosis but were diagnosed with osteoporosis in 2007 or 2008. Additionally, we only included beneficiaries continuously enrolled in standalone prescription drug plans. We excluded beneficiaries who had a chronic condition that was contraindicated with osteoporosis drug utilization. Our final sample included 25,069 beneficiaries. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between the out-of-pocket costs and initiation of oral osteoporosis drug therapy during the year of diagnosis. Findings Twenty-six percent of female Medicare beneficiaries newly diagnosed with osteoporosis initiated oral osteoporosis drug therapy. Beneficiaries’ out-of-pocket costs were not associated with the initiation of drug therapy for osteoporosis. However, there were statistically significant racial disparities in beneficiaries’ initiation of drug therapy. African Americans were 3 percentage points less likely to initiate drug therapy than whites. In contrast, Asian/Pacific Islander and Hispanic beneficiaries were 8 and 18 percentage points respectively more likely to initiate drug therapy than whites. Additionally, institutionalized beneficiaries were 11 percentage points less likely to initiate drug therapy than other beneficiaries. Conclusions Access barriers for drug therapy initiation may be driven by factors other than patients’ out-of-pocket costs. These results suggest that improved osteoporosis treatment requires a more comprehensive approach that goes beyond payment

  20. Chiropractic Use and Changes in Health among Older Medicare Beneficiaries: A Comparative Effectiveness Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Paula Anne; Hockenberry, Jason; Bentler, Suzanne; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chiropractic on five outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries: increased difficulties performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and Lower Body Functions, as well as lower self-rated health and increased depressive symptoms. Methods Among all beneficiaries, we estimated the effect of chiropractic use on changes in health outcomes among those who used chiropractic compared to those who did not, and among beneficiaries with back conditions we estimated the effect of chiropractic use relative to medical care, both over a 2–15 year period. Two analytic approaches were used—one assumed no selection bias, while the other adjusted for potential selection bias using propensity score methods. Results Among all beneficiaries, propensity score analyses indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, and depressive symptoms, although there were increased risks associated with chiropractic for declines in lower body function and self-rated health. Propensity score analyses among beneficiaries with back conditions indicated that chiropractic use led to comparable outcomes for ADLs, IADLs, lower body function, and depressive symptoms, although there was an increased risk associated with chiropractic use for declines in self-rated health. Conclusion The evidence in this study suggests that chiropractic treatment has comparable effects on functional outcomes when compared to medical treatment for all Medicare beneficiaries, but increased risk for declines in self-rated health among beneficiaries with back conditions. PMID:24144425

  1. Simulated Value Based Insurance Design Applied to Statin Use by Medicare Beneficiaries with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, Amy; Lopert, Ruth; Stuart, Bruce; Shaffer, Thomas; Lloyd, Jennifer; Shoemaker, J. Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine cost responsiveness and total costs associated with a simulated “value based” insurance design (VBID) for statin therapy in a Medicare population with diabetes. Methods Four-year panels constructed from the 1997–2005 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey selected by self-report or claims-based diagnoses of diabetes in Year 1, and use of statins in Year 2 (N= 899). We computed number of 30-day statin prescription fills, out-of-pocket (OOP) and third party drug costs, and Medicare Part A and B spending. Methods Multivariate ordinary least squares regression models predicted statins fills as a function of OOP costs, and a generalized linear model with log link predicted Medicare spending as a function of number of fills, controlling for baseline characteristics. Estimated coefficients were used to simulate changes in fills associated with copayment caps from $25 to $1, and to compute changes in 3rd-party payments and Medicare cost offsets associated with incremental fills. Analyses were stratified by patient cardiovascular event risk. Results A simulated OOP price of $25[$1] increased plan drug spending by $340[$794], and generated Medicare Part A/B savings of $262[$531]. Medicare Part A/B savings were greater for higher risk patients, generating a net savings for the plans. Conclusions Reducing statin copayments for Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes resulted in modestly increased use, and reduced medical spending. The VBID simulation strategy met financial feasibility criteria, but only for higher risk patients. PMID:22583449

  2. Massachusetts Coverage Expansion Associated with Reduction in Primary Care Utilization among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Amelia M; White, Chapin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether expanding coverage for the nonelderly affects primary care utilization among Medicare beneficiaries. Data Source. Zip code–level files from Dartmouth Atlas for Massachusetts and surrounding states, including Medicare utilization for 2005 (pre expansion) and 2007 (post expansion), and health insurance coverage for 2005. Study Design. We use two zip code–level outcomes: arc percent change in primary care visits per Medicare beneficiary per year, and percentage point change in the share of beneficiaries with one or more primary care visits. We use a regression-based difference-in-difference analysis that compares Massachusetts with surrounding states, and zip codes with high, medium, and low uninsurance rates in 2005. The 2005 uninsurance rates correspond to the size of Massachusetts' coverage expansion. We use propensity scores for identification of comparable zip codes and for weighting. Principal Findings. In areas of Massachusetts with the highest uninsurance rates—where insurance expansion had the largest impact—visits per beneficiary fell 6.9 percent (p < .001) relative to areas of Massachusetts with the smallest uninsurance rates. Conclusions. The expansion of coverage for the nonelderly reduced primary care visits, but it did not reduce the percent of beneficiaries with at least one visit. These results could imply restricted access, increased efficiency, or some blend. PMID:24117239

  3. Is There Disparity in Physician Service Use? A Comparison of Hispanic and White Medicare Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Mei

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates general physician service use by a national sample of non-Hispanic white and Hispanic Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older. Using the health behavior model as the conceptual framework, Oaxaca decomposition multivariate analyses were conducted to examine predictors for contact with a physician and the number of…

  4. Health and Health Care of Medicare Beneficiaries in 2030

    PubMed Central

    Gaudette, Étienne; Tysinger, Bryan; Cassil, Alwyn; Goldman, Dana P.

    2016-01-01

    On Medicare’s 50th anniversary, we use the Future Elderly Model (FEM) – a microsimulation model of health and economic outcomes for older Americans – to generate a snapshot of changing Medicare demographics and spending between 2010 and 2030. During this period, the baby boomers, who began turning 65 and aging into Medicare in 2011, will drive Medicare demographic changes, swelling the estimated US population aged 65 or older from 39.7 million to 67.0 million. Among the risks for Medicare sustainability, the size of the elderly population in the future likely will have the highest impact on spending but is easiest to forecast. Population health and the proportion of the future elderly with disabilities are more uncertain, though tools such as the FEM can provide reasonable forecasts to guide policymakers. Finally, medical technology breakthroughs and their effect on longevity are most uncertain and perhaps riskiest. Policymakers will need to keep these risks in mind if Medicare is to be sustained for another 50 years. Policymakers may also want to monitor the equity of Medicare financing amid signs that the program’s progressivity is declining, resulting in higher-income people benefiting relatively more from Medicare than lower-income people. PMID:27127455

  5. Medicare Accountable Care Organizations: program eligibility, beneficiary assignment, and quality measures.

    PubMed

    MacKinney, A Clinton; Mueller, Keith J; Zhu, Xi; Vaughn, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are groups of providers (generally physicians and/or hospitals) that may receive financial rewards by maintaining or improving care quality for a group of patients while reducing the cost of care for those patients. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) established a Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) and accompanying Medicare ACOs to “facilitate coordination and cooperation among providers to improve the quality of care for Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries and reduce unnecessary costs.” The MSSP now includes 343 ACOs; an additional 23 ACOs participate in the Medicare Pioneer ACO demonstration program, and there are approximately 240 private ACOs. Based on our analysis, among the Medicare ACOs 119 operate in both rural and urban counties and seven operate exclusively in rural counties. A little over 24 percent of non-metropolitan counties are included in Medicare ACOs. To assist rural providers considering ACO formation, this policy brief describes MSSP eligibility and participation requirements, beneficiary assignment processes, and quality measures. PMID:25399468

  6. Hospital choice by rural medicare beneficiaries: does hospital ownership matter?--a Colorado case.

    PubMed

    Roh, Chul-Young; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2006-01-01

    About 45 percent of rural patients in Colorado bypassed their local rural hospitals during the 1990s. The effect of this phenomenon is a reduction in occupancy rates and a decrease in the competitiveness of rural hospitals, thereby ultimately causing rural hospitals to close and adversely affecting the communities that they were designed to serve. This study tests whether hospital ownership affects hospital choice by patients after controlling for institutional and individual dimensions. A conditional logistic regression is used to analyze Colorado Inpatient Discharge Data (CIDD) on 85,529 patients in addition to hospital data. Rural Medicare beneficiaries are influenced to choose a particular hospital by a combination of hospital characteristics (the number of beds, the number of services, accreditation, ownership type, and distance from patient residence) and patient characteristics (medical condition, age, gender, race, and total charge for services). Increasing rural hospitals' survivability, collaborating with other rural hospitals, expanding the number of available services, making strategic alliance with other providers are possible strategies that may help ward off encroachment by urban competitors. PMID:16583743

  7. Geographic Access to Health Care for Rural Medicare Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Leighton; Hart, L. Gary; Goodman, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Patients in rural areas may use less medical care than those living in urban areas. This could be due to differences in travel distance and time and a utilization of a different mix of generalists and specialists for their care. Purpose: To compare the travel times, distances, and physician specialty mix of all Medicare patients living in…

  8. Reducing cancer screening disparities in medicare beneficiaries through cancer patient navigation.

    PubMed

    Braun, Kathryn L; Thomas, William L; Domingo, Jermy-Leigh B; Allison, Amanda L; Ponce, Avette; Haunani Kamakana, P; Brazzel, Sandra S; Emmett Aluli, N; Tsark, JoAnn U

    2015-02-01

    Significant racial disparities in cancer mortality are seen between Medicare beneficiaries. A randomized controlled trial tested the use of lay navigators (care managers) to increase cancer screening of Asian and Pacific Islander Medicare beneficiaries. The study setting was Moloka'i General Hospital on the island of Moloka'i, Hawai'i, which was one of six sites participating in the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Demonstration sponsored by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Between 2006 and 2009, 488 Medicare beneficiaries (45% Hawaiian, 35% Filipino, 11% Japanese, 8% other) were randomized to have a navigator help them access cancer screening services (experimental condition, n = 242) or cancer education (control condition, n = 246). Self-reported data on screening participation were collected at baseline and exit from the study, and differences were tested using chi-square. Groups were similar in demographic characteristics and baseline screening prevalence of breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancers. At study exit, 57.0% of women in the experimental arm and 36.4% of controls had had a Papanicolaou test in the past 24 months (P = .001), 61.7% of women in the experimental arm and 42.4% of controls had had a mammogram in the past 12 months (P = .003), 54.4% of men in the experimental arm and 36.0% of controls had had a prostate-specific antigen test in the past 12 months (P = .008), and 43.0% of both sexes in the experimental arm and 27.2% of controls had had a flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in the past 5 years (P < .001). Findings suggest that navigation services can increase cancer screening in Medicare beneficiaries in groups with significant disparities. PMID:25640884

  9. Factors affecting interstate use of inpatient care by Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Buczko, W

    1992-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which interstate inflow and outflow of patients affects their observed use of Medicare Part A inpatient care. Interstate patient flow can bias utilization rates and may be due to seasonal migration, interstate inpatient care market areas, or purposive seeking of specialized/high-quality care. Examination of state level patient flow data drawn from 1987 Medicare discharge indicate that most interstate patient flow occurs between adjacent states probably as an outgrowth of interstate markets. Regression analyses of patient flow data suggest that while seasonal migration is an important determinant of patient flow, its importance is secondary to that of indicators of the availability of specialized services. These findings suggest research questions that may be best answered in detailed analyses of inpatient utilization in interstate market areas and seasonal migration. PMID:1500288

  10. How prevalent and costly are Choosing Wisely low-value services? Evidence from Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Collado, Megan

    2014-10-01

    (1) Through the Choosing Wisely initiative, medical specialty societies identified non-indicated cardiac testing in low-risk patients and short-interval dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or bone density testing as low-value care. (2) Nationally, 13 percent of low-risk Medicare beneficiaries received non-indicated cardiac tests, and 10 percent of DXAs reimbursed by Medicare were administered at inappropriately short intervals. There is significant geographic variation in the provision of these services. (2) Carefully designed policy and payment changes will likely prove most effective in reducing low-value care. PMID:25330546

  11. Functional health outcomes as a measure of health care quality for Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Bierman, A S; Lawrence, W F; Haffer, S C; Clancy, C M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS), a new quality measure in the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set, is designed to assess physical and mental functional health outcomes of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare+Choice organizations. We discuss the rationale for the HOS measure together with methodologic challenges in its use and interpretation, using descriptive data from the baseline Medicare HOS to illustrate some of these challenges. DATA SOURCES/STUDY DESIGN: The 1999 Cohort 2 Medicare HOS baseline data were used for a cross-sectional descriptive analysis. A random sample of 1,000 beneficiaries from each health plan with a Medicare+Choice contract was surveyed (N = 156,842; 282 organizations included in these analyses) . PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The HOS measure is designed to assess a previously unmeasured dimension of quality. Plan-level variation was seen across all baseline measures of sociodemographic characteristics and illness burden. At the individual level socioeconomic position as measured by educational attainment was strongly associated with functional status. The least educated beneficiaries had the highest burden of illness on all measures examined, and there was a consistent and significant gradient in health and functional status across all levels of education. In analyses stratified by race and ethnicity, socioeconomic gradients in f un ct ion persist ed. CONCLUSIONS Despite limitations, by focusing at t en t ion on the need to improve functional health out comes among elderly Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare+Choice, the HOS can serve as an important new tool to support efforts to improve health care quality. The HOS provides valuable information at the federal, state, and health plan levels that can be used to identify, prioritize, and evaluate quality improvement interventions and monitor progress for the program overall as well as for vulnerable subgroups. To interpret the HOS as a quality measure

  12. Postdischarge Environmental and Socioeconomic Factors and the Likelihood of Early Hospital Readmission among Community-Dwelling Medicare Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbaje, Alicia I.; Wolff, Jennifer L.; Yu,Qilu; Powe, Neil R.; Anderson, Gerard F.; Boult, Chad

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to determine the associations between postdischarge environmental (PDE) and socioeconomic (SES) factors and early readmission to hospitals. Design and Methods: This study was a cohort study using the 2001 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey and Medicare claims for the period from 2001 to 2002. The participants were…

  13. Differences between generalists and mental health specialists in the psychiatric treatment of Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Ettner, S L; Hermann, R C; Tang, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine differences between the general medical and mental health specialty sectors in the expenditure and treatment patterns of aged and disabled Medicare beneficiaries with a physician diagnosis of psychiatric disorder. DATA SOURCES: Based on 1991-1993 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data, linked to the beneficiary's claims and area-level data on provider supply from the Area Resources File and the American Psychological Association. STUDY DESIGN: Outcomes examined included the number of psychiatric services received, psychiatric and total Medicare expenditures, the type of services received, whether or not the patient was hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder, the length of the psychiatric care episode, the intensity of service use, and satisfaction with care. We compared these outcomes for beneficiaries who did and did not receive mental health specialty services during the episode, using multiple regression analyses to adjust for observable population differences. We also performed sensitivity analyses using instrumental variables techniques to reduce the potential bias arising from unmeasured differences in patient case mix across sectors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Relative to beneficiaries treated only in the general medical sector, those seen by a mental health specialist had longer episodes of care, were more likely to receive services specific to psychiatry, and had greater psychiatric and total expenditures. Among the elderly persons, the higher costs were due to a combination of longer episodes and greater intensity; among the persons who were disabled, they were due primarily to longer episodes. Some evidence was also found of higher satisfaction with care among the disabled individuals treated in the specialty sector. However, evidence of differences in psychiatric hospitalization rates was weaker. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health care provided to Medicare beneficiaries in the general medical sector does not appear to substitute perfectly for

  14. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality for Medicare Beneficiaries Associated with a Commercial ACO Contract

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Landon, Bruce E.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Importance In a multi-payer system, new payment incentives implemented by one insurer for an accountable care organization (ACO) may affect spending and quality of care for another insurer’s enrollees served by the ACO. Such “spillover” effects reflect the extent of organizational efforts to reform care delivery and can contribute to the total impact of ACOs. Objective We examined whether the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) of Massachusetts’ Alternative Quality Contract (AQC), an early commercial ACO initiative associated with reduced spending and improved quality for BCBS enrollees, was also associated with changes in spending and quality for Medicare beneficiaries, who were not covered by the AQC. Design and Exposure Quasi-experimental comparisons from 2007–2010 of Medicare beneficiaries served by 11 provider organizations entering the AQC in 2009 or 2010 (intervention group) vs. beneficiaries served by other providers (control group). Using a difference-in-differences approach, we estimated changes in spending and quality for the intervention group in the first and second years of exposure to the AQC relative to concurrent changes for the control group. Regression and propensity-score methods were used to adjust for differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Participants and Setting Elderly fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries in Massachusetts (1,761,325 person-years). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was total quarterly medical spending per beneficiary. Secondary outcomes included spending by setting and type of service, 5 process measures of quality, potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and 30-day readmissions. Results Before entering the AQC, total quarterly spending for the intervention group was $150 (95% CI, $25–$274) higher than for the control group and rose at a similar rate. In year 2 of the intervention group’s exposure to the AQC, this difference was reduced to $51 (95% CI, −$109–$210; P=0

  15. Geographic Variation in the Use of Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Melissa A.; Walkey, Allan J.; Wallace, Erin R.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Curtis, Lesley H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is used increasingly in older patients, yet the risks and benefits are not completely understood. With such uncertainty, local medical opinion may influence catheter ablation use. Methods In a 100% sample of Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, we investigated variation in use by hospital referral region (HRR) for 20,176 catheter ablation procedures. Results Across 274 HRRs, median age was 71.2 years (interquartile range, 70.5-71.8), a median of 98% of patients were white, and a median of 39% of patients were women. The median age-standardized prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 77.1 (69.4-84.2) per 1000 beneficiaries; the median rate of catheter ablation was 3.5 (2.4-4.9) per 1000 beneficiaries. We found no significant associations between the rate of catheter ablation and prevalence of atrial fibrillation (P = 0.99), end-of-life Medicare expenditures per capita (P = 0.09), or concentration of cardiologists (P = 0.45), but a slight association with Medicare expenditures per capita (linear regression estimate, 0.016; 95% CI, 0.001-0.031; P = 0.04). Examined HRR characteristics explained only 2% of the variation in HRR-level rates of catheter ablation (model R2 = 0.016). Conclusion The rate of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in older patients was low, varied substantially by region, and was not associated with the prevalence of atrial fibrillation, the availability of cardiologists, or end-of-life resource use, and was only slightly associated with overall Medicare expenditures per capita. PMID:26027614

  16. BBA Impacts on Hospital Residents, Finances, and Medicare Subsidies

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry; Adamache, Walter; Drozd, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Concern over rapidly rising Medicare expenditures prompted Congress to pass the 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA) that included provisions reducing graduate medical education (GME) payments and capped the growth in residents for payment purposes. Using Medicare cost reports through 2001, we find that both actual and capped residents continued to grow post-BBA. While teaching hospital total margins declined, GME payment reductions of approximately 17 percent had minimal impact on revenue growth (-0.5 percent annually). Four years after BBA, residents remained a substantial line of business for nearly one-half of teaching hospitals with Medicare effective marginal subsidies exceeding resident stipends by nearly $50,000 on average. Coupled with an estimated replacement cost of over $100,000 per resident, it is not surprising that hospitals accepted nearly 4,000 residents beyond their allowable payment caps in just 4 years post-BBA. PMID:17290672

  17. Functional Limitations, Medication Support, and Responses to Drug Costs among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Christopher; Reed, Mary; Hsu, John; Fung, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Standard Medicare Part D prescription drug benefits include substantial and complex cost-sharing. Many beneficiaries also have functional limitations that could affect self-care capabilities, including managing medications, but also have varying levels of social support to help with these activities. We examined the associations between drug cost responses, functional limitations, and social support. Data Sources and Study Setting We conducted telephone interviews in a stratified random sample of community-dwelling Medicare Advantage beneficiaries (N = 1,201, response rate = 70.0%). Participants reported their functional status (i.e., difficulty with activities of daily living) and social support (i.e., receiving help with medications). Drug cost responses included cost-reducing behaviors, cost-related non-adherence, and financial stress. Study Design We used multivariate logistic regression to assess associations among functional status, help with medications, and drug cost responses, adjusting for patient characteristics. Principal Findings Respondents with multiple limitations who did not receive help with their medications were more likely to report cost-related non-adherence (OR = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2–8.5) and financial stress (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3–4.5) compared to subjects with fewer limitations and no help; however, those with multiple limitations and with medication help had similar odds of unfavorable cost responses as those with fewer limitations. Conclusion The majority of beneficiaries with functional limitations did not receive help with medications. Support with medication management for beneficiaries who have functional limitations could improve adherence and outcomes. PMID:26642195

  18. Variations in Colorectal Cancer Screening of Medicare Beneficiaries Served by Rural Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Thomas T. H.; Ortiz, Judith; Berzon, Rick; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    This study aims (1) to examine the trends and patterns of colorectal cancer screening (CCS) of Medicare beneficiaries in rural areas by state and year (before and after Affordable Care Act [ACA] enactment) and (2) to investigate the contextual, organizational, and aggregated patient characteristics influencing variations in care received by patients of rural health clinics (RHCs). The following 2 hypotheses were formulated: (1) CCS rates are higher in the post-ACA period than in the pre-ACA period, irrespective of the factors rurality, poverty, dually eligible status, and the organizational characteristics of RHCs and (2) the contextual and organizational factors of RHCs exert more influence on the variation in CCS rates of RHC patients than do aggregated personal factors. We used administrative data on CCS rates (2007 through 2012) for rural Medicare beneficiaries. Autoregressive growth curve modeling of the CCS rates was performed. A generalized estimating equation of selected predictors was analyzed. Of the 9 predictors, 5 were statistically significant: The ACA and the percentage of female patients had a positive effect on the CCS rate, whereas regional location, years of RHC certification, and average age of patients had a negative effect on the CCS rate. The predictors accounted for 40.2% of the total variance in CCS. Results show that in rural areas of 9 states, the enactment of ACA improved CCS rates, contextual, organizational, and patient characteristics being considered. Improvement in preventive care will be expected, as the ACA is implemented in the United States. PMID:27088120

  19. 30-Day Readmission Among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Steve; Wei, Wenhui; Bhattacharjee, Sandipan; Miao, Raymond; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study retrospectively assessed rates and risk factors for all-cause hospital readmission among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) aged ≥65 years. Associations between 30-day readmission and patients' demographic, insurance, index hospital, and clinical characteristics; patient complexities specific to the elderly; and health care utilization were examined using multivariable logistic regressions. Of 202,496 elderly Medicare beneficiaries, 52% were female, 76% were white, the mean age was 75.8 years, and 13.2% had all-cause 30-day readmissions. Elderly patients with cognitive impairment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.01–1.12), falls and falls risk (aOR=1.15, 95% CI=1.08–1.22), polypharmacy (aOR=1.20, 95% CI=1.14–1.27), and urinary incontinence (aOR=1.08, 95% CI=1.01–1.15) were at higher risk for all-cause 30-day readmission than their counterparts without these complexities. As elderly-specific complexities are associated with greater risk for readmission, intervention programs to reduce readmission risk among elderly patients with T2DM should be tailored to suit the needs of elderly patients with extensive complexities. (Population Health Management 2015;18:256–264) PMID:25608114

  20. 42 CFR 424.507 - Ordering covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Requirements for Establishing and Maintaining Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.507 Ordering covered items and... clinical laboratory services and items of durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies... otherwise permitted by State law, where the resident is enrolled in an approved graduate medical...

  1. 42 CFR 424.507 - Ordering covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Requirements for Establishing and Maintaining Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.507 Ordering covered items and... clinical laboratory services and items of durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies... otherwise permitted by State law, where the resident is enrolled in an approved graduate medical...

  2. 42 CFR 424.507 - Ordering covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Requirements for Establishing and Maintaining Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.507 Ordering covered items and... clinical laboratory services and items of durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies... otherwise permitted by State law, where the resident is enrolled in an approved graduate medical...

  3. Trends in Antihypertensive Medication Discontinuation and Low Adherence Among Medicare Beneficiaries Initiating Treatment From 2007 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Tajeu, Gabriel S; Kent, Shia T; Kronish, Ian M; Huang, Lei; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Bress, Adam P; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Low antihypertensive medication adherence is common. During recent years, the impact of low medication adherence on increased morbidity and healthcare costs has become more recognized, leading to interventions aimed at improving adherence. We analyzed a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries initiating antihypertensive medication between 2007 and 2012 to assess whether reductions occurred in discontinuation and low adherence. Discontinuation was defined as having no days of antihypertensive medication supply for the final 90 days of the 365 days after initiation. Low adherence was defined as having a proportion of days covered <80% during the 365 days after initiation among beneficiaries who did not discontinue treatment. Between 2007 and 2012, 41 135 Medicare beneficiaries in the 5% sample initiated antihypertensive medication. Discontinuation was stable during the study period (21.0% in 2007 and 21.3% in 2012; P-trend=0.451). Low adherence decreased from 37.4% in 2007 to 31.7% in 2012 (P-trend<0.001). After multivariable adjustment, the relative risk of low adherence for beneficiaries initiating treatment in 2012 versus in 2007 was 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.92). Low adherence was more common among racial/ethnic minorities, beneficiaries with Medicaid buy-in (an indicator of low income), and those with polypharmacy, and was less common among females, beneficiaries initiating antihypertensive medication with multiple classes or a 90-day prescription fill, with dementia, a history of stroke, and those who reached the Medicare Part D coverage gap in the previous year. In conclusion, low adherence to antihypertensive medication has decreased among Medicare beneficiaries; however, rates of discontinuation and low adherence remain high. PMID:27432867

  4. Is there any connection between a second pneumonia shot and hospitalization among Medicare beneficiaries?

    PubMed Central

    Snow, R; Babish, J D; McBean, A M

    1995-01-01

    To learn whether the risk of revaccination in adults should limit its use, the authors investigated whether adverse events requiring hospitalization occurred in a group of Medicare enrollees revaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. A prospective cohort analysis and case study of revaccinated people involved five percent of all elderly Medicare enrollees from 1985 through 1988, consisting of 66,256 people receiving one dose of vaccine and 1,099 receiving two doses. Comparison was made of the hospitalization rate within 30 days after revaccination and rates of singly vaccinated persons using discharge diagnosis for all those hospitalized during the 30 days after revaccination. No significant difference was found between the hospitalization rate of the revaccinated cohort and comparison group. No adverse reactions attributable to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine causing hospitalization were identified among 39 revaccinated persons who were hospitalized within 30 days of revaccination. Revaccination of elderly Medicare beneficiaries does not cause events serious enough to require hospitalization. Vaccination of persons according to the Public Health Service Immunization Practice Advisory Committee guidelines is recommended when the prior immunization status is unknown. PMID:8570826

  5. Medicare Beneficiaries Face Growing Out-Of-Pocket Burden For Specialty Drugs While In Catastrophic Coverage Phase.

    PubMed

    Trish, Erin; Xu, Jianhui; Joyce, Geoffrey

    2016-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes provisions to reduce Medicare beneficiaries' out-of-pocket spending for prescription drugs by gradually closing the coverage gap between the initial coverage limit and the catastrophic coverage threshold (known as the doughnut hole) beginning in 2011. However, Medicare beneficiaries who take specialty pharmaceuticals could still face a large out-of-pocket burden because of uncapped cost sharing in the catastrophic coverage phase. Using 2008-12 pharmacy claims data from a 20 percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries, we analyzed trends in total and out-of-pocket spending among Medicare beneficiaries who take at least one high-cost specialty drug from the top eight specialty drug classes in terms of spending. Annual total drug spending per specialty drug user studied increased considerably during the study period, from $18,335 to $33,301, and the proportion of expenditures incurred while in the catastrophic coverage phase increased from 70 percent to 80 percent. We observed a 26 percent decrease in mean annual out-of-pocket expenditures incurred below the catastrophic coverage threshold, likely attributable to the ACA's doughnut hole cost-sharing reductions, but increases in mean annual out-of-pocket expenditures incurred while in the catastrophic coverage phase offset these reductions almost entirely. Policy makers should consider implementing limits on patients' out-of-pocket burden. PMID:27605634

  6. Changes in Initial Treatment for Prostate Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, Michaela A.; Robinson, Timothy J.; Zagar, Timothy M.; Scales, Charles D.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Reed, Shelby D.; Lee, W. Robert; Schulman, Kevin A.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In the absence of evidence from large clinical trials, optimal therapy for localized prostate cancer remains unclear; however, treatment patterns continue to change. We examined changes in the management of patients with prostate cancer in the Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective claims-based analysis of the use of radiation therapy, surgery, and androgen deprivation therapy in the 12 months after diagnosis of prostate cancer in a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare claims. Patients were Medicare beneficiaries 67 years or older with incident prostate cancer diagnosed between 1999 and 2007. Results: There were 20,918 incident cases of prostate cancer between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy decreased from 55% to 36%, and the proportion of patients receiving no active therapy increased from 16% to 23%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the most common method of radiation therapy, accounting for 77% of external beam radiotherapy by 2007. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy began to replace open surgical approaches, being used in 49% of radical prostatectomies by 2007. Conclusions: Between 2002 and 2007, the use of androgen deprivation therapy decreased, open surgical approaches were largely replaced by minimally invasive radical prostatectomy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the predominant method of radiation therapy in the Medicare population. The aging of the population and the increasing use of newer, higher-cost technologies in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer may have important implications for nationwide health care costs.

  7. Changes in Initial Treatment for Prostate Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999-2007

    PubMed Central

    Dinan, Michaela A.; Robinson, Timothy J.; Zagar, Timothy M.; Scales, Charles D.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Reed, Shelby D.; Robert Lee, W.; Schulman, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In the absence of evidence from large clinical trials, optimal therapy for localized prostate cancer remains unclear; however, treatment patterns continue to change. We examined changes in the management of patients with prostate cancer in the Medicare population. Methods and Materials We conducted a retrospective claims-based analysis of the use of radiation therapy, surgery, and androgen deprivation therapy in the 12 months after diagnosis of prostate cancer in a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare claims. Patients were Medicare beneficiaries 67 years or older with incident prostate cancer diagnosed between 1999 and 2007. Results There were 20,918 incident cases of prostate cancer between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy decreased from 55% to 36%, and the proportion of patients receiving no active therapy increased from 16% to 23%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the most common method of radiation therapy, accounting for 77% of external beam radiotherapy by 2007. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy began to replace open surgical approaches, being used in 49% of radical prostatectomies by 2007. Conclusions Between 2002 and 2007, the use of androgen deprivation therapy decreased, open surgical approaches were largely replaced by minimally invasive radical prostatectomy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the predominant method of radiation therapy in the Medicare population. The aging of the population and the increasing use of newer, higher-cost technologies in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer may have important implications for nationwide health care costs. PMID:22331001

  8. Regional Variation in Use of a New Class of Antidiabetic Medication Among Medicare Beneficiaries: The Case of Incretin Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Marcum, Zachary A.; Driessen, Julia; Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Donohue, Julie M.; Gellad, Walid F.

    2016-01-01

    Background When incretin mimetic (IM) medications were introduced in 2005, their effectiveness compared other less-expensive second-line diabetes therapies was unknown, especially for older adults. Physicians likely had uncertainty about the role of IMs in the diabetes treatment armamentarium. Regional variation in uptake of IMs may be marker of such uncertainty. Objective To investigate the extent of regional variation in the use of IMs among beneficiaries and estimate the cost implications for Medicare. Methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of 2009–2010 claims from a nationally representative sample of 238 499 Medicare Part D beneficiaries aged ≥65 years, who were continuously enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare and Part D and filled ≥1 antidiabetic prescription. Beneficiaries were assigned to 1 306 hospital-referral regions (HRRs) using ZIP codes. The main outcome was adjusted proportion of antidiabetic users an HRR receiving an IM. Results Overall, 29 933 beneficiaries (12.6%) filled an IM prescription, including 26 939 (11. for sitagliptin or saxagliptin and 3718 (1.6%) for exenatide or liraglutide. The adjusted proportion of beneficiaries using varied more than 3-fold across HRRs, from 5th and 95th percentiles of 5.2% to 17.0%. Compared with non-IM users, users faced a 155% higher annual Part D plan ($1067 vs $418) and 144% higher patient ($369 vs $151) costs for antidiabetic prescriptions. Conclusion Among older Part D beneficiaries using antidiabetic drugs, substantial regional variation in the use of IMs, not accounted for by sociodemographics and health status. IM use was associated with substantially greater costs for Part D plans and beneficiaries. PMID:25515869

  9. Patient-Centered Medical Home Features and Health Care Expenditures of Medicare Beneficiaries with Chronic Disease Dyads.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Lindsey M; Stockbridge, Erica L; Padrón, Norma A; Pagán, José A

    2016-06-01

    Three out of 4 Medicare beneficiaries have multiple chronic conditions, and managing the care of this growing population can be complex and costly because of care coordination challenges. This study assesses how different elements of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model may impact the health care expenditures of Medicare beneficiaries with the most prevalent chronic disease dyads (ie, co-occurring high cholesterol and high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart disease, high cholesterol and diabetes, high cholesterol and arthritis, heart disease and high blood pressure). Data from the 2007-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey suggest that increased access to PCMH features may differentially impact the distribution of health care expenditures across health care service categories depending on the combination of chronic conditions experienced by each beneficiary. For example, having no difficulty contacting a provider after regular hours was associated with significantly lower outpatient expenditures for beneficiaries with high cholesterol and diabetes (n = 635; P = 0.038), but it was associated with significantly higher inpatient expenditures for beneficiaries with high blood pressure and high cholesterol (n = 1599; P = 0.015), and no significant differences in expenditures in any category for beneficiaries with high blood pressure and heart disease (n = 1018; P > 0.05 for all categories). However, average total health care expenditures are largely unaffected by implementing the PCMH features considered. Understanding how the needs of Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions can be met through the adoption of the PCMH model is important not only to be able to provide high-quality care but also to control costs. (Population Health Management 2016;19:206-211). PMID:26440215

  10. Patterns and predictors of osteoporosis medication discontinuation and switching among Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low adherence to bisphosphonate therapy is associated with increased fracture risk. Factors associated with discontinuation of osteoporosis medications have not been studied in-depth. This study assessed medication discontinuation and switching patterns among Medicare beneficiaries who were new users of bisphosphonates and evaluated factors possibly associated with discontinuation. Methods We identified patients initiating bisphosphonate treatment using a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries with at least 24 months of traditional fee-for-service and part D drug coverage from 2006 through 2009. We classified medication status at the end of follow-up as: continued original bisphosphonate, discontinued without switching or restarting, restarted the same drug after a treatment gap (≥ 90 days), or switched to another anti-osteoporosis medication. We conducted logistic regression analyses to identify baseline characteristics associated with discontinuation and a case-crossover analysis to identify factors that precipitate discontinuation. Results Of 21,452 new users followed respectively for 12 months, 44% continued their original therapy, 36% discontinued without switching or restarting, 8% restarted the same drug after a gap greater than 90 days, and 11% switched to another anti-osteoporosis medication. Factors assessed during the 12-month period before initiation were weakly associated with discontinuation. Several Factors measured during follow-up were associated with discontinuation, including more physician visits, hospitalization, having a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry test, higher Charlson comorbidity index scores, higher out-of-pocket drug payments, and upper gastrointestinal problems. Patterns were similar for 4,738 new users followed for 30 months. Conclusions Among new bisphosphonates users, switching within and across drug classes and extended treatment gaps are common. Robust definitions and time-varying considerations should be

  11. Metal Emissions and Urban Incident Parkinson Disease: A Community Health Study of Medicare Beneficiaries by Using Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Allison W.; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Lian, Min; Galarza, Aiden; Wegrzyn, Andrew; Schootman, Mario; Racette, Brad A.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease associated with farming and exposure to agricultural chemicals has been reported in numerous studies; little is known about Parkinson disease risk factors for those living in urban areas. The authors investigated the relation between copper, lead, or manganese emissions and Parkinson disease incidence in the urban United States, studying 29 million Medicare beneficiaries in the year 2003. Parkinson disease incidence was determined by using beneficiaries who had not changed residence since 1995. Over 35,000 nonmobile incident Parkinson disease cases, diagnosed by a neurologist, were identified for analysis. Age-, race-, and sex-standardized Parkinson disease incidence was compared between counties with high cumulative industrial release of copper, manganese, or lead (as reported to the Environmental Protection Agency) and counties with no/low reported release of all 3 metals. Parkinson disease incidence (per 100,000) in counties with no/low copper/lead/manganese release was 274.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 226.8, 353.5). Incidence was greater in counties with high manganese release: 489.4 (95% CI: 368.3, 689.5) (relative risk = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.54, 2.07) and counties with high copper release: 304.2 (95% CI: 276.0, 336.8) (relative risk = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.31). Urban Parkinson disease incidence is greater in counties with high reported industrial release of copper or manganese. Environmental exposure to metals may be a risk factor for Parkinson disease in urban areas. PMID:20959505

  12. Factors Associated with Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Use among Medicare Beneficiaries with Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Louise M; Weiss, Julie; Hubbard, Rebecca A; O'Donoghue, Cristina; DeMartini, Wendy B; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Goodrich, Martha; Virnig, Beth; Tosteson, Anna N A; Lehman, Constance D; Onega, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) use among Medicare beneficiaries with breast cancer has substantially increased from 2005 to 2009. We sought to identify factors associated with preoperative breast MRI use among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or stage I-III invasive breast cancer (IBC). Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare data from 2005 to 2009 we identified women ages 66 and older with DCIS or stage I-III IBC who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. We compared preoperative breast MRI use by patient, tumor and hospital characteristics stratified by DCIS and IBC using multivariable logistic regression. From 2005 to 2009, preoperative breast MRI use increased from 5.9% to 22.4% of women diagnosed with DCIS and 7.0% to 24.3% of women diagnosed with IBC. Preoperative breast MRI use was more common among women who were younger, married, lived in higher median income zip codes and had no comorbidities. Among women with IBC, those with lobular disease, smaller tumors (<1 cm) and those with estrogen receptor negative tumors were more likely to receive preoperative breast MRI. Women with DCIS were more likely to receive preoperative MRI if tumors were larger (>2 cm). The likelihood of receiving preoperative breast MRI is similar for women diagnosed with DCIS and IBC. Use of MRI is more common in women with IBC for tumors that are lobular and smaller while for DCIS MRI is used for evaluation of larger lesions. PMID:26511204

  13. The importance of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography for Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Wood, Douglas E

    2014-12-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial has provided convincing evidence of a substantial mortality benefit of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) for current and former smokers at high risk. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended screening, triggering coverage of low-dose CT by private health insurers under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are currently evaluating coverage of lung cancer screening for Medicare beneficiaries. Since 70% of lung cancer occurs in patients 65 years or older, CMS should cover low-dose CT, thus avoiding the situation of at-risk patients being screened up to age 64 through private insurers and then abruptly ceasing screening at exactly the ages when their risk for developing lung cancer is increasing. Legitimate concerns include false-positive findings that lead to further testing and invasive procedures, overdiagnosis (detection of clinically unimportant cancers), the morbidity and mortality of surgery, and the overall costs of follow-up tests and procedures. These concerns can be mitigated by clear criteria for screening high-risk patients, disciplined management of abnormalities based on algorithms, and high-quality multidisciplinary care. Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT can lead to early diagnosis and cure for thousands of patients each year. Professional societies can help CMS responsibly implement a program that is patient-centered and minimizes unintended harms and costs. PMID:25317992

  14. Antihypertensive Medication Classes Used among Medicare Beneficiaries Initiating Treatment in 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Shia T.; Shimbo, Daichi; Huang, Lei; Diaz, Keith M.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Oparil, Suzanne; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background After the 2003 publication of the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) guidelines, there was a 5–10% increase in patients initiating antihypertensive medication with a thiazide-type diuretic, but most patients still did not initiate treatment with this class. There are few contemporary published data on antihypertensive medication classes filled by patients initiating treatment. Methods and Findings We used the 5% random Medicare sample to study the initiation of antihypertensive medication between 2007 and 2010. Initiation was defined by the first antihypertensive medication fill preceded by 365 days with no antihypertensive medication fills. We restricted our analysis to beneficiaries ≥65 years who had two or more outpatient visits with a hypertension diagnosis and full Medicare fee-for-service coverage for the 365 days prior to initiation of antihypertensive medication. Between 2007 and 2010, 32,142 beneficiaries in the 5% Medicare sample initiated antihypertensive medication. Initiation with a thiazide-type diuretic decreased from 19.2% in 2007 to 17.9% in 2010. No other changes in medication classes initiated occurred over this period. Among those initiating antihypertensive medication in 2010, 31.3% filled angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), 26.9% filled beta blockers, 17.2% filled calcium channel blockers, and 14.4% filled angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Initiation with >1 antihypertensive medication class decreased from 25.6% in 2007 to 24.1% in 2010. Patients initiated >1 antihypertensive medication class most commonly with a thiazide-type diuretic and either an ACE-I or ARB. Conclusion These results suggest that JNC 7 had a limited long-term impact on the choice of antihypertensive medication class and provide baseline data prior to the publication of the 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in

  15. Positron emission tomography for initial staging of esophageal cancer among medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Flanagan, Meghan R.; Flum, David R.; Shankaran, Veena; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Mulligan, Michael S.; Wood, Douglas E.; Pellegrini, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of positron emission tomography (PET) in the initial staging of esophageal cancer is to detect occult metastases, but its ability to do so has not been evaluated at the population-level. In 2001, Medicare approved reimbursement of PET for esophageal cancer staging. We hypothesized rapid adoption of PET after 2001 and a coincident increase in the prevalence of stage IV disease. Methods A retrospective cohort study [1997-2009] was conducted of 12,870 Medicare beneficiaries with esophageal cancer using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database. Results PET use increased from <3% before 2001 to 44% in 2009 (post-PET era) (P trend <0.001). Over the same period, the prevalence of stage IV disease also increased (20% in 1997 and 28% in 2009, P trend <0.001). After adjusting for changing patient characteristics over time, the rate of increase in stage IV disease in the post-PET era [relative risk (RR) =1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.13] was no different than the rate of increase in the pre-PET era (RR =1.02; 95% CI, 1.02-1.04). Over the entire study period, the prevalence of unrecorded stage decreased by more than half (43% to 18%, adjusted P trend <0.001) with coincident increases in stage 0-III (37% to 53%, adjusted P trend <0.001) as well as stage IV disease. Conclusions The increasing frequency of PET use and stage IV disease over time is more likely explained by improved documentation rather than PET’s ability to detect occult metastases. The absence of compelling population-level impact compliments previous studies, revealing an opportunity to increase value through selective use of PET. PMID:27284472

  16. Use of statins by medicare beneficiaries post myocardial infarction: poor physician quality or patient-centered care?

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Mary C; Robinson, Jennifer G; Chapman, Cole G; Brooks, John M

    2015-01-01

    Even though guidelines strongly recommend that patients receive a statin for secondary prevention after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), many elderly patients do not fill a statin prescription within 30 days of discharge. This paper assesses whether patterns of statin use by Medicare beneficiaries post-discharge may be due to a mix of high-quality and low-quality physicians. Our data come from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Chronic Condition Data Warehouse (CCW) and include 100% of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for an acute myocardial infarction in 2008 or 2009. Our study sample included physicians treating at least 10 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries during their MI institutional stay. Physician-specific statin fill rates (the proportion of each physician's patients with a statin within 30 days post-discharge) were calculated to assess physician quality. We hypothesized that if the observed statin rates reflected a mix of high-quality and low-quality physicians, then physician-specific statin fill rates should follow a u-shaped or bimodal distribution. In our sample, 62% of patients filled a statin prescription within 30 days of discharge. We found that the distribution of statin fill rates across physicians was normal, with no clear distinctions in physician quality. Physicians, especially cardiologists, with relatively younger and healthier patient populations had higher rates of statin use. Our results suggest that physicians were engaging in patient-centered care, tailoring treatments to patient characteristics. PMID:25724749

  17. Patterns of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use among Medicare beneficiaries with myelodysplastic syndromes and consistency with clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Amy J; Weiss, Sheila R; Baer, Maria R; Ke, Xuehua; Hendrick, Franklin; Zeidan, Amer; Gore, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are used commonly to reduce symptomatic anemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We assessed population-based patterns of ESA use relative to treatment guidelines using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries, with linked Medicare claims providing detailed treatment data from 2001 through 2005. The study found widespread use (62%) of ESA in Medicare beneficiaries with MDS. Similar ESA use rates regardless of risk status, low frequency (45%) of serum erythropoietin determination prior to ESA initiation, and high prevalence (60.4%) of short-duration ESA episodes suggest clinically important discrepancies between actual practice and guideline-recommended therapy. PMID:23523473

  18. A High Risk of Hospitalization Following Release From Correctional Facilities in Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Emily A.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known about the risk of individuals who are released from correctional facilities, a time where their may be discontinuity in care. OBJECTIVE To study the risk for hospitalizations among former inmates soon after their release from correctional facilities. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Data from Medicare administrative claims for 110 419 fee-for-service beneficiaries who were released from a correctional facility from 2002 through 2010 and controls matched by age, sex, race, Medicare status, and residential zip code. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hospitalization rates and specifically those for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions 7, 30, and 90 days after release. RESULTS Of 110 419 released inmates, 1559 individuals (1.4%) were hospitalized within 7 days after release; 4285 individuals (3.9%) within 30 days; and 9196 (8.3%) within 90 days. The odds of hospitalization was higher for released inmates compared with those of matched controls (within 7 days: odds ratio [OR], 2.5 [95% CI, 2.3-2.8]; within 30 days: OR, 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.7-1.9]). Compared with matched controls, former inmates were more likely to be hospitalized for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (within 7 days: OR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.1]; within 30 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.8]; and within 90 days: OR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.5-1.7]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE About 1 in 70 former inmates are hospitalized for an acute condition within 7 days of release, and 1 in 12 by 90 days, a rate much higher than in the general population. PMID:23877707

  19. Cost-related Nonadherence by Medication Type among Medicare Part D Beneficiaries with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jessica; Steers, W. Neil; Ettner, Susan L.; Mangione, Carol M.; Duru, O. Kenrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the rollout of Medicare Part D, cost-related non-adherence (CRN) among older adults remains a problem. Objectives To examine the rate and correlates of self-reported CRN among a population of older persons with diabetes. Research Design Cross-sectional. Subjects 1,264 Part D patients with diabetes, who entered the coverage gap in 2006. Measures Initial administrative medication lists were verified in computer-assisted telephone interviews, in which participants brought their medication bottles to the phone. Medications were classified into cardiometabolic (diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol-lowering), symptom relief, and “other.” Participants were asked if they had any cost-related non-adherence during 2006, and if so to which medication/s. We used the person-medication dyad as the unit of analysis, and tested a multivariate random effects logistic regression model to analyze the correlates of CRN. Results Approximately 16% of participants reported any CRN. CRN was more frequent for cholesterol-lowering medications [Relative risk 1.54, 95%CI 1.01-2.32] compared to medications taken for symptom relief. CRN was reported less frequently with increasing age above 75 years, compared to patients between 65 and 69. In addition, compared to those with incomes >$40,000, CRN risk for those with incomes <$25,000 was markedly higher [RR 3.05, 95%CI 1.99-4.65]. Conclusions In summary, we found high rates of CRN among Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes, particularly those with lower incomes. We observed more frequent CRN for cholesterol-lowering medications as compared to medications for symptom relief. Efforts to ensure medication affordability for this population will be important in boosting adherence to key medications. PMID:23032359

  20. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and statin use among Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Laura G; Hammill, Bradley G; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Curtis, Lesley H; Jones, W Schuyler

    2016-05-01

    At the time of this study, guidelines recommended a primary goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL for all patients, an optional goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol less than 70 mg/dL for patients with overt cardiovascular disease and statins for patients with diabetes and overt cardiovascular disease and patients 40 years and older with diabetes and at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined statin use and achievement of lipid goals among 111,730 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older in 2011. Three-quarters of patients met the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal of less than 100 mg/dL. Patients with cardiovascular disease were more likely to meet the goal than those without, not controlling for other differences. Patients on a statin were more likely to meet the goal. There is considerable opportunity for improvement in cholesterol management in high-risk patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26802221

  1. Factors Associated with Inpatient Hospital (Re)admissions in Medicare Beneficiaries in Need of Food Assistance.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Elisabeth Lilian Pia; Lee, Jung Sun; Young, Henry N

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about pathways underlying inpatient hospital (re)admissions in older adults unable to meet basic needs. This study examined the factors associated with (re)admissions in a sample of low-income older Medicare beneficiaries in need of food assistance in Georgia in 2008 (N = 892, mean age 75.4 ± 8.8 years, 30.3% Black, 68.5% female). About 35.3% of the sample experienced 1 + hospital (re)admissions. (Re)admissions were significantly more likely in individuals who requested Older Americans Act Nutrition Program Home Delivered Meals services (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.4, 3.8), had more outpatient emergency room visits (1 visit: OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.4, 3.1; 2+ visits: OR 3.6; 95% CI 2.4, 5.4), and experienced greater multimorbidity (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.4, 3.1). Support for home and community-based services may be critical in reducing potentially avoidable inpatient hospital (re)admissions. PMID:26106990

  2. The Vast Majority Of Medicare Part D Beneficiaries Still Don't Choose The Cheapest Plans That Meet Their Medication Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Zhang, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    The Medicare Part D program allows beneficiaries to choose among Part D plans administered by different health plans in order to encourage market competition and give beneficiaries more flexibility. Currently around 40–50 Part D plans are available per region. When faced with so many options, do beneficiaries generally choose the least expensive plan? Using 2009 Part D data, we found that only 5.2% of beneficiaries chose the cheapest plan. Nationwide, beneficiaries on average spent $368 more annually than they would have spent under the cheapest plan available in their region, given their medication needs. Beneficiaries often overprotected themselves by paying higher premiums for plan features they did not need, such as generic drug coverage in the coverage gap. Our findings suggest that beneficiaries need more targeted assistance from the government to choose plans, for example, a customized letter indicating three top plans based on beneficiaries’ medication needs. PMID:23048107

  3. Medicaid Enrollment among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries: Individual Determinants, Effects of State Policy, and Impact on Service Use

    PubMed Central

    Pezzin, Liliana E; Kasper, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    Objective To better understand factors associated with Medicaid enrollment among low-income, community-dwelling elderly persons and to examine the effect of Medicaid enrollment on the use of health care services by elderly persons, taking into account selection in program participation. Data Sources 1996 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) Access to Care and Cost and Use files. Methods Individual-level predictions of the probability of dual enrollment are obtained from equations that estimate jointly the residential status of Medicare beneficiaries (community versus institution) and the probability of Medicaid enrollment among community-dwelling eligible beneficiaries. Predicted values are then substituted into the service use equations, which are estimated via two-part models. Principal Findings Less than half of all community-dwelling elderly persons with incomes at or below 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) were enrolled in Medicaid in 1996. Once selective enrollment was accounted for, there was limited evidence of a dual enrollment effect on service use. Although there were no effects of state Medicaid policy variables on the probability that beneficiaries lived in the community (as opposed to nursing homes), the effects of state's Medicaid generosity in home and community-based services had a sizeable and statistically significant effect on influencing the likelihood that eligible elderly persons enrolled in Medicaid. Conclusions Our results provide compelling evidence that Medicaid participation can be influenced by state policy. The observation that “policy matters” provides new insights into how existing programs might reach a larger proportion of potentially eligible beneficiaries. PMID:12236387

  4. Long-term declines in ADLs, IADLs, and mobility among older Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most prior studies have focused on short-term (≤ 2 years) functional declines. But those studies cannot address aging effects inasmuch as all participants have aged the same amount. Therefore, the authors studied the extent of long-term functional decline in older Medicare beneficiaries who were followed for varying time lengths, and the authors also identified the risk factors associated with those declines. Methods The analytic sample included 5,871 self- or proxy-respondents who had complete baseline and follow-up survey data that could be linked to their Medicare claims for 1993-2007. Functional status was assessed using activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs (IADLs), and mobility limitations, with declines defined as the development of two of more new difficulties. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to focus on the associations involving respondent status, health lifestyle, continuity of care, managed care status, health shocks, and terminal drop. Results The average amount of time between the first and final interviews was 8.0 years. Declines were observed for 36.6% on ADL abilities, 32.3% on IADL abilities, and 30.9% on mobility abilities. Functional decline was more likely to occur when proxy-reports were used, and the effects of baseline function on decline were reduced when proxy-reports were used. Engaging in vigorous physical activity consistently and substantially protected against functional decline, whereas obesity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption were only associated with mobility declines. Post-baseline hospitalizations were the most robust predictors of functional decline, exhibiting a dose-response effect such that the greater the average annual number of hospital episodes, the greater the likelihood of functional status decline. Participants whose final interview preceded their death by one year or less had substantially greater odds of functional status decline. Conclusions Both the additive and

  5. Association between age and use of intensive care among surgical Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wunsch, Hannah; Gershengorn, Hayley B.; Guerra, Carmen; Rowe, John; Li, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role age plays in use of intensive care for patients who have major surgery. Materials and Methods Retrospective cohort study examining the association between age and admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) for all Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 or older who had a hospitalization for one of five surgical procedures: esophagectomy, cystectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (open AAA), and elective endovascular AAA repair (endo AAA) from 2004–08. The primary outcome was admission to an ICU. Secondary outcomes were complications and hospital mortality. We used multi-level mixed-effects logistic regression to adjust for other patient and hospital-level factors associated with each outcome. Results The percentage of hospitalized patients admitted to ICU ranged from 41.3% for endo AAA to 81.5% for open AAA. In-hospital mortality also varied, from 1.1% for endo AAA to 6.8% for esophagectomy. After adjusting for other factors, age was associated with admission to ICU for cystectomy (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.56 (95% CI 1.36–1.78) for age 80–84+; 2.25 (1.85–2.75) age 85+ compared with age 65–69), PD (AOR 1.26 (1.06–1.50) age 80–84; 1.49 (1.11–1.99) age 85+) and esophagectomy (AOR 1.26 (1.02–1.55) age 80–84; 1.28 (0.91–1.80) age 85+). Age was not associated with use of intensive care for open or endo AAA. Older age was associated with increases in complication rates and in-hospital mortality for all five surgical procedures. Conclusions The association between age and use of intensive care was procedure-specific. Complication rates and in-hospital mortality increased with age for all five surgical procedures. PMID:23787024

  6. Short-term Outcomes of Vaginal Mesh Placement Among Female Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Khan, Aqsa A.; Eilber, Karyn S.; Chong, Erin; Histed, Stephanie; Wu, Ning; Pashos, Chris L.; Clemens, J. Quentin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare short-term outcomes between prolapse repairs with and without mesh using a national dataset. Mesh use in surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) has gained wide popularity. However, mesh complications have increased concomitantly with its use. Methods Public Use File data were obtained for a 5% random national sample of female Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over. Women who underwent prolapse surgery were identified by CPT-4 codes. Since the code for mesh placement was effected in 2005, we separated patients into three cohorts: those who underwent prolapse repairs from 1999–2000 (presumably without mesh), those who underwent repairs in 2007–2008 (presumably without mesh), and those with mesh (based on CPT-4 code 57267) in 2007–2008. One-year outcomes were identified using ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes and CPT-4 procedure codes. Results 9,180 prolapse repairs without mesh were performed in 1999–2000, 7,729 without mesh in 2007–2008, and 1,804 prolapse repairs with mesh were performed in 2007–2008. Prolapse re-operation within one year of surgery was higher in non-mesh vs. mesh cohorts (6–7% vs. 4%, p < 0.02). Mesh removal rates were higher in mesh vs. non-mesh group (4% vs. 0–1%, p < 0.001). Mesh use was associated with more dyspareunia, mesh-related complications, and urinary retention, even when controlling for concomitant sling. Conclusions Mesh to treat POP and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) was associated with a small decrease in early re-operation for prolapse. This decrease came at the expense of increased rates of pelvic pain, retention, mesh-related complications, and mesh removal. PMID:24680446

  7. The Incidence of Upper and Lower Extremity Surgery for Rheumatoid Arthritis Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Jennifer; Zhong, Lin; Baser, Onur; Yuce, Huseyin; Fox, David A.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: For elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis, aggressive immunosuppression can be difficult to tolerate, and surgery remains an important treatment option for joint pain and deformity. We sought to examine the epidemiology of surgical reconstruction for rheumatoid arthritis among older individuals who were newly diagnosed with the disorder. Methods: We identified a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries (sixty-six years of age and older) newly diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis from 2000 to 2005, and followed these patients longitudinally for a mean of 4.6 years. We used univariate analysis to compare the time from the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis to the first operation among the 360 patients who underwent surgery during the study period. Results: In our study cohort, 589 procedures were performed among 360 patients, and 132 patients (37%) underwent multiple procedures. The rate of upper extremity reconstruction was 0.9%, the rate of lower extremity reconstruction was 1.2%, and knee arthroplasty was the most common procedure performed initially (31%) and overall (29%). Upper extremity procedures were performed sooner than lower extremity procedures (fourteen versus twenty-five months; p = 0.02). In multivariable analysis, surgery rates declined with age for upper and lower extremity procedures (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Knee replacement remains the most common initial procedure among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. However, upper extremity procedures are performed earlier than lower extremity procedures. Understanding the patient and provider factors that underlie variation in procedure rates can inform future strategies to improve the delivery of care to patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Level of Evidence: Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:25740031

  8. 75 FR 75884 - Regulations Regarding Income-Related Monthly Adjustment Amounts to Medicare Beneficiaries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... in the Federal Register at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Background Medicare prescription... Medicare prescription drug coverage premiums, when they go into effect on January 1, 2011. DATES:...

  9. Total Cost of Care Lower among Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries Receiving Care from Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    PubMed Central

    van Hasselt, Martijn; McCall, Nancy; Keyes, Vince; Wensky, Suzanne G; Smith, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare health care utilization and payments between NCQA-recognized patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices and practices without such recognition. Data Sources Medicare Part A and B claims files from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010, 2009 Census, 2007 Health Resources and Services Administration and CMS Utilization file, Medicare's Enrollment Data Base, and the 2005 American Medical Association Physician Workforce file. Study Design This study used a longitudinal, nonexperimental design. Three annual observations (July 1, 2008–June 30, 2010) were available for each practice. We compared selected outcomes between practices with and those without NCQA PCMH recognition. Data Collection Methods Individual Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries and their claims and utilization data were assigned to PCMH or comparison practices based on where they received the plurality of evaluation and management services between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008. Principal Findings Relative to the comparison group, total Medicare payments, acute care payments, and the number of emergency room visits declined after practices received NCQA PCMH recognition. The decline was larger for practices with sicker than average patients, primary care practices, and solo practices. Conclusions This study provides additional evidence about the potential of the PCMH model for reducing health care utilization and the cost of care. PMID:25077375

  10. Effect of Long-term Care Use on Medicare and Medicaid Expenditures for Dual Eligible and Non-dual Eligible Elderly Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Robert L; Wysocki, Andrea; Parashuram, Shriram; Shippee, Tetyana; Lum, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dual eligible Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries consume disproportionate shares of both programs. Objectives: To compare Medicare and Medicaid expenditures of elderly dual eligible beneficiaries with non-dual eligible beneficiaries based on their long-term care (LTC) use. Research Design: Secondary analysis of linked MAX and Medicare data in seven states. Subjects: Dual eligible adults (65+) receiving LTC in institutions, in the community, or not at all; and Medicare non-dual eligibles. Measures: Medicaid acute medical and LTC expenditures per beneficiary year, Medicare expenditures. Results: Among dual eligibles and non-dual eligibles, the average number of diseases and case mix scores are higher for LTC users. Adjusting for case mix virtually eliminates the difference for medical costs, but not for LTC expenditures. Adjusting for LTC status reduces the difference in LTC costs, but increases the difference in medical costs. Conclusions: Efforts to control costs for dual eligibles should target those in LTC while better coordinating medical and LTC expenditures. PMID:24753971

  11. The Effect of Medicare Part D on Guideline-Concordant Pharmacotherapy for Bipolar I Disorder among Dually Enrolled Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Marguerite; Busch, Alisa; Madden, Jeanne; Le Cates, Robert F.; Zhang, Fang; Adams, Alyce; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Soumerai, Stephen; Huskamp, Haiden

    2014-01-01

    Objective In January 2006 drug insurance coverage shifted from Medicaid to Medicare Part D private drug plans for the 6 million individuals enrolled in both programs. Beneficiaries faced new formularies and utilization management policies. It is uncertain if Part D, when compared to Medicaid, relaxed or tightened psychiatric medication management, which could affect receipt of recommended pharmacotherapy, and emergency department use related to treatment discontinuities. This study examined the impact of the transition from Medicaid to Part D on guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy for bipolar I disorder and emergency department use. Methods Using interrupted time series and Medicaid and Medicare administrative data from 2004–2007, the authors analyzed the effect of the coverage transition on receipt of guideline-concordant anti-manic medication, guideline-discordant antidepressant monotherapy, and emergency department visits for a nationally-representative continuous cohort of 1,431 adults diagnosed with bipolar I disorder. Results Sixteen months after the transition, the proportion of the population with any recommended anti-manic use was an estimated 3.1 percentage points higher than expected controlling for baseline trends. The monthly proportion of beneficiaries with 7+ days of antidepressant monotherapy was 2.1 percentage points lower than expected. The number of emergency department visits per month increased by 19% immediately post-transition. Conclusions Increased receipt of guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy for bipolar I disorder may reflect relatively less restrictive management of anti-manic medications under Part D. The clinical significance of these changes is unclear given the small effect sizes. However, increased emergency department visits merit attention for the Medicaid beneficiaries who continue to transition to Part D. PMID:24337444

  12. Associations Between Vitamin D Level and Hospitalizations With and Without an Infection in a National Cohort of Medicare Beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Kempker, Jordan A; Magee, Matthew J; Cegielski, J Peter; Martin, Greg S

    2016-05-15

    Research has implicated low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level as a risk factor for infection; however, results have not been consistent. To further determine the nature of this relationship, we conducted a cohort study using Medicare beneficiaries participating in the 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with data individually linked to hospital records from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The primary exposure was a 25(OH)D level of <15 ng/mL versus ≥15 ng/mL. The outcomes were a hospitalization with or without an infection within 1 year of participation in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, as determined from the final hospital discharge codes (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification). Of 1,713 individuals, 348 had a baseline serum 25(OH)D level of <15 ng/mL, 77 experienced a hospitalization with an infection, and 287 experienced a hospitalization without an infection. In multivariable analyses, a serum 25(OH)D level of <15 ng/mL was associated with a higher risk of hospitalization with an infection (risk ratio = 2.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 5.9, P < 0.01) but not of hospitalization without an infection (risk ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.9, 2.1, P = 0.1). In this study, we found an association between a serum 25(OH)D concentration of <15 ng/mL and a higher subsequent risk for hospitalization with an infection among Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:27189328

  13. Effect of Cost-Sharing Reductions on Preventive Service Use Among Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Suzanne M.; Anderson, Gerard F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Section 4104 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) waives previous cost-sharing requirements for many Medicare-covered preventive services. In 1997, Congress passed similar legislation waiving the deductible only for mammograms and Pap smears. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of the deductible waiver on mammogram and Pap smear utilization rates. Methods Using 1995–2003 Medicare claims from a sample of female, elderly Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, two pre/post analyses were conducted comparing mammogram and Pap smear utilization rates before and after implementation of the deductible waiver. Receipt of screening mammograms and Pap smears served as the outcome measures, and two time measures, representing two post-test observation periods, were used to examine the short- and long-term impacts on utilization. Results There was a 20 percent short-term and a 25 percent longer term increase in the probability of having had a mammogram in the four years following the 1997 deductible waiver. Beneficiaries were no more likely to receive a Pap smear following the deductible waiver. Conclusions Elimination of cost sharing may be an effective strategy for increasing preventive service use, but the impact could depend on the characteristics of the procedure, its cost, and the disease and populations it targets. These historical findings suggest that, with implementation of Section 4104, the greatest increases in utilization will be seen for preventive services that screen for diseases with high incidence or prevalence rates that increase with age, that are expensive, and that are performed on a frequent basis. PMID:24800136

  14. A 12-year prospective study of stroke risk in older Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Wolinsky, Fredric D; Bentler, Suzanne E; Cook, Elizabeth A; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Liu, Li; Wright, Kara B; Geweke, John F; Obrizan, Maksym; Pavlik, Claire E; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Jones, Michael P; Wallace, Robert B; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2009-01-01

    Background 5.8 M living Americans have experienced a stroke at some time in their lives, 780K had either their first or a recurrent stroke this year, and 150K died from strokes this year. Stroke costs about $66B annually in the US, and also results in serious, long-term disability. Therefore, it is prudent to identify all possible risk factors and their effects so that appropriate intervention points may be targeted. Methods Baseline (1993–1994) interview data from the nationally representative Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) were linked to 1993–2005 Medicare claims. Participants were 5,511 self-respondents ≥ 70 years old. Two ICD9-CM case-identification approaches were used. Two approaches to stroke case-identification based on ICD9-CM codes were used, one emphasized sensitivity and the other emphasized specificity. Participants were censored at death or enrollment into managed Medicare. Baseline risk factors included sociodemographic, socioeconomic, place of residence, health behavior, disease history, and functional and cognitive status measures. A time-dependent marker reflecting post-baseline non-stroke hospitalizations was included to reflect health shocks, and sensitivity analyses were conducted to identify its peak effect. Competing risk, proportional hazards regression was used. Results Post-baseline strokes occurred for 545 (9.9%; high sensitivity approach) and 374 (6.8%; high specificity approach) participants. The greatest static risks involved increased age, being widowed or never married, living in multi-story buildings, reporting a baseline history of diabetes, hypertension, or stroke, and reporting difficulty picking up a dime, refusing to answer the delayed word recall test, or having poor cognition. Risks were similar for both case-identification approaches and for recurrent and first-ever vs. only first-ever strokes. The time-dependent health shock (recent hospitalization) marker did not alter the static

  15. On Medicare But At Risk: A State-Level Analysis of Beneficiaries Who Are Underinsured or Facing High Total Cost Burdens.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Cathy; Solís-Román, Claudia; Huober, Nick; Kelchner, Zachary

    2016-05-01

    Medicare provides essential health coverage for older and disabled adults, yet it does not limit out-of-pocket costs for covered benefits and excludes dental, hearing, and longer-term care. The resulting out-of-pocket costs can add up to a substantial share of income. Based on U.S. Census surveys, nearly a quarter of Medicare beneficiaries (11.5 million) were underinsured in 2013–14, meaning they spent a high share of their income on health care. Adding premiums to medical care expenses, we find that 16 percent of beneficiaries (8 million) spent 20 percent or more of their income on insurance plus care. At the state level, the proportion of beneficiaries underinsured ranged from 16 percent to 32 percent, while the proportion with a high total cost burden ranged from 11 percent to 26 percent. Low-income beneficiaries were most at risk. The findings underscore the need to assess beneficiary impacts of any proposal to redesign Medicare. PMID:27214925

  16. Patient Satisfaction, Empowerment, and Health and Disability Status Effects of a Disease Management-Health Promotion Nurse Intervention among Medicare Beneficiaries with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Liebel, Dianne V.; Saad, Zabedah B.; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report the impact on patient and informal caregiver satisfaction, patient empowerment, and health and disability status of a primary care-affiliated disease self-management-health promotion nurse intervention for Medicare beneficiaries with disabilities and recent significant health services use. Design and Methods: The Medicare…

  17. Big Data, Little Data, and Care Coordination for Medicare Beneficiaries with Medigap Coverage.

    PubMed

    Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Wells, Timothy S; Hawkins, Kevin; Bhattarai, Gandhi R; Martel, Charles W; Yeh, Charlotte S

    2015-06-01

    Most healthcare data warehouses include big data such as health plan, medical, and pharmacy claims information for many thousands and sometimes millions of insured individuals. This makes it possible to identify those with multiple chronic conditions who may benefit from participation in care coordination programs meant to improve their health. The objective of this article is to describe how large databases, including individual and claims data, and other, smaller types of data from surveys and personal interviews, are used to support a care coordination program. The program described in this study was implemented for adults who are generally 65 years of age or older and have an AARP(®) Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan (i.e., a Medigap plan) insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company (or, for New York residents, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company of New York). Individual and claims data were used first to calculate risk scores that were then utilized to identify the majority of individuals who were qualified for program participation. For efficient use of time and resources, propensity to succeed modeling was used to prioritize referrals based upon their predicted probabilities of (1) engaging in the care coordination program, (2) saving money once engaged, and (3) receiving higher quality of care. To date, program evaluations have reported positive returns on investment and improved quality of healthcare among program participants. In conclusion, the use of data sources big and small can help guide program operations and determine if care coordination programs are working to help older adults live healthier lives. PMID:27447434

  18. Potential impact of pharmacist interventions to reduce cost for Medicare Part D beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Erin E; Vanwert, Elizabeth M; Erickson, Steven R

    2013-06-01

    The objective was to determine the impact of simulated pharmacist interventions on out-of-pocket cost, time to coverage gap, and cost per patient to the Medicare Part D program using actual patient cases from an adult general medicine clinic. Medication profiles of 100 randomly selected Medicare-eligible patients from a university-affiliated general internal medicine clinic were reviewed by a pharmacist to identify opportunities to cost-maximize the patients' therapies based on the plan. An online Part-D calculator, Aetna Medicare Rx Essentials, was used as the standard plan to determine medication cost and time to gap. The primary analysis was comparison of the patients' pre-review and post-review out-of-pocket cost, time to coverage gap, and cost to Medicare. A total of 65 patients had at least 1 simulated pharmacist cost intervention. The most common intervention was substituting for a less costly generic, followed by substituting a generic for a brand name. Projected patient cost savings was $476 per year. The average time to coverage gap was increased by 0.7 ±1.2 months. This study illustrates that the pharmacists may be able to reduce cost to some patients as well as to the Medicare Part D program. PMID:23178417

  19. Medicare

    MedlinePlus

    ... functionalities on this website may not be available. Medicare.gov Is my test, item, or service covered? ... added to Hospital Compare Learn more Address change/Medicare card issue? Lost or incorrect Medicare card? Select ...

  20. Medicare

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving health services. . . . . . . . . 15 If you have other health insurance. . . . . . . . . . . 15 Contacting Social Security Visit our website At ... 2048 What is Medicare? Medicare is our country’s health insurance program for people age 65 or older. People ...

  1. Medicare

    MedlinePlus

    Medicare is the U.S. government's health insurance program for people age 65 or older. Some people under age 65 can qualify for Medicare, too. They include those with disabilities, permanent kidney ...

  2. Medicare

    Cancer.gov

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administers Medicare, a Health Insurance Program for people age 65 or older, some disabled people under age 65, and people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease.

  3. Defining emergency department episodes by severity and intensity: A 15-year study of Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Episodes of Emergency Department (ED) service use among older adults previously have not been constructed, or evaluated as multi-dimensional phenomena. In this study, we constructed episodes of ED service use among a cohort of older adults over a 15-year observation period, measured the episodes by severity and intensity, and compared these measures in predicting subsequent hospitalization. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the prospective cohort study entitled the Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old (AHEAD). Baseline (1993) data on 5,511 self-respondents ≥70 years old were linked to their Medicare claims for 1991-2005. Claims then were organized into episodes of ED care according to Medicare guidelines. The severity of ED episodes was measured with a modified-NYU algorithm using ICD9-CM diagnoses, and the intensity of the episodes was measured using CPT codes. Measures were evaluated against subsequent hospitalization to estimate comparative predictive validity. Results Over 15 years, three-fourths (4,171) of the 5,511 AHEAD participants had at least 1 ED episode, with a mean of 4.5 episodes. Cross-classification indicated the modified-NYU severity measure and the CPT-based intensity measure captured different aspects of ED episodes (kappa = 0.18). While both measures were significant independent predictors of hospital admission from ED episodes, the CPT measure had substantially higher predictive validity than the modified-NYU measure (AORs 5.70 vs. 3.31; p < .001). Conclusions We demonstrated an innovative approach for how claims data can be used to construct episodes of ED care among a sample of older adults. We also determined that the modified-NYU measure of severity and the CPT measure of intensity tap different aspects of ED episodes, and that both measures were predictive of subsequent hospitalization. PMID:20565949

  4. Predictors and Outcomes of Readmission for Clostridium difficile in a National Sample of Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, M. Didem; Anderson, Fred A.; Santry, Heena P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rates of Clostridium difficile (CD) infections are increasing. Elderly patients may be at particular risk of recurrent CD infection. Little is known about the risk for CD readmission specifically in this age group. Methods A 5 % random sample of Medicare data (2009–2011) was queried for patients surviving a hospitalization for CD by ICD-9 code. Demographic (age, sex, gender), clinical (Elixhauser index, gastrointestinal comorbidities), and hospitalization (length of stay, ICU admission) characteristics as well as exposure to antibiotics and interim non-CD hospitalization were compared for those with and without a readmission for CD. A multivariable survival analysis was used to determine predictors of readmission. Results Of 7,564 patients surviving a CD hospitalization, 8.5 % were readmitted with CD in a median of 25 days (interquartile range (IQR) 14–57). In multivariable survival analyses, interim non-CD hospital exposure was the strongest predictor of CD readmission (hazard ration (HR) 3.75 95 %, confidence interval (CI) 3.2–4.42). Oral and intravenous/intramuscular (IV/IM) antibiotic use, Elixhauser index, and CD as the primary diagnosis also increased the risk of CD readmission. Discharge to hospice, long-term care or a skilled nursing facility decreased the odds of CD readmission. Conclusion Hospital exposure and antibiotic use put elderly patients at risk of CD readmission. Exposure to these factors should be minimized in the immediate post discharge period. PMID:25408315

  5. Patterns of Stress Testing and Diagnostic Catheterization after Coronary Stenting in 250,350 Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Mudrick, Daniel; Shah, Bimal R.; McCoy, Lisa A.; Lytl, Barbara L.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Federspiel, Jerome J.; Cowper, Patricia A.; Green, Cynthia; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patterns of non-invasive stress test (ST) and invasive coronary angiography (CA) utilization after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are not well described in older populations. Methods and Results We linked National Cardiovascular Data Registry® CathPCI Registry® data with longitudinal Medicare claims data for 250,350 patients undergoing PCI from 2005 to 2007 and described subsequent testing and outcomes. Between 60 days post-PCI and end of follow-up (median 24 months), 49% (n=122,894) received stress testing first, 10% (n=25,512) underwent invasive CA first, and 41% (n=101,944) had no testing (NT). A number of clinical risk factors at time of index PCI were associated with decreased likelihood of downstream testing (ST or CA, p<0.05 for all), including older age (HR 0.784 per 10 year increase), male sex (HR 0.946), heart failure (HR 0.925), diabetes (HR 0.954), smoking (HR 0.804), and renal failure (HR 0.880). Fifteen percent of patients with ST first proceeded to subsequent CA within 90 days of testing (n=18,472/101,884); of these, 48% (n=8831) underwent revascularization within 90 days, compared to 53% (n=13,316) of CA first patients (p<0.0001). Conclusions In this descriptive analysis, stress testing and invasive CA were common in older patients after PCI. Paradoxically, patients with higher-risk features at baseline were less likely to undergo post-PCI testing. The revascularization yield was low on patients referred for ST after PCI, with only 9% undergoing revascularization within 90 days. PMID:23074343

  6. Multi-Modality Mediastinal Staging for Lung Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Flum, David R.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Symons, Rebecca Gaston; Wood, Douglas E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The use of non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tests improves the accuracy of mediastinal staging for lung cancer. It is unknown how frequently multi-modality mediastinal staging is used, or whether its use is associated with better health outcomes. Methods A cohort study was conducted using SEER-Medicare data (1998–2005). Patients were categorized as having undergone single (CT only), bi- (CT and PET or CT and invasive staging), or tri-modality (CT, PET, and invasive staging) staging. Results Among 43,912 subjects, 77%, 21%, and 2% received single, bi-, and tri-modality staging, respectively. The use of single modality staging decreased over time from 90% in 1998 to 67% in 2002 (p-trend <0.001), whereas the use of bi- and tri-modality staging increased from 10% to 30% and 0.4% to 5%, respectively. After adjustment for differences in patient characteristics, the use of a greater number of staging modalities was associated with a lower risk of death (bi- versus single modality: HR 0.58, 99% CI 0.56–0.60; tri- versus single modality: HR 0.49, 99% CI 0.45–0.54; tri- versus bi-modality: HR 0.85, 99% CI 0.77–0.93). These associations were maintained even after excluding stage IV patients or adjustment for stage. Conclusions The use of multi-modality mediastinal staging increased over time and was associated with better survival. Stage migration and unmeasured patient and provider characteristics may have affected the magnitude of these associations. Cancer treatment guidelines should emphasize the potential relationship between staging procedures and outcomes, and health care policy should encourage adherence to staging guidelines. PMID:19156000

  7. Strabismus surgery among Medicare beneficiaries: imputed rates of reoperation in the same calendar year

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Christopher T.; Pariyadath, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare strabismus surgery reoperation rates in a large national database of provider payments when the adjustable-suture technique was available and not available. Materials and Methods Fee-for-service payments to Medicare providers for horizontal (CPT 67311) and vertical (CPT 67314) strabismus surgery in 2012 were analyzed to identify payments for reoperations in the same calendar year. The adjustable-suture technique was considered to be available to the patient if the patient’s surgeon billed for adjustable sutures during the year. We determined the association of reoperation with the availability of the adjustable-suture technique and with surgeon volume. Results Patients having horizontal muscle surgery had a rate of reoperation in 2012 of 4.1% (15 of 364 patients) when the adjustable technique was available, compared with 7.1% (77 of 1,082 patients) when the adjustable technique was not available (P = 0.047). Patients having vertical muscle surgery had a rate of reoperation in 2012 of 4.1% (8 of 196 patients) when the adjustable technique was available, compared with 8.3% (38 of 458 patients) when the adjustable technique was not available (P = 0.07). Having surgery in a high-volume surgical practice was not reliably associated with reoperation rates. Conclusions For patients having strabismus surgery, the availability of the adjustable-suture technique was associated with a lower reoperation rate in this large national database (compared with patients for whom the adjustable technique was not available). The difference was statistically significantly different from zero for horizontal muscle surgery but not for vertical muscle surgery. PMID:27330477

  8. Discharge Hospice Referral and Lower 30-Day All-Cause Readmission in Medicare Beneficiaries Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Raya E.; Fletcher, Ross D.; Bakitas, Marie A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Parvataneni, Sridivya; Bearden, Donna; Bailey, F. Amos; Morgan, Charity J.; Singh, Steven; Blackman, Marc R.; Zile, Michael R.; Patel, Kanan; Ahmed, Momanna B.; Tucker, Rodney O.; Brown, Cynthia J.; Love, Thomas E.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Roseman, Jeffrey M.; Rich, Michael W.; Allman, Richard M.; Ahmed, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause for hospital readmission. Hospice care may help palliate HF symptoms but its association with 30-day all-cause readmission remains unknown. Methods and Results Of the 8032 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for HF in 106 Alabama hospitals (1998–2001), 182 (2%) received discharge hospice referrals. Of the 7850 patients not receiving hospice referrals, 1608 (20%) died within 6 months post-discharge (the hospice-eligible group). Propensity scores for hospice referral were estimated for each of the 1790 (182+1608) patients and were used to match 179 hospice-referral patients with 179 hospice-eligible patients who were balanced on 28 baseline characteristics (mean age, 79 years, 58% women, 18% African American). Overall, 22% (1742/8032) died in 6 months, of whom 8% (134/1742) received hospice referrals. Among the 358 matched patients, 30-day all-cause readmission occurred in 5% and 41% of hospice-referral and hospice-eligible patients, respectively (hazard ratio {HR} associated with hospice referral, 0.12; 95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.06–0.24). HRs (95% CIs) for 30-day all-cause readmission associated with hospice referral among the 126 patients who died and 232 patients who survived 30-day post-discharge were 0.03 (0.04–0.21) and 0.17 (0.08–0.36), respectively. Although 30-day mortality was higher in the hospice referral group (43% vs. 27%), it was similar at 90 days (64% vs. 67% among hospice-eligible patients). Conclusions A discharge hospice referral was associated with lower 30-day all-cause readmission among hospitalized HF patients. However, most HF patients who died within 6 months of hospital discharge did not receive a discharge hospice referral. PMID:26019151

  9. Medicare

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people age 65 or older. Some people under age 65 can qualify for Medicare, too. They include those with disabilities, permanent kidney failure, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Medicare helps with the cost of health care. It does not cover all ...

  10. Medicare Hospital Charges in the Last Year of Life: Distribution by Quarter for Rural and Urban Nursing Home Decedents with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessert, Charles E.; Haller, Irina V.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medicare beneficiaries incur 27%-30% of lifetime charges in the last year of life; most charges occur in the last quarter. Factors associated with high end-of-life Medicare charges include less advanced age, non-white race, absence of advance directive, and urban residence. Methods: We analyzed Medicare hospital charges in the last…

  11. Particulate Air Pollution and the Rate of Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure among Medicare Beneficiaries in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bateson, Thomas F.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Schwartz., Joel

    2006-01-01

    We used a case-crossover approach to evaluate the association between ambient air pollution and the rate of hospitalization for congestive heart failure (CHF) among Medicare recipients (age ≥ 65) residing in Allegheny County (Pittsburgh area), PA, during 1987–1999. We also explored effect modification by age, gender, and specific secondary diagnoses. During follow-up, there were 55,019 admissions with a primary diagnosis of CHF. We found that particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide – but not ozone – were positively and significantly associated with the rate of admission on the same day in single-pollutant models. The strongest associations were observed with CO, NO2 and PM10. The associations with CO and NO2 were the most robust in two-pollutant models, remaining statistically significant even after adjusting for other pollutants. Patients with a recent myocardial infarction were at greater risk of particulate-related admission, but there was otherwise no significant effect modification by age, gender, or other secondary diagnoses. These results suggest that short-term elevations in air pollution from traffic-related sources may trigger acute cardiac decompensation of heart failure patients and that those with certain comorbid conditions may be more susceptible to these effects. PMID:15901623

  12. 42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Payments to Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans....

  13. The impact of home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits on hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Melissa; Hanlon, Alexandra; Naylor, Mary D; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2015-08-01

    The implementation of the Home Health Prospective Payment System in 2000 led to a dramatic reduction in home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits among Medicare beneficiaries. While policy leaders have focused on the rising costs of home health care, its potential underutilization, and the relationship between service use and patient outcomes including hospitalization rates have not been rigorously examined. A secondary analysis of five Medicare-owned assessment and claims data sets for the year 2009 was conducted among two independently randomly selected samples of Medicare-reimbursed home health recipients (each n = 31,485) to examine the relationship between home health length of stay or number of skilled nursing visits and hospitalization rates within 90 days of discharge from home health. Patients who had a home health length of stay of at least 22 days or received at least four skilled nursing visits had significantly lower odds of hospitalization than patients with shorter home health stays and fewer skilled nursing visits. Additional study is needed to clarify the best way to structure home health services and determine readiness for discharge to reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill population. In the mean time, the findings of this study suggest that home health providers should consider the benefits of at least four SNV and/or a home health LOS of 22 days or longer. PMID:25990046

  14. Regulations regarding income-related monthly adjustment amounts to Medicare beneficiaries' prescription drug coverage premiums. Interim final rule with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2010-12-01

    We are adding a new subpart to our regulations, which contains the rules we will apply to determine the income-related monthly adjustment amount for Medicare prescription drug coverage premiums. This new subpart implements changes made to the Social Security Act (Act) by the Affordable Care Act. These rules parallel the rules in subpart B of this part, which describes the rules we apply when we determine the income-related monthly adjustment amount for certain Medicare Part B (medical insurance) beneficiaries. These rules describe the new subpart; what information we will use to determine whether you will pay an income-related monthly adjustment amount and the amount of the adjustment when applicable; when we will consider a major life-changing event that results in a significant reduction in your modified adjusted gross income; and how you can appeal our determination about your income-related monthly adjustment amount. These rules will allow us to implement the provisions of the Affordable Care Act on time that relate to the income-related monthly adjustment amount for Medicare prescription drug coverage premiums, when they go into effect on January 1, 2011. PMID:21137594

  15. Underweight, Markers of Cachexia, and Mortality in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort Study of Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Krumholz, Hannah A; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Underweight patients are at higher risk of death after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than normal weight patients; however, it is unclear whether this relationship is explained by confounding due to cachexia or other factors associated with low body mass index (BMI). This study aimed to answer two questions: (1) does comprehensive risk adjustment for comorbid illness and frailty measures explain the higher mortality after AMI in underweight patients, and (2) is the relationship between underweight and mortality also observed in patients with AMI who are otherwise without significant chronic illness and are presumably free of cachexia? Methods and Findings We analyzed data from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project, a cohort-based study of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for AMI between January 1994 and February 1996 with 17 y of follow-up and detailed clinical information to compare short- and long-term mortality in underweight and normal weight patients (n = 57,574). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to investigate the association of low BMI with 30-d, 1-y, 5-y, and 17-y mortality after AMI while adjusting for patient comorbidities, frailty measures, and laboratory markers of nutritional status. We also repeated the analyses in a subset of patients without significant comorbidity or frailty. Of the 57,574 patients with AMI included in this cohort, 5,678 (9.8%) were underweight and 51,896 (90.2%) were normal weight at baseline. Underweight patients were older, on average, than normal weight patients and had a higher prevalence of most comorbidities and measures of frailty. Crude mortality was significantly higher for underweight patients than normal weight patients at 30 d (25.2% versus 16.4%, p < 0.001), 1 y (51.3% versus 33.8%, p < 0.001), 5 y (79.2% versus 59.4%, p < 0.001), and 17 y (98.3% versus 94.0%, p < 0.001). After adjustment, underweight patients had a 13% higher risk of 30-d death and a 26% higher risk of 17-y death than

  16. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  17. 42 CFR 411.23 - Beneficiary's cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Beneficiary's cooperation. 411.23 Section 411.23 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE... Medicare Payment: General Provisions § 411.23 Beneficiary's cooperation. (a) If CMS takes action to...

  18. 42 CFR 411.23 - Beneficiary's cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Beneficiary's cooperation. 411.23 Section 411.23 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE... Medicare Payment: General Provisions § 411.23 Beneficiary's cooperation. (a) If CMS takes action to...

  19. 42 CFR 411.23 - Beneficiary's cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Beneficiary's cooperation. 411.23 Section 411.23 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE... Medicare Payment: General Provisions § 411.23 Beneficiary's cooperation. (a) If CMS takes action to...

  20. 42 CFR 411.23 - Beneficiary's cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beneficiary's cooperation. 411.23 Section 411.23 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE... Medicare Payment: General Provisions § 411.23 Beneficiary's cooperation. (a) If CMS takes action to...

  1. A retrospective comparison of clinical outcomes and Medicare expenditures in skilled nursing facility residents with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    DaVanzo, Joan E; El-Gamil, Audrey M; Dobson, Allen; Sen, Namrata

    2010-09-01

    Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents with chronic wounds require more resources and have relatively high healthcare expenditures compared to Medicare patients without wounds. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using 2006 Medicare Chronic Condition Warehouse claims data for SNF, inpatient, outpatient hospital, and physician supplier settings along with 2006 Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) information to compare Medicare expenditures between two groups of SNF residents with a diagnosis of pressure, venous, ischemic, or diabetic ulcers whose wounds healed during the 10-month study period. The study group (n = 372) was managed using a structured, comprehensive wound management protocol provided by an external wound management team. The matched comparison group consisted of 311 SNF residents who did not receive care from the wound management team. Regression analyses indicate that after controlling for resident comorbidities and wound severity, study group residents experienced lower rates of wound-related hospitalization per day (0.08% versus 0.21%, P < 0.01) and shorter wound episodes (94 days versus 115 days, P < 0.01) than comparison group patients. Total Medicare costs were $21,449.64 for the study group and $40,678.83 for the comparison group (P < 0.01) or $229.07 versus $354.26 (P < 0.01) per resident episode day. Additional studies including wounds that do not heal are warranted. Increasing the number of SNF residents receiving the care described in this study could lead to significant Medicare cost savings. Incorporating wound clinical outcomes into a pay-for-performance measures for SNFs could increase broader SNF adoption of comprehensive wound care programs to treat chronic wounds. PMID:20855911

  2. Do disabled elderly Medicare beneficiaries with major depression make less use of a consumer-directed home care voucher benefit?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with major depression may underutilize consumer-directed long-term care. Systematic underutilization would create disparities in outcomes, undermining program effectiveness. The Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration included a consumer-directed indemnity benefit that paid for goods and services not financed by traditional Medicare. Overall and for most categories of goods and services there was little difference in use and expenditures between those with and without major depression. However, among those using the benefit to hire in-home workers, arguably the most important consumer-directed purchase, average spending for workers was about 30% lower for depressed persons. While our findings are generally reassuring for public policy, future research is needed to verify that major depression is associated with less spending on in-home workers. PMID:25300034

  3. Prior Hospitalization and the Risk of Heart Attack in Older Adults: A 12-Year Prospective Study of Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Suzanne E.; Liu, Li; Jones, Michael P.; Kaskie, Brian; Hockenberry, Jason; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Wright, Kara B.; Geweke, John F.; Obrizan, Maksym; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Rosenthal, Gary E.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Background. We investigated whether prior hospitalization was a risk factor for heart attacks among older adults in the survey on Assets and Health Dynamics among the Oldest Old. Methods. Baseline (1993–1994) interview data were linked to 1993–2005 Medicare claims for 5,511 self-respondents aged 70 years and older and not enrolled in managed Medicare. Primary hospital International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) 410.xx discharge codes identified postbaseline hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs). Participants were censored at death or postbaseline managed Medicare enrollment. Traditional risk factors and other covariates were included. Recent postbaseline non-AMI hospitalizations (ie, prior hospitalizations) were indicated by a time-dependent marker, and sensitivity analyses identified their peak effect. Results. The total number of person-years of surveillance was 44,740 with a mean of 8.1 (median = 9.1) per person. Overall, 483 participants (8.8%) suffered postbaseline heart attacks, with 423 participants (7.7%) having their first-ever AMI. As expected, significant traditional risk factors were sex (men); race (whites); marital status (never being married); education (noncollege); geography (living in the South); and reporting a baseline history of angina, arthritis, diabetes, and heart disease. Risk factors were similar for both any postbaseline and first-ever postbaseline AMI analyses. The time-dependent recent non-AMI hospitalization marker did not alter the effects of the traditional risk factors but increased AMI risk by 366% (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.66, p < .0001). Discussion. Our results suggest that some small percentage (<3%) of heart attacks among older adults might be prevented if effective short-term postdischarge planning and monitoring interventions were developed and implemented. PMID:20106961

  4. A Real-World Study of the Effect of Timing of Insulin Initiation on Outcomes in Older Medicare Beneficiaries with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Zhou, Steve; Wei, Wenhui; Ajmera, Mayank; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare clinical and economic outcomes of early insulin initiation with those of delayed initiation in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING Humana Medicare Advantage health insurance plan. PARTICIPANTS Older (≥65) Medicare beneficiaries with T2DM. MEASUREMENTS Subjects were grouped according to number of classes of oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) they had taken before initiation of insulin: one (early insulin initiators), two, or three or more (delayed insulin initiators). One-year follow-up outcomes included change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), percentage of older adults with HbA1c less than 8.0%, hypoglycemic events, and total healthcare costs. RESULTS Overall, 14,669 individuals were included in the analysis. Baseline and 1-year follow-up HbA1c levels were available for 4,028 (27.5%) individuals. Insulin was initiated early in 32% and delayed in 20%. At follow-up, unadjusted reduction in HbA1c was 0.9 ± 3.7% for the group with one OAD, 0.7 ± 2.4% for those with two, and 0.5 ± 3.6% for those with three or more. Early insulin initiation was associated with significantly greater reduction in HbA1c (0.4%; adjusted P <.001), 30% greater likelihood of achieving HbA1c less than 8.0% (adjusted odds ratio = 1.30, 95% confidence interval = 1.18–1.43), and no significant differences in total costs or hypoglycemia events (11.5% of early initiators vs 10.2% of delayed initiators; P = .32). CONCLUSION This study suggests beneficial effects of early insulin initiation in older adults with T2DM who do not have adequate glycemic control, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or greater total direct healthcare costs. PMID:25955280

  5. Looking inside the nation's medicine cabinet: trends in outpatient drug spending by Medicare beneficiaries, 1997 and 2001.

    PubMed

    Moeller, John F; Miller, G Edward; Banthin, Jessica S

    2004-01-01

    We examine trends in outpatient prescription drug spending by the Medicare civilian, noninstitutionalized population in 1997 and 2001 using nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We find that the 72 percent increase in drug spending over this period, in excess of price inflation for all goods and services, is primarily attributable to increases in the number of prescriptions per drug user and in the price per prescription. We also find, however, that an increase in the number of users is the primary reason for growth in a number of the fastest-growing subclasses of drugs. PMID:15371388

  6. Effect of an Innovative Medicare Managed Care Program on the Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Flood, Shannon; Bershadsky, Boris; Keckhafer, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to assess the quality of care provided by an innovative Medicare+Choice HMO targeted specifically at nursing home residents and employing nurse practitioners to provide additional primary care over and above that provided by physicians. The underlying premise of the Evercare approach is that the additional primary care will…

  7. Racial Differences in Hospice Use and In-Hospital Death among Medicare and Medicaid Dual-Eligible Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwak, Jung; Haley, William E.; Chiriboga, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the role of race in predicting the likelihood of using hospice and dying in a hospital among dual-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid) nursing home residents. Design and Methods: This follow-back cohort study examined factors associated with hospice use and in-hospital death among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White…

  8. Comparison of estimation methods for creating small area rates of acute myocardial infarction among Medicare beneficiaries in California.

    PubMed

    Yasaitis, Laura C; Arcaya, Mariana C; Subramanian, S V

    2015-09-01

    Creating local population health measures from administrative data would be useful for health policy and public health monitoring purposes. While a wide range of options--from simple spatial smoothers to model-based methods--for estimating such rates exists, there are relatively few side-by-side comparisons, especially not with real-world data. In this paper, we compare methods for creating local estimates of acute myocardial infarction rates from Medicare claims data. A Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain estimator that incorporated spatial and local random effects performed best, followed by a method-of-moments spatial Empirical Bayes estimator. As the former is more complicated and time-consuming, spatial linear Empirical Bayes methods may represent a good alternative for non-specialist investigators. PMID:26291680

  9. Dual Eligibility, Selection of Skilled Nursing Facility, and Length of Medicare Paid Postacute Stay

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Gozalo, Pedro; Tyler, Denise; Grabowski, David C.; Trivedi, Amal; Mor, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Medicare and Medicaid dual-eligible beneficiaries use more medical care and experience worse health outcomes than Medicare-only beneficiaries. This article points to a possible inefficiency in the skilled nursing facility (SNF) admission process, specifically that patients and SNFs are partially matched based on dual-eligibility status, and investigates its influence on patients’ SNF length of stay. Using a set of fee-for-service beneficiaries newly admitted for Medicare-paid SNF care, we document two findings: (1) compared with Medicare-only patients, dual-eligibles are more likely to be discharged to SNFs with low nurse-to-patient ratios and (2) dual-eligibles are more likely to become long-stay nursing home residents than Medicare-only beneficiaries if treated in SNFs with low nurse-to-patient ratios. We conclude that changes in the current SNF care referral process have the potential to reduce excess SNF utilization by dual-eligible beneficiaries and could help reduce spending by both Medicare and Medicaid. PMID:24830381

  10. 42 CFR 411.23 - Beneficiary's cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beneficiary's cooperation. 411.23 Section 411.23... Medicare Payment: General Provisions § 411.23 Beneficiary's cooperation. (a) If CMS takes action to recover conditional payments, the beneficiary must cooperate in the action. (b) If CMS's recovery action...

  11. The Adoption of New Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Modalities Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Breast Cancer: Clinical Correlates and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Kenneth B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Herrin, Jeph; Yu, James B.; Long, Jessica B.; Dostaler, Edward; and others

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: New radiation therapy modalities have broadened treatment options for older women with breast cancer, but it is unclear how clinical factors, geographic region, and physician preference affect the choice of radiation therapy modality. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify women diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer from 1998 to 2007 who underwent breast-conserving surgery. We assessed the temporal trends in, and costs of, the adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy. Using hierarchical logistic regression, we evaluated the relationship between the use of these new modalities and patient and regional characteristics. Results: Of 35,060 patients, 69.9% received conventional external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Although overall radiation therapy use remained constant, the use of IMRT increased from 0.0% to 12.6% from 1998 to 2007, and brachytherapy increased from 0.7% to 9.0%. The statistical variation in brachytherapy use attributable to the radiation oncologist and geographic region was 41.4% and 9.5%, respectively (for IMRT: 23.8% and 22.1%, respectively). Women undergoing treatment at a free-standing radiation facility were significantly more likely to receive IMRT than were women treated at a hospital-based facility (odds ratio for IMRT vs EBRT: 3.89 [95% confidence interval, 2.78-5.45]). No such association was seen for brachytherapy. The median radiation therapy cost per treated patient increased from $5389 in 2001 to $8539 in 2007. Conclusions: IMRT and brachytherapy use increased substantially from 1998 to 2007; overall, radiation therapy costs increased by more than 50%. Radiation oncologists played an important role in treatment choice for both types of radiation therapy, whereas geographic region played a bigger role in the use of IMRT than brachytherapy.

  12. 42 CFR 422.110 - Discrimination against beneficiaries prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discrimination against beneficiaries prohibited. 422.110 Section 422.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits and Beneficiary Protections § 422.110...

  13. 42 CFR 422.110 - Discrimination against beneficiaries prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discrimination against beneficiaries prohibited. 422.110 Section 422.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits and Beneficiary Protections § 422.110 Discrimination...

  14. 42 CFR 411.402 - Indemnification of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indemnification of beneficiary. 411.402 Section 411.402 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Payment for Certain Excluded Services § 411.402 Indemnification...

  15. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  16. 42 CFR 411.43 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation. 411.43 Section 411.43 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment...

  17. 42 CFR 411.43 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation. 411.43 Section 411.43 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment...

  18. How Successful Is Medicare Advantage?

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P; McGuire, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Context Medicare Part C, or Medicare Advantage (MA), now almost 30 years old, has generally been viewed as a policy disappointment. Enrollment has vacillated but has never come close to the penetration of managed care plans in the commercial insurance market or in Medicaid, and because of payment policy decisions and selection, the MA program is viewed as having added to cost rather than saving funds for the Medicare program. Recent changes in Medicare policy, including improved risk adjustment, however, may have changed this picture. Methods This article summarizes findings from our group's work evaluating MA's recent performance and investigating payment options for improving its performance even more. We studied the behavior of both beneficiaries and plans, as well as the effects of Medicare policy. Findings Beneficiaries make “mistakes” in their choice of MA plan options that can be explained by behavioral economics. Few beneficiaries make an active choice after they enroll in Medicare. The high prevalence of “zero-premium” plans signals inefficiency in plan design and in the market's functioning. That is, Medicare premium policies interfere with economically efficient choices. The adverse selection problem, in which healthier, lower-cost beneficiaries tend to join MA, appears much diminished. The available measures, while limited, suggest that, on average, MA plans offer care of equal or higher quality and for less cost than traditional Medicare (TM). In counties, greater MA penetration appears to improve TM's performance. Conclusions Medicare policies regarding lock-in provisions and risk adjustment that were adopted in the mid-2000s have mitigated the adverse selection problem previously plaguing MA. On average, MA plans appear to offer higher value than TM, and positive spillovers from MA into TM imply that reimbursement should not necessarily be neutral. Policy changes in Medicare that reform the way that beneficiaries are charged for MA plan

  19. 75 FR 19677 - Medicare Program; Policy and Technical Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...This final rule makes revisions to the regulations governing the Medicare Advantage (MA) program (Part C) and prescription drug benefit program (Part D) based on our continued experience in the administration of the Part C and D programs. The revisions strengthen various program participation and exit requirements; strengthen beneficiary protections; ensure that plan offerings to beneficiaries......

  20. 42 CFR 422.110 - Discrimination against beneficiaries prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discrimination against beneficiaries prohibited. 422.110 Section 422.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits and...

  1. Treatment patterns, overall survival, healthcare resource use and costs in elderly Medicare beneficiaries with chronic myeloid leukemia using second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors as second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, B Douglas; Liu, Jun; Latremouille-Viau, Dominick; Guerin, Annie; Fernandez, Daniel; Chen, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Objective Though the median age at diagnosis is 64 years, few studies focus on elderly (≥65 years) patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). This study examines healthcare outcomes among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with CML who started nilotinib or dasatinib after imatinib. Research design and methods Patients were identified in the Medicare Research Identifiable Files (2006-2012) and had continuous Medicare Parts A, B, and D coverage. Main outcome measures Treatment patterns, overall survival (OS), monthly healthcare resource utilization and medical costs were measured from the second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) initiation (index date) to end of Medicare coverage. Results Despite similar adherence, dasatinib patients (N = 379) were more likely to start on the recommended dose (74% vs. 53%; p < 0.001), and to have dose reductions (21% vs. 11%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.94; p = 0.002) or dose increases (9% vs. 7%; adjusted HR = 1.81; p = 0.048) than nilotinib patients (N = 280). Fewer nilotinib patients discontinued (59% vs. 67%; adjusted HR = 0.80; p = 0.026) or switched to another TKI (21% vs. 29%; adjusted HR = 0.72; p = 0.044) than dasatinib patients. Nilotinib patients had longer median OS (>4.9 years vs. 4.0 years; p = 0.032) and 37% lower mortality risk than dasatinib patients (adjusted HR = 0.63; p = 0.008). Nilotinib patients had 23% fewer inpatient admissions, 30% fewer emergency room visits, 13% fewer outpatient visits (all p < 0.05), and lower monthly medical costs (by $513, p = 0.024) than dasatinib patients. Limitations Lack of clinical assessment (disease phase and response to first-line therapy) and retrospective nature of study (unobservable potential confounding factors, non-randomized treatment choice). Conclusions In the current study of elderly CML patients, initiation of second-line TKIs frequently occurs at doses lower than the recommended starting doses and

  2. Managed care and Medicare reform.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, J B

    1997-04-01

    A primary goal of many Medicare reform proposals is to move program beneficiaries into managed care plans operated by private insurance companies. Advocates contend that managed care plans, especially health maintenance organizations (HMOs), can save substantial money for the federal government, while also improving the quality of medical care and scope of covered benefits for Medicare enrollees. Should Medicare follow the private sector by adopting managed care-based reforms? This article summarized the claims that are made for and against incorporating managed care into Medicare, and reviews evidence from the program's experience with HMOs on financial savings, benefits coverage, and quality of care. This evidence raises concerns regarding the ability of HMOs to provide adequate care for chronically ill Medicare patients. Moreover, there is considerable uncertainty about the future performance of managed care plans. I therefore conclude that policy makers should move cautiously in embracing managed care and that Medicare should not adopt financial incentives, such as vouchers, that are intended to push beneficiaries into HMOs. However, Medicare beneficiary enrollment in managed care plans is likely to increase substantially in coming years regardless of public policy. It is therefore critical for Medicare to pursue policies that protect the quality of care for elderly and disabled patients in managed care plans; curtail excessive payments to HMOs that result from favorable selection of healthier enrollees; and preserve the current fee-for-service Medicare program. PMID:9159717

  3. In the United States, "Opt-Out" States Show No Increase in Access to Anesthesia Services for Medicare Beneficiaries Compared with Non-"Opt-Out" States.

    PubMed

    Sun, Eric C; Miller, Thomas R; Halzack, Nicholas M

    2016-05-01

    In the United States, anesthesia care can be provided by anesthesiologists or nurse anesthetists. Since 2001, 17 states have exercised their right to "opt-out" of the federal requirement that a physician supervise the administration of anesthesia by a nurse anesthetist, with the majority citing increased access to anesthesia care as the rationale for their decision. By using Medicare data, we found that most (4 of 5) cohorts of "opt-out" states likely experienced smaller growth in anesthesia utilization rates compared with non-"opt-out" states, suggesting that opt-out was not associated with an increase in access to anesthesia care. PMID:26895523

  4. 42 CFR 422.108 - Medicare secondary payer (MSP) procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicare secondary payer (MSP) procedures. 422.108 Section 422.108 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits and Beneficiary Protections §...

  5. 42 CFR 422.108 - Medicare secondary payer (MSP) procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medicare secondary payer (MSP) procedures. 422.108 Section 422.108 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits and Beneficiary Protections §...

  6. Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Enrollees Report Less Positive Experiences Than Their Medicare Advantage Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Marc N; Landon, Bruce E; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Edwards, Carol; Orr, Nathan; Beckett, Megan K; Mallett, Joshua; Cleary, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    Since 2006, Medicare beneficiaries have been able to obtain prescription drug coverage through standalone prescription drug plans or their Medicare Advantage (MA) health plan, options exercised in 2015 by 72 percent of beneficiaries. Using data from community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries older than age sixty-four in 700 plans surveyed from 2007 to 2014, we compared beneficiaries' assessments of Medicare prescription drug coverage when provided by standalone plans or integrated into an MA plan. Beneficiaries in standalone plans consistently reported less positive experiences with prescription drug plans (ease of getting medications, getting coverage information, and getting cost information) than their MA counterparts. Because MA plans are responsible for overall health care costs, they might have more integrated systems and greater incentives than standalone prescription drug plans to provide enrollees medications and information effectively, including, since 2010, quality bonus payments to these MA plans under provisions of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:26953300

  7. 2015: Rural Medicare Advantage Enrollment Update.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Chance; Ullrich, Fred; Mueller, Keith

    2015-07-01

    Key Findings. (1) Rural enrollment in Medicare Advantage (MA) and other prepaid plans increased by 6.8 percent between March 2014 and March 2015 to 2.1 million members, or 21.2 percent of all rural residents eligible for Medicare. This compares to a national enrollment in MA and other prepaid plans of 31.1 percent (16.7 million) of enrollees. (2) Rural enrollment in Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) plans (including point-of-service, or POS, plans), Preferred Provider Organization (PP0) plans, and other pre-paid plans (including Medicare Cost and Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly Plans) all increased by 5-13 percent. (3) Enrollment in private fee-for-service (PFFS) plans continued to decline (decreasing nationally by 15.8 percent and 12.1 percent in rural counties over the period March 2014-2015). Only eight states showed an increase in PFFS plan enrollment. Five states experienced decreases of 50 percent or more. (4) The five states with the highest percentages of rural beneficiaries enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan are Minnesota (51.8 percent), Hawaii (39.4 percent), Pennsylvania (36.2 percent), Wisconsin (35.5 percent), and New York (31.5 percent). PMID:26793818

  8. Managed Care and Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: Challenges in Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Edith G.; Clark, William D.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes administrative issues and beneficiary perspectives on the delivery of medical services under Medicare+ Choice (M+C) and/or Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) for dually eligible beneficiaries. We interviewed staff at nine health plans in four market areas in 2000 and 2001, and conducted beneficiary focus groups in 2001. The study reveals beneficiary confusion about the relationship between their dual coverage and managed care enrollment, and problems with care and benefit coordination across these arrangements, based on regulatory and administrative obstacles to effective benefit and care coordination for beneficiaries enrolled in these varied managed care arrangements. PMID:12545599

  9. Use of Stress Testing and Diagnostic Catheterization after Coronary Stenting: Association of Site-level Patterns with Patient Characteristics and Outcomes in 247,052 Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bimal R.; McCoy, Lisa A.; Federspiel, Jerome J.; Mudrick, Daniel; Cowper, Patricia A.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Lytle, Barbara L.; Green, Cynthia L.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine diagnostic testing patterns after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background Little is known about patterns of diagnostic testing after PCI in the U.S. or the relationship of these patterns with clinical outcomes. Methods We linked Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services inpatient and outpatient claims to the National Cardiovascular Data Registry® CathPCI Registry® data from 2005–2007. Hospital quartiles of the cumulative incidence of diagnostic testing use within 12 and 24 months post-PCI were compared for patient characteristics, repeat revascularization, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and death. Results A total of 247,052 patients underwent PCI at 656 institutions. Patient and site characteristics were similar across testing use quartiles. There was a 9% and 20% higher adjusted risk of repeat revascularization in Quartile 3 and Quartile 4 (highest testing rate), respectively, when compared to Quartile 1 (lowest testing rate) (p=0.020 and <0.0001, respectively). The adjusted risk for death or AMI did not differ among quartiles. Conclusions While patient characteristics were largely independent of rates of post-PCI testing, higher testing rates was not associated with lower risks of myocardial infarction or death, but repeat revascularization was significantly higher at these sites. Additional studies should examine whether increased testing is a marker for improved quality of post-PCI care or simply increased healthcare utilization. PMID:23727207

  10. Lessons Learned from the National Medicare & You Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Elizabeth; Teichman, Lori; Crawley, Barbara; Gaumer, Gary; Joseph, Catherine; Reardon, Leo

    2001-01-01

    In fall 1998 CMS implemented the National Medicare Education Program (NMEP) to educate beneficiaries about their Medicare program benefits; health plan choices; supplemental health insurance; beneficiary rights, responsibilities, and protections; and health behaviors. CMS has been monitoring the implementation of the NMEP in six case study sites as well as monitoring each of the information channels for communicating with beneficiaries. This article describes select findings from the case studies, and highlights from assessment activities related to the Medicare & You handbook, the toll-free 1-800-MEDICARE Helpline, Internet, and Regional Education About Choices in Health (REACH). PMID:12500359

  11. 42 CFR 411.51 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-fault insurance. 411.51 Section 411.51 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Liability or No-Fault Insurance § 411.51 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance. (a) The beneficiary...

  12. 42 CFR 411.51 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-fault insurance. 411.51 Section 411.51 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Liability or No-Fault Insurance § 411.51 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance. (a) The beneficiary...

  13. 42 CFR 411.51 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-fault insurance. 411.51 Section 411.51 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Liability or No-Fault Insurance § 411.51 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance. (a) The beneficiary...

  14. 42 CFR 411.51 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-fault insurance. 411.51 Section 411.51 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Liability or No-Fault Insurance § 411.51 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance. (a) The beneficiary...

  15. 42 CFR 411.43 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... workers' compensation. 411.43 Section 411.43 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.43 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation. (a) The beneficiary is responsible...

  16. 42 CFR 411.43 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... workers' compensation. 411.43 Section 411.43 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.43 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation. (a) The beneficiary is responsible...

  17. 42 CFR 411.43 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... workers' compensation. 411.43 Section 411.43 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PAYMENT Limitations on Medicare Payment for Services Covered Under Workers' Compensation § 411.43 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to workers' compensation. (a) The beneficiary is responsible...

  18. 42 CFR 489.27 - Beneficiary notice of discharge rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beneficiary notice of discharge rights. 489.27 Section 489.27 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION PROVIDER AGREEMENTS AND SUPPLIER APPROVAL Essentials of Provider Agreements § 489.27 Beneficiary...

  19. The social roles of Medicare: assessing Medicare's collateral benefits.

    PubMed

    Gusmano, M; Schlesinger, M

    2001-02-01

    The Medicare program incorporates a number of functions that go beyond providing health insurance to its beneficiaries. These activities, which we refer to as "collateral" functions, may have important health consequences but are also an increasing source of controversy. In this essay we develop a conceptual framework for categorizing these involvements, introduce some additional options that might complement Medicare's current collateral functions, assess the reaction of policy elites and Medicare's current beneficiaries to these alternatives, and evaluate the role that collateral activities play for Medicare's core mission. A case can be made for expanding some collateral involvements, but only if the Health Care Financing Administration has the strategic direction and administrative capacity to effectively implement these activities. PMID:11253454

  20. 42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans. (a) Establishment and designation of medical savings account (MSA). A beneficiary who elects coverage under an...

  1. 42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans. (a) Establishment and designation of medical savings account (MSA). A beneficiary who elects coverage under an...

  2. 42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans. (a) Establishment and designation of medical savings account (MSA). A beneficiary who elects coverage under an...

  3. 42 CFR 411.51 - Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance. 411.51 Section 411.51 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES....51 Beneficiary's responsibility with respect to no-fault insurance. (a) The beneficiary...

  4. Impact of Critical Access Hospital Conversion on Beneficiary Liability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Boyd H.

    2008-01-01

    Context: While the Medicare Critical Access Hospital (CAH) program has improved the financial viability of small rural hospitals and enhanced access to care in rural communities, the program puts beneficiaries at risk for paying a larger share of the cost of services covered under the Medicare part B benefit. Purpose: This paper examines the…

  5. Privacy Act of 1974; matching program--HCFA. Notice of a matching program--the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Social Security Administration (SSA), and HCFA--disclosure of IRS taxpayer identity and filing status information to be matched with SSA earned income information for Medicare beneficiaries and their spouses.

    PubMed

    1990-09-21

    As required by Section 6202 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA 1989), Public Law 101-239, the Department of Health and Human Services is providing public notice that the IRS and the SSA will disclose certain information regarding the taxpayer identification and filing status and the earned income of Medicare beneficiaries and their spouses for HCFA's use in identifying Medicare secondary payer (MSP) situations. This will enable HCFA to seek recovery of identified mistaken payments that were the liability of another primary insurer or other type of payer. The matching report set forth below is in compliance with the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (Pub. L. No. 100-503). PMID:10107026

  6. Spironolactone use and higher hospital readmission for Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure, left ventricular ejection fraction <45%, and estimated glomerular filtration rate <45 ml/min/1.73 m(2.).

    PubMed

    Inampudi, Chakradhari; Parvataneni, Sridivya; Morgan, Charity J; Deedwania, Prakash; Fonarow, Gregg C; Sanders, Paul W; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Butler, Javed; Forman, Daniel E; Aronow, Wilbert S; Allman, Richard M; Ahmed, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Although randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of aldosterone antagonists for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), they excluded patients with serum creatinine >2.5 mg/dl, and their use is contraindicated in those with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present analysis, we examined the association of spironolactone use with readmission in hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries with HFrEF and advanced CKD. Of the 1,140 patients with HFrEF (EF <45%) and advanced CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <45 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), 207 received discharge prescriptions for spironolactone. Using propensity scores (PSs) for the receipt of discharge prescriptions for spironolactone, we estimated PS-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for spironolactone-associated outcomes. Patients (mean age 76 years, 49% women, 25% African-American) had mean EF 28%, mean eGFR 31 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and mean potassium 4.5 mEq/L. Spironolactone use had significant PS-adjusted association with higher risk of 30-day (HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.90) and 1-year (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.63) all-cause readmissions. The risk of 1-year all-cause readmission was higher among 106 patients with eGFR <15 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (HR 4.75, 95% CI 1.84 to 12.28) than among those with eGFR 15 to 45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.61, p for interaction 0.003). Spironolactone use had no association with HF readmission and all-cause mortality. In conclusion, among hospitalized patients with HFrEF and advanced CKD, spironolactone use was associated with higher all-cause readmission but had no association with all-cause mortality or HF readmission. PMID:24846806

  7. Demand for a Medicare prescription drug benefit: exploring consumer preferences under a managed competition framework.

    PubMed

    Cline, Richard R; Mott, David A

    2003-01-01

    Several proposals for adding a prescription drug benefit to the Medicare program rely on consumer choice and market forces to promote efficiency. However, little information exists regarding: 1) the extent of price sensitivity for such plans among Medicare beneficiaries, or 2) the extent to which drug-only insurance plans using various cost-control mechanisms might experience adverse selection. Using data from a survey of elderly Wisconsin residents regarding their likely choices from a menu of hypothetical drug plans, we show that respondents are likely to be price sensitive with respect to both premiums and out-of-pocket costs but that selection problems may arise in these markets. Outside intervention may be necessary to ensure the feasibility of a market-based approach to a Medicare drug benefit. PMID:13677564

  8. 42 CFR 423.6 - Cost-sharing in beneficiary education and enrollment-related costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost-sharing in beneficiary education and enrollment-related costs. 423.6 Section 423.6 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM VOLUNTARY MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT General Provisions § 423.6 Cost-sharing...

  9. 77 FR 22071 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ...This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare Advantage (MA) program (Part C) regulations and prescription drug benefit program (Part D) regulations to implement new statutory requirements; strengthen beneficiary protections; exclude plan participants that perform poorly; improve program efficiencies; and clarify program requirements. It also responds to public comments regarding......

  10. Medicare risk contracting: analyzing managed care for the aging population in the USA.

    PubMed

    Rivers, P A; Asubonteng, C A; Bumpus, M; Munchus, G

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on Medicare risk contracting in the USA. The issue of the current method of reimbursement versus Medicare risk contracting is explored. Risk sharing and payment mechanisms are described and analyzed. The strengths and weaknesses (score-card) of Medicare beneficiaries entering HMOs are reviewed. Finally, the issue of selection bias in Medicare HMOs is discussed regarding future implementation strategy. PMID:10351021

  11. An Economic History of Medicare Part C

    PubMed Central

    Mcguire, Thomas G; Newhouse, Joseph P; Sinaiko, Anna D

    2011-01-01

    Context: Twenty-five years ago, private insurance plans were introduced into the Medicare program with the stated dual aims of (1) giving beneficiaries a choice of health insurance plans beyond the fee-for-service Medicare program and (2) transferring to the Medicare program the efficiencies and cost savings achieved by managed care in the private sector. Methods: In this article we review the economic history of Medicare Part C, known today as Medicare Advantage, focusing on the impact of major changes in the program's structure and of plan payment methods on trends in the availability of private plans, plan enrollment, and Medicare spending. Additionally, we compare the experience of Medicare Advantage and of employer-sponsored health insurance with managed care over the same time period. Findings: Beneficiaries' access to private plans has been inconsistent over the program's history, with higher plan payments resulting in greater choice and enrollment and vice versa. But Medicare Advantage generally has cost more than the traditional Medicare program, an overpayment that has increased in recent years. Conclusions: Major changes in Medicare Advantage's payment rules are needed in order to simultaneously encourage the participation of private plans, the provision of high-quality care, and to save Medicare money. PMID:21676024

  12. Shaping the future of Medicare.

    PubMed

    Davis, K

    1999-04-01

    This article suggests that further major changes in Medicare at this time are unwarranted. The enactment of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) has eliminated the need for quick action to assure solvency of the Part A Trust Fund, which is projected to be in balance for at least ten years. It will take time to implement and assess the effects of the BBA. The uncertainties of future trends in the health sector and Medicare suggest a go-slow approach. Future reforms to finance health care as the baby boom generation retires should be guided by the goals of continuing to assure health and economic security to elderly and disabled beneficiaries, with particular attention to the financial burdens on lower-income beneficiaries and those with serious illnesses or chronic conditions. Employers are cutting back on retiree health coverage, and the appropriate contribution of employers will need to be addressed. The BBA included major provisions to expand Medicare managed care choices. Special attention will need to be given to how well these innovations work, their cost impact on Medicare, the extent to which beneficiaries are able to make informed choices, and whether risk selection among plans and between traditional Medicare and plans can be adequately addressed. Most of the savings of BBA came from tighter payment rates to managed care plans and fee-for-service providers; it is unclear whether these will lead to rates well below the private sector or whether further savings can be achieved by extending these changes beyond 2002. PMID:10199676

  13. Medicare Payment Reform: Aligning Incentives for Better Care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gerard F; Davis, Karen; Guterman, Stuart

    2015-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has provided the Medicare program with an array of tools to improve the quality of care that beneficiaries receive and to increase the efficiency with which that care is provided. Notably, the ACA has created the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, which is developing and testing promising new models to improve the quality of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries while reducing spending. These new models are part of an effort by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to increase the proportion of traditional Medicare payments tied to quality or value to 85 percent by 2016 and 90 percent by 2018. This issue brief, one in a series on Medicare's past, present, and future, explores the evolution of Medicare payment policy, the potential of value-based payment to improve care for beneficiaries and achieve savings, and strategies for accelerating its adoption. PMID:26151988

  14. Medicare program; Medicare prescription drug discount card. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2003-12-15

    Section 101, subpart 4 of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, codified in section 1860D-31 of the Social Security Act, provides for a voluntary prescription drug discount card program for Medicare beneficiaries entitled to benefits, or enrolled, under Part A or enrolled under Part B, excluding beneficiaries entitled to medical assistance for outpatient prescription drugs under Medicaid, including section 1115 waiver demonstrations. Eligible beneficiaries may access negotiated prices on prescription drugs by enrolling in drug discount card programs offered by Medicare-endorsed sponsors. Eligible beneficiaries may enroll in the Medicare drug discount card program beginning no later than 6 months after the date of enactment of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 and ending December 31, 2005. After December 31, 2005, beneficiaries enrolled in the program may continue to use their drug discount card during a short transition period beginning January 1, 2006 and ending upon the effective date of a beneficiary's outpatient drug coverage under Medicare Part D, but no later than the last day of the initial open enrollment period under Part D. Beneficiaries with incomes no more than 135 percent of the poverty line applicable to their family size who do not have outpatient prescription drug coverage under certain programs--Medicaid, certain health insurance coverage or group health insurance (such as retiree coverage), TRICARE, and Federal employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP)--also are eligible for transitional assistance, or payment of $600 in 2004 and up to $600 in 2005 of the cost of covered discount card drugs obtained under the program. In most cases, any transitional assistance remaining available to a beneficiary on December 31, 2004 may be rolled over to 2005 and applied toward the cost of covered discount card drugs obtained under the program during 2005. Similarly, in most cases, any

  15. Medicare Advantage update: benefits, enrollment, and payments after the ACA.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Kathryn

    2013-07-19

    In 2012, the Medicare program paid private health plans $136 billion to cover about 13 million beneficiaries who received Part A and B benefits through the Medicare Advantage (MA) program rather than traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare. Private plans have been a part of the program since the 1970s. Debate about the policy goals--Should they cost less per beneficiary than FFS Medicare? Should they be available to all beneficiaries? Should they be able to offer additional benefits?--has long accompanied Medicare's private plan option.This debate is reflected in the history of Medicare payment policy,and policy decisions over the years have affected plans' willingness to participate and beneficiaries' enrollment at different periods of the program. Recently, evidence that the Medicare program was paying more per beneficiary in MA relative to what would have been spent under FFS Medicare prompted policymakers to reduce MA payments in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA). So far, plans continue to participate in MA and enrollment continues to grow, but payment reductions in 2012 through 2014 have been partially offset by payments made to plans through the quality bonus payment demonstration.This brief contains recent data on plan enrollment, availability, and benefits and discusses MA plan payment policy, including changes to MA payment made in the ACA and their actual and projected effects. PMID:24049878

  16. 42 CFR 411.33 - Amount of Medicare secondary payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... deductible obligation. (3) An ESRD beneficiary received 8 dialysis treatments for which a facility charged... met. The primary payer paid $1,024 for Medicare-covered services. The composite rate per...

  17. 42 CFR 411.33 - Amount of Medicare secondary payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... deductible obligation. (3) An ESRD beneficiary received 8 dialysis treatments for which a facility charged... met. The primary payer paid $1,024 for Medicare-covered services. The composite rate per...

  18. Medicare Advantage: options for standardizing benefits and information to improve consumer choice.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ellen; Hoadley, Jack

    2008-04-01

    The Medicare Advantage (MA) program offers beneficiaries a choice of private health plans as alternatives to the traditional fee-for-service Medicare program. MA plans potentially provide additional value, but as plan choices have proliferated, consumers contemplating their options have had difficulty understanding how they differ. Through "standardization" more consistent types of information and a limited number of dimensions along which plans vary--MA plans could reduce complexity and improve beneficiaries' ability to make informed choices. Such standardization steps would offer more meaningful variation in the health coverage options available to beneficiaries, Medicare officials and their community partners would find it far easier to educate beneficiaries about their health plan choices, and beneficiaries would better understand what they were buying. Standardization might also strengthen the ability of the market-based Medicare Advantage program to incorporate beneficiary preferences. PMID:18426037

  19. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  20. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  1. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  2. 42 CFR 408.21 - Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an additional benefit under Medicare+Choice plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE Amount of Monthly Premiums § 408.21 Reduction in Medicare Part B premium as an... direct billed beneficiaries of their reduced premium amounts in the regular monthly billing process....

  3. Use of pharmacists or pharmacies as Medicare Part D information sources

    PubMed Central

    Kennelty, Korey A.; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Chewning, Betty; Mott, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize beneficiaries who used a pharmacy or pharmacist as a Medicare Part D information source. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study involved 4,724 Medicare Part D beneficiaries who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957. The main outcome measure was beneficiary self-reported use of a pharmacy or pharmacist as a Medicare Part D information source. Results Only 13% of the total sample and 15% of those with three or more medications used a pharmacy or pharmacist for Medicare Part D information. Adjusted logistic regression revealed that beneficiaries living in rural communities, compared with metropolitan areas, and with higher out-of-pocket prescription costs were more likely to use a pharmacy or pharmacist for Medicare Part D information. Beneficiaries with lower educational attainment were less likely to use a pharmacy or pharmacist for Medicare Part D information. Conclusion Pharmacists have the knowledge and are in the position in the community to effectively educate beneficiaries about the Medicare Part D program. However, this study suggests that few beneficiaries are using pharmacists or pharmacies for Medicare Part D information. PMID:23229982

  4. Babesiosis Occurrence among the Elderly in the United States, as Recorded in Large Medicare Databases during 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Menis, Mikhail; Forshee, Richard A.; Kumar, Sanjai; McKean, Stephen; Warnock, Rob; Izurieta, Hector S.; Gondalia, Rahul; Johnson, Chris; Mintz, Paul D.; Walderhaug, Mark O.; Worrall, Christopher M.; Kelman, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human babesiosis, caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites, can be an asymptomatic or mild-to-severe disease that may be fatal. The study objective was to assess babesiosis occurrence among the U.S. elderly Medicare beneficiaries, ages 65 and older, during 2006–2013. Methods Our retrospective claims-based study utilized large Medicare administrative databases. Babesiosis occurrence was ascertained by recorded ICD-9-CM diagnosis code. The study assessed babesiosis occurrence rates (per 100,000 elderly Medicare beneficiaries) overall and by year, age, gender, race, state of residence, and diagnosis months. Results A total of 10,305 elderly Medicare beneficiaries had a recorded babesiosis diagnosis during the eight-year study period, for an overall rate of about 5 per 100,000 persons. Study results showed a significant increase in babesiosis occurrence over time (p<0.05), with the largest number of cases recorded in 2013 (N = 1,848) and the highest rates (per 100,000) in five Northeastern states: Connecticut (46), Massachusetts (45), Rhode Island (42), New York (27), and New Jersey (14). About 75% of all cases were diagnosed from May through October. Babesiosis occurrence was significantly higher among males vs. females and whites vs. non-whites. Conclusion Our study reveals increasing babesiosis occurrence among the U.S. elderly during 2006–2013, with highest rates in the babesiosis-endemic states. The study also shows variation in babesiosis occurrence by age, gender, race, state of residence, and diagnosis months. Overall, our study highlights the importance of large administrative databases in assessing the occurrence of emerging infections in the United States. PMID:26469785

  5. Cost of schizophrenia in the Medicare program.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Rachel; Bailey, Robert A; Muller, James; Le, Jennifer; Dirani, Riad

    2014-06-01

    Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with non-schizoaffective schizophrenia (MBS) in a 5% national Medicare fee-for-service sample from 2003-2007 were followed for 1-6 years. Medicare population and cost estimates also were made from 2001-2009. Service utilization and Medicare (and beneficiary share) payments for all services except prescription drugs were analyzed. Although adults with schizophrenia make up approximately 1% of the US adult population, they represent about 1.5% of Medicare beneficiaries. MBSs are disproportionately male and minority compared to national data describing the overall schizophrenia population. They also are younger than the general Medicare population (GMB): males are 9 years younger than females on average, and most enter Medicare long before age 65 through eligibility for social security disability, remaining in the program until death. The cost of care for MBSs in 2009 was, on average, 80% higher than for the average GMB per patient year (2010 dollars), and more than 50% of these costs are attributable to a combination of psychiatric and medical hospitalizations, concentrated in about 30% of MBSs with 1 or more hospitalizations per year. From 2004-2009, total estimated Medicare fee-for-service payments for MBSs increased from $9.4 billion to $11.5 billion, excluding Part D prescription drugs and payments for services to MBSs in Medicare for less than 1 year. Study results characterize utilization and costs for other services and suggest opportunities for further study to inform policy to improve access and continuity of care and decrease costs to the Medicare program associated with this population. PMID:24156665

  6. 42 CFR 424.64 - Payment after beneficiary's death: Bill has not been paid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Made in Special Situations § 424.64 Payment after beneficiary's death: Bill has not been paid. (a... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment after beneficiary's death: Bill has not been paid. 424.64 Section 424.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  7. Educating Older Adults About Medicare: The Role of Cognitive Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayen, Ute J.; McCormack, Lauren A.; Bann, Carla M.

    2005-01-01

    A survey was conducted on 3,738 beneficiaries about their knowledge of the Medicare program as well as their reading habits, reading comprehension ability, and metamemory. Factor analysis yielded a reading and a metamemory factor. These factors explained variance in knowledge about Medicare above and beyond the variance explained by formal…

  8. The Experience of Rural Independent Pharmacies with Medicare Part D: Reports from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Fraser, Roslyn; Mason, Michelle; Mueller, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Context: The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) created prescription drug coverage for Medicare beneficiaries through a new Part D program, the single largest addition to Medicare since its creation in 1965. Prior to program implementation in January 2006, concerns had been voiced as to how independent…

  9. 75 FR 73086 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Renewal of Deeming Authority of the National Committee for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Deeming Authority of the National Committee for Quality Assurance for Medicare Advantage Health... application to renew the Medicare Advantage Deeming Authority of the National Committee for Quality Assurance... beneficiaries may receive covered services through a Medicare Advantage (MA) organization that contracts...

  10. Confronting the barriers to chronic care management in Medicare.

    PubMed

    Berenson, Robert A; Horvath, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of the current Medicare program--both traditional fee-for-service and risk-based contracting--to address the needs of beneficiaries with chronic conditions, who represent almost 80 percent of program enrollment. Grounded in indemnity insurance principles, including concerns about "moral hazard," the traditional Medicare program faces difficulty evolving to support of a chronic care model of health care practice. Although capitation may be the most desirable platform to support provision of care to beneficiaries with chronic conditions, the current structural limitations and problems faced in the Medicare+Choice program limit capitation's use at this time. PMID:14527234

  11. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds. PMID:10915458

  12. 42 CFR 417.460 - Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP. 417.460 Section 417.460 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE...

  13. 42 CFR 417.460 - Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP. 417.460 Section 417.460 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  14. 42 CFR 417.460 - Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP. 417.460 Section 417.460 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE...

  15. 42 CFR 417.460 - Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disenrollment of beneficiaries by an HMO or CMP. 417.460 Section 417.460 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HEALTH MAINTENANCE...

  16. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals. 415.162 Section 415.162 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS,...

  17. 42 CFR 409.42 - Beneficiary qualifications for coverage of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Beneficiary qualifications for coverage of services. 409.42 Section 409.42 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under...

  18. Modernizing Medicare's Benefit Design and Low-Income Subsidies to Ensure Access and Affordability.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Cathy; Davis, Karen; Buttorff, Christine; Andersen, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Insurance coverage through the traditional Medicare program is complex, fragmented, and incomplete. Beneficiaries must purchase supplemental private insurance to fill in the gaps. While impoverished beneficiaries may receive supplemental coverage through Medicaid and subsidies for prescription drugs, help is limited for people with incomes above the poverty level. This patchwork quilt leads to confusion for beneficiaries and high administrative costs, while also undermining coverage and care coordination. Most important, Medicare's benefits fail to limit out-of-pocket costs or ensure adequate financial protection, especially for beneficiaries with low incomes and serious health problems. This brief, part of a series about Medicare's past, present, and future, presents options for an integrated benefit for enrollees in traditional Medicare. The new benefit would not only reduce cost burdens but also could potentially strengthen the Medicare program and enhance its role in stimulating and supporting innovations throughout the health care delivery system. PMID:26219116

  19. 42 CFR 412.507 - Limitation on charges to beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... System for Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.507 Limitation on charges to beneficiaries. (a) Prohibited charges. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a long-term care hospital may not charge a... days used to calculate the Medicare payment. (b) Permitted charges. (1) A long-term care hospital...

  20. 42 CFR 412.507 - Limitation on charges to beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... System for Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.507 Limitation on charges to beneficiaries. (a) Prohibited charges. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a long-term care hospital may not charge a... days used to calculate the Medicare payment. (b) Permitted charges. (1) A long-term care hospital...

  1. 42 CFR 476.130 - Beneficiary complaint review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beneficiary complaint review procedures. 476.130 Section 476.130 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Quality...

  2. 42 CFR 476.120 - Submission of written beneficiary complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Submission of written beneficiary complaints. 476.120 Section 476.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Quality...

  3. 42 CFR 476.130 - Beneficiary complaint review procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Beneficiary complaint review procedures. 476.130 Section 476.130 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and...

  4. 42 CFR 476.140 - Beneficiary complaint reconsideration procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Beneficiary complaint reconsideration procedures. 476.140 Section 476.140 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization...

  5. 42 CFR 476.140 - Beneficiary complaint reconsideration procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beneficiary complaint reconsideration procedures. 476.140 Section 476.140 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW Review Responsibilities of...

  6. 42 CFR 476.120 - Submission of written beneficiary complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Submission of written beneficiary complaints. 476.120 Section 476.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and...

  7. 42 CFR 431.808 - Protection of beneficiary rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of beneficiary rights. 431.808 Section 431.808 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION...

  8. 42 CFR 431.808 - Protection of beneficiary rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of beneficiary rights. 431.808 Section 431.808 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION...

  9. 42 CFR 431.808 - Protection of beneficiary rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of beneficiary rights. 431.808 Section 431.808 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION...

  10. 42 CFR 456.211 - Beneficiary information required for UR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Beneficiary information required for UR. 456.211 Section 456.211 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental...

  11. 42 CFR 456.211 - Beneficiary information required for UR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Beneficiary information required for UR. 456.211 Section 456.211 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental...

  12. Does Medicare Advantage Cost Less Than Traditional Medicare?

    PubMed

    Biles, Brian; Casillas, Giselle; Guterman, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    The costs of providing benefits to enrollees in private Medicare Advantage (MA) plans are slightly less, on average, than what traditional Medicare spends per beneficiary in the same county. However, MA plans that are able to keep their costs comparatively low are concen­trated in a fairly small number of U.S. counties. In the 25 counties where the cost differences between MA plans and traditional Medicare are largest, MA plans spent a total of $5.2 billion less than what traditional Medicare would have been expected to spend on the same benefi­ciaries, with health maintenance organizations (HMOs) accounting for all of that difference. In the rest of the country, MA plans spent $4.8 billion above the expected costs under tradi­tional Medicare. Broad determinations about the relative efficiency of MA plans and traditional Medicare can therefore be misleading, as they fail to take into account local conditions and individual plans' performance. PMID:26934756

  13. MEDICARE PROVIDER ANALYSIS AND REVIEW DATA (MEDPAR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MEDPAR files contain information for 100% of Medicare beneficiaries using hospital inpatient services. Data is provided by state and then by Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) for all short stay and inpatient hospitals for fiscal years 1998-2000. The following fields are furnished: ...

  14. A Note on Income Effects and Health Care Cost Growth in Medicare

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper sets out a model of technical change and health care cost growth for a representative Medicare beneficiary facing a budget constraint. Derivation of an explicit expression for health care cost growth shows how technological change and preferences, including income effects, affect cost growth. The analysis highlights the role of the 76% percent subsidy from current taxpayers to Medicare beneficiaries for purchase of health insurance. This subsidy insulates beneficiaries from the income effects of cost growth by shifting the costs and income effects to taxpayers. Simulations show that over the next 10-20 years, income effects will have little effect on cost growth in Medicare. PMID:26316878

  15. Medicare Managed Care Spillovers and Treatment Intensity.

    PubMed

    Callison, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that the share of Medicare managed care enrollees in a region affects the costs of treating traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries; however, little is known about the mechanisms through which these 'spillover effects' operate. This paper examines the relationship between Medicare managed care penetration and treatment intensity for FFS enrollees hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AMI. I find that increased Medicare managed care penetration is associated with a reduction in both the costs and the treatment intensity of FFS AMI patients. Specifically, as Medicare managed care penetration increases, FFS AMI patients are less likely to receive surgical reperfusion and mechanical ventilation and to experience an overall reduction in the number of inpatient procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25960418

  16. Monitoring access following Medicare price changes: physician perspective.

    PubMed

    McCall, N T

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the author examines changes in Medicare beneficiaries' access to services following the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 "overpriced" procedure price reductions from the physician perspective. Three measures of physician availability remained essentially constant: number of physicians treating beneficiaries or performing overpriced procedures; average Medicare caseload; and average share of a physician's Medicare practice comprised of those who are poor and not white. Physician practice characteristics were examined and provided evidence of continuing participation in Medicare: Average Medicare revenue increased 10 percent, and average volume of all services increased. However, physicians with the largest fee reductions or who were the most financially dependent on the procedures did not change overpriced procedure volume. PMID:10130586

  17. Medicare Rights and Protections

    MedlinePlus

    CENTERS for MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES Medicare Rights & Protections This official government booklet has important information about: Your rights & protections in: ■ ■ Original Medicare ■ ■ Medicare Advantage Plan or other Medicare health ...

  18. The structure of risk adjustment for private plans in Medicare.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Joseph P; Huang, Jie; Brand, Richard J; Fung, Vicki; Hsu, John T

    2011-06-01

    Medicare bases its risk adjustment method for Medicare Advantage plan payment on the relative costs of treating various diagnoses in traditional Medicare. However, there are many reasons to doubt that the relative cost of treating different diagnoses is similar between Medicare Advantage plans and traditional Medicare, including the varying applicability of care management methods to different diagnoses and the varying degrees of market power among suppliers of services to plans. We use internal cost data from a large health plan to compare its cost of treating various diagnoses with Medicare's reimbursement. We find substantial variability across diagnoses, implying that the current risk adjustment system creates incentives for Medicare Advantage plans to favor beneficiaries with certain diagnoses, but find no consistent relationship between the costliness of the diagnosis and the difference between reimbursement and cost. PMID:21756017

  19. Medicare Part D: Things People with Cancer May Want to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Part D plan formularies’ tiered cost-sharing requirements in different plans Prescription Drug Plan Tier 1 ( ... plan to make an exception to its formulary requirements. If the plan turns the Medicare beneficiary down, ...

  20. Wheelchairs, walkers, and canes: what does Medicare pay for, and who benefits?

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Agree, Emily M; Kasper, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Medicare's role in the distribution of mobility-related assistive technology has not been well documented, yet rapid growth and regional variation in spending, and concerns over "in-the-home" coverage criteria, highlight the need for facts. Using the 2001 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, we find that 6.2 percent percent of beneficiaries obtained mobility assistive technology under the Medicare durable medical equipment (DME) benefit. These beneficiaries were disproportionately poor, disabled, and users of both acute and postacute services. Average per item spending ranged from $52 for canes to $6,208 for power wheelchairs. Among beneficiaries who acquired such technology through the DME benefit, these devices comprised just 2 percent of overall Medicare spending. PMID:16012154

  1. Medicare program: changes to the Medicare claims appeal procedures. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    Medicare beneficiaries and, under certain circumstances, providers and suppliers of health care services, can appeal adverse determinations regarding claims for benefits under Medicare Part A and Part B under sections 1869 and 1879 of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 521 of the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Benefits Act of 2000 (BIPA) amended section 1869 of the Act to provide for significant changes to the Medicare claims appeal procedures. This interim final rule responds to comments on the November 15, 2002 proposed rule regarding changes to these appeal procedures, establishes the implementing regulations, and explains how the new procedures will be implemented. It also sets forth provisions that are needed to implement the new statutory requirements enacted in Title IX of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). PMID:15754467

  2. Medicare program; FY 2015 hospice wage index and payment rate update; hospice quality reporting requirements and process and appeals for Part D payment for drugs for beneficiaries enrolled in hospice. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    This final rule will update the hospice payment rates and the wage index for fiscal year (FY) 2015 and continue the phase-out of the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor (BNAF). This rule provides an update on hospice payment reform analyses, potential definitions of "terminal illness'' and "related conditions,'' and information on potential processes and appeals for Part D payment for drugs while beneficiaries are under a hospice election. This rule will specify timeframes for filing the notice of election and the notice of termination/revocation; add the attending physician to the hospice election form, and require hospices to document changes to the attending physician; require hospices to complete their hospice aggregate cap determinations within 5 months after the cap year ends, and remit any overpayments; and update the hospice quality reporting program. In addition, this rule will provide guidance on determining hospice eligibility; information on the delay in the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM); and will further clarify how hospices are to report diagnoses on hospice claims. Finally, the rule will make a technical regulations text change. PMID:25167592

  3. Medicare Coverage for Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazy, R; Abrahamson, MJ

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. Medicare population is growing at an alarming rate. From 1980 to 2004, the number of people aged 65 or older with diagnosed diabetes increased from 2.3 million to 5.8 million. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), 32% of Medicare spending is attributed to the diabetes population. Since its inception, Medicare has expanded medical coverage of monitoring devices, screening tests and visits, educational efforts, and preventive medical services for its diabetic enrollees. However, oral antidiabetic agents and insulin were excluded from reimbursement. In 2003, Congress passed the Medicare Modernization Act that includes a drug benefit to be administered either through Medicare Advantage drug plans or privately sponsored prescription drug plans for implementation in January 2006. In this article we highlight key patient and drug plan characteristics and resources that providers may focus upon to assist their patients choose a coverage plan. Using a case example, we illustrate the variable financial impact the adoption of Medicare part D may have on beneficiaries with diabetes due to their economic status. We further discuss the potential consequences the legislation will have on diabetic patients enrolled in Medicare, their providers, prescribing strategies, and the diabetes market. PMID:16686819

  4. Medicare+Choice: doubling or disappearing?

    PubMed

    Berenson, Robert A

    2001-01-01

    Although the changes in the program created by the Balanced Budget Act are often viewed as the reason for the current instability in the Medicare+Choice (M+C) program, in fact, health plans are having difficulties in all of their markets, not just in Medicare. It may be time to reconsider the purpose of the program and to fundamentally redesign how payments are made to managed care organizations contracting with Medicare. Two alternative approaches are suggested: treating M+C like another provider type by severing the payment linkage to spending under traditional Medicare, and overhauling the program by creating a value-based purchasing orientation rewarding plans that provide higher-quality care to beneficiaries with chronic diseases. PMID:11911326

  5. 42 CFR 413.35 - Limitations on coverage of costs: Charges to beneficiaries if cost limits are applied to services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitations on coverage of costs: Charges to beneficiaries if cost limits are applied to services. 413.35 Section 413.35 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR...

  6. The Star Rating System and Medicare Advantage Plans.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    With nearly 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries opting to enroll in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans instead of fee-for-service Medicare, it's safe to say the MA program is quite popular. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) administers a Star Ratings program for MA plans, which offers measures of quality and service among the plans that are used not only to help beneficiaries choose plans but also to award additional payments to plans that meet high standards. These additional payments, in turn, are used by plans to provide additional benefits to beneficiaries or to reduce cost sharing--added features that are likely to factor into beneficiaries' choice of MA plans. The Star Ratings program is also meant to drive improvements in the quality of plans, and this secondary effort seems to have been successful. Despite this success, issues with the Star Ratings system remain, including: how performance metrics are developed, chosen, and maintained; how differences among beneficiary populations (particularly with regard to the dually eligible and those receiving low-income subsidies) should be recognized; and the extent to which health plans can control the variables on which they are being measured. Because the Star Ratings approach has been extended to providers of health care as well--hospitals, nursing homes, and dialysis facilities--these issues are worth exploring as CMS fine-tunes its methods of measurement. PMID:26072530

  7. Prevalence of multiple chronic conditions in the United States' Medicare population.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kathleen M; O'Donnell, Brian E; Dean, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which administers the Medicare program in the United States, launched the Chronic Condition Data Warehouse (CCW). The CCW contains all Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) institutional and non-institutional claims, nursing home and home health assessment data, and enrollment/eligibility information from January 1, 1999 forward for a random 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries (and 100% of the Medicare population from 2000 forward). Twenty-one predefined chronic condition indicator variables are coded within the CCW, to facilitate research on chronic conditions. The current article describes this new data source, and the authors demonstrate the utility of the CCW in describing the extent of chronic disease among Medicare beneficiaries. Medicare claims were analyzed to determine the prevalence, utilization, and Medicare program costs for some common and high cost chronic conditions in the Medicare FFS population in 2005. Chronic conditions explored include diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure, cancer, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and depression. Fifty percent of Medicare FFS beneficiaries were receiving care for one or more of these chronic conditions. The highest prevalence is observed for diabetes, with nearly one-fourth of the Medicare FFS study cohort receiving treatment for this condition (24.3 percent). The annual number of inpatient days during 2005 is highest for CKD (9.51 days) and COPD (8.18 days). As the number of chronic conditions increases, the average per beneficiary Medicare payment amount increases dramatically. The annual Medicare payment amounts for a beneficiary with only one of the chronic conditions is $7,172. For those with two conditions, payment jumps to $14,931, and for those with three or more conditions, the annual Medicare payments per beneficiary is $32,498. The CCW data files have tremendous value for health services research. The longitudinal data and

  8. Older adults navigating medicare: when benefits are denied.

    PubMed

    Aranha, Karen M; Bell, Nancy J; Dunham, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Guided by Bourdieu's theory of practice and symbolic violence, this qualitative study explored experiences and perceptions of elderly beneficiaries who had been denied rehabilitation services by Medicare. In semistructured interviews, 12 beneficiaries or family members told of the physical, psychological, and financial consequences of service denial/termination. The resulting perception of Medicare was as a cumbersome, difficult to negotiate system. Findings have implications for future research on service denial and indicate the need for better communication with, and support of, consumers by health care professionals when this occurs. PMID:23350568

  9. Pharmacy utilization and the Medicare Modernization Act.

    PubMed

    Maio, Vittorio; Pizzi, Laura; Roumm, Adam R; Clarke, Janice; Goldfarb, Neil I; Nash, David B; Chess, David

    2005-01-01

    To control expenditures and use medications appropriately, the Medicare drug coverage program has established pharmacy utilization management (PUM) measures. This article assesses the effects of these strategies on the care of seniors. The literature suggests that although caps on drug benefits lower pharmaceutical costs, they may also increase the use of other health care services and hurt health outcomes. Our review raises concerns regarding the potential unintended effects of the Medicare drug program's PUM policies for beneficiaries. Therefore, the economic and clinical impact of PUM measures on seniors should be studied further to help policymakers design better drug benefit plans. PMID:15787955

  10. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... improve the capabilities of provider organizations to coordinate the care of a population of Medicare... improve beneficiaries' quality outcomes and reduce the growth of Medicare expenditures. Completion of the... to build capacity needed to achieve better care for individuals, better population health, and...

  11. MCBS Highlights: Ownership and Average Premiums for Medicare Supplementary Insurance Policies

    PubMed Central

    Chulis, George S.; Eppig, Franklin J.; Poisal, John A.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes private supplementary health insurance holdings and average premiums paid by Medicare enrollees. Data were collected as part of the 1992 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS). Data show the number of persons with insurance and average premiums paid by type of insurance held—individually purchased policies, employer-sponsored policies, or both. Distributions are shown for a variety of demographic, socioeconomic, and health status variables. Primary findings include: Seventy-eight percent of Medicare beneficiaries have private supplementary insurance; 25 percent of those with private insurance hold more than one policy. The average premium paid for private insurance in 1992 was $914. PMID:10153473

  12. The economic impact of Medicare Part D on congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dall, Timothy M; Blanchard, Tericke D; Gallo, Paul D; Semilla, April P

    2013-05-01

    Medicare Part D has had important implications for patient outcomes and treatment costs among beneficiaries with congestive heart failure (CHF). This study finds that improved medication adherence associated with expansion of drug coverage under Part D led to nearly $2.6 billion in reductions in medical expenditures annually among beneficiaries diagnosed with CHF and without prior comprehensive drug coverage, of which over $2.3 billion was savings to Medicare. Further improvements in adherence could potentially save Medicare another $1.9 billion annually, generating upwards of $22.4 billion in federal savings over 10 years. PMID:23725537

  13. How Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage Works with a Medicare Advantage Plan or Medicare Cost Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Works with a Medicare Advantage Plan or Medicare Cost Plan Medicare offers prescription drug coverage for everyone ... t offer Medicare prescription drug coverage. • A Medicare Cost Plan if it doesn’t offer Medicare prescription ...

  14. Medicare: Comparison of Catastrophic Health Insurance Proposals. Briefing Report to the Chairman, Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    In response to a request from the chairman of the Congressional Select Committee on Aging, the General Accounting Office (GAO) investigated the potential effects of legislative proposals to provide catastrophic coverage to Medicare beneficiaries on beneficiaries' out-of-pocket health care expenses. The GAO reviewed GAO and other reports to…

  15. Making Medicare Advantage a Middle-Class Program

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Jacob; McGuire, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the role of Medicare's premium policy in sorting beneficiaries between traditional Medicare (TM) and managed care plans in the Medicare Advantage (MA) program. Beneficiaries vary in their demand for care. TM fully accommodates demand but creates a moral hazard inefficiency. MA rations care but disregards some elements of the demand. We describe an efficient assignment of beneficiaries to these two options, and argue that efficiency requires an MA program oriented to serve the large middle part of the distribution of demand: the “middle class.” Current Medicare policy of a “single premium” for MA plans cannot achieve efficient sorting. We characterize the demand-based premium policy that can implement the efficient assignment of enrollees to plans. If only a single premium is feasible, the second-best policy involves too many of the low-demand individuals in MA and a too low level of services relative to the first best. We identify approaches to using premium policy to revitalize MA and improve the efficiency of Medicare. PMID:23454916

  16. Making Medicare advantage a middle-class program.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Jacob; McGuire, Thomas G

    2013-03-01

    This paper studies the role of Medicare's premium policy in sorting beneficiaries between traditional Medicare (TM) and managed care plans in the Medicare advantage (MA) program. Beneficiaries vary in their demand for care. TM fully accommodates demand but creates a moral hazard inefficiency. MA rations care but disregards some elements of the demand. We describe an efficient assignment of beneficiaries to these two options, and argue that efficiency requires an MA program oriented to serve the large middle part of the distribution of demand: the "middle class." Current Medicare policy of a "single premium" for MA plans cannot achieve efficient sorting. We characterize the demand-based premium policy that can implement the efficient assignment of enrollees to plans. If only a single premium is feasible, the second-best policy involves too many of the low-demand individuals in MA and a too low level of services relative to the first best. We identify approaches to using premium policy to revitalize MA and improve the efficiency of Medicare. PMID:23454916

  17. Medicare finances: findings of the 2006 trustees report.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, Paul N; Lavery, Joni

    2006-05-01

    Medicare helps pay medical expenses for 37 million Americans age 65 and older and 6 million persons with disabilities. The benefits are financed primarily by dedicated taxes on wages and self-employment income, premiums paid by beneficiaries, and payments from general revenues. According to the 2006 report of Medicare's trustees, Medicare's Hospital Insurance (HI) program is not adequately financed. The HI trust fund is projected to start drawing down its reserves in 2010. Its reserves will be depleted in 2018, at which time scheduled income will cover 80 percent of estimated expenditures. The Supplementary Medical Insurance program is adequately financed but will require continuing increases in both premiums and general revenue contributions. Medicare spending is growing rapidly because of increases in the cost and use of medical services. Total Medicare expenditures are projected to grow from 2.7 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2005 to 9.0 percent of GDP in 2050. PMID:16685781

  18. Competitive bidding for Medicare Part B clinical laboratory services.

    PubMed

    Kautter, John; Pope, Gregory C

    2014-06-01

    The traditional Medicare fee-for-service program may be able to purchase clinical laboratory test services at a lower cost through competitive bidding. Demonstrations of competitive bidding for clinical laboratory tests have been twice mandated or authorized by Congress but never implemented. This article provides a summary and review of the final design of the laboratory competitive bidding demonstration mandated by the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. The design was analogous to a sealed bid (first price), clearing price auction. Design elements presented include covered laboratory tests and beneficiaries, laboratory bidding and payment status under the demonstration, composite bids, determining bidding winners and the demonstration fee schedule, and quality under the demonstration. Expanded use of competitive bidding in Medicare, including specifically for clinical laboratory tests, has been recommended in some proposals for Medicare reform. The presented design may be a useful point of departure if Medicare clinical laboratory competitive bidding is revived in the future. PMID:24366366

  19. MEASURING LOW-VALUE CARE IN MEDICARE

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Aaron L.; Landon, Bruce E.; Elshaug, Adam G.; Chernew, Michael E.; McWilliams, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Importance Despite the importance of identifying and reducing wasteful health care utilization, few direct measures of overuse have been developed. Direct measures are appealing because they identify specific services to limit and can characterize low-value care even among the most efficient providers. Objective To develop claims-based measures of low-value services, examine service use (and associated spending) detected by these measures in Medicare, and determine if patterns of use are related across different types of low-value services. Design, Setting and Participants Drawing from evidence-based lists of services that provide minimal clinical benefit, we developed and trialed 26 claims-based measures of low-value services. Using 2009 claims for 1,360,908 Medicare beneficiaries, we assessed the proportion of beneficiaries receiving these services, mean per-beneficiary service use, and the proportion of total spending devoted to these services. We compared the amount of use and spending detected by versions of these measures with different sensitivity and specificity. We also estimated correlations between use of different services within geographic areas, adjusting for beneficiaries’ sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Main Outcome Measures Use and spending detected by 26 measures of low-value services in 6 categories: low-value cancer screening; low-value diagnostic and preventive testing; low-value preoperative testing; low-value imaging; low-value cardiovascular testing and procedures; and other low-value surgical procedures. Results Services detected by more sensitive versions of measures affected 41% of beneficiaries and constituted 2.7% of overall annual spending. Services detected by more specific versions of measures affected 24% of beneficiaries and constituted 0.6% of overall spending. In adjusted analyses, low-value spending detected in geographic regions at the 5th percentile of the regional distribution of low-value spending ($221

  20. Claims and Appeals (Medicare)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Change Plans Getting started with Medicare Your Medicare coverage choices When & how to sign up for Part ... Apply for Medicare online How to get drug coverage When can I join a health or drug ...

  1. What Medicare Covers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Change Plans Getting started with Medicare Your Medicare coverage choices When & how to sign up for Part ... Apply for Medicare online How to get drug coverage When can I join a health or drug ...

  2. Medicare: Physician Compare

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation The page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support ... gov About Us Glossary MyMedicare.gov Login Search Medicare.gov + Share widget - Select to show Back to ...

  3. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) and the hospital are related by common ownership or control as described in § 413.17 of this chapter... school for the costs of those services furnished to all patients, payment is made by Medicare to the... services furnished to hospital patients must be apportioned to beneficiaries as provided for...

  4. 42 CFR 476.110 - Use of immediate advocacy to resolve oral beneficiary complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of immediate advocacy to resolve oral beneficiary complaints. 476.110 Section 476.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities...

  5. Paying Medicare Advantage plans by competitive bidding: how much competition is there?

    PubMed

    Biles, Brian; Pozen, Jonah; Guterman, Stuart

    2009-08-01

    Private health plans that enroll Medicare beneficiaries--known as Medicare Advantage (MA) plans--are being paid $11 billion more in 2009 than it would cost to cover these beneficiaries in regular fee-for-service Medicare. To generate Medicare savings for offsetting the costs of health reform, the Obama Administration has proposed eliminating these extra payments to private insurers and instituting a competitive bidding system that pays MA plans based on the bids they submit. This study examines the concentration of enrollment among MA plans and the degree to which firms offering MA plans actually face competition. The results show that in the large majority of U.S. counties, MA plan enrollment is highly concentrated in a small number of firms. Given the relative lack of competition in many markets as well as the potential impact on traditional Medicare, the authors call for careful consideration of a new system for setting MA plan payments. PMID:19685587

  6. HOW MUCH FAVORABLE SELECTION IS LEFT IN MEDICARE ADVANTAGE?

    PubMed Central

    PRICE, MARY; MCWILLIAMS, J. MICHAEL; HSU, JOHN; MCGUIRE, THOMAS G.

    2015-01-01

    The health economics literature contains two models of selection, one with endogenous plan characteristics to attract good risks and one with fixed plan characteristics; neither model contains a regulator. Medicare Advantage, a principal example of selection in the literature, is, however, subject to anti-selection regulations. Because selection causes economic inefficiency and because the historically favorable selection into Medicare Advantage plans increased government cost, the effectiveness of the anti-selection regulations is an important policy question, especially since the Medicare Advantage program has grown to comprise 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries. Moreover, similar anti-selection regulations are being used in health insurance exchanges for those under 65. Contrary to earlier work, we show that the strengthened anti-selection regulations that Medicare introduced starting in 2004 markedly reduced government overpayment attributable to favorable selection in Medicare Advantage. At least some of the remaining selection is plausibly related to fixed plan characteristics of Traditional Medicare versus Medicare Advantage rather than changed selection strategies by Medicare Advantage plans. PMID:26389127

  7. Medicare Special Needs Plan (SNP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... up/change plans About Medicare health plans Medicare Advantage Plans + Share widget - Select to show Subcategories Getting ... plan? About Medicare health plans , current subcategory Medicare Advantage Plans , current page Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA) ...

  8. The Effect of Hospice on Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.; Friedman, Bruce; Caprio, Thomas V.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hospice enrollment is known to reduce risk of hospitalizations for nursing home residents who use it. We examined whether residing in facilities with a higher hospice penetration: 1) reduces hospitalization risk for non-hospice residents; and 2) decreases hospice-enrolled residents’ hospitalization risk relative to hospice-enrolled residents in facilities with a lower hospice penetration. Method Medicare Beneficiary File, Inpatient and Hospice Claims, Minimum Data Set Version 2.0, Provider of Services File and Area Resource File. Retrospective analysis of long-stay nursing home residents who died during 2005-2007. Overall, 505,851 non-hospice (67.66%) and 241,790 hospice-enrolled (32.34%) residents in 14,030 facilities nationwide were included. We fit models predicting the probability of hospitalization conditional on hospice penetration and resident and facility characteristics. We used instrumental variable method to address the potential endogeneity between hospice penetration and hospitalization. Distance between each nursing home and the closest hospice was the instrumental variable. Main Findings In the last 30 days of life, 37.63% of non-hospice and 23.18% of hospice residents were hospitalized. Every 10% increase in hospice penetration leads to a reduction in hospitalization risk of 5.1% for non-hospice residents and 4.8% for hospice-enrolled residents. Principal Conclusions Higher facility-level hospice penetration reduces hospitalization risk for both non-hospice and hospice-enrolled residents. The findings shed light on nursing home end-of-life care delivery, collaboration among providers and cost benefit analysis of hospice care. PMID:25304181

  9. SGR Repeal and Medicare Beneficiary Access Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Baucus, Max [D-MT

    2013-12-19

    01/16/2014 By Senator Baucus from Committee on Finance filed written report. Report No. 113-135. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Medicare SGR Repeal and Beneficiary Access Improvement Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2014-03-11

    03/12/2014 Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 327. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Medical cost offsets from prescription drug utilization among Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Roebuck, M Christopher

    2014-10-01

    This brief commentary extends earlier work on the value of adherence to derive medical cost offset estimates from prescription drug utilization. Among seniors with chronic vascular disease, 1% increases in condition-specific medication use were associated with significant (P  less than  0.001) reductions in gross nonpharmacy medical costs in the amounts of 0.63% for dyslipidemia, 0.77% for congestive heart failure, 0.83% for diabetes, and 1.17% for hypertension. PMID:25278321

  12. 26 CFR 513.10 - Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS IRELAND Withholding of Tax § 513.10 Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust. A nonresident alien who is resident in Ireland for the purposes of Irish tax and who is...

  13. 26 CFR 514.7 - Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS FRANCE Withholding of Tax § 514.7 Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or... respective articles concerned, a nonresident alien individual who is a resident of France and who is...

  14. 26 CFR 514.7 - Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS FRANCE Withholding of Tax § 514.7 Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or... respective articles concerned, a nonresident alien individual who is a resident of France and who is...

  15. 26 CFR 514.7 - Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS FRANCE Withholding of Tax § 514.7 Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or... respective articles concerned, a nonresident alien individual who is a resident of France and who is...

  16. 26 CFR 514.7 - Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS FRANCE Withholding of Tax § 514.7 Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or... respective articles concerned, a nonresident alien individual who is a resident of France and who is...

  17. 26 CFR 514.7 - Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS FRANCE Withholding of Tax § 514.7 Beneficiaries of a domestic estate or... respective articles concerned, a nonresident alien individual who is a resident of France and who is...

  18. Medicare Program; Obtaining Final Medicare Secondary Payer Conditional Payment Amounts via Web Portal. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-17

    This final rule specifies the process and timeline for expanding CMS' existing Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) Web portal to conform to section 201 of the Medicare IVIG and Strengthening Medicare and Repaying Taxpayers Act of 2012 (the SMART Act). The final rule specifies a timeline for developing a multifactor authentication solution to securely permit authorized users other than the beneficiary to access CMS' MSP conditional payment amounts and claims detail information via the MSP Web portal. It also requires that we add functionality to the existing MSP Web portal that permits users to: Notify us that the specified case is approaching settlement; obtain time and date stamped final conditional payment summary statements and amounts before reaching settlement; and ensure that relatedness disputes and any other discrepancies are addressed within 11 business days of receipt of dispute documentation. PMID:27192735

  19. Trends in Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Qin, Yolanda; Young, Theo; Thomas, Zachary; Spivey, Christina A.; Solomon, David K.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background To increase the enrollment rate of medication therapy management (MTM) programs in Medicare Part D plans, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) lowered the allowable eligibility thresholds based on the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs for Medicare Part D plans for 2010 and after. However, an increase in MTM enrollment rates has not been realized. Objectives To describe trends in MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans and to identify patterns that may hinder enrollment in MTM programs. Methods This study analyzed data extracted from the Medicare Part D MTM Programs Fact Sheets (2008–2014). The annual percentages of utilizing each threshold value of the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs, as well as other aspects of MTM enrollment practices, were analyzed among Medicare MTM programs that were established by Medicare Part D plans. Results For 2010 and after, increased proportions of Medicare Part D plans set their eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. For example, in 2008, 48.7% of Medicare Part D plans (N = 347:712) opened MTM enrollment to Medicare beneficiaries with only 2 chronic disease states (specific diseases varied between plans), whereas the other half restricted enrollment to patients with a minimum of 3 to 5 chronic disease states. After 2010, only approximately 20% of plans opened their MTM enrollment to patients with 2 chronic disease states, with the remaining 80% restricting enrollment to patients with 3 or more chronic diseases. Conclusion The policy change by CMS for 2010 and after is associated with increased proportions of plans setting their MTM eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. Changes to the eligibility thresholds by Medicare Part D plans might have acted as a barrier for increased MTM enrollment. Thus, CMS may need to identify alternative strategies to increase MTM enrollment in Medicare plans. PMID:26380030

  20. Improving the design of competitive bidding in Medicare Advantage.

    PubMed

    Cawley, John H; Whitford, Andrew B

    2007-04-01

    In 2003, Congress passed the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act, which required that in 2006 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implement a system of competitive bids to set payments for the Medicare Advantage program. Managed care plans now bid for the right to enroll Medicare beneficiaries. Data from the first year of bidding suggest that imperfect competition is limiting the success of the bidding system. This article offers suggestions to improve this system based on findings from auction theory and previous government-run auctions. In particular, CMS can benefit by adjusting its system of competitive bids in four ways: credibly committing to regulations governing bidding; limiting the scope for collusion, entry deterrence, and predatory behavior among bidders; adjusting how benchmark reimbursement rates are set; and accounting for asymmetric information among bidders. PMID:17463410

  1. 75 FR 32858 - Medicare Program; Policy and Technical Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ...-AP77 Medicare Program; Policy and Technical Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...; Policy and Technical Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit... entitled ``Medicare Program; Policy and Technical Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the...

  2. The Future of Medicare Policy Reform

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Allen; Langenbrunner, John C.

    1986-01-01

    The Medicare program, the largest health insurance program in the United States, is clearly at a crossroads as it enters its third decade. Historical increases in health care expenditures, plus a changing political and economic landscape, have set the groundwork for policy reform. Two basic reform strategies--reimbursement arrangements and program funding mechanisms--are discussed. In 1983, Congress enacted the Prospective Payment System (PPS) which initiated a fundamental change in the way hospitals are paid for care delivered to Medicare beneficiaries. But the PPS is only a stepping-stone to broader reforms such as capitation and vouchers. In addition, new methods of program funding may be necessary, especially in light of policymakers' considerations of coverage of services such as long term care and organ transplants.

  3. Predicting risk selection following major changes in Medicare.

    PubMed

    Pizer, Steven D; Frakt, Austin B; Feldman, Roger

    2008-04-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 created several new types of private insurance plans within Medicare, starting in 2006. Some of these plan types previously did not exist in the commercial market and there was great uncertainty about their prospects. In this paper, we show that statistical models and historical data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey can be used to predict the experience of new plan types with reasonable accuracy. This lays the foundation for the analysis of program modifications currently under consideration. We predict market share, risk selection, and stability for the most prominent new plan type, the stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan (PDP). First, we estimate a model of consumer choice across Medicare insurance plans available in the data. Next, we modify the data to include PDPs and use the model to predict the probability of enrollment for each beneficiary in each plan type. Finally, we calculate mean-adjusted actual spending by plan type. We predict that adverse selection into PDPs will be substantial, but that enrollment and premiums will be stable. Our predictions correspond well to actual experience in 2006. PMID:17557273

  4. Medicare end stage renal disease population, 1982-87

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbaugh, M. Zermain; Sarsitis, Ida M.; Milam, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    A synopsis is given between the relationship of the number of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients to the total Medicare population and their associated expenditures. The aging trend within the ESRD population is examined in terms of enrollment statistics and incidence (new cases) counts. Also, longitudinal trends in expenditures, program enrollment, and incidence of ESRD are included. Findings indicate that the ESRD population is growing at a faster rate than Medicare in general. Further, within ESRD, the beneficiary population is aging. PMID:10113457

  5. Medicare program: changes to the Medicare claims appeal procedures. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-12-01

    Under the procedures in this final rule, Medicare beneficiaries and, under certain circumstances, providers and suppliers of health care services can appeal adverse determinations regarding claims for benefits under Medicare Part A and Part B pursuant to sections 1869 and 1879 of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 521 of the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Benefits Improvement and Protection Act of 2000 (BIPA) amended section 1869 of the Act to provide for significant changes to the Medicare claims appeal procedures. After publication of a proposed rule implementing the section 521 changes, additional new statutory requirements for the appeals process were enacted in Title IX of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). In March 2005, we published an interim final rule with comment period to implement these statutory changes. This final rule responds to comments on the interim final rule regarding changes to these appeal procedures, makes revisions where warranted, establishes the final implementing regulations, and explains how the new procedures will be put into practice. PMID:20169676

  6. The Relationship between Commercial Health Care Prices and Medicare Spending and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Romley, John A; Axeen, Sarah; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Chernew, Michael E; Bhattacharya, Jay; Goldman, Dana P

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between commercial health care prices and Medicare spending/utilization across U.S. regions. Data Sources Claims from large employers and Medicare Parts A/B/D over 2007–2009. Study Design We compared prices paid by commercial health plans to Medicare spending and utilization, adjusted for beneficiary health and the cost of care, across 301 hospital referral regions. Principal Findings A 10 percent lower commercial price (around the average level) is associated with 3.0 percent higher Medicare spending per member per year, and 4.3 percent more specialist visits (p < .01). Conclusions Commercial health care prices are negatively associated with Medicare spending across regions. Providers may respond to low commercial prices by shifting service volume into Medicare. Further investigation is needed to establish causality. PMID:25429755

  7. Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage From the National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gindi, Renee; Cohen, Robin A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using linked administrative data, to validate Medicare coverage estimates among adults aged 65 or older from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and to assess the impact of a recently added Medicare probe question on the validity of these estimates. Data sources Linked 2005 NHIS and Master Beneficiary Record and Payment History Update System files from the Social Security Administration (SSA). Study design We compared Medicare coverage reported on NHIS with “benchmark” benefit records from SSA. Principal findings With the addition of the probe question, more reports of coverage were captured, and the agreement between the NHIS-reported coverage and SSA records increased from 88% to 95%. Few additional overreports were observed. Conclusions Increased accuracy of the Medicare coverage status of NHIS participants was achieved with the Medicare probe question. Though some misclassification remains, data users interested in Medicare coverage as an outcome or correlate can use this survey measure with confidence. PMID:24800138

  8. Medicare program; carrier jurisdiction for claims for durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies (DMEPOS) and other issues involving suppliers, and criteria and standards for evaluating regional DMEPOS carriers--HCFA. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1992-06-18

    This final rule Modifies regulations to provide that claims for durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and certain other items covered under part B of Medicare be processed by designated carriers. Specifies the jurisdictions each designated carrier will serve. Changes the method by which claims for these items are allocated among the carriers from "point of sale" to "beneficiary residence." Establishes certain minimum standards for suppliers for purposes of submitting the above claims. Incorporates in regulations certain supplier disclosure requirements imposed under section 4164 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, as part of the process for issuing and renewing a supplier's billing number. Describes the criteria and standards to be used beginning October 1, 1993 for evaluating the performance of designated carriers processing claims for durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) in the administration of the Medicare program. Section 1842(b)(2) of the Social Security Act requires us to publish criteria and standards against which we evaluate Medicare carriers for public comment in the Federal Register. We expect the above changes to lead to more efficient and economical administration of the Medicare program. PMID:10171046

  9. Assets of new retired-worker beneficiaries: findings from the New Beneficiary Survey.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S R

    1985-07-01

    Most new retired workers in 1982 owned some type of asset, usually a savings, checking, or credit union account, according to data obtained by the Social Security Administration (SSA) in its New Beneficiary Survey. Many recently retired workers also owned their home, often mortgage-free. Homeownership was their most significant asset in terms of its median value. Comparatively few retirees owned property other than a home, though for owners of such property, the median value was substantial. Married couples, whose assets included those of both partners, more frequently owned assets and their assets had higher median values than did unmarried individuals. A comparison of retired workers with persons aged 65 or older who were enrolled in the Medicare program but who had not yet received retired-worker benefits showed that these Medicare-only enrollees were much better off, both in the likelihood of owning assets and in having higher median values for their assets. Individuals who retired before reaching age 65 and therefore received a reduced social security benefit were not as well off as those whose first benefit was paid at age 65 or older. Overall, the asset situation of new retired workers in 1982 was better than that of men and unmarried women aged 58-63 in 1969, even when the 1969 assets were adjusted to constant 1982 dollars. PMID:4035530

  10. What Is Medicare?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov Medicare forms Advance directives & long-term care Electronic prescribing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) Download claims with Medicare’s Blue ... health plan offered by a private company that contracts with Medicare to provide you with all your ...

  11. Medicare Advantage Plans

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov Medicare forms Advance directives & long-term care Electronic prescribing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) Download claims with Medicare’s Blue ... health plan offered by a private company that contracts with Medicare to provide you with all your ...

  12. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... D is the name of Medicare's prescription drug coverage. It's insurance that helps people pay for prescription ... monthly cost. Private companies provide Medicare prescription drug coverage. You choose the drug plan you like best. ...

  13. TMA Uncovers Medicare Mistakes.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-07-01

    The Texas Medical Association recently uncovered some major Medicare mistakes that show just why some physicians talk about leaving the federal program. Investigations and advocacy by TMA staff put Medicare on the path to a fix. PMID:26201065

  14. Medicare program; appeals of CMS or CMS contractor determinations when a provider or supplier fails to meet the requirements for Medicare billing privileges. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-06-27

    This final rule implements a number of regulatory provisions that are applicable to all providers and suppliers, including durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) suppliers. This final rule establishes appeals processes for all providers and suppliers whose enrollment, reenrollment or revalidation application for Medicare billing privileges is denied and whose Medicare billing privileges are revoked. It also establishes timeframes for deciding enrollment appeals by an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) or the Departmental Appeals Board (DAB), or Board, within the DHHS; and processing timeframes for CMS' Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) contractors. In addition, this final rule allows Medicare FFS contractors to revoke Medicare billing privileges when a provider or supplier submits a claim or claims for services that could not have been furnished to a beneficiary. This final rule also specifies that a Medicare contractor may establish a Medicare enrollment bar for any provider or supplier whose billing privileges have been revoked. Lastly, the final rule requires that all providers and suppliers receive Medicare payments by electronic funds transfer (EFT) if the provider or supplier, is submitting an initial enrollment application to Medicare, changing their enrollment information, revalidating or re-enrolling in the Medicare program. PMID:18677828

  15. Traditional Medicare Versus Private Insurance: How Spending, Volume, And Price Change At Age Sixty-Five.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jacob; Song, Zirui

    2016-05-01

    To slow the growth of Medicare spending, some policy makers have advocated raising the Medicare eligibility age from the current sixty-five years to sixty-seven years. For the majority of affected adults, this would delay entry into Medicare and increase the time they are covered by private insurance. Despite its policy importance, little is known about how such a change would affect national health care spending, which is the sum of health care spending for all consumers and payers-including governments. We examined how spending differed between Medicare and private insurance using longitudinal data on imaging and procedures for a national cohort of individuals who switched from private insurance to Medicare at age sixty-five. Using a regression discontinuity design, we found that spending fell by $38.56 per beneficiary per quarter-or 32.4 percent-upon entry into Medicare at age sixty-five. In contrast, we found no changes in the volume of services at age sixty-five. For the previously insured, entry into Medicare led to a large drop in spending driven by lower provider prices, which may reflect Medicare's purchasing power as a large insurer. These findings imply that increasing the Medicare eligibility age may raise national health care spending by replacing Medicare coverage with private insurance, which pays higher provider prices than Medicare does. PMID:27140993

  16. Medicare Part D and Its Effect on the Use of Prescription Drugs and Use of Other Health Care Services of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Robert; Nasreen Khan,

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of gaining prescription drug insurance, as a result of Medicare Part D, on use of prescription drugs and other medical services for a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Given the heightened importance of prescription drugs for those with chronic illness, we provide separate estimates for elderly in…

  17. Measuring Coding Intensity in the Medicare Advantage Program

    PubMed Central

    Kronick, Richard; Welch, W. Pete

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2004, Medicare implemented a system of paying Medicare Advantage (MA) plans that gave them greater incentive than fee-for-service (FFS) providers to report diagnoses. Data Risk scores for all Medicare beneficiaries 2004–2013 and Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) data, 2006–2011. Measures Change in average risk score for all enrollees and for stayers (beneficiaries who were in either FFS or MA for two consecutive years). Prevalence rates by Hierarchical Condition Category (HCC). Results Each year the average MA risk score increased faster than the average FFS score. Using the risk adjustment model in place in 2004, the average MA score as a ratio of the average FFS score would have increased from 90% in 2004 to 109% in 2013. Using the model partially implemented in 2014, the ratio would have increased from 88% to 102%. The increase in relative MA scores appears to largely reflect changes in diagnostic coding, not real increases in the morbidity of MA enrollees. In survey-based data for 2006–2011, the MA-FFS ratio of risk scores remained roughly constant at 96%. Intensity of coding varies widely by contract, with some contracts coding very similarly to FFS and others coding much more intensely than the MA average. Underpinning this relative growth in scores is particularly rapid relative growth in a subset of HCCs. Discussion Medicare has taken significant steps to mitigate the effects of coding intensity in MA, including implementing a 3.4% coding intensity adjustment in 2010 and revising the risk adjustment model in 2013 and 2014. Given the continuous relative increase in the average MA risk score, further policy changes will likely be necessary. PMID:25068076

  18. Hospice Enrollment, Local Hospice Utilization Patterns, and Rehospitalization in Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Timothy R.; Smith, Maureen A.; Bartels, Christie M.; Campbell, Toby C.; Yu, Menggang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rehospitalizations are prevalent and associated with decreased quality of life. Although hospice has been advocated to reduce rehospitalizations, it is not known how area-level hospice utilization patterns affect rehospitalization risk. Objectives: The study objective was to examine the association between hospice enrollment, local hospice utilization patterns, and 30-day rehospitalization in Medicare patients. Methods: With a retrospective cohort design, 1,997,506 hospitalizations were assessed between 2005 and 2009 from a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Local hospice utilization was defined using tertiles representing the percentage of all deaths occurring in hospice within each Hospital Service Area (HSA). Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the relationship between 30-day rehospitalization, hospice enrollment, and local hospice utilization, adjusting for patient sociodemographics, medical history, and hospital characteristics. Results: Rates of patients dying in hospice were 27% in the lowest hospice utilization tertile, 41% in the middle tertile, and 53% in the highest tertile. Patients enrolled in hospice had lower rates of 30-day rehospitalization than those not enrolled (2.2% versus 18.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.118–0.131). Patients residing in areas of low hospice utilization were at greater rehospitalization risk than those residing in areas of high utilization (19.1% versus 17.5%; HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.04–1.06), which persisted beyond that accounted for by individual hospice enrollment. Conclusions: Area-level hospice utilization is inversely proportional to rehospitalization rates. This relationship is not fully explained by direct hospice enrollment, and may reflect a spillover effect of the benefits of hospice extending to nonenrollees. PMID:25879990

  19. Dual-eligibles with Mental Disorders and Medicare Part D: How are they faring?

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Julie M.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Zuvekas, Samuel H.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, 6 million beneficiaries who were dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid switched from Medicaid to Medicare Part D coverage of their prescription drugs. This change led to a significant expansion of Medicare’s role in financing psychotropic medications for this group. A reduction in the number of plans serving dual-eligibles and an increase in utilization restrictions for some psychotropics since 2006 raises concerns about medication access for dual-eligibles with mental disorders and point to potential problems with adverse selection. To improve access to medication for this population, Medicare might consider changes to the enrollment and risk-sharing systems. PMID:19414883

  20. Rural Implications of Medicare's Post-Acute-Care Transfer Payment Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenman, Julie A.; Mueller, Curt D.

    2005-01-01

    Under the Medicare post-acute-care (PAC) transfer policy, acute-care hospitals are reimbursed under a per-diem formula whenever beneficiaries are discharged from selected diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) to a skilled nursing facility, home health care, or a prospective payment system (PPS)-excluded facility. Total per-diem payments are below the…

  1. 78 FR 48688 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive ESRD Care Initiative; Extension of the Submission Deadlines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Medicare program. We anticipate that the Comprehensive ESRD Care Model would result in improved health... seamless and integrated care for beneficiaries with ESRD, we are developing a comprehensive care delivery... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  2. Chronic condition mortality in the Medicare population.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kenneth J; Bloom, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The census and proportion of the US population that is age 65 years and older has never been as high. Medicare data files are a valuable source of data on medical conditions and care that can be used to study the older age population. We obtained access to The CMS Medicare data files including a 5% sample of annual Beneficiary Annual Summary (BASF) files for the years 1999-2009, and the most current Vital Status file available at the time of our request (2011). The Vital Status file enabled us to assess longitudinal follow-up for survival analysis. Data from over 3 million beneficiaries were available. The BASF files include summarized data pertaining to condition categories, defined by the Chronic Conditions Data Warehouse (CCW), which was of primary interest for this analysis. Cox regression models were used to assess the mortality risk associated with a set of 15 chronic conditions, as well as severity factors based on summary claims data. We were able to confirm a number of expectations, such as the high level of mortality risk with lung cancer, congestive heart failure, and in the oldest ages, Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. We were also able to identify chronic conditions that behave more as chronic conditions individuals may "live with" rather than "die of." Depression, diabetes, prostate and breast cancer are present for longer durations and/or are associated with low or no increased mortality risk in the Medicare population. Inpatient confinement or skilled nursing facility utilization were markers for increased risk, as expected. Unexpectedly, frequent physician visits (>10/year) was a marker for more favorable mortality, perhaps indicating that close supervision of chronic conditions lead to improved survival. PMID:23451615

  3. Medicare in interventional pain management: A critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2006-07-01

    Recent years have been quite eventful for interventional pain physicians with numerous changes in the Medicare payment system with a view for the future and what it holds for interventional pain management for 2006 and beyond. On February 8, 2006, President Bush signed the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, which cuts the federal budget by 39 billion dollars and Medicare and Medicaid by almost 11 billion dollars over five years. The Act contains a number of important provisions that effect physicians in general and interventional pain physicians in particular. This Act provides one year, 0% conversion factor update in payments for physicians services in 2006. Medicare has four programs or parts, namely Medicare Parts A, B, C, and D, and two funds to pay providers for serving beneficiaries in each of these program. Part B helps pay for physician, outpatient hospital, home health, and other services for the aged and disabled who have voluntarily enrolled. Before 1922, the fees that Medicare paid for those services were largely based on physician's historical charges. Despite Congress's actions of freezing or limiting the fee increases, spending continued to rise because of increases in the volume and intensity of physician services. Medicare spending per beneficiary for physician services grew at an average annual rate of 11.6% from 1980 through 1991. Consequently Congress was forced to reform the way that Medicare sets physician fees, due to ineffectiveness of the fee controls and reductions. The sustained growth rate (SGR) system was established because of the concern that the fee schedule itself would not adequately constrain increases in spending for physicians' services. The law specifies a formula for calculating the SGR, based on changes in four factors: (1) estimated changes in fees; (2) estimated change in the average number of Part B enrollees (excluding Medicare Advantage beneficiaries); (3) estimated projected growth in real gross domestic product (GDP

  4. The reservation wages of Social Security Disability Insurance beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    persons who have shifted to the Old-Age program and those who are still under the DI program have median reservation wage to the last wage ratios of 0.69 and 0.93, respectively. A significantly lower reservation wage for persons who have moved to the Old-Age program was also found in a regression framework. This heterogeneity between the two groups may result in part from the different program characteristics both groups face, for instance, in terms of benefit termination and Medicare eligibility rules. *Subjective reservation wage data can be useful to study populations that are out of the labor force. This article is innovative in that it focuses on a group of persons who are typically considered as being out of the labor force, and therefore are not asked reservation wages in general household surveys such as the Current Population Survey. It would be of great interest to collect more reservation wage data for DI beneficiaries in a longitudinal data set to expand this analysis, for instance, to assess conclusively the effects of changing program characteristics on reservation wages and return-to-work outcomes as beneficiaries transition to the Old-Age program or as new return-to-work programs are put in place. PMID:18777671

  5. Medicare and Medicaid risk contracting opportunities for PSOs.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, P K

    1997-07-01

    Legislation has been proposed in Congress to allow provider-sponsored organizations (PSOs) to negotiate risk contracts directly with the Medicare program and, possibly, with Medicaid programs. Initially, qualifying PSOs would not be required to be licensed as HMOS, but would be required to demonstrate fiscal solvency and meet quality assurance standards. The proposed solvency requirements, as well as requirements regarding the proportion of commercial to Medicare enrollees in a plan, would not be as rigorous for PSOs as they are for HMOs. The legislation's proponents argue that relaxing requirements for PSO risk contracting will allow Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries more healthcare choices and better benefit packages. Opponents assert that PSOs would be given an unfair advantage in the marketplace and that consumers may be exposed to a greater risk of plan insolvency. While details of the legislation need to be reconciled, many observers predict that it will become law. PMID:10168434

  6. Medicare and Medicaid: Conflicting Incentives for Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C

    2007-01-01

    The structure of Medicare and Medicaid creates conflicting incentives regarding dually eligible beneficiaries without coordinating their care. Both Medicare and Medicaid have an interest in limiting their costs, and neither has an incentive to take responsibility for the management or quality of care. Examples of misaligned incentives are Medicare's cost-sharing rules, cost shifting within home health care and nursing homes, and cost shifting across chronic and acute care settings. Several policy initiatives—capitation, pay-for-performance, and the shift of the dually eligible population's Medicaid costs to the federal government—may address these conflicting incentives, but all have strengths and weaknesses. With the aging baby boom generation and projected federal and state budget shortfalls, this issue will be a continuing focus of policymakers in the coming decades. PMID:18070331

  7. A political history of medicare and prescription drug coverage.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas R; Lee, Philip R; Lipton, Helene L

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the history of efforts to add prescription drug coverage to the Medicare program. It identifies several important patterns in policymaking over four decades. First, prescription drug coverage has usually been tied to the fate of broader proposals for Medicare reform. Second, action has been hampered by divided government, federal budget deficits, and ideological conflict between those seeking to expand the traditional Medicare program and those preferring a greater role for private health care companies. Third, the provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 reflect earlier missed opportunities. Policymakers concluded from past episodes that participation in the new program should be voluntary, with Medicare beneficiaries and taxpayers sharing the costs. They ignored lessons from past episodes, however, about the need to match expanded benefits with adequate mechanisms for cost containment. Based on several new circumstances in 2003, the article demonstrates why there was a historic opportunity to add a Medicare prescription drug benefit and identify challenges to implementing an effective policy. PMID:15225331

  8. Impact of Medicare payment reductions on access to surgical services.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J B; Cromwell, J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study evaluates the impact of surgical fee reductions under Medicare on the utilization of surgical services. DATA SOURCES. Medicare physician claims data were obtained from 11 states for a five-year time period (1985-1989). STUDY DESIGN. Under OBRA-87, Medicare reduced payments for 11 surgical procedures. A fixed effects regression method was used to determine the impact of these payment reductions on access to care for potentially vulnerable Medicare beneficiaries: joint Medicaid-eligibles, blacks, and the very old. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Medicare claims and enrollment data were used to construct a cross-section time-series of population-based surgical rates from 1985 through 1989. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Reductions in surgical fees led to small but significant increases in use for three procedures, small decreases in use for two procedures, and no impact on the remaining six procedures. There was little evidence that access to surgery was impaired for potentially vulnerable enrollees; in fact, declining fees often led to greater rates of increases for some subgroups. CONCLUSIONS. Our results suggest that volume responses by surgeons to payment changes under the Medicare Fee Schedule may be smaller than HCFA's original estimates. Nevertheless, both access and quality of care should continue to be closely monitored. PMID:8537224

  9. A Political History of Medicare and Prescription Drug Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Thomas R; Lee, Philip R; Lipton, Helene L

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the history of efforts to add prescription drug coverage to the Medicare program. It identifies several important patterns in policymaking over four decades. First, prescription drug coverage has usually been tied to the fate of broader proposals for Medicare reform. Second, action has been hampered by divided government, federal budget deficits, and ideological conflict between those seeking to expand the traditional Medicare program and those preferring a greater role for private health care companies. Third, the provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 reflect earlier missed opportunities. Policymakers concluded from past episodes that participation in the new program should be voluntary, with Medicare beneficiaries and taxpayers sharing the costs. They ignored lessons from past episodes, however, about the need to match expanded benefits with adequate mechanisms for cost containment. Based on several new circumstances in 2003, the article demonstrates why there was a historic opportunity to add a Medicare prescription drug benefit and identify challenges to implementing an effective policy. PMID:15225331

  10. Boutique to Booming: Medicare Managed Care and the Private Path to Policy Change.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Andrew S

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, Medicare Advantage (MA) enrollment surpassed 30 percent of eligible beneficiaries. Twenty-five years earlier, enrollment hovered at just 3 percent. The expansion of private Medicare plans presents a puzzling instance of policy change within Medicare-a program long held to be a quintessential case of policy stasis. This article investigates the policy features that made Medicare susceptible to this dramatic policy shift, as well as the processes by which the initial policy change remade the politics of Medicare and solidified the MA program. The first enrollment surge occurred in the absence of a proximate legislative or administrative change. Instead, increased spending and expanded benefits were the result of the interaction of new market dynamics with an existing legislative framework-demonstrating an expansionary form of policy drift. The 1982 Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act created a policy space that gave the new and lightly controlled managed care industry considerable operational discretion. As the interests of the government's private partners changed in response to new market dynamics, a change occurred in the output and performance of the Medicare managed care program. As enrollment and spending increased, Medicare's politics were remade by the political empowerment of the managed care industry and the creation of a new subconstituency of beneficiaries. PMID:26921379

  11. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  12. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  13. Use of resident-origin data to define nursing home market boundaries.

    PubMed

    Zwanziger, Jack; Mukamel, Dana B; Indridason, Indridi

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies of nursing home markets have assumed that a nursing home's market is coincident with the boundaries of the county in which it is located. We test this assumption by using the zip code of residence for Medicare beneficiaries admitted into a nursing home in New York state in the periods 1992-93 and 1996-97. We find that nursing homes located in urban areas have markets that are a fraction of the size of the county in which they are located. We calculate the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) to measure the competitiveness of each nursing home's market. This shows that nursing home markets tend to be more concentrated than those that result from assuming countywide markets. These results suggest that studies of nursing home markets should not use counties as markets. PMID:12067076

  14. Medicare and private spending trends from 2008 to 2012 diverge in Texas.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Luisa; Taychakhoonavudh, Suthira; Parikh, Rohan; White, Chapin

    2015-02-01

    The recent relatively slow growth in health care spending masks significant differences among payers, clinical settings, and geographic areas. To better understand the spending slowdown, we focus on 2008-2012 trends in Texas among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries and enrollees in Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas (BCBSTX). Spending per person for Medicare grew only 1.5% per year on average, compared with 5.2% for BCBSTX. In Medicare, utilization rates were relatively flat, while prices grew more slowly than input prices. In BCBSTX, spending growth was driven by increases in negotiated prices, in particular hospital prices. We find that geographic variation declined sharply in Medicare, due to drops in spending on post-acute care in two notoriously high-spending regions but rose slightly in BCBSTX. The aggregate spending trends mask two divergent stories: spending growth in Medicare is very slow, but price increases continue to drive unsustainable spending growth among the privately insured. PMID:25550272

  15. 77 FR 32407 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Medicare Program; Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit Programs for...; Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit Programs for Contract Year...-9364. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2012-8071 of April 12, 2012 (77 FR...

  16. 75 FR 71064 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit... Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit Programs for Contract Year 2012 and Other... CONTACT: Sabrina Ahmed, (410) 786-7499. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc....

  17. 42 CFR 422.262 - Beneficiary premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Plan Approval § 422.262 Beneficiary premiums. (a) Determination of MA monthly basic beneficiary premium. (1) For an MA plan with an unadjusted statutory non-drug bid amount that is less than the relevant unadjusted non-drug benchmark amount, the basic beneficiary premium is zero. (2) For an MA...

  18. 42 CFR 422.262 - Beneficiary premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Information and Plan Approval § 422.262 Beneficiary premiums. (a) Determination of MA monthly basic beneficiary premium. (1) For an MA plan with an unadjusted statutory non-drug bid amount that is less than the relevant unadjusted non-drug benchmark amount, the basic beneficiary premium is zero. (2) For an MA...

  19. 42 CFR 422.262 - Beneficiary premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Information and Plan Approval § 422.262 Beneficiary premiums. (a) Determination of MA monthly basic beneficiary premium. (1) For an MA plan with an unadjusted statutory non-drug bid amount that is less than the relevant unadjusted non-drug benchmark amount, the basic beneficiary premium is zero. (2) For an MA...

  20. 42 CFR 422.262 - Beneficiary premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Plan Approval § 422.262 Beneficiary premiums. (a) Determination of MA monthly basic beneficiary premium. (1) For an MA plan with an unadjusted statutory non-drug bid amount that is less than the relevant unadjusted non-drug benchmark amount, the basic beneficiary premium is zero. (2) For an MA...

  1. 42 CFR 422.262 - Beneficiary premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Information and Plan Approval § 422.262 Beneficiary premiums. (a) Determination of MA monthly basic beneficiary premium. (1) For an MA plan with an unadjusted statutory non-drug bid amount that is less than the relevant unadjusted non-drug benchmark amount, the basic beneficiary premium is zero. (2) For an MA...

  2. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... Websites Visit other Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services & Health and Human Services Websites section Expand Medicare.gov Link to the ... helpful links for all Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services websites section Expand Web Policies & Important Links Privacy ...

  3. The continuing cost of privatization: extra payments to Medicare Advantage plans jump to $11.4 billion in 2009.

    PubMed

    Biles, Brian; Pozen, Jonah; Guterman, Stuart

    2009-05-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 explicitly increased Medicare payments to private Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. As a result, MA plans have, for the past six years, been paid more for their enrollees than they would be expected to cost in traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Payments to MA plans in 2009 are projected to be 13 percent greater than the corresponding costs in traditional Medicare--an average of $1,138 per MA plan enrollee, for a total of $11.4 billion. Although the extra payments are used to provide enrollees additional benefits, those benefits are not available to all beneficiaries-- but they are financed by general program funds. If payments to MA plans were instead equal to the spending level under traditional Medicare, the more than $150 billion in savings over 10 years could be used to finance improved benefits for the low-income elderly and disabled, or for expanding health-insurance coverage. PMID:19449498

  4. What's Medicare? What's Medicaid?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the plan • Run by Medicare-approved private insurance companies • May include extra benefits and services for an ... of prescription drugs • Run by Medicare-approved private insurance companies • May help lower your prescription drug costs and ...

  5. Are Medicare bundles in your future?

    PubMed

    Mulvany, Chad

    2015-08-01

    To ensure they are well-positioned for an expansion by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services of bundled payment, hospitals that are not participants in the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative should take the following steps: Understand which organizations in their markets are already participating and which might participate. Understand care utilization patterns within their care delivery networks and how those patterns affect cost per episode. Identify high-quality, cost-efficient postacute care providers and begin collaborating with them to further improve outcomes. Educate discharging physicians about the impact that choices related to postacute settings have on both beneficiary out-of-pocket obligations and overall cost of care. PMID:26548136

  6. Did Medicare Part D Reduce Disparities?

    PubMed Central

    Zissimopoulos, Julie; Joyce, Geoffrey F.; Scarpati, Lauren M.; Goldman, Dana P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed whether Medicare Part D reduced disparities in access to medication. Study Design Secondary data analysis of a twenty percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries, using Parts A and B medical claims from 2002–2008 and Part D drug claims from 2006–2008. Methods We analyzed medication use of Hispanics, blacks and whites beneficiaries with diabetes before and after reaching the Part D coverage gap, and compared it to race-specific reference groups not exposed to the loss in coverage. Unadjusted difference-indifference results were validated with multivariate regression models adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, and ZIP code-level household income used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Results The rate at which Hispanics reduced use of diabetes-related medications in the coverage gap was twice as high as whites, while blacks decreased use of diabetes-related medications by thirty-three percent more than whites. The reduction in medication use was correlated with drug price. Hispanics and blacks were more likely than whites to discontinue a therapy after reaching the coverage gap but more likely to resume once coverage restarted. Hispanics without subsidies and living in low income areas reduced medication use more than similar blacks and whites in the coverage gap. Conclusions We find that the Part D coverage gap is particularly disruptive to minorities and those living in low-income areas. The implications of this work suggest that protecting the health of vulnerable groups requires more than premium subsidies. Patient education may be a first step, but more substantive improvements in adherence may require changes in health care delivery. PMID:25880361

  7. 42 CFR 415.208 - Services of moonlighting residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of moonlighting residents. 415.208 Section 415.208 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN...

  8. 42 CFR 415.208 - Services of moonlighting residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of moonlighting residents. 415.208 Section 415.208 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN...

  9. Ensuring Access to Affordable Drug Coverage in Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Antos, Joseph R.

    2005-01-01

    The long-awaited outpatient prescription drug benefit in Medicare began January 2006. Despite its importance, the drug benefit is controversial. Instead of paying directly for prescriptions, the program will operate through competing private plans. Although it is too early to assess the full impact of Part D on beneficiaries, health plans and providers, employers, and taxpayers, we can discuss the major tradeoffs that will determine the success of the program. Key issues include whether market-based approaches will be more effective than direct government intervention in limiting spending; how will beneficiaries, drug plans, employers, and States adapt to the new program; and the balance between cost containment and access to innovative pharmaceuticals. PMID:17290641

  10. 78 FR 43820 - Medicare Program; Medical Loss Ratio Requirements for the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Program; Medical Loss Ratio Requirements for the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug...; Medical Loss Ratio Requirements for the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit... In FR Doc. 2013-12156 of May 23, 2013 (78 FR 31284), there were a number of technical,...

  11. Policy Changes in Medicare Home Health Care: Challenges to Providing Family-Centered, Community-Based Care for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) established new reimbursement systems in the Medicare home health fee-for-service benefit. Reimbursements were reduced to 1993 levels and per-beneficiary capitated limits were introduced for the first time. This article analyzes the impact of these changes on chronically ill older adults and their families.…

  12. Privatization of Medicare: toward disentitlement and betrayal of a social contract.

    PubMed

    Geyman, John P

    2004-01-01

    An intense political battle is being waged over the future of U.S. Medicare. The 40-year social contract established with the nation's elderly and disabled is seriously threatened. The basic issue is whether Medicare will remain a universal entitlement program or be privatized and dismantled as an obligation of government. Faced with the growing costs of the Medicare program, changing demographics of an aging population, and long-term federal deficits, conservative interests are promoting further privatization of the program under the guise of increasing beneficiaries' choice and the claimed efficiency of the private marketplace. Following a historical overview of past efforts to privatize Medicare, this article reviews the track record of private Medicare plans over the last 20 years with regard to choice, reliability, cost containment, benefits, quality of care, efficiency, public satisfaction, and fraud. In all of these areas, privatized Medicare has performed less well than original Medicare. Based on the evidence, one has to conclude that privatization of Medicare is detrimental to the elderly and disabled, the most vulnerable groups in our society, and that the only winners in that transformation are private market interests. PMID:15560424

  13. 38 CFR 6.6 - Change of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Change of beneficiary. 6... GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE Beneficiary of United States Government Life Insurance § 6.6 Change of beneficiary... time to time and without the consent or knowledge of the beneficiary to change the beneficiary....

  14. 38 CFR 6.6 - Change of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Change of beneficiary. 6... GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE Beneficiary of United States Government Life Insurance § 6.6 Change of beneficiary... time to time and without the consent or knowledge of the beneficiary to change the beneficiary....

  15. 38 CFR 6.6 - Change of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Change of beneficiary. 6... GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE Beneficiary of United States Government Life Insurance § 6.6 Change of beneficiary... time to time and without the consent or knowledge of the beneficiary to change the beneficiary....

  16. 38 CFR 6.6 - Change of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Change of beneficiary. 6... GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE Beneficiary of United States Government Life Insurance § 6.6 Change of beneficiary... time to time and without the consent or knowledge of the beneficiary to change the beneficiary....

  17. 38 CFR 6.6 - Change of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Change of beneficiary. 6... GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE Beneficiary of United States Government Life Insurance § 6.6 Change of beneficiary... time to time and without the consent or knowledge of the beneficiary to change the beneficiary....

  18. A description of the extreme aged population based on improved Medicare enrollment data.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, B

    1992-11-01

    The mortality and size of the extreme aged population can be studied most accurately with Medicare enrollment data from the Social Security Administration's Master Beneficiary Record after certain types of questionable records are eliminated. With the improved data base we find that mortality rates at the very old ages are higher than published rates, we are more confident of the reality of the race crossover, and we can estimate the number of centenarians more accurately. Furthermore, a large matched-records study shows close agreement on age at death between the Master Beneficiary Record and the death certificate. PMID:1483542

  19. Medicare and Rural Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... in rural areas. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) – CMMI, also known as the CMS Innovation ...

  20. Predictable Unpredictability: the Problem with Basing Medicare Policy on Long-Term Financial Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry; Zaylor, Abigail

    2015-07-01

    The authors assess how Medicare financing and projections of future costs have changed since 2000. They also assess the impact of legislative reforms on the sources and levels of financing and compare cost forecasts made at different times. Although the aging U.S. population and rising health care costs are expected to increase the share of gross domestic product devoted to Medicare, changes made in the program over the past decade have helped stabilize Medicare's financial outlook--even as benefits have been expanded. Long-term forecasting uncertainty should make policymakers and beneficiaries wary of dramatic changes to the program in the near term that are intended to alter its long-term forecast: the range of error associated with cost forecasts rises as the forecast window lengthens. Instead, policymakers should focus on the immediate policy window, taking steps to reduce the current burden of Medicare costs by containing spending today. PMID:26219117

  1. Fostering accountable health care: moving forward in medicare.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Elliott S; McClellan, Mark B; Bertko, John; Lieberman, Steven M; Lee, Julie J; Lewis, Julie L; Skinner, Jonathan S

    2009-01-01

    To succeed, health care reform must slow spending growth while improving quality. We propose a new approach to help achieve more integrated and efficient care by fostering local organizational accountability for quality and costs through performance measurement and "shared savings" payment reform. The approach is practical and feasible: it is voluntary for providers, builds on current referral patterns, requires no change in benefits or lock-in for beneficiaries, and offers the possibility of sustained provider incomes even as total costs are constrained. We simulate the potential expenditure impact and show that significant Medicare savings are possible. PMID:19174383

  2. 42 CFR 136a.16 - Beneficiary Identification Cards and verification of tribal membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... satisfactory to the Indian Health Service of tribal membership and residence within a Health Service Delivery... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Beneficiary Identification Cards and verification of tribal membership. 136a.16 Section 136a.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  3. 20 CFR 234.43 - Payment to designated beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beneficiaries. If a designated beneficiary dies before the date on which the RLS becomes payable, his or her... beneficiary dies before negotiating the RLS check, that share is payable to his or her estate. (b)...

  4. 20 CFR 234.43 - Payment to designated beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... beneficiaries. If a designated beneficiary dies before the date on which the RLS becomes payable, his or her... beneficiary dies before negotiating the RLS check, that share is payable to his or her estate. (b)...

  5. 20 CFR 234.43 - Payment to designated beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... beneficiaries. If a designated beneficiary dies before the date on which the RLS becomes payable, his or her... beneficiary dies before negotiating the RLS check, that share is payable to his or her estate. (b)...

  6. 20 CFR 234.43 - Payment to designated beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... beneficiaries. If a designated beneficiary dies before the date on which the RLS becomes payable, his or her... beneficiary dies before negotiating the RLS check, that share is payable to his or her estate. (b)...

  7. 20 CFR 234.43 - Payment to designated beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beneficiaries. If a designated beneficiary dies before the date on which the RLS becomes payable, his or her... beneficiary dies before negotiating the RLS check, that share is payable to his or her estate. (b)...

  8. Medicare Advantage Plans Pay Hospitals Less Than Traditional Medicare Pays.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Devlin, Aileen M; Kessler, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    There is ongoing debate about how prices paid to providers by Medicare Advantage plans compare to prices paid by fee-for-service Medicare. We used data from Medicare and the Health Care Cost Institute to identify the prices paid for hospital services by fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare, Medicare Advantage plans, and commercial insurers in 2009 and 2012. We calculated the average price per admission, and its trend over time, in each of the three types of insurance for fixed baskets of hospital admissions across metropolitan areas. After accounting for differences in hospital networks, geographic areas, and case-mix between Medicare Advantage and FFS Medicare, we found that Medicare Advantage plans paid 5.6 percent less for hospital services than FFS Medicare did. Without taking into account the narrower networks of Medicare Advantage, the program paid 8.0 percent less than FFS Medicare. We also found that the rates paid by commercial plans were much higher than those of either Medicare Advantage or FFS Medicare, and growing. At least some of this difference comes from the much higher prices that commercial plans pay for profitable service lines. PMID:27503970

  9. Projected Savings and Workforce Transformation from Converting Independence at Home to a Medicare Benefit.

    PubMed

    Kinosian, Bruce; Taler, George; Boling, Peter; Gilden, Dan

    2016-08-01

    The Independence at Home (IAH) Demonstration Year 1 results have confirmed earlier studies that showed the ability of home-based primary care (HBPC) to improve care and lower costs for Medicare's frailest beneficiaries. The first-year report showed IAH savings of 7.7% for all programs and 17% for the nine of 17 programs that surpassed the 5% mandatory savings threshold. Using these results as applied to the Medicare 5% claims file, the effect of expanding HBPC to the 2.2 million Medicare beneficiaries who are similar to IAH demonstration participants was projected. Total savings ranged from $12 billion to $53 billion depending on the speed and extent of dissemination of HBPC among this IAH-like population. Using a fixed growth rate, as hospitalists experienced in their first decade, 35% coverage would be achieved at the end of 10 years, with total 10-year savings through IAH reaching $37.5 billion and $17.3 billion accruing to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as a net reduction in overall expenditures, with $12.6 billion from Medicare Parts A and B savings. PMID:27241598

  10. Insurers’ Negotiating Leverage and the External Effects of Medicare Part D*

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius; Yin, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the size and bargaining power of private insurers, public subsidization of private health insurance may project effects beyond the subsidized population. We test for such spillovers by analyzing how increases in insurer size resulting from the implementation of Medicare Part D affected drug prices negotiated in the non-Medicare commercial market. On average, Part D lowered prices for commercial enrollees by 3.7%. The external commercial market savings amount to $1.5 billion per year, which, if passed to consumers, approximates the internal cost-savings of newly-insured subsidized beneficiaries. If retained by insurers, it corresponds to a 5% average increase in profitability. PMID:25937676

  11. Medicare program; changes to the criteria for determination of reasonable charges--HCFA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1987-03-01

    This rule revises the Medicare regulations governing reasonable charges for payment for the purchase of used durable medical equipment. This revision is intended to encourage the sale of used equipment to Medicare beneficiaries. In addition, to correct a program inequity and to simplify program administration, we are extending, for services furnished on or after January 1, 1987, one of the provisions of section 9304 of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985. The provision we are extending deals with determining customary charges for physicians who have terminated their compensation agreements with a hospital. PMID:10301337

  12. Medicare Cost Differences between Nursing Home Patients Admitted with and without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Bruce; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Fahlman, Cheryl; Quinn, Charlene C.; Burton, Lynda; Zuckerman, Illene H.; Hebel, J. Rich; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Singhal, Puneet K.; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare Medicare costs of treating older adults with and without dementia in nursing home settings. Design and Methods: An expert panel established the dementia status of a stratified random sample of newly admitted residents in 59 Maryland nursing homes between 1992 and 1995. Medicare expenditures…

  13. 78 FR 57807 - Aged Beneficiary Designation Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... record- keeper in regulations on June 13, 1997 (62 FR 32426). All beneficiary designation forms in an... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0; #0;Proposed Rules #0... beneficiary designation form is valid only if it is received by the TSP record- keeper not more than one...

  14. The Cost of Cancer-Related Physician Services to Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Maroongroge, Sean; Kim, Simon P.; Mougalian, Sarah; Johung, Kimberly; Decker, Roy H.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Long, Jessica B.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Although physician services represent a substantial portion of cancer care costs, little is known about trends in the costs of physician cancer services in the fee-for-service Medicare program. We analyzed aggregated data from all Part B Medicare claims for physician and supplier services attributed to cancer patients from 1999 to 2012 to characterize how billing and payments have changed over time for the most common cancer types. Billing and expenditure data are from the Medicare Statistical Supplement, and age-adjusted incidence data are from SEER. Physician services for cancer patients grew from $7.6 billion in 1999 to $12.3 billion in 2012 (60 percent increase). Reimbursements for physician and supplier services for cancer treatment in Medicare Part B beneficiaries steadily grew from 1999 to 2005 and then plateaued through 2012, led by a decrease in reimbursements for prostate cancer care. These trends may reflect shifts toward hospital-based care or changes in aggressiveness of care. PMID:26029009

  15. Do Medicare Advantage plans select enrollees in higher margin clinical categories?

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Joseph P; McWilliams, J Michael; Price, Mary; Huang, Jie; Fireman, Bruce; Hsu, John

    2013-12-01

    The CMS-HCC risk adjustment system for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans calculates weights, which are effectively relative prices, for beneficiaries with different observable characteristics. To do so it uses the relative amounts spent per beneficiary with those characteristics in Traditional Medicare (TM). For multiple reasons one might expect relative amounts in MA to differ from TM, thereby making some beneficiaries more profitable to treat than others. Much of the difference comes from differences in how TM and MA treat different diseases or diagnoses. Using data on actual medical spending from two MA-HMO plans, we show that the weights calculated from MA costs do indeed differ from those calculated using TM spending. One of the two plans (Plan 1) is more typical of MA-HMO plans in that it contracts with independent community providers, while the other (Plan 2) is vertically integrated with care delivery. We calculate margins, or average revenue/average cost, for Medicare beneficiaries in the two plans who have one of 48 different combinations of medical conditions. The two plans' margins for these 48 conditions are correlated (r=0.39, p<0.01). Both plans have margins that are more positive for persons with conditions that are managed by primary care physicians and where medical management can be effective. Conversely they have lower margins for persons with conditions that tend to be treated by specialists with greater market power than primary care physicians and for acute conditions where little medical management is possible. The two plan's margins among beneficiaries with different observable characteristics vary over a range of 160 and 98 percentage points, respectively, and thus would appear to offer substantial incentive for selection by HCC. Nonetheless, we find no evidence of overrepresentation of beneficiaries in high margin HCC's in either plan. Nor, using the margins from Plan 1, the more typical plan, do we find evidence of overrepresentation of high

  16. Do Medicare Advantage Plans Select Enrollees in Higher Margin Clinical Categories?

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; McWilliams, J. Michael; Price, Mary; Huang, Jie; Fireman, Bruce; Hsu, John

    2013-01-01

    The CMS-HCC risk adjustment system for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans calculates weights, which are effectively relative prices, for beneficiaries with different observable characteristics. To do so it uses the relative amounts spent per beneficiary with those characteristics in Traditional Medicare (TM). For multiple reasons one might expect relative amounts in MA to differ from TM, thereby making some beneficiaries more profitable to treat than others. Much of the difference comes from differences in how TM and MA treat different diseases or diagnoses. Using data on actual medical spending from two MA-HMO plans, we show that the weights calculated from MA costs do indeed differ from those calculated using TM spending. One of the two plans (Plan 1) is more typical of MA-HMO plans in that it contracts with independent community providers, while the other (Plan 2) is vertically integrated with care delivery. We calculate margins, or Average Revenue/Average Cost, for Medicare beneficiaries in the two plans who have one of 48 different combinations of medical conditions. The two plans’ margins for these 48 conditions are correlated (r=0.39, p<0.01). Both plans have margins that are more positive for persons with conditions that are managed by primary care physicians and where medical management can be effective. Conversely they have lower margins for persons with conditions that tend to be treated by specialists with greater market power than primary care physicians and for acute conditions where little medical management is possible. The two plan’s margins among beneficiaries with different observable characteristics vary over a range of 160 and 98 percentage points, respectively, and thus would appear to offer substantial incentive for selection by HCC. Nonetheless, we find no evidence of overrepresentation of beneficiaries in high margin HCC’s in either plan. Nor, using the margins from Plan 1, the more typical plan, do we find evidence of overrepresentation

  17. Medicare Preventive and Screening Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... covered? Search Medicare.gov for covered items Preventive & screening services How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers: Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening Alcohol misuse screenings & counseling Bone mass measurements (bone ...

  18. Medicare program; Medicare integrity program, intermediary and carrier functions, and conflict of interest requirements--HCFA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-03-20

    This proposed rule would implement section 1893 of the Social Security Act (the Act) by establishing the Medicare integrity program (MIP) to carry out Medicare program integrity activities that are funded from the Medicare Trust Funds. Section 1893 expands our contracting authority to allow us to contract with "eligible entities" to perform Medicare program integrity activities. These activities include review of provider and supplier activities, including medical, fraud, and utilization review: cost report audits; Medicare secondary payer determinations; education of providers, suppliers, beneficiaries, and other persons regarding payment integrity and benefit quality assurance issues; and developing and updating a list of durable medical equipment items that are subject to prior authorization. This proposed rule would set forth the definition of eligible entities, services to be procured, competitive requirements based on Federal acquisition regulations and exceptions (guidelines for automatic renewal), procedures for identification, evaluation, and resolution of conflicts of interest, and limitations on contractor liability. In addition, this proposed rule would bring certain sections of the Medicare regulations concerning fiscal intermediaries and carriers into conformity with the Act. The rule would distinguish between those functions that the statute requires be included in agreements with intermediaries and those that may be included in the agreements. It would also provide that some or all of the listed functions may be included in carrier contracts. Currently all these functions are mandatory for carrier contracts. These changes would give us the flexibility to transfer functions from one intermediary or carrier to another or to otherwise limit the functions an intermediary or carrier performs if we determine that to do so would result in more effective and efficient program administration. PMID:10177750

  19. MEDICARE HEALTH OUTCOMES SURVEY (HOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) is the first Medicare managed care outcomes measure. CMS, in collaboration with NCQA, launched the Medicare HOS in the 1998 Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS?). The measure includes the most recent advances in summarizi...

  20. Mortality after distal radial fractures in the Medicare population

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa J.; Zhong, Lin; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a low energy fracture of the distal radius increases the risk for another, more serious fracture such as a proximal femoral fracture. Early mortality after proximal femoral fracture has been widely studied, but the association between distal radial fracture and mortality is unknown. The date of death for all Medicare beneficiaries who sustained an isolated distal radial fracture in 2007 was determined using Medicare Vital Statistics files. The adjusted mortality rate for each age-sex group was calculated and compared with published US mortality tables. Distal radial fractures were not associated with an increased mortality rate. In fact, beneficiaries had a significantly lower mortality rate after distal radial fractures than the general population. This may be related to the injured beneficiaries’ involvement in the healthcare system. Mortality rate did not vary significantly based on time from injury. Our results indicate that any mortality is unlikely to be attributable to the distal radial fracture or its treatment. Level of Evidence: III PMID:26085186

  1. 78 FR 16614 - Medicare Program; Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) and Medicare Supplementary Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ..., appeals of Part A claim denials that were remanded from the ALJ level to the QIC level will be returned to the ALJ level for adjudication of the Part A claim appeal consistent with the scope of review... Medicare Program; Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) and Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance (Part...

  2. Medicare Part D and the Nursing Home Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, David G.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Newhouse, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how the introduction of Medicare Part D is changing the operations of long-term-care pharmacies (LTCPs) and nursing homes, as well as implications of those changes for nursing home residents. Design and Methods: We reviewed existing sources of information and interviewed stakeholders across…

  3. 5 CFR 1651.3 - Designation of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... benefit. A beneficiary may be designated without the knowledge or consent of that beneficiary or the knowledge or consent of the participant's spouse. A participant may designate a custodian under the Uniform..., identify the primary beneficiary whose share the contingent beneficiary is to receive in the event...

  4. 5 CFR 1651.3 - Designation of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... benefit. A beneficiary may be designated without the knowledge or consent of that beneficiary or the knowledge or consent of the participant's spouse. A participant may designate a custodian under the Uniform..., identify the primary beneficiary whose share the contingent beneficiary is to receive in the event...

  5. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  6. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  7. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  8. Resident Medical Care Utilization Patterns in Continuing Care Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Morris, Shirley; Morris, John N.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an evaluation of medical care service utilization by two elderly cohorts one living in continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) and the other living in traditional community settings. CCRC residents' overall use of Medicare-covered medical services did not differ significantly from that of the traditional community-residing elders. Both groups incurred annual per capita expenditures of approximately $2,000. In their last year of life, however, CCRC residents displayed significantly lower expenditures for hospital care ($3,854 versus $7,268) but higher expenditures for Medicare or non-Medicare-covered nursing home care ($5,565 versus $3,533). PMID:10133107

  9. Changes in Patients’ Experiences in Medicare Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Landon, Bruce E.; Chernew, Michael E.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Incentives for accountable care organizations (ACOs) to limit health care use and improve quality may enhance or hurt patients’ experiences with care. METHODS Using Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey data covering 3 years before and 1 year after the start of Medicare ACO contracts in 2012 as well as linked Medicare claims, we compared patients’ experiences in a group of 32,334 fee-for-service beneficiaries attributed to ACOs (ACO group) with those in a group of 251,593 beneficiaries attributed to other providers (control group), before and after the start of ACO contracts. We used linear regression and a difference-in-differences analysis to estimate changes in patients’ experiences in the ACO group that differed from concurrent changes in the control group, with adjustment for the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the patients. RESULTS After ACO contracts began, patients’ reports of timely access to care and their primary physicians’ being informed about specialty care differentially improved in the ACO group, as compared with the control group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.006, respectively), whereas patients’ ratings of physicians, interactions with physicians, and overall care did not differentially change. Among patients with multiple chronic conditions and high predicted Medicare spending, overall ratings of care differentially improved in the ACO group as compared with the control group (P = 0.02). Differential improvements in timely access to care and overall ratings were equivalent to moving from average performance among ACOs to the 86th to 98th percentile (timely access to care) and to the 82nd to 96th percentile (overall ratings) and were robust to adjustment for group differences in trends during the preintervention period. CONCLUSIONS In the first year, ACO contracts were associated with meaningful improvements in some measures of patients’ experience and with unchanged performance in

  10. Medicare Letters To Curb Overprescribing Of Controlled Substances Had No Detectable Effect On Providers.

    PubMed

    Sacarny, Adam; Yokum, David; Finkelstein, Amy; Agrawal, Shantanu

    2016-03-01

    Inappropriate prescribing is a rising threat to the health of Medicare beneficiaries and a drain on Medicare's finances. In this study we used a randomized controlled trial approach to evaluate a low-cost, light-touch intervention aimed at reducing the inappropriate provision of Schedule II controlled substances in the Medicare Part D program. Potential overprescribers were sent a letter explaining that their practice patterns were highly unlike those of their peers. Using rich administrative data, we were unable to detect an effect of these letters on prescribing. We describe ongoing efforts to build on this null result with alternative interventions. Learning about the potential of light-touch interventions, both effective and ineffective, will help produce a better toolkit for policy makers to improve the value and safety of health care. PMID:26953302

  11. Socioeconomic characteristics of enrollees appear to influence performance scores for medicare part D contractors.

    PubMed

    Young, Gary J; Rickles, Nathaniel M; Chou, Chia-Hung; Raver, Eli

    2014-01-01

    More than 150 private companies contract with the federal government to provide Part D prescription drug benefits to Medicare beneficiaries, either through stand-alone drug plans or as part of Medicare Advantage plans. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) evaluates these companies on a set of performance measures, including plan enrollees' medication adherence. We used 2012 data from CMS and data from the US Census Bureau to investigate whether these performance ratings are influenced by the socioeconomic characteristics of enrollee populations. We found that some companies have a substantial advantage over others because of their enrollees' socioeconomic characteristics, with more than a third of the variation in adherence scores tied to these characteristics. CMS should seriously consider adjusting adherence scores to account for differences in the socioeconomic characteristics of enrollee populations. PMID:24395946

  12. Dx for a careful approach to moving dual-eligible beneficiaries into managed care plans.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Patricia; Lyons, Barbara; Rentas, Jennifer; Rowland, Diane

    2012-06-01

    Policy makers are moving rapidly to develop and test reforms aimed at doing a better job of managing the costs and care for people dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid. This commentary underscores the importance of pursuing new initiatives to address care coordination and spending concerns. It then focuses on key issues raised by proposals that would shift dual-eligible beneficiaries into managed care plans. The paper describes the heterogeneity and complexity of this population, emphasizing the need for approaches closely tied to the needs of particular subgroups of dual-eligible beneficiaries. It warns against moving too quickly, noting the time and resources required to build capacity to serve patients, secure provider networks, and develop an infrastructure for integrating and managing both Medicare and Medicaid services. The commentary cautions that optimistic savings assumptions might not materialize, raises questions about how savings will be allocated, and highlights the need for accountability as new models are being developed and tested to improve care for a population with complex needs. PMID:22665830

  13. Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system. PMID:24889943

  14. TRICARE; constructive eligibility for TRICARE benefits of certain persons otherwise ineligible under retroactive determination of entitlement to Medicare Part A hospital insurance benefits. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-06-27

    The Department is publishing this final rule to implement section 706 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2010, Public Law 111-84. Specifically, section 706 exempts TRICARE beneficiaries under the age of 65 who become disabled from the requirement to enroll in Medicare Part B for the retroactive months of entitlement to Medicare Part A in order to maintain TRICARE coverage. This statutory amendment and final rule only impact eligibility for the period in which the beneficiary's disability determination is pending before the Social Security Administration. Eligible beneficiaries are still required to enroll in Medicare Part B in order to maintain their TRICARE coverage for future months, but are considered to have coverage under the TRICARE program for the retroactive months of their entitlement to Medicare Part A. This final rule also amends the eligibility section of the TRICARE regulation to more clearly address reinstatement of TRICARE eligibility following a gap in coverage due to lack of enrollment in Medicare Part B. PMID:22737761

  15. Medicare prescription drug discount cards.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Natasha

    2004-01-01

    With the passage of the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 came the creation of a Part D drug benefit through Medicare. Until that benefit is implemented, Medicare has established a drug discount card program to help your clients save money on their outpatient prescription drug expenses. In this brief, we discuss the Medicare-approved discount cards--who is eligible, how they work, how your clients can best make important decisions about them, and what help is out there for people with low incomes. PMID:15224690

  16. Underreporting High-Risk Prescribing Among Medicare Advantage Plans

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alicia L.; Kazis, Lewis E.; Dore, David D.; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Medicare Advantage plans are required to report clinical performance using Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators, the accuracy of plan-reported performance rates is unknown. Objective To compare calculated and reported rates of high-risk prescribing among Medicare Advantage plans. Design Cross-sectional comparison. Setting 172 Medicare Advantage plans. Patients A random sample of beneficiaries in 172 Medicare Advantage plans in 2006 (n = 177 227) and 2007 (n = 173 655). Measurements Plan-reported HEDIS rates of high-risk prescribing among elderly persons were compared with rates calculated from Medicare Advantage plans’ Part D claims by using the same measure specifications and source population. Results The mean rate of high-risk prescribing derived from Part D claims was 26.9% (95% CI, 25.9% to 28.0%), whereas the mean plan-reported rate was 21.1% (CI, 20.0% to 22.3%). Approximately 95% of plans underreported rates of high-risk prescribing relative to calculated rates derived from Part D claims. The differences in the calculated and reported rates negatively affected quality rankings for the plans that most accurately reported rates. For example, the 9 plans that reported rates of high-risk prescribing within 1 percentage point of calculated rates were ranked 43.4 positions lower when reported rates were used instead of calculated rates. Among 103 680 individuals present in both the sample of Part D claims and HEDIS data in 2006, Medicare Advantage plans incorrectly excluded 10.3% as ineligible for the HEDIS high-risk prescribing measure. Among those correctly included in the high-risk prescribing denominator, the reported rate of high-risk prescribing was 21.9% and the calculated rate was 26.2%. Limitation A single quality measure was assessed. Conclusion Medicare Advantage plans underreport rates of high-risk prescribing, suggesting a role for routine audits to ensure the validity of publicly reported

  17. Anesthesiologists Are Affiliated with Many Hospitals Only Reporting Anesthesia Claims Using Modifier QZ for Medicare Claims in 2013.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas R; Abouleish, Amr; Halzack, Nicholas M

    2016-04-01

    We examined hospitals that exclusively used the billing modifier QZ in anesthesia claims for a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries in 2013. We used a national Medicare provider file to identify physician anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists affiliated with these hospitals. Among the 538 hospitals that exclusively reported the modifier QZ, 47.5% had affiliated physician anesthesiologists. These hospitals accounted for 60.4% of the cases. Our results illustrate the challenges of using modifier QZ to describe anesthesia practice arrangements in hospitals. The modifier QZ does not seem to be a valid surrogate for no anesthesiologist being involved in the care provided. PMID:26491838

  18. Applying the 2003 Beers Update to Elderly Medicare Enrollees in the Part D Program

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Steven A.; Montgomery, Melissa A.; Baugh, Dave K.; Ciborowski, Gary M.; Riley, Gerald F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inappropriate prescribing of certain medications known as Beers drugs may be harmful to the elderly, because the potential risk for an adverse outcome outweighs the potential benefit. Objectives (1) To assess Beers drug use in dual enrollees compared to non-duals; (2) to explore the association between dual enrollment status and Beers use, controlling for the effects of age, gender, race/ethnicity, census region, and health status; (3) to assess which medication therapeutic category had the highest Beers use. Design Cross sectional retrospective review of 2007 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service Part D data. Potentially inappropriate medication use was assessed, independent of diagnosis, using the 2003 update by Fick et al. Findings The likelihood of Beers drug use among duals approximates that of non-duals (OR 1.023, 95% CI 1.020–1.026). Characteristics associated with the receipt of a Beers medication include Hispanic origin, younger age, female gender, poor health status, and residence outside of the U.S.' Northeast region. Genitourinary products had the highest Beers use within medication therapeutic categories among both dual and non-dual enrollees (21.1% and 19.9%, respectively). Conclusions Part D data can be successfully used to monitor Beers drug use. With adjustments for several important and easily measured demographic, health, and prescription drug use covariates, Beers drug use appears to be as common among non-dual enrollees as it is among dual enrollees in the Part D program. New Part D drug utilization policies that apply to all beneficiaries may need to be enacted to reduce Beers drug use. PMID:24800144

  19. Your Guide to Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug coverage to Original Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee- for- Service ( PFFS) Plans, some Medicare Cost Plans, ... Monthly premium Most drug plans charge a monthly fee that differs from plan to plan. You pay ...

  20. Medicare and Caregivers: Illness and Hospitilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Medicare and Caregivers Illness and Hospitalization Facing a chronic ... and give you Medicare-covered services. When Does Medicare Cover Hospital Care? If a person needs to ...

  1. Financial and Quality Impacts of the Medicare Physician Group Practice Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Gregory; Kautter, John; Leung, Musetta; Trisolini, Michael; Adamache, Walter; Smith, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of the Medicare Physician Group Practice (PGP) demonstration on expenditure, utilization, and quality outcomes. Data Source Secondary data analysis of 2001–2010 Medicare claims for 1,776,387 person years assigned to the ten participating provider organizations and 1,579,080 person years in the corresponding local comparison groups. Study Design We used a pre-post comparison group observational design consisting of four pre-demonstration years (1/01–12/04) and five demonstration years (4/05–3/10). We employed a propensity-weighted difference-in-differences regression model to estimate demonstration effects, adjusting for demographics, health status, geographic area, and secular trends. Principal Findings The ten demonstration sites combined saved $171 (2.0%) per assigned beneficiary person year (p<0.001) during the five-year demonstration period. Medicare paid performance bonuses to the participating PGPs that averaged $102 per person year. The net savings to the Medicare program were $69 (0.8%) per person year. Demonstration savings were achieved primarily from the inpatient setting. The demonstration improved quality of care as measured by six of seven claims-based process quality indicators. Conclusions The PGP demonstration, which used a payment model similar to the Medicare Accountable Care Organization (ACO) program, resulted in small reductions in Medicare expenditures and inpatient utilization, and improvements in process quality indicators. Judging from this demonstration experience, it is unlikely that Medicare ACOs will initially achieve large savings. Nevertheless, ACOs paid through shared savings may be an important first step toward greater efficiency and quality in the Medicare fee-for-service program. PMID:25161812

  2. Enrollees Choose Priorities for Medicare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danis, Marion; Biddle, Andrea K.; Goold, Susan Dorr

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and results of ascertaining Medicare enrollees' priorities for insured medical benefits. Design and Methods: Structured group exercises were conducted with Medicare enrollees from clinical and community settings in central North Carolina. By participating in a decision exercise,…

  3. 5 CFR 870.802 - Designation of beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... change his/her beneficiary at any time without the knowledge or consent of the previous beneficiary. This... individual does not make a designation for these benefits and there is no previous valid designation on...

  4. Choice Set Size and Decision-Making: The Case of Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans

    PubMed Central

    Bundorf, M. Kate; Szrek, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of choice on consumer decision-making is controversial in U.S. health policy. Objective Our objective was to determine how choice set size influences decision-making among Medicare beneficiaries choosing prescription drug plans. Methods We randomly assigned members of an internet-enabled panel age 65 and over to sets of prescription drug plans of varying sizes (2, 5, 10, and 16) and asked them to choose a plan. Respondents answered questions about the plan they chose, the choice set, and the decision process. We used ordered probit models to estimate the effect of choice set size on the study outcomes. Results Both the benefits of choice, measured by whether the chosen plan is close to the ideal plan, and the costs, measured by whether the respondent found decision-making difficult, increased with choice set size. Choice set size was not associated with the probability of enrolling in any plan. Conclusions Medicare beneficiaries face a tension between not wanting to choose from too many options and feeling happier with an outcome when they have more alternatives. Interventions that reduce cognitive costs when choice sets are large may make this program more attractive to beneficiaries. PMID:20228281

  5. 5 CFR 1651.10 - Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... BENEFITS § 1651.10 Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries. (a) Designated beneficiary dies before... the trust were a beneficiary that predeceased the participant. (c) Non-designated beneficiary dies... beneficiary form dies before the participant, the beneficiary's share will be paid equally to other...

  6. 5 CFR 1651.10 - Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BENEFITS § 1651.10 Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries. (a) Designated beneficiary dies before... the trust were a beneficiary that predeceased the participant. (c) Non-designated beneficiary dies... beneficiary form dies before the participant, the beneficiary's share will be paid equally to other...

  7. 5 CFR 1651.10 - Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... BENEFITS § 1651.10 Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries. (a) Designated beneficiary dies before... the trust were a beneficiary that predeceased the participant. (c) Non-designated beneficiary dies... beneficiary form dies before the participant, the beneficiary's share will be paid equally to other...

  8. 5 CFR 1651.10 - Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... BENEFITS § 1651.10 Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries. (a) Designated beneficiary dies before... the trust were a beneficiary that predeceased the participant. (c) Non-designated beneficiary dies... beneficiary form dies before the participant, the beneficiary's share will be paid equally to other...

  9. 5 CFR 1651.10 - Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... BENEFITS § 1651.10 Deceased and non-existent beneficiaries. (a) Designated beneficiary dies before... the trust were a beneficiary that predeceased the participant. (c) Non-designated beneficiary dies... beneficiary form dies before the participant, the beneficiary's share will be paid equally to other...

  10. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  11. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  12. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  13. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  14. 26 CFR 54.4980B-3 - Qualified beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified beneficiaries. 54.4980B-3 Section 54.4980B-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980B-3 Qualified beneficiaries. The determination of who is a qualified beneficiary,...

  15. 42 CFR 423.293 - Collection of monthly beneficiary premium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of monthly beneficiary premium. 423.293... Monthly Beneficiary Premiums; Plan Approval § 423.293 Collection of monthly beneficiary premium. (a) General rules. Part D sponsors must— (1) Charge enrollees a consolidated monthly Part D premium equal...

  16. 42 CFR 423.293 - Collection of monthly beneficiary premium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... amount for an individual whose income exceeds the income threshold amounts specified at 20 CFR 418.2115... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Collection of monthly beneficiary premium. 423.293... Monthly Beneficiary Premiums; Plan Approval § 423.293 Collection of monthly beneficiary premium....

  17. 25 CFR 17.13 - Government employees as beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Government employees as beneficiaries. 17.13 Section 17... INDIANS § 17.13 Government employees as beneficiaries. In considering the will of a deceased Osage Indian the superintendent may disapprove any will which names as a beneficiary thereunder a...

  18. 25 CFR 17.13 - Government employees as beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Government employees as beneficiaries. 17.13 Section 17.13....13 Government employees as beneficiaries. In considering the will of a deceased Osage Indian the superintendent may disapprove any will which names as a beneficiary thereunder a government employee who is...

  19. 25 CFR 17.13 - Government employees as beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government employees as beneficiaries. 17.13 Section 17... INDIANS § 17.13 Government employees as beneficiaries. In considering the will of a deceased Osage Indian the superintendent may disapprove any will which names as a beneficiary thereunder a...

  20. 25 CFR 17.13 - Government employees as beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Government employees as beneficiaries. 17.13 Section 17... INDIANS § 17.13 Government employees as beneficiaries. In considering the will of a deceased Osage Indian the superintendent may disapprove any will which names as a beneficiary thereunder a...

  1. 25 CFR 17.13 - Government employees as beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Government employees as beneficiaries. 17.13 Section 17... INDIANS § 17.13 Government employees as beneficiaries. In considering the will of a deceased Osage Indian the superintendent may disapprove any will which names as a beneficiary thereunder a...

  2. Effects of Expanded Coverage for Chiropractic Services on Medicare Costs in a CMS Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Stason, William B.; Ritter, Grant A; Prottas, Jeffrey; Tompkins, Christopher; Shepard, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderately convincing evidence supports the benefits of chiropractic manipulations for low back pain. Its effectiveness in other applications is less well documented, and its cost-effectiveness is not known. These questions led the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to conduct a two-year demonstration of expanded Medicare coverage for chiropractic services in the treatment of beneficiaries with neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) conditions affecting the back, limbs, neck, or head. Methods The demonstration was conducted in 2005–2007 in selected counties of Illinois, Iowa, and Virginia and the entire states of Maine and New Mexico. Medicare claims were compiled for the preceding year and two demonstration years for the demonstration areas and matched comparison areas. The impact of the demonstration was analyzed through multivariate regression analysis with a difference-in-difference framework. Results Expanded coverage increased Medicare expenditures by $50 million or 28.5% in users of chiropractic services and by $114 million or 10.4% in all patients treated for NMS conditions in demonstration areas during the two-year period. Results varied widely among demonstration areas ranging from increased costs per user of $485 in Northern Illinois and Chicago counties to decreases in costs per user of $59 in New Mexico and $178 in Scott County, Iowa. Conclusion The demonstration did not assess possible decreases in costs to other insurers, out-of-pocket payments by patients, the need for and costs of pain medications, or longer term clinical benefits such as avoidance of orthopedic surgical procedures beyond the two-year period of the demonstration. It is possible that other payers or beneficiaries saved money during the demonstration while costs to Medicare were increased. PMID:26928221

  3. Medicare Home Visit Program Associated With Fewer Hospital And Nursing Home Admissions, Increased Office Visits.

    PubMed

    Mattke, Soeren; Han, Dan; Wilks, Asa; Sloss, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Clinical home visit programs for Medicare beneficiaries are a promising approach to supporting aging in place and avoiding high-cost institutional care. Such programs combine a comprehensive geriatric assessment by a clinician during a home visit with referrals to community providers and health plan resources to address uncovered issues. We evaluated UnitedHealth Group's HouseCalls program, which has been offered to Medicare Advantage plan members in Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas since January 2008. We found that, compared to non-HouseCalls Medicare Advantage plan members and fee-for-service beneficiaries, HouseCalls participants had reductions in admissions to hospitals (1 percent and 14 percent, respectively) and lower risk of nursing home admission (0.67 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively). In addition, participants' numbers of office visits--chiefly to specialists--increased 2-6 percent (depending on the comparison group). The program's effects on emergency department use were mixed. These results indicate that a thorough home-based clinical assessment of a member's health and home environment combined with referral services can support aging in place, promote physician office visits, and preempt costly institutional care. PMID:26643635

  4. Regulating and Paying for Hospice and Palliative Care: Reflections on the Medicare Hospice Benefit.

    PubMed

    Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M

    2016-08-01

    Hospice began as a social movement outside of mainstream medicine with the goal of helping those dying alone and in unbearable pain in health care institutions. The National Hospice Study, undertaken to test whether hospice improved dying cancer patients' quality of life while saving Medicare money, found hospice care achieved comparable outcomes to traditional cancer care and was less costly as long as hospice lengths of stay were not too long. In 1982, before study results were final, Congress created a Medicare hospice benefit under a capitated per diem payment system restricting further treatment. In 1986 the benefit was extended to beneficiaries living in nursing homes. This change resulted in longer average lengths of stay, explosive growth in the number of hospices, particularly of the for-profit variety, and increases in total Medicare expenditures on hospice care. An increasingly high proportion of beneficiaries receive hospice care. However, over 30 percent are served fewer than seven days before they die, while very long stays are also increasingly common. These and other factors raise quality concerns about hospice being disconnected from the rest of the health care system. We offer suggestions regarding how hospice could be better integrated into the broader health care delivery system. PMID:27127256

  5. The Beneficiary Perspective - Benefits and Beyond

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter of the Handbook on Ecosystem Services, we first explore distinctions between nature’s benefits and human beneficiaries of nature, and how seemingly slight differences in the definition of ecosystem services can lead to vastly different outcomes. We adopt a ...

  6. Regulatory beneficiaries and informal agency policymaking.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Nina A

    2007-03-01

    Administrative agencies frequently use guidance documents to set policy broadly and prospectively in areas ranging from Department of Education Title IX enforcement to Food and Drug Administration regulation of direct-to- consumer pharmaceutical advertising. In form, these guidances often closely resemble the policies agencies issue in ordinary notice-and-comment rulemaking. However, guidances are generally developed with little public participation and are often immune from judicial review. Nonetheless, guidances can prompt significant changes in behavior from those the agencies regulate. A number of commentators have guardedly defended the current state of affairs. Though guidances lack some important procedural safeguards, they can help agencies supervise low-level employees and supply valuable information to regulated entities regarding how an agency will implement a program. Thus far, however, the debate has largely ignored the distinct and substantial interests of regulatory beneficiaries--those who expect to benefit from government regulation of others. Regulatory beneficiaries include, among others, pharmaceutical consumers, environmental users, and workers seeking safe workplaces. When agencies make policy informally, regulatory beneficiaries suffer distinctive losses to their ability to participate in the agency's decision and to invoke judicial review. This Article argues that considering the interests of regulatory beneficiaries strengthens the case for procedural reform. The Article then assesses some possible solutions. PMID:17410678

  7. Medicare reform and primary care concerns for future physicians.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Charles H; Spinelli, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    The widening income gap between specialists and primary care physicians (PCPs) has spurred many physician associations to reform the current Resource-Based Relative Value Scale fee schedule and sustainable growth rate expenditure target system. Hoping to better represent primary care, the American Association of Family Physicians formed a task force in 2011 to suggest supplements to the Relative Value Update Committee's procedural code recommendations to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In addition, the predicted shortage of PCPs has caused many medical schools to increase class sizes; the scarcity of PCPs has also spurred the founding of new medical schools. Such measures, however, have not been met with more residency program sites or graduate medical education funding. The present article highlights major Medicare reform strategies and explores several issues affecting the field of primary care, including reimbursement, representation, and residency training. PMID:24084804

  8. 76 FR 59138 - Medicare Program; Medicare Appeals; Adjustment to the Amount in Controversy Threshold Amounts for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Medicare Appeals; Adjustment to the Amount in Controversy Threshold Amounts for Calendar Year 2012 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... review under the Medicare appeals process. The adjustment to the AIC threshold amounts will be...

  9. Twenty years of Medicare and Medicaid: Covered populations, use of benefits, and program expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Gornick, Marian; Greenberg, Jay N.; Eggers, Paul W.; Dobson, Allen

    1985-01-01

    Marian Gornick is Director, Division of Beneficiary Studies, in the Office of Research, Health Care Financing Administration. She has been involved in research studies relating to Medicare and Medicaid since the programs were first implemented. Jay N. Greenberg is on the faculty of the Heller Graduate School, Brandeis University. Dr. Greenberg serves as the Associate Director for Research of the school's Health Policy Center. Paul W. Eggers is Chief, Program Evaluation Branch, in the Office of Research, Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA). Dr. Eggers’ research activities involve the evaluation of the impact of HCFA programs on the beneficiaries. Allen Dobson is Director, Office of Research, Health Care Financing Administration. Dr. Dobson is responsible for directing the planning and development of the Agency's research agenda. PMID:10311371

  10. Staying Healthy: Medicare's Preventive Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor to test your cholesterol, lipid, and triglyceride levels to help determine if you’re at ... condititions. Medicare covers tests for cholesterol, lipid, and triglyceride levels every 5 years. Colorectal Cancer Screenings These ...

  11. Commonsense Medicare SGR Repeal and Beneficiary Access Improvement Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2014-03-25

    03/26/2014 Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 336. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Responsible Medicare SGR Repeal and Beneficiary Access Improvement Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Hatch, Orrin G. [R-UT

    2014-03-12

    03/13/2014 Read the second time. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 330. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. 77 FR 43496 - Regulations Regarding Income-Related Monthly Adjustment Amounts to Medicare Beneficiaries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... comments we published in the Federal Register on December 7, 2010, at 75 FR 75884. The interim final rule...: The interim final rule with request for comments published on December 7, 2010 (75 FR 75884) is... interim final rule with request for comments in the Federal Register at 75 FR 75884 and provided a...

  14. Medicare and Medicaid at 25.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E

    1990-08-01

    On July 30, the United States marked the 25th anniversary of the signing of the law that brought Medicare and Medicaid into existence. These programs continue to control health policy, determine the direction of health spending, and provide access to health care services for millions of Americans. Contributing editor Emily Friedman takes a look at the history of Medicare and its effect on the American public and hospitals. PMID:2115496

  15. Enhancement of Identifying Cancer Specialists through the Linkage of Medicare Claims to Additional Sources of Physician Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Lori A; Adamache, Walter; Eheman, Christie R; Ryerson, A Blythe; Richardson, Lisa C

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the number of cancer specialists identified in three national datasets, the effect of combining these datasets, and the use of refinement rules to classify physicians as cancer specialists. Data Sources 1992–2003 linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data and a cancer-free comparison population of Medicare beneficiaries, Unique Physician Identification Number (UPIN) Registry, and the American Medical Association (AMA) Masterfile. Study Design We compared differences in counts of cancer specialists identified in Medicare claims only with the number obtained by combining data sources and after using rules to refine specialty identification. Data Extraction We analyzed physician specialty variables provided on Medicare claims, along with the specialties obtained by linkage of unencrypted UPINs on Medicare claims to the UPIN Registry, the AMA Masterfile, and all sources combined. Principle Findings Medicare claims identified the fewest number of cancer specialists (n=11,721) compared with 19,753 who were identified when we combined all three datasets. The percentage increase identified by combining datasets varied by subspecialty (187 percent for surgical oncologists to 50 percent for radiation oncologists). Rules created to refine identification most affected the count of radiation oncologists. Conclusions Researchers should consider taking the additional effort and cost to refine classification by using additional data sources based on their study objectives. PMID:19207588

  16. Pharmaceutical "charge compression" under the Medicare outpatient prospective payment system.

    PubMed

    Braid, Mary Jo; Forbes, Kevin F; Moran, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the actual acquisition costs of a sample of pharmaceuticals demonstrates that payment rates for pharmaceutical therapies under the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) are systematically biased against fully reimbursing high cost pharmaceutical therapies. Under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS') methodology, which assumes a constant markup, a bias in the cost estimate occurs when hospitals apply below average markups in establishing their charges for pharmaceutical products with above average costs. We developed a model of the relationship between product costs and charge markups. The logarithmic model shows that an increase in the acquisition cost per episode can be expected to lead to a reduction in the charge markup multiple. When markups for pharmaceuticals decline as acquisition cost increases, a rate-setting methodology that assumes a constant markup results in reimbursement for higher cost products that can be far below acquisition cost. The incentives in the payment system could affect site of care choices and beneficiary access. PMID:15151194

  17. Managing Medicare reimbursement on medical-psychiatry units.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Simundson, S

    1991-09-01

    Many general hospitals are confronting issues of financial strain precipitated to a large extent by Medicare payment reductions. The viability of psychiatry programs within general hospitals more than ever depends upon some demonstration of their financial as well as clinical contribution. The aim of this study is to review some of the basic parameters governing Part A (hospital) Medicare reimbursement of DRG-exempt general hospital psychiatry units and to provide options for improving their financial viability. There are a number of specific mechanisms involved in managing Medicare cost and reimbursement. Establishing a system for gatekeeping is important because significant control of payor mix and length of stay resides with the unit gatekeeper. Establishing liaison for short-stay patients with nursing home papers is important because Medicare pays on a target cost per discharge. The identification of short-stay patients is financially very favorable, and often critical to balance the unavoidable longer-stay patients. This paper also discusses how medical-psychiatric units can interface most effectively with medical-surgical units. Finally, there is some discussion of the need to develop pre- and postadmission outpatient medical-psychiatric programs. The financial aspects of medical-psychiatry care, if not the increasing scrutiny of managed care, will force further development of such outpatient programs. PMID:1743500

  18. Physician impact on hospital admission and on mortality rates in the Medicare population.

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, H; Jacoby, I; Millman, M; Lukomnik, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We assess the effect of variations in the supply and specialty distribution of physicians on admission rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACS) and for all causes, and on mortality rates among Medicare beneficiaries of various health care service areas (HCSA). DATA SOURCES. For the Medicare beneficiaries, sources were the Health Care Financing Administration's 1992 enrollment and impatient (Part A) files for a 5 percent sample of that population; for the overall populations and for the medical resources of the HCSAs, the Area Resource File. STUDY DESIGN. This observational, cross-sectional study employed multiple linear regression to assess the influence of population characteristics and of the supply of physicians on hospital admissions, and Poisson regression in the analysis of the factors that affect mortality. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Physician supply levels vary nearly fourfold or more when comparing the top and bottom deciles of the HCSAs, Medicare admissions for ACS conditions vary about threefold, and admission rates for all causes and mortality rates vary about 1.5-fold. Physician supply levels and distributions have very little influence on ACS admission rates, and even less on the admissions for all causes and on mortality, except in HCSAs with very low physician supply levels (one-fourth the national average or less). However, these HCSAs account for only about 1 percent of the U.S. population. CONCLUSIONS. Physician supply levels and the proportions of specialists and generalists have negligible effects on health status as measured by mortality rates and by rates of admission for all causes and for conditions presumed to be sensitive to the adequacy of ambulatory care. Reductions in admissions for such conditions are not likely to be achieved through broadening of insurance to levels that exist under Medicare, nor through increases in the supply of physicians, nor, conversely, through a reduction in any presumed oversupply of

  19. What Influences the Awareness of Physician Quality Information? Implications for Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Jon; Maeng, Daniel; Abraham, Jean; Scanlon, Dennis P; Alexander, Jeffrey; Mittler, Jessica; Finch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Examine the factors that are associated with awareness of physician quality information (PQI) among older people with one or more chronic illnesses and the implications for Medicare. Data Sources/Study Setting Random digit-dial survey of adults with one or more chronic illnesses. Research Design Structural equation modeling to examine factors related to awareness of PQI. Results Awareness of PQI is low (13 percent), but comparable to findings in general population surveys. Age, race, education, and self-reported health status are associated with PQI awareness. Trust in the Internet as a source of health care information and not trusting one’s physician as a source of information both are associated with a greater likelihood of being aware of PQI. Patients with high levels of activation have greater trust in physicians as information sources, but this is not associated with awareness, nor is degree of satisfaction with their care experience. Conclusions Awareness of PQI among older persons with chronic illnesses is relatively low across all socio-economic and demographic subgroups. Changes in population characteristics over time are unlikely to improve awareness in this population, nor are changes in patient activation or satisfaction with care. Medicare would need a broad-based effort if it wishes to raise PQI awareness among Medicare beneficiaries in the near term. Before undertaking resource-intensive efforts to increase awareness, Medicare may want to consider what level of awareness actually is needed to accomplish the overall objective for PQI transparency, which is raising the quality of care received by beneficiaries. It may be that relatively low levels of awareness are sufficient. PMID:24949225

  20. 42 CFR 483.13 - Resident behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resident behavior and facility practices. 483.13 Section 483.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.13 Resident behavior and facility practices. (a)...

  1. 42 CFR 483.13 - Resident behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resident behavior and facility practices. 483.13 Section 483.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.13 Resident behavior and facility practices. (a)...

  2. 42 CFR 483.356 - Protection of residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... behavior, and the resident's chronological and developmental age; size; gender; physical, medical, and... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of residents. 483.356 Section 483.356 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  3. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-2 - Death of individual beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Death of individual beneficiaries. 1.652(c)-2... Death of individual beneficiaries. If income is required to be distributed currently to a beneficiary... beneficiary (because of the beneficiary's death), the extent to which the income is included in the...

  4. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-2 - Death of individual beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Death of individual beneficiaries. 1.652(c)-2... Death of individual beneficiaries. If income is required to be distributed currently to a beneficiary... beneficiary (because of the beneficiary's death), the extent to which the income is included in the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-2 - Death of individual beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Death of individual beneficiaries. 1.652(c)-2... Death of individual beneficiaries. If income is required to be distributed currently to a beneficiary... beneficiary (because of the beneficiary's death), the extent to which the income is included in the...

  6. 26 CFR 1.652(c)-2 - Death of individual beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Death of individual beneficiaries. 1.652(c)-2... Death of individual beneficiaries. If income is required to be distributed currently to a beneficiary... beneficiary (because of the beneficiary's death), the extent to which the income is included in the...

  7. Adverse and Advantageous Selection in the Medicare Supplemental Market: A Bayesian Analysis of Prescription drug Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Trivedi, Pravin K

    2016-02-01

    This paper develops an extended specification of the two-part model, which controls for unobservable self-selection and heterogeneity of health insurance, and analyzes the impact of Medicare supplemental plans on the prescription drug expenditure of the elderly, using a linked data set based on the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data for 2003-2004. The econometric analysis is conducted using a Bayesian econometric framework. We estimate the treatment effects for different counterfactuals and find significant evidence of endogeneity in plan choice and the presence of both adverse and advantageous selections in the supplemental insurance market. The average incentive effect is estimated to be $757 (2004 value) or 41% increase per person per year for the elderly enrolled in supplemental plans with drug coverage against the Medicare fee-for-service counterfactual and is $350 or 21% against the supplemental plans without drug coverage counterfactual. The incentive effect varies by different sources of drug coverage: highest for employer-sponsored insurance plans, followed by Medigap and managed medicare plans. PMID:25504934

  8. Medicare program; reasonable charge limitations--HCFA. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1986-08-11

    This final rule implements section 9304(a) of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 which enacted section 1842(b)(8) of the Social Security Act (Act). In accordance with section 1842(b)(8) of the Act, we specify the circumstances under which HCFA or its Medicare Part B carriers will consider establishing special reasonable charge payment limits for services (including supplies and equipment) reimbursed under Part B of the Medicare program. The rule describes the factors HCFA or a carrier will consider and the procedures it will follow in establishing them. The limits would be either an upper limit to correct a grossly excessive charge or a lower limit to correct a grossly deficient charge. In either case, the limit would be either a specific dollar amount, or a special method used in determining reasonable charges to be allowed for a particular service or category of service. The purpose of this rule is to establish a stronger framework for setting special reasonable charge limits for services when the standard reimbursement methodology results in payments that are grossly excessive or deficient. A related purpose is to protect the Medicare program from excessive outlays and to prevent any adverse effects on both Medicare beneficiaries and consumers in general that we believe would result from a lack of such limits. The rule also will protect suppliers from reimbursement that is grossly deficient. PMID:10300984

  9. Access of rural AFDC Medicaid beneficiaries to mental health services.

    PubMed

    Lambert, D; Agger, M S

    1995-01-01

    This article examines geographic differences in the use of mental health services among Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)-eligible Medicaid beneficiaries in Maine. Findings indicate that rural AFDC beneficiaries have significantly lower utilization of mental health services than urban beneficiaries. Specialty mental health providers account for the majority of ambulatory visits for both rural and urban beneficiaries. However, rural beneficiaries rely more on primary-care providers than do urban beneficiaries. Differences in use are largely explained by variations in the supply of specialty mental health providers. This finding supports the long-held assumption that lower supply is a barrier to access to mental health services in rural areas. PMID:10153467

  10. The financial status of Medicare.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, R S

    1998-01-01

    Medicare is the largest health care program in the country, providing medical care to 38 million aged and disabled Americans. Concerns over rapid cost increases and the imminent insolvency of the Medicare Hospital Insurance trust fund led to enactment of sweeping Medicare legislation as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Preliminary estimates indicate that this legislation will result in program savings of $150 billion in the first five years and will postpone the depletion of the Hospital Insurance fund from the year 2001 until about 2010. While the Balanced Budget Act significantly reduces Hospital Insurance expenditure in the long range, serious deficits are still expected when the "baby boom" generation reaches retirement. The Medicare Supplementary Medical Insurance trust fund is automatically in financial balance, but policy makers remain concerned about continuing rapid cost increases. A new National Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare will attempt to determine effective solutions to these long-range problems. Images p110-a p111-a p111-b PMID:9719810

  11. 42 CFR 478.40 - Beneficiary's right to a hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS RECONSIDERATIONS AND APPEALS Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) Reconsiderations and Appeals § 478.40 Beneficiary's right to...

  12. 42 CFR 403.504 - Number and size of grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Beneficiary Counseling and Assistance Grants § 403.504 Number and... Medicare population and where that population resides. (2) The factors CMS uses to compare States' Medicare... percentage of the State's total population who are Medicare beneficiaries. (iii) Approximately 15 percent...

  13. 42 CFR 403.504 - Number and size of grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Beneficiary Counseling and Assistance Grants § 403.504 Number and... Medicare population and where that population resides. (2) The factors CMS uses to compare States' Medicare... percentage of the State's total population who are Medicare beneficiaries. (iii) Approximately 15 percent...

  14. Data on Medicare eligibility and cancer screening utilization.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian P; Allard, Christopher B; Sammon, Jesse D; Hanske, Julian; McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Goldberg, Joel E; Reznor, Gally; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Choueiri, Toni K; Nguyen, Paul L; Weissman, Joel S; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2016-06-01

    Health insurance is associated with increased utilization of cancer screening services. Data on breast, prostate and colorectal cancer screening were abstracted from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor and Surveillance System. This data in brief includes two sets of analyses: (i) the use of cancer screening in individuals within the low-income bracket and (ii) determinants for each of the three approaches to colorectal cancer screening (fecal occult blood test, colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy+fecal occult blood test). Covariates included education attainment, residency, and access to health care provider. The data supplement our original research article on the effect of Medicare eligibility on cancer screening utilization "The impact of Medicare eligibility on cancer screening behaviors" [1]. PMID:27054176

  15. 42 CFR 415.202 - Services of residents not in approved GME programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents not in approved GME programs. 415.202 Section 415.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS,...

  16. 42 CFR 415.200 - Services of residents in approved GME programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in approved GME programs. 415.200 Section 415.200 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS,...

  17. 42 CFR 415.206 - Services of residents in nonprovider settings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in nonprovider settings. 415.206 Section 415.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND...

  18. 42 CFR 413.77 - Direct GME payments: Determination of per resident amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Direct GME payments: Determination of per resident amounts. 413.77 Section 413.77 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES;...

  19. 78 FR 53507 - Agency Information Collection (Beneficiary Travel Mileage Reimbursement Application Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... for the beneficiary travel mileage reimbursement benefit in an efficient, convenient and accurate... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Beneficiary Travel Mileage Reimbursement Application Form) Activity..._submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- NEW (Beneficiary Travel...

  20. 78 FR 36035 - Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Beneficiary Travel Mileage Reimbursement Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... beneficiary travel mileage reimbursement benefit in an efficient, convenient and accurate manner. VHA must... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity: [Beneficiary Travel Mileage Reimbursement Application... to ``OMB Control No. 2900--NEW (Beneficiary Travel Mileage Reimbursement Application Form)'' in...

  1. Overview of the Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988 and its impact on health-care delivery.

    PubMed

    Grealy, M R

    1989-07-01

    The Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988 is described, and its impact on health-care delivery is discussed. The act will expand Medicare coverage of inpatient hospital care and will also provide payment for outpatient prescription drugs and home i.v. therapy. For the prescription drug benefit, deductible and coinsurance payments will be phased in, and Medicare will establish payment limits. A per diem fee schedule will be established to pay for the supplies and services used in home i.v. therapy. Providers of home therapy must have qualifications specified by the act. Pharmacists will have an important role in ensuring that patients understand and comply with their drug therapy once they leave the hospital. As members of the home health-care team, pharmacists will be involved in identifying candidates for home care, instructing patients in the use of sophisticated medical equipment, and monitoring the safety and efficacy of therapy. Medicare beneficiaries will help finance the new coverage by paying a flat premium; in addition, all individuals eligible for Medicare will pay supplemental premiums based on their federal income tax liability. Congress, however, will come under pressure to lower or freeze these premiums. Hospitals and pharmacists should cooperate in urging Congress to provide adequate funding for services specified by the catastrophic coverage act. PMID:2672805

  2. Six features of Medicare coordinated care demonstration programs that cut hospital admissions of high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Randall S; Peikes, Deborah; Peterson, Greg; Schore, Jennifer; Razafindrakoto, Carol M

    2012-06-01

    As policy makers seek to slow the growth in Medicare spending, they have appropriately focused attention on beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions. Many care coordination and disease management programs designed to improve beneficiaries' care and reduce their need for hospitalizations have been tested, but few have been successful. This study, however, found that four of eleven programs that were part of the Medicare Coordinated Care Demonstration reduced hospitalizations by 8-33 percent among enrollees who had a high risk of near-term hospitalization. The six approaches practiced by care coordinators in at least three of the four programs were as follows: supplementing telephone calls to patients with frequent in-person meetings; occasionally meeting in person with providers; acting as a communications hub for providers; delivering evidence-based education to patients; providing strong medication management; and providing timely and comprehensive transitional care after hospitalizations. When care management fees were included, the programs were essentially cost-neutral, but none of these programs generated net savings to Medicare. Our results suggest that incorporating these approaches into medical homes, accountable care organizations, and other policy initiatives could reduce hospitalizations and improve patients' lives. However, the approaches would save money only if care coordination fees were modest and organizations found cost-effective ways to deliver the interventions. PMID:22665827

  3. 75 FR 65282 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities; Hospice Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... forth requirements consistent with requirements in the June 5, 2008 final rule (73 FR 32088) entitled... skilled nursing facility (SNF) in the Medicare program, or as a nursing facility (NF) in the Medicaid..., approximately 1.4 million elderly and disabled nursing home residents are receiving care in nearly...

  4. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  5. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Beneficiaries of Other Federal Agencies § 728.58...

  6. 32 CFR 728.59 - Peace Corps beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Immunizations. Immunizations, as requested, may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this...; however, help may be required of naval MTFs for ancillary services. (2) Immunizations. When requested, immunizations may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this section. (3) Medical care....

  7. 32 CFR 728.59 - Peace Corps beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Immunizations. Immunizations, as requested, may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this...; however, help may be required of naval MTFs for ancillary services. (2) Immunizations. When requested, immunizations may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this section. (3) Medical care....

  8. 32 CFR 728.59 - Peace Corps beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Immunizations. Immunizations, as requested, may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this...; however, help may be required of naval MTFs for ancillary services. (2) Immunizations. When requested, immunizations may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this section. (3) Medical care....

  9. 32 CFR 728.59 - Peace Corps beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Immunizations. Immunizations, as requested, may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this...; however, help may be required of naval MTFs for ancillary services. (2) Immunizations. When requested, immunizations may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this section. (3) Medical care....

  10. 32 CFR 728.59 - Peace Corps beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Immunizations. Immunizations, as requested, may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this...; however, help may be required of naval MTFs for ancillary services. (2) Immunizations. When requested, immunizations may be provided all beneficiaries listed in paragraph (a) of this section. (3) Medical care....

  11. 42 CFR 423.293 - Collection of monthly beneficiary premium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... amounts specified at 20 CFR 418.2115, the Part D—IRMAA must be paid through withholding from the enrollee... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Collection of monthly beneficiary premium. 423.293... of Bids and Monthly Beneficiary Premiums; Plan Approval § 423.293 Collection of monthly...

  12. 42 CFR 423.293 - Collection of monthly beneficiary premium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... amounts specified at 20 CFR 418.2115, the Part D—IRMAA must be paid through withholding from the enrollee... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Collection of monthly beneficiary premium. 423.293... of Bids and Monthly Beneficiary Premiums; Plan Approval § 423.293 Collection of monthly...

  13. 42 CFR 423.293 - Collection of monthly beneficiary premium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... amounts specified at 20 CFR 418.2115, the Part D—IRMAA must be paid through withholding from the enrollee... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Collection of monthly beneficiary premium. 423.293... of Bids and Monthly Beneficiary Premiums; Plan Approval § 423.293 Collection of monthly...

  14. 32 CFR 728.56 - Treasury Department beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treasury Department beneficiaries. 728.56 Section 728.56 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Beneficiaries of Other Federal Agencies § 728.56 Treasury...

  15. 32 CFR 728.56 - Treasury Department beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Treasury Department beneficiaries. 728.56 Section 728.56 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Beneficiaries of...

  16. 32 CFR 728.55 - Department of Justice beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Department of Justice beneficiaries. 728.55 Section 728.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Beneficiaries of...

  17. 32 CFR 728.56 - Treasury Department beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Treasury Department beneficiaries. 728.56 Section 728.56 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Beneficiaries of...

  18. 32 CFR 728.56 - Treasury Department beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Treasury Department beneficiaries. 728.56 Section 728.56 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Beneficiaries of...

  19. 76 FR 63017 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... January 28, 2005 Federal Register (70 FR 4588 through 4741 and 70 FR 4194 through 4585, respectively.... For instance, in September 2008 and January 2009, we issued Part C and D regulations (73 FR 54226 and 74 FR 1494, respectively) to implement provisions in the Medicare Improvement for Patients...

  20. 75 FR 71189 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Federal Register on January 28, 2005 (70 FR 4588 through 4741 and 70 FR 4194 through 4585, respectively... Medicare Part D prescription drug plan sponsors (72 FR 68700). In April 2008, we published a final rule to address policy and technical changes to the Part D program (73 FR 20486). In September 2008 and...

  1. There Is a Mismatch Between the Medicare Benefit Package and the Preferences of Patients With Cancer and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Donald H.; Danis, Marion; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Howie, Lynn J.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Wolf, Steven P.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify insured services that are most important to Medicare beneficiaries with cancer and their family caregivers when coverage is limited. Methods A total of 440 participants (patients, n = 246; caregivers, n = 194) were enrolled onto the CHAT (Choosing Health Plans All Together) study from August 2010 to March 2013. The exercise elicited preferences about what benefits Medicare should cover for patients with cancer in their last 6 months of life. Facilitated sessions lasted 2.5 hours, included 8 to 10 participants, and focused on choices about Medicare health benefits within the context of a resource-constrained environment. Results Six of 15 benefit categories were selected by > 80% of participants: cancer care, prescription drugs, primary care, home care, palliative care, and nursing home coverage. Only 12% of participants chose the maximum level of cancer benefits, a level of care commonly financed in the Medicare program. Between 40% and 50% of participants chose benefits not currently covered by Medicare: unrestricted cash, concurrent palliative care, and home-based long-term care. Nearly one in five participants picked some level of each of these three benefit categories and allocated on average 30% of their resources toward them. Conclusion The mismatch between covered benefits and participant preferences shows that addressing quality of life and the financial burden of care is a priority for a substantial subset of patients with cancer in the Medicare program. Patient and caregiver preferences can be elicited, and the choices they express could suggest potential for Medicare benefit package reform and flexibility. PMID:25154830

  2. Temporal and Geographic variation in the validity and internal consistency of the Nursing Home Resident Assessment Minimum Data Set 2.0

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Minimum Data Set (MDS) for nursing home resident assessment has been required in all U.S. nursing homes since 1990 and has been universally computerized since 1998. Initially intended to structure clinical care planning, uses of the MDS expanded to include policy applications such as case-mix reimbursement, quality monitoring and research. The purpose of this paper is to summarize a series of analyses examining the internal consistency and predictive validity of the MDS data as used in the "real world" in all U.S. nursing homes between 1999 and 2007. Methods We used person level linked MDS and Medicare denominator and all institutional claim files including inpatient (hospital and skilled nursing facilities) for all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries entering U.S. nursing homes during the period 1999 to 2007. We calculated the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of diagnoses taken from Medicare hospital claims and from the MDS among all new admissions from hospitals to nursing homes and the internal consistency (alpha reliability) of pairs of items within the MDS that logically should be related. We also tested the internal consistency of commonly used MDS based multi-item scales and examined the predictive validity of an MDS based severity measure viz. one year survival. Finally, we examined the correspondence of the MDS discharge record to hospitalizations and deaths seen in Medicare claims, and the completeness of MDS assessments upon skilled nursing facility (SNF) admission. Results Each year there were some 800,000 new admissions directly from hospital to US nursing homes and some 900,000 uninterrupted SNF stays. Comparing Medicare enrollment records and claims with MDS records revealed reasonably good correspondence that improved over time (by 2006 only 3% of deaths had no MDS discharge record, only 5% of SNF stays had no MDS, but over 20% of MDS discharges indicating hospitalization had no associated Medicare claim). The PPV

  3. Warfarin usage among elderly atrial fibrillation patients with traumatic injury, an analysis of United States Medicare fee-for-service enrollees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinggang; Baumgarten, Mona; Smith, Gordon; Gambert, Steven; Gottlieb, Stephen; Rattinger, Gail; Albrecht, Jennifer; Langenberg, Patricia; Zuckerman, Ilene

    2015-01-01

    This study examined warfarin usage for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with atrial fibrillation (AF) who suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), hip fracture, or torso injuries. Using the 5% Chronic Condition Data Warehouse administrative claims data, this study included fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who had a single injury hospitalization (TBI, hip fracture, or major torso injury) between 1/1/2007 and 12/31/2009, with complete Medicare Parts A, B (no Medicare Advantage), and D coverage 6 months before injury, and who were aged 66 years or older and diagnosed with AF at least 1 year before injury. About 45% of the AF patients were using warfarin before TBI or torso injury, and 35% before hip fracture. After injury, there was a dramatic and persistent decrease in warfarin use in TBI and torso injury groups (30% for TBI and 37% for torso injury at 12 months after injury). Warfarin usage in hip fracture patients also dropped after injury but returned to pre-injury level within 4 months. TBI and torso injury lead to significant decreases in warfarin usage in elderly AF patients. Further research is needed to understand reasons for the pattern and to develop evidence-based management strategies in the post-acute setting. PMID:25098860

  4. Alternative geographic configurations for Medicare payments to health maintenance organizations.

    PubMed

    Porell, F W; Tompkins, C P; Turner, W M

    1990-01-01

    Under prevailing legislation, Medicare payments to health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are based upon projected fee-for-service reimbursement levels for enrollees' county of residence. These rates have been criticized in light of substantial variations in rates among neighboring counties and large fluctuations in rates over time. In this study, the use of nine alternative configurations and the county itself were evaluated on the basis of payment-area homogeneity, payment rate stability, and policy criteria, including the fiscal impacts of reconfiguration on HMOs. The results revealed rather modest differences among most alternative configurations and do not lend strong support for payment area reconfiguration at this time. PMID:10113270

  5. Medicare proposal may benefit insurers.

    PubMed

    Fine, Allan

    2004-01-01

    The proposed guidelines from U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention Inc., which was assigned the task by last year's Medicare law, seek a middle ground between pharmaceutical companies and insurers. The USP proposal is expected to result in a final plan after the organization takes comments. It is also supposed to define a list of classes of drugs--more formally divided into therapeutic areas and pharmacologic subcategories. PMID:15685817

  6. Changes in Low-Value Services in Year 1 of the Medicare Pioneer Accountable Care Organization Program

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Aaron L.; Chernew, Michael E.; Landon, Bruce E.; McWilliams, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Importance Wasteful practices are widespread in the US health care system. It is unclear if payment models intended to improve health care efficiency, such as the Medicare accountable care organization (ACO) programs, discourage the provision of low-value services. Objective To assess whether the first year of the Medicare Pioneer ACO program was associated with a reduction in use of low-value services. Design, Setting and Participants In a difference-in-differences analysis, we compared use of low-value services between Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries attributed to provider groups that entered the Pioneer program (ACO group) and beneficiaries attributed to other providers (control group) before (2009–2011) vs. after (2012) Pioneer ACO contracts began. We adjusted comparisons for beneficiaries’ sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and for geography. We decomposed estimates according to service characteristics (clinical category, price, and sensitivity to patient preferences) and compared estimates between subgroups of ACOs with higher vs. lower baseline use of low-value services. Main Outcomes and Measures Use of, and spending on, 31 services in instances that provide minimal clinical benefit. Results During the pre-contract period, trends in use of low-value services were similar for the ACO and control groups. The first year of ACO contracts was associated with a differential reduction of 0.8 low-value services per 100 beneficiaries for the ACO group (95% CI: −1.2, −0.4; P<0.001), corresponding to a 1.9% reduction in service quantity (95% CI: −2.9%, −0.9%) and a 4.5% differential reduction in spending on low-value services (95% CI: −7.5%, −1.4%; P=0.004). Differential reductions were similar for services less vs. more sensitive to patient preferences and for higher- vs. lower-priced services. ACOs with higher than their markets average baseline levels of low-value service use experienced greater service reductions (−1.2 services

  7. 42 CFR 421.304 - Medicare integrity program contractor functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicare integrity program contractor functions... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medicare Integrity Program Contractors § 421.304 Medicare integrity program contractor functions. The contract between CMS and a...

  8. 42 CFR 421.500 - Medicare review function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medicare review function. 421.500 Section 421.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medical Review § 421.500 Medicare...

  9. 42 CFR 411.165 - Basis for conditional Medicare payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payments. 411.165 Section 411.165 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special...

  10. 42 CFR 421.304 - Medicare integrity program contractor functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medicare integrity program contractor functions. 421.304 Section 421.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medicare...

  11. 42 CFR 411.32 - Basis for Medicare secondary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis for Medicare secondary payments. 411.32 Section 411.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  12. 42 CFR 411.32 - Basis for Medicare secondary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for Medicare secondary payments. 411.32 Section 411.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  13. 42 CFR 421.304 - Medicare integrity program contractor functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medicare integrity program contractor functions. 421.304 Section 421.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medicare...

  14. 42 CFR 411.175 - Basis for Medicare primary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments. 411.175 Section 411.175 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special Rules:...

  15. 42 CFR 411.33 - Amount of Medicare secondary payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Amount of Medicare secondary payment. 411.33 Section 411.33 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  16. 42 CFR 411.165 - Basis for conditional Medicare payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payments. 411.165 Section 411.165 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special...

  17. 42 CFR 411.175 - Basis for Medicare primary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments. 411.175 Section 411.175 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special Rules:...

  18. 42 CFR 411.32 - Basis for Medicare secondary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis for Medicare secondary payments. 411.32 Section 411.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  19. 42 CFR 411.33 - Amount of Medicare secondary payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Amount of Medicare secondary payment. 411.33 Section 411.33 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  20. 42 CFR 411.33 - Amount of Medicare secondary payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Amount of Medicare secondary payment. 411.33 Section 411.33 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  1. 42 CFR 421.304 - Medicare integrity program contractor functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medicare integrity program contractor functions. 421.304 Section 421.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medicare Integrity...

  2. 42 CFR 411.165 - Basis for conditional Medicare payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payments. 411.165 Section 411.165 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special...

  3. 42 CFR 411.165 - Basis for conditional Medicare payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payments. 411.165 Section 411.165 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special...

  4. 42 CFR 421.304 - Medicare integrity program contractor functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medicare integrity program contractor functions. 421.304 Section 421.304 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medicare...

  5. 42 CFR 411.175 - Basis for Medicare primary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments. 411.175 Section 411.175 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special Rules:...

  6. 42 CFR 421.500 - Medicare review function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicare review function. 421.500 Section 421.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medical Review § 421.500 Medicare review function....

  7. 42 CFR 421.500 - Medicare review function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medicare review function. 421.500 Section 421.500 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE CONTRACTING Medical Review § 421.500 Medicare review function....

  8. 42 CFR 411.175 - Basis for Medicare primary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments. 411.175 Section 411.175 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special Rules:...

  9. 42 CFR 411.32 - Basis for Medicare secondary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis for Medicare secondary payments. 411.32 Section 411.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  10. 42 CFR 411.165 - Basis for conditional Medicare payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payments. 411.165 Section 411.165 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special...

  11. 42 CFR 411.32 - Basis for Medicare secondary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis for Medicare secondary payments. 411.32 Section 411.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Insurance...

  12. 42 CFR 411.175 - Basis for Medicare primary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments. 411.175 Section 411.175 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM MEDICARE AND LIMITATIONS ON MEDICARE PAYMENT Special Rules:...

  13. The Medicare Part D coverage gap: implications for non-dually eligible older adults with a mental illness.

    PubMed

    Bakk, Louanne; Woodward, Amanda Toler; Dunkle, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how the Medicare Part D coverage gap impacts non-dually eligible older adults with a mental illness. Qualitative, semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 case managers from community-based agencies serving persons, age 55 and over, with a mental disorder. Five themes illustrating the central difficulties associated with the Part D gap emerged: medication affordability, beneficiary understanding, administrative barriers, Low-Income Subsidy income and asset guidelines, and medication compliance. Although the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act gradually reduces cost sharing within the gap, findings suggest that medication access and adherence may continue to be impacted by the benefit's structure. PMID:24377835

  14. Use of Medicare services before and after introduction of the prospective payment system.

    PubMed Central

    Manton, K G; Woodbury, M A; Vertrees, J C; Stallard, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The case mix-adjusted pattern of use of health care services, especially posthospital care, is compared before and after the introduction of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS). DATA SOURCES. The 1982 and 1984 National Long Term Care Surveys (NLTCS) linked to Medicare administrative records 1982-1986 provide health and health service use data for 12-month periods before and after the introduction of PPS. STUDY DESIGN. Case-mix differences between pre- and post-periods are controlled by using the Grade of Membership model to identify health groups from the NLTCS data. Differences in timing (e.g., hospital length of stay) were controlled using life table models estimated for each health group, that is, service use patterns pre- and post-PPS are compared within groups. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Hospital LOS and admission rates declined post-PPS. Changes in the timing and location of death occurred but, overall, mortality did not increase. Changes in post-acute care service use by elderly, chronically disabled Medicare beneficiaries were observed: home health service use increased overall and among the unmarried disabled population. CONCLUSIONS. PPS did not adversely affect quality of care as reflected in mortality or in hospital readmissions. Moreover, the differential use of post-acute care, and changes in hospital LOS by health group, indicate that the system responded, specific to marital status and age, to the severity of needs of chronically disabled persons. PMID:8344820

  15. Eligibility For And Enrollment In Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Programs Varies By Plan Sponsor.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Hendrick, Franklin B; Shen, Xian; Dai, Mingliang; Tom, Sarah E; Dougherty, J Samantha; Miller, Laura M

    2016-09-01

    Medicare Part D prescription drug plans must offer medication therapy management to beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions and high drug expenditures. However, plan sponsors have considerable latitude in setting eligibility criteria. Newly available data indicate that enrollment rates in medication therapy management among stand-alone prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage drug plans averaged only 10 percent in 2012. The enrollment variation across plan sponsors-from less than 0.2 percent to more than 57.0 percent-was associated with the restrictiveness of their eligibility criteria. For example, enrollment was 16.4 percent in plans requiring two chronic conditions versus 9.2 percent in plans requiring three, and 12.7 percent in plans requiring the use of any Part D drug versus 4.4 percent in plans requiring the use of drugs in specific classes. This variation represents inequities in access to medication therapy management across plans and results in missed opportunities for interventions that might improve therapeutic outcomes and reduce spending. The new Part D Enhanced Medication Therapy Management model of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has the potential to significantly increase the impact of medication therapy management by aligning financial incentives with improvements in medication use and encouraging innovation. PMID:27605635

  16. Likelihood of hospital readmission after first discharge: Medicare Advantage vs. fee-for-service patients.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bernard; Jiang, H Joanna; Steiner, Claudia A; Bott, John

    2012-01-01

    This study tests whether the likelihood of hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is different for enrollees in Medicare Advantage plans versus the standard fee-for-service program. A key requirement is to control for self-selection into Advantage plans. The study uses statewide inpatient databases maintained by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for five states in 2006. The type of Medicare coverage is known, along with an encrypted patient identifier. We identify eligible first discharges and the first readmission within 30 days. We use selected area characteristics as instrumental variables for enrollment in Advantage plans and apply a bivariate probit analysis. Descriptively, there is a slightly lower likelihood of readmission for Advantage plan enrollees. However, the Advantage plan patients are younger and less severely ill. After risk adjustment and control for self-selection, the enrollees in Advantage plans have a substantially higher likelihood of readmission. Recognizing caveats and limitations, the study supports informing Medicare beneficiaries about the rates of readmission for Advantage plans in their area. Analytical methods to adjust for self-selection into particular plans or plan types should be considered when possible. PMID:23230702

  17. 75 FR 76471 - Medicare Program; Renewal of the Medicare Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... FR 68780) announcing the establishment of the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee (MCAC). The... Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC) AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid... Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC). ADDRESSES: Copies of the Charter: To obtain a copy of...

  18. 26 CFR 1.662(c)-2 - Death of individual beneficiary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death of individual beneficiary. 1.662(c)-2... Corpus § 1.662(c)-2 Death of individual beneficiary. If an amount specified in section 662(a) (1) or (2... not end with or within the last taxable year of a beneficiary (because of the beneficiary's...

  19. Meaningful use stage 2 e-prescribing threshold and adverse drug events in the Medicare Part D population with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Encinosa, William; Mostashari, Farzad; Bynum, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supports the potential for e-prescribing to reduce the incidence of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospital-based studies, but studies in the ambulatory setting have not used occurrence of ADE as their outcome. Using the “prescription origin code” in 2011 Medicare Part D prescription drug events files, the authors investigate whether physicians who meet the meaningful use stage 2 threshold for e-prescribing (≥50% of prescriptions e-prescribed) have lower rates of ADEs among their diabetic patients. Risk of any patient with diabetes in the provider’s panel having an ADE from anti-diabetic medications was modeled adjusted for prescriber and patient panel characteristics. Physician e-prescribing to Medicare beneficiaries was associated with reduced risk of ADEs among their diabetes patients (Odds Ratio: 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.96), as were several prescriber and panel characteristics. However, these physicians treated fewer patients from disadvantaged populations. PMID:25948698

  20. Four precursors of Medicare in Saskatchewan.

    PubMed

    Houston, C Stuart; Massie, Merle

    2009-01-01

    T. C. Douglas, on assuming power in June 1944 as the first social democratic premier in North America, began working in a step-like pattern as finances permitted, toward his goal of eventual province-wide Medicare. Douglas and his team were able to build on the success of bold initiatives already in place in the Depression-scarred rural municipalities of Pittville, Miry Creek, Webb, and Riverside. These municipalities developed medical and hospital plans that offered residents comprehensive coverage with freedom of choice of doctor. Built on idealism, prairie pragmatism and tenacity, these formative health plans served not only as models, but provided the leadership required during the creation and early years of Swift Current Health Region #1. Key figures such as Bill Burak, Carl Kjorven, Stewart Robertson, and Charles Haydon brought experience, depth, and ambition to the task at hand. Envisioned as simply a demonstration region by the Saskatchewan government, HR #1 achieved more: a seamless integration of preventative medicine with medical care, combined with a sense of local empowerment. PMID:20509545