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Sample records for medication error data-sharing

  1. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  2. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used ... You can help prevent errors by Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your ...

  3. Medical error and disclosure.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew A; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Errors occur commonly in healthcare and can cause significant harm to patients. Most errors arise from a combination of individual, system, and communication failures. Neurologists may be involved in harmful errors in any practice setting and should familiarize themselves with tools to prevent, report, and examine errors. Although physicians, patients, and ethicists endorse candid disclosure of harmful medical errors to patients, many physicians express uncertainty about how to approach these conversations. A growing body of research indicates physicians often fail to meet patient expectations for timely and open disclosure. Patients desire information about the error, an apology, and a plan for preventing recurrence of the error. To meet these expectations, physicians should participate in event investigations and plan thoroughly for each disclosure conversation, preferably with a disclosure coach. Physicians should also anticipate and attend to the ongoing medical and emotional needs of the patient. A cultural change towards greater transparency following medical errors is in motion. Substantial progress is still required, but neurologists can further this movement by promoting policies and environments conducive to open reporting, respectful disclosure to patients, and support for the healthcare workers involved. PMID:24182370

  4. Medical device error.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Gerald R

    2002-12-01

    This article discusses principal concepts for the analysis, classification, and reporting of problems involving medical device technology. We define a medical device in regulatory terminology and define and discuss concepts and terminology used to distinguish the causes and sources of medical device problems. Database classification systems for medical device failure tracking are presented, as are sources of information on medical device failures. The importance of near-accident reporting is discussed to alert users that reported medical device errors are typically limited to those that have caused an injury or death. This can represent only a fraction of the true number of device problems. This article concludes with a summary of the most frequently reported medical device failures by technology type, clinical application, and clinical setting. PMID:12400632

  5. Evaluating a medical error taxonomy.

    PubMed Central

    Brixey, Juliana; Johnson, Todd R.; Zhang, Jiajie

    2002-01-01

    Healthcare has been slow in using human factors principles to reduce medical errors. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) recognizes that a lack of attention to human factors during product development may lead to errors that have the potential for patient injury, or even death. In response to the need for reducing medication errors, the National Coordinating Council for Medication Errors Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP) released the NCC MERP taxonomy that provides a standard language for reporting medication errors. This project maps the NCC MERP taxonomy of medication error to MedWatch medical errors involving infusion pumps. Of particular interest are human factors associated with medical device errors. The NCC MERP taxonomy of medication errors is limited in mapping information from MEDWATCH because of the focus on the medical device and the format of reporting. PMID:12463789

  6. Medication Errors in Outpatient Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors may occur during parental administration of prescription and over-the-counter medications in the outpatient pediatric setting. Misinterpretation of medication labels and dosing errors are two types of errors in medication administration. Health literacy may play an important role in parents' ability to safely manage their child's medication regimen. There are several proposed strategies for decreasing these medication administration errors, including using standardized dosing instruments, using strictly metric units for medication dosing, and providing parents and caregivers with picture-based dosing instructions. Pediatric healthcare providers should be aware of these strategies and seek to implement many of them into their practices. PMID:27537086

  7. Data Sharing.

    PubMed

    Longo, Dan L; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-21

    The aerial view of the concept of data sharing is beautiful. What could be better than having high-quality information carefully reexamined for the possibility that new nuggets of useful data are lying there, previously unseen? The potential for leveraging existing results for even more benefit pays appropriate increased tribute to the patients who put themselves at risk to generate the data. The moral imperative to honor their collective sacrifice is the trump card that takes this trick. However, many of us who have actually conducted clinical research, managed clinical studies and data collection and analysis, and curated data sets have . . . PMID:26789876

  8. Barriers to Medical Error Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Rezaie, Shirin; Aghighi, Negar

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan, Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%), lack of proper reporting form (51.8%), lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%), and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%). The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%), age of 50–40 years (67.6%), less-experienced personnel (58.7%), educational level of MSc (87.5%), and staff of radiology department (88.9%). Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement. PMID:26605018

  9. 20 Tips to Help Prevent Medical Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Medical Errors 20 Tips to Help Prevent Medical Errors: Patient Fact Sheet This information is for ... current information. Select to Download PDF (295 KB). Medical errors can occur anywhere in the health care ...

  10. Medical Error and Moral Luck.

    PubMed

    Hubbeling, Dieneke

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the concept of moral luck. Moral luck is discussed in the context of medical error, especially an error of omission that occurs frequently, but only rarely has adverse consequences. As an example, a failure to compare the label on a syringe with the drug chart results in the wrong medication being administered and the patient dies. However, this error may have previously occurred many times with no tragic consequences. Discussions on moral luck can highlight conflicting intuitions. Should perpetrators receive a harsher punishment because of an adverse outcome, or should they be dealt with in the same way as colleagues who have acted similarly, but with no adverse effects? An additional element to the discussion, specifically with medical errors, is that according to the evidence currently available, punishing individual practitioners does not seem to be effective in preventing future errors. The following discussion, using relevant philosophical and empirical evidence, posits a possible solution for the moral luck conundrum in the context of medical error: namely, making a distinction between the duty to make amends and assigning blame. Blame should be assigned on the basis of actual behavior, while the duty to make amends is dependent on the outcome. PMID:26662613

  11. Analysis of Medication Error Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.; Young, Jonathan; Santell, John; Hicks, Rodney; Posse, Christian; Fecht, Barbara A.

    2004-11-15

    In medicine, as in many areas of research, technological innovation and the shift from paper based information to electronic records has created a climate of ever increasing availability of raw data. There has been, however, a corresponding lag in our abilities to analyze this overwhelming mass of data, and classic forms of statistical analysis may not allow researchers to interact with data in the most productive way. This is true in the emerging area of patient safety improvement. Traditionally, a majority of the analysis of error and incident reports has been carried out based on an approach of data comparison, and starts with a specific question which needs to be answered. Newer data analysis tools have been developed which allow the researcher to not only ask specific questions but also to “mine” data: approach an area of interest without preconceived questions, and explore the information dynamically, allowing questions to be formulated based on patterns brought up by the data itself. Since 1991, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has been collecting data on medication errors through voluntary reporting programs. USP’s MEDMARXsm reporting program is the largest national medication error database and currently contains well over 600,000 records. Traditionally, USP has conducted an annual quantitative analysis of data derived from “pick-lists” (i.e., items selected from a list of items) without an in-depth analysis of free-text fields. In this paper, the application of text analysis and data analysis tools used by Battelle to analyze the medication error reports already analyzed in the traditional way by USP is described. New insights and findings were revealed including the value of language normalization and the distribution of error incidents by day of the week. The motivation for this effort is to gain additional insight into the nature of medication errors to support improvements in medication safety.

  12. Medical Errors: Tips to Help Prevent Them

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Medical Errors: Tips to Help Prevent Them Medical Errors: Tips to Help Prevent Them Medical errors are one of the nation's ... single most important way you can help to prevent errors is to be an active member of ...

  13. Clinical review: Medication errors in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Moyen, Eric; Camiré, Eric; Stelfox, Henry Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Medication errors in critical care are frequent, serious, and predictable. Critically ill patients are prescribed twice as many medications as patients outside of the intensive care unit (ICU) and nearly all will suffer a potentially life-threatening error at some point during their stay. The aim of this article is to provide a basic review of medication errors in the ICU, identify risk factors for medication errors, and suggest strategies to prevent errors and manage their consequences. PMID:18373883

  14. Medication Errors - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Medication Errors URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Medication Errors - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. Medication errors: an overview for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Wittich, Christopher M; Burkle, Christopher M; Lanier, William L

    2014-08-01

    Medication error is an important cause of patient morbidity and mortality, yet it can be a confusing and underappreciated concept. This article provides a review for practicing physicians that focuses on medication error (1) terminology and definitions, (2) incidence, (3) risk factors, (4) avoidance strategies, and (5) disclosure and legal consequences. A medication error is any error that occurs at any point in the medication use process. It has been estimated by the Institute of Medicine that medication errors cause 1 of 131 outpatient and 1 of 854 inpatient deaths. Medication factors (eg, similar sounding names, low therapeutic index), patient factors (eg, poor renal or hepatic function, impaired cognition, polypharmacy), and health care professional factors (eg, use of abbreviations in prescriptions and other communications, cognitive biases) can precipitate medication errors. Consequences faced by physicians after medication errors can include loss of patient trust, civil actions, criminal charges, and medical board discipline. Methods to prevent medication errors from occurring (eg, use of information technology, better drug labeling, and medication reconciliation) have been used with varying success. When an error is discovered, patients expect disclosure that is timely, given in person, and accompanied with an apology and communication of efforts to prevent future errors. Learning more about medication errors may enhance health care professionals' ability to provide safe care to their patients. PMID:24981217

  16. Toward a cognitive taxonomy of medical errors.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiajie; Patel, Vimla L.; Johnson, Todd R.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    2002-01-01

    One critical step in addressing and resolving the problems associated with human errors is the development of a cognitive taxonomy of such errors. In the case of errors, such a taxonomy may be developed (1) to categorize all types of errors along cognitive dimensions, (2) to associate each type of error with a specific underlying cognitive mechanism, (3) to explain why, and even predict when and where, a specific error will occur, and (4) to generate intervention strategies for each type of error. Based on Reason's (1992) definition of human errors and Norman's (1986) cognitive theory of human action, we have developed a preliminary action-based cognitive taxonomy of errors that largely satisfies these four criteria in the domain of medicine. We discuss initial steps for applying this taxonomy to develop an online medical error reporting system that not only categorizes errors but also identifies problems and generates solutions. PMID:12463962

  17. Medical Errors: a Hidden Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... who called for changes to that criteria. "The medical coding system was designed to maximize billing for physician services, not to collect national health statistics, as it is currently being ... studies that analyzed medical death rate data from 2000 to 2008, including ...

  18. Medication Errors Involving the Intravenous Administration Route: Characteristics of Voluntarily Reported Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of medication errors involving the intravenous (IV) route of administration were analyzed in reports from 1995 to 2013. This was accomplished through a voluntary medication error reporting program. A retrospective case study design analyzed reports by practitioners or consumers on IV-associated medication errors (N = 975) affecting patients. Patterns in error accounts reflected cultural changes in health care organizations. Equipment, labeling, incorrect route of administration, types of errors, patient outcomes, and causal agents represented major codes. Results point to health care provider and consumer knowledge, the need for ongoing education of nursing staff, and interdisciplinary strategies for preventing IV-associated medication errors. PMID:27379682

  19. Medical Errors: a Hidden Killer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The medical coding system was designed to maximize billing for physician services, not to collect national health ... the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department ...

  20. Case report of a medication error

    PubMed Central

    Naunton, Mark; Nor, Kowsar; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Thomas, Jackson; Kosari, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The World Health Organisation recognizes confusing drug names as one of the most common causes of medication errors. Other factors include spelling, phonetic, or packaging similarities. Case presentation: We presented a case report of an inadvertent administration of a non-ocular pharmaceutical product (Novasone® lotion) into the eye of an octogenarian individual, and briefly reviewed the relevant literature. Discussion: We discussed prevention strategies to avoid similar ophthalmic medication errors. PMID:27428216

  1. Addressing medical errors in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shepard P; Adkinson, Joshua M; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-09-01

    Influential think tanks such as the Institute of Medicine have raised awareness about the implications of medical errors. In response, organizations, medical societies, and hospitals have initiated programs to decrease the incidence and prevent adverse effects of these errors. Surgeons deal with the direct implications of adverse events involving patients. In addition to managing the physical consequences, they are confronted with ethical and social issues when caring for a harmed patient. Although there is considerable effort to implement system-wide changes, there is little guidance for hand surgeons on how to address medical errors. Admitting an error by a physician is difficult, but a transparent environment where patients are notified of errors and offered consolation and compensation is essential to maintain physician-patient trust. Furthermore, equipping hand surgeons with a guide for addressing medical errors will help identify system failures, provide learning points for safety improvement, decrease litigation against physicians, and demonstrate a commitment to ethical and compassionate medical care. PMID:25154576

  2. Prevention of medication errors: detection and audit.

    PubMed

    Montesi, Germana; Lechi, Alessandro

    2009-06-01

    1. Medication errors have important implications for patient safety, and their identification is a main target in improving clinical practice errors, in order to prevent adverse events. 2. Error detection is the first crucial step. Approaches to this are likely to be different in research and routine care, and the most suitable must be chosen according to the setting. 3. The major methods for detecting medication errors and associated adverse drug-related events are chart review, computerized monitoring, administrative databases, and claims data, using direct observation, incident reporting, and patient monitoring. All of these methods have both advantages and limitations. 4. Reporting discloses medication errors, can trigger warnings, and encourages the diffusion of a culture of safe practice. Combining and comparing data from various and encourages the diffusion of a culture of safe practice sources increases the reliability of the system. 5. Error prevention can be planned by means of retroactive and proactive tools, such as audit and Failure Mode, Effect, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA). Audit is also an educational activity, which promotes high-quality care; it should be carried out regularly. In an audit cycle we can compare what is actually done against reference standards and put in place corrective actions to improve the performances of individuals and systems. 6. Patient safety must be the first aim in every setting, in order to build safer systems, learning from errors and reducing the human and fiscal costs. PMID:19594533

  3. Analyzing temozolomide medication errors: potentially fatal.

    PubMed

    Letarte, Nathalie; Gabay, Michael P; Bressler, Linda R; Long, Katie E; Stachnik, Joan M; Villano, J Lee

    2014-10-01

    The EORTC-NCIC regimen for glioblastoma requires different dosing of temozolomide (TMZ) during radiation and maintenance therapy. This complexity is exacerbated by the availability of multiple TMZ capsule strengths. TMZ is an alkylating agent and the major toxicity of this class is dose-related myelosuppression. Inadvertent overdose can be fatal. The websites of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) MedWatch database were reviewed. We searched the MedWatch database for adverse events associated with TMZ and obtained all reports including hematologic toxicity submitted from 1st November 1997 to 30th May 2012. The ISMP describes errors with TMZ resulting from the positioning of information on the label of the commercial product. The strength and quantity of capsules on the label were in close proximity to each other, and this has been changed by the manufacturer. MedWatch identified 45 medication errors. Patient errors were the most common, accounting for 21 or 47% of errors, followed by dispensing errors, which accounted for 13 or 29%. Seven reports or 16% were errors in the prescribing of TMZ. Reported outcomes ranged from reversible hematological adverse events (13%), to hospitalization for other adverse events (13%) or death (18%). Four error reports lacked detail and could not be categorized. Although the FDA issued a warning in 2003 regarding fatal medication errors and the product label warns of overdosing, errors in TMZ dosing occur for various reasons and involve both healthcare professionals and patients. Overdosing errors can be fatal. PMID:25026995

  4. Toward worldwide data sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond; Joy, Steven; King, Todd

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade the nature of space science research has changed dramatically. Earlier investigators could carry out meaningful research by looking at observations from a single instrument on a single spacecraft. Today that is rapidly changing and researchers regularly use data from multiple instruments on multiple spacecraft as well as observations from ground observatories. Increasingly those observations come from missions flown by many countries. Recent advances in distributed data management have made it possible for researchers located around the world to access and use data from multiple nations. By using virtual observatory technology it no longer matters where data are housed they can be freely accessed wherever they reside. In this presentation we will discuss two initiatives designed to make space science data access worldwide. One is the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) and the other is the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium (HDMC). In both cases the key to worldwide data sharing is adopting common metadata standards. In this talk we will review how these two groups are addressing the worldwide data sharing and their progress in achieving their goals. IPDA and HDMC are two of several efforts to promote broad based data sharing. Talks in the remainder of the symposium will discuss this is more detail.

  5. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety. PMID:18232615

  6. Medication errors during hospital drug rounds.

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, K W; Jenkins, D B; Noyce, P R; Barber, N D

    1995-01-01

    Objective--To determine the nature and rate of drug administration errors in one National Health Service hospital. Design--Covert observational survey be tween January and April 1993 of drug rounds with intervention to stop drug administration errors reaching the patient. Setting--Two medical, two surgical, and two medicine for the elderly wards in a former district general hospital, now a NHS trust hospital. Subjects--37 Nurses performing routine single nurse drug rounds. Main measures--Drug administration errors recorded by trained observers. Results--Seventy four drug rounds were observed in which 115 errors occurred during 3312 drug administrations. The overall error rate was 3.5% (95% confidence interval 2.9% to 4.1%). Errors owing to omissions, because the drug had not been supplied or located or the prescription had not been seen, accounted for most (68%, 78) of the errors. Wrong doses accounted for 15% (17) errors, four of which were greater than the prescribed dose. The dose was given within two hours of the time indicated by the prescriber in 98.2% of cases. Conclusion--The observed rate of drug administration errors is too high. It might be reduced by a multidisciplinary review of practices in prescribing, supply, and administration of drugs. PMID:10156392

  7. Predictors of medication errors among elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Picone, Debra Matsen; Titler, Marita G; Dochterman, Joanne; Shever, Leah; Kim, Taikyoung; Abramowitz, Paul; Kanak, Mary; Qin, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Medication errors are a serious safety concern and most errors are preventable. A retrospective study design was employed to describe medication errors experienced during 10187 hospitalizations of elderly patients admitted to a Midwest teaching hospital between July 1, 1998 and December 31, 2001 and to determine the factors predictive of medication errors. The model considered patient characteristics, clinical conditions, interventions, and nursing unit characteristics. The dependent variable, medication error, was measured using a voluntary incident reporting system. There were 861 medication errors; 96% may have been preventable. Most errors were omissions errors (48.8%) and the source was administration (54%) or transcription errors (38%). Variables associated with a medication error included unique number of medications (polypharmacy), patient gender and race, RN staffing changes, medical and nursing interventions, and specific pharmacological agents. Further validation of this explanatory model and focused interventions may help decrease the incidence of medication errors. PMID:18305099

  8. Preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M R; Anderson, R W; Attilio, R M; Green, L; Muller, R J; Pruemer, J M

    1996-04-01

    Recommendations for preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy are made. Before a health care provider is granted privileges to prescribe, dispense, or administer antineoplastic agents, he or she should undergo a tailored educational program and possibly testing or certification. Appropriate reference materials should be developed. Each institution should develop a dose-verification process with as many independent checks as possible. A detailed checklist covering prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration should be used. Oral orders are not acceptable. All doses should be calculated independently by the physician, the pharmacist, and the nurse. Dosage limits should be established and a review process set up for doses that exceed the limits. These limits should be entered into pharmacy computer systems, listed on preprinted order forms, stated on the product packaging, placed in strategic locations in the institution, and communicated to employees. The prescribing vocabulary must be standardized. Acronyms, abbreviations, and brand names must be avoided and steps taken to avoid other sources of confusion in the written orders, such as trailing zeros. Preprinted antineoplastic drug order forms containing checklists can help avoid errors. Manufacturers should be encouraged to avoid or eliminate ambiguities in drug names and dosing information. Patients must be educated about all aspects of their cancer chemotherapy, as patients represent a last line of defense against errors. An interdisciplinary team at each practice site should review every medication error reported. Pharmacists should be involved at all sites where antineoplastic agents are dispensed. Although it may not be possible to eliminate all medication errors in cancer chemotherapy, the risk can be minimized through specific steps. Because of their training and experience, pharmacists should take the lead in this effort. PMID:8697025

  9. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Impact of Medical errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Impact of Medical errors : 06/27/2016 To use the sharing ... topics. While recent research published in BMJ finds medical errors may be higher than previously reported in ...

  10. FMEA: a model for reducing medical errors.

    PubMed

    Chiozza, Maria Laura; Ponzetti, Clemente

    2009-06-01

    Patient safety is a management issue, in view of the fact that clinical risk management has become an important part of hospital management. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive technique for error detection and reduction, firstly introduced within the aerospace industry in the 1960s. Early applications in the health care industry dating back to the 1990s included critical systems in the development and manufacture of drugs and in the prevention of medication errors in hospitals. In 2008, the Technical Committee of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), licensed a technical specification for medical laboratories suggesting FMEA as a method for prospective risk analysis of high-risk processes. Here we describe the main steps of the FMEA process and review data available on the application of this technique to laboratory medicine. A significant reduction of the risk priority number (RPN) was obtained when applying FMEA to blood cross-matching, to clinical chemistry analytes, as well as to point-of-care testing (POCT). PMID:19298799

  11. Medical errors: getting the incentives right.

    PubMed

    Grepperud, Sverre

    2005-12-01

    This work examines the role of penalties as providers of incentives to prevent medical errors and ensure that such incidents, once they occur, become common knowledge. It is shown that a scheme with two penalties (accountability and non-report) induces the first-best solution. However, this scheme does not necessarily imply a punitive environment, but may, under given circumstances, yield insignificant and even negative penalties. Alternative sanction systems, such as voluntary reporting and immunity, are found to have less desirable properties. An exception is confidentiality (anonymity) which turns out to be an optimal scheme. Finally, the examination of various penalty restrictions (scope and scale) shows that such barriers may promote both tougher and softer sanction schemes. PMID:16378237

  12. The spectrum of medical errors: when patients sue

    PubMed Central

    Kels, Barry D; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    Inarguably medical errors constitute a serious, dangerous, and expensive problem for the twenty-first-century US health care system. This review examines the incidence, nature, and complexity of alleged medical negligence and medical malpractice. The authors hope this will constitute a road map to medical providers so that they can better understand the present climate and hopefully avoid the “Scylla and Charybdis” of medical errors and medical malpractice. Despite some documented success in reducing medical errors, adverse events and medical errors continue to represent an indelible stain upon the practice, reputation, and success of the US health care industry. In that regard, what may be required to successfully attack the unacceptably high severity and volume of medical errors is a locally directed and organized initiative sponsored by individual health care organizations that is coordinated, supported, and guided by state and federal governmental and nongovernmental agencies. PMID:22924008

  13. Classifying and Predicting Errors of Inpatient Medication Reconciliation

    PubMed Central

    Pippins, Jennifer R.; Gandhi, Tejal K.; Hamann, Claus; Ndumele, Chima D.; Labonville, Stephanie A.; Diedrichsen, Ellen K.; Carty, Marcy G.; Karson, Andrew S.; Bhan, Ishir; Coley, Christopher M.; Liang, Catherine L.; Turchin, Alexander; McCarthy, Patricia C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Failure to reconcile medications across transitions in care is an important source of potential harm to patients. Little is known about the predictors of unintentional medication discrepancies and how, when, and where they occur. Objective To determine the reasons, timing, and predictors of potentially harmful medication discrepancies. Design Prospective observational study. Patients Admitted general medical patients. Measurements Study pharmacists took gold-standard medication histories and compared them with medical teams’ medication histories, admission and discharge orders. Blinded teams of physicians adjudicated all unexplained discrepancies using a modification of an existing typology. The main outcome was the number of potentially harmful unintentional medication discrepancies per patient (potential adverse drug events or PADEs). Results Among 180 patients, 2066 medication discrepancies were identified, and 257 (12%) were unintentional and had potential for harm (1.4 per patient). Of these, 186 (72%) were due to errors taking the preadmission medication history, while 68 (26%) were due to errors reconciling the medication history with discharge orders. Most PADEs occurred at discharge (75%). In multivariable analyses, low patient understanding of preadmission medications, number of medication changes from preadmission to discharge, and medication history taken by an intern were associated with PADEs. Conclusions Unintentional medication discrepancies are common and more often due to errors taking an accurate medication history than errors reconciling this history with patient orders. Focusing on accurate medication histories, on potential medication errors at discharge, and on identifying high-risk patients for more intensive interventions may improve medication safety during and after hospitalization. PMID:18563493

  14. Avoiding Medication Errors: Reducing Harm in Residents Using Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Grissinger, Matthew; Gaunt, Michael J; Rich, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors involving oral anticoagulants have led to serious adverse events, including hemorrhage, treatment failures leading to thromboembolic events, and death. This article will highlight medication errors that may arise during the use of oral anticoagulants and provide risk-reduction strategies to address the potential for error and patient harm. PMID:27250070

  15. The pharmacist's role in preventing medication errors in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Rupal; Maples, Meghan; Bernacchi, Ann; Duong, Linh; Oramasionwu, Christine U

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 1.5 million medication errors occur each year in the United States. Older adults may be at increased risk for these errors as a result of a variety of contributing factors such as inappropriate medication use, polymorbidity, and complexities in managing dosage adjustments for geriatric patients. Pharmacists, as trained medication experts, are uniquely poised to lead efforts to prevent, detect, and resolve medications errors. As the American population continues to age, future pharmacists are likely to play an even greater role in promoting safe and effective medication use in older adults. In this paper, we highlight common settings for medication errors in older individuals, explore tools and solutions for error prevention, and outline the unique role that pharmacists have in preventing medication errors in older adults. PMID:25521659

  16. Workload and environmental factors in hospital medication errors.

    PubMed

    Roseman, C; Booker, J M

    1995-01-01

    Nine hospital workload factors and seasonal changes in daylight and darkness were examined over a 5-year period in relation to nurse medication errors at a medical center in Anchorage, Alaska. Three workload factors, along with darkness, were found to be significant predictors of the risk of medication error. Errors increased with the number of patient days per month (OR/250 patient days = 1.61) and the number of shifts worked by temporary nursing staff (OR/10 shifts = 1.15); errors decreased with more overtime worked by permanent nursing staff members (OR/10 shifts = .85). Medication errors were 95% more likely in midwinter than in the fall, but the effect of increasing darkness was strongest; a 2-month delay was found between the level of darkness and the rate of errors. More than half of all medication errors occurred during the first 3 months of the year. PMID:7624233

  17. Reducing medication errors in critical care: a multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Kruer, Rachel M; Jarrell, Andrew S; Latif, Asad

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has reported that medication errors are the single most common type of error in health care, representing 19% of all adverse events, while accounting for over 7,000 deaths annually. The frequency of medication errors in adult intensive care units can be as high as 947 per 1,000 patient-days, with a median of 105.9 per 1,000 patient-days. The formulation of drugs is a potential contributor to medication errors. Challenges related to drug formulation are specific to the various routes of medication administration, though errors associated with medication appearance and labeling occur among all drug formulations and routes of administration. Addressing these multifaceted challenges requires a multimodal approach. Changes in technology, training, systems, and safety culture are all strategies to potentially reduce medication errors related to drug formulation in the intensive care unit. PMID:25210478

  18. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. Settings and Design: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: An 18-item survey was designed and comprised questions on demographic data, knowledge of medication errors, availability of reporting systems in hospitals, attitudes toward error reporting, causes of medication errors. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software Version 17. Results: A total of 323 of healthcare professionals completed the questionnaire with 64.6% response rate of 138 (42.72%) physicians, 34 (10.53%) pharmacists, and 151 (46.75%) nurses. A majority of the participants had a good knowledge about medication errors concept and their dangers on patients. Only 68.7% of them were aware of reporting systems in hospitals. Healthcare professionals revealed that there was no clear mechanism available for reporting of errors in most hospitals. Prescribing (46.5%) and administration (29%) errors were the main causes of errors. The most frequently encountered medication errors were anti-hypertensives, antidiabetics, antibiotics, digoxin, and insulin. Conclusions: This study revealed differences in the awareness among healthcare professionals toward medication errors in hospitals. The poor knowledge about medication errors emphasized the urgent necessity to adopt appropriate measures to raise awareness about medication errors in Saudi hospitals. PMID:27330261

  19. The pathophysiology of medication errors: how and where they arise

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Sarah E; Ferner, Harriet S; Ferner, Robin E

    2009-01-01

    Errors arise when an action is intended but not performed; errors that arise from poor planning or inadequate knowledge are characterized as mistakes; those that arise from imperfect execution of well-formulated plans are called slips when an erroneous act is committed and lapses when a correct act is omitted. Some tasks are intrinsically prone to error. Examples are tasks that are unfamiliar to the operator or performed under pressure. Tasks that require the calculation of a dosage or dilution are especially susceptible to error. The tasks of prescribing, preparation, and administration of medicines are complex, and are carried out within a complex system; errors can occur at each of many steps and the error rate for the overall process is therefore high. The error rate increases when health-care professionals are inexperienced, inattentive, rushed, distracted, fatigued, or depressed; orthopaedic surgeons and nurses may be more likely than other health-care professionals to make medication errors. Medication error rates in hospital are higher in paediatric departments and intensive care units than elsewhere. Rates of medication errors may be higher in very young or very old patients. Intravenous antibiotics are the drugs most commonly involved in medication errors in hospital; antiplatelet agents, diuretics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are most likely to account for ‘preventable admissions’. Computers effectively reduce the rates of easily counted errors. It is not clear whether they can save lives lost through rare but dangerous errors in the medication process. PMID:19594527

  20. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    PubMed Central

    Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Breeze, Janis L.; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Hanke, Michael; Haselgrove, Christian; Helmer, Karl G.; Keator, David B.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Schwartz, Yannick; Ashburner, John; Kennedy, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture (EDC) methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging. PMID:22493576

  1. NURSE STAFFING AND MEDICATION ERRORS: CROSS SECTIONAL OR LONGITUDINAL RELATIONSHIPS?

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Barbara A.; Belyea, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We used autoregressive latent trajectory (ALT) modeling to examine the relationship between change in nurse staffing and change in medication errors over 6 months in 284 general medical-surgical nursing units. We also investigated the impact of select hospital and nursing unit characteristics on the baseline level and rate of change in medication errors. We found essentially no support for a nurse staffing – medication error relationship either cross-sectionally or longitudinally. Few hospital or nursing unit characteristics had significant relationships to either the baseline level or rate of change in medication errors. However, ALT modeling is a promising technique that can promote a deeper understanding of the theoretically complex relationships that may underlie the nurse staffing – medication error relationship. PMID:18825733

  2. Medication errors: problems and recommendations from a consensus meeting

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Abha; Aronson, Jeffrey K; Britten, Nicky; Ferner, Robin E; de Smet, Peter A; Fialová, Daniela; Fitzgerald, Richard J; Likić, Robert; Maxwell, Simon R; Meyboom, Ronald H; Minuz, Pietro; Onder, Graziano; Schachter, Michael; Velo, Giampaolo

    2009-01-01

    Here we discuss 15 recommendations for reducing the risks of medication errors: Provision of sufficient undergraduate learning opportunities to make medical students safe prescribers. Provision of opportunities for students to practise skills that help to reduce errors. Education of students about common types of medication errors and how to avoid them. Education of prescribers in taking accurate drug histories. Assessment in medical schools of prescribing knowledge and skills and demonstration that newly qualified doctors are safe prescribers. European harmonization of prescribing and safety recommendations and regulatory measures, with regular feedback about rational drug use. Comprehensive assessment of elderly patients for declining function. Exploration of low-dose regimens for elderly patients and preparation of special formulations as required. Training for all health-care professionals in drug use, adverse effects, and medication errors in elderly people. More involvement of pharmacists in clinical practice. Introduction of integrated prescription forms and national implementation in individual countries. Development of better monitoring systems for detecting medication errors, based on classification and analysis of spontaneous reports of previous reactions, and for investigating the possible role of medication errors when patients die. Use of IT systems, when available, to provide methods of avoiding medication errors; standardization, proper evaluation, and certification of clinical information systems. Nonjudgmental communication with patients about their concerns and elicitation of symptoms that they perceive to be adverse drug reactions. Avoidance of defensive reactions if patients mention symptoms resulting from medication errors. PMID:19594525

  3. Medical error and related factors during internship and residency.

    PubMed

    Ahmadipour, Habibeh; Nahid, Mortazavi

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to determine the real incidence of medical errors due to the lack of a precise definition of errors, as well as the failure to report them under certain circumstances. We carried out a cross- sectional study in Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran in 2013. The participants were selected through the census method. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which consisted of questions on the participants' demographic data and questions on the medical errors committed. The data were analysed by SPSS 19. It was found that 270 participants had committed medical errors. There was no significant difference in the frequency of errors committed by interns and residents. In the case of residents, the most common error was misdiagnosis and in that of interns, errors related to history-taking and physical examination. Considering that medical errors are common in the clinical setting, the education system should train interns and residents to prevent the occurrence of errors. In addition, the system should develop a positive attitude among them so that they can deal better with medical errors. PMID:26592783

  4. The Environmental Context of Patient Safety and Medical Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Douglas; Moscovice, Ira; Hietpas, Terry; Holtzman, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    The environmental context of patient safety and medical errors was explored with specific interest in rural settings. Special attention was paid to unique features of rural health care organizations and their environment that relate to the patient safety issue and medical errors (including the distribution of patients, types of adverse events…

  5. Medical errors; causes, consequences, emotional response and resulting behavioral change

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Attia; Khan, Rehan Ahmed; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the causes of medical errors, the emotional and behavioral response of pediatric medicine residents to their medical errors and to determine their behavior change affecting their future training. Methods: One hundred thirty postgraduate residents were included in the study. Residents were asked to complete questionnaire about their errors and responses to their errors in three domains: emotional response, learning behavior and disclosure of the error. The names of the participants were kept confidential. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: A total of 130 residents were included. Majority 128(98.5%) of these described some form of error. Serious errors that occurred were 24(19%), 63(48%) minor, 24(19%) near misses,2(2%) never encountered an error and 17(12%) did not mention type of error but mentioned causes and consequences. Only 73(57%) residents disclosed medical errors to their senior physician but disclosure to patient’s family was negligible 15(11%). Fatigue due to long duty hours 85(65%), inadequate experience 66(52%), inadequate supervision 58(48%) and complex case 58(45%) were common causes of medical errors. Negative emotions were common and were significantly associated with lack of knowledge (p=0.001), missing warning signs (p=<0.001), not seeking advice (p=0.003) and procedural complications (p=0.001). Medical errors had significant impact on resident’s behavior; 119(93%) residents became more careful, increased advice seeking from seniors 109(86%) and 109(86%) started paying more attention to details. Intrinsic causes of errors were significantly associated with increased information seeking behavior and vigilance (p=0.003) and (p=0.01) respectively. Conclusion: Medical errors committed by residents have inadequate disclosure to senior physicians and result in negative emotions but there was positive change in their behavior, which resulted in improvement in their future training and patient care. PMID:27375682

  6. Medication Errors: New EU Good Practice Guide on Risk Minimisation and Error Prevention.

    PubMed

    Goedecke, Thomas; Ord, Kathryn; Newbould, Victoria; Brosch, Sabine; Arlett, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A medication error is an unintended failure in the drug treatment process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient. Reducing the risk of medication errors is a shared responsibility between patients, healthcare professionals, regulators and the pharmaceutical industry at all levels of healthcare delivery. In 2015, the EU regulatory network released a two-part good practice guide on medication errors to support both the pharmaceutical industry and regulators in the implementation of the changes introduced with the EU pharmacovigilance legislation. These changes included a modification of the 'adverse reaction' definition to include events associated with medication errors, and the requirement for national competent authorities responsible for pharmacovigilance in EU Member States to collaborate and exchange information on medication errors resulting in harm with national patient safety organisations. To facilitate reporting and learning from medication errors, a clear distinction has been made in the guidance between medication errors resulting in adverse reactions, medication errors without harm, intercepted medication errors and potential errors. This distinction is supported by an enhanced MedDRA(®) terminology that allows for coding all stages of the medication use process where the error occurred in addition to any clinical consequences. To better understand the causes and contributing factors, individual case safety reports involving an error should be followed-up with the primary reporter to gather information relevant for the conduct of root cause analysis where this may be appropriate. Such reports should also be summarised in periodic safety update reports and addressed in risk management plans. Any risk minimisation and prevention strategy for medication errors should consider all stages of a medicinal product's life-cycle, particularly the main sources and types of medication errors during product development. This article

  7. Medication error prevention: profiling one of pharmacy's foremost advocacy efforts for advice on error prevention.

    PubMed

    Proulx, S; Wilfinger, R; Cohen, M R

    1997-04-01

    Medication errors have become a growing concern with the increase in the number of critically ill patients, in the complexity of drug therapy and in the use of more potent, dangerous drugs. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), a nonprofit organization founded three years ago, is in the forefront of medication error prevention efforts. Working with practitioners, regulatory agencies, healthcare institutions, professional organizations and the pharmaceutical industry, both nationally and internationally, ISMP provides timely and accurate medication safety information through its educational programs, site-reviews, and ongoing publications. This article reviews the work of ISMP and offers recommendations for managers to begin error prevention strategies. PMID:10166239

  8. Reducing the Risk of Harm From Medication Errors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Neuspiel, Daniel R.; Taylor, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors affect the pediatric age group in all settings: outpatient, inpatient, emergency department, and at home. Children may be at special risk due to size and physiologic variability, limited communication ability, and treatment by nonpediatric health care providers. Those with chronic illnesses and on multiple medications may be at higher risk of experiencing adverse drug events. Some strategies that have been employed to reduce harm from pediatric medication errors include e-prescribing and computerized provider order entry with decision support, medication reconciliation, barcode systems, clinical pharmacists in medical settings, medical staff training, package changes to reduce look-alike/sound-alike confusion, standardization of labeling and measurement devices for home administration, and quality improvement interventions to promote nonpunitive reporting of medication errors coupled with changes in systems and cultures. Future research is needed to measure the effectiveness of these preventive strategies. PMID:25114560

  9. An intravenous medication safety system: preventing high-risk medication errors at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Irene; Sullivan, Mark; Hutchinson, James; Thurman, Susan; Gaffney, F Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Improving medication safety at the point of care--particularly for high-risk drugs--is a major concern of nursing administrators. The medication errors most likely to cause harm are administration errors related to infusion of high-risk medications. An intravenous medication safety system is designed to prevent high-risk infusion medication errors and to capture continuous quality improvement data for best practice improvement. Initial testing with 50 systems in 2 units at Vanderbilt University Medical Center revealed that, even in the presence of a fully mature computerized prescriber order-entry system, the new safety system averted 99 potential infusion errors in 8 months. PMID:15577664

  10. Coping with medical mistakes and errors in judgment.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Richard M; Kuhn, Gloria; Andrew, Louise B; Thomas, Harold A

    2002-03-01

    Attention has recently been focused on medical errors as a cause of morbidity and mortality in clinical practice. Although much has been written regarding the cognitive aspects of decision making and the importance of systems management as an approach to medical error reduction, little consideration has been given to the emotional impact of errors on the practitioner. Evidence exists that errors are common in clinical practice and that physicians often deal with them in dysfunctional ways. However, there is no general acknowledgment within the profession of the inevitability of medical errors or of the need for practitioners to be trained in their management. This article focuses on the affective aspects of physician errors and presents a strategy for coping with them. PMID:11867981

  11. Medication error detection in two major teaching hospitals: What are the types of errors?

    PubMed Central

    Saghafi, Fatemeh; Zargarzadeh, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing number of reports on medication errors and relevant subsequent damages, especially in medical centers has become a growing concern for patient safety in recent decades. Patient safety and in particular, medication safety is a major concern and challenge for health care professionals around the world. Our prospective study was designed to detect prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administering medication errors in two major university hospitals. Materials and Methods: After choosing 20 similar hospital wards in two large teaching hospitals in the city of Isfahan, Iran, the sequence was randomly selected. Diagrams for drug distribution were drawn by the help of pharmacy directors. Direct observation technique was chosen as the method for detecting the errors. A total of 50 doses were studied in each ward to detect prescribing, transcribing and administering errors in each ward. The dispensing error was studied on 1000 doses dispensed in each hospital pharmacy. Results: A total of 8162 number of doses of medications were studied during the four stages, of which 8000 were complete data to be analyzed. 73% of prescribing orders were incomplete and did not have all six parameters (name, dosage form, dose and measuring unit, administration route, and intervals of administration). We found 15% transcribing errors. One-third of administration of medications on average was erroneous in both hospitals. Dispensing errors ranged between 1.4% and 2.2%. Conclusion: Although prescribing and administrating compromise most of the medication errors, improvements are needed in all four stages with regard to medication errors. Clear guidelines must be written and executed in both hospitals to reduce the incidence of medication errors. PMID:25364360

  12. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Baker, Stephanie N

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitude of factors that create an almost ideal environment for medication errors to thrive. To limit and mitigate these errors, it is necessary to have a thorough knowledge of the medication-use process in the emergency department and develop strategies targeted at each individual step. Some of these strategies include medication-error analysis, computerized provider-order entry systems, automated dispensing cabinets, bar-coding systems, medication reconciliation, standardizing medication-use processes, education, and emergency-medicine clinical pharmacists. Special consideration also needs to be given to the development of strategies for the pediatric population, as they can be at an elevated risk of harm. Regardless of the strategies implemented, the prevention of medication errors begins and ends with the development of a culture that promotes the reporting of medication errors, and a systematic, nonpunitive approach to their elimination. PMID:27147879

  13. The Effect of Individual Factors on the Medication Error.

    PubMed

    Zyoud, Amr H; Abdullah, Nor Azimah Chew

    2016-01-01

    Medication error is a major issue in healthcare industry and significant efforts have been taken in recent years to comprehend factors that influence errors in medication. Therefore, the present study aims to examine individual factors that contribute to medication errors as perceived by nurses. 255 registered nurses working in different Jordanian public hospitals have been chosen as samples to collect the study data from. They were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the perceived individual factors, specifically, on nursing mathematical calculation skills and training as well as knowledge on medication treatment as factors contributing to medication errors. The current study found that the nurses' mathematical calculation skills, training and their knowledge on medication treatment have significant relationship with medication error. This was proven as the study framework is able to explain 45.6% of the total variance. Consequently, it is recommended that healthcare authorities and hospitals in Jordan should focus on nursing knowledge in medication treatment and the nurses' ability to perform drug calculation in order to improve the medication system in Jordan. PMID:27357892

  14. Data sharing for pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian J; Merry, Alan F

    2009-10-01

    Pooling data from different pediatric studies can provide a single robust pharmacokinetic analysis that allows covariate analysis and hypothesis testing. Data sharing should be driven by the altruistic purpose of improving drug understanding to the clinical benefit of children. Electronic communications have rendered the sharing of data relatively easy, and data sharing within the wider scientific community has become commonplace. Data sharing allows verification of results, save costs and time, allows new interpretation of old data, and can fulfill teaching benefits. It may stimulate cooperative competition between researchers and allow individual researchers to concentrate on unique aspects of the scientific puzzle. However, there is occasionally a reluctance to share, in part because of fear of others stealing the hard work of a research group, which may not be recognized in subsequent publications that reuse data. Providing data may require additional effort for presentation in a suitable format. Data may be abused or used for purposes other than those for which they were collected. Propriety claims may limit access to industry-sponsored drug research. The question of who has ownership of data is contentious. Investigators often consider data they have collected to be their own property. Reputations and grants may be hinge on ownership of a data set. However, other team members, institutions, funding agencies, and the public also have a stake. The difficulties identified in the general scientific community also apply to data sharing for pediatric pharmacokinetic studies. There are few clearly established rules at present, and consideration of the issues hinges on ethical and philosophical arguments. The development of databases will depend on collaboration and cooperation and greater clarity and consensus over appropriate processes and procedures. PMID:19558615

  15. What Drives Academic Data Sharing?

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Benedikt; Friesike, Sascha; Hebing, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread support from policy makers, funding agencies, and scientific journals, academic researchers rarely make their research data available to others. At the same time, data sharing in research is attributed a vast potential for scientific progress. It allows the reproducibility of study results and the reuse of old data for new research questions. Based on a systematic review of 98 scholarly papers and an empirical survey among 603 secondary data users, we develop a conceptual framework that explains the process of data sharing from the primary researcher’s point of view. We show that this process can be divided into six descriptive categories: Data donor, research organization, research community, norms, data infrastructure, and data recipients. Drawing from our findings, we discuss theoretical implications regarding knowledge creation and dissemination as well as research policy measures to foster academic collaboration. We conclude that research data cannot be regarded as knowledge commons, but research policies that better incentivise data sharing are needed to improve the quality of research results and foster scientific progress. PMID:25714752

  16. Human factors and medication errors: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gluyas, Heather; Morrison, Paul

    2014-12-15

    Human beings are error prone. A significant component of human error is flaws inherent in human cognitive processes, which are exacerbated by situations in which the individual making the error is distracted, stressed or overloaded, or does not have sufficient knowledge to undertake an action correctly. The scientific discipline of human factors deals with environmental, organisational and job factors, as well as human and individual characteristics, which influence behaviour at work in a way that potentially gives rise to human error. This article discusses how cognitive processing is related to medication errors. The case of a coronial inquest into the death of a nursing home resident is used to highlight the way people think and process information, and how such thinking and processing may lead to medication errors. PMID:25492790

  17. MEADERS: Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Event Reporting system.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Atif

    2007-01-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recently funded the PBRN Resource Center to develop a system for reporting ambulatory medication errors. Our goal was to develop a usable system that practices could use internally to track errors. We initially performed a comprehensive literature review of what is currently available. Then, using a combination of expert panel meetings and iterative development we designed an instrument for ambulatory medication error reporting and createad a reporting system based both in MS Access 2003 and on the web using MS ASP.NET 2.0 technologies. PMID:18694263

  18. [The analysis of the medication error, in practice].

    PubMed

    Didelot, Nicolas; Cistio, Céline

    2016-01-01

    By performing a systemic analysis of medication errors which occur in practice, the multidisciplinary teams can avoid a reoccurrence with the aid of an improvement action plan. The methods must take into account all the factors which might have contributed to or favoured the occurrence of a medication incident or accident. PMID:27177485

  19. Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses' miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, student nurses and physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4): 389 -395; Hutton, M., 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application Nursing Standard 13(11): 35-38; Weeks, K., Lynne, P., Torrance, C., 2000. Written drug dosage errors made by students: the threat to clinical effectiveness and the need for a new approach. Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing 4, 20-29]; Wright, K., 2004. Investigation to find strategies to improve student nurses' maths skills. British Journal Nursing 13(21) 1280-1287; Wright, K., 2005. An exploration into the most effective way to teach drug calculation skills to nursing students. Nurse Education Today 25, 430-436], but there have been no reviews of the literature on medication errors in practice that specifically look to see whether the medication errors are caused by nurses' poor calculation skills. The databases Medline, CINAHL, British Nursing Index (BNI), Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) and Archives and Cochrane reviews were searched for research studies or systematic reviews which reported on the incidence or causes of drug errors in clinical practice. In total 33 articles met the criteria for this review. There were no studies that examined nurses' drug calculation errors in practice. As a result studies and systematic reviews that investigated the types and causes of drug errors were examined to establish whether miscalculations by nurses were the causes of errors. The review found insufficient evidence to suggest that medication errors are caused by nurses' poor

  20. Medication Error Management around the Globe: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Patel, Isha; Balkrishnan, R

    2010-09-01

    Medical mistakes that include medication errors have raised concerns about medication safety. Due to high consumption of medicines and self-treatment by all, especially the aging population, the issue of proper medication use and safety is at the forefront of public health concerns globally. Each country has a different approach towards medication event monitoring that is compliant with its own health care system. This paper focuses on the efforts and endeavors of some of the countries around the world to create an efficient error reporting systems to ensure public safety. Our analysis indicates that there are established and effective medication vigilance systems in many developed countries. The different countries undertake activities which range from collecting information about prescriptions, surveying physicians about adverse drug events, and conducting sophisticated post-marketing surveillance studies. There is still need for such sophisticated system in India; however recent promising developments are occurring towards building a medication vigilance system. Development of these systems may eventually contribute to a global medication vigilance system, which could reduce concern with medication errors and safety. PMID:21694983

  1. Medication Error Management around the Globe: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha; Balkrishnan, R.

    2010-01-01

    Medical mistakes that include medication errors have raised concerns about medication safety. Due to high consumption of medicines and self-treatment by all, especially the aging population, the issue of proper medication use and safety is at the forefront of public health concerns globally. Each country has a different approach towards medication event monitoring that is compliant with its own health care system. This paper focuses on the efforts and endeavors of some of the countries around the world to create an efficient error reporting systems to ensure public safety. Our analysis indicates that there are established and effective medication vigilance systems in many developed countries. The different countries undertake activities which range from collecting information about prescriptions, surveying physicians about adverse drug events, and conducting sophisticated post-marketing surveillance studies. There is still need for such sophisticated system in India; however recent promising developments are occurring towards building a medication vigilance system. Development of these systems may eventually contribute to a global medication vigilance system, which could reduce concern with medication errors and safety. PMID:21694983

  2. Detecting medication errors: analysis based on a hospital's incident reports.

    PubMed

    Härkänen, Marja; Turunen, Hannele; Saano, Susanna; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse how medication incidents are detected in different phases of the medication process. The study design is a retrospective register study. The material was collected from one university hospital's web-based incident reporting database in Finland. In 2010, 1617 incident reports were made, 671 of those were medication incidents and analysed in this study. Statistical methods were used to analyse the material. Results were reported using frequencies and percentages. Twenty-one percent of all medication incidents were detected during documenting or reading the documents. One-sixth of medication incidents were detected during medicating the patients, and approximately one-tenth were detected during verifying of the medicines. It is important to learn how to break the chain of medication errors as early as possible. Findings showed that for nurses, the ability to concentrate on documenting and medicating the patient is essential. PMID:24256158

  3. Scalable Models of Data Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helly, J.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.

    2001-12-01

    The ability of investigators to share data is essential to the progress of interdisciplinary, integrative scientific research. Information technology can be used to facilitate this advance by providing the means for both the integration of data from different disciplines as well as assisting investigators in one discipline in obtaining effective access to data from other disciplines. The process of developing such a data infrastructure pose technological and disciplinary challenges relating to the definition of metadata standards, data formats, the physical and logical architecture of the data network as well as the methods of controlling it, protection of intellectual property rights, incentives to researchers to share data, and long-term funding to name a dominant few. This paper presents a review of these main issues in achieving effective data sharing based on previous efforts within the ecological community and discusses their relevance to the marine science community. In particular, we offer recommendations for an information architecture to address these concerns and to support the gradual development of a long-term data network supporting interdisciplinary research. The recommendations are offered not so much as a point design but rather as a design space that will stimulate community discussion and enable the evolution of data sharing policies accommodated by a flexible, long-term data network.

  4. The Dash Data Sharing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, David A.; Slaughter, Brooks

    1994-01-01

    The Data Sharing system (DASH) project was recently undertaken at NASA Johnson Space Center to introduce distributed data sharing into the Mission Control Center (MCC). Although the project focused on MCC communications, the solution is a general one. This paper describes that project. DASH allows applications to share data. It provides callable interfaces for applications wishing to export or import data. The system consists of several processes: publishers make exported data available to subscribers, which provide it to interested importing applications. A network registration service provides network location transparency, allowing the other processes to reside at arbitrary network locations. These processes act as intermediaries between external producing and consuming applications. DASH has been demonstrated in the MCC where it transmits Shuttle electrical bus data from the Bus Loss Smart System to the Configurable Realtime Analysis System. In addition, the Failure Impact and Procedure Analysis system used DASH to transmit Shuttle remote manipulator data from an expert system to a version of CRANS. DASH is currently being used to integrate a knowledge acquisition application and the CLIPS expert system shell.

  5. Poor communication on patients’ medication across health care levels leads to potentially harmful medication errors

    PubMed Central

    Frydenberg, Karin; Brekke, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Objective General practitioners have a key role in updating their patients’ medication. Poor communication regarding patients’ drug use may easily occur when patients cross health care levels. We wanted to explore whether such inadequate communication leads to errors in patients’ medication on admission, during hospital stay, and after discharge, and whether these errors were potentially harmful. Design Exploratory case study of 30 patients. Setting General practices in central Norway and medical ward of Innlandet Hospital Trust Gjøvik, Norway. Subjects 30 patients urgently admitted to the medical ward, and using three or more drugs on admission. Main outcome measures Discrepancies between the patients’ actual drugs taken and what was recorded on admission to hospital, during hospitalization, at discharge, and five weeks after hospital stay. The discrepancies were grouped according to the NCC Merp Index for Categorizing Medication Errors to assess their potential harm. Results The 30 patients used a total of 250 drugs, and 50 medication errors were found, affecting 18 of the patients; 27 errors were potentially harmful, according to NCC Merp Index: 23 in category E, four in category F. Half of the errors originated from an incomplete medication list in the referral letter. Conclusion The majority of the medication errors were made when the patients were admitted to hospital, and a substantial proportion were potentially harmful. The medication list should be reviewed together with the patient on admission, and each patient should carry an updated medication list provided by his or her general practitioner. PMID:23050954

  6. Disclosing harmful medical errors to patients: tackling three tough cases.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas H; Bell, Sigall K; Smith, Kelly M; Mello, Michelle M; McDonald, Timothy B

    2009-09-01

    A gap exists between recommendations to disclose errors to patients and current practice. This gap may reflect important, yet unanswered questions about implementing disclosure principles. We explore some of these unanswered questions by presenting three real cases that pose challenging disclosure dilemmas. The first case involves a pancreas transplant that failed due to the pancreas graft being discarded, an error that was not disclosed partly because the family did not ask clarifying questions. Relying on patient or family questions to determine the content of disclosure is problematic. We propose a standard of materiality that can help clinicians to decide what information to disclose. The second case involves a fatal diagnostic error that the patient's widower was unaware had happened. The error was not disclosed out of concern that disclosure would cause the widower more harm than good. This case highlights how institutions can overlook patients' and families' needs following errors and emphasizes that benevolent deception has little role in disclosure. Institutions should consider whether involving neutral third parties could make disclosures more patient centered. The third case presents an intraoperative cardiac arrest due to a large air embolism where uncertainty around the clinical event was high and complicated the disclosure. Uncertainty is common to many medical errors but should not deter open conversations with patients and families about what is and is not known about the event. Continued discussion within the medical profession about applying disclosure principles to real-world cases can help to better meet patients' and families' needs following medical errors. PMID:19736193

  7. Medical error and systems of signaling: conceptual and linguistic definition.

    PubMed

    Smorti, Andrea; Cappelli, Francesco; Zarantonello, Roberta; Tani, Franca; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2014-09-01

    In recent years the issue of patient safety has been the subject of detailed investigations, particularly as a result of the increasing attention from the patients and the public on the problem of medical error. The purpose of this work is firstly to define the classification of medical errors, which are distinguished between two perspectives: those that are personal, and those that are caused by the system. Furthermore we will briefly review some of the main methods used by healthcare organizations to identify and analyze errors. During this discussion it has been determined that, in order to constitute a practical, coordinated and shared action to counteract the error, it is necessary to promote an analysis that considers all elements (human, technological and organizational) that contribute to the occurrence of a critical event. Therefore, it is essential to create a culture of constructive confrontation that encourages an open and non-punitive debate about the causes that led to error. In conclusion we have thus underlined that in health it is essential to affirm a system discussion that considers the error as a learning source, and as a result of the interaction between the individual and the organization. In this way, one should encourage a non-guilt bearing discussion on evident errors and on those which are not immediately identifiable, in order to create the conditions that recognize and corrects the error even before it produces negative consequences. PMID:25034521

  8. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  9. Factors effective on medication errors: A nursing view

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Akram; Ebrahimpour, Fatemeh; Ghodousi, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medication errors are the most common medical errors, which may result in some complications for patients. This study was carried out to investigate what influence medication errors by nurses from their viewpoint. Methods: In this descriptive study, 150 nurses who were working in Qazvin Medical University teaching hospitals were selected by proportional random sampling, and data were collected by means of a researcher-made questionnaire including demographic attributes (age, gender, working experience,…), and contributing factors in medication errors (in three categories including nurse-related, management-related, and environment-related factors). Findings: The mean age of the participant nurses was 30.7 ± 6.5 years. Most of them (87.1%) were female with a Bachelor of Sciences degree (86.7%) in nursing. The mean of their overtime working was 64.8 ± 38 h/month. The results showed that the nurse-related factors are the most effective factors (55.44 ± 9.14) while the factors related to the management system (52.84 ± 11.24) and the ward environment (44.0 ± 10.89) are respectively less effective. The difference between these three groups was significant (P = 0.000). In each aforementioned category, the most effective factor on medication error (ranked from the most effective to the least effective) were as follow: The nurse's inadequate attention (98.7%), the errors occurring in the transfer of medication orders from the patient's file to kardex (96.6%) and the ward's heavy workload (86.7%). Conclusion: In this study nurse-related factors were the most effective factors on medication errors, but nurses are one of the members of health-care providing team, so their performance must be considered in the context of the health-care system like work force condition, rules and regulations, drug manufacturing that might impact nurses performance, so it could not be possible to prevent medication errors without paying attention to our health-care system in a

  10. Evaluation of Intravenous Medication Errors with Smart Infusion Pumps in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; McIntosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Wien, Matt; Bates, David W.

    2013-01-01

    While some published research indicates a fairly high frequency of Intravenous (IV) medication errors associated with the use of smart infusion pumps, the generalizability of these results are uncertain. Additionally, the lack of a standardized methodology for measuring these errors is an issue. In this study we iteratively developed a web-based data collection tool to capture IV medication errors using a participatory design approach with interdisciplinary experts. Using the developed tool, a prevalence study was then conducted in an academic medical center. The results showed that the tool was easy to use and effectively captured all IV medication errors. Through the prevalence study, violation errors of hospital policy were found that could potentially place patients at risk, but no critical errors known to contribute to patient harm were noted. PMID:24551395

  11. Reducing medical errors through barcoding at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Nichols, James H; Bartholomew, Cathy; Brunton, Mary; Cintron, Carlos; Elliott, Sheila; McGirr, Joan; Morsi, Deborah; Scott, Sue; Seipel, Joseph; Sinha, Daisy

    2004-01-01

    Medical errors are a major concern in health care today. Errors in point-of-care testing (POCT) are particularly problematic because the test is conducted by clinical operators at the site of patient care and immediate medical action is taken on the results prior to review by the laboratory. The Performance Improvement Program at Baystate Health System, Springfield, Massachusetts, noted a number of identification errors occurring with glucose and blood gas POCT devices. Incorrect patient account numbers that were attached to POCT results prevented the results from being transmitted to the patient's medical record and appropriately billed. In the worst case, they could lead to results being transferred to the wrong patient's chart and inappropriate medical treatment. Our first action was to lock-out operators who repeatedly made identification errors (3-Strike Rule), requiring operators to be counseled and retrained after their third error. The 3-Strike Rule significantly decreased our glucose meter errors (p = 0.014) but did not have an impact on the rate of our blood gas errors (p = 0.378). Neither device approached our ultimate goal of zero tolerance. A Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) was conducted to determine the various processes that could lead to an identification error. A primary source of system failure was the manual entry of 14 digits for each test, five numbers for operator and nine numbers for patient account identification. Patient barcoding was implemented to automate the data entry process, and after an initial familiarization period, resulted in significant improvements in error rates for both the glucose (p = 0.0007) and blood gas devices (p = 0.048). Despite the improvements, error rates with barcoding still did not achieve zero errors. Operators continued to utilize manual data entry when the barcode scan was unsuccessful or unavailable, and some patients were found to have incorrect patient account numbers due to hospital transfer

  12. A classification of errors in lay comprehension of medical documents

    PubMed Central

    Keselman, Alla; Smith, Catherine Arnott

    2012-01-01

    Emphasis on participatory medicine requires that patients and consumers participate in tasks traditionally reserved for healthcare providers. This includes reading and comprehending medical documents, often but not necessarily in the context of interacting with Personal Health Records (PHRs). Research suggests that while giving patients access to medical documents has many benefits (e.g., improved patient-provider communication), lay people often have difficulty understanding medical information. Informatics can address the problem by developing tools that support comprehension; this requires in-depth understanding of the nature and causes of errors that lay people make when comprehending clinical documents. The objective of this study was to develop a classification scheme of comprehension errors, based on lay individuals’ retellings of two documents containing clinical text: a description of a clinical trial and a typical office visit note. While not comprehensive, the scheme can serve as a foundation of further development of a taxonomy of patients’ comprehension errors. Eighty participants, all healthy volunteers, read and retold two medical documents. A data-driven content analysis procedure was used to extract and classify retelling errors. The resulting hierarchical classification scheme contains nine categories and twenty-three subcategories. The most common error made by the participants involved incorrectly recalling brand names of medications. Other common errors included misunderstanding clinical concepts, misreporting the objective of a clinical research study and physician’s findings during a patient’s visit, and confusing and misspelling clinical terms. A combination of informatics support and health education is likely to improve the accuracy of lay comprehension of medical documents. PMID:22925723

  13. Medication safety in neonatal care: a review of medication errors among neonates

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Natalia; Bajorek, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the medication errors in hospitalized patients, comparing those in neonates with medication errors across the age spectrum. Method: In tier 1, PubMed, Embase and Google Scholar were searched, using selected MeSH terms relating to hospitalized paediatric, adult and elderly populations. Tier 2 involved a search of the same electronic databases for literature relating to hospitalized neonatal patients. Results: A total of 58 articles were reviewed. Medication errors were well documented in each patient group. Overall, prescribing and administration errors were most commonly identified across each population, and mostly related to errors in dosing. Errors due to patient misidentification and overdosing were particularly prevalent in neonates, with 47% of administration errors involving at least tenfold overdoses. Unique errors were identified in elderly patients, comprising duplication of therapy and unnecessary prescribing of medicines. Overall, the medicines most frequently identified with error across each patient group included: heparin, antibiotics, insulin, morphine and parenteral nutrition. While neonatal patients experience the same types of medication errors as other hospitalized patients, the medication-use process within this group is more complex and has greater consequences resulting from error. Suggested strategies to help overcome medication error most commonly involved the integration of a clinical pharmacist into the treating team. Conclusion: This review highlights that each step of the medication-use process is prone to error across the age spectrum. Further research is required to develop targeted strategies relevant to specific patient groups that integrate key pharmacy services into wards. PMID:27298721

  14. Characteristics associated with post-discharge medication errors

    PubMed Central

    Mixon, Amanda S.; Myers, Amy P.; Leak, Cardella L.; Mary Lou Jacobsen, J.; Cawthon, Courtney; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Nwosu, Samuel; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Schnelle, John F.; Speroff, Theodore; Kripalani, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of patient- and medication-related factors with post-discharge medication errors. Patients and Methods The Vanderbilt Inpatient Cohort Study (VICS) includes adults hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We measured health literacy, subjective numeracy, marital status, cognition, social support, education, income, depression, global health status, and medication adherence in patients enrolled between October 2011 and August 2012. We used binomial logistic regression to determine predictors of discordance between the discharge medication list and patient-reported list during post-discharge medication review. Results Among 471 patients, mean age was 59 years; mean total number of medications reported was 12; and 17% had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Half (51%) of patients had ≥1 one discordant medication (i.e., appeared either on the discharge or patient-reported list but not both); 27% failed to report a medication on their discharge list; and 36% reported a medication not on their discharge list. Additionally, 59% had a misunderstanding in indication, dose, or frequency in a cardiac medication. In multivariable analyses, higher subjective numeracy (Odds Ratio (OR)=0.81, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.67-0.98) was associated with lower odds of having discordant medications. For cardiac medications, participants with higher health literacy (OR=0.84, CI 0.74-0.95), higher subjective numeracy (OR=0.77, CI 0.63-0.95), and who were female (OR=0.60, CI 0.46-0.78) had lower odds of misunderstandings in indication, dose, or frequency. Conclusion Medication errors are present in approximately half of patients following hospital discharge and are more common among patients with lower numeracy or health literacy. PMID:24998906

  15. Medication Errors of Nurses and Factors in Refusal to Report Medication Errors Among Nurses in a Teaching Medical Center of Iran in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Mostafaei, Davoud; Barati Marnani, Ahmad; Mosavi Esfahani, Haleh; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Shahzaidi, Shiva; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh; Aghamiri, Seyed Samad

    2014-01-01

    Background: About one third of unwanted reported medication consequences are due to medication errors, resulting in one-fifth of hospital injuries. Objectives: The aim of this study was determined formal and informal medication errors of nurses and the level of importance of factors in refusal to report medication errors among nurses. Patients and Methods: The cross-sectional study was done on the nursing staff of Shohada Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, Iran in 2012. The data was gathered through a questionnaire, made by the researchers. The questionnaires' face and content validity was confirmed by experts and for measuring its reliability test-retest was used. The data was analyzed by descriptive statistics. We used SPSS for related statistical analyses. Results: The most important factors in refusal to report medication errors respectively were: lack of medication error recording and reporting system in the hospital (3.3%), non-significant error reporting to hospital authorities and lack of appropriate feedback (3.1%), and lack of a clear definition for a medication error (3%). There were both formal and informal reporting of medication errors in this study. Conclusions: Factors pertaining to management in hospitals as well as the fear of the consequences of reporting are two broad fields among the factors that make nurses not report their medication errors. In this regard, providing enough education to nurses, boosting the job security for nurses, management support and revising related processes and definitions are some factors that can help decreasing medication errors and increasing their report in case of occurrence. PMID:25763202

  16. Effect of an automated bedside dispensing machine on medication errors.

    PubMed

    Barker, K N; Pearson, R E; Hepler, C D; Smith, W E; Pappas, C A

    1984-07-01

    The effect of an automated bedside dispensing machine on medication errors was studied on a 32-bed surgical unit of an 848-bed hospital. The experimental system (McLaughlin Dispensing System) included at each patient's bedside a locked medication cabinet that was electronically programmed to allow the nurse access to doses due at a particular time. The control system was a decentralized unit dose system. A crossover study design with random assignment of subjects and treatments was used. In the 14-day study period, nurses were observed by a pharmacist for 28 five-hour periods as they administered medications on the day and evening shifts. The mean error rates were significantly different--10.6% for the experimental system and 15.9% for the control system. Wrong time errors were the most common type. No significant differences were found between day and evening shifts or workloads of individual nurses. There was no treatment order effect. The error rate was significantly lower for the automated dispensing system than for the system using unit doses dispensed from a satellite pharmacy. Automated dispensing systems may be useful in reducing errors in administration time and dose omissions. PMID:6465150

  17. Medication Errors in the Southeast Asian Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Salmasi, Shahrzad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Hong, Yet Hoi; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Background Medication error (ME) is a worldwide issue, but most studies on ME have been undertaken in developed countries and very little is known about ME in Southeast Asian countries. This study aimed systematically to identify and review research done on ME in Southeast Asian countries in order to identify common types of ME and estimate its prevalence in this region. Methods The literature relating to MEs in Southeast Asian countries was systematically reviewed in December 2014 by using; Embase, Medline, Pubmed, ProQuest Central and the CINAHL. Inclusion criteria were studies (in any languages) that investigated the incidence and the contributing factors of ME in patients of all ages. Results The 17 included studies reported data from six of the eleven Southeast Asian countries: five studies in Singapore, four in Malaysia, three in Thailand, three in Vietnam, one in the Philippines and one in Indonesia. There was no data on MEs in Brunei, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Timor. Of the seventeen included studies, eleven measured administration errors, four focused on prescribing errors, three were done on preparation errors, three on dispensing errors and two on transcribing errors. There was only one study of reconciliation error. Three studies were interventional. Discussion The most frequently reported types of administration error were incorrect time, omission error and incorrect dose. Staff shortages, and hence heavy workload for nurses, doctor/nurse distraction, and misinterpretation of the prescription/medication chart, were identified as contributing factors of ME. There is a serious lack of studies on this topic in this region which needs to be addressed if the issue of ME is to be fully understood and addressed. PMID:26340679

  18. Initiatives to identify and mitigate medication errors in England.

    PubMed

    Cousins, David; Gerrett, David; Richards, Natalie; Jadeja, Mitulsinh M

    2015-04-01

    In response to the EU Directive on Pharmacovigilance, the National Health Service (NHS) in England and the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the UK have formed a partnership to work together to simplify and increase medication error reporting, improve data report quality, maximise learning and guide practice to minimise harm from medication errors by sharing incident data. This initiative will facilitate implementation of new requirements for medication error reporting and reduce the need for duplicate data entry by frontline staff. The initiative is also intended to provide new types of feedback from the National Reporting and Learning System run by the NHS England and from the Yellow Card Scheme run by the MHRA and to improve learning at the local level by clarifying medication safety roles and identifying key safety contacts to allow better communication between local and national levels. Finally, the partnership has established a new National Medication Safety Network to provide a forum for discussing potential and recognised safety issues, and for identifying trends and actions to improve the safe use of medicines. This article describes the initiative, the structure of which may act as a template for other countries. PMID:25735854

  19. Medication error report: Intrathecal administration of labetalol during obstetric anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Baisakhi; Hazra, Avijit

    2015-01-01

    Labetalol, a combined alfa and beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, is used as an antihypertensive drug. We report a case of an acute rise in blood pressure and lower limb pain due to the inadvertent intrathecal administration of labetalol, mistaking it for bupivacaine, during obstetric anesthesia. The situation was rescued by converting to general anesthesia. The cesarean delivery was uneventful, and mother as well as newborn child showed no ill-effect. This particular medication error was attributable to a failure on the part of the doctors administering the injection to read and cross-check medication labels and the practice of keeping multiple injections together. In the absence of an organized medication error reporting system and action on that basis, such events may recur in future. PMID:26288484

  20. Automated Communication Tools and Computer-Based Medication Reconciliation to Decrease Hospital Discharge Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth J; Handler, Steven M; Kapoor, Wishwa N; Martich, G Daniel; Reddy, Vivek K; Clark, Sunday

    2016-07-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of automated primary care physician (PCP) communication and patient safety tools, including computerized discharge medication reconciliation, on discharge medication errors and posthospitalization patient outcomes, using a pre-post quasi-experimental study design, in hospitalized medical patients with ≥2 comorbidities and ≥5 chronic medications, at a single center. The primary outcome was discharge medication errors, compared before and after rollout of these tools. Secondary outcomes were 30-day rehospitalization, emergency department visit, and PCP follow-up visit rates. This study found that discharge medication errors were lower post intervention (odds ratio = 0.57; 95% confidence interval = 0.44-0.74; P < .001). Clinically important errors, with the potential for serious or life-threatening harm, and 30-day patient outcomes were not significantly different between study periods. Thus, automated health system-based communication and patient safety tools, including computerized discharge medication reconciliation, decreased hospital discharge medication errors in medically complex patients. PMID:25753453

  1. Prevalence of medication administration errors in two medical units with automated prescription and dispensing

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Martin-Barbero, Maria Luisa; Duran-Garcia, Esther; Durango-Limarquez, Maria Isabel; Hernández-Sampelayo, Paloma; Sanjurjo-Saez, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency of medication administration errors and their potential risk factors in units using a computerized prescription order entry program and profiled automated dispensing cabinets. Design Prospective observational study conducted within two clinical units of the Gastroenterology Department in a 1537-bed tertiary teaching hospital in Madrid (Spain). Measurements Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors and their potential severity were described. The correlation between potential risk factors and medication errors was studied to identify potential causes. Results In total, 2314 medication administrations to 73 patients were observed: 509 errors were recorded (22.0%)—68 (13.4%) in preparation and 441 (86.6%) in administration. The most frequent errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially concerning food intake (13.9%)), wrong reconstitution/dilution (1.7%), omission (1.4%), and wrong infusion speed (1.2%). Errors were classified as no damage (95.7%), no damage but monitoring required (2.3%), and temporary damage (0.4%). Potential clinical severity could not be assessed in 1.6% of cases. The potential risk factors morning shift, evening shift, Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical medication class antacids, prokinetics, antibiotics and immunosuppressants, oral administration, and intravenous administration were associated with a higher risk of administration errors. No association was found with variables related to understaffing or nurse's experience. Conclusions Medication administration errors persist in units with automated prescription and dispensing. We identified a need to improve nurses' working procedures and to implement a Clinical Decision Support tool that generates recommendations about scheduling according to dietary restrictions, preparation of medication before parenteral administration, and adequate infusion rates. PMID:21890872

  2. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. PMID:25649961

  3. [Medical reviews of claims for damages and errors in urology].

    PubMed

    Lent, V; Smentkowski, U; Weber, B; Brummeisl, W

    2013-09-01

    In liability law, a medical review is considered to be an expert opinion that is provided at the request of those involved (patient or physician) of a course of treatment. It must be carried out according to defined criteria with the aim of providing a plausible basis for arbitration. This is achieved by means of an objective determination of the facts, a reasonable assessment of the error(s) and (where appropriate) a realistic description of the injury involved. The following fields should be covered in a concise review: conditions and procedures applied to the review, criteria to be used in the review, types of error that are possible during the treatment, assessment of the treatment errors committed, possible treatment errors that can occur in urology, conclusions to be drawn from the review. In summary, a medical assessment carried out in the course of claims for damages should provide a balanced assessment that takes into account the confidential relationship between the physician and patient. This means that the review procedure must be performed under the best possible conditions for professional standards and care. PMID:24043538

  4. What have we learned about interventions to reduce medical errors?

    PubMed

    Woodward, Helen I; Mytton, Oliver T; Lemer, Claire; Yardley, Iain E; Ellis, Benjamin M; Rutter, Paul D; Greaves, Felix E C; Noble, Douglas J; Kelley, Edward; Wu, Albert W

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors and adverse events are now recognized as major threats to both individual and public health worldwide. This review provides a broad perspective on major effective, established, or promising strategies to reduce medical errors and harm. Initiatives to improve safety can be conceptualized as a "safety onion" with layers of protection, depending on their degree of remove from the patient. Interventions discussed include those applied at the levels of the patient (patient engagement and disclosure), the caregiver (education, teamwork, and checklists), the local workplace (culture and workplace changes), and the system (information technology and incident reporting systems). Promising interventions include forcing functions, computerized prescriber order entry with decision support, checklists, standardized handoffs and simulation training. Many of the interventions described still lack strong evidence of benefit, but this should not hold back implementation. Rather, it should spur innovation accompanied by evaluation and publication to share the results. PMID:20070203

  5. Opioids, iatrogenic harm and disclosure of medical error.

    PubMed

    Blinderman, Craig D

    2010-02-01

    The safety of patients in U.S. hospitals is a serious problem, with adverse events because of medical error affecting a significant proportion of hospitalized patients. Patients at the end of life are particularly vulnerable and are at risk of potential adverse events. This article presents a case in which opioids were rapidly titrated to neurotoxic doses in a patient who was terminally extubated. The patient was profoundly sedated and was noted to have Cheyne-Stokes breathing. The possibility of opioid-related iatrogenic harm is raised, and a discussion of what counts as medical error in these circumstances is explored. Palliative care specialists have a unique responsibility to provide guidance and establish a standard of care that clinicians should adhere to. Prevention of harm in dying patients should be a priority in the hospital setting. PMID:20152593

  6. Developing control charts to review and monitor medication errors.

    PubMed

    Ciminera, J L; Lease, M P

    1992-03-01

    There is a need to monitor reported medication errors in a hospital setting. Because the quantity of errors vary due to external reporting, quantifying the data is extremely difficult. Typically, these errors are reviewed using classification systems that often have wide variations in the numbers per class per month. The authors recommend the use of control charts to review historical data and to monitor future data. The procedure they have adopted is a modification of schemes using absolute (i.e., positive) values of successive differences to estimate the standard deviation when only single incidence values are available in time rather than sample averages, and when many successive differences may be zero. PMID:10116719

  7. Patient safety: helping medical students understand error in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Patey, Rona; Flin, Rhona; Cuthbertson, Brian H; MacDonald, Louise; Mearns, Kathryn; Cleland, Jennifer; Williams, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective To change the culture of healthcare organisations and improve patient safety, new professionals need to be taught about adverse events and how to trap and mitigate against errors. A literature review did not reveal any patient safety courses in the core undergraduate medical curriculum. Therefore a new module was designed and piloted. Design A 5‐h evidence‐based module on understanding error in healthcare was designed with a preliminary evaluation using self‐report questionnaires. Setting A UK medical school. Participants 110 final year students. Measurements and main results Participants completed two questionnaires: the first questionnaire was designed to measure students' self‐ratings of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in relation to patient safety and medical error, and was administered before and approximately 1 year after the module; the second formative questionnaire on the teaching process and how it could be improved was administered after completion of the module. Conclusions Before attending the module, the students reported they had little understanding of patient safety matters. One year later, only knowledge and the perceived personal control over safety had improved. The students rated the teaching process highly and found the module valuable. Longitudinal follow‐up is required to provide more information on the lasting impact of the module. PMID:17693671

  8. Emergency department crowding and risk of preventable medical errors.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Stephen K; Huckins, David S; Liu, Shan W; Pallin, Daniel J; Sullivan, Ashley F; Lipton, Robert I; Camargo, Carlos A

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the association between emergency department (ED) crowding and preventable medical errors (PME). This was a retrospective cohort study of 533 ED patients enrolled in the National ED Safety Study (NEDSS) in four Massachusetts EDs. Individual patients' average exposure to ED crowding during their ED visit was compared with the occurrence of a PME (yes/no) for the three diagnostic categories in NEDSS: acute myocardial infarction, asthma exacerbation, and dislocation requiring procedural sedation. To accommodate site-to-site differences in available administrative data, ED crowding was measured using one of three previously validated crowding metrics (ED Work Index, ED Workscore, and ED Occupancy). At each site, the continuous measure was placed into site-specific quartiles, and these quartiles then were combined across sites. We found that 46 (8.6%; 95% confidence interval, 6.4-11.3%) of the 533 patients experienced a PME. For those seen during higher levels of ED crowding (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1), the occurrence of PMEs was more than twofold higher, both on unadjusted analysis and adjusting for two potential confounders (diagnosis, site). The association appeared non-linear, with most PMEs occurring at the highest crowding level. We identified a direct association between high levels of ED crowding and risk of preventable medical errors. Further study is needed to determine the generalizability of these results. Should such research confirm our findings, we would suggest that mitigating ED crowding may reduce the occurrence of preventable medical errors. PMID:22009553

  9. Medication error reduction and the use of PDA technology.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Sue

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether nursing medication errors could be reduced and nursing care provided more efficiently using personal digital assistant (PDA) technology. The sample for this study consisted of junior and senior undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. By self-selection of owning a PDA or not, students were placed in the PDA (experimental) group or the textbook (control) group, provided with a case study to read, and asked to answer six questions (i.e., three medication administration calculations and three clinical decisions based on medication administration). The analysis of collected data, calculated using a t test, revealed that the PDA group answered the six questions with greater accuracy and speed than did the textbook group. PMID:17396552

  10. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    PubMed Central

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia. Methods A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services. Results Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%), followed by transcription errors (15%), dispensing errors (14%), and prescribing errors (7%). Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant. Conclusion Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors. PMID:24940067

  11. Data Sharing from a Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheville, R. Alan

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses questions of data sharing from the perspective of a former NSF program officer. A brief comparison of policy and research perspectives is made to highlight different values in these two communities. Data sharing is framed as one means to support dialog between researchers and those involved in policy. Other uses of data…

  12. Corpus-based error detection in a multilingual medical thesaurus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Roosewelt L; Pacheco, Edson; Cancian, Pindaro S; Nohama, Percy; Schulz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Cross-language document retrieval systems require support by some kind of multilingual thesaurus for semantically indexing documents in different languages. The peculiarities of the medical sublanguage, together with the subjectivism of lexicographers' choices, complicates the thesaurus construction process. It furthermore requires a high degree of communication and interaction between the lexicographers involved. In order to detect errors, a systematic procedure is therefore necessary. We here describe a method which supports the maintenance of the multilingual medical subword repository of the MorphoSaurus system which assigns language-independent semantic identifiers to medical texts. Based on the assumption that the distribution of these semantic identifiers should be similar whenever comparing closely related texts in different languages, our approach identifies those semantic identifiers that vary most in distribution comparing language pairs. The revision of these identifiers and the lexical items related to them revealed multiple errors which were subsequently classified and fixed by the lexicographers. The overall quality improvement of the thesaurus was finally measured using the OHSUMED IR benchmark, resulting in a significant improvement of the retrieval quality for one of the languages tested. PMID:17911773

  13. An Overview of ISS Human Research Data Sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morshedi, Pasha

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is an attempt to clarify several aspects of the current procedures, tools, and challenges of human data sharing for ISS flight activities. There are several binary variables to consider with respect to human spaceflight data sharing: Medical vs. Research, Active Flight vs. Non-Flight, Tactical vs. Supplemental, Prospective vs. Retrospective. This presentation will address each of these variables and how they determine which processes and mechanisms are used both to document and facilitate human data sharing. Some of these variables will likely be so obvious that they induce eye rolls. Please bear with us. We're trying to make these slides fairly rudimentary for a wide, (eventually) international audience. Other distinctions are made if data originated from a NASA vs. IP crewmember. Those distinctions will be made apparent when needed.

  14. Medication review and transitions of care: a case report of a decade-old medication error.

    PubMed

    Comer, Rachel; Lizer, Mitsi

    2015-03-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian male with a 25-year history of paranoid schizophrenia was brought to the emergency department because of violence toward the staff in his nursing facility. He was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and was admitted to the behavioral health unit for medication stabilization. History included a five-year state psychiatric hospital admission and nursing facility placement. Because of poor cognitive function, the patient was unable to corroborate medication history, so the pharmacy student on rotation performed an in-depth chart review. The review revealed a transcription error in 2003 deleting amantadine 100 mg twice daily and adding amiodarone 100 mg twice daily. Subsequent hospitalization resulted in another transcription error increasing the amiodarone to 200 mg twice daily. All electrocardiograms conducted were negative for atrial fibrillation. Once detected, the consulted cardiologist discontinued the amiodarone, and the primary care provider was notified via letter and discharge papers. An admission four months later revealed that the nursing facility restarted the amiodarone. Amiodarone was discontinued and the facility was again notified. This case reviews how a 10-year-old medication error went undetected in the electronic medical records through numerous medication reconciliations, but was uncovered when a single comprehensive medication review was conducted. PMID:25760662

  15. Impact of pharmacy-led medication reconciliation on medication errors during transition in the hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lillian; Mosley, Juan; Lott, Sonia; Cyr, Ernie; Amin, Raid; Everton, Emily; Islami, Abdullah; Phan, Linh; Komolafe, Opeyemi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess if the pharmacy department should be more involved in the medication reconciliation process to assist in the reduction of medication errors that occur during transition of care points in the hospital setting. Methods: This was an observational prospective cohort study at a 531-bed hospital in Pensacola, FL from June 1, 2014 to August 31, 2014. Patients were included in the study if they had health insurance and were taking five or more medications. Patients with congestive heart failure were excluded from the study. Student pharmacists collected and evaluated medication histories obtained from patients’ community pharmacies, and directed patient interviews. Primary care providers were only contacted on an as needed basis. The information collected was presented to the clinical pharmacist, where interventions were made utilizing clinical judgment. Results: During the three month study, 1045 home medications were reviewed by student pharmacist. Of these, 290 discrepancies were discovered (27.8%; p=0.02). The most common medication discrepancy found was dose optimization (45.5%). The remaining discrepancies included: added therapy (27.6%), other (15.2%), and discontinued therapy (11.7%). Pharmacists made 143 interventions based on clinical judgment (49.3%; p=0.04). Conclusion: Involvement of pharmacy personnel during the medication reconciliation process can be an essential component in reducing medical errors. With the addition of the pharmacy department during the admission process, accuracy, cost savings, and patient safety across all phases and transition points of care were achieved. PMID:26759617

  16. Preventing medication errors in neonatology: Is it a dream?

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Roberto; Porcella, Annalisa

    2014-08-01

    Since 1999, the problem of patient safety has drawn particular attention, becoming a priority in health care. A "medication error" (ME) is any preventable event occurring at any phase of the pharmacotherapy process (ordering, transcribing, dispensing, administering, and monitoring) that leads to, or can lead to, harm to the patient. Hence, MEs can involve every professional of the clinical team. MEs range from those with severe consequences to those with little or no impact on the patient. Although a high ME rate has been found in neonatal wards, newborn safety issues have not been adequately studied until now. Healthcare professionals working in neonatal wards are particularly susceptible to committing MEs due to the peculiarities of newborn patients and of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment. Current neonatal prevention strategies for MEs have been borrowed from adult wards, but many factors such as high costs and organizational barriers have hindered their diffusion. In general, two types of strategies have been proposed: the first strategy consists of identifying human factors that result in errors and redesigning the work in the NICU in order to minimize them; the second one suggests to design and implement effective systems for preventing errors or intercepting them before reaching the patient. In the future, prevention strategies for MEs need to be improved and tailored to the special neonatal population and the NICU environment and, at the same time, every effort will have to be made to support their clinical application. PMID:25254183

  17. Voluntary Electronic Reporting of Medical Errors and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Milch, Catherine E; Salem, Deeb N; Pauker, Stephen G; Lundquist, Thomas G; Kumar, Sanjaya; Chen, Jack

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the rate and types of events reported in acute care hospitals using an electronic error reporting system (e-ERS). DESIGN Descriptive study of reported events using the same e-ERS between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2003. SETTING Twenty-six acute care nonfederal hospitals throughout the U.S. that voluntarily implemented a web-based e-ERS for at least 3 months. PARTICIPANTS Hospital employees and staff. INTERVENTION A secure, standardized, commercially available web-based reporting system. RESULTS Median duration of e-ERS use was 21 months (range 3 to 33 months). A total of 92,547 reports were obtained during 2,547,154 patient-days. Reporting rates varied widely across hospitals (9 to 95 reports per 1,000 inpatient-days; median=35). Registered nurses provided nearly half of the reports; physicians contributed less than 2%. Thirty-four percent of reports were classified as nonmedication-related clinical events, 33% as medication/infusion related, 13% were falls, 13% as administrative, and 6% other. Among 80% of reports that identified level of impact, 53% were events that reached a patient (“patient events”), 13% were near misses that did not reach the patient, and 14% were hospital environment problems. Among 49,341 patient events, 67% caused no harm, 32% temporary harm, 0.8% life threatening or permanent harm, and 0.4% contributed to patient deaths. CONCLUSIONS An e-ERS provides an accessible venue for reporting medical errors, adverse events, and near misses. The wide variation in reporting rates among hospitals, and very low reporting rates by physicians, requires investigation. PMID:16390502

  18. The Promotion of Data Sharing in Pharmacoepidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Nayha

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the role of pharmacoepidemiology in patient safety and the crucial role of data sharing in ensuring that such activities occur. Against the backdrop of proposed reforms of European data protection legislation, it considers whether the current legislative landscape adequately facilitates this essential data sharing. It is argued that rather than maximising and promoting the benefits of such activities by facilitating data sharing, current and proposed legislative landscapes hamper these vital activities. The article posits that current and proposed data protection approaches to pharmacoepidemiology — and more broadly, re-uses of data — should be reoriented towards enabling these important safety enhancing activities. Two potential solutions are offered: 1) a dedicated working party on data reuse for health research and 2) the introduction of new, dedicated legislation. PMID:25065034

  19. Medication error in anaesthesia and critical care: A cause for concern

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Dilip; Gupta, Suman; Sharma, Chetan; Kothari, Saroj

    2010-01-01

    Medication error is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in medical profession, and anaesthesia and critical care are no exception to it. Man, medicine, machine and modus operandi are the main contributory factors to it. In this review, incidence, types, risk factors and preventive measures of the medication errors are discussed in detail. PMID:20885862

  20. 77 FR 4277 - Proposed Data Sharing Activity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Bureau of the Census Proposed Data Sharing Activity AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce... the Department of Commerce proposes to share business data for statistical purposes. More specifically, the Census Bureau will share selected business data of multi-location businesses with the U.S....

  1. Armenian Virtual Observatory: Services and Data Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazyan, A. V.; Astsatryan, H. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of this article is to introduce the data management and services of the Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO), which consists of user friendly data management mechanisms, a new and productive cross-correlation service, and data sharing API based on international standards and protocols.

  2. Searching for the Final Answer: Factors Contributing to Medication Administration Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Tess M.

    2001-01-01

    Causal factors contributing to errors in medication administration should be thoroughly investigated, focusing on systems rather than individual nurses. Unless systemic causes are addressed, many errors will go unreported for fear of reprisal. (Contains 42 references.) (SK)

  3. Data sharing by scientists: Practices and perceptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tenopir, C.; Allard, S.; Douglass, K.; Aydinoglu, A.U.; Wu, L.; Read, E.; Manoff, M.; Frame, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Scientific research in the 21st century is more data intensive and collaborative than in the past. It is important to study the data practices of researchers - data accessibility, discovery, re-use, preservation and, particularly, data sharing. Data sharing is a valuable part of the scientific method allowing for verification of results and extending research from prior results. Methodology/Principal Findings: A total of 1329 scientists participated in this survey exploring current data sharing practices and perceptions of the barriers and enablers of data sharing. Scientists do not make their data electronically available to others for various reasons, including insufficient time and lack of funding. Most respondents are satisfied with their current processes for the initial and short-term parts of the data or research lifecycle (collecting their research data; searching for, describing or cataloging, analyzing, and short-term storage of their data) but are not satisfied with long-term data preservation. Many organizations do not provide support to their researchers for data management both in the short- and long-term. If certain conditions are met (such as formal citation and sharing reprints) respondents agree they are willing to share their data. There are also significant differences and approaches in data management practices based on primary funding agency, subject discipline, age, work focus, and world region. Conclusions/Significance: Barriers to effective data sharing and preservation are deeply rooted in the practices and culture of the research process as well as the researchers themselves. New mandates for data management plans from NSF and other federal agencies and world-wide attention to the need to share and preserve data could lead to changes. Large scale programs, such as the NSF-sponsored DataNET (including projects like DataONE) will both bring attention and resources to the issue and make it easier for scientists to apply sound

  4. Data Sharing by Scientists: Practices and Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Tenopir, Carol; Allard, Suzie; Douglass, Kimberly; Aydinoglu, Arsev Umur; Wu, Lei; Read, Eleanor; Manoff, Maribeth; Frame, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientific research in the 21st century is more data intensive and collaborative than in the past. It is important to study the data practices of researchers – data accessibility, discovery, re-use, preservation and, particularly, data sharing. Data sharing is a valuable part of the scientific method allowing for verification of results and extending research from prior results. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 1329 scientists participated in this survey exploring current data sharing practices and perceptions of the barriers and enablers of data sharing. Scientists do not make their data electronically available to others for various reasons, including insufficient time and lack of funding. Most respondents are satisfied with their current processes for the initial and short-term parts of the data or research lifecycle (collecting their research data; searching for, describing or cataloging, analyzing, and short-term storage of their data) but are not satisfied with long-term data preservation. Many organizations do not provide support to their researchers for data management both in the short- and long-term. If certain conditions are met (such as formal citation and sharing reprints) respondents agree they are willing to share their data. There are also significant differences and approaches in data management practices based on primary funding agency, subject discipline, age, work focus, and world region. Conclusions/Significance Barriers to effective data sharing and preservation are deeply rooted in the practices and culture of the research process as well as the researchers themselves. New mandates for data management plans from NSF and other federal agencies and world-wide attention to the need to share and preserve data could lead to changes. Large scale programs, such as the NSF-sponsored DataNET (including projects like DataONE) will both bring attention and resources to the issue and make it easier for scientists to apply sound data

  5. The Importance of Medication Errors Reporting in Improving the Quality of Clinical Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Nesreen Mohamed Kamal; Ismail, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medication errors have significant implications on patient safety. Error detection through an active management and effective reporting system discloses medication errors and encourages safe practices. Objectives: To improve patient safety through determining and reducing the major causes of medication errors (MEs), after applying tailored preventive strategies. Methodology: A pre-test, post-test study was conducted on all inpatients at a 177 bed hospital where all medication procedures in each ward were monitored by a clinical pharmacist. The patient files were reviewed, as well. Error reports were submitted to a hospital multidisciplinary committee to identify major causes of errors. Accordingly, corrective interventions that consisted of targeted training programs for nurses and physicians were conducted. Results: Medication errors were higher during ordering/prescription stage (38.1%), followed by administration phase (20.9%). About 45% of errors reached the patients: 43.5% were harmless and 1.4% harmful. 7.7% were potential errors and more than 47% could be prevented. After the intervention, error rates decreased from (6.7%) to (3.6%) (P≤0.001). Conclusion: The role of a ward based clinical pharmacist with a hospital multidisciplinary committee was effective in recognizing, designing and implementing tailored interventions for reduction of medication errors. A systematic approach is urgently needed to decrease organizational susceptibility to errors, through providing required resources to monitor, analyze and implement effective interventions. PMID:27045415

  6. Being a Victim of Medical Error in Brazil: An (Un)Real Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Vitor Silva; Custódio, Eda Marconi

    2016-01-01

    Medical error stems from inadequate professional conduct that is capable of producing harm to life or exacerbating the health of another, whether through act or omission. This situation has become increasingly common in Brazil and worldwide. In this study, the aim was to understand what being the victim of medical error is like and to investigate the circumstances imposed on this condition of victims in Brazil. A semi-structured interview was conducted with twelve people who had gone through situations of medical error in their lives, creating a space for narratives of their experiences and deep reflection on the phenomenon. The concept of medical error has a negative connotation, often being associated with the incompetence of a medical professional. Medical error in Brazil is demonstrated by low-quality professional performance and represents the current reality of the country because of the common lack of respect and consideration for patients. Victims often remark on their loss of identity, as their social functions have been interrupted and they do not expect to regain such. It was found, however, little assumption of error in the involved doctors’ discourses and attitudes, which felt a need to judge the medical conduct in an attempt to assert their rights. Medical error in Brazil presents a punitive character and is little discussed in medical and scientific circles. The stigma of medical error is closely connected to the value and cultural judgments of the country, making it difficult to accept, both by victims and professionals. PMID:27403461

  7. Being a Victim of Medical Error in Brazil: An (Un)Real Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Vitor Silva; Custódio, Eda Marconi

    2016-06-23

    Medical error stems from inadequate professional conduct that is capable of producing harm to life or exacerbating the health of another, whether through act or omission. This situation has become increasingly common in Brazil and worldwide. In this study, the aim was to understand what being the victim of medical error is like and to investigate the circumstances imposed on this condition of victims in Brazil. A semi-structured interview was conducted with twelve people who had gone through situations of medical error in their lives, creating a space for narratives of their experiences and deep reflection on the phenomenon. The concept of medical error has a negative connotation, often being associated with the incompetence of a medical professional. Medical error in Brazil is demonstrated by low-quality professional performance and represents the current reality of the country because of the common lack of respect and consideration for patients. Victims often remark on their loss of identity, as their social functions have been interrupted and they do not expect to regain such. It was found, however, little assumption of error in the involved doctors' discourses and attitudes, which felt a need to judge the medical conduct in an attempt to assert their rights. Medical error in Brazil presents a punitive character and is little discussed in medical and scientific circles. The stigma of medical error is closely connected to the value and cultural judgments of the country, making it difficult to accept, both by victims and professionals. PMID:27403461

  8. Medication Errors in the Home: A Multisite Study of Children With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roblin, Douglas W.; Weingart, Saul N.; Houlahan, Kathleen E.; Degar, Barbara; Billett, Amy; Keuker, Christopher; Biggins, Colleen; Li, Justin; Wasilewski, Karen; Mazor, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As home medication use increases, medications previously managed by nurses are now managed by patients and their families. Our objective was to describe the types of errors occurring in the home medication management of children with cancer. METHODS: In a prospective observational study at 3 pediatric oncology clinics in the northeastern and southeastern United States, patients undergoing chemotherapy and their parents were recruited from November 2007 through April 2011. We reviewed medical records and checked prescription doses. A trained nurse visited the home, reviewed medication bottles, and observed administration. Two physicians independently made judgments regarding whether an error occurred and its severity. Overall rates of errors were weighted to account for clustering within sites. RESULTS: We reviewed 963 medications and observed 242 medication administrations in the homes of 92 patients. We found 72 medication errors. Four errors led to significant patient injury. An additional 40 errors had potential for injury: 2 were life-threatening, 13 were serious, and 25 were significant. Error rates varied between study sites (40–121 errors per 100 patients); the weighted overall rate was 70.2 errors per 100 patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 58.9–81.6). The weighted rate of errors with injury was 3.6 (95% CI: 1.7–5.5) per 100 patients and with potential to injure the patient was 36.3 (95% CI: 29.3–43.3) per 100 patients. Nonchemotherapy medications were more often involved in an error than chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Medication errors were common in this multisite study of outpatient pediatric cancer care. Rates of preventable medication-related injuries in this outpatient population were comparable or higher than those found in studies of hospitalized patients. PMID:23629608

  9. Medical errors in primary care clinics – a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient safety is vital in patient care. There is a lack of studies on medical errors in primary care settings. The aim of the study is to determine the extent of diagnostic inaccuracies and management errors in public funded primary care clinics. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in twelve public funded primary care clinics in Malaysia. A total of 1753 medical records were randomly selected in 12 primary care clinics in 2007 and were reviewed by trained family physicians for diagnostic, management and documentation errors, potential errors causing serious harm and likelihood of preventability of such errors. Results The majority of patient encounters (81%) were with medical assistants. Diagnostic errors were present in 3.6% (95% CI: 2.2, 5.0) of medical records and management errors in 53.2% (95% CI: 46.3, 60.2). For management errors, medication errors were present in 41.1% (95% CI: 35.8, 46.4) of records, investigation errors in 21.7% (95% CI: 16.5, 26.8) and decision making errors in 14.5% (95% CI: 10.8, 18.2). A total of 39.9% (95% CI: 33.1, 46.7) of these errors had the potential to cause serious harm. Problems of documentation including illegible handwriting were found in 98.0% (95% CI: 97.0, 99.1) of records. Nearly all errors (93.5%) detected were considered preventable. Conclusions The occurrence of medical errors was high in primary care clinics particularly with documentation and medication errors. Nearly all were preventable. Remedial intervention addressing completeness of documentation and prescriptions are likely to yield reduction of errors. PMID:23267547

  10. Incidence of medication errors in a Moroccan medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Medication errors (ME) are an important problem in all hospitalized populations, especially in intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of the study was to determine incidence, type and consequences of ME. Materials and methods Prospective observational cohort study during six weeks in a Moroccan ICU. Were included all patients admitted for > 24 hours. ME were collected by two reviewers following three methods: voluntary and verbally report by medical and paramedical staff, chart review and studying prescriptions and transcriptions. Seriousness of events was classified from Category A: circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause error, to Category I: patient's death. Results 63 patients were eligible with a total of 509 patient-days, and 4942 prescription. We found 492 ME, which incidence was 10 per 100 orders and 967 per 1000 patient-days. There were 113 potential Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) [2.28 per 100 orders and 222 per 1000 patient-days] and 8 ADEs [0.16 per 100 orders and 15.7 per 1000 patient-days]. MEs occurred in transcribing stage in 60%cases. Antibiotics were the drug category in 33%. Two ADEs conducted to death. Conclusion MEs are common in Moroccan medical ICU. These results suggest future targets of prevention strategies to reduce the rate of ME. PMID:21970430

  11. Noncompliance pattern due to medication errors at a Teaching Hospital in Srikot, India

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Heenopama; Thawani, Vijay; Raina, Rangeel Singh; Kothiyal, Gitanjali; Chakarabarty, Mrinmoy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the medication errors leading to noncompliance in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of a teaching institution from Srikot, Garhwal, Uttarakhand to analyze the medication errors in 500 indoor prescriptions from medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and ENT departments over five months and 100 outdoor patients of medicine department. Results: Medication error rate for indoor patients was found to be 22.4 % and 11.4% for outdoor patients as against the standard acceptable error rate 3%. Maximum errors were observed in the indoor prescriptions of the surgery department accounting for 44 errors followed by medicine 32 and gynecology 25 in the 500 cases studied leading to faulty administration of medicines. Conclusion: Many medication errors were noted which go against the practice of rational therapeutics. Such studies can be directed to usher in the rational use of medicines for increasing compliance and therapeutic benefits. PMID:23833376

  12. Toward a theoretical approach to medical error reporting system research and design.

    PubMed

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Escoto, Kamisha Hamilton; Beasley, John W; Holden, Richard J

    2006-05-01

    The release of the Institute of Medicine (Kohn et al., 2000) report "To Err is Human", brought attention to the problem of medical errors, which led to a concerted effort to study and design medical error reporting systems for the purpose of capturing and analyzing error data so that safety interventions could be designed. However, to make real gains in the efficacy of medical error or event reporting systems, it is necessary to begin developing a theory of reporting systems adoption and use and to understand how existing theories may play a role in explaining adoption and use. This paper presents the results of a 9-month study exploring the barriers and facilitators for the design of a statewide medical error reporting system and discusses how several existing theories of technology acceptance, adoption and implementation fit with many of the results. In addition we present an integrated theoretical model of medical error reporting system design and implementation. PMID:16182233

  13. Toward a theoretical approach to medical error reporting system research and design

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Escoto, Kamisha Hamilton; Beasley, John W.; Holden, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The release of the Institute of Medicine (Kohn et al., 2000) report “To Err is Human”, brought attention to the problem of medical errors, which led to a concerted effort to study and design medical error reporting systems for the purpose of capturing and analyzing error data so that safety interventions could be designed. However, to make real gains in the efficacy of medical error or event reporting systems, it is necessary to begin developing a theory of reporting systems adoption and use and to understand how existing theories may play a role in explaining adoption and use. This paper presents the results of a 9-month study exploring the barriers and facilitators for the design of a statewide medical error reporting system and discusses how several existing theories of technology acceptance, adoption and implementation fit with many of the results. In addition we present an integrated theoretical model of medical error reporting system design and implementation. PMID:16182233

  14. [Medical error--professional liability for malpractice in Bosnia and Herzegovina].

    PubMed

    Pranjić, Nurka

    2009-01-01

    Medical care is frequently compared to aviation, as many of the factors which lead to errors in both fields are similar. In this article we review the literature on such events and discuss the ethical, legal and practical aspects of civil liability in the case of medical error. Ethics, professional policy and the law, as well as the relevant empirical literature, suggest that timely and candid disclosure should be standard practice. In harmonization to ethical codex, the physician is obliged to inform the patient about the origin of medical error. Civil liability is one of the most important parts of law that regulates health care service. Medical chambers could be having a very important role in alternative methods of medical error disciplinary screening proceedings. Guidelines for disclosure of medical error to patients, and their families if necessary, are proposed. PMID:19769287

  15. Sleep Loss in Resident Physicians: The Cause of Medical Errors?

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Milton

    2010-01-01

    This review begins with the history of the events starting with the death of Libby Zion that lead to the Bell Commission, that the studied her death and made recommendations for improvement that were codified into law in New York state as the 405 law that the ACGME essentially adopted in putting a cap on work hours and establishing the level of staff supervision that must be available to residents in clinical situations particularly the emergency room and acute care units. A summary is then provided of the findings of the laboratory effects of total sleep deprivation including acute total sleep loss and the consequent widespread physiologic alterations, and of the effects of selective and chronic sleep loss. Generally the sequence of responses to increasing sleep loss goes from mood changes to cognitive effects to performance deficits. In the laboratory situation, deficits resulting from sleep deprivation are clearly and definitively demonstrable. Sleep loss in the clinical situation is usually sleep deprivation superimposed on chronic sleep loss. An examination of questionnaire studies, the literature on reports of sleep loss, studies of the reduction of work hours on performance as well as observational and a few interventional studies have yielded contradictory and often equivocal results. The residents generally find they feel better working fewer hours but improvements in patient care are often not reported or do not occur. A change in the attitude of the resident toward his role and his patient has not been salutary. Decreasing sleep loss should have had a positive effect on patient care in reducing medical error, but this remains to be unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:21188260

  16. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-10-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons' self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  17. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons’ self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  18. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  19. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  20. Characteristics of medication errors made by students during the administration phase: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson; Hicks, Rodney; Serembus, Joanne Farley

    2006-01-01

    Faculty concentrate on teaching nursing students about safe medication administration practices and on challenging them to develop skills for calculating drug dose and intravenous flow rate problems. In spite of these efforts, students make medication errors and little is known about the attributes of these errors. Therefore, this descriptive, retrospective, secondary analysis study examined the characteristics of medication errors made by nursing students during the administration phase of the medication use process as reported to the MEDMARX, a database operated by the United States Pharmacopeia through the Patient Safety Program. Fewer than 3% of 1,305 student-made medication errors occurring in the administration process resulted in patient harm. Most were omission errors, followed by errors of giving the wrong dose (amount) of a drug. The most prevalent cause of the errors was students' performance deficits, whereas inexperience and distractions were leading contributing factors. The antimicrobial therapeutic class of drugs and the 10 subcategories within this class were the most commonly reported medications involved. Insulin was the highest-frequency single medication reported. Overall, this study shows that students' administration errors may be more frequent than suspected. Faculty might consider curriculum revisions that incorporate medication use safety throughout each course in nursing major courses. PMID:16459288

  1. Development of an ontology to model medical errors, information needs, and the clinical communication space.

    PubMed Central

    Stetson, P. D.; McKnight, L. K.; Bakken, S.; Curran, C.; Kubose, T. T.; Cimino, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Medical errors are common, costly and often preventable. Work in understanding the proximal causes of medical errors demonstrates that systems failures predispose to adverse clinical events. Most of these systems failures are due to lack of appropriate information at the appropriate time during the course of clinical care. Problems with clinical communication are common proximal causes of medical errors. We have begun a project designed to measure the impact of wireless computing on medical errors. We report here on our efforts to develop an ontology representing the intersection of medical errors, information needs and the communication space. We will use this ontology to support the collection, storage and interpretation of project data. The ontology's formal representation of the concepts in this novel domain will help guide the rational deployment of our informatics interventions. A real-life scenario is evaluated using the ontology in order to demonstrate its utility. PMID:11825270

  2. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs) and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors) was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52%) of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p < 0.001) in nursing homes as in residential homes. The level of non-compliance with system alerts was very low in both settings (0.075% of administrations). The pre-study survey revealed that only 12

  3. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Nnaemeka G.; Doshi, Pratik B.; Miller, Sara K.; McCarthy, James J.; Hoot, Nathan R.; Darger, Bryan F.; Benitez, Roberto C.; Chathampally, Yashwant G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED) is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, user-friendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system. PMID:26759657

  4. The approach of Bayesian model indicates media awareness of medical errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K.; Arulchelvan, S.

    2016-06-01

    This research study brings out the factors behind the increase in medical malpractices in the Indian subcontinent in the present day environment and impacts of television media awareness towards it. Increased media reporting of medical malpractices and errors lead to hospitals taking corrective action and improve the quality of medical services that they provide. The model of Cultivation Theory can be used to measure the influence of media in creating awareness of medical errors. The patient's perceptions of various errors rendered by the medical industry from different parts of India were taken up for this study. Bayesian method was used for data analysis and it gives absolute values to indicate satisfaction of the recommended values. To find out the impact of maintaining medical records of a family online by the family doctor in reducing medical malpractices which creates the importance of service quality in medical industry through the ICT.

  5. Data sharing for public health research: A qualitative study of industry and academia.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Pamela A; Wilhelm, Erin E; Lee, Sinae; Merkhofer, Elizabeth; Shoulson, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is a key biomedical research theme for the 21st century. Biomedical data sharing is the exchange of data among (non)affiliated parties under mutually agreeable terms to promote scientific advancement and the development of safe and effective medical products. Wide sharing of research data is important for scientific discovery, medical product development, and public health. Data sharing enables improvements in development of medical products, more attention to rare diseases, and cost-efficiencies in biomedical research. We interviewed 11 participants about their attitudes and beliefs about data sharing. Using a qualitative, thematic analysis approach, our analysis revealed a number of themes including: experiences, approaches, perceived challenges, and opportunities for sharing data. PMID:26596125

  6. Obligation towards medical errors disclosure at a tertiary care hospital in Dubai, UAE

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmad; Rahman, Syed Azizur; Abou El-Enein, Nagwa Younes

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to identify healthcare providers’ obligation towards medical errors disclosure as well as to study the association between the severity of the medical error and the intention to disclose the error to the patients and their families. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was followed to identify the magnitude of disclosure among healthcare providers in different departments at a randomly selected tertiary care hospital in Dubai. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The total sample size accounted for 106 respondents. Data were collected using a questionnaire composed of two sections namely; demographic variables of the respondents and a section which included variables relevant to medical error disclosure. RESULTS: Statistical analysis yielded significant association between the obligation to disclose medical errors with male healthcare providers (X2 = 5.1), and being a physician (X2 = 19.3). Obligation towards medical errors disclosure was significantly associated with those healthcare providers who had not committed any medical errors during the past year (X2 = 9.8), and any type of medical error regardless the cause, extent of harm (X2 = 8.7). Variables included in the binary logistic regression model were; status (Exp β (Physician) = 0.39, 95% CI 0.16–0.97), gender (Exp β (Male) = 4.81, 95% CI 1.84–12.54), and medical errors during the last year (Exp β (None) = 2.11, 95% CI 0.6–2.3). CONCLUSION: Education and training of physicians about disclosure conversations needs to start as early as medical school. Like the training in other competencies required of physicians, education in communicating about medical errors could help reduce physicians’ apprehension and make them more comfortable with disclosure conversations. PMID:27567766

  7. Data Sharing & Publishing at Nature Publishing Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDecar, J. C.; Hrynaszkiewicz, I.; Hufton, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the research community has come to recognize that upon-request data sharing has important limitations1,2. The Nature-titled journals feel that researchers have a duty to share data without undue qualifications, in a manner that allows others to replicate and build upon their published findings. Historically, the Nature journals have been strong supporters of data deposition in communities with existing data mandates, and have required data sharing upon request in all other cases. To help address some of the limitations of upon-request data sharing, the Nature titles have strengthened their existing data policies and forged a new partnership with Scientific Data, to promote wider data sharing in discoverable, citeable and reusable forms, and to ensure that scientists get appropriate credit for sharing3. Scientific Data is a new peer-reviewed journal for descriptions of research datasets, which works with a wide of range of public data repositories4. Articles at Scientific Data may either expand on research publications at other journals or may be used to publish new datasets. The Nature Publishing Group has also signed the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles5, and Scientific Data is our first journal to include formal data citations. We are currently in the process of adding data citation support to our various journals. 1 Wicherts, J. M., Borsboom, D., Kats, J. & Molenaar, D. The poor availability of psychological research data for reanalysis. Am. Psychol. 61, 726-728, doi:10.1037/0003-066x.61.7.726 (2006). 2 Vines, T. H. et al. Mandated data archiving greatly improves access to research data. FASEB J. 27, 1304-1308, doi:10.1096/fj.12-218164 (2013). 3 Data-access practices strengthened. Nature 515, 312, doi:10.1038/515312a (2014). 4 More bang for your byte. Sci. Data 1, 140010, doi:10.1038/sdata.2014.10 (2014). 5 Data Citation Synthesis Group: Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles. (FORCE11, San Diego, CA, 2014).

  8. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD: associations with behavioural variability and post-error adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Allen, Elena A.; Eichele, Heike; van Wageningen, Heidi; Høvik, Marie Farstad; Sørensen, Lin; Worren, Marius Kalsås; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined the blood-oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods We acquired functional MRI data during a Flanker task in medication-naive children with ADHD and healthy controls aged 8–12 years and analyzed the data using independent component analysis. For components corresponding to performance monitoring networks, we compared activations across groups and conditions and correlated them with reaction times (RT). Additionally, we analyzed post-error adaptations in behaviour and motor component activations. Results We included 25 children with ADHD and 29 controls in our analysis. Children with ADHD displayed reduced activation to errors in cingulo-opercular regions and higher RT variability, but no differences of interference control. Larger BOLD amplitude to error trials significantly predicted reduced RT variability across all participants. Neither group showed evidence of post-error response slowing; however, post-error adaptation in motor networks was significantly reduced in children with ADHD. This adaptation was inversely related to activation of the right-lateralized ventral attention network (VAN) on error trials and to task-driven connectivity between the cingulo-opercular system and the VAN. Limitations Our study was limited by the modest sample size and imperfect matching across groups. Conclusion Our findings show a deficit in cingulo-opercular activation in children with ADHD that could relate to reduced signalling for errors. Moreover, the reduced orienting of the VAN signal may mediate deficient post-error motor adaptions. Pinpointing general performance monitoring problems to specific brain regions and operations in error processing may help to guide the targets of future treatments for ADHD. PMID:26441332

  9. [Medication errors: importance of notification in the management of patient safety].

    PubMed

    Bohomol, Elena; Ramos, Laís Helena

    2007-01-01

    Notifying medication errors is an important instrument in managing assistance quality and safety for the patient. The objective of this study was to verify with the nursing team their understanding that a medication error had been committed, and to observe how they notified responsible physicians of the event. To achieve this, researchers used a descriptive/exploratory survey with 89 professionals. The results demonstrate a lack of uniformity in understanding that medication errors had been committed, when these errors must be communicated to a physician, and when an event report must be filled out. The research shows the necessity to develop educational programs that shed light on exactly what constitutes a medication error, clarifying causes of the problem and providing solutions to solve it. PMID:17477164

  10. Database Design to Ensure Anonymous Study of Medical Errors: A Report from the ASIPS collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Wilson D.; Staton, Elizabeth W.; Higgins, Gregory S.; Main, Deborah S.; West, David R.; Harris, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    Medical error reporting systems are important information sources for designing strategies to improve the safety of health care. Applied Strategies for Improving Patient Safety (ASIPS) is a multi-institutional, practice-based research project that collects and analyzes data on primary care medical errors and develops interventions to reduce error. The voluntary ASIPS Patient Safety Reporting System captures anonymous and confidential reports of medical errors. Confidential reports, which are quickly de-identified, provide better detail than do anonymous reports; however, concerns exist about the confidentiality of those reports should the database be subject to legal discovery or other security breaches. Standard database elements, for example, serial ID numbers, date/time stamps, and backups, could enable an outsider to link an ASIPS report to a specific medical error. The authors present the design and implementation of a database and administrative system that reduce this risk, facilitate research, and maintain near anonymity of the events, practices, and clinicians. PMID:12925548

  11. Frequency, Types, and Potential Clinical Significance of Medication-Dispensing Errors

    PubMed Central

    Bohand, Xavier; Simon, Laurent; Perrier, Eric; Mullot, Hélène; Lefeuvre, Leslie; Plotton, Christian

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Many dispensing errors occur in the hospital, and these can endanger patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the rate of dispensing errors by a unit dose drug dispensing system, to categorize the most frequent types of errors, and to evaluate their potential clinical significance. METHODS: A prospective study using a direct observation method to detect medication-dispensing errors was used. From March 2007 to April 2007, “errors detected by pharmacists” and “errors detected by nurses” were recorded under six categories: unauthorized drug, incorrect form of drug, improper dose, omission, incorrect time, and deteriorated drug errors. The potential clinical significance of the “errors detected by nurses” was evaluated. RESULTS: Among the 734 filled medication cassettes, 179 errors were detected corresponding to a total of 7249 correctly fulfilled and omitted unit doses. An overall error rate of 2.5% was found. Errors detected by pharmacists and nurses represented 155 (86.6%) and 24 (13.4%) of the 179 errors, respectively. The most frequent types of errors were improper dose (n = 57, 31.8%) and omission (n = 54, 30.2%). Nearly 45% of the 24 errors detected by nurses had the potential to cause a significant (n = 7, 29.2%) or serious (n = 4, 16.6%) adverse drug event. CONCLUSIONS: Even if none of the errors reached the patients in this study, a 2.5% error rate indicates the need for improving the unit dose drug-dispensing system. Furthermore, it is almost certain that this study failed to detect some medication errors, further arguing for strategies to prevent their recurrence. PMID:19142545

  12. Use of Electronic Medication Administration Records to Reduce Perceived Stress and Risk of Medication Errors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Alenius, Malin; Graf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Concerns have been raised about the effects of current medication administration processes on the safety of many of the aspects of medication administration. Keeping electronic medication administration records could decrease many of these problems. Unfortunately, there has not been much research on this topic, especially in nursing homes. A prospective case-control survey was consequently performed at two nursing homes; the electronic record system was introduced in one, whereas the other continued to use paper records. The personnel were asked to fill in a questionnaire of their perceptions of stress and risk of medication errors at baseline (n = 66) and 20 weeks after the intervention group had started recording medication administration electronically (n = 59). There were statistically significant decreases in the perceived risk of omitting a medication, of medication errors occurring because of communication problems, and of medication errors occurring because of inaccurate medication administration records in the intervention group (all P < .01 vs the control group). The perceived overall daily stress levels were also reduced in the intervention group (P < .05). These results indicate that the utilization of electronic medication administration records will reduce many of the concerns regarding the medication administration process. PMID:27270628

  13. Medication prescribing errors and associated factors at the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication error is common and preventable cause of medical errors and occurs as a result of either human error or a system flaw. The consequences of such errors are more harmful and frequent among pediatric patients. Objective To assess medication prescribing errors and associated factors in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital from February 17 to March 17, 2012. Data on the prescribed drugs were collected from patient charts and prescription papers among all patients who were admitted during the study period. Descriptive statistics was used to determine frequency, prevalence, means, and standard deviations. The relationship between dependent and independent variables were computed using logistic regression (with significance declared at p-value of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval). Results Out of the 384 Medication order s identified during the study, a total of 223 prescribing errors were identified. This corresponds to an overall medication prescribing error rate of 58.07%. Incomplete prescriptions and dosing errors were the two most common types of prescribing errors. Antibiotics (54.26%) were the most common classes of drugs subjected to prescribing error. Day of the week and route of administration were factors significantly associated with increased prescribing error. Conclusions Medication prescribing errors are common in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital. Improving quick access to up to date reference materials, providing regular refresher trainings and possibly including a clinical pharmacist in the healthcare team are recommended. PMID:24826198

  14. Turning the tide on medical errors in intensive care units: a human factors approach.

    PubMed

    Rogerson, William T; Tremethick, Mary Jane

    2004-01-01

    Errors occur in all nursing settings. The current healthcare climate tends to focus on individuals as the cause of errors rather than addressing issues that may be inherently wrong with the healthcare system that predisposes the individual to make errors. Human factors engineering (HFE), which is focused on removing human factors as much as possible from errors, has the potential to greatly impact medical errors in intensive care units. Applied in other high-risk industries, HFE has been critical in understanding and preventing errors at a systems level. Knowledge concerning the role systems play in errors and improvements to medical systems using HFE is intended to empower nurses to be advocates for systems change, resulting in a safer work environment and a safer healthcare delivery system. PMID:15273483

  15. Eleven-year descriptive analysis of closed court verdicts on medical errors in Spain and Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Priscila; Sato, Luke; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Comas, Mercè; Dwyer, Kathy; Sala, Maria; Castells, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and compare the characteristics of court verdicts on medical errors allegedly harming patients in Spain and Massachusetts from 2002 to 2012. Design, setting and participants We reviewed 1041 closed court verdicts obtained from data on litigation in the Thomson Reuters Aranzadi Westlaw databases in Spain (Europe), and 370 closed court verdicts obtained from the Controlled Risk and Risk Management Foundation of Harvard Medical Institutions (CRICO/RMF) in Massachusetts (USA). We included closed court verdicts on medical errors. The definition of medical errors was based on that of the Institute of Medicine (USA). We excluded any agreements between parties before a judgement. Results Medical errors were involved in 25.9% of court verdicts in Spain and in 74% of those in Massachusetts. The most frequent cause of medical errors was a diagnosis-related problem (25.1%; 95% CI 20.7% to 31.1% in Spain; 35%; 95% CI 29.4% to 40.7% in Massachusetts). The proportion of medical errors classified as high severity was 34% higher in Spain than in Massachusetts (p=0.001). The most frequent factors contributing to medical errors in Spain were surgical and medical treatment (p=0.001). In Spain, 98.5% of medical errors resulted in compensation awards compared with only 6.9% in Massachusetts. Conclusions This study reveals wide differences in litigation rates and the award of indemnity payments in Spain and Massachusetts; however, common features of both locations are the high rates of diagnosis-related problems and the long time interval until resolution. PMID:27577585

  16. INTRAVENOUS MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION ERRORS AND THEIR CAUSES IN CARDIAC CRITICAL CARE UNITS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Esmaeili, Ravanbakhsh; Tajari, Mojdeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The dangerous events caused by medication errors are one of the main challenges faced in critical care units. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of intravenous medication administration errors and their causes in cardiac critical care units in Iran. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was conducted in the critical care units (CCUs and cardiac surgery intensive care units) of 12 teaching hospitals. Of the total of 240 nurses working in these departments, 190 participated in the present study. The data collection tools used in this study included the “nurses’ demographic data questionnaire”, the “patients’ medical and demographic data questionnaire” and the “nurses’ self-reporting questionnaire about the frequency of intravenous medication administration errors and their causes”. The data obtained were analyzed in SPSS-20 using descriptive statistics such as the absolute and relative frequency. Findings: During the 2 months in which this study was being conducted, 2542 patients were admitted to these departments and 20240 doses of intravenous medications were administered to these patients. The nurses reported 262 intravenous medication administration errors. The most common intravenous medication error pertained to administering the wrong medication (n=71 and 27.1%). As for the causes of intravenous medication administration errors, 51.5% of the errors were associated with work conditions, 24% with packaging, 13.4% with communication, 9.9% with transcription and 1.2% with pharmacies. Discussion and Conclusion: According to the results, strategies are recommended to be adopted for reducing or limiting medication errors, such as building a stronger pharmacology knowledge base in nurses and nursing students, improving work conditions and improving communication between the nurses and physicians. PMID:26889108

  17. Use of a clinical event monitor to prevent and detect medication errors.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, T. H.; Savarino, J.; Marshall, R.; Hoey, C. T.

    2000-01-01

    Errors in health care facilities are common and often unrecognized. We have used our clinical event monitor to prevent and detect medication errors by scrutinizing electronic messages sent to it when any medication order is written in our facility. A growing collection of medication safety rules covering dose limit errors, laboratory monitoring, and other topics may be applied to each medication order message to provide an additional layer of protection beyond existing order checks, reminders, and alerts available within our computer-based record system. During a typical day the event monitor receives 4802 messages, of which 4719 pertain to medication orders. We have found the clinical event monitor to be a valuable tool for clinicians and quality management groups charged with improving medication safety. PMID:11079962

  18. The effectiveness of risk management program on pediatric nurses’ medication error

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Bayat, Fariba; Salehi, Tahmineh; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medication therapy is one of the most complex and high-risk clinical processes that nurses deal with. Medication error is the most common type of error that brings about damage and death to patients, especially pediatric ones. However, these errors are preventable. Identifying and preventing undesirable events leading to medication errors are the main risk management activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a risk management program on the pediatric nurses’ medication error rate. Materials and Methods: This study is a quasi-experimental one with a comparison group. In this study, 200 nurses were recruited from two main pediatric hospitals in Tehran. In the experimental hospital, we applied the risk management program for a period of 6 months. Nurses of the control hospital did the hospital routine schedule. A pre- and post-test was performed to measure the frequency of the medication error events. SPSS software, t-test, and regression analysis were used for data analysis. Results: After the intervention, the medication error rate of nurses at the experimental hospital was significantly lower (P < 0.001) and the error-reporting rate was higher (P < 0.007) compared to before the intervention and also in comparison to the nurses of the control hospital. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study and taking into account the high-risk nature of the medical environment, applying the quality-control programs such as risk management can effectively prevent the occurrence of the hospital undesirable events. Nursing mangers can reduce the medication error rate by applying risk management programs. However, this program cannot succeed without nurses’ cooperation. PMID:24403939

  19. Database Maintenance, Data Sharing Policy, Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Papale, D.; Agarwal, D. A; Baldocchi, D. D.; Cook, Robert B; Fisher, J. B.; van Ingen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific questions of today are now more global than ever before. The answers to these questions are buried within multiple disciplines and across a diverse range of scientists and institutions. The expanse and complexity of data required by researchers often exceed the means of a single scientist. Data sharing in the form of its distributed collection and analysis is increasingly common. Collective research now takes place in what may be called 'collaboratories' or in 'centers without walls' (Clery 2006). Creating effective artifacts, which enable scientists to collaborate on data analyses, continues to be a significant challenge for today's science activities. It is rare that providing a file system abstraction on distributed data enables acceleration of scientific discoveries. By explicitly identifying and addressing the different requirements for data contributors, data curators, and data consumers, we can create a data management architecture which enables the creation of datasets that evolve over time with growing and changing data, data annotations, participants, and use rules. This involves also a crucial contribution by the teams and people collecting the data, that in addition to carefully acquire and process the measurements and to be ready to share their measurements within the scientific community, need to follow general rules that help to make their data well documented and safely stored and to maximize visibility to their works and sites. In this chapter, we provide examples of the types of functions and capabilities typically provided within the data management systems, focusing in particular on databases structures and characteristics, data practices, and data user services. Finally, the importance and advantages of collective efforts like data sharing for synthesis activities and the relative data policy options are discussed and analyzed.

  20. Justifying a pediatric critical-care satellite pharmacy by medication-error reporting.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, J E

    1986-02-01

    As a part of an evaluation of the need for a satellite pharmacy to serve two pediatric critical-care units, an observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of medication errors in the units. A pharmacist observed nurses preparing and administering medications in 18 12-hour shifts. Of the nine shifts observed in each unit, five were day shifts and four were night shifts. Five nurses were observed per shift in the intensive-care nursery (ICN) and three nurses per shift in the pediatric intensive-care unit (PICU). The classification of errors was based on the definitions established by the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. The total error rate was 17.4% in the ICN and 38.0% in the PICU. When the error rates were calculated excluding wrong-time errors, they were 7.1% in the ICN and 11.7% in the PICU. Of 147 errors, 124 (84.4%) occurred with medications with a high potential for serious consequences. The error rates were similar on the day and night shifts in the PICU (42.1% and 31.3%, respectively), but they were significantly higher on the day shifts than the night shifts in the ICN (24.5% and 8.4%, respectively). The number of medication errors in the two units was substantial, and steps were taken to implement a 24-hour pediatric critical-care satellite pharmacy with unit dose drug distribution to reduce the incidence of errors. PMID:3953597

  1. Perspective of midwives working at hospitals affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences regarding medical errors

    PubMed Central

    Valiani, Mahboubeh; Majidi, Jamileh; Beigi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Committing an error is part of the human nature. No health care provider, despite the mastery of their skills, is immune from committing it. Medical error in the labor and obstetrics wards as well as other health units is inevitable and reduces the quality of health care, leading to accident. Sometimes these events, like the death of mother, fetus, and newborn, would be beyond repair. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspective of gynecological ward providers about medical errors. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive–analytical study. Sample size was 94 participants selected using census sampling. The study population included all midwives of four hospitals (Al-Zahra, Beheshti, Isa Ben Maryam, and Amin). Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: This study shows that three factors (human, structural, and managerial) have affected medical errors in the labor and obstetrics wards. From the midwifery perspective, human factors were the most important factors with an average score of 73.26% and the lowest score was related to structural factors with an average score of 65.36%. Intervention strategies to reduce errors, service training program tailored to the needs of the service provider, distribution of the tasks at different levels, and attempts to reform the system instead of punishing the wrongdoer were set in priority list. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study on the perspectives of participants, among the three factors of medical errors (human factors, structural factors, and management factors), human factors are the biggest threat in committing medical errors. Modification in the pattern of teaching by the midwifery professors and their presence in the hospitals, creating a no-blame culture, and sharing of alerts in medical errors are among appropriate actions in the dimensions of human, structural, and managerial factors. PMID:26457089

  2. Indication-based prescribing prevents wrong-patient medication errors in computerized provider order entry (CPOE)

    PubMed Central

    Galanter, William; Falck, Suzanne; Burns, Matthew; Laragh, Marci; Lambert, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether indication-based computer order entry alerts intercept wrong-patient medication errors. Materials and methods At an academic medical center serving inpatients and outpatients, we developed and implemented a clinical decision support system to prompt clinicians for indications when certain medications were ordered without an appropriately coded indication on the problem list. Among all the alerts that fired, we identified every instance when a medication order was started but not completed and, within a fixed time interval, the same prescriber placed an order for the same medication for a different patient. We closely reviewed each of these instances to determine whether they were likely to have been intercepted errors. Results Over a 6-year period 127 320 alerts fired, which resulted in 32 intercepted wrong-patient errors, an interception rate of 0.25 per 1000 alerts. Neither the location of the prescriber nor the type of prescriber affected the interception rate. No intercepted errors were for patients with the same last name, but in 59% of the intercepted errors the prescriber had both patients’ charts open when the first order was initiated. Discussion Indication alerts linked to the problem list have previously been shown to improve problem list completion. This analysis demonstrates another benefit, the interception of wrong-patient medication errors. Conclusions Indication-based alerts yielded a wrong-patient medication error interception rate of 0.25 per 1000 alerts. These alerts could be implemented independently or in combination with other strategies to decrease wrong-patient medication errors. PMID:23396543

  3. Description of medication errors detected at a drug information centre in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Luciana; Winkler, Natália; Dos Santos, Marlise A.; Martinbiancho, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify and describe actual or potential medication errors related to drug information inquiries made by staff members of a teaching hospital to a Drug Information Centre from January 2012 to December 2013. Methods: Data were collected from the records of inquiries made by health care professionals to the Drug Information Centre throughout this period. Results: During the study period, the Drug Information Centre received 3,500 inquiries. Of these, 114 inquiries had medication errors. Most errors were related to prescribing, preparation, and administration and were classified according to severity as category B (57%) (potential errors) and categories C (26.3%) and D (15.8%) (actual errors that did not result in harm to the patient). Error causes included overdose (13.2%), wrong route of administration (11.4%), inadequate drug storage (11.4%), and wrong dosage form (8.8%). The drugs most frequently involved in errors were vitamin K (4.4%), vancomycin (3.5%), and meropenem (3.5%). Conclusion: In this study, it was not possible to measure the reduction in error rate involving medication use because of the lack of previous data on this process in the institution. However, our findings indicate that the Drug Information Centre may be used as a strategy to seek improvements in processes involving medication use. PMID:25883691

  4. Medication errors in the intensive care unit: literature review using the SEIPS model.

    PubMed

    Frith, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors in intensive care units put patients at risk for injury or death every day. Safety requires an organized and systematic approach to improving the tasks, technology, environment, and organizational culture associated with medication systems. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model can help leaders and health care providers understand the complicated and high-risk work associated with critical care. Using this model, the author combines a human factors approach with the well-known structure-process-outcome model of quality improvement to examine research literature. The literature review reveals that human factors, including stress, high workloads, knowledge deficits, and performance deficits, are associated with medication errors. Factors contributing to medication errors are frequent interruptions, communication problems, and poor fit of health information technology to the workflow of providers. Multifaceted medication safety interventions are needed so that human factors and system problems can be addressed simultaneously. PMID:24153217

  5. Indication Alerts Intercept Drug Name Confusion Errors during Computerized Entry of Medication Orders

    PubMed Central

    Galanter, William L.; Bryson, Michelle L.; Falck, Suzanne; Rosenfield, Rachel; Laragh, Marci; Shrestha, Neeha; Schiff, Gordon D.; Lambert, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Confusion between similar drug names is a common cause of potentially harmful medication errors. Interventions to prevent these errors at the point of prescribing have had limited success. The purpose of this study is to measure whether indication alerts at the time of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) can intercept drug name confusion errors. Methods and Findings A retrospective observational study of alerts provided to prescribers in a public, tertiary hospital and ambulatory practice with medication orders placed using CPOE. Consecutive patients seen from April 2006 through February 2012 were eligible if a clinician received an indication alert during ordering. A total of 54,499 unique patients were included. The computerized decision support system prompted prescribers to enter indications when certain medications were ordered without a coded indication in the electronic problem list. Alerts required prescribers either to ignore them by clicking OK, to place a problem in the problem list, or to cancel the order. Main outcome was the proportion of indication alerts resulting in the interception of drug name confusion errors. Error interception was determined using an algorithm to identify instances in which an alert triggered, the initial medication order was not completed, and the same prescriber ordered a similar-sounding medication on the same patient within 5 minutes. Similarity was defined using standard text similarity measures. Two clinicians performed chart review of all cases to determine whether the first, non-completed medication order had a documented or non-documented, plausible indication for use. If either reviewer found a plausible indication, the case was not considered an error. We analyzed 127,458 alerts and identified 176 intercepted drug name confusion errors, an interception rate of 0.14±.01%. Conclusions Indication alerts intercepted 1.4 drug name confusion errors per 1000 alerts. Institutions with CPOE should consider

  6. Developing Incentives for Data Sharing in Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    In recent decades, ecological scientists’ capacity for generating data has increased at an exponential rate. The need to organize data in ways useful for problem solving has similarly accelerated in the face of global challenges such as climate change, widespread species extinctions, and declines in biodiversity. In light of these trends, virtually every field of ecology would benefit from more comprehensive and systematic documentation and publication of metadata, combined with general availability of data through online sources. Both organizations and individual scientists need to take action to meet these needs. In response, the Ecological Society of America (ESA) has led a series of NSF-sponsored workshops to help scientists find common ground on how to make data more readily discoverable and accessible in their own disciplines. The most recent of these focused in the development of incentives for data sharing, both at the individual and organizational level. This presentation will summarize the workshop recommendations, with a focus on preservation, curation, and access to data; access to analytical and visualization tools; and the need to make data archiving simple and routine. The roles of funders and publishers of research are also key and will be highlighted.

  7. Social Media, Education and Data Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Walker, R. J.; Masters, A.

    2011-12-01

    Social media is a blending of technology and social interactions which allows for the creation and exchange of user-generated content. Social media started as conversations between groups of people, now companies are using social media to communicate with customers and politicians use it to communicate with their constituents. Social media is now finding uses in the science communities. This adoption is driven by the expectation of students that technology will be an integral part of their research and that it will match the technology they use in their social lifes. Students are using social media to keep informed and collaborate with others. They have also replaced notepads with smart mobile devices. We have been introducing social media components into Virtual Observatories as a way to quickly access and exchange information with a tap or a click. We discuss the use of Quick Response (QR) codes, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), unique identifiers, Twitter, Facebook and tiny URL redirects as ways to enable easier sharing of data and information. We also discuss what services and features are needed in a Virtual Observatory to make data sharing with social media possible.

  8. The effect of a safe zone on nurse interruptions, distractions, and medication administration errors.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mindy; Schadewald, Diane; Dietrich, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a health care priority. Yet medical errors are ranked the eighth leading cause of death. Medication administration errors (MAEs) often result from multiple environmental and individual factors. This quality improvement initiative adapted a protocol based on airline industry safety measures to decrease nurse distractions and interruptions during medication administration, with the goal of decreasing MAEs. Sources of distractions, interruptions, and MAEs were measured pre and post intervention. Patient satisfaction scores were measured concurrently. Results of this initiative differ from previous studies in which similar interventions reduced both distractions and MAEs. An unexpected finding was dramatically increased patient satisfaction. PMID:25723837

  9. Errors of oral medication administration in a patient with enteral feeding tube.

    PubMed

    Emami, Shahram; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Mashayekhi, Simin; Asgharian, Parina

    2012-07-01

    Enteral feeding tube is employed for feeding of critically ill patients who are unable to eat. In the cases of oral medication administration to enterally fed patients, some potential errors could happen. We report a 53-year-old man who was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of a teaching hospital due to the post-CPR hypoxemic encephalopathy. The patient was intubated and underwent mechanical ventilation. A nasogastric (NG) tube was used as the enteral route for nutrition and administration of oral medications. Oral medications were crushed then dissolved in tap water and were given to the patient through NG tube. In present article we report several medication errors occurred during enterally drug administration, including errors in dosage form selection, methods of oral medication administration and drug interactions and incompatibility with nutrition formula. These errors could reduce the effects of drugs and lead to unsuccessful treatment of patient and also could increase the risk of potential adverse drug reactions. Potential leading causes of these errors include lack of drug knowledge among physicians, inadequate training of nurses and lack of pharmacists participation in medical settings. PMID:24991587

  10. A simple tool for neuroimaging data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Haselgrove, Christian; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kennedy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming increasingly common, but despite encouragement and facilitation by funding agencies, journals, and some research efforts, most neuroimaging data acquired today is still not shared due to political, financial, social, and technical barriers to sharing data that remain. In particular, technical solutions are few for researchers that are not a part of larger efforts with dedicated sharing infrastructures, and social barriers such as the time commitment required to share can keep data from becoming publicly available. We present a system for sharing neuroimaging data, designed to be simple to use and to provide benefit to the data provider. The system consists of a server at the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) and user tools for uploading data to the server. The primary design principle for the user tools is ease of use: the user identifies a directory containing Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data, provides their INCF Portal authentication, and provides identifiers for the subject and imaging session. The user tool anonymizes the data and sends it to the server. The server then runs quality control routines on the data, and the data and the quality control reports are made public. The user retains control of the data and may change the sharing policy as they need. The result is that in a few minutes of the user’s time, DICOM data can be anonymized and made publicly available, and an initial quality control assessment can be performed on the data. The system is currently functional, and user tools and access to the public image database are available at http://xnat.incf.org/. PMID:24904398

  11. Designing an Algorithm to Preserve Privacy for Medical Record Linkage With Error-Prone Data

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Doyel; Chen, Tingting; Khethavath, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Linking medical records across different medical service providers is important to the enhancement of health care quality and public health surveillance. In records linkage, protecting the patients’ privacy is a primary requirement. In real-world health care databases, records may well contain errors due to various reasons such as typos. Linking the error-prone data and preserving data privacy at the same time are very difficult. Existing privacy preserving solutions for this problem are only restricted to textual data. Objective To enable different medical service providers to link their error-prone data in a private way, our aim was to provide a holistic solution by designing and developing a medical record linkage system for medical service providers. Methods To initiate a record linkage, one provider selects one of its collaborators in the Connection Management Module, chooses some attributes of the database to be matched, and establishes the connection with the collaborator after the negotiation. In the Data Matching Module, for error-free data, our solution offered two different choices for cryptographic schemes. For error-prone numerical data, we proposed a newly designed privacy preserving linking algorithm named the Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm, that allows the error-prone data to be correctly matched if the distance between the two records is below a threshold. Results We designed and developed a comprehensive and user-friendly software system that provides privacy preserving record linkage functions for medical service providers, which meets the regulation of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It does not require a third party and it is secure in that neither entity can learn the records in the other’s database. Moreover, our novel Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm implemented in this software can work well with error-prone numerical data. We theoretically proved the correctness and security of our Error

  12. Estimated Cost Savings from Reducing Errors in the Preparation of Sterile Doses of Medications

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Preventing intravenous (IV) preparation errors will improve patient safety and reduce costs by an unknown amount. Objective: To estimate the financial benefit of robotic preparation of sterile medication doses compared to traditional manual preparation techniques. Methods: A probability pathway model based on published rates of errors in the preparation of sterile doses of medications was developed. Literature reports of adverse events were used to project the array of medical outcomes that might result from these errors. These parameters were used as inputs to a customized simulation model that generated a distribution of possible outcomes, their probability, and associated costs. Results: By varying the important parameters across ranges found in published studies, the simulation model produced a range of outcomes for all likely possibilities. Thus it provided a reliable projection of the errors avoided and the cost savings of an automated sterile preparation technology. The average of 1,000 simulations resulted in the prevention of 5,420 medication errors and associated savings of $288,350 per year. The simulation results can be narrowed to specific scenarios by fixing model parameters that are known and allowing the unknown parameters to range across values found in previously published studies. Conclusions: The use of a robotic device can reduce health care costs by preventing errors that can cause adverse drug events. PMID:25477598

  13. The use of failure mode effect and criticality analysis in a medication error subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Williams, E; Talley, R

    1994-04-01

    Failure Mode Effect and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) is the systematic assessment of a process or product that enables one to determine the location and mechanism of potential failures. It has been used by engineers, particularly in the aerospace industry, to identify and prioritize potential failures during product development when there is a lack of data but an abundance of expertise. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has recommended its use in analyzing the medication administration process in hospitals and in drug product development in the pharamceutical industry. A medication error subcommittee adopted and modified FMECA to identify and prioritize significant failure modes in its specific medication administration process. Based on this analysis, the subcommittee implemented solutions to four of the five highest ranked failure modes. FMECA provided a method for a multidisciplinary group to address the most important medication error concerns based upon the expertise of the group members. It also facilitated consensus building in a group with varied perceptions. PMID:10133462

  14. Reducing medication errors and increasing patient safety: case studies in clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David M

    2003-07-01

    Today, reducing medication errors and improving patient safety have become common topics of discussion for the president of the United States, federal and state legislators, the insurance industry, pharmaceutical companies, health care professionals, and patients. But this is not news to clinical pharmacologists. Improving the judicious use of medications and minimizing adverse drug reactions have always been key areas of research and study for those working in clinical pharmacology. However, added to the older terms of adverse drug reactions and rational therapeutics, the now politically correct expression of medication error has emerged. Focusing on the word error has drawn attention to "prevention" and what can be done to minimize mistakes and improve patient safety. Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary has several definitions of error, but the one that seems to be most appropriate in the context of medication errors is "an act that through ingnorance, deficiency, or accident departs from or fails to achieve what should be done." What should be done is generally known as "the five rights": the right drug, right dose, right route, right time, and right patient. One can make an error of omission (failure to act correctly) or an error of commission (acted incorrectly). This article now summarizes what is currently known about medication errors and translates the information into case studies illustrating common scenarios leading to medication errors. Each case is analyzed to provide insight into how the medication error could have been prevented. "System errors" are described, and the application of failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) is presented to determine the part of the "safety net" that failed. Examples of reengineering the system to make it more "error proof" are presented. An error can be prevented. However, the practice of medicine, pharmacy, and nursing in the hospital setting is very complicated, and so many steps occur from "pen to patient" that there

  15. A method for the prevention of high-risk medication errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allgeyer, Dean

    2007-02-01

    A device and process for preventing medical errors due to the improper administration of an intravenously delivered medication includes the spectroscopic analysis of intravenous fluid components. An emission source and detector are placed adjacent to the intravenous tubing of an administration set to generate signals for spectroscopic analysis. The signals are processed to identify the medication and, in certain embodiments of the invention, can determine the medication's concentration. In a preferred embodiment, the emission source, detector, and hardware and software for the spectroscopic analysis are placed in an infusion pump.

  16. Female residents experiencing medical errors in general internal medicine: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doctors, especially doctors-in-training such as residents, make errors. They have to face the consequences even though today’s approach to errors emphasizes systemic factors. Doctors’ individual characteristics play a role in how medical errors are experienced and dealt with. The role of gender has previously been examined in a few quantitative studies that have yielded conflicting results. In the present study, we sought to qualitatively explore the experience of female residents with respect to medical errors. In particular, we explored the coping mechanisms displayed after an error. This study took place in the internal medicine department of a Swiss university hospital. Methods Within a phenomenological framework, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight female residents in general internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and thereafter analyzed. Results Seven main themes emerged from the interviews: (1) A perception that there is an insufficient culture of safety and error; (2) The perceived main causes of errors, which included fatigue, work overload, inadequate level of competences in relation to assigned tasks, and dysfunctional communication; (3) Negative feelings in response to errors, which included different forms of psychological distress; (4) Variable attitudes of the hierarchy toward residents involved in an error; (5) Talking about the error, as the core coping mechanism; (6) Defensive and constructive attitudes toward one’s own errors; and (7) Gender-specific experiences in relation to errors. Such experiences consisted in (a) perceptions that male residents were more confident and therefore less affected by errors than their female counterparts and (b) perceptions that sexist attitudes among male supervisors can occur and worsen an already painful experience. Conclusions This study offers an in-depth account of how female residents specifically experience and cope with medical errors. Our

  17. Simple prescribing errors and allergy documentation in medical hospital admissions in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Barton, Lorna; Futtermenger, Judith; Gaddi, Yash; Kang, Angela; Rivers, Jon; Spriggs, David; Jenkins, Paul F; Thompson, Campbell H; Thomas, Josephine S

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to quantify and compare the prevalence of simple prescribing errors made by clinicians in the first 24 hours of a general medical patient's hospital admission. Four public or private acute care hospitals across Australia and New Zealand each audited 200 patients' drug charts. Patient demographics, pharmacist review and pre-defined prescribing errors were recorded. At least one simple error was present on the medication charts of 672/715 patients, with a linear relationship between the number of medications prescribed and the number of errors (r = 0.571, p < 0.001). The four sites differed significantly in the prevalence of different types of simple prescribing errors. Pharmacists were more likely to review patients aged > or = 75 years (39.9% vs 26.0%; p < 0.001) and those with more than 10 drug prescriptions (39.4% vs 25.7%; p < 0.001). Patients reviewed by a pharmacist were less likely to have inadequate documentation of allergies (13.5% vs 29.4%, p < 0.001). Simple prescribing errors are common, although their nature differs from site to site. Clinical pharmacists target patients with the most complex health situations, and their involvement leads to improved documentation. PMID:22586784

  18. Medication errors in family practice, in hospitals and after discharge from the hospital: an ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Thousands of medical errors are occurring daily in physician's offices, in hospitals, and even upon discharge from the hospital, leading to unnecessary injury and death and costing billions of dollars. We have a systems approach that has been proven to be tried and true in aviation, nuclear energy and many other industrial settings. Being honest when medical mistakes occur, reporting them to national clearing house, objectively searching for root causes, avoiding the fixing of arbitrary blame, and then, where possible, implementing safeguards to minimize the occurrence of future mistakes, is the best way to enhance patient safety. But until the medical establishment takes medical errors and patient safety more seriously, and until the general public rises up in protest, it is up to the state and federal governments to take the lead in protecting the lives of innocent Americans by creating a public policy. PMID:15301199

  19. Preventing medication errors in hospitals through a systems approach and technological innovation: a prescription for 2010.

    PubMed

    Crane, Jacquelyn; Crane, Frederick G

    2006-01-01

    Medication errors in hospital settings are considered both widespread and costly to the American healthcare system; yet, it is tractable to available solutions. This article offers a novel prescription for the problem that could be implemented by 2010. It consists of a systems approach--failure mode effects analysis (FMEA)--in combination with emerging technologies, such as a decision support system (DDS) with integrated real-time medical informatics, electronic medical records (EMR), computer physician order entry (CPOE), bar coding, automated dispensing machines (ADM), and robotics. Cost and benefit analysis reveals that this proposed integrated solution will radically reduce medication errors in hospitals and save the lives of thousands of Americans who frequent such facilities on an annual basis, as well as reduce healthcare costs. PMID:17131715

  20. Medication errors: an analysis comparing PHICO's closed claims data and PHICO's Event Reporting Trending System (PERTS).

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David M; Pendrak, Robert F

    2003-07-01

    Clinical pharmacologists are all dedicated to improving the use of medications and decreasing medication errors and adverse drug reactions. However, quality improvement requires that some significant parameters of quality be categorized, measured, and tracked to provide benchmarks to which future data (performance) can be compared. One of the best ways to accumulate data on medication errors and adverse drug reactions is to look at medical malpractice data compiled by the insurance industry. Using data from PHICO insurance company, PHICO's Closed Claims Data, and PHICO's Event Reporting Trending System (PERTS), this article examines the significance and trends of the claims and events reported between 1996 and 1998. Those who misread history are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past. From a quality improvement perspective, the categorization of the claims and events is useful for reengineering integrated medication delivery, particularly in a hospital setting, and for redesigning drug administration protocols on low therapeutic index medications and "high-risk" drugs. Demonstrable evidence of quality improvement is being required by state laws and by accreditation agencies. The state of Florida requires that quality improvement data be posted quarterly on the Web sites of the health care facilities. Other states have followed suit. The insurance industry is concerned with costs, and medication errors cost money. Even excluding costs of litigation, an adverse drug reaction may cost up to $2500 in hospital resources, and a preventable medication error may cost almost $4700. To monitor costs and assess risk, insurance companies want to know what errors are made and where the system has broken down, permitting the error to occur. Recording and evaluating reliable data on adverse drug events is the first step in improving the quality of pharmacotherapy and increasing patient safety. Cost savings and quality improvement evolve on parallel paths. The PHICO data

  1. Translating Research Into Practice: Voluntary Reporting of Medication Errors in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine J.; Cochran, Gary; Hicks, Rodney W.; Mueller, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    Context:Low service volume, insufficient information technology, and limited human resources are barriers to learning about and correcting system failures in small rural hospitals. This paper describes the implementation of and initial findings from a voluntary medication error reporting program developed by the Nebraska Center for Rural Health…

  2. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  3. Designing a national combined reporting form for adverse drug reactions and medication errors.

    PubMed

    Tanti, A; Serracino-Inglott, A; Borg, J J

    2015-04-01

    The Maltese Medicines Authority was tasked with developing a reporting form that captures high-quality case information on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors in order to fulfil its public-health obligations set by the European Union (EU) legislation on pharmacovigilance. This paper describes the process of introducing the first combined ADR/medication error reporting form in the EU for health-care professionals, the analysis of reports generated by it and the promotion of the system. A review of existing ADR forms was carried out and recommendations from the European Medicines Agency and World Health Organization audits integrated. A new, combined ADR/medication error reporting form was developed and pilot tested based on case studies. The Authority's quality system (ISO 9001 certified) was redesigned and a promotion strategy was deployed. The process used in Malta can be useful for countries that need to develop systems relative to ADR/medication error reporting and to improve the quality of data capture within their systems. PMID:26077519

  4. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part X: Other Technology to Reduce Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Harolds, Laura B

    2016-05-01

    There are many devices, as well as computer programs, that have the potential to reduce medication errors. In the prior article, computer provider order entry linked to electronic clinical decision support was discussed. The current article discusses bar coding, automated dispensing cabinets, and smart intravenous infusion pumps. PMID:26914567

  5. 75 FR 18514 - Developing Guidance on Naming, Labeling, and Packaging Practices to Reduce Medication Errors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Developing Guidance on Naming, Labeling, and Packaging Practices to Reduce Medication Errors.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to initiate constructive dialogue and information sharing among regulators, researchers, the pharmaceutical industry, health care organizations, health care professionals, and......

  6. Perceptions and Practices of Data Sharing in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johri, Aditya; Yang, Seungwon; Vorvoreanu, Mihaela; Madhavan, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    As part of our NSF funded collaborative project on Data Sharing within Engineering Education Community, we conducted an empirical study to better understand the current climate of data sharing and participants' future expectations of the field. We present findings of this mixed method study and discuss implications. Overall, we found strong…

  7. Transforming Education Research through Open Video Data Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Rick O.; Adolph, Karen E.; Millman, David S.; Gordon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Open data sharing promises to accelerate the pace of discovery in the developmental and learning sciences, but significant technical, policy, and cultural barriers have limited its adoption. As a result, most research on learning and development remains shrouded in a culture of isolation. Data sharing is the rare exception (Gilmore, 2016). Many…

  8. DPSynthesizer: Differentially Private Data Synthesizer for Privacy Preserving Data Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Xiong, Li; Zhang, Lifan; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2015-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently emerged in private statistical data release as one of the strongest privacy guarantees. Releasing synthetic data that mimic original data with Differential privacy provides a promising way for privacy preserving data sharing and analytics while providing a rigorous privacy guarantee. However, to this date there is no open-source tools that allow users to generate differentially private synthetic data, in particular, for high dimensional and large domain data. Most of the existing techniques that generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data only work well for single dimensional or low-dimensional histograms. They become problematic for high dimensional and large domain data due to increased perturbation error and computation complexity. We propose DPSynthesizer, a toolkit for differentially private data synthesization. The core of DPSynthesizer is DPCopula designed for high-dimensional and large-domain data. DPCopula computes a differentially private copula function from which synthetic data can be sampled. Copula functions are used to describe the dependence between multivariate random vectors and allow us to build the multivariate joint distribution using one-dimensional marginal distributions. DPSynthesizer also implements a set of state-of-the-art methods for building differentially private histograms, suitable for low-dimensional data, from which synthetic data can be generated. We will demonstrate the system using DPCopula as well as other methods with various data sets and show the feasibility, utility, and efficiency of various methods. PMID:26167358

  9. Information partnerships--shared data, shared scale.

    PubMed

    Konsynski, B R; McFarlan, F W

    1990-01-01

    How can one company gain access to another's resources or customers without merging ownership, management, or plotting a takeover? The answer is found in new information partnerships, enabling diverse companies to develop strategic coalitions through the sharing of data. The key to cooperation is a quantum improvement in the hardware and software supporting relational databases: new computer speeds, cheaper mass-storage devices, the proliferation of fiber-optic networks, and networking architectures. Information partnerships mean that companies can distribute the technological and financial exposure that comes with huge investments. For the customer's part, partnerships inevitably lead to greater simplification on the desktop and more common standards around which vendors have to compete. The most common types of partnership are: joint marketing partnerships, such as American Airline's award of frequent flyer miles to customers who use Citibank's credit card; intraindustry partnerships, such as the insurance value-added network service (which links insurance and casualty companies to independent agents); customer-supplier partnerships, such as Baxter Healthcare's electronic channel to hospitals for medical and other equipment; and IT vendor-driven partnerships, exemplified by ESAB (a European welding supplies and equipment company), whose expansion strategy was premised on a technology platform offered by an IT vendor. Partnerships that succeed have shared vision at the top, reciprocal skills in information technology, concrete plans for an early success, persistence in the development of usable information for all partners, coordination on business policy, and a new and imaginative business architecture. PMID:10107083

  10. Recent Literature on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Naples, Jennifer G; Hanlon, Joseph T; Schmader, Kenneth E; Semla, Todd P

    2016-02-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are common in older adults, but locating literature addressing these issues is often challenging. The objective of this article is to summarize recent studies addressing medication errors and adverse drug events in a single location to improve accessibility for individuals working with older adults. A comprehensive literature search for studies published in 2014 was conducted, and 51 potential articles were identified. After critical review, 17 studies were selected for inclusion based on innovation; rigorous observational or experimental study designs; and use of reliable, valid measures. Four articles characterizing potentially inappropriate prescribing and interventions to optimize medication regimens were annotated and critiqued in detail. The authors hope that health policy-makers and clinicians find this information helpful in improving the quality of care for older adults. PMID:26804210

  11. Recent Literature on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Hanlon, Joseph T.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Semla, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are common in older adults, but locating literature addressing these issues is often challenging. The objective of this article was to summarize recent studies addressing medication errors and adverse drug events in a single location to improve accessibility for individuals working with older adults. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search for studies published in 2014 and identified 51 potential articles. After critical review, 17 studies were selected for inclusion based on innovation, rigorous observational or experimental study designs, and use of reliable, valid measures. Four articles characterizing potentially inappropriate prescribing and interventions to optimize medication regimens were annotated and critiqued in detail. We hope that health policy makers and clinicians find this information helpful in improving the quality of care for older adults. PMID:26804210

  12. Modern Palliative Radiation Treatment: Do Complexity and Workload Contribute to Medical Errors?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Neil; Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario ; Holden, Lori; Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario ; Robson, Sheila; Mah, Kathy; Di Prospero, Lisa; Wong, C. Shun; Chow, Edward; Spayne, Jacqueline; Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether treatment workload and complexity associated with palliative radiation therapy contribute to medical errors. Methods and Materials: In the setting of a large academic health sciences center, patient scheduling and record and verification systems were used to identify patients starting radiation therapy. All records of radiation treatment courses delivered during a 3-month period were retrieved and divided into radical and palliative intent. 'Same day consultation, planning and treatment' was used as a proxy for workload and 'previous treatment' and 'multiple sites' as surrogates for complexity. In addition, all planning and treatment discrepancies (errors and 'near-misses') recorded during the same time frame were reviewed and analyzed. Results: There were 365 new patients treated with 485 courses of palliative radiation therapy. Of those patients, 128 (35%) were same-day consultation, simulation, and treatment patients; 166 (45%) patients had previous treatment; and 94 (26%) patients had treatment to multiple sites. Four near-misses and 4 errors occurred during the audit period, giving an error per course rate of 0.82%. In comparison, there were 10 near-misses and 5 errors associated with 1100 courses of radical treatment during the audit period. This translated into an error rate of 0.45% per course. An association was found between workload and complexity and increased palliative therapy error rates. Conclusions: Increased complexity and workload may have an impact on palliative radiation treatment discrepancies. This information may help guide the necessary recommendations for process improvement for patients who require palliative radiation therapy.

  13. Selected Medication Safety Risks to Manage in 2016-Part II; Methylergonovine Errors in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2016-06-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:27354742

  14. [Medico-legal opinionating in cases of medical errors in declaration of death].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Drozd, Radosław

    2007-01-01

    Declaration of death is a diagnosis and it has legal consequences. While declaring death, there is a possibility of committing a medical error. The majority of irregularities in declaring an individual dead occur in emergency situations. When a physician declares death, he is released from the professional obligation of saving the individual's life. The studies were based on the results of medico-legal evaluations in criminal cases in medical errors. In case death is erroneously declared, we may face a situation of squandering the chance of saving the life of a human being. Exposure to loss of life or to severe detriment to health are possible charges here, along with failure to offer medical assistance, although a deliberate character of the offence according to article 162 of the Polish penal code renders such a legal qualification dubious in case of medical errors. In both cases verification is needed whether an interest protected by law was still in existence, i.e. whether the individual was still alive when the physician incorrectly declared him dead. PMID:18432142

  15. Developing and implementing an institute-wide data sharing policy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has a strong reputation for prepublication data sharing as a result of its policy of rapid release of genome sequence data and particularly through its contribution to the Human Genome Project. The practicalities of broad data sharing remain largely uncharted, especially to cover the wide range of data types currently produced by genomic studies and to adequately address ethical issues. This paper describes the processes and challenges involved in implementing a data sharing policy on an institute-wide scale. This includes questions of governance, practical aspects of applying principles to diverse experimental contexts, building enabling systems and infrastructure, incentives and collaborative issues. PMID:21955348

  16. An Empirically Derived Taxonomy of Factors Affecting Physicians' Willingness to Disclose Medical Errors

    PubMed Central

    Kaldjian, Lauris C; Jones, Elizabeth W; Rosenthal, Gary E; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Hillis, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physician disclosure of medical errors to institutions, patients, and colleagues is important for patient safety, patient care, and professional education. However, the variables that may facilitate or impede disclosure are diverse and lack conceptual organization. OBJECTIVE To develop an empirically derived, comprehensive taxonomy of factors that affects voluntary disclosure of errors by physicians. DESIGN A mixed-methods study using qualitative data collection (structured literature search and exploratory focus groups), quantitative data transformation (sorting and hierarchical cluster analysis), and validation procedures (confirmatory focus groups and expert review). RESULTS Full-text review of 316 articles identified 91 impeding or facilitating factors affecting physicians' willingness to disclose errors. Exploratory focus groups identified an additional 27 factors. Sorting and hierarchical cluster analysis organized factors into 8 domains. Confirmatory focus groups and expert review relocated 6 factors, removed 2 factors, and modified 4 domain names. The final taxonomy contained 4 domains of facilitating factors (responsibility to patient, responsibility to self, responsibility to profession, responsibility to community), and 4 domains of impeding factors (attitudinal barriers, uncertainties, helplessness, fears and anxieties). CONCLUSIONS A taxonomy of facilitating and impeding factors provides a conceptual framework for a complex field of variables that affects physicians' willingness to disclose errors to institutions, patients, and colleagues. This taxonomy can be used to guide the design of studies to measure the impact of different factors on disclosure, to assist in the design of error-reporting systems, and to inform educational interventions to promote the disclosure of errors to patients. PMID:16918739

  17. Using Simulation to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Identify Medication Errors Involving the Top 100 Prescription Medications

    PubMed Central

    Awdishu, Linda; Namba, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate first-year pharmacy students’ ability to identify medication errors involving the top 100 prescription medications. Design. In the first quarter of a 3-quarter pharmacy self-care course, a didactic lecture on the most common prescribing and dispensing prescription errors was presented to first-year pharmacy students (P1) in preparation for a prescription review simulation done individually and as a group. In the following quarter, they were given a formal prescription review workshop before a second simulation involving individual and group review of a different set of prescriptions. Students were evaluated based on the number of correctly checked prescriptions and a self-assessment of their confidence in reviewing prescriptions. Assessment. All 63 P1 students completed the prescription review simulations. The individual scores did not significantly change, but group scores improved from 79 (16.2%) in the fall quarter to 98.6 (4.7%) in the winter quarter. Students perceived improvement of their prescription checking skills, specifically in their ability to fill a prescription on their own, identify prescribing and dispensing errors, and perform pharmaceutical calculations. Conclusion. A prescription review module consisting of a didactic lecture, workshop and simulation-based methods to teach prescription analysis was successful at improving first year pharmacy students’ knowledge, confidence, and application of these skills. PMID:27402989

  18. Using Simulation to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Ability to Identify Medication Errors Involving the Top 100 Prescription Medications.

    PubMed

    Atayee, Rabia S; Awdishu, Linda; Namba, Jennifer

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To evaluate first-year pharmacy students' ability to identify medication errors involving the top 100 prescription medications. Design. In the first quarter of a 3-quarter pharmacy self-care course, a didactic lecture on the most common prescribing and dispensing prescription errors was presented to first-year pharmacy students (P1) in preparation for a prescription review simulation done individually and as a group. In the following quarter, they were given a formal prescription review workshop before a second simulation involving individual and group review of a different set of prescriptions. Students were evaluated based on the number of correctly checked prescriptions and a self-assessment of their confidence in reviewing prescriptions. Assessment. All 63 P1 students completed the prescription review simulations. The individual scores did not significantly change, but group scores improved from 79 (16.2%) in the fall quarter to 98.6 (4.7%) in the winter quarter. Students perceived improvement of their prescription checking skills, specifically in their ability to fill a prescription on their own, identify prescribing and dispensing errors, and perform pharmaceutical calculations. Conclusion. A prescription review module consisting of a didactic lecture, workshop and simulation-based methods to teach prescription analysis was successful at improving first year pharmacy students' knowledge, confidence, and application of these skills. PMID:27402989

  19. Risk factors for medication errors in the electronic and manual prescription 1

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Cris Renata Grou; de Melo, Eveline Maria Magalhães; de Aguiar, Lucas Barbosa; Pinho, Diana Lúcia Moura; Stival, Marina Morato

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare electronic and manual prescriptions of a public hospital of Brasilia, identifying risk factors for the occurrence of medication errors. Method: descriptive-exploratory, comparative and retrospective study. Data collection occurred from July 2012 to January 2013, using an instrument for the review of the information contained in medical records related to the medication process. A total of 190 manual and 199 electronic records composed the sample, with 2027 prescriptions each. Results: compared to the manual prescription, a significant reduction was observed in the risk factors after implantation of the electronic prescription, in items such as "lack of the form of dilution" (71.1% to 22.3%) and "prescription with brand name" (99.5% to 31.5%). Conversely, the risk factors "no check" and "lack of CRM of the prescriber" increased. The lack of the allergy registration and the occurrences related to medication were the same for both groups. Conclusion: generally, the use of the electronic prescription system was associated with a significant reduction in risk factors for medication errors, concerning the following aspects: illegibility, prescription with brand name and presence of essential items that provide a safe and effective prescription. PMID:27508913

  20. Data sharing in international transboundary contexts: The Vietnamese perspective on data sharing in the Lower Mekong Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu, Hang Ngo; Wehn, Uta

    2016-05-01

    Transboundary data sharing is widely recognised as a necessary element in the successful handling of water-related climate change issues, as it is a means towards integrated water resources management (IWRM). However, in practice it is often a challenge to achieve it. The Mekong River Commission (MRC), an inter-governmental agency established by Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam, has adopted IWRM in its water strategy plan in order to properly manage the transboundary waters of the Mekong River. In this context, data sharing procedures were institutionalised and have been officially implemented by the four member countries since 2001. This paper uses a systematic approach to identify the extent of data sharing and the factors influencing the willingness of key individuals in the Vietnam National Mekong Committee and its Primary Custodians to share data. We find that the initial objectives of the Procedures for Data and Information Exchange and Sharing (PDIES) have not been fully achieved and, further, that Vietnam has much to gain and little to lose by engaging in data sharing in the MRC context. The primary motivation for data sharing stems from the desire to protect national benefits and to prevent upstream countries from overexploiting the shared water resources. However, data sharing is hindered by a lack of national regulations in the Vietnam context concerning data sharing between state agencies and outdated information management systems.

  1. [Legal and medico-legal assessment of medical errors in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Rorat, Marta; Drozd, Radosław

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the doctrine of criminal law and the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in search of a starting point for the legal protection of human life and health. In cases of medical errors in obstetrics concerning a fetus, an act of a perpetrator can be classified as manslaughter or exposure to direct danger of loss of life or great bodily injury depending on whether the fetus is recognized as "a human being". The authors criticize the doctrinal criteria of the beginning of legal protection: spatial, physiological, obstetric, and developmental, pointing to the possibilities of decriminalization of medical errors of omission. A solution to this situation is the presented evolution of the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. It moves towards establishing the beginning of legal and criminal protection of life and health at the "moment of emergence of objective grounds to necessitate delivery". PMID:22715678

  2. Improving end of life care: an information systems approach to reducing medical errors.

    PubMed

    Tamang, S; Kopec, D; Shagas, G; Levy, K

    2005-01-01

    Chronic and terminally ill patients are disproportionately affected by medical errors. In addition, the elderly suffer more preventable adverse events than younger patients. Targeting system wide "error-reducing" reforms to vulnerable populations can significantly reduce the incidence and prevalence of human error in medical practice. Recent developments in health informatics, particularly the application of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques such as data mining, neural networks, and case-based reasoning (CBR), presents tremendous opportunities for mitigating error in disease diagnosis and patient management. Additionally, the ubiquity of the Internet creates the possibility of an almost ideal network for the dissemination of medical information. We explore the capacity and limitations of web-based palliative information systems (IS) to transform the delivery of care, streamline processes and improve the efficiency and appropriateness of medical treatment. As a result, medical error(s) that occur with patients dealing with severe, chronic illness and the frail elderly can be reduced.The palliative model grew out of the need for pain relief and comfort measures for patients diagnosed with cancer. Applied definitions of palliative care extend this convention, but there is no widely accepted definition. This research will discuss the development life cycle of two palliative information systems: the CONFER QOLP management information system (MIS), currently used by a community-based palliative care program in Brooklyn, New York, and the CAREN case-based reasoning prototype. CONFER is a web platform based on the idea of "eCare". CONFER uses XML (extensible mark-up language), a W3C-endorced standard mark up to define systems data. The second system, CAREN, is a CBR prototype designed for palliative care patients in the cancer trajectory. CBR is a technique, which tries to exploit the similarities of two situations and match decision-making to the best

  3. Data sharing policy design for consortia: challenges for sustainability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The field of human genomics has led advances in the sharing of data with a view to facilitating translation of research into innovations for human health. This change in scientific practice has been implemented through new policy developed by many principal investigators, project managers and funders, which has ultimately led to new forms of practice and innovative governance models for data sharing. Here, we examine the development of the governance of data sharing in genomics, and explore some of the key challenges associated with the design and implementation of these policies. We examine how the incremental nature of policy design, the perennial problem of consent, the gridlock caused by multiple and overlapping access systems, the administrative burden and the problems with incentives and acknowledgment all have an impact on the potential for data sharing to be maximized. We conclude by proposing ways in which the scientific community can address these problems, to improve the sustainability of data sharing into the future. PMID:24475754

  4. The disclosure of unanticipated outcomes of care and medical errors: what does this mean for anesthesiologists?

    PubMed

    Souter, Karen J; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2012-03-01

    The disclosure of unanticipated outcomes to patients, including medical errors, has received considerable attention of late. The discipline of anesthesiology is a leader in patient safety, and as the doctrine of full disclosure gains momentum, anesthesiologists must become acquainted with these philosophies and practices. Effective disclosure can improve doctor-patient relations, facilitate better understanding of systems, and potentially decrease medical malpractice costs. However, many physicians remain wary of discussing errors with patients due to concern about litigation, the communication challenges of disclosure, and loss of self-esteem. As a result, harmful errors are often not disclosed to patients. Disclosure poses special challenges for anesthesiologists. There is often very limited time before the anesthetic in which to build the patient-physician relationship, and anesthesiologists usually function within complex health care teams. Other team members such as the surgeon may have different perspectives on what the patient should be told about operating room errors. The anesthesiologist may still be physically caring for the patient while the surgeon has the initial discussion with the family about the event. As a result the anesthesiologist may be excluded from the planning or conduct of the important initial disclosure conversations. New disclosure strategies are needed to engage anesthesiologists as active participants in the disclosure of unanticipated outcomes. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the emerging best practices surrounding disclosure, as well as the training opportunities and disclosure support resources that are increasingly available. Innovative models should be developed that promote collaboration between all perioperative team members in the disclosure process. There are important opportunities for anesthesiologists to play a leading role in defining specialty-specific disclosure practices and to more effectively meet patients

  5. How to minimize perceptual error and maximize expertise in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundel, Harold L.

    2007-03-01

    Visual perception is such an intimate part of human experience that we assume that it is entirely accurate. Yet, perception accounts for about half of the errors made by radiologists using adequate imaging technology. The true incidence of errors that directly affect patient well being is not known but it is probably at the lower end of the reported values of 3 to 25%. Errors in screening for lung and breast cancer are somewhat better characterized than errors in routine diagnosis. About 25% of cancers actually recorded on the images are missed and cancer is falsely reported in about 5% of normal people. Radiologists must strive to decrease error not only because of the potential impact on patient care but also because substantial variation among observers undermines confidence in the reliability of imaging diagnosis. Observer variation also has a major impact on technology evaluation because the variation between observers is frequently greater than the difference in the technologies being evaluated. This has become particularly important in the evaluation of computer aided diagnosis (CAD). Understanding the basic principles that govern the perception of medical images can provide a rational basis for making recommendations for minimizing perceptual error. It is convenient to organize thinking about perceptual error into five steps. 1) The initial acquisition of the image by the eye-brain (contrast and detail perception). 2) The organization of the retinal image into logical components to produce a literal perception (bottom-up, global, holistic). 3) Conversion of the literal perception into a preferred perception by resolving ambiguities in the literal perception (top-down, simulation, synthesis). 4) Selective visual scanning to acquire details that update the preferred perception. 5) Apply decision criteria to the preferred perception. The five steps are illustrated with examples from radiology with suggestions for minimizing error. The role of perceptual

  6. [In the aftermath of medical error: caring for patients, family, and the healthcare workers involved].

    PubMed

    Schwappach, David L B

    2015-01-01

    Medical errors, in particular those resulting in harm, pose a serious situation for patients ("first victims") and the healthcare workers involved ("second victims") and can have long-lasting and distressing consequences. To prevent a second traumatization, appropriate and empathic interaction with all persons involved is essential besides error analysis. Patients share a nearly universal, broad preference for a complete disclosure of incidents, regardless of age, gender, or education. This includes the personal, timely and unambiguous disclosure of the adverse event, information relating to the event, its causes and consequences, and an apology and sincere expression of regret. While the majority of healthcare professionals generally support and honest and open disclosure of adverse events, they also face various barriers which impede the disclosure (e.g., fear of legal consequences). Despite its essential importance, disclosure of adverse events in practice occurs in ways that are rarely acceptable to patients and their families. The staff involved often experiences acute distress and an intense emotional response to the event, which may become chronic and increase the risk of depression, burnout and post-traumatic stress disorders. Communication with peers is vital for people to be able to cope constructively and protectively with harmful errors. Survey studies among healthcare workers show, however, that they often do not receive sufficient individual and institutional support. Healthcare organizations should prepare for medical errors and harmful events and implement a communication plan and a support system that covers the requirements and different needs of patients and the staff involved. PMID:25410745

  7. Privacy Risks from Genomic Data-Sharing Beacons

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    The human genetics community needs robust protocols that enable secure sharing of genomic data from participants in genetic research. Beacons are web servers that answer allele-presence queries—such as “Do you have a genome that has a specific nucleotide (e.g., A) at a specific genomic position (e.g., position 11,272 on chromosome 1)?”—with either “yes” or “no.” Here, we show that individuals in a beacon are susceptible to re-identification even if the only data shared include presence or absence information about alleles in a beacon. Specifically, we propose a likelihood-ratio test of whether a given individual is present in a given genetic beacon. Our test is not dependent on allele frequencies and is the most powerful test for a specified false-positive rate. Through simulations, we showed that in a beacon with 1,000 individuals, re-identification is possible with just 5,000 queries. Relatives can also be identified in the beacon. Re-identification is possible even in the presence of sequencing errors and variant-calling differences. In a beacon constructed with 65 European individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrated that it is possible to detect membership in the beacon with just 250 SNPs. With just 1,000 SNP queries, we were able to detect the presence of an individual genome from the Personal Genome Project in an existing beacon. Our results show that beacons can disclose membership and implied phenotypic information about participants and do not protect privacy a priori. We discuss risk mitigation through policies and standards such as not allowing anonymous pings of genetic beacons and requiring minimum beacon sizes. PMID:26522470

  8. Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca; Carruthers, Sam; Gardner, Peter; Wright, John; McEachan, Rosie R C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this article was to identify the latent failures that are perceived to underpin medication errors. Study Setting The study was conducted within three medical wards in a hospital in the United Kingdom. Study Design The study employed a cross-sectional qualitative design. Data Collection Methods Interviews were conducted with 12 nurses and eight managers. Interviews were transcribed and subject to thematic content analysis. A two-step inter-rater comparison tested the reliability of the themes. Principal Findings Ten latent failures were identified based on the analysis of the interviews. These were ward climate, local working environment, workload, human resources, team communication, routine procedures, bed management, written policies and procedures, supervision and leadership, and training. The discussion focuses on ward climate, the most prevalent theme, which is conceptualized here as interacting with failures in the nine other organizational structures and processes. Conclusions This study is the first of its kind to identify the latent failures perceived to underpin medication errors in a systematic way. The findings can be used as a platform for researchers to test the impact of organization-level patient safety interventions and to design proactive error management tools and incident reporting systems in hospitals. PMID:22375850

  9. The Relationship Between Nursing Experience and Education and the Occurrence of Reported Pediatric Medication Administration Errors.

    PubMed

    Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the most common incidents in the hospitals. They can be harmful, and they are even more detrimental for pediatric patients. This study explored the relationship between nursing experience, education, the frequency and severity of reported pediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs). The data for this study were collected from a larger pan Canadian study. A survey tool was developed to collect self-reported data from nurses. In addition to descriptive statistics, a Poisson regression or a multiple linear regression was completed to address the research questions, and a Boneferrai correction was conducted to adjust for the small sample size. Results demonstrated that on units with more nurses with a higher level of current experience, more PMAEs were reported (p=.001), however; the PMAEs reported by these nurses were not as severe (p=.003). Implications to advance both safe medication delivery in the pediatric setting and safe culture of reporting for both actual and potential errors are identified. PMID:26872514

  10. [Second victims of medical errors: a systematic review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Panella, Massimiliano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Vanhaecht, Kris; Donnarumma, Chiara; Tozzi, Quinto; Di Stanislao, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    "Second victims" are health care providers who remain traumatized and suffer at the psycho-physical level after being involved in a patient adverse event. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to: a) estimate the prevalence of second victims among healthcare workers, b) describe personal and work outcomes of second victims, c) identify coping strategies used by second victims to face their problems, and d) describe current support strategies. Findings reveal that the prevalence of "second victims" of medical errors is high, ranging in four studies from 10.4% to 43.3%. Medical errors have a negative impact on healthcare providers involved, leading to physical, cognitive and behavioural symptoms including the practice of defensive medicine. Managers of health organizations need to be aware of the "second victim" phenomenon and ensure adequate support is given to healthcare providers involved. The best strategy seems to be the creation of networks of support at both the individual and organizational levels. More research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of support structures for second victims and to quantify the extent of the practice of defensive medicine following medical error. PMID:24770362

  11. Medication errors in an internal intensive care unit of a large teaching hospital: a direct observation study.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Delfani, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Medication errors account for about 78% of serious medical errors in intensive care unit (ICU). So far no study has been performed in Iran to evaluate all type of possible medication errors in ICU. Therefore the objective of this study was to reveal the frequency, type and consequences of all type of errors in an ICU of a large teaching hospital. The prospective observational study was conducted in an 11 bed internal ICU of a university hospital in Shiraz. In each shift all processes that were performed on one selected patient was observed and recorded by a trained pharmacist. Observer would intervene only if medication error would cause substantial harm. The data was evaluated and then were entered in a form that was designed for this purpose. The study continued for 38 shifts. During this period, a total of 442 errors per 5785 opportunities for errors (7.6%) occurred. Of those, there were 9.8% administration errors, 6.8% prescribing errors, 3.3% transcription errors and, 2.3% dispensing errors. Totally 45 interventions were made, 40% of interventions result in the correction of errors. The most common causes of errors were observed to be: rule violations, slip and memory lapses and lack of drug knowledge. According to our results, the rate of errors is alarming and requires implementation of a serious solution. Since our system lacks a well-organize detection and reporting mechanism, there is no means for preventing errors in the first place. Hence, as the first step we must implement a system where errors are routinely detected and reported. PMID:22837122

  12. Medical errors--is total quality management for the battlefield desirable?

    PubMed

    Cohen, David J; Lisagor, Philip

    2005-11-01

    There has recently been a great deal of discussion in both the lay press as well as the medical press regarding the incidence of errors that occur during medical practice. There have been many discussions of how quality control measures from industry can be applied to the health care system. Indeed both civilian and "brick and mortar" military medical treatment facilities are adapting these techniques. It is important that we understand the principles behind Total Quality Management (TQM) as well as its techniques and limitations. TQM is based on limiting deviation from an accepted standard of practice. These principles may be as applicable to our military health care facilities in a field environment as they are to our fixed facilities, although the standards used for measurement may have to be modified to adapt to different constraints of environment and resources. TQM techniques can nonetheless be applied in virtually any facility to ensure the best possible care and outcomes for our soldiers. PMID:16450816

  13. Medical error reduction and tort reform through private, contractually-based quality medicine societies.

    PubMed

    MacCourt, Duncan; Bernstein, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The current medical malpractice system is broken. Many patients injured by malpractice are not compensated, whereas some patients who recover in tort have not suffered medical negligence; furthermore, the system's failures demoralize patients and physicians. But most importantly, the system perpetuates medical error because the adversarial nature of litigation induces a so-called "Culture of Silence" in physicians eager to shield themselves from liability. This silence leads to the pointless repetition of error, as the open discussion and analysis of the root causes of medical mistakes does not take place as fully as it should. In 1993, President Clinton's Task Force on National Health Care Reform considered a solution characterized by Enterprise Medical Liability (EML), Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), some limits on recovery for non-pecuniary damages (Caps), and offsets for collateral source recovery. Yet this list of ingredients did not include a strategy to surmount the difficulties associated with each element. Specifically, EML might be efficient, but none of the enterprises contemplated to assume responsibility, i.e., hospitals and payers, control physician behavior enough so that it would be fair to foist liability on them. Likewise, although ADR might be efficient, it will be resisted by individual litigants who perceive themselves as harmed by it. Finally, while limitations on collateral source recovery and damages might effectively reduce costs, patients and trial lawyers likely would not accept them without recompense. The task force also did not place error reduction at the center of malpractice tort reform -a logical and strategic error, in our view. In response, we propose a new system that employs the ingredients suggested by the task force but also addresses the problems with each. We also explicitly consider steps to rebuff the Culture of Silence and promote error reduction. We assert that patients would be better off with a system where

  14. Medical error disclosure: from the therapeutic alliance to risk management: the vision of the new Italian code of medical ethics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Italian code of medical deontology recently approved stipulates that physicians have the duty to inform the patient of each unwanted event and its causes, and to identify, report and evaluate adverse events and errors. Thus the obligation to supply information continues to widen, in some way extending beyond the doctor-patient relationship to become an essential tool for improving the quality of professional services. Discussion The new deontological precepts intersect two areas in which the figure of the physician is paramount. On the one hand is the need for maximum integrity towards the patient, in the name of the doctor’s own, and the other’s (the patient’s) dignity and liberty; on the other is the physician’s developing role in the strategies of the health system to achieve efficacy, quality, reliability and efficiency, to reduce errors and adverse events and to manage clinical risk. Summary In Italy, due to guidelines issued by the Ministry of Health and to the new code of medical deontology, the role of physicians becomes a part of a complex strategy of risk management based on a system focused approach in which increasing transparency regarding adverse outcomes and full disclosure of health- related negative events represent a key factor. PMID:25023339

  15. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice - the second victim.

    PubMed

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  16. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice – the second victim

    PubMed Central

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  17. Safety subcultures in health-care organizations and managing medical error.

    PubMed

    Sirriyeh, Reema; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Gardner, Peter; Ferguson, Sally

    2012-02-01

    Leadership has been proposed as a key latent factor influencing the safety culture of an organization, the likelihood of errors occurring and the way in which these are managed. Therefore, when an error occurs, managers have an integral role to ensure that the most desirable outcomes are achieved for patients, health-care staff and their organization. Semistructured interviews were conducted in a large UK teaching hospital to explore the perspectives of staff who are tasked in some way with managing patient safety. Data from 26 transcripts were analysed using an adapted version of Spencer's (2003) qualitative framework, which revealed five primary themes. This paper reports findings from two overarching primary themes, described as being management and safety subcultures. These themes describe experiences of managing medical errors and the subgroup variations between professions, ranks and specialties in attitudes and behaviours towards error, and its management in a large National Health Service Trust. We discuss implications for health-care managers and health professionals in developing a stronger and more unified safety culture in their organizations, along with considerations for academic researchers when undertaking health services research. PMID:22323667

  18. Developing Governance for Federated Community-based EHR Data Sharing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Stephens, Kari A; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Keppel, Gina A; Whitener, Ron J; Echo-Hawk, Abigail; Korngiebel, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Bi-directional translational pathways between scientific discoveries and primary care are crucial for improving individual patient care and population health. The Data QUEST pilot project is a program supporting data sharing amongst community based primary care practices and is built on a technical infrastructure to share electronic health record data. We developed a set of governance requirements from interviewing and collaborating with partner organizations. Recommendations from our partner organizations included: 1) partner organizations can physically terminate the link to the data sharing network and only approved data exits the local site; 2) partner organizations must approve or reject each query; 3) partner organizations and researchers must respect local processes, resource restrictions, and infrastructures; and 4) partner organizations can be seamlessly added and removed from any individual data sharing query or the entire network. PMID:25717404

  19. Balancing data sharing requirements for analyses with data sensitivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarnevich, C.S.; Graham, J.J.; Newman, G.J.; Crall, A.W.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    Data sensitivity can pose a formidable barrier to data sharing. Knowledge of species current distributions from data sharing is critical for the creation of watch lists and an early warning/rapid response system and for model generation for the spread of invasive species. We have created an on-line system to synthesize disparate datasets of non-native species locations that includes a mechanism to account for data sensitivity. Data contributors are able to mark their data as sensitive. This data is then 'fuzzed' in mapping applications and downloaded files to quarter-quadrangle grid cells, but the actual locations are available for analyses. We propose that this system overcomes the hurdles to data sharing posed by sensitive data. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Data Sharing of Mechanical Design Formulas Using Semantic Web Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Watanuki, Keiichi

    Speed and efficiency are necessary in the field of mechanical design. CAD/CAM/CAE technologies have advanced and attention has also been paid to increasing the efficiency of data sharing and agent processes in the web environment. In this paper, Semantic Web technology is used to enable the sharing of metadata. The metadata consists of design documents and design formulas, with additional semantic information inserted. Mathematical information is expressed by adding metadata into conventional mechanical design formulas using a Resource Description Framework (RDF). The design formulas are later written in MathML (Mathematical Markup Language) for the sake of data sharing. In this way, data sharing and advanced searching is made easy, because the relevant information is made machine readable in the web environment. The calculation of design formulas is made possible using a mathematical processing system, thus increasing the efficiency of mechanical design.

  1. [Witch trials in the Salem as a medical error. Witch hunts in the XVII century and the medical art].

    PubMed

    Werner, Wiktor

    2005-01-01

    That article concerns with the influences of medical practitioners in witch hunts in the Salem (1692). Witch trials in England and English colonies in the XVII century were mainly criminal trials. Witchcraft had been there considered principally as a crime-tool rather then the crime itself. Witches were usually accused of crimes such as the murder and the disease sending. Physicians normally played in that situations the role of court experts. They decided if analyzed disease had normal or abnormal, artificial origin. In the Salem an medical practitioner judged that an illness which touched some children had come from the acts of sorcery. That was the beginning of a long and bloody witch hunt. Death sentences in the Salem trial were also justified with applying medical and physical categories to show the objectivity of a witchcraft. Salem judges were sure that by using "objective" categories they had been able to proof the existence of material relations between the witch and bewitched persons without the possibility of error. PMID:17144196

  2. Systems mapping workshops and their role in understanding medication errors in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Buckle, P; Clarkson, P J; Coleman, R; Bound, J; Ward, J; Brown, J

    2010-09-01

    Systems mapping workshops have been applied to the problem of medication errors in healthcare. The workshops were designed using experiential group work principles. They involved a range of stakeholders from within the health service as well as those who supply the health sector, including designers who may be able to enhance the safety of products and systems used in healthcare. Research has shown that the method encourages stakeholder participation, provides robust results within a limited time and enhances understanding across specialist interest groups. Additional, creative design workshops that considered the same topic showed significant promise in developing concepts from which potential solutions could be developed further. PMID:20129599

  3. Task and error analysis balancing benefits over business of electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Deborah Sater; Rodriguez, Walter; Wood, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Task and error analysis research was performed to identify: a) the process for healthcare organisations in managing healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse; b) how the process can be enhanced and; c) if electronic medical records (EMRs) have a role in this process from a business and safety perspective. The research question is if EMRs have a role in enhancing the healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse. A discussion on the business of EMRs is addressed to understand the balancing act between the safety and business aspects of an EMR. PMID:25161108

  4. Using Simulation to Address Hierarchy-Related Errors in Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Aaron William; Boone, Megan C; Porter, Melissa B; Miller, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hierarchy, the unavoidable authority gradients that exist within and between clinical disciplines, can lead to significant patient harm in high-risk situations if not mitigated. High-fidelity simulation is a powerful means of addressing this issue in a reproducible manner, but participant psychological safety must be assured. Our institution experienced a hierarchy-related medication error that we subsequently addressed using simulation. The purpose of this article is to discuss the implementation and outcome of these simulations. Methods: Script and simulation flowcharts were developed to replicate the case. Each session included the use of faculty misdirection to precipitate the error. Care was taken to assure psychological safety via carefully conducted briefing and debriefing periods. Case outcomes were assessed using the validated Team Performance During Simulated Crises Instrument. Gap analysis was used to quantify team self-insight. Session content was analyzed via video review. Results: Five sessions were conducted (3 in the pediatric intensive care unit and 2 in the Pediatric Emergency Department). The team was unsuccessful at addressing the error in 4 (80%) of 5 cases. Trends toward lower communication scores (3.4/5 vs 2.3/5), as well as poor team self-assessment of communicative ability, were noted in unsuccessful sessions. Learners had a positive impression of the case. Conclusions: Simulation is a useful means to replicate hierarchy error in an educational environment. This methodology was viewed positively by learner teams, suggesting that psychological safety was maintained. Teams that did not address the error successfully may have impaired self-assessment ability in the communication skill domain. PMID:24867545

  5. Effect of automated drug distribution systems on medication error rates in a short-stay geriatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Cousein, Etienne; Mareville, Julie; Lerooy, Alexandre; Caillau, Antoine; Labreuche, Julien; Dambre, Delphine; Odou, Pascal; Bonte, Jean-Paul; Puisieux, François; Decaudin, Bertrand; Coupé, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives To assess the impact of an automated drug distribution system on medication errors (MEs). Methods Before-after observational study in a 40-bed short stay geriatric unit within a 1800 bed general hospital in Valenciennes, France. Researchers attended nurse medication administration rounds and compared administered to prescribed drugs, before and after the drug distribution system changed from a ward stock system (WSS) to a unit dose dispensing system (UDDS), integrating a unit dose dispensing robot and automated medication dispensing cabinet (AMDC). Results A total of 615 opportunities of errors (OEs) were observed among 148 patients treated during the WSS period, and 783 OEs were observed among 166 patients treated during the UDDS period. ME [medication administration error (MAE)] rates were calculated and compared between the two periods. Secondary measures included type of errors, seriousness of errors and risk reduction for the patients. The implementation of an automated drug dispensing system resulted in a 53% reduction in MAEs. All error types were reduced in the UDDS period compared with the WSS period (P < 0.001). Wrong dose and wrong drug errors were reduced by 79.1% (2.4% versus 0.5%, P = 0.005) and 93.7% (1.9% versus 0.01%, P = 0.009), respectively. Conclusion An automated UDDS combining a unit dose dispensing robot and AMDCs could reduce discrepancies between ordered and administered drugs, thus improving medication safety among the elderly. PMID:24917185

  6. Adaptative Peer to Peer Data Sharing for Technology Enhanced Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelaccio, Michele; Buttarazzi, Berta

    Starting from the hypothesis that P2P Data Sharing in a direct teaching scenario (e.g.: a classroom lesson) may lead to relevant benefits, this paper explores the features of EduSHARE a Collaborative Learning System useful for Enhanced Learning Process.

  7. Data Sharing: Academic Libraries and the Scholarly Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Shawn W.; Bennett, Terrence B.

    2011-01-01

    Technological advances have raised expectations for data sharing; and financial exigencies have brought the issue into sharper focus, especially as grant-funding institutions are beginning to require shared access to research results and the data that support them. These data are increasingly linked to publications and related resources, thereby…

  8. Making data sharing work: The FCP/INDI experience

    PubMed Central

    Mennes, Maarten; Biswal, Bharat; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the fMRI Data Center (fMRIDC) pioneered open-access data sharing in the task-based functional neuroimaging community. Well ahead of its time, the fMRIDC effort encountered logistical, sociocultural and funding barriers that impeded the field-wise instantiation of open-access data sharing. In 2009, ambitions for open-access data sharing were revived in the resting state functional MRI community in the form of two grassroots initiatives: the 1000 Functional Connectomes Project (FCP) and its successor, the International Neuroimaging Datasharing Initiative (INDI). Beyond providing open access to thousands of clinical and non-clinical imaging datasets, the FCP and INDI have also demonstrated the feasibility of large-scale data aggregation for hypothesis generation and testing. Yet, the success of the FCP and INDI should not be confused with widespread embracement of open-access data sharing. Reminiscent of the challenges faced by fMRIDC, key controversies persist and include participant privacy, the role of informatics, and the logistical and cultural challenges of establishing an open science ethos. We discuss the FCP and INDI in the context of these challenges, highlighting the promise of current initiatives and suggesting solutions for possible pitfalls. PMID:23123682

  9. Designing for Global Data Sharing, Designing for Educational Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Robin S.; Radcliffe, David; Fosmire, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an example of a global data sharing project with an educational transformation agenda. This agenda shaped both the design of the shared dataset and the experience of sharing the common dataset to support multiple perspective inquiry and enable integrative and critically reflexive research-to-practice dialogue. The shared…

  10. Data Sharing to Inform School-Based Asthma Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portwood, Sharon G.; Nelson, Elissa B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This article examines results and lessons learned from a collaborative project involving a large urban school district, its county health department, multiple community partners, and the local university to establish an effective system for data sharing to inform monitoring and evaluation of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools (CMS)…

  11. Medication errors related to transdermal opioid patches: lessons from a regional incident reporting system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective A few cases of adverse reactions linked to erroneous use of transdermal opioid patches have been reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to describe and characterize medication errors (MEs) associated with use of transdermal fentanyl and buprenorphine. Methods All events concerning transdermal opioid patches reported between 2004 and 2011 to a regional incident reporting system and assessed as MEs were scrutinized and characterized. MEs were defined as “a failure in the treatment process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient”. Results In the study 151 MEs were identified. The three most common error types were wrong administration time 67 (44%), wrong dose 34 (23%), and omission of dose 20 (13%). Of all MEs, 118 (78%) occurred in the administration stage of the medication process. Harm was reported in 26 (17%) of the included cases, of which 2 (1%) were regarded as serious harm (nausea/vomiting and respiratory depression). Pain was the most common adverse reaction reported. Conclusions Of the reported MEs related to transdermal fentanyl and buprenorphine, most occurred during administration. Improved routines to ascertain correct and timely administration and educational interventions to reduce MEs for these drugs are warranted. PMID:24912424

  12. MERIS (Medical Error Reporting Information System) as an innovative patient safety intervention: a health policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Riga, Marina; Vozikis, Athanassios; Pollalis, Yannis; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-04-01

    The economic crisis in Greece poses the necessity to resolve problems concerning both the spiralling cost and the quality assurance in the health system. The detection and the analysis of patient adverse events and medical errors are considered crucial elements of this course. The implementation of MERIS embodies a mandatory module, which adopts the trigger tool methodology for measuring adverse events and medical errors an intensive care unit [ICU] environment, and a voluntary one with web-based public reporting methodology. A pilot implementation of MERIS running in a public hospital identified 35 adverse events, with approx. 12 additional hospital days and an extra healthcare cost of €12,000 per adverse event or of about €312,000 per annum for ICU costs only. At the same time, the voluntary module unveiled 510 reports on adverse events submitted by citizens or patients. MERIS has been evaluated as a comprehensive and effective system; it succeeded in detecting the main factors that cause adverse events and discloses severe omissions of the Greek health system. MERIS may be incorporated and run efficiently nationally, adapted to the needs and peculiarities of each hospital or clinic. PMID:25554702

  13. Challenges of web-based personal genomic data sharing.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Mahsa; Borry, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the relationship between genes and diseases, the increasing availability and sharing of phenotypic and genotypic data have been promoted as an imperative within the scientific community. In parallel with data sharing practices by clinicians and researchers, recent initiatives have been observed in which individuals are sharing personal genomic data. The involvement of individuals in such initiatives is facilitated by the increased accessibility of personal genomic data, offered by private test providers along with availability of online networks. Personal webpages and on-line data sharing platforms such as Consent to Research (Portable Legal Consent), Free the Data, and Genomes Unzipped are being utilized to host and share genotypes, electronic health records and family history uploaded by individuals. Although personal genomic data sharing initiatives vary in nature, the emphasis on the individuals' control on their data in order to benefit research and ultimately health care has seen as a key theme across these initiatives. In line with the growing practice of personal genomic data sharing, this paper aims to shed light on the potential challenges surrounding these initiatives. As in the course of these initiatives individuals are solicited to individually balance the risks and benefits of sharing their genomic data, their awareness of the implications of personal genomic data sharing for themselves and their family members is a necessity. Furthermore, given the sensitivity of genomic data and the controversies around their complete de-identifiability, potential privacy risks and harms originating from unintended uses of data have to be taken into consideration. PMID:26085313

  14. Predictors of Chemotherapy Patients' Intentions to Engage in Medical Error Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Wernli, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background. Patients can make contributions to the safety of chemotherapy administration but little is known about their motivations to participate in safety-enhancing strategies. The theory of planned behavior was applied to analyze attitudes, norms, behavioral control, and chemotherapy patients' intentions to participate in medical error prevention. Methods. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey study among chemotherapy patients treated at the oncology/hematology department of a large regional hospital was conducted. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to investigate the relationship between patients' responses to measures of attitudes, norms, and behavioral control and their intentions. Results. Four hundred seventy-nine patients completed the survey (52% response rate). Attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms explained 62% of the variance in intentions to engage in error monitoring and reporting. Perceived behavioral control (β = 0.476), norms relating to patients' relatives (β = 0.343), and instrumental attitudes (β = 0.281) were the strongest (direct) predictors of patients' intentions. Experiential attitudes had the smallest effect on intentions (β = 0.178). Subjective norms relating to expectations attributed to oncology staff had strong direct and indirect effects on patients' intentions (total effect, 0.382). Conclusions. Patients acknowledge the benefit of error monitoring and reporting and anticipate positive outcomes of involvement, but their valuations of the process of engaging in error prevention are less positive. Behavioral control and perceptions of staff approval are central for patients. Involvement of cancer patients in safety requires oncologists to address their patients' normative and control beliefs through education and proactive approval of patient engagement. PMID:20682607

  15. Types and severity of medication errors in Iran; a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Medication error (ME) is the most common single preventable cause of adverse drug events which negatively affects patient safety. ME prevalence is a valuable safety indicator in healthcare system. Inadequate studies on ME, shortage of high-quality studies and wide variations in estimations from developing countries including Iran, decreases the reliability of ME evaluations. In order to clarify the status of MEs, we aimed to review current available literature on this subject from Iran. We searched Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOHOST and also Persian databases (IranMedex, and SID) up to October 2012 to find studies on adults and children about prescription, transcription, dispensing, and administration errors. Two authors independently selected and one of them reviewed and extracted data for types, definitions and severity of MEs. The results were classified based on different stages of drug delivery process. Eighteen articles (11 Persian and 7 English) were included in our review. All study designs were cross-sectional and conducted in hospital settings. Nursing staff and students were the most frequent populations under observation (12 studies; 66.7%). Most of studies did not report the overall frequency of MEs aside from ME types. Most of studies (15; 83.3%) reported prevalence of administration errors between 14.3%-70.0%. Prescribing error prevalence ranged from 29.8%-47.8%. The prevalence of dispensing and transcribing errors were from 11.3%-33.6% and 10.0%-51.8% respectively. We did not find any follow up or repeated studies. Only three studies reported findings on severity of MEs. The most reported types of and the highest percentages for any type of ME in Iran were administration errors. Studying ME in Iran is a new area considering the duration and number of publications. Wide ranges of estimations for MEs in different stages may be because of the poor quality of studies with diversity in definitions, methods, and populations. For gaining

  16. Investigating the Causes of Medication Errors and Strategies to Prevention of Them from Nurses and Nursing Student Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Gorgich, Enam Alhagh Charkhat; Barfroshan, Sanam; Ghoreishi, Gholamreza; Yaghoobi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Medication errors as a serious problem in world and one of the most common medical errors that threaten patient safety and may lead to even death of them. The purpose of this study was to investigate the causes of medication errors and strategies to prevention of them from nurses and nursing student viewpoint. Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 327 nursing staff of khatam-al-anbia hospital and 62 intern nursing students in nursing and midwifery school of Zahedan, Iran, enrolled through the availability sampling in 2015. The data were collected by the valid and reliable questionnaire. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics, T-test and ANOVA were applied by use of SPSS16 software. Findings: The results showed that the most common causes of medications errors in nursing were tiredness due increased workload (97.8%), and in nursing students were drug calculation, (77.4%). The most important way for prevention in nurses and nursing student opinion, was reducing the work pressure by increasing the personnel, proportional to the number and condition of patients and also creating a unit as medication calculation. Also there was a significant relationship between the type of ward and the mean of medication errors in two groups. Conclusion: Based on the results it is recommended that nurse-managers resolve the human resources problem, provide workshops and in-service education about preparing medications, side-effects of drugs and pharmacological knowledge. Using electronic medications cards is a measure which reduces medications errors. PMID:27045413

  17. Unintentional Pharmaceutical-Related Medication Errors Caused by Laypersons Reported to the Toxicological Information Centre in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michal; Leššo, Roman; Pelclová, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the article was to study unintentional pharmaceutical-related poisonings committed by laypersons that were reported to the Toxicological Information Centre in the Czech Republic. Identifying frequency, sources, reasons and consequences of the medication errors in laypersons could help to reduce the overall rate of medication errors. Records of medication error enquiries from 2013 to 2014 were extracted from the electronic database, and the following variables were reviewed: drug class, dosage form, dose, age of the subject, cause of the error, time interval from ingestion to the call, symptoms, prognosis at the time of the call and first aid recommended. Of the calls, 1354 met the inclusion criteria. Among them, central nervous system-affecting drugs (23.6%), respiratory drugs (18.5%) and alimentary drugs (16.2%) were the most common drug classes involved in the medication errors. The highest proportion of the patients was in the youngest age subgroup 0-5 year-old (46%). The reasons for the medication errors involved the leaflet misinterpretation and mistaken dose (53.6%), mixing up medications (19.2%), attempting to reduce pain with repeated doses (6.4%), erroneous routes of administration (2.2%), psychiatric/elderly patients (2.7%), others (9.0%) or unknown (6.9%). A high proportion of children among the patients may be due to the fact that children's dosages for many drugs vary by their weight, and more medications come in a variety of concentrations. Most overdoses could be prevented by safer labelling, proper cap closure systems for liquid products and medication reconciliation by both physicians and pharmacists. PMID:26990237

  18. Water, Water, Everywhere: Defining and Assessing Data Sharing in Academia.

    PubMed

    Van Tuyl, Steven; Whitmire, Amanda L

    2016-01-01

    Sharing of research data has begun to gain traction in many areas of the sciences in the past few years because of changing expectations from the scientific community, funding agencies, and academic journals. National Science Foundation (NSF) requirements for a data management plan (DMP) went into effect in 2011, with the intent of facilitating the dissemination and sharing of research results. Many projects that were funded during 2011 and 2012 should now have implemented the elements of the data management plans required for their grant proposals. In this paper we define 'data sharing' and present a protocol for assessing whether data have been shared and how effective the sharing was. We then evaluate the data sharing practices of researchers funded by the NSF at Oregon State University in two ways: by attempting to discover project-level research data using the associated DMP as a starting point, and by examining data sharing associated with journal articles that acknowledge NSF support. Sharing at both the project level and the journal article level was not carried out in the majority of cases, and when sharing was accomplished, the shared data were often of questionable usability due to access, documentation, and formatting issues. We close the article by offering recommendations for how data producers, journal publishers, data repositories, and funding agencies can facilitate the process of sharing data in a meaningful way. PMID:26886581

  19. Exploring Pathways to Trust: A Tribal Perspective on Data Sharing

    PubMed Central

    James, Rosalina; Tsosie, Rebecca; Sahota, Puneet; Parker, Myra; Dillard, Denise; Sylvester, Ileen; Lewis, John; Klejka, Joseph; Muzquiz, LeeAnna; Olsen, Polly; Whitener, Ron; Burke, Wylie

    2014-01-01

    National Institutes of Health data-sharing policies aim to maximize public benefit derived from genetic studies by increasing research efficiency and the use of a pooled data resource for future studies. While broad access to data may lead to benefits for populations underrepresented in genetic studies, such as indigenous groups, tribes have ownership interest in their data. The Northwest-Alaska Pharmacogenetic Research Network, a partnership involving tribal organizations and universities conducting basic and translational pharmacogenetic research, convened a meeting to discuss the collection, management, and secondary use of research data, and of the processes surrounding access to data stored in federal repositories. This article reports on tribal perspectives that emerged from the dialogue and discusses the implications of tribal government sovereign status on research agreements and data-sharing negotiations. There is strong tribal support for efficient research processes that expedite the benefits from collaborative research, but there is also a need for data sharing procedures that take into account tribal sovereignty and appropriate oversight of research ¬ such as tribally-based research review processes and review of draft manuscripts. We also note specific ways in which accountability could be encouraged by National Institutes of Health as part of the research process. PMID:24830328

  20. [Medical errors and iatrogenic injury--results of 173 Schlichtungsstellen proceedings in general practice].

    PubMed

    Scheppokat, K D

    2004-09-01

    The Schlichtungsstelle (expert panel for alternative dispute resolution) of Northern Germany receives and decides on large numbers of malpractice claims. We report on 173 panel decisions on claims involving general practitioners: Medical negligence was found in 40%, and patient-injuries due to negligence in 28% of these cases. Treatment-caused injuries of the patient were also found in several of the cases decided against the claimant. In proceedings on the grounds of injections, 26 of 30 claimants concerned had suffered iatrogenic injuries. Treatment-caused injuries were severe in 40 of the 173 patients, fatal in 7. Injury rated and margins of error are much lower in industry than in medicine. Reviews of hospital records identified adverse events in 3-4% of hospitalized patients. Autopsy studies revealed that in 10-50% of cases the diagnosis verified postmortem had been missed clinically. Effective risk-management should be based on a trustful relationship among the persons working together: so that errors and adverse events might be discussed openly and the roles of persons, organization or system can be laid open. PMID:15527195

  1. Understanding the causes of intravenous medication administration errors in hospitals: a qualitative critical incident study

    PubMed Central

    Keers, Richard N; Williams, Steven D; Cooke, Jonathan; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the underlying causes of intravenous medication administration errors (MAEs) in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Setting Two NHS teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Participants Twenty nurses working in a range of inpatient clinical environments were identified and recruited using purposive sampling at each study site. Primary outcome measures Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurse participants using the critical incident technique, where they were asked to discuss perceived causes of intravenous MAEs that they had been directly involved with. Transcribed interviews were analysed using the Framework approach and emerging themes were categorised according to Reason's model of accident causation. Results In total, 21 intravenous MAEs were discussed containing 23 individual active failures which included slips and lapses (n=11), mistakes (n=8) and deliberate violations of policy (n=4). Each active failure was associated with a range of error and violation provoking conditions. The working environment was implicated when nurses lacked healthcare team support and/or were exposed to a perceived increased workload during ward rounds, shift changes or emergencies. Nurses frequently reported that the quality of intravenous dose-checking activities was compromised due to high perceived workload and working relationships. Nurses described using approaches such as subconscious functioning and prioritising to manage their duties, which at times contributed to errors. Conclusions Complex interactions between active and latent failures can lead to intravenous MAEs in hospitals. Future interventions may need to be multimodal in design in order to mitigate these risks and reduce the burden of intravenous MAEs. PMID:25770226

  2. Color-Coded Prefilled Medication Syringes Decrease Time to Delivery and Dosing Error in Simulated Emergency Department Pediatric Resuscitations

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Maria E.; Hernandez, Caleb; Stevens, Allen D.; Jones, Seth; Sande, Margaret; Blumen, Jason R.; Hopkins, Emily; Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Study objective The Institute of Medicine has called on the US health care system to identify and reduce medical errors. Unfortunately, medication dosing errors remain commonplace and may result in potentially life-threatening outcomes, particularly for pediatric patients when dosing requires weight-based calculations. Novel medication delivery systems that may reduce dosing errors resonate with national health care priorities. Our goal was to evaluate novel, prefilled medication syringes labeled with color-coded volumes corresponding to the weight-based dosing of the Broselow Tape, compared with conventional medication administration, in simulated pediatric emergency department (ED) resuscitation scenarios. Methods We performed a prospective, block-randomized, crossover study in which 10 emergency physician and nurse teams managed 2 simulated pediatric arrest scenarios in situ, using either prefilled, color-coded syringes (intervention) or conventional drug administration methods (control). The ED resuscitation room and the intravenous medication port were video recorded during the simulations. Data were extracted from video review by blinded, independent reviewers. Results Median time to delivery of all doses for the conventional and color-coded delivery groups was 47 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI] 40 to 53 seconds) and 19 seconds (95% CI 18 to 20 seconds), respectively (difference=27 seconds; 95% CI 21 to 33 seconds). With the conventional method, 118 doses were administered, with 20 critical dosing errors (17%); with the color-coded method, 123 doses were administered, with 0 critical dosing errors (difference=17%; 95% CI 4% to 30%). Conclusion A novel color-coded, prefilled syringe decreased time to medication administration and significantly reduced critical dosing errors by emergency physician and nurse teams during simulated pediatric ED resuscitations. PMID:25701295

  3. Building and Sustaining International Scientific Partnerships Through Data Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Yoksas, T.; Miller, L.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding global environmental processes and their regional linkages has heightened the importance of full, open, and timely access to earth system science data and strong international scientific partnerships. To that end, the Unidata Program at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research has developed a growing portfolio of international outreach activities, conducted in close collaboration with academic, research and operational institutions on several continents. The overarching goals of Unidata's international activities include: - democratization of access-to and use-of data that describe the dynamic earth system - building capacity and empowering geoscientists and educators worldwide - strengthening international science partnerships for exchanging knowledge and expertise - effectuating sustainable cultural changes that recognize the benefits of data sharing, and - helping to build regional and global communities around specific geoscientific themes Using an Internet-based data sharing network, Unidata has made great strides in establishing the underpinnings of a worldwide data sharing network. To date, over 160 institutions of higher education worldwide are participating in this data sharing effort. The Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, as it is known, was originally developed for sharing mostly atmospheric science data among U.S. institutions. It has now been extended beyond North America into a system of interconnected regional data networks encompassing Latin America, the Caribbean, Antarctica, Asia, Europe, and most recently Africa. The adoption of the IDD concept in Brazil has been so successful that Brazil now ranks second behind the U. S. in the number of institutions participating in their own regionally customized and managed data sharing network, which is dubbed the IDD-Brazil. Another noteworthy data distribution network, Antarctic IDD, is leveraging the IDD system for the benefit of the Antarctic meteorological research

  4. Investigating the epidemiology of medication errors and error-related adverse drug events (ADEs) in primary care, ambulatory care and home settings: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Ghadah Asaad; Grant, Liz; Aljadhey, Hisham; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a need to better understand the epidemiology of medication errors and error-related adverse events in community care contexts. Methods and analysis We will systematically search the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office of the WHO (EMRO), MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science. In addition, we will search Google Scholar and contact an international panel of experts to search for unpublished and in progress work. The searches will cover the time period January 1990–December 2015 and will yield data on the incidence or prevalence of and risk factors for medication errors and error-related adverse drug events in adults living in community settings (ie, primary care, ambulatory and home). Study quality will be assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program quality assessment tool for cohort and case–control studies, and cross-sectional studies will be assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Descriptive Studies. Meta-analyses will be undertaken using random-effects modelling using STATA (V.14) statistical software. Ethics and dissemination This protocol will be registered with PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews, and the systematic review will be reported in the peer-reviewed literature using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. PMID:27580826

  5. Comparison of consumers’ views on electronic data sharing for healthcare and research

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jill G; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    New models of healthcare delivery such as accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes seek to improve quality, access, and cost. They rely on a robust, secure technology infrastructure provided by health information exchanges (HIEs) and distributed research networks and the willingness of patients to share their data. There are few large, in-depth studies of US consumers’ views on privacy, security, and consent in electronic data sharing for healthcare and research together. Objective This paper addresses this gap, reporting on a survey which asks about California consumers’ views of data sharing for healthcare and research together. Materials and Methods The survey conducted was a representative, random-digit dial telephone survey of 800 Californians, performed in Spanish and English. Results There is a great deal of concern that HIEs will worsen privacy (40.3%) and security (42.5%). Consumers are in favor of electronic data sharing but elements of transparency are important: individual control, who has access, and the purpose for use of data. Respondents were more likely to agree to share deidentified information for research than to share identified information for healthcare (76.2% vs 57.3%, p < .001). Discussion While consumers show willingness to share health information electronically, they value individual control and privacy. Responsiveness to these needs, rather than mere reliance on Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), may improve support of data networks. Conclusion Responsiveness to the public’s concerns regarding their health information is a pre-requisite for patient-centeredness. This is one of the first in-depth studies of attitudes about electronic data sharing that compares attitudes of the same individual towards healthcare and research. PMID:25829461

  6. Can utilizing a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system prevent hospital medical errors and adverse drug events?

    PubMed

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians' resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  7. What are incident reports telling us? A comparative study at two Australian hospitals of medication errors identified at audit, detected by staff and reported to an incident system

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Johanna I.; Li, Ling; Lehnbom, Elin C.; Baysari, Melissa T.; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Burke, Rosemary; Conn, Chris; Day, Richard O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To (i) compare medication errors identified at audit and observation with medication incident reports; (ii) identify differences between two hospitals in incident report frequency and medication error rates; (iii) identify prescribing error detection rates by staff. Design Audit of 3291patient records at two hospitals to identify prescribing errors and evidence of their detection by staff. Medication administration errors were identified from a direct observational study of 180 nurses administering 7451 medications. Severity of errors was classified. Those likely to lead to patient harm were categorized as ‘clinically important’. Setting Two major academic teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Main Outcome Measures Rates of medication errors identified from audit and from direct observation were compared with reported medication incident reports. Results A total of 12 567 prescribing errors were identified at audit. Of these 1.2/1000 errors (95% CI: 0.6–1.8) had incident reports. Clinically important prescribing errors (n = 539) were detected by staff at a rate of 218.9/1000 (95% CI: 184.0–253.8), but only 13.0/1000 (95% CI: 3.4–22.5) were reported. 78.1% (n = 421) of clinically important prescribing errors were not detected. A total of 2043 drug administrations (27.4%; 95% CI: 26.4–28.4%) contained ≥1 errors; none had an incident report. Hospital A had a higher frequency of incident reports than Hospital B, but a lower rate of errors at audit. Conclusions Prescribing errors with the potential to cause harm frequently go undetected. Reported incidents do not reflect the profile of medication errors which occur in hospitals or the underlying rates. This demonstrates the inaccuracy of using incident frequency to compare patient risk or quality performance within or across hospitals. New approaches including data mining of electronic clinical information systems are required to support more effective medication error detection and

  8. Water, Water, Everywhere: Defining and Assessing Data Sharing in Academia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sharing of research data has begun to gain traction in many areas of the sciences in the past few years because of changing expectations from the scientific community, funding agencies, and academic journals. National Science Foundation (NSF) requirements for a data management plan (DMP) went into effect in 2011, with the intent of facilitating the dissemination and sharing of research results. Many projects that were funded during 2011 and 2012 should now have implemented the elements of the data management plans required for their grant proposals. In this paper we define ‘data sharing’ and present a protocol for assessing whether data have been shared and how effective the sharing was. We then evaluate the data sharing practices of researchers funded by the NSF at Oregon State University in two ways: by attempting to discover project-level research data using the associated DMP as a starting point, and by examining data sharing associated with journal articles that acknowledge NSF support. Sharing at both the project level and the journal article level was not carried out in the majority of cases, and when sharing was accomplished, the shared data were often of questionable usability due to access, documentation, and formatting issues. We close the article by offering recommendations for how data producers, journal publishers, data repositories, and funding agencies can facilitate the process of sharing data in a meaningful way. PMID:26886581

  9. An Event-B Approach to Data Sharing Agreements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Alvaro E.; Aziz, Benjamin; Bicarregui, Juan; Wilson, Michael D.

    A Data Sharing Agreement (DSA) is a contract among two or more principals regulating how they share data. Agreements are usually represented as a set of clauses expressed using the deontic notions of obligation, prohibition and permission. In this paper, we present how to model DSAs using the Event-B specification language. Agreement clauses are modelled as temporal-logic formulas that preserve the intuitive meaning of the deontic operators, and constrain the actions that a principal can execute. We have exploited the ProB animator and model checker in order to verify that a system behaves according to its associated DSA and to validate that principals' actions are in agreement with the DSA clauses.

  10. A Review of Medication Errors in Iran: Sources, Underreporting Reasons and Preventive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Ava; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Khoee, Seyed Hamid; Dastan, Farzaneh; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2014-01-01

    Medication error (ME) is the most common preventable cause of adverse drug events which negatively affects patient safety. Inadequate, low-quality studies plus wide estimation variations in ME from developing countries including Iran, decreases the reliability of ME evaluations. To clarify sources, underreporting reasons and preventive measures of MEs, we reviewed Iran current available literature. We searched Scopus, WOS, PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOHOST and Persian databases (IranMedex, and SID) up to October 2012. Two authors independently selected and one reviewed and extracted data. Results reported by more than 30% of studies considered as the most important topics. Finally 25 articles were included. All study designs were cross-sectional (except for two interventional studies) and in hospital settings. Nursing staff and students were the most observed populations. Individual factor, with “inadequate knowledge of medication” as its most frequent reason, were the mostly reported source of MEs. Fear and reporting process were two most important reporting barriers. The sense of being reprimanded and ignoring to report respectively were their most frequent factors. Anti-infectives were the most frequent drugs involved in MEs. Preventive measures were varied and reporting of their effectiveness was inconsistent. There are still many research gaps which need to be explored by further studies. Based on our findings, further researches may be focused on design, implementation, and evaluation of a ME reporting system as groundwork, assessing systems-related factors to ME alongside individual factors and evaluating the effectiveness of preventive measures for MEs in trials. PMID:24734052

  11. [Longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in lower medication-related errors--survey of national university hospitals in Japan].

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Toyama, Akira; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaya, Toshio; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2011-04-01

    It is obvious that pharmacists play a critical role as risk managers in the healthcare system, especially in medication treatment. Hitherto, there is not a single multicenter-survey report describing the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in preventing medical errors from occurring in the wards in Japan. Thus, we conducted a 1-month survey to elucidate the relationship between the number of errors and working hours of pharmacists in the ward, and verified whether the assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward would prevent medical errors between October 1-31, 2009. Questionnaire items for the pharmacists at 42 national university hospitals and a medical institute included the total and the respective numbers of medication-related errors, beds and working hours of pharmacist in 2 internal medicine and 2 surgical departments in each hospital. Regardless of severity, errors were consecutively reported to the Medical Security and Safety Management Section in each hospital. The analysis of errors revealed that longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in less medication-related errors; this was especially significant in the internal medicine ward (where a variety of drugs were used) compared with the surgical ward. However, the nurse assignment mode (nurse/inpatients ratio: 1 : 7-10) did not influence the error frequency. The results of this survey strongly indicate that assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward is critically essential in promoting medication safety and efficacy. PMID:21467804

  12. When data sharing gets close to 100%: what human paleogenetics can teach the open science movement.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Paolo; Capocasa, Marco; Milia, Nicola; Sanna, Emanuele; Battaggia, Cinzia; Luzi, Daniela; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes data sharing regarding mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and autosomal polymorphisms in a total of 162 papers on ancient human DNA published between 1988 and 2013. The estimated sharing rate was not far from totality (97.6% ± 2.1%) and substantially higher than observed in other fields of genetic research (evolutionary, medical and forensic genetics). Both a questionnaire-based survey and the examination of Journals' editorial policies suggest that this high sharing rate cannot be simply explained by the need to comply with stakeholders requests. Most data were made available through body text, but the use of primary databases increased in coincidence with the introduction of complete mitochondrial and next-generation sequencing methods. Our study highlights three important aspects. First, our results imply that researchers' awareness of the importance of openness and transparency for scientific progress may complement stakeholders' policies in achieving very high sharing rates. Second, widespread data sharing does not necessarily coincide with a prevalent use of practices which maximize data findability, accessibility, useability and preservation. A detailed look at the different ways in which data are released can be very useful to detect failures to adopt the best sharing modalities and understand how to correct them. Third and finally, the case of human paleogenetics tells us that a widespread awareness of the importance of Open Science may be important to build reliable scientific practices even in the presence of complex experimental challenges. PMID:25799293

  13. Family Perceptions of Medication Administration at School: Errors, Risk Factors, and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Daniel; Farris, Karen; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Howarth, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Medications are administered every day in schools across the country. Researchers and clinicians have studied school nurses' and educators' experiences with medication administration, but not the experiences of children or their parents. This study examined medication administration from the child and parent perspectives to (a) determine problems…

  14. Institutional and Individual Influences on Scientists' Data Sharing Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Youngseek

    2013-01-01

    In modern research activities, scientific data sharing is essential, especially in terms of data-intensive science and scholarly communication. Scientific communities are making ongoing endeavors to promote scientific data sharing. Currently, however, data sharing is not always well-deployed throughout diverse science and engineering disciplines.…

  15. Produce More Oil Gas via eBusiness Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Jehn; Mike Stettner

    2004-09-30

    GWPC, DOGGR, and other state agencies propose to build eBusiness applications based on a .NET front-end user interface for the DOE's Energy 100 Award-winning Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) data source and XML Web services. This project will slash the costs of regulatory compliance by automating routine regulatory reporting and permit notice review and by making it easier to exchange data with the oil and gas industry--especially small, independent operators. Such operators, who often do not have sophisticated in-house databases, will be able to use a subset of the same RBDMS tools available to the agencies on the desktop to file permit notices and production reports online. Once the data passes automated quality control checks, the application will upload the data into the agency's RBDMS data source. The operators also will have access to state agency datasets to focus exploration efforts and to perform production forecasting, economic evaluations, and risk assessments. With the ability to identify economically feasible oil and gas prospects, including unconventional plays, over the Internet, operators will minimize travel and other costs. Because GWPC will coordinate these data sharing efforts with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), this project will improve access to public lands and make strides towards reducing the duplicative reporting to which industry is now subject for leases that cross jurisdictions. The resulting regulatory streamlining and improved access to agency data will make more domestic oil and gas available to the American public while continuing to safeguard environmental assets.

  16. Genomic Research and Wide Data Sharing: Views of Prospective Participants

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Susan Brown; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Bares, Julie M.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Larson, Eric B.; Burke, Wylie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Sharing study data within the research community generates tension between two important goods: promoting scientific goals and protecting the privacy interests of study participants. The present study was designed to explore the perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes of research participants and possible future participants regarding genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and repository-based research. Methods Focus group sessions with (1) current research participants, (2) surrogate decision-makers, and (3) three age-defined cohorts (18–34 years, 35–50, >50). Results Participants expressed a variety of opinions about the acceptability of wide sharing of genetic and phenotypic information for research purposes through large, publicly accessible data repositories. Most believed that making de-identified study data available to the research community is a social good that should be pursued. Privacy and confidentiality concerns were common, though they would not necessarily preclude participation. Many participants voiced reservations about sharing data with for-profit organizations. Conclusions Trust is central in participants’ views regarding GWAS data sharing. Further research is needed to develop governance models that enact the values of stewardship. PMID:20535021

  17. Practical Barriers and Ethical Challenges in Genetic Data Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Claire L.; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Culverhouse, Rob; Daley, Denise; Igo, Robert P.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Mandal, Diptasri M.; Mascalzoni, Deborah; Montgomery, Courtney Gray; Pierce, Brandon L.; Plaetke, Rosemarie; Shete, Sanjay; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Stein, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The underlying ethos of dbGaP is that access to these data by secondary data analysts facilitates advancement of science. NIH has required that genome-wide association study data be deposited in the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) since 2003. In 2013, a proposed updated policy extended this requirement to next-generation sequencing data. However, recent literature and anecdotal reports suggest lingering logistical and ethical concerns about subject identifiability, informed consent, publication embargo enforcement, and difficulty in accessing dbGaP data. We surveyed the International Genetic Epidemiology Society (IGES) membership about their experiences. One hundred and seventy five (175) individuals completed the survey, a response rate of 27%. Of respondents who received data from dbGaP (43%), only 32% perceived the application process as easy but most (75%) received data within five months. Remaining challenges include difficulty in identifying an institutional signing official and an overlong application process. Only 24% of respondents had contributed data to dbGaP. Of these, 31% reported local IRB restrictions on data release; an additional 15% had to reconsent study participants before depositing data. The majority of respondents (56%) disagreed that the publication embargo period was sufficient. In response, we recommend longer embargo periods and use of varied data-sharing models rather than a one-size-fits-all approach. PMID:25153467

  18. DeID - a data sharing tool for neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuebo; Wang, James; Wang, Anlin; Meng, Qingping; Prescott, Christian; Tsu, Loretta; Eckert, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Funding institutions and researchers increasingly expect that data will be shared to increase scientific integrity and provide other scientists with the opportunity to use the data with novel methods that may advance understanding in a particular field of study. In practice, sharing human subject data can be complicated because data must be de-identified prior to sharing. Moreover, integrating varied data types collected in a study can be challenging and time consuming. For example, sharing data from structural imaging studies of a complex disorder requires the integration of imaging, demographic and/or behavioral data in a way that no subject identifiers are included in the de-identified dataset and with new subject labels or identification values that cannot be tracked back to the original ones. We have developed a Java program that users can use to remove identifying information in neuroimaging datasets, while still maintaining the association among different data types from the same subject for further studies. This software provides a series of user interaction wizards to allow users to select data variables to be de-identified, implements functions for auditing and validation of de-identified data, and enables the user to share the de-identified data in a single compressed package through various communication protocols, such as FTPS and SFTP. DeID runs with Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems and its open architecture allows it to be easily adapted to support a broader array of data types, with the goal of facilitating data sharing. DeID can be obtained at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/deid. PMID:26441500

  19. Pattern and Predictors of Medication Dosing Errors in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in Pakistan: A Single Center Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ahsan; Masood, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) alters the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response of various drugs and increases the risk of toxicity. The data regarding the pattern and predictors of medication dosing errors is scare from the developing countries. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the pattern and predictors of medication dosing errors in CKD patients in a tertiary care setting in Pakistan. Methods A retrospective study design was employed and medical charts of all those CKD patients who had an eGFR ≤60ml/min/1.73m2, hospitalization ≥24 hours, and admitted in the nephrology unit during January 2013 to December 2014 were assessed. Descriptive statistics and the logistic regression analysis were done using IBM SPSS version 20. Results In total, 205 medical charts were assessed. The mean age of patients was 38.64 (±16.82) years. Overall, 1534 drugs were prescribed to CKD patients, of which, nearly 34.0% drugs required dose adjustment. Among those drugs, only 41.8% were properly adjusted, and the remaining 58.2% were unadjusted. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the medication dosing errors were significantly associated with the CKD stages, i.e. stage 4 (OR 0.054; 95% CI [0.017–0.177]; p <0.001) and stage 5 (OR 0.098; 95% CI [0.040–0.241]; p <0.001), the number of prescribed medicines ≥ 5 (OR 0.306; 95% CI [0.133–0.704]; p 0.005), and the presence of a comorbidity (OR 0.455; 95% CI [0.226–0.916]; p 0.027) such as the hypertension (OR 0.453; 95% CI [0.231–0.887]; p 0.021). Conclusions It is concluded that more than half drugs prescribed to CKD patients requiring dose adjustment were unadjusted. The predictors of medication dosing errors were the severe-to-end stages of chronic kidney disease, the presence of a comorbidity such as hypertension, and a higher number of prescribed medicines. Therefore, attention should be paid to these risk factors. PMID:27367594

  20. ASTER Global DEM contribution to GEOSS demonstrates open data sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohre, T.; Duda, K. A.; Meyer, D. J.; Behnke, J.; Nasa Esdis Lp Daac

    2010-12-01

    across all the GEOSS Societal Benefit areas was shown. The release of the global tiled research-grade DEM resulted in a significant increase in demand for ASTER elevation models, and increased awareness of related products. No cost access to these data has also promoted new applications of remotely sensed data, increasing their use across the full range of the GEOSS societal benefit areas. In addition, the simplified data access and greatly expanded pool of users resulted in a number of suggestions from researchers in many disciplines for possible enhancements to future versions of the ASTER GDEM. The broad distribution of the product can be directly attributed to the adoption of fundamental GEOSS data sharing principles, which are directed toward expanded access by minimizing time delay and cost, thus facilitating data use for education, research, and a range of other applications. The ASTER GDEM demonstrated the need and user demand for an improved global DEM product as well as the added benefit of not only “full and open” distribution, but “free and open” distribution.

  1. [Carbon monoxide poisoning caused by medical error. Fatalities in connection with medical measures in Leipzig and Hannover].

    PubMed

    Hunger, H; Tröger, H D; Urban, R

    1990-01-01

    There are significant differences in the frequency of CO intoxication and its relation to other not natural causes of death between the autopsy cases of Leipzig (DDR) and Hannover (BRD). While the percentage of all autopsies in Leipzig runs up to 7.6%, in Hannover it runs up to only 1.5%. Beside the well-known cases of not recognized CO intoxication at the autopsy with or without following intoxication of other persons, two concrete cases of not recognized CO intoxication with the survival of the victims discussed. The not noticed CO intoxication followed by the death of the victim is usually considered in medicolegal opinious as "medical malpractice". In cases of survived not noticed CO intoxications this opinion ist only supposed in special cases with longer anamnesis and a typical seasonal rythmic of symptoms. PMID:2241778

  2. Development of a patient positioning error compensation tool for Korea Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator Treatment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Suh, Tae-Suk; Cho, Woong; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a potential validation tool for compensating for the patient positioning error was developed by using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. For 2D/3D registration, digitallyreconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR, so we adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and the orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and the two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and of the head and neck of a cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT images were applied. After registration, the translation and the rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23 ° ± 0.40 ° for rotations were acquired by using 2D/3D registration with the anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00 ° ± 0.2 ° for rotations were acquired by using CT image sets. We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning errors. In addition, this research could be a fundamental step in compensating for patient positioning errors at the Korea Heavy-ion Medical Accelerator Treatment Center.

  3. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors. PMID:22521848

  4. Cooperative Data Sharing: Simple Support for Clusters of SMP Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiNucci, David C.; Balley, David H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Libraries like PVM and MPI send typed messages to allow for heterogeneous cluster computing. Lower-level libraries, such as GAM, provide more efficient access to communication by removing the need to copy messages between the interface and user space in some cases. still lower-level interfaces, such as UNET, get right down to the hardware level to provide maximum performance. However, these are all still interfaces for passing messages from one process to another, and have limited utility in a shared-memory environment, due primarily to the fact that message passing is just another term for copying. This drawback is made more pertinent by today's hybrid architectures (e.g. clusters of SMPs), where it is difficult to know beforehand whether two communicating processes will share memory. As a result, even portable language tools (like HPF compilers) must either map all interprocess communication, into message passing with the accompanying performance degradation in shared memory environments, or they must check each communication at run-time and implement the shared-memory case separately for efficiency. Cooperative Data Sharing (CDS) is a single user-level API which abstracts all communication between processes into the sharing and access coordination of memory regions, in a model which might be described as "distributed shared messages" or "large-grain distributed shared memory". As a result, the user programs to a simple latency-tolerant abstract communication specification which can be mapped efficiently to either a shared-memory or message-passing based run-time system, depending upon the available architecture. Unlike some distributed shared memory interfaces, the user still has complete control over the assignment of data to processors, the forwarding of data to its next likely destination, and the queuing of data until it is needed, so even the relatively high latency present in clusters can be accomodated. CDS does not require special use of an MMU, which

  5. Connection error in the delivery of medical gases to a surgical unit.

    PubMed

    Dangoisse, M J; Lalot, M; Lechat, J P

    2010-01-01

    Whilst anesthetic incidents due to problems with the delivery of medical gases to a surgical unit are exceptional, their consequences are potentially drastic. With the growing of modern hospitals, every anesthetist may one day find himself confronted with such events, which are new to him, partly because they are infrequent, but mainly because they are due to causes outside his immediate environment. A simple mistake in the labelling and identification of medical gas lines resulted in a cross-connection of the oxygen and air, causing perioperative hypoxemia following the administration of a mixture poor in oxygen. The questions of training, responsibility and procedures in regard to these types of incidents are discussed below. PMID:20593642

  6. Potential error in the use of an automated external defibrillator during an in-flight medical emergency.

    PubMed

    Katis, Peter G; Dias, Solange M

    2004-01-01

    In-flight medical emergencies are uncommon, generally non-lethal events. In fatal cases, the most common cause of death is a sudden cardiac event. This fact, and the awareness that early defibrillation is the most important determinant of successful cardiac resuscitation, have led to the increasing availability of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) aboard commercial airplanes. AEDs are sophisticated and extremely reliable devices that are designed to be used by trained laypersons in the hope of minimizing the crucial time to defibrillation. Although designed to be foolproof, both machine- and operator-dependent usage errors have been recognized. In this case study we report a unique operator-dependent error involving the misreading of an AED instruction window, briefly review the history of AED use in the airline industry, and underscore the need for a sound knowledge of basic life support skills when working with these devices. We conclude by making recommendations to prevent similar errors from occurring in the future. PMID:17433145

  7. The Effect of an Intervention Aimed at Reducing Errors when Administering Medication through Enteral Feeding Tubes in an Institution for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idzinga, J. C.; de Jong, A. L.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies, both in hospitals and in institutions for clients with an intellectual disability (ID), have shown that medication errors at the administration stage are frequent, especially when medication has to be administered through an enteral feeding tube. In hospitals a specially designed intervention programme has proven to…

  8. Codifying Collegiality: Recent Developments in Data Sharing Policy in the Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve; Zinner, Darren E.; Campbell, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, there have been significant changes in data sharing policies and in the data sharing environment faced by life science researchers. Using data from a 2013 survey of over 1600 life science researchers, we analyze the effects of sharing policies of funding agencies and journals. We also examine the effects of new sharing infrastructure and tools (i.e., third party repositories and online supplements). We find that recently enacted data sharing policies and new sharing infrastructure and tools have had a sizable effect on encouraging data sharing. In particular, third party repositories and online supplements as well as data sharing requirements of funding agencies, particularly the NIH and the National Human Genome Research Institute, were perceived by scientists to have had a large effect on facilitating data sharing. In addition, we found a high degree of compliance with these new policies, although noncompliance resulted in few formal or informal sanctions. Despite the overall effectiveness of data sharing policies, some significant gaps remain: about one third of grant reviewers placed no weight on data sharing plans in their reviews, and a similar percentage ignored the requirements of material transfer agreements. These patterns suggest that although most of these new policies have been effective, there is still room for policy improvement. PMID:25259842

  9. Towards more reliable automated multi-dose dispensing: retrospective follow-up study on medication dose errors and product defects.

    PubMed

    Palttala, Iida; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Honkanen, Outi; Suominen, Risto; Antikainen, Osmo; Hirvonen, Jouni; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2013-03-01

    To date, little is known on applicability of different types of pharmaceutical dosage forms in an automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. The purpose of the present study was to identify and further investigate various process-induced and/or product-related limitations associated with multi-dose dispensing process. The rates of product defects and dose dispensing errors in automated multi-dose dispensing were retrospectively investigated during a 6-months follow-up period. The study was based on the analysis of process data of totally nine automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing systems. Special attention was paid to the dependence of multi-dose dispensing errors/product defects and pharmaceutical tablet properties (such as shape, dimensions, weight, scored lines, coatings, etc.) to profile the most suitable forms of tablets for automated dose dispensing systems. The relationship between the risk of errors in dose dispensing and tablet characteristics were visualized by creating a principal component analysis (PCA) model for the outcome of dispensed tablets. The two most common process-induced failures identified in the multi-dose dispensing are predisposal of tablet defects and unexpected product transitions in the medication cassette (dose dispensing error). The tablet defects are product-dependent failures, while the tablet transitions are dependent on automated multi-dose dispensing systems used. The occurrence of tablet defects is approximately twice as common as tablet transitions. Optimal tablet preparation for the high-speed multi-dose dispensing would be a round-shaped, relatively small/middle-sized, film-coated tablet without any scored line. Commercial tablet products can be profiled and classified based on their suitability to a high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. PMID:22458299

  10. A Review of the Literature on Computational Errors With Whole Numbers. Mathematics Education Diagnostic and Instructional Centre (MEDIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, J. K.

    Research on error patterns associated with whole number computation is reviewed. Details of the results of some of the individual studies cited are given in the appendices. In Appendix A, 33 addition errors, 27 subtraction errors, 41 multiplication errors, and 41 division errors are identified, and the frequency of these errors made by 352…

  11. Does the implementation of an electronic prescribing system create unintended medication errors? A study of the sociotechnical context through the analysis of reported medication incidents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even though electronic prescribing systems are widely advocated as one of the most effective means of improving patient safety, they may also introduce new risks that are not immediately obvious. Through the study of specific incidents related to the processes involved in the administration of medication, we sought to find out if the prescribing system had unintended consequences in creating new errors. The focus of this study was a large acute hospital in the Midlands in the United Kingdom, which implemented a Prescribing, Information and Communication System (PICS). Methods This exploratory study was based on a survey of routinely collected medication incidents over five months. Data were independently reviewed by two of the investigators with a clinical pharmacology and nursing background respectively, and grouped into broad types: sociotechnical incidents (related to human interactions with the system) and non-sociotechnical incidents. Sociotechnical incidents were distinguished from the others because they occurred at the point where the system and the professional intersected and would not have occurred in the absence of the system. The day of the week and time of day that an incident occurred were tested using univariable and multivariable analyses. We acknowledge the limitations of conducting analyses of data extracted from incident reports as it is widely recognised that most medication errors are not reported and may contain inaccurate data. Interpretation of results must therefore be tentative. Results Out of a total of 485 incidents, a modest 15% (n = 73) were distinguished as sociotechnical issues and thus may be unique to hospitals that have such systems in place. These incidents were further analysed and subdivided into categories in order to identify aspects of the context which gave rise to adverse situations and possible risks to patient safety. The analysis of sociotechnical incidents by time of day and day of week indicated a trend

  12. The effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry and decision support system on medication errors in the neonatal ward: experiences from an Iranian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Alireza; Ellenius, Johan; Pourasghar, Faramarz; Tofighi, Shahram; Salehi, Aref; Amanati, Ali; Fors, Uno G H

    2011-02-01

    Medication dosing errors are frequent in neonatal wards. In an Iranian neonatal ward, a 7.5 months study was designed in three periods to compare the effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) without and with decision support functionalities in reducing non-intercepted medication dosing errors in antibiotics and anticonvulsants. Before intervention (Period 1), error rate was 53%, which did not significantly change after the implementation of CPOE without decision support (Period 2). However, errors were significantly reduced to 34% after that the decision support was added to the CPOE (Period 3; P < 0.001). Dose errors were more often intercepted than frequency errors. Over-dose was the most frequent type of medication errors and curtailed-interval was the least. Transcription errors did not reduce after the CPOE implementation. Physicians ignored alerts when they could not understand why they appeared. A suggestion is to add explanations about these reasons to increase physicians' compliance with the system's recommendations. PMID:20703588

  13. Changes in data sharing and data reuse practices and perceptions among scientists worldwide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tenopir, Carol; Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Allard, Suzie; Frame, Mike; Pjesivac, Ivanka; Birch, Ben; Pollock, Danielle; Dorsett, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of data sharing into the research lifecycle is an important part of modern scholarly debate. In this study, the DataONE Usability and Assessment working group addresses two primary goals: To examine the current state of data sharing and reuse perceptions and practices among research scientists as they compare to the 2009/2010 baseline study, and to examine differences in practices and perceptions across age groups, geographic regions, and subject disciplines. We distributed surveys to a multinational sample of scientific researchers at two different time periods (October 2009 to July 2010 and October 2013 to March 2014) to observe current states of data sharing and to see what, if any, changes have occurred in the past 3–4 years. We also looked at differences across age, geographic, and discipline-based groups as they currently exist in the 2013/2014 survey. Results point to increased acceptance of and willingness to engage in data sharing, as well as an increase in actual data sharing behaviors. However, there is also increased perceived risk associated with data sharing, and specific barriers to data sharing persist. There are also differences across age groups, with younger respondents feeling more favorably toward data sharing and reuse, yet making less of their data available than older respondents. Geographic differences exist as well, which can in part be understood in terms of collectivist and individualist cultural differences. An examination of subject disciplines shows that the constraints and enablers of data sharing and reuse manifest differently across disciplines. Implications of these findings include the continued need to build infrastructure that promotes data sharing while recognizing the needs of different research communities. Moving into the future, organizations such as DataONE will continue to assess, monitor, educate, and provide the infrastructure necessary to support such complex grand science challenges.

  14. Changes in Data Sharing and Data Reuse Practices and Perceptions among Scientists Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Tenopir, Carol; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Allard, Suzie; Frame, Mike; Pjesivac, Ivanka; Birch, Ben; Pollock, Danielle; Dorsett, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of data sharing into the research lifecycle is an important part of modern scholarly debate. In this study, the DataONE Usability and Assessment working group addresses two primary goals: To examine the current state of data sharing and reuse perceptions and practices among research scientists as they compare to the 2009/2010 baseline study, and to examine differences in practices and perceptions across age groups, geographic regions, and subject disciplines. We distributed surveys to a multinational sample of scientific researchers at two different time periods (October 2009 to July 2010 and October 2013 to March 2014) to observe current states of data sharing and to see what, if any, changes have occurred in the past 3-4 years. We also looked at differences across age, geographic, and discipline-based groups as they currently exist in the 2013/2014 survey. Results point to increased acceptance of and willingness to engage in data sharing, as well as an increase in actual data sharing behaviors. However, there is also increased perceived risk associated with data sharing, and specific barriers to data sharing persist. There are also differences across age groups, with younger respondents feeling more favorably toward data sharing and reuse, yet making less of their data available than older respondents. Geographic differences exist as well, which can in part be understood in terms of collectivist and individualist cultural differences. An examination of subject disciplines shows that the constraints and enablers of data sharing and reuse manifest differently across disciplines. Implications of these findings include the continued need to build infrastructure that promotes data sharing while recognizing the needs of different research communities. Moving into the future, organizations such as DataONE will continue to assess, monitor, educate, and provide the infrastructure necessary to support such complex grand science challenges. PMID:26308551

  15. Changes in Data Sharing and Data Reuse Practices and Perceptions among Scientists Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Tenopir, Carol; Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Allard, Suzie; Frame, Mike; Pjesivac, Ivanka; Birch, Ben; Pollock, Danielle; Dorsett, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of data sharing into the research lifecycle is an important part of modern scholarly debate. In this study, the DataONE Usability and Assessment working group addresses two primary goals: To examine the current state of data sharing and reuse perceptions and practices among research scientists as they compare to the 2009/2010 baseline study, and to examine differences in practices and perceptions across age groups, geographic regions, and subject disciplines. We distributed surveys to a multinational sample of scientific researchers at two different time periods (October 2009 to July 2010 and October 2013 to March 2014) to observe current states of data sharing and to see what, if any, changes have occurred in the past 3–4 years. We also looked at differences across age, geographic, and discipline-based groups as they currently exist in the 2013/2014 survey. Results point to increased acceptance of and willingness to engage in data sharing, as well as an increase in actual data sharing behaviors. However, there is also increased perceived risk associated with data sharing, and specific barriers to data sharing persist. There are also differences across age groups, with younger respondents feeling more favorably toward data sharing and reuse, yet making less of their data available than older respondents. Geographic differences exist as well, which can in part be understood in terms of collectivist and individualist cultural differences. An examination of subject disciplines shows that the constraints and enablers of data sharing and reuse manifest differently across disciplines. Implications of these findings include the continued need to build infrastructure that promotes data sharing while recognizing the needs of different research communities. Moving into the future, organizations such as DataONE will continue to assess, monitor, educate, and provide the infrastructure necessary to support such complex grand science challenges. PMID:26308551

  16. Confidentiality and data sharing: vulnerabilities of the Mexican Genomics Sovereignty Act.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-07-01

    A law known as "Genomic Sovereignty Act", instituted in 2011, regulates research on the human genome in Mexico. This law establishes Government regulations for the exportation of DNA samples from Mexican nationals for population genetics studies. The Genomic Sovereignty Act protects fundamental human values, as confidentiality and non-discrimination based on personal genetic information. It also supports the development of the genome-based medical biotechnology and the bio-economy. Current laws for the protection of the genomic confidentiality, however, are inexplicit and insufficient, and the legal and technological instruments are primitive and insufficient to safeguard this bioethical principle. In addition, this law may undermine efforts of the national and international scientific communities to cooperate with big-data analysis for the development of the genome-based biomedical sciences. The argument of this article is that deficiencies in the protection of the confidentiality of genomic information and limitations in data sharing severely weaken the objectives and scope of the Genomic Sovereignty Act. In addition, the Act may compromise the national biomedical development and the international cooperation for research and development in the field of human genomics. PMID:25990230

  17. The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P < 0.001). Other context and

  18. Safety in numbers 2: Competency modelling and diagnostic error assessment in medication dosage calculation problem-solving.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Keith W; Hutton, B Meriel; Young, Simon; Coben, Diana; Clochesy, John M; Pontin, David

    2013-03-01

    Accurately defining and modelling competence in medication dosage calculation problem-solving (MDC-PS) is a fundamental pre-requisite to measuring competence, diagnosing errors and determining the necessary design and content of professional education programmes. In this paper we advance an MDC-PS competence model that illustrates the relationship between conceptual competence (dosage problem-understanding), calculation competence (dosage-computation) and technical measurement competence (dosage-measurement). To facilitate bridging of the theory-practice gap it is critical that such models are operationalised within a wider education framework that supports the learning, assessment and synthesis of cognitive competence (the knowing that and knowing why of MDC-PS) and functional competence (the know-how and skills associated with the professional practice of MDC-PS in clinical settings). Within the context of supporting the learning and diagnostic assessment of MDC-PS we explore PhD fieldwork that challenges the value of pedagogical approaches that focus solely on abstract information, that isolate the process of knowledge construction from its application in practice settings and contribute to the generation of conceptual errors. We consider misconceptions theory and the concept of mathematical 'dropped stitches' and offer an assessment model and program designed to diagnose flawed arithmetical operation and computation constructs. PMID:23276625

  19. Identifying and preventing medical errors in patients with limited English proficiency: key findings and tools for the field.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Melanie; Renfrew, Megan R; Green, Alexander R; Lopez, Lenny; Tan-McGrory, Aswita; Brach, Cindy; Betancourt, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1999 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report To Err is Human, progress has been made in patient safety, but few efforts have focused on safety in patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). This article describes the development, content, and testing of two new evidence-based Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) tools for LEP patient safety. In the content development phase, a comprehensive mixed-methods approach was used to identify common causes of errors for LEP patients, high-risk scenarios, and evidence-based strategies to address them. Based on our findings, Improving Patient Safety Systems for Limited English Proficient Patients: A Guide for Hospitals contains recommendations to improve detection and prevention of medical errors across diverse populations, and TeamSTEPPS Enhancing Safety for Patients with Limited English Proficiency Module trains staff to improve safety through team communication and incorporating interpreters in the care process. The Hospital Guide was validated with leaders in quality and safety at diverse hospitals, and the TeamSTEPPS LEP module was field-tested in varied settings within three hospitals. Both tools were found to be implementable, acceptable to their audiences, and conducive to learning. Further research on the impact of the combined use of the guide and module would shed light on their value as a multifaceted intervention. PMID:24629098

  20. Color-coded prefilled medication syringes decrease time to delivery and dosing errors in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations: A randomized crossover trial☆, ☆

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Allen D.; Hernandez, Caleb; Jones, Seth; Moreira, Maria E.; Blumen, Jason R.; Hopkins, Emily; Sande, Margaret; Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication dosing errors remain commonplace and may result in potentially life-threatening outcomes, particularly for pediatric patients where dosing often requires weight-based calculations. Novel medication delivery systems that may reduce dosing errors resonate with national healthcare priorities. Our goal was to evaluate novel, prefilled medication syringes labeled with color-coded volumes corresponding to the weight-based dosing of the Broselow Tape, compared to conventional medication administration, in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitation scenarios. Methods We performed a prospective, block-randomized, cross-over study, where 10 full-time paramedics each managed two simulated pediatric arrests in situ using either prefilled, color-coded-syringes (intervention) or their own medication kits stocked with conventional ampoules (control). Each paramedic was paired with two emergency medical technicians to provide ventilations and compressions as directed. The ambulance patient compartment and the intravenous medication port were video recorded. Data were extracted from video review by blinded, independent reviewers. Results Median time to delivery of all doses for the intervention and control groups was 34 (95% CI: 28–39) seconds and 42 (95% CI: 36–51) seconds, respectively (difference = 9 [95% CI: 4–14] seconds). Using the conventional method, 62 doses were administered with 24 (39%) critical dosing errors; using the prefilled, color-coded syringe method, 59 doses were administered with 0 (0%) critical dosing errors (difference = 39%, 95% CI: 13–61%). Conclusions A novel color-coded, prefilled syringe decreased time to medication administration and significantly reduced critical dosing errors by paramedics during simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations. PMID:26247145

  1. The Precise Observation System for the Safe Use of Medicines (POSSUM): An Approach for Studying Medication Administration Errors in the Field.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Raban, Magdalena Z; Lehnbom, Elin C; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Medication administration errors (MAEs) in hospital are frequent and significantly more likely to result in serious harm to patients than other medication error types. Many interventions have been proposed in order reduce MAEs and the amount of harm associated with these errors. A major limitation in assessing the effectiveness of these interventions has been the lack of robust measures for assessing changes in MAEs and associated harms. Drawing upon extensive foundational research we have developed a robust approach and data collection software to be applied in direct observational studies of nurses to allow measurement of changes in MAE rates. We report how this approach is being applied in a large stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce MAEs in a paediatric hospital. PMID:27577460

  2. An Observational Study of the Impact of a Computerized Physician Order Entry System on the Rate of Medication Errors in an Orthopaedic Surgery Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Fabien; Majoul, Elyes; Montes-Palacios, Carlota; Antignac, Marie; Cherrier, Bertrand; Doursounian, Levon; Feron, Jean-Marc; Robert, Cyrille; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Hindlet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the impact of the implementation of a Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) associated with a pharmaceutical checking of medication orders on medication errors in the 3 stages of drug management (i.e. prescription, dispensing and administration) in an orthopaedic surgery unit. Methods A before-after observational study was conducted in the 66-bed orthopaedic surgery unit of a teaching hospital (700 beds) in Paris France. Direct disguised observation was used to detect errors in prescription, dispensing and administration of drugs, before and after the introduction of computerized prescriptions. Compliance between dispensing and administration on the one hand and the medical prescription on the other hand was studied. The frequencies and types of errors in prescribing, dispensing and administration were investigated. Results During the pre and post-CPOE period (two days for each period) 111 and 86 patients were observed, respectively, with corresponding 1,593 and 1,388 prescribed drugs. The use of electronic prescribing led to a significant 92% decrease in prescribing errors (479/1593 prescribed drugs (30.1%) vs 33/1388 (2.4%), p < 0.0001) and to a 17.5% significant decrease in administration errors (209/1222 opportunities (17.1%) vs 200/1413 (14.2%), p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in regards to dispensing errors (430/1219 opportunities (35.3%) vs 449/1407 (31.9%), p = 0.07). Conclusion The use of CPOE and a pharmacist checking medication orders in an orthopaedic surgery unit reduced the incidence of medication errors in the prescribing and administration stages. The study results suggest that CPOE is a convenient system for improving the quality and safety of drug management. PMID:26207363

  3. Developing Ethical Practices for Public Health Research Data Sharing in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Spencer G.; Silaigwana, Blessing; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The abundance of South African clinical and public health research data has the potential to unlock important and valuable future advances in biomedical science. Amid increasing calls for more effective sharing of individual-level data, commitment to promote access to research data is evident within South Africa’s public research sector, but national guidance and regulation are absent. This qualitative study examined the perceptions, experiences and concerns of 32 research stakeholders about data-sharing practices. There was consensus about the utility of data sharing in publicly funded health research. However, disparate views emerged about the possible harms and benefits of sharing data and how these should be weighed. The relative dearth of policies governing data-sharing practices needs to be addressed and a framework of support developed that incentivizes data-sharing practices for researchers that are both ethical and effective. PMID:26297750

  4. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Basal Infusion Overdose; Life-threatening Errors with Flecainide Suspension in Children; Medical Product Error-Prevention Efforts Need to Be Shared and Harmonized Internationally.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2015-09-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26715797

  5. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Basal Infusion Overdose; Life-threatening Errors with Flecainide Suspension in Children; Medical Product Error-Prevention Efforts Need to Be Shared and Harmonized Internationally

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael R.; Smetzer, Judy L.

    2015-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again—perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers’ names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters’ wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26715797

  6. Learning without Borders: A Review of the Implementation of Medical Error Reporting in Médecins Sans Frontières

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Leslie; Bil, Karla; Fernhout, Jena

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the results from the first 3 years of implementation of a medical error reporting system in Médecins Sans Frontières-Operational Centre Amsterdam (MSF) programs. Methodology A medical error reporting policy was developed with input from frontline workers and introduced to the organisation in June 2010. The definition of medical error used was “the failure of a planned action to be completed as intended or the use of a wrong plan to achieve an aim.” All confirmed error reports were entered into a database without the use of personal identifiers. Results 179 errors were reported from 38 projects in 18 countries over the period of June 2010 to May 2013. The rate of reporting was 31, 42, and 106 incidents/year for reporting year 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The majority of errors were categorized as dispensing errors (62 cases or 34.6%), errors or delays in diagnosis (24 cases or 13.4%) and inappropriate treatment (19 cases or 10.6%). The impact of the error was categorized as no harm (58, 32.4%), harm (70, 39.1%), death (42, 23.5%) and unknown in 9 (5.0%) reports. Disclosure to the patient took place in 34 cases (19.0%), did not take place in 46 (25.7%), was not applicable for 5 (2.8%) cases and not reported for 94 (52.5%). Remedial actions introduced at headquarters level included guideline revisions and changes to medical supply procedures. At field level improvements included increased training and supervision, adjustments in staffing levels, and adaptations to the organization of the pharmacy. Conclusion It was feasible to implement a voluntary reporting system for medical errors despite the complex contexts in which MSF intervenes. The reporting policy led to system changes that improved patient safety and accountability to patients. Challenges remain in achieving widespread acceptance of the policy as evidenced by the low reporting and disclosure rates. PMID:26381622

  7. [Treatment errors involving diagnosis using prostate specific antigen. Decisions of the commission of experts for medical mistakes of treatment of the state medical board of North Rhine].

    PubMed

    Lent, V; Baumbusch, F; Weber, G

    2005-12-01

    Advances in prostate specific antigen (PSA) diagnosis are accompanied by deficits in realization. The justification of claims by affected patients against their doctors are reviewed by commissions of experts and mediation by medical councils out of court, impartial and free of charge. The objectivity of the review is ensured by the independence of the commission and its members as well as the determination of facts and their assessment. Criteria are professional standards and required care. Since 1995, 21 requests by affected patients have been reviewed. In 15 cases (71.4%), treatment errors were ascertained. This involved either a delayed or an insufficient diagnosis (prostatic biopsy). In ten of the patients, a mostly early prostate cancer would have be diagnosed and treated at the time of the first finding of PSA values between 3.3 and 10.4 ng/ml. In ten of 13 patients, the tumor was diagnosed late, having PSA values between 6.8 and 1251 ng/ml with no chance of curative therapy. As in other life threatening diseases, time of recognition is most important for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Particularly for early recognition, PSA is much more sensitive then digital rectal examination, and in cases without a digital finding is the only parameter for early diagnoses. In men with suspicious PSA values (>4.0 ng/ml) suitable a diagnostic test (prostate biopsy) is required early, until cancer is detected or excluded. PMID:16142454

  8. Physician Order Entry Or Nurse Order Entry? Comparison of Two Implementation Strategies for a Computerized Order Entry System Aimed at Reducing Dosing Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fors, Uno GH; Tofighi, Shahram; Tessma, Mesfin; Ellenius, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the significant effect of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) in reducing nonintercepted medication errors among neonatal inpatients, only a minority of hospitals have successfully implemented such systems. Physicians' resistance and users' frustration seem to be two of the most important barriers. One solution might be to involve nurses in the order entry process to reduce physicians’ data entry workload and resistance. However, the effect of this collaborative order entry method in reducing medication errors should be compared with a strictly physician order entry method. Objective To investigate whether a collaborative order entry method consisting of nurse order entry (NOE) followed by physician verification and countersignature is as effective as a strictly physician order entry (POE) method in reducing nonintercepted dose and frequency medication errors in the neonatal ward of an Iranian teaching hospital. Methods A four-month prospective study was designed with two equal periods. During the first period POE was used and during the second period NOE was used. In both methods, a warning appeared when the dose or frequency of the prescribed medication was incorrect that suggested the appropriate dosage to the physicians. Physicians’ responses to the warnings were recorded in a database and subsequently analyzed. Relevant paper-based and electronic medical records were reviewed to increase credibility. Results Medication prescribing for 158 neonates was studied. The rate of nonintercepted medication errors during the NOE period was 40% lower than during the POE period (rate ratio 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] .50, .71;P < .001). During the POE period, 80% of nonintercepted errors occurred at the prescription stage, while during the NOE period, 60% of nonintercepted errors occurred in that stage. Prescription errors decreased from 10.3% during the POE period to 4.6% during the NOE period (P < .001), and the number of warnings

  9. Persistence of Hemorrhage and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (HDP) as the Main Causes of Maternal Mortality: Emergence of Medical Errors in Iranian Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    FARROKH-ESLAMLOU, Hamidreza; AGHLMAND, Siamak; OSHNOUEI, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to assess factors affecting substandard care and probable medical errors associated with obstetric hemorrhage and HDP at a Northwestern Iranian health care system. Methods In a community-based descriptive cross-sectional study, data on all maternal deaths occurred at West Azerbaijan Province, Iran during a period of 10 years from March 21, 2002 to March 20, 2011 was analyzed. The principal cause of death, main contributory factors, nature of care, main responsible staff for sub-standard care and medical error were determined. The data on maternal deaths was obtained from the national Maternal Mortality Surveillance System (MMSS) which were covered all maternal deaths. The “Three delays model” was used to recognize contributing factors of maternal deaths due to obstetric hemorrhage and HDP. Results There were 183 maternal deaths, therefore the Mean Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) in the province was 32.8 per 100 000 live births (95% CI, 32.64—32.88). The most common causes of maternal deaths were obstetric hemorrhage in 36.6% of cases and HDP in 25.7%. The factors that most contributed to the deaths were all types of medical errors and substandard care with different proportions in management of obstetric hemorrhage and HDP. Conclusion A substandard care and medical error was the major contributing factor in both obstetric hemorrhage and HDP leading to maternal mortality, therefore, it is necessary to improve the quality of health care at all levels especially hospitals. PMID:26060702

  10. The Learning Objective Catalogue for Patient Safety in Undergraduate Medical Education – A Position Statement of the Committee for Patient Safety and Error Management of the German Association for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Gutmann, Johanna; Drossard, Sabine; Gurrea Salas, David; Prodinger, Wolfgang; Mc Dermott, Fiona; Urban, Bert; Staender, Sven; Baschnegger, Heiko; Hoffmann, Gordon; Hübsch, Grit; Scholz, Christoph; Meier, Anke; Wegscheider, Mirko; Hoffmann, Nicolas; Ohlenbusch-Harke, Theda; Keil, Stephanie; Schirlo, Christian; Kühne-Eversmann, Lisa; Heitzmann, Nicole; Busemann, Alexandra; Koechel, Ansgar; Manser, Tanja; Welbergen, Lena; Kiesewetter, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since the report “To err is human” was published by the Institute of Medicine in the year 2000, topics regarding patient safety and error management are in the focal point of interest of science and politics. Despite international attention, a structured and comprehensive medical education regarding these topics remains to be missing. Goals: The Learning Objective Catalogue for Patient Safety described below the Committee for Patient Safety and Error Management of the German Association for Medical Education (GMA) has aimed to establish a common foundation for the structured implementation of patient safety curricula at the medical faculties in German-speaking countries. Methods: The development the Learning Objective Catalogue resulted via the participation of 13 faculties in two committee meetings, two multi-day workshops, and additional judgments of external specialists. Results: The Committee of Patient Safety and Error Management of GMA developed the present Learning Objective Catalogue for Patient Safety in Undergraduate Medical Education, structured in three chapters: Basics, Recognize Causes as Foundation for Proactive Behavior, and Approaches for Solutions. The learning objectives within the chapters are organized on three levels with a hierarchical organization of the topics. Overall, the Learning Objective Catalogue consists of 38 learning objectives. All learning objectives are referenced with the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education. Discussion: The Learning Objective Catalogue for Patient Safety in Undergraduate Medical Education is a product that was developed through collaboration of members from 13 medical faculties. In the German-speaking countries, the Learning Objective Catalogue should advance discussion regarding the topics of patient safety and error management and help develop subsequent educational structures. The Learning Objective Catalogue for Patient Safety can

  11. Privacy Technology to Support Data Sharing for Comparative Effectiveness Research: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoqian; Sarwate, Anand D.; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    Objective Effective data sharing is critical for comparative effectiveness research (CER), but there are significant concerns about inappropriate disclosure of patient data. These concerns have spurred the development of new technologies for privacy preserving data sharing and data mining. Our goal is to review existing and emerging techniques that may be appropriate for data sharing related to CER. Material and methods We adapted a systematic review methodology to comprehensively search the research literature. We searched 7 databases and applied three stages of filtering based on titles, abstracts, and full text to identify those works most relevant to CER. Results Based on agreement and using the arbitrage of a third party expert, we selected 97 articles for meta-analysis. Our findings are organized along major types of data sharing in CER applications (i.e., institution-to-institution, institution-hosted, and public release). We made recommendations based on specific scenarios. Limitation We limited the scope of our study to methods that demonstrated practical impact, eliminating many theoretical studies of privacy that have been surveyed elsewhere. We further limited our study to data sharing for data tables, rather than complex genomic, set-valued, time series, text, image, or network data. Conclusion State-of-the-art privacy preserving technologies can guide the development of practical tools that will scale up the CER studies of the future. However, many challenges remain in this fast moving field in terms of practical evaluations as well as applications to a wider range of data types. PMID:23774511

  12. Addressing medical coding and billing part II: a strategy for achieving compliance. A risk management approach for reducing coding and billing errors.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Diane L.; Norman, Helen; Burroughs, Valentine J.

    2002-01-01

    Medical practice today, more than ever before, places greater demands on physicians to see more patients, provide more complex medical services and adhere to stricter regulatory rules, leaving little time for coding and billing. Yet, the need to adequately document medical records, appropriately apply billing codes and accurately charge insurers for medical services is essential to the medical practice's financial condition. Many physicians rely on office staff and billing companies to process their medical bills without ever reviewing the bills before they are submitted for payment. Some physicians may not be receiving the payment they deserve when they do not sufficiently oversee the medical practice's coding and billing patterns. This article emphasizes the importance of monitoring and auditing medical record documentation and coding application as a strategy for achieving compliance and reducing billing errors. When medical bills are submitted with missing and incorrect information, they may result in unpaid claims and loss of revenue to physicians. Addressing Medical Audits, Part I--A Strategy for Achieving Compliance--CMS, JCAHO, NCQA, published January 2002 in the Journal of the National Medical Association, stressed the importance of preparing the medical practice for audits. The article highlighted steps the medical practice can take to prepare for audits and presented examples of guidelines used by regulatory agencies to conduct both medical and financial audits. The Medicare Integrity Program was cited as an example of guidelines used by regulators to identify coding errors during an audit and deny payment to providers when improper billing occurs. For each denied claim, payments owed to the medical practice are are also denied. Health care is, no doubt, a costly endeavor for health care providers, consumers and insurers. The potential risk to physicians for improper billing may include loss of revenue, fraud investigations, financial sanction

  13. Data Rights and Responsibilities: A Human Rights Perspective on Data Sharing.

    PubMed

    Harris, Theresa L; Wyndham, Jessica M

    2015-07-01

    A human-rights-based analysis can be a useful tool for the scientific community and policy makers as they develop codes of conduct, harmonized standards, and national policies for data sharing. The human rights framework provides a shared set of values and norms across borders, defines rights and responsibilities of various actors involved in data sharing, addresses the potential harms as well as the benefits of data sharing, and offers a framework for balancing competing values. The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications offers a particularly helpful lens through which to view data as both a tool of scientific inquiry to which access is vital and as a product of science from which everyone should benefit. PMID:26297755

  14. From the principles of genomic data sharing to the practices of data access committees

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahsa; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Borry, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Sharing genomic research data through controlled-access databases has increased in recent years. Policymakers and funding organizations endorse genomic data sharing in order to optimize the use of public funds and to increase the statistical power of databases. Well-established data access arrangements and data access committees (DACs)—responsible for reviewing and managing requests for access to genomic databases—are therefore central for implementing the policies and principles of data sharing. This article aims to investigate the functionality of DACs through the perspective of existing practices. PMID:25759363

  15. Mortality as an indicator of patient safety in orthopaedics: lessons from qualitative analysis of a database of medical errors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Orthopaedic surgery is a high-risk specialty in which errors will undoubtedly occur. Patient safety incidents can yield valuable information to generate solutions and prevent future cases of avoidable harm. The aim of this study was to understand the causative factors leading to all unnecessary deaths in orthopaedics and trauma surgery reported to the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) over a four-year period (2005–2009), using a qualitative approach. Methods Reports made to the NPSA are categorised and stored in the database as free-text data. A search was undertaken to identify the cases of all-cause mortality in orthopaedic and trauma surgery, and the free-text elements were used for thematic analysis. Descriptive statistics were calculated based on the incidents reported. This included presenting the number of times categories of incidents had the same or similar response. Superordinate and subordinate categories were created. Results A total of 257 incident reports were analysed. Four main thematic categories emerged. These were: (1) stages of the surgical journey – 118/191 (62%) of deaths occurred in the post-operative phase; (2) causes of patient deaths – 32% were related to severe infections; (3) reported quality of medical interventions – 65% of patients experienced minimal or delayed treatment; (4) skills of healthcare professionals – 44% of deaths had a failure in non-technical skills. Conclusions Most complications in orthopaedic surgery can be dealt with adequately, provided they are anticipated and that risk-reduction strategies are instituted. Surgeons take pride in the precision of operative techniques; perhaps it is time to enshrine the multimodal tools available to ensure safer patient care. PMID:22682470

  16. Propylene Glycol Toxicity with Stoss Therapy; State Drug Tracking Database Helps Prevent an Error; Where Did That Medication Come From?; Expiration Date Difficult to Read.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2015-04-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26448654

  17. Data Sharing Agreement Checklist for IDEA Part C and Part B 619 Agencies and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 document is an adaptation of the 2012 release of "Data Sharing Agreement Checklist" intended for K-12 audiences. Presented as a checklist, the document summarizes the requirements for the written agreements under the audit or evaluation exception that is specified in FERPA and that also applies to the IDEA for Part C early…

  18. Big heart data: advancing health informatics through data sharing in cardiovascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A

    2015-07-01

    The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be reused beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data reuse, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Meta-analyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases. PMID:25415993

  19. A human rights approach to an international code of conduct for genomic and clinical data sharing.

    PubMed

    Knoppers, Bartha M; Harris, Jennifer R; Budin-Ljøsne, Isabelle; Dove, Edward S

    2014-07-01

    Fostering data sharing is a scientific and ethical imperative. Health gains can be achieved more comprehensively and quickly by combining large, information-rich datasets from across conventionally siloed disciplines and geographic areas. While collaboration for data sharing is increasingly embraced by policymakers and the international biomedical community, we lack a common ethical and legal framework to connect regulators, funders, consortia, and research projects so as to facilitate genomic and clinical data linkage, global science collaboration, and responsible research conduct. Governance tools can be used to responsibly steer the sharing of data for proper stewardship of research discovery, genomics research resources, and their clinical applications. In this article, we propose that an international code of conduct be designed to enable global genomic and clinical data sharing for biomedical research. To give this proposed code universal application and accountability, however, we propose to position it within a human rights framework. This proposition is not without precedent: international treaties have long recognized that everyone has a right to the benefits of scientific progress and its applications, and a right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from scientific productions. It is time to apply these twin rights to internationally collaborative genomic and clinical data sharing. PMID:24573176

  20. Big Heart Data: Advancing Health Informatics through Data Sharing in Cardiovascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R.; Young, Alistair A.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be re-used beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data re-use, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Meta-analyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases. PMID:25415993

  1. Image data sharing for biomedical research--meeting HIPAA requirements for De-identification.

    PubMed

    Freymann, John B; Kirby, Justin S; Perry, John H; Clunie, David A; Jaffe, C Carl

    2012-02-01

    Data sharing is increasingly recognized as critical to cross-disciplinary research and to assuring scientific validity. Despite National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation policies encouraging data sharing by grantees, little data sharing of clinical data has in fact occurred. A principal reason often given is the potential of inadvertent violation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act privacy regulations. While regulations specify the components of private health information that should be protected, there are no commonly accepted methods to de-identify clinical data objects such as images. This leads institutions to take conservative risk-averse positions on data sharing. In imaging trials, where images are coded according to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard, the complexity of the data objects and the flexibility of the DICOM standard have made it especially difficult to meet privacy protection objectives. The recent release of DICOM Supplement 142 on image de-identification has removed much of this impediment. This article describes the development of an open-source software suite that implements DICOM Supplement 142 as part of the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA). It also describes the lessons learned by the authors as NBIA has acquired more than 20 image collections encompassing over 30 million images. PMID:22038512

  2. Data Standards for Omics Data: the Basis of Data Sharing and Reuse.

    SciTech Connect

    Chervitz, Stephen A.; Deutsch, Eric W.; Field, Dawn; Parkinson, Helen E.; Quackenbush, John; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna A.; Stoeckert, Christian Jr. J.; Taylor, Chris F.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Ball, Catherine A.

    2011-11-01

    To facilitate sharing of Omics data, many groups of scientists have been working to establish the relevant data standards. The main components of data sharing standards are experiment description standards, data exchange standards, terminology standards, and experiment execution standards. Here we provide a survey of existing and emerging standards that are intended to assist the free and open exchange of large-format data.

  3. Compliance and Cognitive Function: A Methodological Approach to Measuring Unintentional Errors in Medication Compliance in the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Lisa M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Assessed multiple aspects of cognitive performance, medication planning ability, and medication compliance in 20 elderly outpatients. Findings suggest that aspects of attention/concentration, visual and verbal memory, and motor function which are untapped by simple mental status assessment are related to medication access, planning, and compliance…

  4. Multilateral Biomedical Data Sharing in the One-year Joint US-Russian Mission on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Haven, C.; Johnson-Throop, K.; Van Baalen, M.; McFather, J.

    2014-01-01

    presentation will describe the overarching principles for multilateral data collection, analysis and sharing and for data security for medical and research data shared between ISS partners prior to release in public forums.

  5. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-fen; Jin, Jing-fen; Feng, Xiu-qin; Huang, Xin; Zhu, Ling-ling; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Medication errors may occur during prescribing, transcribing, prescription auditing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring. Medication administration errors (MAEs) are those that actually reach patients and remain a threat to patient safety. The Joint Commission International (JCI) advocates medication error prevention, but experience in reducing MAEs during the period of before and after JCI accreditation has not been reported. Methods An intervention study, aimed at reducing MAEs in hospitalized patients, was performed in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China, during the journey to JCI accreditation and in the post-JCI accreditation era (first half-year of 2011 to first half-year of 2014). Comprehensive interventions included organizational, information technology, educational, and process optimization-based measures. Data mining was performed on MAEs derived from a compulsory electronic reporting system. Results The number of MAEs continuously decreased from 143 (first half-year of 2012) to 64 (first half-year of 2014), with a decrease in occurrence rate by 60.9% (0.338% versus 0.132%, P<0.05). The number of MAEs related to high-alert medications decreased from 32 (the second half-year of 2011) to 16 (the first half-year of 2014), with a decrease in occurrence rate by 57.9% (0.0787% versus 0.0331%, P<0.05). Omission was the top type of MAE during the first half-year of 2011 to the first half-year of 2014, with a decrease by 50% (40 cases versus 20 cases). Intravenous administration error was the top type of error regarding administration route, but it continuously decreased from 64 (first half-year of 2012) to 27 (first half-year of 2014). More experienced registered nurses made fewer medication errors. The number of MAEs in surgical wards was twice that in medicinal wards. Compared with non-intensive care units, the intensive care units exhibited higher occurrence rates of MAEs

  6. Trust, Respect, and Reciprocity: Informing Culturally Appropriate Data-Sharing Practice in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Merson, Laura; Phong, Tran Viet; Nhan, Le Nguyen Thanh; Dung, Nguyen Thanh; Ngan, Ta Thi Dieu; Kinh, Nguyen Van; Parker, Michael; Bull, Susan

    2015-07-01

    International science funders and publishers are driving a growing trend in data sharing. There is mounting pressure on researchers in low- and middle-income settings to conform to new sharing policies, despite minimal empirically grounded accounts of the ethical challenges of implementing the policies in these settings. This study used in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 48 stakeholders in Vietnam to explore the experiences, attitudes, and expectations that inform ethical and effective approaches to sharing clinical research data. Distinct views on the role of trust, respect, and reciprocity were among those that emerged to inform culturally appropriate best practices. We conclude by discussing the challenges that authors of data-sharing policies should consider in this unique context. PMID:26297747

  7. The tension between data sharing and the protection of privacy in genomics research.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing and global data sharing challenge many of the governance mechanisms currently in place to protect the privacy of research participants. These challenges will make it more difficult to guarantee anonymity for participants, provide information to satisfy the requirements of informed consent, and ensure complete withdrawal from research when requested. To move forward, we need to improve the current governance systems for research so that they are responsive to individual privacy concerns but can also be effective at a global level. We need to develop a system of e-governance that can complement existing governance systems but that places greater reliance on the use of technology to ensure compliance with ethical and legal requirements. These new governance structures must be able to address the concerns of research participants while at the same time ensuring effective data sharing that promotes public trust in genomics research. PMID:22404490

  8. The Tension Between Data Sharing and the Protection of Privacy in Genomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing and global data sharing challenge many of the governance mechanisms currently in place to protect the privacy of research participants. These challenges will make it more difficult to guarantee anonymity for participants, provide information to satisfy the requirements of informed consent, and ensure complete withdrawal from research when requested. To move forward, we need to improve the current governance systems for research so that they are responsive to individual privacy concerns but can also be effective at a global level. We need to develop a system of e-governance that can complement existing governance systems but that places greater reliance on the use of technology to ensure compliance with ethical and legal requirements. These new governance structures must be able to address the concerns of research participants while at the same time ensuring effective data sharing that promotes public trust in genomics research. PMID:22404490

  9. An International Framework for Data Sharing: Moving Forward with the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health.

    PubMed

    Rahimzadeh, Vasiliki; Dyke, Stephanie O M; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2016-06-01

    The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health is marshaling expertise in biomedical research and data sharing policy to propel bench-to-bedside translation of genomics in parallel with many of the BioSHaRE-EU initiatives described at length in this Issue. Worldwide representation of institutions, funders, researchers, and patient advocacy groups at the Global Alliance is testament to a shared ideal that sees maximizing the public good as a chief priority of genomic innovation in health. The Global Alliance has made a critical stride in this regard with the development of its Framework for Responsible Sharing of Genomic and Health-related Data.(1) This article first discusses the human rights pillars that underlie the Framework and mission of the Global Alliance. Second, it outlines the Global Alliance's use of data governance policies through a number of demonstration projects. Finally, the authors describe how the Global Alliance envisions international data sharing moving forward in the postgenomic era. PMID:27082668

  10. Integrating GIS with Distributed Applications Using Dynamic Data-Sharing Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Robert A. ); Tzemos, Spyridon ); Stoops, LaMar R. )

    2002-08-21

    Effective integration of a stand-alone GIS (e.g., ArcView 3.x) into a complex distributed software application requires an efficient, reliable mechanism for passing data and function requests to and from the GIS component. This paper describes the use of dynamic data-sharing and inter-process communication mechanisms to integrate GIS capability into a multi-jurisdictional distributed emergency management information system. These mechanisms include dynamic layer updates from spatial and attribute information shared via a distributed relational database across multiple sites; storage of private and shared ViewMarks to facilitate consistent GIS views; and asynchronous inter-process communication using function queuing and a data sharing library.

  11. Impact of a Drug Shortage on Medication Errors and Clinical Outcomes in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Elizabeth S.; Morris, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the rate of prescribing errors, resulting adverse events, and patient outcomes associated with sedation and analgesia in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) before and during a national shortage of fentanyl and injectable benzodiazepines. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed of patients admitted to the PICU with at least 1 prescribed order for a sedative or analgesic agent during the time periods of January to February of 2011 and 2012. Initial orders for sedative and analgesic agents were identified and investigated for appropriateness of dose and were assessed for error-associated adverse events. Orders were stratified by timing in regard to clinical pharmacist on-site availability. Demographic and outcome information, including unintended extubations, ventilator days, and PICU length of stay, were gathered. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-nine orders representing 72 patients and 179 orders representing 75 patients in 2011 and 2012, respectively, were included in analysis. No differences were found in the rate of prescribing errors in 2011 and 2012 (33 errors in 169 orders vs. 39 errors in 179 orders, respectively, p=0.603). No differences were found in rates of prescribing errors in regard to clinical pharmacist on-site availability. A significant increase was seen in unintended extubations per 100 ventilator days, with 0.15 in 2011 vs. 1.13 in 2012, respectively (p<0.001). A significant decrease was seen in ventilator days per patient (p<0.001) and PICU length of stay per patient (p=0.019). CONCLUSIONS: There were no differences in rates of prescribing errors before versus during the fentanyl and benzodiazepine shortage. PMID:26766934

  12. Data Standards for Omics Data: The Basis of Data Sharing and Reuse

    PubMed Central

    Chervitz, Stephen A.; Deutsch, Eric W.; Field, Dawn; Parkinson, Helen; Quackenbush, John; Rocca-Serra, Phillipe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Taylor, Chris F.; Taylor, Ronald; Ball, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate sharing of Omics data, many groups of scientists have been working to establish the relevant data standards. The main components of data sharing standards are experiment description standards, data exchange standards, terminology standards, and experiment execution standards. Here we provide a survey of existing and emerging standards that are intended to assist the free and open exchange of large-format data. PMID:21370078

  13. The Mason Water Data Information System (MWDIS): Enabling data sharing and discovery at George Mason University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C.; Da Silva, A. L.; Nunes, A.; Haddad, J.; Lawler, S.

    2014-12-01

    Enabling effective data use and re-use in scientific investigations relies heavily not only on data availability but also on efficient data sharing discovery. The CUAHSI led Hydrological Information Systems (HIS) and supporting products have paved the way to efficient data sharing and discovery in the hydrological sciences. Based on the CUAHSI-HIS framework concepts for hydrologic data sharing we developed a unique system devoted to the George Mason University scientific community to support university wide data sharing and discovery as well as real time data access for extreme events situational awareness. The internet-based system will provide an interface where the researchers will input data collected from the measurement stations and present them to the public in form of charts, tables, maps, and documents. Moreover, the system is developed in ASP.NET MVC 4 using as Database Management System, Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2, and hosted by Amazon Web Services. Currently the system is supporting the Mason Watershed Project providing historical hydrological, atmospheric and water quality data for the campus watershed and real time flood conditions in the campus. The system is also a gateway for unprecedented data collection of hurricane storm surge hydrodynamics in coastal wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay providing not only access to historical data but recent storms such as Hurricane Arthur. Future research includes coupling the system to a real-time flood alert system on campus, and besides providing data on the World Wide Web, to foment and provide a venue for interdisciplinary collaboration within the water scientists in the region.

  14. Capturing and Supporting Contexts for Scientific Data Sharing via the Biological Sciences Collaboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Lansing, Carina S.

    2004-11-10

    Scientific collaboration is largely focused on the sharing and joint analysis of scientific data and results. Today, a movement is afoot within the scientific computing community to shift “collaboratory” development from traditional tool-centric approaches to more data-centric ones. Yet, to effectively support data sharing means more than providing a common repository for storing and retrieving shared data sets. In order to reasonably comprehend and apply another researcher’s data set, the scientist must grasp the various contexts of the data as it relates to the overall data space, applications, experiments, projects, and the scientific community. Under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Biological Sciences Collaboratory (BSC) enables the sharing of biological data and analyses through diverse capabilities such as metadata capture, electronic laboratory notebooks, data organization views, data provenance tracking, analysis notes, task management, and scientific workflow management. Overall, BSC strives to identify and capture the various social and scientific contexts in which data sharing collaborations in biology take place and to provide collaboration tools and capabilities that can effectively support and facilitate these important data sharing contexts.

  15. Eight reasons payer interoperability and data sharing are essential in ACOs. Interoperability standards could be a prerequisite to measuring care.

    PubMed

    Mookencherry, Shefali

    2012-01-01

    It makes strategic and business sense for payers and providers to collaborate on how to take substantial cost out of the healthcare delivery system. Acting independently, neither medical groups, hospitals nor health plans have the optimal mix of resources and incentives to significantly reduce costs. Payers have core assets such as marketing, claims data, claims processing, reimbursement systems and capital. It would be cost prohibitive for all but the largest providers to develop these capabilities in order to compete directly with insurers. Likewise, medical groups and hospitals are positioned to foster financial interdependence among providers and coordinate the continuum of patient illnesses and care settings. Payers and providers should commit to reasonable clinical and cost goals, and share resources to minimize expenses and financial risks. It is in the interest of payers to work closely with providers on risk-management strategies because insurers need synergy with ACOs to remain cost competitive. It is in the interest of ACOs to work collaboratively with payers early on to develop reasonable and effective performance benchmarks. Hence, it is essential to have payer interoperability and data sharing integrated in an ACO model. PMID:22352172

  16. A practical guide to the implementation of an effective incident reporting scheme to reduce medication error on the hospital ward.

    PubMed

    Webster, Craig S; Anderson, David J

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses an anonymous incident reporting scheme to reduce drug administration error on the hospital ward, as part of an effective, non-punitive, systems-focused approach to safety. Drug error is costly in terms of increased hospital stay, resources consumed, patient harm, lives lost and careers ruined. Safety initiatives that focus, not on blaming individuals, but on improving the wider system in which personnel work have been adopted in a number of branches of health care. However, in nursing, blame remains the predominant approach for dealing with error, and the ward has seen little application of the systems approach to safety. Safety interventions founded on an effective incident scheme typically pay for themselves in terms of dollar savings arising from averted harm. Recent calls for greater health-care safety require finding new ways to make drug administration safer throughout the hospital, and the scope for such safety gains on the hospital ward remains considerable. PMID:12100674

  17. Data Democratization - Promoting Real-Time Data Sharing and Use throughout the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoksas, T. C.

    2006-05-01

    The Unidata Program Center (Unidata) of the University Corporation of Atmospheric Research (UCAR) is actively involved in international collaborations whose goals are real-time sharing of hydro-meteorological data by institutions of higher education throughout the Americas; in the distribution of analysis and visualization tools for those data; and in the establishment of server sites that provide easy-to-use, programmatic remote- access to a wide variety of datasets. Data sharing capabilities are being provided by Unidata's Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, a community-based effort that has been the primary source of real-time meteorological data for approximately 150 US universities for over a decade. A collaboration among Unidata, Brazil's Centro de PreviSão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC), the Universidad Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), and the Universidade de São Paulo (USP) has resulted in the creation of a Brazilian peer of the North American IDD, the IDD-Brasil. Collaboration among Unidata, the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR), and the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) seeks to extend IDD data sharing throughout Central America and the Caribbean in an IDD-Caribe. Collaboration between Unidata and the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), a World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Regional Meteorological Training Center (RMTC) based in Barbados, has been launched to investigate the possibility of expansion of IDD data sharing throughout Caribbean RMTC member countries. Most recently, efforts aimed at creating a data sharing network for researchers on the Antarctic continent have resulted in the establishment of the Antarctic-IDD. Data analysis and visualization capabilities are being provided by Unidata through a suite of freely-available applications: the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) GEneral Meteorology PAcKage (GEMPAK); the Unidata Integrated Data Viewer (IDV); and University of

  18. Data Sharing Interviews with Crop Sciences Faculty: Why They Share Data and How the Library Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to generate a deeper understanding of data sharing by targeting faculty members who had already made data publicly available. During interviews, crop scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign were asked why they decided to share data, why they chose a data sharing method (e. g., supplementary file,…

  19. German critical incident reporting system database of prehospital emergency medicine: Analysis of reported communication and medication errors between 2005–2015

    PubMed Central

    Hohenstein, Christian; Fleischmann, Thomas; Rupp, Peter; Hempel, Dorothea; Wilk, Sophia; Winning, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication failure in prehospital emergency medicine can affect patient safety as it does in other areas of medicine as well. We analyzed the database of the critical incident reporting system for prehospital emergency medicine in Germany retrospectively regarding communication errors. METHODS: Experts of prehospital emergency medicine and risk management screened the database for verbal communication failure, non-verbal communication failure and missing communication at all. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2015, 845 reports were analyzed, of which 247 reports were considered to be related to communication failure. An arbitrary classification resulted in six different kinds: 1) no acknowledgement of a suggestion; 2) medication error; 3) miscommunication with dispatcher; 4) utterance heard/understood improperly; 5) missing information transfer between two persons; and 6) other communication failure. CONCLUSION: Communication deficits can lead to critical incidents in prehospital emergency medicine and are a very important aspect in patient safety. PMID:27313802

  20. Technical and Policy Approaches to Balancing Patient Privacy and Data Sharing in Clinical and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Bradley; Karp, David; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers need to share data to support scientific validation and information reuse, and to comply with a host of regulations and directives from funders. Various organizations are constructing informatics resources in the form of centralized databases to ensure widespread availability of data derived from sponsored research. The widespread use of such open databases is contingent on the protection of patient privacy. In this paper, we review several aspects of the privacy-related problems associated with data sharing for clinical research from technical and policy perspectives. We begin with a review of existing policies for secondary data sharing and privacy requirements in the context of data derived from research and clinical settings. In particular, we focus on policies specified by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and touch upon how these policies are related to current, as well as future, use of data stored in public database archives. Next, we address aspects of data privacy and “identifiability” from a more technical perspective, and review how biomedical databanks can be exploited and seemingly anonymous records can be “re-identified” using various resources without compromising or hacking into secure computer systems. We highlight which data features specified in clinical research data models are potentially vulnerable or exploitable. In the process, we recount a recent privacy-related concern associated with the publication of aggregate statistics from pooled genome-wide association studies that has had a significant impact on the data sharing policies of NIH-sponsored databanks. Finally, we conclude with a list of recommendations that cover various technical, legal, and policy mechanisms that open clinical databases can adopt to strengthen data privacy protections as they move toward wider deployment and adoption. PMID:20051768

  1. Optimal Care Mother-Baby and Outcomes through Community-wide Data Sharing, Interoperability and Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Steven H; Gilbert-Bradley, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The power of interoperable systems with data/information integration, central to achieving the goals of Telehealth, is illustrated through mutually beneficial sharing between Labor & Delivery (L&D) and Obstetrics (OBs) Clinics. Data shared between L&D and OB brought improved practice patterns and outcomes, and increased satisfaction at both. Staffing and skillsets were significantly improved by knowing complications arriving and anticipated volumes. OBs increased clinic efficiencies and improved patient-direct care time with improved clinical and cost outcomes. PMID:25980718

  2. Research Update: The materials genome initiative: Data sharing and the impact of collaborative ab initio databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anubhav; Persson, Kristin A.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-05-01

    Materials innovations enable new technological capabilities and drive major societal advancements but have historically required long and costly development cycles. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) aims to greatly reduce this time and cost. In this paper, we focus on data reuse in the MGI and, in particular, discuss the impact of three different computational databases based on density functional theory methods to the research community. We also discuss and provide recommendations on technical aspects of data reuse, outline remaining fundamental challenges, and present an outlook on the future of MGI's vision of data sharing.

  3. Democratization of genetic data: connecting government approval of clinical tests with data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Theodora S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When a doctor orders a genetic test, patients assume that the test will yield a useful result to guide how their physicians take care of them. That assumption is frequently correct, but not always. Until recently, a genetic test only interrogated the sequence of one or two genes. Now, DNA-sequencing technologies are so fast and cheap that they have enabled clinicians to sequence panels of genes that may or may not be relevant to the patient's condition. The technology has outpaced our ability to interpret the results. Connecting approval of clinical tests to data sharing could help close this gap. PMID:27148568

  4. A Requirement Engineering Framework for Electronic Data Sharing of Health Care Data Between Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Peyton, Liam; Kuziemsky, Craig

    Health care is increasingly provided to citizens by a network of collaboration that includes multiple providers and locations. Typically, that collaboration is on an ad-hoc basis via phone calls, faxes, and paper based documentation. Internet and wireless technologies provide an opportunity to improve this situation via electronic data sharing. These new technologies make possible new ways of working and collaboration but it can be difficult for health care organizations to understand how to use the new technologies while still ensuring that their policies and objectives are being met. It is also important to have a systematic approach to validate that e-health processes deliver the performance improvements that are expected. Using a case study of a palliative care patient receiving home care from a team of collaborating health organizations, we introduce a framework based on requirements engineering. Key concerns and objectives are identified and modeled (privacy, security, quality of care, and timeliness of service). And, then, proposed business processes which use new technologies are modeled in terms of these concerns and objectives to assess their impact and ensure that electronic data sharing is well regulated.

  5. Domain ontologies for data sharing an example from environmental monitoring using field GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundt, Hardy; Bishr, Yaser

    2002-02-01

    Different geospatial information communities, public authorities as well as private institutions, recognize increasingly the World Wide Web as a medium to distribute their data. With the occurrence of national laws that push authorities to make environmental data accessible, Internet-based services have to be developed to enable the public to obtain information digitally. Dissemination of data is only one side of the coin. The other side is the use of such data. The use requires mechanisms to share data via networks. Lack of semantic interoperability has been identified as the main obstacle for data sharing. Research, however, must develop methods to overcome the problems of sharing data considering their semantics. Ontologies are considered to be one approach to support data sharing. This paper describes the use of ontologies via the Internet based on an example from field GIS supported environmental monitoring. The basic idea is that the members of different information communities get access to the meaning of data if they can approach the ontologies that have been developed by those who collected the data. This might be possible by applying the resource definition framework (RDF) and RDF/Schema. RDF can be used to define and structure terms and vocabulary used in a specific information community. The goal of the paper is to examine the role of ontologies based on the study of a particular application domain, namely stream surveying. The use of RDF/Schema is described related to the example.

  6. Conducting Research with Tribal Communities: Sovereignty, Ethics, and Data-Sharing Issues

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Barbara; Stone, Dave; O’Neill, Catherine; Berger, Patricia; Harris, Stuart; Donatuto, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Background: When conducting research with American Indian tribes, informed consent beyond conventional institutional review board (IRB) review is needed because of the potential for adverse consequences at a community or governmental level that are unrecognized by academic researchers. Objectives: In this article, we review sovereignty, research ethics, and data-sharing considerations when doing community-based participatory health–related or natural-resource–related research with American Indian nations and present a model material and data-sharing agreement that meets tribal and university requirements. Discussion: Only tribal nations themselves can identify potential adverse outcomes, and they can do this only if they understand the assumptions and methods of the proposed research. Tribes must be truly equal partners in study design, data collection, interpretation, and publication. Advances in protection of intellectual property rights (IPR) are also applicable to IRB reviews, as are principles of sovereignty and indigenous rights, all of which affect data ownership and control. Conclusions: Academic researchers engaged in tribal projects should become familiar with all three areas: sovereignty, ethics and informed consent, and IPR. We recommend developing an agreement with tribal partners that reflects both health-related IRB and natural-resource–related IPR considerations. PMID:21890450

  7. Big data from small data: data-sharing in the 'long tail' of neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Adam R; Nielson, Jessica L; Cragin, Melissa H; Bandrowski, Anita E; Martone, Maryann E

    2014-11-01

    The launch of the US BRAIN and European Human Brain Projects coincides with growing international efforts toward transparency and increased access to publicly funded research in the neurosciences. The need for data-sharing standards and neuroinformatics infrastructure is more pressing than ever. However, 'big science' efforts are not the only drivers of data-sharing needs, as neuroscientists across the full spectrum of research grapple with the overwhelming volume of data being generated daily and a scientific environment that is increasingly focused on collaboration. In this commentary, we consider the issue of sharing of the richly diverse and heterogeneous small data sets produced by individual neuroscientists, so-called long-tail data. We consider the utility of these data, the diversity of repositories and options available for sharing such data, and emerging best practices. We provide use cases in which aggregating and mining diverse long-tail data convert numerous small data sources into big data for improved knowledge about neuroscience-related disorders. PMID:25349910

  8. Big data from small data: data-sharing in the ‘long tail’ of neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R; Nielson, Jessica L; Cragin, Melissa H; Bandrowski, Anita E; Martone, Maryann E

    2016-01-01

    The launch of the US BRAIN and European Human Brain Projects coincides with growing international efforts toward transparency and increased access to publicly funded research in the neurosciences. The need for data-sharing standards and neuroinformatics infrastructure is more pressing than ever. However, ‘big science’ efforts are not the only drivers of data-sharing needs, as neuroscientists across the full spectrum of research grapple with the overwhelming volume of data being generated daily and a scientific environment that is increasingly focused on collaboration. In this commentary, we consider the issue of sharing of the richly diverse and heterogeneous small data sets produced by individual neuroscientists, so-called long-tail data. We consider the utility of these data, the diversity of repositories and options available for sharing such data, and emerging best practices. We provide use cases in which aggregating and mining diverse long-tail data convert numerous small data sources into big data for improved knowledge about neuroscience-related disorders. PMID:25349910

  9. The European Union's Adequacy Approach to Privacy and International Data Sharing in Health Research.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Jennifer; Chan, Benny; Joly, Yann

    2016-03-01

    The European Union (EU) approach to data protection consists of assessing the adequacy of the data protection offered by the laws of a particular jurisdiction against a set of principles that includes purpose limitation, transparency, quality, proportionality, security, access, and rectification. The EU's Data Protection Directive sets conditions on the transfer of data to third countries by prohibiting Member States from transferring to such countries as have been deemed inadequate in terms of the data protection regimes. In theory, each jurisdiction is evaluated similarly and must be found fully compliant with the EU's data protection principles to be considered adequate. In practice, the inconsistency with which these evaluations are made presents a hurdle to international data-sharing and makes difficult the integration of different data-sharing approaches; in the 20 years since the Directive was first adopted, the laws of only five countries from outside of the EU, Economic Area, or the European Free Trade Agreement have been deemed adequate to engage in data transfers without the need for further administrative safeguards. PMID:27256130

  10. Data Democratization - Promoting Real-Time Data Sharing and Use Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoksas, T. C.; Almeida, W. G.; Leon, V. C.

    2007-05-01

    The Unidata Program Center (Unidata) of the University Corporation of Atmospheric Research (UCAR) is actively involved in international collaborations whose goals are the free-and-open sharing of hydro-meteorological data; the distribution of analysis and visualization tools for those data; the establishment of server technologies that provide easy-to-use, programmatic remote-access to a wide variety of datasets, and in the building of a community where data, tools, and best practices in education and research are shared. The tools and services provided by Unidata are available to the research and education community free-of-charge. Data sharing capabilities are being provided by Unidata's Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, a community-based effort that has been the primary source of real-time meteorological data in the US university community for over a decade. A collaboration among Unidata, Brazil's Centro de Previso de Tempo e Estudos Climaticos (CPTEC), the Universidad Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), and the Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP) has resulted in the creation of a Brazilian peer of the North American IDD, the IDD-Brasil. Collaboration between Unidata and the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR) seeks to extend IDD data sharing throughout Central America and the Caribbean in an IDD-Caribe. Efforts aimed at creating a data sharing network for researchers on the Antarctic continent have resulted in the establishment of the Antarctic-IDD. Most recently, explorations of data sharing between UCAR and select countries in Africa have begun. Data analysis and visualization capabilities are available through Unidata in a suite of freely-available applications: the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) GEneral Meteorology PAcKage (GEMPAK); the Unidata Integrated Data Viewer (IDV); and University of Wisconsin, Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS). Remote data access capabilities are

  11. High-resolution, low-delay, and error-resilient medical ultrasound video communication using H.264/AVC over mobile WiMAX networks.

    PubMed

    Panayides, Andreas; Antoniou, Zinonas C; Mylonas, Yiannos; Pattichis, Marios S; Pitsillides, Andreas; Pattichis, Constantinos S

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we describe an effective video communication framework for the wireless transmission of H.264/AVC medical ultrasound video over mobile WiMAX networks. Medical ultrasound video is encoded using diagnostically-driven, error resilient encoding, where quantization levels are varied as a function of the diagnostic significance of each image region. We demonstrate how our proposed system allows for the transmission of high-resolution clinical video that is encoded at the clinical acquisition resolution and can then be decoded with low-delay. To validate performance, we perform OPNET simulations of mobile WiMAX Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical (PHY) layers characteristics that include service prioritization classes, different modulation and coding schemes, fading channels conditions, and mobility. We encode the medical ultrasound videos at the 4CIF (704 × 576) resolution that can accommodate clinical acquisition that is typically performed at lower resolutions. Video quality assessment is based on both clinical (subjective) and objective evaluations. PMID:23232416

  12. Nutritional treatment for inborn errors of metabolism: indications, regulations, and availability of medical foods and dietary supplements using phenylketonuria as an example.

    PubMed

    Camp, Kathryn M; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A; Huntington, Kathleen L

    2012-09-01

    Medical foods and dietary supplements are used to treat rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) identified through state-based universal newborn screening. These products are regulated under Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food and dietary supplement statutes. The lack of harmony in terminology used to refer to medical foods and dietary supplements and the misuse of words that imply that FDA regulates these products as drugs have led to confusion. These products are expensive and, although they are used for medical treatment of IEM, third-party payer coverage of these products is inconsistent across the United States. Clinicians and families report termination of coverage in late adolescence, failure to cover treatment during pregnancy, coverage for select conditions only, or no coverage. We describe the indications for specific nutritional treatment products for IEM and their regulation, availability, and categorization. We conclude with a discussion of the problems that have contributed to the paradox of identifying individuals with IEM through newborn screening but not guaranteeing that they receive optimal treatment. Throughout the paper, we use the nutritional treatment of phenylketonuria as an example of IEM treatment. PMID:22854513

  13. caNanoLab: data sharing to expedite the use of nanotechnology in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Gaheen, Sharon; Hinkal, George W; Morris, Stephanie A; Lijowski, Michal; Heiskanen, Mervi; Klemm, Juli D

    2013-11-21

    The use of nanotechnology in biomedicine involves the engineering of nanomaterials to act as therapeutic carriers, targeting agents and diagnostic imaging devices. The application of nanotechnology in cancer aims to transform early detection, targeted therapeutics and cancer prevention and control. To assist in expediting and validating the use of nanomaterials in biomedicine, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology, in collaboration with the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (Alliance), has developed a data sharing portal called caNanoLab. caNanoLab provides access to experimental and literature curated data from the NCI Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory, the Alliance and the greater cancer nanotechnology community. PMID:25364375

  14. The need to redefine genomic data sharing: A focus on data accessibility.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Tempest A; Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Protopapas, Elena; Wahid, Hamza; Nielsen, Fiona G G

    2014-12-01

    DNAdigest's mission is to investigate and address the issues hindering efficient and ethical genomic data sharing in the human genomics research community. We conducted contextual interviews with human genomics researchers in clinical, academic or industrial R&D settings about their experience with accessing and sharing human genomic data. The qualitative interviews were followed by an online survey which provided quantitative support for our findings. Here we present the generalised workflow for accessing human genomic data through both public and restricted-access repositories and discuss reported points of frustration and their possible improvements. We discuss how data discoverability and accessibility are lacking in current mechanisms and how these are the prerequisites for adoption of best practices in the research community. We summarise current initiatives related to genomic data discovery and present a new data discovery platform available at http://nucleobase.co.uk. PMID:27294022

  15. Data Citation Standard: A Means to Support Data Sharing, Attribution, and Traceability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, I.; Plag, H. P.; Fritz, S.

    2012-04-01

    Geo-referenced data are crucial for addressing many of the burning societal problems and to support related interdisciplinary research. Data sharing is hampered by the lack of a widely accepted method for giving credit to those who make their data freely available and for tracking the use of data throughout it's life-cycle. Particularly in the scientific community, recognition and renown are important currencies. Providing means for data citation would be a strong incentive for data sharing. Recently, a number of organizations and projects have started to address the concept of data citation (e.g., PANGAEA, NASA DAACS, USGS, NOAA National Data Centers, ESIP, US National Academy of Sciences, and EGIDA). A number of proposals for data citation guidelines have emerged and a better understanding of the many issues at hand is evolving, but to date, no standard has been accepted. This is not surprising, as data citation is far more complicated than citation of scientific publication. Data sets differ in many aspects from standard scientific publications. For example, data sets generally are not locatable and attributable in the same way as scientific publications. Data sets often are not static (introducing versioning), and they are mostly not peer-reviewed (requiring quality control). There is a consensus that the implementation of a standard would reveal new issues that are not obvious today. With the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is in a unique position to provide the testbed for the implementation of a draft standard. The GEO Plenary supports the implementation of a draft standard developed by the Science and Technology Committee (STC) of GEO with support of the EGIDA Project. This draft is based on guidelines developed by international groups. Currently, users of the GEO-Portal are not obliged or encouraged to cite data accessed through GEOSS - if at all, citation requirements come from the individual data

  16. Dataworks for GNSS: Software for Supporting Data Sharing and Federation of Geodetic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.; Wier, S.; Rost, M.; Matykiewicz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Continuously-operating Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks are increasingly being installed globally for a wide variety of science and societal applications. GNSS enables Earth science research in areas including tectonic plate interactions, crustal deformation in response to loading by tectonics, magmatism, water and ice, and the dynamics of water - and thereby energy transfer - in the atmosphere at regional scale. The many individual scientists and organizations that set up GNSS stations globally are often open to sharing data, but lack the resources or expertise to deploy systems and software to manage and curate data and metadata and provide user tools that would support data sharing. UNAVCO previously gained experience in facilitating data sharing through the NASA-supported development of the Geodesy Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) open source software. GSAC provides web interfaces and simple web services for data and metadata discovery and access, supports federation of multiple data centers, and simplifies transfer of data and metadata to long-term archives. The NSF supported the dissemination of GSAC to multiple European data centers forming the European Plate Observing System. To expand upon GSAC to provide end-to-end, instrument-to-distribution capability, UNAVCO developed Dataworks for GNSS with NSF funding to the COCONet project, and deployed this software on systems that are now operating as Regional GNSS Data Centers as part of the NSF-funded TLALOCNet and COCONet projects. Dataworks consists of software modules written in Python and Java for data acquisition, management and sharing. There are modules for GNSS receiver control and data download, a database schema for metadata, tools for metadata handling, ingest software to manage file metadata, data file management scripts, GSAC, scripts for mirroring station data and metadata from partner GSACs, and extensive software and operator documentation. UNAVCO plans to provide a cloud VM

  17. Biomedical Data Sharing and Reuse: Attitudes and Practices of Clinical and Scientific Research Staff

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Lisa M.; Lu, Ya-Ling; Joubert, Douglas J.; Welsh, Judith; Brandys, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant efforts are underway within the biomedical research community to encourage sharing and reuse of research data in order to enhance research reproducibility and enable scientific discovery. While some technological challenges do exist, many of the barriers to sharing and reuse are social in nature, arising from researchers’ concerns about and attitudes toward sharing their data. In addition, clinical and basic science researchers face their own unique sets of challenges to sharing data within their communities. This study investigates these differences in experiences with and perceptions about sharing data, as well as barriers to sharing among clinical and basic science researchers. Methods Clinical and basic science researchers in the Intramural Research Program at the National Institutes of Health were surveyed about their attitudes toward and experiences with sharing and reusing research data. Of 190 respondents to the survey, the 135 respondents who identified themselves as clinical or basic science researchers were included in this analysis. Odds ratio and Fisher’s exact tests were the primary methods to examine potential relationships between variables. Worst-case scenario sensitivity tests were conducted when necessary. Results and Discussion While most respondents considered data sharing and reuse important to their work, they generally rated their expertise as low. Sharing data directly with other researchers was common, but most respondents did not have experience with uploading data to a repository. A number of significant differences exist between the attitudes and practices of clinical and basic science researchers, including their motivations for sharing, their reasons for not sharing, and the amount of work required to prepare their data. Conclusions Even within the scope of biomedical research, addressing the unique concerns of diverse research communities is important to encouraging researchers to share and reuse data

  18. Normal vitamin D levels and bone mineral density among children with inborn errors of metabolism consuming medical food-based diets.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Katie E; Koeller, David M; Harding, Cary O; Huntington, Kathleen L; Gillingham, Melanie B

    2016-01-01

    A higher incidence of osteopenia is observed among children with inherited metabolic disorders (inborn errors of metabolism, or IEMs) who consume medical food-based diets that restrict natural vitamin D-containing food sources. We evaluated the vitamin D status of children with IEMs who live in the Pacific Northwest with limited sun exposure and determined whether bone mineral density (BMD) in children with phenylketonuria (PKU), the most common IEM, correlated with diet or biochemical markers of bone metabolism. We hypothesized that children with IEMs would have lower serum vitamin D concentrations than controls and that some children with PKU would have reduced bone mineralization. A retrospective record review of 88 patients with IEMs, and 445 children on unrestricted diets (controls) found the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were normal and not significantly different between groups (IEM patients, 27.1 ± 10.9; controls, 27.6 ± 11.2). Normal BMD at the hip or spine (-2 medical food-based diets supports normal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and BMD in children with IEMs, including PKU. The risk of vitamin D deficiency among patients consuming a medical food-based diet is similar to the general population. PMID:26773786

  19. ShareSync: A Solution for Deterministic Data Sharing over Ethernet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Daniel J., II; Koons, William A.; Kennedy, Richard D.; Davis, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of upgrading the Contact Dynamics Simulation Laboratory (CDSL) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), a simple, cost effective method was needed to communicate data among the networked simulation machines and I/O controllers used to run the facility. To fill this need and similar applicable situations, a generic protocol was developed, called ShareSync. ShareSync is a lightweight, real-time, publish-subscribe Ethernet protocol for simple and deterministic data sharing across diverse machines and operating systems. ShareSync provides a simple Application Programming Interface (API) for simulation programmers to incorporate into their code. The protocol is compatible with virtually all Ethernet-capable machines, is flexible enough to support a variety of applications, is fast enough to provide soft real-time determinism, and is a low-cost resource for distributed simulation development, deployment, and maintenance. The first design cycle iteration of ShareSync has been completed, and the protocol has undergone several testing procedures including endurance and benchmarking tests and approaches the 2001ts data synchronization design goal for the CDSL.

  20. PRODUCE MORE OIL AND GAS VIA eBUSINESS DATA SHARING

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Jehn; Mike Stettner

    2004-04-30

    GWPC, DOGGR, and other state agencies propose to build eBusiness applications based on a .NET front-end user interface for the DOE's Energy 100 Award-winning Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) data source and XML Web services. This project will slash the costs of regulatory compliance by automating routine regulatory reporting and permit notice review and by making it easier to exchange data with the oil and gas industry--especially small, independent operators. Such operators, who often do not have sophisticated in-house databases, will be able to use a subset of the same RBDMS tools available to the agencies on the desktop to file permit notices and production reports online. Once the data passes automated quality control checks, the application will upload the data into the agency's RBDMS data source. The operators also will have access to state agency datasets to focus exploration efforts and to perform production forecasting, economic evaluations, and risk assessments. With the ability to identify economically feasible oil and gas prospects, including unconventional plays, over the Internet, operators will minimize travel and other costs. Because GWPC will coordinate these data sharing efforts with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), this project will improve access to public lands and make strides towards reducing the duplicative reporting to which industry is now subject for leases that cross jurisdictions. The resulting regulatory streamlining and improved access to agency data will make more domestic oil and gas available to the American public while continuing to safeguard environmental assets.

  1. Produce More Oil and Gas via eBusiness Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Jehn; Mike Stettner; Ben Grunewald

    2005-07-22

    GWPC, DOGGR, and other state agencies propose to build eBusiness applications based on a .NET front-end user interface for the DOE's Energy 100 Award-winning Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) data source and XML Web services. This project will slash the costs of regulatory compliance by automating routine regulatory reporting and permit notice review and by making it easier to exchange data with the oil and gas industry--especially small, independent operators. Such operators, who often do not have sophisticated in-house databases, will be able to use a subset of the same RBDMS tools available to the agencies on the desktop to file permit notices and production reports online. Once the data passes automated quality control checks, the application will upload the data into the agency's RBDMS data source. The operators also will have access to state agency datasets to focus exploration efforts and to perform production forecasting, economic evaluations, and risk assessments. With the ability to identify economically feasible oil and gas prospects, including unconventional plays, over the Internet, operators will minimize travel and other costs. Because GWPC will coordinate these data sharing efforts with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), this project will improve access to public lands and make strides towards reducing the duplicative reporting to which industry is now subject for leases that cross jurisdictions. The resulting regulatory streamlining and improved access to agency data will make more domestic oil and gas available to the American public while continuing to safeguard environmental assets.

  2. Research and implementation of geography service bus in spatial data sharing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhiqiang; Nan, Jiang; Lin, Tao; Bai, Mingbai; He, Xingfu

    2006-10-01

    Geographic Information Systems, GIS, software has wide applications in business; however, implementation of the interoperability among the GIS has also become a challenge. This paper presents a solution based on Geography Service Bus that uses web services to achieve the interoperability among these heterogeneous GIS to allow users share the Geosciences data as well as access service. Referring to the abstract specification of OWS (OGC Web Services), the proposed solution adopts the SOA (Service-Oriented Architecture) when implementing SDSP (Spatial Data Sharing Platform). To accomplish this, a new abstract layer, GSB (Geography Service Bus), is created to provide standard interface. GSB extends ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) proposed by IBM and SUN, and combines the application in geography. GSB inherits the general features of ESB, such as interoperability, heterogeneity and service-oriented while offering unique functions like the high volume geo-data access and better management in geographic services. GSB includes the following JAVA implemented components: the management component of the geography registry service, the route component of the geography request service and the geographical business process component, etc. GSB plays an important role in SDSP and has been developed and successfully applied in the Data Center for Resources & Environmental Sciences in East China as a key project of Chinese Academy of Sciences. It has been observed that the introduction of GSB has tremendously improved both performance and interoperability of SDSP among heterogeneous GIS than traditional methods.

  3. Data sharing reveals complexity in the westward spread of domestic animals across Neolithic Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Benjamin S; Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric; Orton, David; Çakırlar, Canan; Gourichon, Lionel; Atici, Levent; Galik, Alfred; Marciniak, Arkadiusz; Mulville, Jacqui; Buitenhuis, Hijlke; Carruthers, Denise; De Cupere, Bea; Demirergi, Arzu; Frame, Sheelagh; Helmer, Daniel; Martin, Louise; Peters, Joris; Pöllath, Nadja; Pawłowska, Kamilla; Russell, Nerissa; Twiss, Katheryn; Würtenberger, Doris

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the results of a major data integration project bringing together primary archaeozoological data for over 200,000 faunal specimens excavated from seventeen sites in Turkey spanning the Epipaleolithic through Chalcolithic periods, c. 18,000-4,000 cal BC, in order to document the initial westward spread of domestic livestock across Neolithic central and western Turkey. From these shared datasets we demonstrate that the westward expansion of Neolithic subsistence technologies combined multiple routes and pulses but did not involve a set 'package' comprising all four livestock species including sheep, goat, cattle and pig. Instead, Neolithic animal economies in the study regions are shown to be more diverse than deduced previously using quantitatively more limited datasets. Moreover, during the transition to agro-pastoral economies interactions between domestic stock and local wild fauna continued. Through publication of datasets with Open Context (opencontext.org), this project emphasizes the benefits of data sharing and web-based dissemination of large primary data sets for exploring major questions in archaeology (Alternative Language Abstract S1). PMID:24927173

  4. Quantitative Imaging Network: Data Sharing and Competitive AlgorithmValidation Leveraging The Cancer Imaging Archive1

    PubMed Central

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Freymann, John Blake; Kirby, Justin Stephen; Kinahan, Paul Eugene; Prior, Fred William

    2014-01-01

    The Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN), supported by the National Cancer Institute, is designed to promote research and development of quantitative imaging methods and candidate biomarkers for the measurement of tumor response in clinical trial settings. An integral aspect of the QIN mission is to facilitate collaborative activities that seek to develop best practices for the analysis of cancer imaging data. The QIN working groups and teams are developing new algorithms for image analysis and novel biomarkers for the assessment of response to therapy. To validate these algorithms and biomarkers and translate them into clinical practice, algorithms need to be compared and evaluated on large and diverse data sets. Analysis competitions, or “challenges,” are being conducted within the QIN as a means to accomplish this goal. The QIN has demonstrated, through its leveraging of The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA), that data sharing of clinical images across multiple sites is feasible and that it can enable and support these challenges. In addition to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) imaging data, many TCIA collections provide linked clinical, pathology, and “ground truth” data generated by readers that could be used for further challenges. The TCIA-QIN partnership is a successful model that provides resources for multisite sharing of clinical imaging data and the implementation of challenges to support algorithm and biomarker validation. PMID:24772218

  5. Data Sharing Reveals Complexity in the Westward Spread of Domestic Animals across Neolithic Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Benjamin S.; Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric; Orton, David; Çakırlar, Canan; Gourichon, Lionel; Atici, Levent; Galik, Alfred; Marciniak, Arkadiusz; Mulville, Jacqui; Buitenhuis, Hijlke; Carruthers, Denise; De Cupere, Bea; Demirergi, Arzu; Frame, Sheelagh; Helmer, Daniel; Martin, Louise; Peters, Joris; Pöllath, Nadja; Pawłowska, Kamilla; Russell, Nerissa; Twiss, Katheryn; Würtenberger, Doris

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the results of a major data integration project bringing together primary archaeozoological data for over 200,000 faunal specimens excavated from seventeen sites in Turkey spanning the Epipaleolithic through Chalcolithic periods, c. 18,000-4,000 cal BC, in order to document the initial westward spread of domestic livestock across Neolithic central and western Turkey. From these shared datasets we demonstrate that the westward expansion of Neolithic subsistence technologies combined multiple routes and pulses but did not involve a set ‘package’ comprising all four livestock species including sheep, goat, cattle and pig. Instead, Neolithic animal economies in the study regions are shown to be more diverse than deduced previously using quantitatively more limited datasets. Moreover, during the transition to agro-pastoral economies interactions between domestic stock and local wild fauna continued. Through publication of datasets with Open Context (opencontext.org), this project emphasizes the benefits of data sharing and web-based dissemination of large primary data sets for exploring major questions in archaeology (Alternative Language Abstract S1). PMID:24927173

  6. DeID – a data sharing tool for neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuebo; Wang, James; Wang, Anlin; Meng, Qingping; Prescott, Christian; Tsu, Loretta; Eckert, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Funding institutions and researchers increasingly expect that data will be shared to increase scientific integrity and provide other scientists with the opportunity to use the data with novel methods that may advance understanding in a particular field of study. In practice, sharing human subject data can be complicated because data must be de-identified prior to sharing. Moreover, integrating varied data types collected in a study can be challenging and time consuming. For example, sharing data from structural imaging studies of a complex disorder requires the integration of imaging, demographic and/or behavioral data in a way that no subject identifiers are included in the de-identified dataset and with new subject labels or identification values that cannot be tracked back to the original ones. We have developed a Java program that users can use to remove identifying information in neuroimaging datasets, while still maintaining the association among different data types from the same subject for further studies. This software provides a series of user interaction wizards to allow users to select data variables to be de-identified, implements functions for auditing and validation of de-identified data, and enables the user to share the de-identified data in a single compressed package through various communication protocols, such as FTPS and SFTP. DeID runs with Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems and its open architecture allows it to be easily adapted to support a broader array of data types, with the goal of facilitating data sharing. DeID can be obtained at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/deid. PMID:26441500

  7. Lessons learned while building the Deepwater Horizon Database: Toward improved data sharing in coastal science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thessen, Anne E.; McGinnis, Sean; North, Elizabeth W.

    2016-02-01

    Process studies and coupled-model validation efforts in geosciences often require integration of multiple data types across time and space. For example, improved prediction of hydrocarbon fate and transport is an important societal need which fundamentally relies upon synthesis of oceanography and hydrocarbon chemistry. Yet, there are no publically accessible databases which integrate these diverse data types in a georeferenced format, nor are there guidelines for developing such a database. The objective of this research was to analyze the process of building one such database to provide baseline information on data sources and data sharing and to document the challenges and solutions that arose during this major undertaking. The resulting Deepwater Horizon Database was approximately 2.4 GB in size and contained over 8 million georeferenced data points collected from industry, government databases, volunteer networks, and individual researchers. The major technical challenges that were overcome were reconciliation of terms, units, and quality flags which were necessary to effectively integrate the disparate data sets. Assembling this database required the development of relationships with individual researchers and data managers which often involved extensive e-mail contacts. The average number of emails exchanged per data set was 7.8. Of the 95 relevant data sets that were discovered, 38 (40%) were obtained, either in whole or in part. Over one third (36%) of the requests for data went unanswered. The majority of responses were received after the first request (64%) and within the first week of the first request (67%). Although fewer than half of the potentially relevant datasets were incorporated into the database, the level of sharing (40%) was high compared to some other disciplines where sharing can be as low as 10%. Our suggestions for building integrated databases include budgeting significant time for e-mail exchanges, being cognizant of the cost versus

  8. A Review of the Use of Script-Based Tracking in CALL Research for Data Sharing: Applications Providing Meaning Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang

    2013-01-01

    Using script-based tracking to gain insights into the way students learn or process language information can be traced as far back as to the 1980s. Nevertheless, researchers continue to face challenges in collecting and studying this type of data. The objective of this study is to propose data sharing through data repositories as a way to (a) ease…

  9. Panel A report: Standards needed to interconnect ADS pilots for data sharing for catalogues, directories, and dictionaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    User requirements, guidelines, and standards for interconnecting an Applications Data Service (ADS) program for data sharing are discussed. Methods for effective sharing of information (catalogues, directories, and dictionaries) among member installations are addressed. An ADS Directory/Catalog architectural model is also given.

  10. The Climate-G testbed: towards a large scale data sharing environment for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, G.; Fiore, S.; Denvil, S.; Petitdidier, M.; Fox, P.; Schwichtenberg, H.; Blower, J.; Barbera, R.

    2009-04-01

    data visualization; metadata search/discovery across several countries/institutions; open environment for climate change data sharing.

  11. a Public Platform for Geospatial Data Sharing for Disaster Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbo, S.; Boccardo, P.; Dalmasso, S.; Pasquali, P.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted in Africa to assist local governments in addressing the risk situation related to natural hazards. Geospatial data containing information on vulnerability, impacts, climate change, disaster risk reduction is usually part of the output of such studies and is valuable to national and international organizations to reduce the risks and mitigate the impacts of disasters. Nevertheless this data isn't efficiently widely distributed and often resides in remote storage solutions hardly reachable. Spatial Data Infrastructures are technical solutions capable to solve this issue, by storing geospatial data and making them widely available through the internet. Among these solutions, GeoNode, an open source online platform for geospatial data sharing, has been developed in recent years. GeoNode is a platform for the management and publication of geospatial data. It brings together mature and stable open-source software projects under a consistent and easy-to-use interface allowing users, with little training, to quickly and easily share data and create interactive maps. GeoNode data management tools allow for integrated creation of data, metadata, and map visualizations. Each dataset in the system can be shared publicly or restricted to allow access to only specific users. Social features like user profiles and commenting and rating systems allow for the development of communities around each platform to facilitate the use, management, and quality control of the data the GeoNode instance contains (http://geonode.org/). This paper presents a case study scenario of setting up a Web platform based on GeoNode. It is a public platform called MASDAP and promoted by the Government of Malawi in order to support development of the country and build resilience against natural disasters. A substantial amount of geospatial data has already been collected about hydrogeological risk, as well as several

  12. Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

    2007-05-31

    -commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

  13. One strategy to reduce medication errors: the effect of an online continuing education module on nurses' use of the Lexi-Comp feature of the Pyxis MedStation 2000.

    PubMed

    Straight, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the impact of an online self-learning module on nurse knowledge and use of the Lexi-Comp feature of the Pyxis MedStation Rx 2000 system, a point-of-care medication delivery system. Data were collected among nurse-users at a community-based healthcare organization (N = 41). Pre- and post-training surveys were used to evaluate training effects. After training, completion of the tutorial and knowledge and use of the Lexi-Comp feature increased by 23% and 56%, respectively. One month after training, a drop in medication errors on administration at the healthcare organization was observed. These findings suggest that use of evaluative and instructional tools would improve integration of technology and clinical practice and improve patient outcomes in medication error reduction. PMID:18091618

  14. Insulin use: preventable errors.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is vital for patients with type 1 diabetes and useful for certain patients with type 2 diabetes. The serious consequences of insulin-related medication errors are overdose, resulting in severe hypoglycaemia, causing seizures, coma and even death; or underdose, resulting in hyperglycaemia and sometimes ketoacidosis. Errors associated with the preparation and administration of insulin are often reported, both outside and inside the hospital setting. These errors are preventable. By analysing reports from organisations devoted to medication error prevention and from poison control centres, as well as a few studies and detailed case reports of medication errors, various types of error associated with insulin use have been identified, especially in the hospital setting. Generally, patients know more about the practicalities of their insulin treatment than healthcare professionals with intermittent involvement. Medication errors involving insulin can occur at each step of the medication-use process: prescribing, data entry, preparation, dispensing and administration. When prescribing insulin, wrong-dose errors have been caused by the use of abbreviations, especially "U" instead of the word "units" (often resulting in a 10-fold overdose because the "U" is read as a zero), or by failing to write the drug's name correctly or in full. In electronic prescribing, the sheer number of insulin products is a source of confusion and, ultimately, wrong-dose errors, and often overdose. Prescribing, dispensing or administration software is rarely compatible with insulin prescriptions in which the dose is adjusted on the basis of the patient's subsequent capillary blood glucose readings, and can therefore generate errors. When preparing and dispensing insulin, a tuberculin syringe is sometimes used instead of an insulin syringe, leading to overdose. Other errors arise from confusion created by similar packaging, between different insulin products or between insulin and other

  15. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close ...

  16. Why is Data Sharing in Collaborative Natural Resource Efforts so Hard and What can We Do to Improve it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Carol J.; Lucero, Yasmin; Barnas, Katie

    2014-05-01

    Increasingly, research and management in natural resource science rely on very large datasets compiled from multiple sources. While it is generally good to have more data, utilizing large, complex datasets has introduced challenges in data sharing, especially for collaborating researchers in disparate locations ("distributed research teams"). We surveyed natural resource scientists about common data-sharing problems. The major issues identified by our survey respondents ( n = 118) when providing data were lack of clarity in the data request (including format of data requested). When receiving data, survey respondents reported various insufficiencies in documentation describing the data (e.g., no data collection description/no protocol, data aggregated, or summarized without explanation). Since metadata, or "information about the data," is a central obstacle in efficient data handling, we suggest documenting metadata through data dictionaries, protocols, read-me files, explicit null value documentation, and process metadata as essential to any large-scale research program. We advocate for all researchers, but especially those involved in distributed teams to alleviate these problems with the use of several readily available communication strategies including the use of organizational charts to define roles, data flow diagrams to outline procedures and timelines, and data update cycles to guide data-handling expectations. In particular, we argue that distributed research teams magnify data-sharing challenges making data management training even more crucial for natural resource scientists. If natural resource scientists fail to overcome communication and metadata documentation issues, then negative data-sharing experiences will likely continue to undermine the success of many large-scale collaborative projects.

  17. An intelligent monitoring and management system for cross-enterprise biomedical data sharing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tusheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jianguo

    2013-03-01

    In order to enable multiple disciplines of medical researchers, clinical physicians and biomedical engineers working together in a secured, efficient, and transparent cooperative environment, we had designed an e-Science platform for biomedical imaging research and application cross multiple academic institutions and hospitals in Shanghai by using grid-based or cloud-based distributed architecture and presented this work in SPIE Medical Imaging conference held in San Diego in 2012. However, when the platform integrates more and more nodes over different networks, the first challenge is that how to monitor and maintain all the hosts and services operating cross multiple academic institutions and hospitals in the e-Science platform, such as DICOM and Web based image communication services, messaging services and XDS ITI transaction services. In this presentation, we presented a system design and implementation of intelligent monitoring and management which can collect system resource status of every node in real time, alert when node or service failure occurs, and can finally improve the robustness, reliability and service continuity of this e-Science platform.

  18. Precompetitive Data Sharing as a Catalyst to Address Unmet Needs in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Diane; Hu, Michele T; Romero, Klaus; Breen, Kieran; Burn, David; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bhattaram, Atul; Isaac, Maria; Venuto, Charles; Kubota, Ken; Little, Max A; Friend, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Morris, Huw R; Grosset, Donald; Sutherland, Margaret; Gallacher, John; Williams-Gray, Caroline; Bain, Lisa J; Avilés, Enrique; Marek, Ken; Toga, Arthur W; Stark, Yafit; Forrest Gordon, Mark; Ford, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex heterogeneous disorder with urgent need for disease-modifying therapies. Progress in successful therapeutic approaches for PD will require an unprecedented level of collaboration. At a workshop hosted by Parkinson's UK and co-organized by Critical Path Institute's (C-Path) Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD) Consortiums, investigators from industry, academia, government and regulatory agencies agreed on the need for sharing of data to enable future success. Government agencies included EMA, FDA, NINDS/NIH and IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative). Emerging discoveries in new biomarkers and genetic endophenotypes are contributing to our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of PD. In parallel there is growing recognition that early intervention will be key for successful treatments aimed at disease modification. At present, there is a lack of a comprehensive understanding of disease progression and the many factors that contribute to disease progression heterogeneity. Novel therapeutic targets and trial designs that incorporate existing and new biomarkers to evaluate drug effects independently and in combination are required. The integration of robust clinical data sets is viewed as a powerful approach to hasten medical discovery and therapies, as is being realized across diverse disease conditions employing big data analytics for healthcare. The application of lessons learned from parallel efforts is critical to identify barriers and enable a viable path forward. A roadmap is presented for a regulatory, academic, industry and advocacy driven integrated initiative that aims to facilitate and streamline new drug trials and registrations in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26406139

  19. Metadata Repository for Improved Data Sharing and Reuse Based on HL7 FHIR.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Hannes; Kock, Ann-Kristin; Duhm-Harbeck, Petra; Habermann, Jens K; Ingenerf, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Unreconciled data structures and formats are a common obstacle to the urgently required sharing and reuse of data within healthcare and medical research. Within the North German Tumor Bank of Colorectal Cancer, clinical and sample data, based on a harmonized data set, is collected and can be pooled by using a hospital-integrated Research Data Management System supporting biobank and study management. Adding further partners who are not using the core data set requires manual adaptations and mapping of data elements. Facing this manual intervention and focusing the reuse of heterogeneous healthcare instance data (value level) and data elements (metadata level), a metadata repository has been developed. The metadata repository is an ISO 11179-3 conformant server application built for annotating and mediating data elements. The implemented architecture includes the translation of metadata information about data elements into the FHIR standard using the FHIR Data Element resource with the ISO 11179 Data Element Extensions. The FHIR-based processing allows exchange of data elements with clinical and research IT systems as well as with other metadata systems. With increasingly annotated and harmonized data elements, data quality and integration can be improved for successfully enabling data analytics and decision support. PMID:27577363

  20. Physical examination. Frequently observed errors.

    PubMed

    Wiener, S; Nathanson, M

    1976-08-16

    A method allowing for direct observation of intern and resident physicians while interviewing and examining patients has been in use on our medical wards for the last five years. A large number of errors in the performance of the medical examination by young physicians were noted and a classification of these errors into those of technique, omission, detection, interpretation, and recording was made. An approach to detection and correction of each of these kinds of errors is presented, as well as a discussion of possible reasons for the occurrence of these errors in physician performance. PMID:947266

  1. Help prevent hospital errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Medication Errors Patient Safety Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission ... for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D. ...

  2. A systematic literature review of individuals' perspectives on broad consent and data sharing in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Nanibaa' A.; Sathe, Nila A.; Antommaria, Armand H. Matheny; Holm, Ingrid A.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Smith, Maureen E.; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Clayton, Ellen W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In 2011, an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking proposed that de-identified human data and specimens be included in biobanks only if patients provide consent. The National Institutes of Health Genomic Data Sharing policy went into effect in 2015, requiring broad consent from almost all research participants. Genet Med 18 7, 663–671. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review of attitudes toward biobanking, broad consent, and data sharing. Bibliographic databases included MEDLINE, Web of Science, EthxWeb, and GenETHX. Study screening was conducted using DistillerSR. Genet Med 18 7, 663–671. Results: The final 48 studies included surveys (n = 23), focus groups (n = 8), mixed methods (n = 14), interviews (n = 1), and consent form analyses (n = 2). Study quality was characterized as good (n = 19), fair (n = 27), and poor (n = 2). Although many participants objected, broad consent was often preferred over tiered or study-specific consent, particularly when broad consent was the only option, samples were de-identified, logistics of biobanks were communicated, and privacy was addressed. Willingness for data to be shared was high, but it was lower among individuals from under-represented minorities, individuals with privacy and confidentiality concerns, and when pharmaceutical companies had access to data. Genet Med 18 7, 663–671. Conclusions: Additional research is needed to understand factors affecting willingness to give broad consent for biobank research and data sharing in order to address concerns to enhance acceptability. Genet Med 18 7, 663–671. PMID:26583683

  3. Research Enabled through Eighteen Years of Geodesy Data Sharing by the UNAVCO Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.

    2009-12-01

    et al., 2003]. An important contribution to these analyses for the Great Basin is MAGNET, a 307-station array operated by the University of Nevada with 30-50 active stations per day since 2004 [Blewitt et al., 2004]. The simultaneous increase in GNSS data and analysis expertise now allows for routine global analysis of many thousands of GNSS stations. Such analysis ensures that all phase ambiguities are fixed and that common-mode errors are significantly reduced and thereby allow for increased spatial and temporal resolution for strain-rate models and other solid-earth investigations. These examples highlight two research areas where exciting advances are built upon the GNSS data available from the UNAVCO Data Center. The continued open availability of GNSS data will provide an invaluable resource for refinement of current understanding of geodesy and completely new discoveries into the future. Blewitt, G., C. Kreemer, and W.C. Hammond (2009). Geodetic observation of contemporary deformation in the northern Walker Lane: 1. Semipermanent GPS strategy, p. 1-15, doi: 10.1130/2009.2447(03). Kreemer, C., W.E. Holt, and A.J. Haines, An integrated global model of present-day plate motions and plate boundary deformation, Geophys. J. Int., 154, 8-34, 2003.

  4. The primary reasons behind data sharing, its wider benefits and how to cope with the realities of commercial data.

    PubMed

    Tellam, Ross L; Rushton, Paul; Schuerman, Peter; Pala, Irene; Anane, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Data availability expectations have changed over the years in scientific publishing, nowhere more so than in the field of genomics. This field has spearheaded openness and transparency via public and structured deposition of data. BMC Genomics strongly encourages deposition and unrestricted availability of all primary data underlying research studies both as a way of ensuring reproducibility and standardisation, but also as part of overall community-driven expectation on data deposition and sharing. With funders and publishers moving towards more explicit mandates (regarding data availability), we examined the current barriers to unrestricted availability of data and explored different scenarios in which commercial agreements might run contrary to scientific convention and data sharing policies. In this editorial, Ross Tellam (CSIRO, Australia), Paul Rushton (Texas A&M AgriLife Research) and Peter Schuerman (University of California, Merced), give their views on the importance of data sharing and examine the current challenges in research fields like crop and livestock genomics, where often it is necessary to integrate the interests of academic and commercial stakeholders. We discuss the current approaches, highlight the importance of community-driven standards, and propose ways forward. PMID:26343138

  5. tranSMART: An Open Source and Community-Driven Informatics and Data Sharing Platform for Clinical and Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Athey, Brian D; Braxenthaler, Michael; Haas, Magali; Guo, Yike

    2013-01-01

    tranSMART is an emerging global open source public private partnership community developing a comprehensive informatics-based analysis and data-sharing cloud platform for clinical and translational research. The tranSMART consortium includes pharmaceutical and other companies, not-for-profits, academic entities, patient advocacy groups, and government stakeholders. The tranSMART value proposition relies on the concept that the global community of users, developers, and stakeholders are the best source of innovation for applications and for useful data. Continued development and use of the tranSMART platform will create a means to enable "pre-competitive" data sharing broadly, saving money and, potentially accelerating research translation to cures. Significant transformative effects of tranSMART includes 1) allowing for all its user community to benefit from experts globally, 2) capturing the best of innovation in analytic tools, 3) a growing 'big data' resource, 4) convergent standards, and 5) new informatics-enabled translational science in the pharma, academic, and not-for-profit sectors. PMID:24303286

  6. Improving HIV Surveillance Data for Public Health Action in Washington, DC: A Novel Multiorganizational Data-Sharing Method

    PubMed Central

    Smart, JC

    2016-01-01

    Background The National HIV/AIDS Strategy calls for active surveillance programs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to more accurately measure access to and retention in care across the HIV care continuum for persons living with HIV within their jurisdictions and to identify persons who may need public health services. However, traditional public health surveillance methods face substantial technological and privacy-related barriers to data sharing. Objective This study developed a novel data-sharing approach to improve the timeliness and quality of HIV surveillance data in three jurisdictions where persons may often travel across the borders of the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. Methods A deterministic algorithm of approximately 1000 lines was developed, including a person-matching system with Enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS) variables. Person matching was defined in categories (from strongest to weakest): exact, very high, high, medium high, medium, medium low, low, and very low. The algorithm was verified using conventional component testing methods, manual code inspection, and comprehensive output file examination. Results were validated by jurisdictions using internal review processes. Results Of 161,343 uploaded eHARS records from District of Columbia (N=49,326), Maryland (N=66,200), and Virginia (N=45,817), a total of 21,472 persons were matched across jurisdictions over various strengths in a matching process totaling 21 minutes and 58 seconds in the privacy device, leaving 139,871 uniquely identified with only one jurisdiction. No records matched as medium low or low. Over 80% of the matches were identified as either exact or very high matches. Three separate validation methods were conducted for this study, and they all found ≥90% accuracy between records matched by this novel method and traditional matching methods. Conclusions This study illustrated a novel data-sharing approach that may facilitate timelier and better

  7. Data Governance and Data Sharing Agreements for Community-Wide Health Information Exchange: Lessons from the Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Claudia; Des Jardins, Terrisca R.; Heider, Arvela; Lyman, Kristin A.; McWilliams, Lee; Rein, Alison L.; Schachter, Abigail A.; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Topper, Joan; Turske, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Unprecedented efforts are underway across the United States to electronically capture and exchange health information to improve health care and population health, and reduce costs. This increased collection and sharing of electronic patient data raises several governance issues, including privacy, security, liability, and market competition. Those engaged in such efforts have had to develop data sharing agreements (DSAs) among entities involved in information exchange, many of whom are “nontraditional” health care entities and/or new partners. This paper shares lessons learned based on the experiences of six federally funded communities participating in the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, and offers guidance for navigating data governance issues and developing DSAs to facilitate community-wide health information exchange. Innovation: While all entities involved in electronic data sharing must address governance issues and create DSAs accordingly, until recently little formal guidance existed for doing so – particularly for community-based initiatives. Despite this lack of guidance, together the Beacon Communities’ experiences highlight promising strategies for navigating complex governance issues, which may be useful to other entities or communities initiating information exchange efforts to support delivery system transformation. Credibility: For the past three years, AcademyHealth has provided technical assistance to most of the 17 Beacon Communities, 6 of whom contributed to this collaborative writing effort. Though these communities varied widely in terms of their demographics, resources, and Beacon-driven priorities, common themes emerged as they described their approaches to data governance and DSA development. Conclusions: The 6 Beacon Communities confirmed that DSAs are necessary to satisfy legal and market-based concerns, and they identified several specific issues, many of which have been noted by others involved in

  8. Developing Ethical Practices for Public Health Research Data Sharing in South Africa: The Views and Experiences From a Diverse Sample of Research Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Denny, Spencer G; Silaigwana, Blessing; Wassenaar, Douglas; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The abundance of South African clinical and public health research data has the potential to unlock important and valuable future advances in biomedical science. Amid increasing calls for more effective sharing of individual-level data, commitment to promote access to research data is evident within South Africa's public research sector, but national guidance and regulation are absent. This qualitative study examined the perceptions, experiences and concerns of 32 research stakeholders about data-sharing practices. There was consensus about the utility of data sharing in publicly funded health research. However, disparate views emerged about the possible harms and benefits of sharing data and how these should be weighed. The relative dearth of policies governing data-sharing practices needs to be addressed and a framework of support developed that incentivizes data-sharing practices for researchers that are both ethical and effective. PMID:26297750

  9. Sharing Public Health Research Data: Toward the Development of Ethical Data-Sharing Practice in Low- and Middle-Income Settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Bull, Susan

    2015-07-01

    It is increasingly recognized that effective and appropriate data sharing requires the development of models of good data-sharing practice capable of taking seriously both the potential benefits to be gained and the importance of ensuring that the rights and interests of participants are respected and that risk of harms is minimized. Calls for the greater sharing of individual-level data from biomedical and public health research are receiving support among researchers and research funders. Despite its potential importance, data sharing presents important ethical, social, and institutional challenges in low-income settings. In this article, we report on qualitative research conducted in five low- and middle-income countries exploring the experiences of key research stakeholders and their views about what constitutes good data-sharing practice. PMID:26297744

  10. Data sharing and intellectual property in a genomic epidemiology network: policies for large-scale research collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Dave A.; Parker, Michael; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic epidemiology is a field of research that seeks to improve the prevention and management of common diseases through an understanding of their molecular origins. It involves studying thousands of individuals, often from different populations, with exacting techniques. The scale and complexity of such research has required the formation of research consortia. Members of these consortia need to agree on policies for managing shared resources and handling genetic data. Here we consider data-sharing and intellectual property policies for an international research consortium working on the genomic epidemiology of malaria. We outline specific guidelines governing how samples and data are transferred among its members; how results are released into the public domain; when to seek protection for intellectual property; and how intellectual property should be managed. We outline some pragmatic solutions founded on the basic principles of promoting innovation and access. PMID:16710548

  11. National Geothermal Data System: Case Studies on Exploration and Development of Potential Geothermal Sites Through Distributed Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Arlene; Allison, Lee; Richard, Steve; Caudill-Daugherty, Christy; Patten, Kim

    2014-09-29

    The NGDS released version 1 of the system on April 30, 2014 using the US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) as its data integration platform. NGDS supports the 2013 Open Data Policy, and as such, the launch was featured at the 2014 Energy Datapalooza. Currently, the NGDS features a comprehensive user interface for searching and accessing nearly 41,000 documents and more than 9 million data points shared by scores of data providers across the U.S. The NGDS supports distributed data sharing, permitting the data owners to maintain the raw data that is made available to the consumer. Researchers and industry have been utilizing the NGDS as a mechanism for promoting geothermal development across the country, from hydrothermal to ground source heat pump applications. Case studies in geothermal research and exploration from across the country are highlighted.

  12. Sweat, Skepticism, and Uncharted Territory: A Qualitative Study of Opinions on Data Sharing Among Public Health Researchers and Research Participants in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Hate, Ketaki; Meherally, Sanna; Shah More, Neena; Jayaraman, Anuja; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Osrin, David

    2015-07-01

    Efforts to internalize data sharing in research practice have been driven largely by developing international norms that have not incorporated opinions from researchers in low- and middle-income countries. We sought to identify the issues around ethical data sharing in the context of research involving women and children in urban India. We interviewed researchers, managers, and research participants associated with a Mumbai non-governmental organization, as well as researchers from other organizations and members of ethics committees. We conducted 22 individual semi-structured interviews and involved 44 research participants in focus group discussions. We used framework analysis to examine ideas about data and data sharing in general; its potential benefits or harms, barriers, obligations, and governance; and the requirements for consent. Both researchers and participants were generally in favor of data sharing, although limited experience amplified their reservations. We identified three themes: concerns that the work of data producers may not receive appropriate acknowledgment, skepticism about the process of sharing, and the fact that the terrain of data sharing was essentially uncharted and confusing. To increase data sharing in India, we need to provide guidelines, protocols, and examples of good practice in terms of consent, data preparation, screening of applications, and what individuals and organizations can expect in terms of validation, acknowledgment, and authorship. PMID:26297746

  13. Computerized medication administration records decrease medication occurrences.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Hill, J J; Wilson, R G; Nipper, K; Kwon, I W

    1997-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that medication errors occur at a number of locations in the continuum between ordering of drug therapy and administration of the medication. Computer management of patient medication profiles offers the opportunity to enhance communication between pharmacists and nurses, and to decrease medication errors and delays in delivery of therapy. A number of authors have postulated that computerization of medication profiles would enhance medication delivery accuracy and timeliness, but no study has demonstrated this improvement. We report the results of a retrospective analysis undertaken to assess the improvements resulting from sharing a computerized medication record. We used a broader definition of medication occurrences that includes the more traditional definition, and averted errors, delays in delivery of medications and information, and disagreements between pharmacy and nursing medication profiles. We compared medication occurrences reported through an existing internal system between two periods; the first when separate pharmacy and nursing medication records were used, and the second period when a shared medication record was used by pharmacy and nursing. Average medication occurrences per admission decreased from 0.1084 to 0.0658 (p < 0.01). Medication occurrences per dose decreased from 0.0005 to 0.0003 (p < 0.01). The use of a shared medication record by pharmacy and nursing led to a statistically significant decrease in medication occurrences. Information shared between the two professions allowed timely resolution of discrepancies in medication orders, leading to better execution of drug therapy, decreased medication occurrences, and increased efficiency. PMID:10166241

  14. The Benefits and Challenges of Having AN Open and Free Basis Satellite Data Sharing Platform in Turkey: GEZGİN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda Deveci, Hüsne; Koru, Aziz; Sakarya, Ufuk; Tevrizoğlu, İsmail; Teke, Mustafa; Küpçü, Ramazan; Avenoğlu, Bülent; Demirkesen, Can; Zübeyde Gürbüz, Sevgi; Feray Öztoprak, A.; Açıkgöz, İbrahim Serdar; Hakkı Demirhan, İsmail; Ömer Kozal, Ali; Efendioğlu, Mehmet; Berke, Erdinç; Fehmi Şimşek, F.; Atıl, İlkay; Kaya, Derya; Uçmak, Pınar; Ersöz, Eda; Özen, Hilal

    2016-06-01

    Turkey is a county that experiences rapid socioeconomic development, which, in turn, leads to high urbanization rates due to migration of people from rural to urban areas, many large-scale development projects (e.g. highways, dams, housing and infrastructure), and environmental problems that adversely affect agriculture, such as soil erosion and deforestation. Furthermore, Turkey lies in a region prone to natural disasters, especially earthquakes, landslides, flooding and forest fires. Successfully overcoming these challenges requires continuous monitoring to enable rapid response as well as the development of effective socioeconomic policies. In this regard, space-based earth observation (EO) systems play a critical role in the rapid acquisiton and extraction of crucial information. The first launch of the first Turkish-designed satellite, RASAT, in 2011 led to the wide-spread exploitation of space-based resources by Turkish institutions through the dissemination of EO data on an open and free basis via the GEZGIN internet portal (http://www.gezgin.gov.tr). The push for data sharing was further instigated by the nationally funded project GEOPORTAL ("Satellite Image Processing and Geoportal Development Project") and European Union FP7 project EOPOWER ("Earth Observation for Economic Empowerment"), which strove to create conditions for sustainable economic development through the increased use of Earth observation products and services for environmental applications. In this work, the technical challenges involving processing and preparing raw satellite data for dissemination as well as software design of the GEZGIN Portal will be presented.

  15. If We Share Data, Will Anyone Use Them? Data Sharing and Reuse in the Long Tail of Science and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Jillian C.; Rolando, Elizabeth; Borgman, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Research on practices to share and reuse data will inform the design of infrastructure to support data collection, management, and discovery in the long tail of science and technology. These are research domains in which data tend to be local in character, minimally structured, and minimally documented. We report on a ten-year study of the Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center. We found that CENS researchers are willing to share their data, but few are asked to do so, and in only a few domain areas do their funders or journals require them to deposit data. Few repositories exist to accept data in CENS research areas.. Data sharing tends to occur only through interpersonal exchanges. CENS researchers obtain data from repositories, and occasionally from registries and individuals, to provide context, calibration, or other forms of background for their studies. Neither CENS researchers nor those who request access to CENS data appear to use external data for primary research questions or for replication of studies. CENS researchers are willing to share data if they receive credit and retain first rights to publish their results. Practices of releasing, sharing, and reusing of data in CENS reaffirm the gift culture of scholarship, in which goods are bartered between trusted colleagues rather than treated as commodities. PMID:23935830

  16. Toward Global Biobank Integration by Implementation of the Minimum Information About BIobank Data Sharing (MIABIS 2.0 Core).

    PubMed

    Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Norlin, Loreana; van Enckevort, David; Anton, Gabriele; Schuffenhauer, Simone; Silander, Kaisa; Mook, Linda; Holub, Petr; Bild, Raffael; Swertz, Morris; Litton, Jan-Eric

    2016-08-01

    Biobanks are the biological back end of data-driven medicine, but lack standards and generic solutions for interoperability and information harmonization. The move toward a global information infrastructure for biobanking demands semantic interoperability through harmonized services and common ontologies. To tackle this issue, the Minimum Information About BIobank data Sharing (MIABIS) was developed in 2012 by the Biobanking and BioMolecular Resources Research Infrastructure of Sweden (BBMRI.se). The wide acceptance of the first version of MIABIS encouraged evolving it to a more structured and descriptive standard. In 2013 a working group was formed under the largest infrastructure for health in Europe, Biobanking and BioMolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI-ERIC), with the remit to continue the development of MIABIS (version 2.0) through a multicountry governance process. MIABIS 2.0 Core has been developed with 22 attributes describing Biobanks, Sample Collections, and Studies according to a modular structure that makes it easier to adhere to and to extend the standard. This integration standard will make a great contribution to the discovery and exploitation of biobank resources and lead to a wider and more efficient use of valuable bioresources, thereby speeding up the research on human diseases. Many within the European Union have accepted MIABIS 2.0 Core as the "de facto" biobank information standard. PMID:26977825

  17. The Rate of Physicochemical Incompatibilities, Administration Errors. Factors Correlating with Nurses' Errors.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, Fanak; Sefidani Forough, Aida; Taghikhani, Sepideh; Saliminejad, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors are commonly encountered in hospital setting. Intravenous medications pose particular risks because of their greater complexity and the multiple steps required in their preparation, administration and monitoring. We aimed to determine the rate of errors during the preparation and administration phase of intravenous medications and the correlation of these errors with the demographics of nurses involved in the process. One hundred patients who were receiving IV medications were monitored by a trained pharmacist. The researcher accompanied the nurses during the preparation and administration process of IV medications. Collected data were compared with the acceptable guidelines. A checklist was filled for each IV medication. Demographic data of the nurses were collected as well. A total of 454 IV medications were recorded. Inappropriate administration rate constituted a large proportion of errors in our study (35.3%). No significant or life threatening drug interaction was recorded during the study. Evaluating the impact of the nurses' demographic characteristics on the incidence of medication errors showed that there is a direct correlation between nurses' employment status and the rate of medication errors, while other characteristics did not show a significant impact on the rate of administration errors. Administration errors were significantly higher in temporary 1-year contract group than other groups (p-value < 0.0001). Study results show that there should be more vigilance on administration rate of IV medications to prevent negative consequences especially by pharmacists. Optimizing the working conditions of nurses may play a crucial role. PMID:26185509

  18. The Rate of Physicochemical Incompatibilities, Administration Errors. Factors Correlating with Nurses' Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, Fanak; Sefidani Forough, Aida; Taghikhani, Sepideh; Saliminejad, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors are commonly encountered in hospital setting. Intravenous medications pose particular risks because of their greater complexity and the multiple steps required in their preparation, administration and monitoring. We aimed to determine the rate of errors during the preparation and administration phase of intravenous medications and the correlation of these errors with the demographics of nurses involved in the process. One hundred patients who were receiving IV medications were monitored by a trained pharmacist. The researcher accompanied the nurses during the preparation and administration process of IV medications. Collected data were compared with the acceptable guidelines. A checklist was filled for each IV medication. Demographic data of the nurses were collected as well. A total of 454 IV medications were recorded. Inappropriate administration rate constituted a large proportion of errors in our study (35.3%). No significant or life threatening drug interaction was recorded during the study. Evaluating the impact of the nurses’ demographic characteristics on the incidence of medication errors showed that there is a direct correlation between nurses’ employment status and the rate of medication errors, while other characteristics did not show a significant impact on the rate of administration errors. Administration errors were significantly higher in temporary 1-year contract group than other groups (p-value < 0.0001). Study results show that there should be more vigilance on administration rate of IV medications to prevent negative consequences especially by pharmacists. Optimizing the working conditions of nurses may play a crucial role. PMID:26185509

  19. Nanoinformatics workshop report: current resources, community needs and the proposal of a collaborative framework for data sharing and information integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Stacey L.; Hutchison, James E.; Baker, Nathan; Ostraat, Michele; Tinkle, Sally; Steevens, Jeffrey; Hoover, Mark D.; Adamick, Jessica; Rajan, Krishna; Gaheen, Sharon; Cohen, Yoram; Nel, Andre; Cachau, Raul E.; Tuominen, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The quantity of information on nanomaterial properties and behavior continues to grow rapidly. Without a concerted effort to collect, organize and mine disparate information coming out of current research efforts, the value and effective use of this information will be limited at best. Data will not be translated to knowledge. At worst, erroneous conclusions will be drawn and future research may be misdirected. Nanoinformatics can be a powerful approach to enhance the value of global information in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Much progress has been made through grassroots efforts in nanoinformatics resulting in a multitude of resources and tools for nanoscience researchers. In 2012, the nanoinformatics community believed it was important to critically evaluate and refine currently available nanoinformatics approaches in order to best inform the science and support the future of predictive nanotechnology. The Greener Nano 2012: Nanoinformatics Tools and Resources Workshop brought together informatics groups with materials scientists active in nanoscience research to evaluate and reflect on the tools and resources that have recently emerged in support of predictive nanotechnology. The workshop goals were to establish a better understanding of current nanoinformatics approaches and to clearly define immediate and projected informatics infrastructure needs of the nanotechnology community. The theme of nanotechnology environmental health and safety (nanoEHS) was used to provide real-world, concrete examples on how informatics can be utilized to advance our knowledge and guide nanoscience. The benefit here is that the same properties that impact the performance of products could also be the properties that inform EHS. From a decision management standpoint, the dual use of such data should be considered a priority. Key outcomes include a proposed collaborative framework for data collection, data sharing and information integration.

  20. The eTOX Data-Sharing Project to Advance in Silico Drug-Induced Toxicity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cases, Montserrat; Briggs, Katharine; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Pognan, François; Marc, Philippe; Kleinöder, Thomas; Schwab, Christof H.; Pastor, Manuel; Wichard, Jörg; Sanz, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    The high-quality in vivo preclinical safety data produced by the pharmaceutical industry during drug development, which follows numerous strict guidelines, are mostly not available in the public domain. These safety data are sometimes published as a condensed summary for the few compounds that reach the market, but the majority of studies are never made public and are often difficult to access in an automated way, even sometimes within the owning company itself. It is evident from many academic and industrial examples, that useful data mining and model development requires large and representative data sets and careful curation of the collected data. In 2010, under the auspices of the Innovative Medicines Initiative, the eTOX project started with the objective of extracting and sharing preclinical study data from paper or pdf archives of toxicology departments of the 13 participating pharmaceutical companies and using such data for establishing a detailed, well-curated database, which could then serve as source for read-across approaches (early assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug candidate by comparison of similar structure and/or effects) and training of predictive models. The paper describes the efforts undertaken to allow effective data sharing intellectual property (IP) protection and set up of adequate controlled vocabularies) and to establish the database (currently with over 4000 studies contributed by the pharma companies corresponding to more than 1400 compounds). In addition, the status of predictive models building and some specific features of the eTOX predictive system (eTOXsys) are presented as decision support knowledge-based tools for drug development process at an early stage. PMID:25405742

  1. The eTOX data-sharing project to advance in silico drug-induced toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Cases, Montserrat; Briggs, Katharine; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Pognan, François; Marc, Philippe; Kleinöder, Thomas; Schwab, Christof H; Pastor, Manuel; Wichard, Jörg; Sanz, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    The high-quality in vivo preclinical safety data produced by the pharmaceutical industry during drug development, which follows numerous strict guidelines, are mostly not available in the public domain. These safety data are sometimes published as a condensed summary for the few compounds that reach the market, but the majority of studies are never made public and are often difficult to access in an automated way, even sometimes within the owning company itself. It is evident from many academic and industrial examples, that useful data mining and model development requires large and representative data sets and careful curation of the collected data. In 2010, under the auspices of the Innovative Medicines Initiative, the eTOX project started with the objective of extracting and sharing preclinical study data from paper or pdf archives of toxicology departments of the 13 participating pharmaceutical companies and using such data for establishing a detailed, well-curated database, which could then serve as source for read-across approaches (early assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug candidate by comparison of similar structure and/or effects) and training of predictive models. The paper describes the efforts undertaken to allow effective data sharing intellectual property (IP) protection and set up of adequate controlled vocabularies) and to establish the database (currently with over 4000 studies contributed by the pharma companies corresponding to more than 1400 compounds). In addition, the status of predictive models building and some specific features of the eTOX predictive system (eTOXsys) are presented as decision support knowledge-based tools for drug development process at an early stage. PMID:25405742

  2. Using GIS servers and interactive maps in spectral data sharing and administration: Case study of Ahvaz Spectral Geodatabase Platform (ASGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Mojtaba; Rangzan, Kazem; Saberi, Azim

    2013-10-01

    With emergence of air-borne and space-borne hyperspectral sensors, spectroscopic measurements are gaining more importance in remote sensing. Therefore, the number of available spectral reference data is constantly increasing. This rapid increase often exhibits a poor data management, which leads to ultimate isolation of data on disk storages. Spectral data without precise description of the target, methods, environment, and sampling geometry cannot be used by other researchers. Moreover, existing spectral data (in case it accompanied with good documentation) become virtually invisible or unreachable for researchers. Providing documentation and a data-sharing framework for spectral data, in which researchers are able to search for or share spectral data and documentation, would definitely improve the data lifetime. Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS) are main candidates for spectral data management and their efficiency is proven by many studies and applications to date. In this study, a new approach to spectral data administration is presented based on spatial identity of spectral samples. This method benefits from scalability and performance of RDBMS for storage of spectral data, but uses GIS servers to provide users with interactive maps as an interface to the system. The spectral files, photographs and descriptive data are considered as belongings of a geospatial object. A spectral processing unit is responsible for evaluation of metadata quality and performing routine spectral processing tasks for newly-added data. As a result, by using internet browser software the users would be able to visually examine availability of data and/or search for data based on descriptive attributes associated to it. The proposed system is scalable and besides giving the users good sense of what data are available in the database, it facilitates participation of spectral reference data in producing geoinformation.

  3. Diagnosis errors are a system problem, not just doctor's fault.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The Institute of Medicine has issued a report calling on the medical community to more effectively address diagnostic errors. Reducing these errors will require a collaborative approach. Diagnostic errors are not typically caused by only a physician's error. Radiologists and pathologists should be more involved with diagnoses. Risk managers should treat diagnostic errors as a system problem. PMID:26565056

  4. Using Medications Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... health systems play an important role in preventing medication errors. To make sure you use medicines safely and effectively, ASHP recommends that you: Keep a list of all medications that you take (prescribed drugs, nonprescription medicines, herbal ...

  5. Negligence, genuine error, and litigation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, David H

    2013-01-01

    Not all medical injuries are the result of negligence. In fact, most medical injuries are the result either of the inherent risk in the practice of medicine, or due to system errors, which cannot be prevented simply through fear of disciplinary action. This paper will discuss the differences between adverse events, negligence, and system errors; the current medical malpractice tort system in the United States; and review current and future solutions, including medical malpractice reform, alternative dispute resolution, health courts, and no-fault compensation systems. The current political environment favors investigation of non-cap tort reform remedies; investment into more rational oversight systems, such as health courts or no-fault systems may reap both quantitative and qualitative benefits for a less costly and safer health system. PMID:23426783

  6. The International Data Sharing Challenge: Realities and Lessons Learned from International Field Projects and Data Analysis Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. F.; Moore, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    data sharing and open data. This will be done through the framework of the projects noted above in an environment of proprietary data claims, multiple formats and data collection procedures, stockpiling of data, international data restrictions and mistrust of other scientists.

  7. Review article: Emergency department data sharing to reduce alcohol-related violence: a systematic review of the feasibility and effectiveness of community-level interventions.

    PubMed

    Droste, Nicolas; Miller, Peter; Baker, Tim

    2014-08-01

    The present paper aims to review current evidence for the effectiveness and/or feasibility of using inter-agency data sharing of ED recorded assault information to direct interventions reducing alcohol-related or nightlife assaults, injury or violence. Potential data-sharing partners involve police, local council, liquor licensing regulators and venue management. A systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted. The initial search discovered 19,506 articles. After removal of duplicates and articles not meeting review criteria, n = 8 articles were included in quantitative and narrative synthesis. Seven of eight studies were conducted in UK EDs, with the remaining study presenting Australian data. All studies included in the review deemed data sharing a worthwhile pursuit. All studies attempting to measure intervention effectiveness reported substantial reductions of assaults and ED attendances post-intervention, with one reporting no change. Negative logistic feasibility concerns were minimal, with general consensus among authors being that data-sharing protocols and partnerships could be easily implemented into modern ED triage systems, with minimal cost, staff workload burden, impact to patient safety, service and anonymity, or risk of harm displacement to other licensed venues, or increase to length of patient stay. However, one study reported a potential harm displacement effect to streets surrounding intervention venues. In future, data-sharing systems should triangulate ED, police and ambulance data sources, and assess intervention effectiveness using randomised controlled trials that account for variations in venue capacity, fluctuations in ED attendance and population levels, seasonal variations in assault and injury, and control for concurrent interventions. PMID:24931278

  8. Automatic Errors: A Case Series on the Errors Inherent in Electronic Prescribing.

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Laura M; Bursua, Adam; Groo, Vicki L

    2016-07-01

    The adoption of electronic prescribing is on the rise, as it reduces medication errors compared to handwritten orders. The inadvertent dispensing of discontinued medications is a type of medication error that is less well described, but one that can lead to adverse events. Software for electronic prescriptions transmits orders for refills or new prescriptions, but not discontinuations, to the pharmacy. Medications that have been stopped are displayed only at the prescribing facility's electronic medical record (EMR). This report describes five cases in which the pharmacy dispensed electronically discontinued medications, two of which contributed to adverse outcomes. PMID:26883522

  9. Enhancing interdisciplinary collaboration and decisionmaking with J-Earth: an open source data sharing, visualization and GIS analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashad, L. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Fink, J. H.; Anwar, S.; Dickenshied, S.; Engle, E.; Noss, D.

    2010-12-01

    Our society currently is facing a number of major environmental challenges, most notably the threat of climate change. A multifaceted, interdisciplinary approach involving physical and social scientists, engineers and decisionmakers is critical to adequately address these complex issues. To best facilitate this interdisciplinary approach, data and models at various scales - from local to global - must be quickly and easily shared between disciplines to effectively understand environmental phenomena and human-environmental interactions. When data are acquired and studied on different scales and within different disciplines, researchers and practitioners may not be able to easily learn from each others results. For example, climate change models are often developed at a global scale, while strategies that address human vulnerability to climate change and mitigation/adaptation strategies are often assessed on a local level. Linkages between urban heat island phenomena and global climate change may be better understood with increased data flow amongst researchers and those making policy decisions. In these cases it would be useful have a single platform to share, visualize, and analyze numerical model and satellite/airborne remote sensing data with social, environmental, and economic data between researchers and practitioners. The Arizona State University 100 Cities Project and Mars Space Flight Facility are developing the open source application J-Earth, with the goal of providing this single platform, that facilitates data sharing, visualization, and analysis between researchers and applied practitioners around environmental and other sustainability challenges. This application is being designed for user communities including physical and social scientists, NASA researchers, non-governmental organizations, and decisionmakers to share and analyze data at multiple scales. We are initially focusing on urban heat island and urban ecology studies, with data and users from

  10. Research Stakeholders’ Views on Benefits and Challenges for Public Health Research Data Sharing in Kenya: The Importance of Trust and Social Relations

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Irene; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael; Kamuya, Dorcas; Molyneux, Sassy; Marsh, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition of the importance of sharing research data within the international scientific community, but also of the ethical and social challenges this presents, particularly in the context of structural inequities and varied capacity in international research. Public involvement is essential to building locally responsive research policies, including on data sharing, but little research has involved stakeholders from low-to-middle income countries. Methods Between January and June 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in Kenya involving sixty stakeholders with varying experiences of research in a deliberative process to explore views on benefits and challenges in research data sharing. In-depth interviews and extended small group discussions based on information sharing and facilitated debate were used to collect data. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, and charting flow and dynamics in debates. Findings The findings highlight both the opportunities and challenges of communicating about this complex and relatively novel topic for many stakeholders. For more and less research-experienced stakeholders, ethical research data sharing is likely to rest on the development and implementation of appropriate trust-building processes, linked to local perceptions of benefits and challenges. The central nature of trust is underpinned by uncertainties around who might request what data, for what purpose and when. Key benefits perceived in this consultation were concerned with the promotion of public health through science, with legitimate beneficiaries defined differently by different groups. Important challenges were risks to the interests of study participants, communities and originating researchers through stigmatisation, loss of privacy, impacting autonomy and unfair competition, including through forms of intentional and unintentional 'misuse' of data. Risks were also seen for science. Discussion Given background structural

  11. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors. PMID:26649954

  12. A New Cure for Medical Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In May 2000, senior officials of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and NASA signed an agreement that would commit the two agencies to create the Patient Safety Reporting System (PSRS) to report: events or situations that could have resulted in accident, injury, or illness, but did not, either by chance or through timely intervention (close-calls); unexpected serious occurrences that involved a patient or employee's death, physical injury, or psychological injury; lessens learned; and safety ideas. The VA provided NASA with funding for the initial development of the new system, which automatically removes all personal names, facility names and locations, and other potentially identifying information before entering reports into its database. Designed to complement the VA's current internal reporting systems, the PSRS is modeled after NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System, which was established in 1975 under a Memorandum of Agreement between the Federal Aviation Administration and NASA and began operation in 1976.

  13. Drug errors: consequences, mechanisms, and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Glavin, R J

    2010-07-01

    Medication errors are common throughout healthcare and result in significant human and financial cost. Prospective studies suggest that the error rate in anaesthesia is around one error in every 133 anaesthetics. There are several categories of medication error ranging from slips and lapses to fixation errors and deliberate violations. Violations may be more likely in organizations with a tendency to blame front-line workers, a tendency to deny the existence of latent conditions, and a blinkered pursuit of productivity indicators. In these organizations, borderline-tolerated conditions of use may occur which blur the distinction between safe and unsafe practice. Latent conditions will also make the error at the 'sharp end' more likely to result in actual patient harm. Several complementary strategies are proposed which may result in fewer medication errors. At the organizational level, developing a safety culture and promoting robust error reporting systems is key. The individual anaesthetist can play a part in this, setting an example to other members of the team in vigilance for errors, creating a safety climate with psychological safety, and reporting and learning from errors. PMID:20507858

  14. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  15. Sun compass error model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blucker, T. J.; Ferry, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    An error model is described for the Apollo 15 sun compass, a contingency navigational device. Field test data are presented along with significant results of the test. The errors reported include a random error resulting from tilt in leveling the sun compass, a random error because of observer sighting inaccuracies, a bias error because of mean tilt in compass leveling, a bias error in the sun compass itself, and a bias error because the device is leveled to the local terrain slope.

  16. Patient/family views on data sharing in rare diseases: study in the European LeukoTreat project.

    PubMed

    Darquy, Sylviane; Moutel, Grégoire; Lapointe, Anne-Sophie; D'Audiffret, Diane; Champagnat, Julie; Guerroui, Samia; Vendeville, Marie-Louise; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Duchange, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore patient and family views on the sharing of their medical data in the context of compiling a European leukodystrophies database. A survey questionnaire was delivered with help from referral centers and the European Leukodystrophies Association, and the questionnaires returned were both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. This study found that patients/families were strongly in favor of participating. Patients/families hold great hope and trust in the development of this type of research. They have a strong need for information and transparency on database governance, the conditions framing access to data, all research conducted, partnerships with the pharmaceutical industry, and they also need access to results. Our findings bring ethics-driven arguments for a process combining initial broad consent with ongoing information. On both, we propose key item-deliverables to database participants. PMID:26081642

  17. Never too old for anonymity: a statistical standard for demographic data sharing via the HIPAA Privacy Rule

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Kathleen; Masys, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Objective Healthcare organizations must de-identify patient records before sharing data. Many organizations rely on the Safe Harbor Standard of the HIPAA Privacy Rule, which enumerates 18 identifiers that must be suppressed (eg, ages over 89). An alternative model in the Privacy Rule, known as the Statistical Standard, can facilitate the sharing of more detailed data, but is rarely applied because of a lack of published methodologies. The authors propose an intuitive approach to de-identifying patient demographics in accordance with the Statistical Standard. Design The authors conduct an analysis of the demographics of patient cohorts in five medical centers developed for the NIH-sponsored Electronic Medical Records and Genomics network, with respect to the US census. They report the re-identification risk of patient demographics disclosed according to the Safe Harbor policy and the relative risk rate for sharing such information via alternative policies. Measurements The re-identification risk of Safe Harbor demographics ranged from 0.01% to 0.19%. The findings show alternative de-identification models can be created with risks no greater than Safe Harbor. The authors illustrate that the disclosure of patient ages over the age of 89 is possible when other features are reduced in granularity. Limitations The de-identification approach described in this paper was evaluated with demographic data only and should be evaluated with other potential identifiers. Conclusion Alternative de-identification policies to the Safe Harbor model can be derived for patient demographics to enable the disclosure of values that were previously suppressed. The method is generalizable to any environment in which population statistics are available. PMID:21169618

  18. Errors inducing radiation overdoses.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that equipments exposing radiation and used for therapeutic purposes should be often checked for possibly administering radiation overdoses to the patients. Technologists, radiation safety officers, radiologists, medical physicists, healthcare providers and administration should take proper care on this issue. "We must be beneficial and not harmful to the patients", according to the Hippocratic doctrine. Cases of radiation overdose are often reported. A series of cases of radiation overdoses have recently been reported. Doctors who were responsible, received heavy punishments. It is much better to prevent than to treat an error or a disease. A Personal Smart Card or Score Card has been suggested for every patient undergoing therapeutic and/or diagnostic procedures by the use of radiation. Taxonomy may also help. PMID:24251304

  19. 77 FR 74196 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Product Design To Minimize Medication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Product Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication Errors... using a systems approach to minimize medication errors relating to product design. The draft...

  20. Remediating Common Math Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Rudolph F.

    1981-01-01

    Explanations and remediation suggestions for five types of mathematics errors due either to perceptual or cognitive difficulties are given. Error types include directionality problems, mirror writing, visually misperceived signs, diagnosed directionality problems, and mixed process errors. (CL)

  1. Precompetitive Data Sharing as a Catalyst to Address Unmet Needs in Parkinson’s Disease 1

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Diane; Hu, Michele T.; Romero, Klaus; Breen, Kieran; Burn, David; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bhattaram, Atul; Isaac, Maria; Venuto, Charles; Kubota, Ken; Little, Max A.; Friend, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Morris, Huw R.; Grosset, Donald; Sutherland, Margaret; Gallacher, John; Williams-Gray, Caroline; Bain, Lisa J.; Avilés, Enrique; Marek, Ken; Toga, Arthur W.; Stark, Yafit; Forrest Gordon, Mark; Ford, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease is a complex heterogeneous disorder with urgent need for disease-modifying therapies. Progress in successful therapeutic approaches for PD will require an unprecedented level of collaboration. At a workshop hosted by Parkinson’s UK and co-organized by Critical Path Institute’s (C-Path) Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD) Consortiums, investigators from industry, academia, government and regulatory agencies agreed on the need for sharing of data to enable future success. Government agencies included EMA, FDA, NINDS/NIH and IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative). Emerging discoveries in new biomarkers and genetic endophenotypes are contributing to our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of PD. In parallel there is growing recognition that early intervention will be key for successful treatments aimed at disease modification. At present, there is a lack of a comprehensive understanding of disease progression and the many factors that contribute to disease progression heterogeneity. Novel therapeutic targets and trial designs that incorporate existing and new biomarkers to evaluate drug effects independently and in combination are required. The integration of robust clinical data sets is viewed as a powerful approach to hasten medical discovery and therapies, as is being realized across diverse disease conditions employing big data analytics for healthcare. The application of lessons learned from parallel efforts is critical to identify barriers and enable a viable path forward. A roadmap is presented for a regulatory, academic, industry and advocacy driven integrated initiative that aims to facilitate and streamline new drug trials and registrations in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26406139

  2. Medical manslaughter.

    PubMed

    Lyons, B

    2013-01-01

    On November 29, 2011 Dr Conrad Murray was sentenced to four years in prison after being convicted of the involuntary manslaughter of Michael Jackson. Expert witness statements indicated that Murray's actions were an "extreme departure from the standard of care", particularly with regard to (1) inappropriately treating insomnia with a surgical anaesthetic (propofol); (2) failing to acquire sufficiently informed consent; (3) administering propofol without the necessary monitoring equipment; (4) delaying contacting the emergency services; and (5) making ineffective resuscitation efforts. Further medical evidence argued that Murray's care of Jackson contained "17 egregious violations", defined as acts that posed a foreseeable danger to the patient's life. These deficiencies, it was stated, constituted gross negligence. Such events might seem remote from daily medical practice in Ireland. However, medical errors resulting in patient death are reported to be unfortunately frequent, even if such fatalities are rarely as dramatic, or as public, as that of Michael Jackson. Medical care is not necessarily straightforward, and any treatment outcome is dependent on clinician skill, the nature of the intervention, and on the pathological condition of the patient. Regardless of these latter two factors, a poor outcome still may occur through physician omissions or the commission of errors or violations. Merry and McCall Smith distinguish between errors and violations on the following basis: (1) errors are not deliberate, and result in unintentional actions and consequences; (2) violations, on the other hand, entail a deliberate deviation from accepted rules or norms. It was alleged that much of Dr Murray's professional conduct in this case fell into the latter category. PMID:23472376

  3. A systems approach to error prevention in medicine.

    PubMed

    Wieman, Thomas Jeffery; Wieman, Eric Andrew

    2004-12-01

    Minimization of medical errors is at the core of all clinical medical practices. The first tenet of care is to do no harm. The enormous complexity of modern medical care has made error detection and management extremely difficult. Traditional deterministic methods of solving the "error issue" cannot cope with the huge number of potential errors that are possible. Systems thinking and approach to error reduction provides a different avenue for tackling this challenging dilemma. The intent of this article is to introduce a systems view of medical errors and to explain how it can provide new insights about dealing with massively complex organizations such as the healthcare system. Important features include an understanding of system relationships, sources of error, human components, optimization versus perfection in systems and the interrelationships between human and system processes. PMID:15562464

  4. Information-Gathering Patterns Associated with Higher Rates of Diagnostic Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delzell, John E., Jr.; Chumley, Heidi; Webb, Russell; Chakrabarti, Swapan; Relan, Anju

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are an important source of medical errors. Problematic information-gathering is a common cause of diagnostic errors among physicians and medical students. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine if medical students' information-gathering patterns formed clusters of similar strategies, and if so (2) to calculate the…

  5. Understanding and Confronting Our Mistakes: The Epidemiology of Error in Radiology and Strategies for Error Reduction.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Michael A; Walker, Eric A; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2015-10-01

    Arriving at a medical diagnosis is a highly complex process that is extremely error prone. Missed or delayed diagnoses often lead to patient harm and missed opportunities for treatment. Since medical imaging is a major contributor to the overall diagnostic process, it is also a major potential source of diagnostic error. Although some diagnoses may be missed because of the technical or physical limitations of the imaging modality, including image resolution, intrinsic or extrinsic contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio, most missed radiologic diagnoses are attributable to image interpretation errors by radiologists. Radiologic interpretation cannot be mechanized or automated; it is a human enterprise based on complex psychophysiologic and cognitive processes and is itself subject to a wide variety of error types, including perceptual errors (those in which an important abnormality is simply not seen on the images) and cognitive errors (those in which the abnormality is visually detected but the meaning or importance of the finding is not correctly understood or appreciated). The overall prevalence of radiologists' errors in practice does not appear to have changed since it was first estimated in the 1960s. The authors review the epidemiology of errors in diagnostic radiology, including a recently proposed taxonomy of radiologists' errors, as well as research findings, in an attempt to elucidate possible underlying causes of these errors. The authors also propose strategies for error reduction in radiology. On the basis of current understanding, specific suggestions are offered as to how radiologists can improve their performance in practice. PMID:26466178

  6. Are patients morally responsible for their errors?

    PubMed

    Buetow, S; Elwyn, G

    2006-05-01

    Amid neglect of patients' contribution to error has been a failure to ask whether patients are morally responsible for their errors. This paper aims to help answer this question and so define a worthy response to the errors. Recent work on medical errors has emphasised system deficiencies and discouraged finding people to blame. We scrutinize this approach from an incompatibilist, agent causation position and draw on Hart's taxonomy of four senses of moral responsibility: role responsibility; capacity responsibility; causal responsibility; and liability responsibility. Each sense is shown to contribute to an overall theoretical judgment as to whether patients are morally responsible for their errors (and success in avoiding them). Though how to weight the senses is unclear, patients appear to be morally responsible for the avoidable errors they make, contribute to or can influence. PMID:16648274

  7. User-Friendly Data-Sharing Practices for Fostering Collaboration within a Research Network: Roles of a Vanguard Center for a Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Eun; Sung, Jung Hye; Barnett, M. Edwina; Norris, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Although various attempts have been made to build collaborative cultures for data sharing, their effectiveness is still questionable. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) Vanguard Center (JHSVC) at the NIH-funded Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Translational Research Network (RTRN) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) may be a new concept in that the data are being shared with a research network where a plethora of scientists/researchers are working together to achieve their common goal. This study describes the current practices to share the JHS data through the mechanism of JHSVC. The JHS is the largest single-site cohort study to prospectively investigate the determinants of cardiovascular disease among African-Americans. It has adopted a formal screened access method through a formalized JHSVC mechanism, in which only a qualified scientist(s) can access the data. The role of the DCC was to help RTRN researchers explore hypothesis-driven ideas to enhance the output and impact of JHS data through customized services, such as feasibility tests, data querying, manuscript proposal development and data analyses for publication. DCC has implemented these various programs to facilitate data utility. A total of 300 investigators attended workshops and/or received training booklets. DCC provided two online and five onsite workshops and developed/distributed more than 250 copies of the booklet to help potential data users understand the structure of and access to the data. Information on data use was also provided through the RTRN website. The DCC efforts led to the production of five active manuscript proposals, seven completed publications, 11 presentations and four NIH grant proposals. These outcomes resulted from activities during the first four years; over the last couple of years, there were few new requests. Our study suggested that DCC-customized services enhanced the accessibility of JHS data and their utility by RTRN researchers and helped to achieve the

  8. User-Friendly Data-Sharing Practices for Fostering Collaboration within a Research Network: Roles of a Vanguard Center for a Community-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Eun; Sung, Jung Hye; Barnett, M Edwina; Norris, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Although various attempts have been made to build collaborative cultures for data sharing, their effectiveness is still questionable. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) Vanguard Center (JHSVC) at the NIH-funded Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) Translational Research Network (RTRN) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) may be a new concept in that the data are being shared with a research network where a plethora of scientists/researchers are working together to achieve their common goal. This study describes the current practices to share the JHS data through the mechanism of JHSVC. The JHS is the largest single-site cohort study to prospectively investigate the determinants of cardiovascular disease among African-Americans. It has adopted a formal screened access method through a formalized JHSVC mechanism, in which only a qualified scientist(s) can access the data. The role of the DCC was to help RTRN researchers explore hypothesis-driven ideas to enhance the output and impact of JHS data through customized services, such as feasibility tests, data querying, manuscript proposal development and data analyses for publication. DCC has implemented these various programs to facilitate data utility. A total of 300 investigators attended workshops and/or received training booklets. DCC provided two online and five onsite workshops and developed/distributed more than 250 copies of the booklet to help potential data users understand the structure of and access to the data. Information on data use was also provided through the RTRN website. The DCC efforts led to the production of five active manuscript proposals, seven completed publications, 11 presentations and four NIH grant proposals. These outcomes resulted from activities during the first four years; over the last couple of years, there were few new requests. Our study suggested that DCC-customized services enhanced the accessibility of JHS data and their utility by RTRN researchers and helped to achieve the

  9. The Nurse's Medication Day

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

  10. Perceived Benefits, Harms, and Views About How to Share Data Responsibly: A Qualitative Study of Experiences With and Attitudes Toward Data Sharing Among Research Staff and Community Representatives in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Tangseefa, Decha; Somsaman, Aimatcha; Chunsuttiwat, Tri; Nosten, François; Day, Nicholas P J; Bull, Susan; Parker, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The Thailand Major Overseas Programme coordinates large multi-center studies in tropical medicine and generates vast amounts of data. As the data sharing movement gains momentum, we wanted to understand attitudes and experiences of relevant stakeholders about what constitutes good data sharing practice. We conducted 15 interviews and three focus groups discussions involving 25 participants and found that they generally saw data sharing as something positive. Data sharing was viewed as a means to contribute to scientific progress and lead to better quality analysis, better use of resources, greater accountability, and more outputs. However, there were also important reservations including potential harms to research participants, their communities, and the researchers themselves. Given these concerns, several areas for discussion were identified: data standardization, appropriate consent models, and governance. PMID:26297749

  11. Full and Open Access to Data in the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS): Implementing the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Uhlir, P. F.; Gabrinowicz, J. I.

    2008-12-01

    Full and open access to data from remote sensing platforms and other sources can facilitate not only scientific research but also the more widespread and effective use of scientific data for the benefit of society. The Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) is a major international initiative of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) to develop "coordinated, comprehensive and sustained Earth observations and information." In 2005, GEO adopted the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles, which call for the "full and open exchange of data, metadata, and products shared within GEOSS, recognizing relevant international instruments and national policies and legislation." These Principles also note that "All shared data, metadata, and products will be made available with minimum time delay and at minimum cost" and that "All shared data, metadata, and products being free of charge or no more than cost of reproduction will be encouraged for research and education." GEOSS Task DA-06-01, aimed at developing a set of recommended implementation guidelines for the Principles, was established in 2006 under the leadership of CODATA, the Committee on Data for Science and Technology of the International Council for Science (ICSU). An international team of authors has developed a draft White Paper on the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles and a proposed set of implementation guidelines. These have been carefully reviewed by independent reviewers, various GEO Committees, and GEO National Members and Participating Organizations. It is expected that the proposed implementation guidelines will be discussed at the GEO-V Plenary in Budapest in November 2008. The current version of the proposed implementation guidelines recognizes the importance of good faith, voluntary adherence to the Principles by GEO National Members and Participating Organizations. It underscores the value of reuse and re-dissemination of GEOSS data with minimum restrictions, not only within GEOSS itself but on the part of

  12. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. ); Quimby, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  13. The Development of the Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey Minimum DataSet (TOPICS-MDS): A Large-Scale Data Sharing Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Lutomski, Jennifer E.; Baars, Maria A. E.; Schalk, Bianca W. M.; Boter, Han; Buurman, Bianca M.; den Elzen, Wendy P. J.; Jansen, Aaltje P. D.; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Steunenberg, Bas; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Melis, René J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport commissioned the National Care for the Elderly Programme. While numerous research projects in older persons’ health care were to be conducted under this national agenda, the Programme further advocated the development of The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey Minimum DataSet (TOPICS-MDS) which would be integrated into all funded research protocols. In this context, we describe TOPICS data sharing initiative (www.topics-mds.eu). Materials and Methods A working group drafted TOPICS-MDS prototype, which was subsequently approved by a multidisciplinary panel. Using instruments validated for older populations, information was collected on demographics, morbidity, quality of life, functional limitations, mental health, social functioning and health service utilisation. For informal caregivers, information was collected on demographics, hours of informal care and quality of life (including subjective care-related burden). Results Between 2010 and 2013, a total of 41 research projects contributed data to TOPICS-MDS, resulting in preliminary data available for 32,310 older persons and 3,940 informal caregivers. The majority of studies sampled were from primary care settings and inclusion criteria differed across studies. Discussion TOPICS-MDS is a public data repository which contains essential data to better understand health challenges experienced by older persons and informal caregivers. Such findings are relevant for countries where increasing health-related expenditure has necessitated the evaluation of contemporary health care delivery. Although open sharing of data can be difficult to achieve in practice, proactively addressing issues of data protection, conflicting data analysis requests and funding limitations during TOPICS-MDS developmental phase has fostered a data sharing culture. To date, TOPICS-MDS has been successfully incorporated into 41 research projects, thus supporting the

  14. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alter, George C; Vardigan, Mary

    2015-07-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this "uncharted territory," as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised. PMID:26297753

  15. Data sharing in Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, John R.

    2016-05-01

    Surface Science has an editorial policy that atomic positions that are determined in a publication (experimental and computational) be made accessible to its readers. In this Prospective, we suggest an even broader need in data and methodology sharing. We illustrate an approach we have used to embed experimental and computational data as well as code in manuscripts and supporting information files, and we show how it results in reusable data and code.

  16. Addressing Global Data Sharing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Alter, George C.

    2015-01-01

    This issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics highlights the ethical issues that arise when researchers conducting projects in low- and middle-income countries seek to share the data they produce. Although sharing data is considered a best practice, the barriers to doing so are considerable and there is a need for guidance and examples. To that end, the authors of this article reviewed the articles in this special issue to identify challenges common to the five countries and to offer some practical advice to assist researchers in navigating this “uncharted territory,” as some termed it. Concerns around informed consent, data management, data dissemination, and validation of research contributions were cited frequently as particularly challenging areas, so the authors focused on these four topics with the goal of providing specific resources to consult as well as examples of successful projects attempting to solve many of the problems raised. PMID:26297753

  17. Inborn errors of metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism - inborn errors of ... Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn errors of metabolism. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 205. Rezvani I, Rezvani G. An ...

  18. Programming Errors in APL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    This paper discusses and provides some preliminary data on errors in APL programming. Data were obtained by analyzing listings of 148 complete and partial APL sessions collected from student terminal rooms at the University of Alberta. Frequencies of errors for the various error messages are tabulated. The data, however, are limited because they…

  19. Refractive errors in children.

    PubMed

    Tongue, A C

    1987-12-01

    Optical correction of refractive errors in infants and young children is indicated when the refractive errors are sufficiently large to cause unilateral or bilateral amblyopia, if they are impairing the child's ability to function normally, or if the child has accommodative strabismus. Screening for refractive errors is important and should be performed as part of the annual physical examination in all verbal children. Screening for significant refractive errors in preverbal children is more difficult; however, the red reflex test of Bruckner is useful for the detection of anisometropic refractive errors. The photorefraction test, which is an adaptation of Bruckner's red reflex test, may prove to be a useful screening device for detecting bilateral as well as unilateral refractive errors. Objective testing as well as subjective testing enables ophthalmologists to prescribe proper optical correction for refractive errors for infants and children of any age. PMID:3317238

  20. Error-prone signalling.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, R A; Grafen, A

    1992-06-22

    The handicap principle of Zahavi is potentially of great importance to the study of biological communication. Existing models of the handicap principle, however, make the unrealistic assumption that communication is error free. It seems possible, therefore, that Zahavi's arguments do not apply to real signalling systems, in which some degree of error is inevitable. Here, we present a general evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) model of the handicap principle which incorporates perceptual error. We show that, for a wide range of error functions, error-prone signalling systems must be honest at equilibrium. Perceptual error is thus unlikely to threaten the validity of the handicap principle. Our model represents a step towards greater realism, and also opens up new possibilities for biological signalling theory. Concurrent displays, direct perception of quality, and the evolution of 'amplifiers' and 'attenuators' are all probable features of real signalling systems, yet handicap models based on the assumption of error-free communication cannot accommodate these possibilities. PMID:1354361

  1. Aircraft system modeling error and control error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V. (Inventor); Kaneshige, John T. (Inventor); Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S. (Inventor); Burken, John J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for modeling error-driven adaptive control of an aircraft. Normal aircraft plant dynamics is modeled, using an original plant description in which a controller responds to a tracking error e(k) to drive the component to a normal reference value according to an asymptote curve. Where the system senses that (1) at least one aircraft plant component is experiencing an excursion and (2) the return of this component value toward its reference value is not proceeding according to the expected controller characteristics, neural network (NN) modeling of aircraft plant operation may be changed. However, if (1) is satisfied but the error component is returning toward its reference value according to expected controller characteristics, the NN will continue to model operation of the aircraft plant according to an original description.

  2. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  3. Error detection method

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  4. The Error in Total Error Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Witnauer, James E.; Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Most models of human and animal learning assume that learning is proportional to the discrepancy between a delivered outcome and the outcome predicted by all cues present during that trial (i.e., total error across a stimulus compound). This total error reduction (TER) view has been implemented in connectionist and artificial neural network models to describe the conditions under which weights between units change. Electrophysiological work has revealed that the activity of dopamine neurons is correlated with the total error signal in models of reward learning. Similar neural mechanisms presumably support fear conditioning, human contingency learning, and other types of learning. Using a computational modelling approach, we compared several TER models of associative learning to an alternative model that rejects the TER assumption in favor of local error reduction (LER), which assumes that learning about each cue is proportional to the discrepancy between the delivered outcome and the outcome predicted by that specific cue on that trial. The LER model provided a better fit to the reviewed data than the TER models. Given the superiority of the LER model with the present data sets, acceptance of TER should be tempered. PMID:23891930

  5. Error coding simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-01-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  6. Model Error Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    2008-01-01

    An error budget is a commonly used tool in design of complex aerospace systems. It represents system performance requirements in terms of allowable errors and flows these down through a hierarchical structure to lower assemblies and components. The requirements may simply be 'allocated' based upon heuristics or experience, or they may be designed through use of physics-based models. This paper presents a basis for developing an error budget for models of the system, as opposed to the system itself. The need for model error budgets arises when system models are a principle design agent as is increasingly more common for poorly testable high performance space systems.

  7. Error coding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-11-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  8. [The notion and classification of expert errors].

    PubMed

    Klevno, V A

    2012-01-01

    The author presents the analysis of the legal and forensic medical literature concerning currently accepted concepts and classification of expert malpractice. He proposes a new easy-to-remember definition of the expert error and considers the classification of such mistakes. The analysis of the cases of erroneous application of the medical criteria for estimation of the harm to health made it possible to reveal and systematize the causes accounting for the cases of expert malpractice committed by forensic medical experts and health providers when determining the degree of harm to human health. PMID:22686055

  9. We need to talk about error: causes and types of error in veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Oxtoby, C; Ferguson, E; White, K; Mossop, L

    2015-10-31

    Patient safety research in human medicine has identified the causes and common types of medical error and subsequently informed the development of interventions which mitigate harm, such as the WHO's safe surgery checklist. There is no such evidence available to the veterinary profession. This study therefore aims to identify the causes and types of errors in veterinary practice, and presents an evidence based system for their classification. Causes of error were identified from retrospective record review of 678 claims to the profession's leading indemnity insurer and nine focus groups (average N per group=8) with vets, nurses and support staff were performed using critical incident technique. Reason's (2000) Swiss cheese model of error was used to inform the interpretation of the data. Types of error were extracted from 2978 claims records reported between the years 2009 and 2013. The major classes of error causation were identified with mistakes involving surgery the most common type of error. The results were triangulated with findings from the medical literature and highlight the importance of cognitive limitations, deficiencies in non-technical skills and a systems approach to veterinary error. PMID:26489997

  10. Everyday Scale Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Elizabeth A.; Uttal, David H.; DeLoache, Judy S.

    2010-01-01

    Young children occasionally make "scale errors"--they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and…

  11. [Diagnostic error and the patient's rights act].

    PubMed

    Müller, S; Dralle, H

    2013-02-01

    The question which party bears the burden of proof has significant influence on the result of a medical liability process. The party that bears the burden of proof and cannot provide the proof loses the lawsuit. Particularly important in this context is an omitted medical examination. In the case of such an omitted medical examination the courts may grant reversal of the burden of proof to patients in subsequent medical processes. The civil courts differentiate between a simple mistake or a grave error in treatment and furthermore, the medical examination has to be distinguished from the duty of diagnosis.In the new patients' rights act the burden of proof is established by law. Thereafter in principle the patient must still prove that the doctor made a mistake and that this was the cause of the damage. PMID:23340974

  12. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF POPULATION 7: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, DRY ACTIVE WASTE, AND MISCELLANEOUS DEBRIS, SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpenau, Evan M

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  13. Uncorrected refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  14. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  15. Error Prevention Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In a complex computer environment there is ample opportunity for error, a mistake by a programmer, or a software-induced undesirable side effect. In insurance, errors can cost a company heavily, so protection against inadvertent change is a must for the efficient firm. The data processing center at Transport Life Insurance Company has taken a step to guard against accidental changes by adopting a software package called EQNINT (Equations Interpreter Program). EQNINT cross checks the basic formulas in a program against the formulas that make up the major production system. EQNINT assures that formulas are coded correctly and helps catch errors before they affect the customer service or its profitability.

  16. Error prevention and error management in medicine--adopting strategies from other professions.

    PubMed

    Thomeczek, C

    2003-12-01

    The report of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 'To Err Is Human' received public interest. The simple term 'medical error' as it has been used in public so far does not describe the complex setting in medicine. The development of error management in industry (e.g. aviation) with an emphasis on human factors, communication, and systematic error is demonstrated in order to design similar approaches for medicine. Recommendations are based on the principles for designing safety systems in health care organisations published in the IOM report. PMID:14709928

  17. Facts about Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lens can cause refractive errors. What is refraction? Refraction is the bending of light as it passes ... rays entering the eye, causing a more precise refraction or focus. In many cases, contact lenses provide ...

  18. Errors in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Anumba, Dilly O C

    2013-08-01

    Prenatal screening and diagnosis are integral to antenatal care worldwide. Prospective parents are offered screening for common fetal chromosomal and structural congenital malformations. In most developed countries, prenatal screening is routinely offered in a package that includes ultrasound scan of the fetus and the assay in maternal blood of biochemical markers of aneuploidy. Mistakes can arise at any point of the care pathway for fetal screening and diagnosis, and may involve individual or corporate systemic or latent errors. Special clinical circumstances, such as maternal size, fetal position, and multiple pregnancy, contribute to the complexities of prenatal diagnosis and to the chance of error. Clinical interventions may lead to adverse outcomes not caused by operator error. In this review I discuss the scope of the errors in prenatal diagnosis, and highlight strategies for their prevention and diagnosis, as well as identify areas for further research and study to enhance patient safety. PMID:23725900

  19. Error mode prediction.

    PubMed

    Hollnagel, E; Kaarstad, M; Lee, H C

    1999-11-01

    The study of accidents ('human errors') has been dominated by efforts to develop 'error' taxonomies and 'error' models that enable the retrospective identification of likely causes. In the field of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) there is, however, a significant practical need for methods that can predict the occurrence of erroneous actions--qualitatively and quantitatively. The present experiment tested an approach for qualitative performance prediction based on the Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM). Predictions of possible erroneous actions were made for operators using different types of alarm systems. The data were collected as part of a large-scale experiment using professional nuclear power plant operators in a full scope simulator. The analysis showed that the predictions were correct in more than 70% of the cases, and also that the coverage of the predictions depended critically on the comprehensiveness of the preceding task analysis. PMID:10582035

  20. Pronominal Case-Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaper, Willem

    1976-01-01

    Contradicts a previous assertion by C. Tanz that children commit substitution errors usually using objective pronoun forms for nominative ones. Examples from Dutch and German provide evidence that substitutions are made in both directions. (CHK)

  1. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  2. Error-Compensated Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.; Stacy, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed reflecting telescope includes large, low-precision primary mirror stage and small, precise correcting mirror. Correcting mirror machined under computer control to compensate for error in primary mirror. Correcting mirror machined by diamond cutting tool. Computer analyzes interferometric measurements of primary mirror to determine shape of surface of correcting mirror needed to compensate for errors in wave front reflected from primary mirror and commands position and movement of cutting tool accordingly.

  3. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  4. [The positive culture of error, historical, epistemological and ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Poma, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The punitive culture of error erects a wall of silence between players in the care relationship. A positive culture of error, founded on a new ethical approach to the nurse-patient relationship, enables everyone to move beyond the illusion of medical infallibility and to cope better with the effects of an adverse event. PMID:27085923

  5. Institute for Safe Medication Practices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Safety Oral Liquid Docusate Sodium by PharmaTech : Recall - Contaminated Alere to Initiate Voluntary Withdrawal of the ... for Valcyte New Precaution when Calculating Carboplatin Doses Recall of Actavis Fentanyl Patches Medical Errors from Misreading ...

  6. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toggle navigation Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications ( ...

  7. Human error in aviation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, David C.

    1988-01-01

    The role of human error in commercial and general aviation accidents and the techniques used to evaluate it are reviewed from a human-factors perspective. Topics addressed include the general decline in accidents per million departures since the 1960s, the increase in the proportion of accidents due to human error, methods for studying error, theoretical error models, and the design of error-resistant systems. Consideration is given to information acquisition and processing errors, visually guided flight, disorientation, instrument-assisted guidance, communication errors, decision errors, debiasing, and action errors.

  8. Errata: Papers in Error Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svartvik, Jan, Ed.

    Papers presented at the symposium of error analysis in Lund, Sweden, in September 1972, approach error analysis specifically in its relation to foreign language teaching and second language learning. Error analysis is defined as having three major aspects: (1) the description of the errors, (2) the explanation of errors by means of contrastive…

  9. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-09-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by a diagnostic quantity called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that, regardless of the usefulness of the smoothing error as a diagnostic tool in its own right, the concept of the smoothing error as a component of the retrieval error budget is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state; in other words, to characterize the full loss of information with respect to the true atmosphere, the effect of the representation of the atmospheric state on a finite grid also needs to be considered. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is problematic because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help, because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully discuss temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the covariance matrix involved has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation and if the averaging kernel matrices have been evaluated on a grid fine enough to capture all atmospheric variations that the instruments are sensitive to. This is, under the assumptions stated, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the

  10. Compact disk error measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, D.; Harriman, K.; Tehranchi, B.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: provide hardware and software that will perform simple, real-time, high resolution (single-byte) measurement of the error burst and good data gap statistics seen by a photoCD player read channel when recorded CD write-once discs of variable quality (i.e., condition) are being read; extend the above system to enable measurement of the hard decision (i.e., 1-bit error flags) and soft decision (i.e., 2-bit error flags) decoding information that is produced/used by the Cross Interleaved - Reed - Solomon - Code (CIRC) block decoder employed in the photoCD player read channel; construct a model that uses data obtained via the systems described above to produce meaningful estimates of output error rates (due to both uncorrected ECC words and misdecoded ECC words) when a CD disc having specific (measured) error statistics is read (completion date to be determined); and check the hypothesis that current adaptive CIRC block decoders are optimized for pressed (DAD/ROM) CD discs. If warranted, do a conceptual design of an adaptive CIRC decoder that is optimized for write-once CD discs.

  11. Experimental Quantum Error Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Yi, Zhen-Huan; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Fei; Yang, Tao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Faithful transmission of quantum information is a crucial ingredient in quantum communication networks. To overcome the unavoidable decoherence in a noisy channel, to date, many efforts have been made to transmit one state by consuming large numbers of time-synchronized ancilla states. However, such huge demands of quantum resources are hard to meet with current technology and this restricts practical applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate quantum error detection, an economical approach to reliably protecting a qubit against bit-flip errors. Arbitrary unknown polarization states of single photons and entangled photons are converted into time bins deterministically via a modified Franson interferometer. Noise arising in both 10 m and 0.8 km fiber, which induces associated errors on the reference frame of time bins, is filtered when photons are detected. The demonstrated resource efficiency and state independence make this protocol a promising candidate for implementing a real-world quantum communication network. PMID:22953047

  12. Measurement error revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Robert K.

    1999-12-01

    It is widely accepted in the electronics industry that measurement gauge error variation should be no larger than 10% of the related specification window. In a previous paper, 'What Amount of Measurement Error is Too Much?', the author used a framework from the process industries to evaluate the impact of measurement error variation in terms of both customer and supplier risk (i.e., Non-conformance and Yield Loss). Application of this framework in its simplest form suggested that in many circumstances the 10% criterion might be more stringent than is reasonably necessary. This paper reviews the framework and results of the earlier work, then examines some of the possible extensions to this framework suggested in that paper, including variance component models and sampling plans applicable in the photomask and semiconductor businesses. The potential impact of imperfect process control practices will be examined as well.

  13. Surprise beyond prediction error

    PubMed Central

    Chumbley, Justin R; Burke, Christopher J; Stephan, Klaas E; Friston, Karl J; Tobler, Philippe N; Fehr, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Surprise drives learning. Various neural “prediction error” signals are believed to underpin surprise-based reinforcement learning. Here, we report a surprise signal that reflects reinforcement learning but is neither un/signed reward prediction error (RPE) nor un/signed state prediction error (SPE). To exclude these alternatives, we measured surprise responses in the absence of RPE and accounted for a host of potential SPE confounds. This new surprise signal was evident in ventral striatum, primary sensory cortex, frontal poles, and amygdala. We interpret these findings via a normative model of surprise. PMID:24700400

  14. Evolution of error diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1999-10-01

    As we approach the new millennium, error diffusion is approaching the 25th anniversary of its invention. Because of its exceptionally high image quality, it continues to be a popular choice among digital halftoning algorithms. Over the last 24 years, many attempts have been made to modify and improve the algorithm--to eliminate unwanted textures and to extend it to printing media and color. Some of these modifications have been very successful and are in use today. This paper will review the history of the algorithm and its modifications. Three watershed events in the development of error diffusion will be described, together with the lessons learned along the way.

  15. Evolution of error diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1998-12-01

    As we approach the new millennium, error diffusion is approaching the 25th anniversary of its invention. Because of its exceptionally high image quality, it continues to be a popular choice among digital halftoning algorithms. Over the last 24 years, many attempts have been made to modify and improve the algorithm - to eliminate unwanted textures and to extend it to printing media and color. Some of these modifications have been very successful and are in use today. This paper will review the history of the algorithm and its modifications. Three watershed events in the development of error diffusion will be described, together with the lesions learned along the way.

  16. Error Free Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical theory for development of "higher order" software to catch computer mistakes resulted from a Johnson Space Center contract for Apollo spacecraft navigation. Two women who were involved in the project formed Higher Order Software, Inc. to develop and market the system of error analysis and correction. They designed software which is logically error-free, which, in one instance, was found to increase productivity by 600%. USE.IT defines its objectives using AXES -- a user can write in English and the system converts to computer languages. It is employed by several large corporations.

  17. Access Scheme for Controlling Mobile Agents and its Application to Share Medical Information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Yu- Xin; Hwang, Jen-Hung; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This study is showing the advantage of mobile agents to conquer heterogeneous system environments and contribute to a virtual integrated sharing system. Mobile agents will collect medical information from each medical institution as a method to achieve the medical purpose of data sharing. Besides, this research also provides an access control and key management mechanism by adopting Public key cryptography and Lagrange interpolation. The safety analysis of the system is based on a network attacker's perspective. The achievement of this study tries to improve the medical quality, prevent wasting medical resources and make medical resources access to appropriate configuration. PMID:27010391

  18. Preventing Communication Errors in Telephone Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Reisman, Anna B; Brown, Karen E

    2005-01-01

    Errors in telephone communication can result in outcomes ranging from inconvenience and anxiety to serious compromises in patient safety. Although 25% of interactions between physicians and patients take place on the telephone, little has been written about telephone communication and medical mishaps. Similarly, training in telephone medicine skills is limited; only 6% of residency programs teach any aspect of telephone medicine. Increasing familiarity with common telephone challenges with patients may help physicians decrease the likelihood of negative outcomes. We use case vignettes to highlight communication errors in common telephone scenarios. These scenarios include giving sensitive test results, requests for narcotics, managing ill patients who are not sick enough for the emergency room, dealing with late-night calls, communicating with unintelligible patients, and handling calls from family members. We provide management strategies to minimize the occurrence of these errors. PMID:16191150

  19. Orwell's Instructive Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Liam

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about George Orwell, his instructive errors, and the manner in which Orwell pierced worthless theory, faced facts and defended decency (with fluctuating success), and largely ignored the tradition of accumulated wisdom that has rendered him a timeless teacher--one whose inadvertent lessons, while infrequently…

  20. Medical Transcriptionists

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment or software that is connected to their computer. However, technological advances have changed the way medical ... this section Medical transcriptionists must be comfortable using computers. Medical transcriptionists typically need postsecondary education. Prospective medical ...

  1. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this page, ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten ...

  2. Intravenous Medication Administration in Intensive Care: Opportunities for Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support to decrease medication administration errors in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, medication order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error. PMID:18998790

  3. Challenge and Error: Critical Events and Attention-Related Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheyne, James Allan; Carriere, Jonathan S. A.; Solman, Grayden J. F.; Smilek, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Attention lapses resulting from reactivity to task challenges and their consequences constitute a pervasive factor affecting everyday performance errors and accidents. A bidirectional model of attention lapses (error [image omitted] attention-lapse: Cheyne, Solman, Carriere, & Smilek, 2009) argues that errors beget errors by generating attention…

  4. [Errors in surgery. Strategies to improve surgical safety].

    PubMed

    Arenas-Márquez, Humberto; Anaya-Prado, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Surgery is an extreme experience for both patient and surgeon. The patient has to be rescued from something so serious that it may justify the surgeon to violate his/her integrity in order to resolve the problem. Nevertheless, both physician and patient recognize that the procedure has some risks. Medical errors are the 8th cause of death in the U.S., and malpractice can be documented in >50% of the legal prosecutions in Mexico. Of special interest is the specialty of general surgery where legal responsibility can be confirmed in >80% of the cases. Interest in mortality attributed to medical errors has existed since the 19th century; clearly identifying the lack of knowledge, abilities, and poor surgical and diagnostic judgment as the cause of errors. Currently, poor organization, lack of team work, and physician/ patient-related factors are recognized as the cause of medical errors. Human error is unavoidable and health care systems and surgeons should adopt the culture of error analysis openly, inquisitively and permanently. Errors should be regarded as an opportunity to learn that health care should to be patient centered and not surgeon centered. In this review, we analyze the causes of complications and errors that can develop during routine surgery. Additionally, we propose measures that will allow improvements in the safety of surgical patients. PMID:18778549

  5. Creating an organizational culture for medication safety.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Robin Donohoe

    2005-03-01

    Medication errors are costly from human, economic, and societal perspectives. All patients are vulnerable to the detrimental effects of these errors. Recommendations regarding the problem of medication errors include: Prevention of error by learning from the nonpunitive reporting of errors and near misses; Evaluation of the system for potential causes of error through failure mode and effects analysis and encouragement of a questioning attitude; Elimination of system problems that increase the risk of error; Recognition that humans are fallible and that error will occur even in a perfect system; Minimization of the consequences of errors when they do occur. An important goal for healthcare organizations should be to create a culture that accepts the imperfection of human performance and solicits the assistance of team members in the development of safeguards for error prevention. Proposed interventions to prevent medication errors can be described by the PATIENT SAFE taxonomy, which includes: Patient participation; Adherence to established policy and procedures; Technology use; Information accessibility; Education regarding medication safety; Nonpunitive approach to reporting of errors and near misses; Teamwork, communication, and collaboration; Staffing: adequate number and staffing mix; Administration support for the clinical goal of patient safety; Failure mode and effects analysis with team member involvement; Environment and equipment to support patient safety PMID:15733943

  6. [The error, source of learning].

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Stéphanie; Bohic, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    The error itself is not recognised as a fault. It is the intentionality which differentiates between an error and a fault. An error is unintentional while a fault is a failure to respect known rules. The risk of error is omnipresent in health institutions. Public authorities have therefore set out a series of measures to reduce this risk. PMID:27155272

  7. Imagery of Errors in Typing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Martina; Martinez, Fanny; Wenke, Dorit

    2011-01-01

    Using a typing task we investigated whether insufficient imagination of errors and error corrections is related to duration differences between execution and imagination. In Experiment 1 spontaneous error imagination was investigated, whereas in Experiment 2 participants were specifically instructed to imagine errors. Further, in Experiment 2 we…

  8. Neural Correlates of Reach Errors

    PubMed Central

    Hashambhoy, Yasmin; Rane, Tushar; Shadmehr, Reza

    2005-01-01

    Reach errors may be broadly classified into errors arising from unpredictable changes in target location, called target errors, and errors arising from miscalibration of internal models, called execution errors. Execution errors may be caused by miscalibration of dynamics (e.g.. when a force field alters limb dynamics) or by miscalibration of kinematics (e.g., when prisms alter visual feedback). While all types of errors lead to similar online corrections, we found that the motor system showed strong trial-by-trial adaptation in response to random execution errors but not in response to random target errors. We used fMRI and a compatible robot to study brain regions involved in processing each kind of error. Both kinematic and dynamic execution errors activated regions along the central and the post-central sulci and in lobules V, VI, and VIII of the cerebellum, making these areas possible sites of plastic changes in internal models for reaching. Only activity related to kinematic errors extended into parietal area 5. These results are inconsistent with the idea that kinematics and dynamics of reaching are computed in separate neural entities. In contrast, only target errors caused increased activity in the striatum and the posterior superior parietal lobule. The cerebellum and motor cortex were as strongly activated as with execution errors. These findings indicate a neural and behavioral dissociation between errors that lead to switching of behavioral goals, and errors that lead to adaptation of internal models of limb dynamics and kinematics. PMID:16251440

  9. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  10. The Insufficiency of Error Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammarberg, B.

    1974-01-01

    The position here is that error analysis is inadequate, particularly from the language-teaching point of view. Non-errors must be considered in specifying the learner's current command of the language, its limits, and his learning tasks. A cyclic procedure of elicitation and analysis, to secure evidence of errors and non-errors, is outlined.…

  11. Control by model error estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.; Skelton, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Modern control theory relies upon the fidelity of the mathematical model of the system. Truncated modes, external disturbances, and parameter errors in linear system models are corrected by augmenting to the original system of equations an 'error system' which is designed to approximate the effects of such model errors. A Chebyshev error system is developed for application to the Large Space Telescope (LST).

  12. Manson's triple error.

    PubMed

    F, Delaporte

    2008-09-01

    The author discusses the significance, implications and limitations of Manson's work. How did Patrick Manson resolve some of the major problems raised by the filarial worm life cycle? The Amoy physician showed that circulating embryos could only leave the blood via the percutaneous route, thereby requiring a bloodsucking insect. The discovery of a new autonomous, airborne, active host undoubtedly had a considerable impact on the history of parasitology, but the way in which Manson formulated and solved the problem of the transfer of filarial worms from the body of the mosquito to man resulted in failure. This article shows how the epistemological transformation operated by Manson was indissociably related to a series of errors and how a major breakthrough can be the result of a series of false proposals and, consequently, that the history of truth often involves a history of error. PMID:18814729

  13. Modular error embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Ettinger, J. Mark

    1999-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

  14. Error-Free Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    001 is an integrated tool suited for automatically developing ultra reliable models, simulations and software systems. Developed and marketed by Hamilton Technologies, Inc. (HTI), it has been applied in engineering, manufacturing, banking and software tools development. The software provides the ability to simplify the complex. A system developed with 001 can be a prototype or fully developed with production quality code. It is free of interface errors, consistent, logically complete and has no data or control flow errors. Systems can be designed, developed and maintained with maximum productivity. Margaret Hamilton, President of Hamilton Technologies, also directed the research and development of USE.IT, an earlier product which was the first computer aided software engineering product in the industry to concentrate on automatically supporting the development of an ultrareliable system throughout its life cycle. Both products originated in NASA technology developed under a Johnson Space Center contract.

  15. Human factors error and patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T; Beatty, P C W

    2002-08-01

    A wide range of studies have shown that human factors errors are the major cause of critical incidents that threaten patient safety in the medical environments where patient monitoring takes place, contributing to approximately 87% of all such incidents. Studies have also shown that good cognitively ergonomic design of monitoring equipment for use in these environments should reduce the human factors errors associated with the information they provide. The purpose of this review is to consider the current state of knowledge concerning human factors engineering in its application to patient monitoring. It considers the prevalence of human factors error, principles of good human factors design, the effect of specific design features and the problem of the measurement of the effectiveness of designs in reducing human factors error. The conclusion of the review is that whilst the focus of human factors studies has, in recent years, moved from instrument design to organizational issues, patient monitor designers still have an important contribution to make to improving the safety of the monitored patient. Further, whilst better psychological understanding of the causes of human factors errors will in future guide better human factors engineering, in this area there are still many practical avenues of research that need exploring from the current base of understanding. PMID:12214768

  16. Error-correction coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, Erold W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made towards the completion of a specific task on error-correcting coding. The proposed research consisted of investigating the use of modulation block codes as the inner code of a concatenated coding system in order to improve the overall space link communications performance. The study proposed to identify and analyze candidate codes that will complement the performance of the overall coding system which uses the interleaved RS (255,223) code as the outer code.

  17. Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    The challenge of approximating the exchange-correlation functional in Density Functional Theory (DFT) has led to the development of numerous different approximations of varying accuracy on different calculated properties. There is therefore a need for reliable estimation of prediction errors within the different approximation schemes to DFT. The Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals (BEEF) have been developed with this in mind. The functionals are constructed by fitting to experimental and high-quality computational databases for molecules and solids including chemisorption and van der Waals systems. This leads to reasonably accurate general-purpose functionals with particual focus on surface science. The fitting procedure involves considerations on how to combine different types of data, and applies Tikhonov regularization and bootstrap cross validation. The methodology has been applied to construct GGA and metaGGA functionals with and without inclusion of long-ranged van der Waals contributions. The error estimation is made possible by the generation of not only a single functional but through the construction of a probability distribution of functionals represented by a functional ensemble. The use of the functional ensemble is illustrated on compound heat of formation and by investigations of the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates.

  18. Human Error In Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Nancy M.; Rouse, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Report presents results of research aimed at understanding causes of human error in such complex systems as aircraft, nuclear powerplants, and chemical processing plants. Research considered both slips (errors of action) and mistakes (errors of intention), and influence of workload on them. Results indicated that: humans respond to conditions in which errors expected by attempting to reduce incidence of errors; and adaptation to conditions potent influence on human behavior in discretionary situations.

  19. Sources of error in emergency ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the common sources of diagnostic errors in emergency ultrasonography. Methods The authors performed a Medline search using PubMed (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland) for original research and review publications examining the common sources of errors in diagnosis with specific reference to emergency ultrasonography. The search design utilized different association of the following terms : (1) emergency ultrasonography, (2) error, (3) malpractice and (4) medical negligence. This review was restricted to human studies and to English-language literature. Four authors reviewed all the titles and subsequent the abstract of 171 articles that appeared appropriate. Other articles were recognized by reviewing the reference lists of significant papers. Finally, the full text of 48 selected articles was reviewed. Results Several studies indicate that the etiology of error in emergency ultrasonography is multi-factorial. Common sources of error in emergency ultrasonography are: lack of attention to the clinical history and examination, lack of communication with the patient, lack of knowledge of the technical equipment, use of inappropriate probes, inadequate optimization of the images, failure of perception, lack of knowledge of the possible differential diagnoses, over-estimation of one’s own skill, failure to suggest further ultrasound examinations or other imaging techniques. Conclusions To reduce errors in interpretation of ultrasonographic findings, the sonographer needs to be aware of the limitations of ultrasonography in the emergency setting, and the similarities in the appearances of various physiological and pathological processes. Adequate clinical informations are essential. Diagnostic errors should be considered not as signs of failure, but as learning opportunities. PMID:23902656

  20. Database construction for improving patient safety by examining pathology errors.

    PubMed

    Grzybicki, Dana Marie; Turcsanyi, Brian; Becich, Michael J; Gupta, Dilip; Gilbertson, John R; Raab, Stephen S

    2005-10-01

    A critical component of improving patient safety is reducing medical errors. "Improving Patient Safety by Examining Pathology Errors" is a project designed to collect data about and analyze diagnostic errors voluntarily reported by 4 academic anatomic pathology laboratories and to develop and implement interventions to reduce errors and improve patient outcomes. The study database is Web-mediated and Oracle-based, and it houses de-identified error data detected by cytologic-histologic correlation and interdepartmental conference review. We describe the basic design of the database with a focus on challenges faced as a consequence of the absence of standardized and detailed laboratory workload and quality assurance data sets in widely used laboratory information systems and the lack of efficient and comprehensive electronic de-identification of unlinked institutional laboratory information systems and clinical data. Development of these electronic data abstraction capabilities is critical for efforts to improve patient safety through the examination of pathology diagnostic errors. PMID:16146808

  1. Nurses' Behaviors and Visual Scanning Patterns May Reduce Patient Identification Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquard, Jenna L.; Henneman, Philip L.; He, Ze; Jo, Junghee; Fisher, Donald L.; Henneman, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Patient identification (ID) errors occurring during the medication administration process can be fatal. The aim of this study is to determine whether differences in nurses' behaviors and visual scanning patterns during the medication administration process influence their capacities to identify patient ID errors. Nurse participants (n = 20)…

  2. How do Community Pharmacies Recover from E-prescription Errors?

    PubMed Central

    Odukoya, Olufunmilola K.; Stone, Jamie A.; Chui, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of e-prescribing is increasing annually, with over 788 million e-prescriptions received in US pharmacies in 2012. Approximately 9% of e-prescriptions have medication errors. Objective To describe the process used by community pharmacy staff to detect, explain, and correct e-prescription errors. Methods The error recovery conceptual framework was employed for data collection and analysis. 13 pharmacists and 14 technicians from five community pharmacies in Wisconsin participated in the study. A combination of data collection methods were utilized, including direct observations, interviews, and focus groups. The transcription and content analysis of recordings were guided by the three-step error recovery model. Results Most of the e-prescription errors were detected during the entering of information into the pharmacy system. These errors were detected by both pharmacists and technicians using a variety of strategies which included: (1) performing double checks of e-prescription information; (2) printing the e-prescription to paper and confirming the information on the computer screen with information from the paper printout; and (3) using colored pens to highlight important information. Strategies used for explaining errors included: (1) careful review of patient’ medication history; (2) pharmacist consultation with patients; (3) consultation with another pharmacy team member; and (4) use of online resources. In order to correct e-prescription errors, participants made educated guesses of the prescriber’s intent or contacted the prescriber via telephone or fax. When e-prescription errors were encountered in the community pharmacies, the primary goal of participants was to get the order right for patients by verifying the prescriber’s intent. Conclusion Pharmacists and technicians play an important role in preventing e-prescription errors through the detection of errors and the verification of prescribers’ intent. Future studies are needed

  3. Drug Administration Errors in an Institution for Individuals with Intellectual Disability: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; Robertz, R.; de Jong, A. L.; van Roon, E. N.; Leufkens, H. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Medication errors can result in harm, unless barriers to prevent them are present. Drug administration errors are less likely to be prevented, because they occur in the last stage of the drug distribution process. This is especially the case in non-alert patients, as patients often form the final barrier to prevention of errors.…

  4. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... Possession of marijuana is illegal under federal law. Medical marijuana refers to using marijuana to treat certain medical ... Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten Taken as a liquid extract Marijuana leaves and buds contain substances ...

  5. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePlus

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  6. Speech Errors, Error Correction, and the Construction of Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linde, Charlotte

    Speech errors have been used in the construction of production models of the phonological and semantic components of language, and for a model of interactional processes. Errors also provide insight into how speakers plan discourse and syntactic structure,. Different types of discourse exhibit different types of error. The present data are taken…

  7. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePlus

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... The pregnancy is harmful to the woman's health (therapeutic abortion). The pregnancy resulted after a traumatic event ...

  8. Skylab water balance error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the precision of the net water balance were obtained for the entire Skylab preflight and inflight phases as well as for the first two weeks of flight. Quantitative estimates of both total sampling errors and instrumentation errors were obtained. It was shown that measurement error is minimal in comparison to biological variability and little can be gained from improvement in analytical accuracy. In addition, a propagation of error analysis demonstrated that total water balance error could be accounted for almost entirely by the errors associated with body mass changes. Errors due to interaction between terms in the water balance equation (covariances) represented less than 10% of the total error. Overall, the analysis provides evidence that daily measurements of body water changes obtained from the indirect balance technique are reasonable, precise, and relaible. The method is not biased toward net retention or loss.

  9. Standard Errors for Matrix Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogasawara, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Derives the asymptotic standard errors and intercorrelations for several matrix correlations assuming multivariate normality for manifest variables and derives the asymptotic standard errors of the matrix correlations for two factor-loading matrices. (SLD)

  10. Uncertainty quantification and error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Higdon, Dave M; Anderson, Mark C; Habib, Salman; Klein, Richard; Berliner, Mark; Covey, Curt; Ghattas, Omar; Graziani, Carlo; Seager, Mark; Sefcik, Joseph; Stark, Philip

    2010-01-01

    UQ studies all sources of error and uncertainty, including: systematic and stochastic measurement error; ignorance; limitations of theoretical models; limitations of numerical representations of those models; limitations on the accuracy and reliability of computations, approximations, and algorithms; and human error. A more precise definition for UQ is suggested below.

  11. Grammatical Errors and Communication Breakdown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomiyama, Machiko

    This study investigated the relationship between grammatical errors and communication breakdown by examining native speakers' ability to correct grammatical errors. The assumption was that communication breakdown exists to a certain degree if a native speaker cannot correct the error or if the correction distorts the information intended to be…

  12. Beta systems error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric backscatter coefficient, beta, measured with an airborne CO Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) system operating in a continuous wave, focussed model is discussed. The Single Particle Mode (SPM) algorithm, was developed from concept through analysis of an extensive amount of data obtained with the system on board a NASA aircraft. The SPM algorithm is intended to be employed in situations where one particle at a time appears in the sensitive volume of the LDV. In addition to giving the backscatter coefficient, the SPM algorithm also produces as intermediate results the aerosol density and the aerosol backscatter cross section distribution. A second method, which measures only the atmospheric backscatter coefficient, is called the Volume Mode (VM) and was simultaneously employed. The results of these two methods differed by slightly less than an order of magnitude. The measurement uncertainties or other errors in the results of the two methods are examined.

  13. Medical liability reform crisis 2008.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stuart L

    2009-02-01

    The crisis of medical liability has resulted in drastic increases in insurance premiums and reduced access for patients to specialty care, particularly in areas such as obstetrics/gynecology, neurosurgery, and orthopaedic surgery. The current liability environment neither effectively compensates persons injured from medical negligence nor encourages addressing system errors to improve patient safety. The author reviews trends across the nation and reports on the efforts of an organization called "Doctors for Medical Liability Reform" to educate the public and lawmakers on the need for solutions to the chaotic process of adjudicating medical malpractice claims in the United States. PMID:18989732

  14. Register file soft error recovery

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  15. Rapid mapping of volumetric errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.; Hale, L.; Yordy, D.

    1995-09-13

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to mapping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) modeling the relationship between the volumetric error and the current state of the machine; (2) acquiring error data based on length measurements throughout the work volume; and (3) optimizing the model to the particular machine.

  16. Medical specialty boards can help measure graduate medical education outcomes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Carek, Peter; Holmboe, Eric S; Puffer, James C; Warm, Eric J; Phillips, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    U.S. graduate medical education (GME) training institutions are under increasing scrutiny to measure program outcomes as a demonstration of accountability for the sizeable funding they receive from the federal government. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is a potential agent of measuring GME accountability but has no interaction with physicians after residency training is completed. American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) member boards interact with physicians throughout their careers through maintenance of certification (MOC) and are a potential source of valuable data on physician competency and quality of care, both of which could be used to measure GME accountability.The authors propose that ABMS boards and the ACGME deepen their existing relationship to better assess residency training outcomes. ABMS boards have a wealth of data on physicians collected as a by-product of MOC and business operations. Further, many ABMS boards collect practice demographics and scope-of-practice information through MOC enrollment surveys or recertification examination questionnaires. These data are potentially valuable in helping residencies know what their graduates are doing in practice. Part 4 of MOC generally involves assessment of the quality of care delivered in practice, and ABMS boards could share these deidentified data with the ACGME and residency programs to provide direct feedback on the practice outcomes of graduates.ABMS member boards and the ACGME should broaden their long-standing relationship to further develop shared roles and data-sharing mechanisms to better inform residencies and the public about GME training outcomes. PMID:24871232

  17. Social aspects of clinical errors.

    PubMed

    Richman, Joel; Mason, Tom; Mason-Whitehead, Elizabeth; McIntosh, Annette; Mercer, Dave

    2009-08-01

    Clinical errors, whether committed by doctors, nurses or other professions allied to healthcare, remain a sensitive issue requiring open debate and policy formulation in order to reduce them. The literature suggests that the issues underpinning errors made by healthcare professionals involve concerns about patient safety, professional disclosure, apology, litigation, compensation, processes of recording and policy development to enhance quality service. Anecdotally, we are aware of narratives of minor errors, which may well have been covered up and remain officially undisclosed whilst the major errors resulting in damage and death to patients alarm both professionals and public with resultant litigation and compensation. This paper attempts to unravel some of these issues by highlighting the historical nature of clinical errors and drawing parallels to contemporary times by outlining the 'compensation culture'. We then provide an overview of what constitutes a clinical error and review the healthcare professional strategies for managing such errors. PMID:19201405

  18. Listen carefully: the risk of error in spoken medication orders.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Bruce L; Dickey, Laura Walsh; Fisher, William M; Gibbons, Robert D; Lin, Swu-Jane; Luce, Paul A; McLennan, Conor T; Senders, John W; Yu, Clement T

    2010-05-01

    Clinicians and patients often confuse drug names that sound alike. We conducted auditory perception experiments in the United States to assess the impact of similarity, familiarity, background noise and other factors on clinicians' (physicians, family pharmacists, nurses) and laypersons' ability to identify spoken drug names. We found that accuracy increased significantly as the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio increased, as subjective familiarity with the name increased and as the national prescribing frequency of the name increased. For clinicians only, similarity to other drug names reduced identification accuracy, especially when the neighboring names were frequently prescribed. When one name was substituted for another, the substituted name was almost always a more frequently prescribed drug. Objectively measurable properties of drug names can be used to predict confusability. The magnitude of the noise and familiarity effects suggests that they may be important targets for intervention. We conclude that the ability of clinicians and lay people to identify spoken drug names is influenced by signal-to-noise ratio, subjective familiarity, prescribing frequency, and the similarity neighborhoods of drug names. PMID:20207461

  19. Lessons from the TAPS study - errors relating to medical records.

    PubMed

    Makeham, Meredith A B; Bridges-Webb, Charles; Kidd, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    The Threats to Australian Patient Safety (TAPS) Study collected 648 anonymous reports about threats to patient safety from a representative random sample of Australian general practitioners. These contained any events the GPs felt should not have happened and would not want to happen again, regardless of who was at fault or the outcome of the event. This series of articles presents clinical lessons resulting from the TAPS study. PMID:18398521

  20. Data sharing for prevention: a case study in the development of a comprehensive emergency department injury surveillance system and its use in preventing violence and alcohol-related harms

    PubMed Central

    Quigg, Zara; Hughes, Karen; Bellis, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine emergency department (ED) data sharing via a local injury surveillance system and assess its contribution to the prevention of violence and alcohol-related harms. Methods 6-year (2004–2010) exploratory study analysing injury attendances to one ED in the North West of England using descriptive and trend analyses. Results Over the 6-year period, there were 242 796 ED injury attendances, including 21 683 for intentional injuries. Compared with unintentional injury patients, intentional injury patients were more likely to be men, aged 18–34 years, live in the most deprived communities, have attended the ED at night/weekends, have been injured in a public place and have consumed alcohol prior to the injury. Detailed data collected on alcohol and violence-related ED attendances were shared with local partners to monitor local trends and inform prevention activity including targeted policing and licensing enforcement. Over the 6-year period, intentional ED injury attendances decreased by 35.6% and alcohol-related assault attendances decreased by 30.3%. Conclusions The collection of additional ED data on assault details and alcohol use prior to injury, and its integration into multi-agency policy and practice, played an important role in driving local violence prevention activity. Further research is needed to assess the direct contribution ED data sharing makes to reductions in violence. PMID:22210640

  1. The 13 errors.

    PubMed

    Flower, J

    1998-01-01

    The reality is that most change efforts fail. McKinsey & Company carried out a fascinating research project on change to "crack the code" on creating and managing change in large organizations. One of the questions they asked--and answered--is why most organizations fail in their efforts to manage change. They found that 80 percent of these failures could be traced to 13 common errors. They are: (1) No winning strategy; (2) failure to make a compelling and urgent case for change; (3) failure to distinguish between decision-driven and behavior-dependent change; (4) over-reliance on structure and systems to change behavior; (5) lack of skills and resources; (6) failure to experiment; (7) leaders' inability or unwillingness to confront how they and their roles must change; (8) failure to mobilize and engage pivotal groups; (9) failure to understand and shape the informal organization; (10) inability to integrate and align all the initiatives; (11) no performance focus; (12) excessively open-ended process; and (13) failure to make the whole process transparent and meaningful to individuals. PMID:10351717

  2. Contour Error Map Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis; Lane, John; Immer, Christopher; Case, Jonathan; Manobianco, John

    2005-01-01

    The contour error map (CEM) algorithm and the software that implements the algorithm are means of quantifying correlations between sets of time-varying data that are binarized and registered on spatial grids. The present version of the software is intended for use in evaluating numerical weather forecasts against observational sea-breeze data. In cases in which observational data come from off-grid stations, it is necessary to preprocess the observational data to transform them into gridded data. First, the wind direction is gridded and binarized so that D(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on forecast data and d(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on gridded observational data. Here, i and j are spatial indices representing 1.25-km intervals along the west-to-east and south-to-north directions, respectively; and n is a time index representing 5-minute intervals. A binary value of D or d = 0 corresponds to an offshore wind, whereas a value of D or d = 1 corresponds to an onshore wind. CEM includes two notable subalgorithms: One identifies and verifies sea-breeze boundaries; the other, which can be invoked optionally, performs an image-erosion function for the purpose of attempting to eliminate river-breeze contributions in the wind fields.

  3. Error analysis in laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantert, Walter A.; Tendick, Frank; Bhoyrul, Sunil; Tyrrell, Dana; Fujino, Yukio; Rangel, Shawn; Patti, Marco G.; Way, Lawrence W.

    1998-06-01

    Iatrogenic complications in laparoscopic surgery, as in any field, stem from human error. In recent years, cognitive psychologists have developed theories for understanding and analyzing human error, and the application of these principles has decreased error rates in the aviation and nuclear power industries. The purpose of this study was to apply error analysis to laparoscopic surgery and evaluate its potential for preventing complications. Our approach is based on James Reason's framework using a classification of errors according to three performance levels: at the skill- based performance level, slips are caused by attention failures, and lapses result form memory failures. Rule-based mistakes constitute the second level. Knowledge-based mistakes occur at the highest performance level and are caused by shortcomings in conscious processing. These errors committed by the performer 'at the sharp end' occur in typical situations which often times are brought about by already built-in latent system failures. We present a series of case studies in laparoscopic surgery in which errors are classified and the influence of intrinsic failures and extrinsic system flaws are evaluated. Most serious technical errors in lap surgery stem from a rule-based or knowledge- based mistake triggered by cognitive underspecification due to incomplete or illusory visual input information. Error analysis in laparoscopic surgery should be able to improve human performance, and it should detect and help eliminate system flaws. Complication rates in laparoscopic surgery due to technical errors can thus be considerably reduced.

  4. Nursing Strategies to Increase Medication Safety in Inpatient Settings.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Katherine; Cochran, Gary; Barrett, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Using data obtained through 2 multidisciplinary studies focused on medication safety effectiveness, this article provides nursing recommendations to decrease medication delivery errors. Strategies to minimize and address interruptions/distractions are proposed for the 3 most problematic time frames in which medication errors typically arise: medication acquisition, transportation, and bedside delivery. With planned interventions such as programmed scripts and hospital-based protocols to manage interruptions and distractions, patient safety can be maintained in the inpatient setting. PMID:26945258

  5. Online Deviation Detection for Medical Processes

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Stefan C.; Avrunin, George S.; Clarke, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Human errors are a major concern in many medical processes. To help address this problem, we are investigating an approach for automatically detecting when performers of a medical process deviate from the acceptable ways of performing that process as specified by a detailed process model. Such deviations could represent errors and, thus, detecting and reporting deviations as they occur could help catch errors before harm is done. In this paper, we identify important issues related to the feasibility of the proposed approach and empirically evaluate the approach for two medical procedures, chemotherapy and blood transfusion. For the evaluation, we use the process models to generate sample process executions that we then seed with synthetic errors. The process models describe the coordination of activities of different process performers in normal, as well as in exceptional situations. The evaluation results suggest that the proposed approach could be applied in clinical settings to help catch errors before harm is done. PMID:25954343

  6. Random errors in egocentric networks.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Zack W

    2012-10-01

    The systematic errors that are induced by a combination of human memory limitations and common survey design and implementation have long been studied in the context of egocentric networks. Despite this, little if any work exists in the area of random error analysis on these same networks; this paper offers a perspective on the effects of random errors on egonet analysis, as well as the effects of using egonet measures as independent predictors in linear models. We explore the effects of false-positive and false-negative error in egocentric networks on both standard network measures and on linear models through simulation analysis on a ground truth egocentric network sample based on facebook-friendships. Results show that 5-20% error rates, which are consistent with error rates known to occur in ego network data, can cause serious misestimation of network properties and regression parameters. PMID:23878412

  7. Random errors in egocentric networks

    PubMed Central

    Almquist, Zack W.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic errors that are induced by a combination of human memory limitations and common survey design and implementation have long been studied in the context of egocentric networks. Despite this, little if any work exists in the area of random error analysis on these same networks; this paper offers a perspective on the effects of random errors on egonet analysis, as well as the effects of using egonet measures as independent predictors in linear models. We explore the effects of false-positive and false-negative error in egocentric networks on both standard network measures and on linear models through simulation analysis on a ground truth egocentric network sample based on facebook-friendships. Results show that 5–20% error rates, which are consistent with error rates known to occur in ego network data, can cause serious misestimation of network properties and regression parameters. PMID:23878412

  8. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  9. [Error factors in spirometry].

    PubMed

    Quadrelli, S A; Montiel, G C; Roncoroni, A J

    1994-01-01

    Spirometry is the more frequently used method to estimate pulmonary function in the clinical laboratory. It is important to comply with technical requisites to approximate the real values sought as well as adequate interpretation of results. Recommendations are made to establish: 1--quality control 2--define abnormality 3--classify the change from normal and its degree 4--define reversibility. In relation to quality control several criteria are pointed out such as end of the test, back-extrapolation and extrapolated volume in order to delineate most common errors. Daily calibration is advised. Inspection of graphical records of the test is mandatory. The limitations to the common use of 80% of predicted values to establish abnormality is stressed. The reasons for employing 95% confidence limits are detailed. It is important to select the reference values equation (in view of the differences in predicted values). It is advisable to validate the selection with local population normal values. In relation to the definition of the defect as restrictive or obstructive, the limitations of vital capacity (VC) to establish restriction, when obstruction is also present, are defined. Also the limitations of maximal mid-expiratory flow 25-75 (FMF 25-75) as an isolated marker of obstruction. Finally the qualities of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (VEF1) and the difficulties with other indicators (CVF, FMF 25-75, VEF1/CVF) to estimate reversibility after bronchodilators are evaluated. The value of different methods used to define reversibility (% of change in initial value, absolute change or % of predicted), is commented. Clinical spirometric studies in order to be valuable should be performed with the same technical rigour as any other more complex studies. PMID:7990690

  10. Statistical errors in Monte Carlo estimates of systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Byron P.

    2007-01-01

    For estimating the effects of a number of systematic errors on a data sample, one can generate Monte Carlo (MC) runs with systematic parameters varied and examine the change in the desired observed result. Two methods are often used. In the unisim method, the systematic parameters are varied one at a time by one standard deviation, each parameter corresponding to a MC run. In the multisim method (see ), each MC run has all of the parameters varied; the amount of variation is chosen from the expected distribution of each systematic parameter, usually assumed to be a normal distribution. The variance of the overall systematic error determination is derived for each of the two methods and comparisons are made between them. If one focuses not on the error in the prediction of an individual systematic error, but on the overall error due to all systematic errors in the error matrix element in data bin m, the number of events needed is strongly reduced because of the averaging effect over all of the errors. For simple models presented here the multisim model was far better if the statistical error in the MC samples was larger than an individual systematic error, while for the reverse case, the unisim model was better. Exact formulas and formulas for the simple toy models are presented so that realistic calculations can be made. The calculations in the present note are valid if the errors are in a linear region. If that region extends sufficiently far, one can have the unisims or multisims correspond to k standard deviations instead of one. This reduces the number of events required by a factor of k2. The specific terms unisim and multisim were coined by Peter Meyers and Steve Brice, respectively, for the MiniBooNE experiment. However, the concepts have been developed over time and have been in general use for some time.

  11. General Advice on Safe Medication Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication errors happen. They happen in hospitals, in pharmacies, or even at home. And sometimes people get ... tablet or capsule, and the name of the pharmacy. The imprint can help you identify a drug ...

  12. Teratogenic inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, J. V.

    1986-01-01

    Most children with inborn errors of metabolism are born healthy without malformations as the fetus is protected by the metabolic activity of the placenta. However, certain inborn errors of the fetus have teratogenic effects although the mechanisms responsible for the malformations are not generally understood. Inborn errors in the mother may also be teratogenic. The adverse effects of these may be reduced by improved metabolic control of the biochemical disorder. PMID:3540927

  13. Confidence limits and their errors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran Raja

    2002-03-22

    Confidence limits are common place in physics analysis. Great care must be taken in their calculation and use especially in cases of limited statistics. We introduce the concept of statistical errors of confidence limits and argue that not only should limits be calculated but also their errors in order to represent the results of the analysis to the fullest. We show that comparison of two different limits from two different experiments becomes easier when their errors are also quoted. Use of errors of confidence limits will lead to abatement of the debate on which method is best suited to calculate confidence limits.

  14. Compensating For GPS Ephemeris Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong

    1992-01-01

    Method of computing position of user station receiving signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) of navigational satellites compensates for most of GPS ephemeris error. Present method enables user station to reduce error in its computed position substantially. User station must have access to two or more reference stations at precisely known positions several hundred kilometers apart and must be in neighborhood of reference stations. Based on fact that when GPS data used to compute baseline between reference station and user station, vector error in computed baseline is proportional ephemeris error and length of baseline.

  15. Retransmission error control with memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindhu, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, an error control technique that is a basic improvement over automatic-repeat-request ARQ is presented. Erroneously received blocks in an ARQ system are used for error control. The technique is termed ARQ-with-memory (MRQ). The general MRQ system is described, and simple upper and lower bounds are derived on the throughput achievable by MRQ. The performance of MRQ with respect to throughput, message delay and probability of error is compared to that of ARQ by simulating both systems using error data from a VHF satellite channel being operated in the ALOHA packet broadcasting mode.

  16. A theory of human error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Human error, a significant contributing factor in a very high proportion of civil transport, general aviation, and rotorcraft accidents is investigated. Correction of the sources of human error requires that one attempt to reconstruct underlying and contributing causes of error from the circumstantial causes cited in official investigative reports. A validated analytical theory of the input-output behavior of human operators involving manual control, communication, supervisory, and monitoring tasks which are relevant to aviation operations is presented. This theory of behavior, both appropriate and inappropriate, provides an insightful basis for investigating, classifying, and quantifying the needed cause-effect relationships governing propagation of human error.

  17. Medical Data Transmission Using Cell Phone Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voos, J.; Centeno, C.; Riva, G.; Zerbini, C.; Gonzalez, E.

    2011-12-01

    A big challenge in telemedicine systems is related to have the technical requirements needed for a successful implementation in remote locations where the available hardware and communication infrastructure is not adequate for a good medical data transmission. Despite of the wide standards availability, methodologies, applications and systems integration facilities in telemedicine, in many cases the implementation requirements are not achievable to allow the system execution in remote areas of our country. Therefore, this paper presents an alternative for the messages transmission related to medical studies using the cellular network and the standard HL7 V3 [1] for data modeling. The messages are transmitted to a web server and stored in a centralized database which allows data sharing with other specialists.

  18. A posteriori error estimator and error control for contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Alexander; Wohlmuth, Barbara I.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two error estimators for one-body contact problems. The first error estimator is defined in terms of H( div ) -conforming stress approximations and equilibrated fluxes while the second is a standard edge-based residual error estimator without any modification with respect to the contact. We show reliability and efficiency for both estimators. Moreover, the error is bounded by the first estimator with a constant one plus a higher order data oscillation term plus a term arising from the contact that is shown numerically to be of higher order. The second estimator is used in a control-based AFEM refinement strategy, and the decay of the error in the energy is shown. Several numerical tests demonstrate the performance of both estimators.

  19. Medication Information Flow in Home Care.

    PubMed

    Norri-Sederholm, Teija; Saranto, Kaija; Paakkonen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Critical success factors in medication care involve communication and information sharing. Knowing the information needs of each actor in medication process in home care, is the first step to ensure that the right type of information is available, when needed. The aim of the study was to describe the needed and delivered information in home care in order to perform medication care successfully. A total of 15 nurses from primary home care participated a workshop focusing on medication treatment. The qualitative data was collected by focus group technique. Data was analyzed according to content analysis. Three medication information themes were formulated: Client-related information, medication, and medication error. The critical medication information were generic drug information, validity of the list of medication and client's clinical status. As a conclusion findings, show the diversity of the medication information in home care. PMID:27332222

  20. Medical Appointments

    MedlinePlus

    ... trouble concentrating, stomach problems or emotional issues like anxiety. New or increasing side effects or reactions to your medications. Again, for how long? How serious are they? Medication compliance: How well you’ve been taking your medications. Have you missed doses? If so, ...