Science.gov

Sample records for medication therapy management

  1. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy.

    PubMed

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  2. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  3. Medication therapy management services: definitions and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Annette N; Martin, Michelle T; Tilton, Jessica J; Touchette, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    In the US, the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 required that Medicare Part D insurers provide medication therapy management (MTM) services (MTMS) to selected beneficiaries, with the goals of providing education, improving adherence, or detecting adverse drug events and medication misuse. These broad goals and variety in MTM programmes available make assessment of these programmes difficult. The objectives of this article are to review the definitions of MTMS proposed by various stakeholders, and to summarize and evaluate the outcomes of MTMS consistent with those that may be offered in Medicare Part D or reimbursed by State Medicaid programmes. MTM programmes are approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Pharmacy, medical and insurance organizations have provided guidelines and definitions for MTM programmes, distinguishing them from other types of community pharmacy activities. MTM has been distinguished from disease state management because of the focus on medications and multiple conditions. It differs from patient counselling because it is delivered independent of dispensing and involves collaboration with patients and providers. There is no consensus on the recommended mode of delivery (i.e. face-to-face or by telephone) for MTM. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify articles published after 2000 using the search terms 'medication therapy management' and 'medication management'. Studies with outcomes evaluating community-based programmes consistent with MTMS, regardless of MTMS reimbursement source, were included in the review. Seven publications describing four MTMS were identified. For each of the identified articles, we describe the study design, service setting, inclusion criteria and outcomes. An additional three surveys describing multiple MTMS were identified and are summarized. Finally, ongoing efforts by CMS to evaluate the success of MTMS in the US are described. To date, there are limited outcomes available for MTMS

  4. 78 FR 57159 - Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Scientific Information Request on Medication... scientific information submissions. SUMMARY: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is seeking scientific information submissions from the public on medication therapy management Scientific information...

  5. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  6. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that include...

  7. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... and systems to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use...

  8. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that include...

  9. Collaborative drug therapy management and comprehensive medication management-2015.

    PubMed

    McBane, Sarah E; Dopp, Anna L; Abe, Andrew; Benavides, Sandra; Chester, Elizabeth A; Dixon, Dave L; Dunn, Michaelia; Johnson, Melissa D; Nigro, Sarah J; Rothrock-Christian, Tracie; Schwartz, Amy H; Thrasher, Kim; Walker, Scot

    2015-04-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) previously published position statements on collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in 1997 and 2003. Since 2003, significant federal and state legislation addressing CDTM has evolved and expanded throughout the United States. CDTM is well suited to facilitate the delivery of comprehensive medication management (CMM) by clinical pharmacists. CMM, defined by ACCP as a core component of the standards of practice for clinical pharmacists, is designed to optimize medication-related outcomes in collaborative practice environments. New models of care delivery emphasize patient-centered, team-based care and increasingly link payment to the achievement of positive economic, clinical, and humanistic outcomes. Hence clinical pharmacists practicing under CDTM agreements or through other privileging processes are well positioned to provide CMM. The economic value of clinical pharmacists in team-based settings is well documented. However, patient access to CMM remains limited due to lack of payer recognition of the value of clinical pharmacists in collaborative care settings and current health care payment policy. Therefore, the clinical pharmacy discipline must continue to establish and expand its use of CDTM agreements and other collaborative privileging mechanisms to provide CMM. Continued growth in the provision of CMM by appropriately qualified clinical pharmacists in collaborative practice settings will enhance recognition of their positive impact on medication-related outcomes. PMID:25884536

  10. Revealing undetected problems with medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Akash J; Gatewood, Sharon B S

    2008-06-01

    Implementation of Medication Therapy Management (MTM) services under the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 has highlighted the innovative roles that pharmacists are assuming in progressive, community-based practice settings. MTM underscores the vital role that community pharmacists have in helping patients achieve desirable therapeutic outcomes and reduce health care expenses. Pharmacists can: 1) obtain detailed medication histories, 2) assess patient adherence and the development of side effects, 3) educate patients on their medications and disease states, and 4) perform cost-effective therapeutic interchanges in collaboration with prescribers. This case describes an MTM session with a 68-year-old Caucasian male who is a regular prescription customer at a local grocery-store chain pharmacy. The patient was screened and identified by his Medicare Part D plan as one who qualifies for MTM services. He has a history of dyslipidemia, depression, and epilepsy. The patient was contacted by the pharmacist to participate in a MTM appointment to discuss his current medications and disease states. After obtaining a detailed history, the pharmacist identified significant medication-related problems including inappropriate prescribing of medication, self-treatment, and the patient's lack of knowledge concerning his medications. After discussions with the patient and his health care providers, a medication plan was created for the patient to follow. Open communication among the patient, pharmacist, and prescribers is a crucial component to ensure the success of MTM services. PMID:18764677

  11. Medication therapy management and adherence among US renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Tolley, Elizabeth A; Kaplan, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication therapy management (MTM) services among patient populations with a range of disease states have improved adherence rates. However, no published studies have examined the impact of Medicare Part D MTM eligibility on renal transplant recipients’ (RTRs) immunosuppressant therapy (IST) adherence. This study’s purpose was therefore, to determine the effects of Medicare Part D MTM on IST adherence among adult RTRs at 12 months posttransplant. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Medicare Parts A, B, and D claims and transplant follow-up data reported in the United States Renal Data System. The sample included adult RTRs who were transplanted between 2006 and 2011, had graft survival for 12 months, were enrolled in Part D, and were prescribed tacrolimus. IST adherence was measured by medication possession ratio for tacrolimus. MTM eligibility was determined using criteria established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regression. Results In all, 17,181 RTRs were included. The majority of the sample were male (59.1%), and 42% were MTM-eligible. Mean medication possession ratio was 0.91±0.17 (mean ± standard deviation), with 16.83% having a medication possession ratio of <0.80. MTM eligibility, sex, age, and number of prescription drugs were significantly associated with adherence in the full model (P<0.05). MTM-eligible RTRs were more likely to be adherent than those who were not MTM-eligible (odds ratio =1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.26, P=0.02). Conclusion The findings provide evidence that access to MTM services increases IST adherence among RTRs. PMID:27175070

  12. Providing medication therapy management for smoking cessation patients.

    PubMed

    Smalls, Tiffany D; Broughton, Amelia D; Hylick, Ericka V; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service released the first report of the Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Smoking and Health. The report concluded that cigarette smoking caused lung and laryngeal cancer as well as bronchitis. Today, smoking is one of the leading preventable causes of deaths in the United States. Research has shown that it potentially causes more deaths than human immunodeficiency virus, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, and firearm-related incidents. Health care providers play a critical role in guiding and directing patients to quit smoking by introducing them to smoking-cessation options. This is due to the fact that if these patients quit, they can reduce their cardiovascular risk. Pharmacists, being one of the easily accessible health care providers, have an advantage over other clinicians when it comes to influencing patients to quit smoking and to modify their lifestyles. Pharmacists through medication therapy management directly interact with these patients to manage medications as well as behavioral factors. PMID:25500554

  13. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists’ perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services. PMID:27293237

  14. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Poole, Traci M; Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists' perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services. PMID:27293237

  15. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) VOLUNTARY MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION...

  16. Role of medication therapy management in preexposure prophylaxis therapy for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Kelli W; Woodard, Laresa M; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Patient medication adherence is a long-standing problem and is one that raises serious issues for patient health, public health, and health care quality. Medication nonadherence costs the US economy an estimated US$290 billion in avoidable medical spending every year. One of the most costly health conditions is HIV disease, which continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. About 34 million people are living with HIV around the world. With the emerging preventative treatment against HIV, known as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), come concerns surrounding the potential impact of nonadherence to this newly approved medication therapy. Nonadherence to antiretroviral treatments are commonly the root cause for patients not reaching their treatment goals, putting them at risk of progression and worsening of their disease and complications, such as increased risk of opportunistic infections. Therefore, it is essential to improve antiretroviral medication adherence. By identifying members who are nonadherent to their prescribed antiretroviral medications and working collaboratively with patients, physicians, and pharmacists, Medication Therapy Management (MTM) can potentially increase medication adherence by helping patients identify, resolve, and prevent issues that may affect their decision not to take a medication as intended. PMID:25500557

  17. Challenges to Integrating Pharmacogenetic Testing into Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen LaPointe, Nancy M.; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Some have proposed the integration of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing into medication therapy management (MTM) to enable further refinement of treatment(s) to reduce risk of adverse responses and improve efficacy. PGx testing involves the analysis of genetic variants associated with therapeutic or adverse response and may be useful in enhancing the ability to identify ineffective and/or harmful drugs or drug combinations. This “enhanced” MTM might also reduce patient concerns about side effects and increase confidence that the medication is effective, addressing two key factors that impact patient adherence - concern and necessity. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integration of PGx testing into MTM in clinical practice has not yet been determined. Objectives In this paper, we consider some of the challenges to the integration and delivery of PGx testing in MTM services. What is already known about this subject While the addition of pharmacogenetic testing has been suggested, little literature exists exploring the challenges or feasibility of doing so. PMID:25803768

  18. Medication reconciliation and therapy management in dialysis-dependent patients: need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Cardone, Katie E; Manley, Harold J; St Peter, Wendy L; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-11-01

    Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model. PMID:23990162

  19. Simulated Medication Therapy Management Activities in a Pharmacotherapy Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Trapskin, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To measure the impact of medication therapy management (MTM) learning activities on students’ confidence and intention to provide MTM using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. An MTM curriculum combining lecture instruction and active-learning strategies was incorporated into a required pharmacotherapy laboratory course. Assessment. A validated survey instrument was developed to evaluate student confidence and intent to engage in MTM services using the domains comprising the Theory of Planned Behavior. Confidence scores improved significantly from baseline for all items (p < 0.00), including identification of billable services, documentation, and electronic billing. Mean scores improved significantly for all Theory of Planned Behavior items within the constructs of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms (p < 0.05). At baseline, 42% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they had knowledge and skills to provide MTM. This percentage increased to 82% following completion of the laboratory activities. Conclusion. Implementation of simulated MTM activities in a pharmacotherapy laboratory significantly increased knowledge scores, confidence measures, and scores on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs related to perceived behavioral control and subjective norms. Despite these improvements, intention to engage in future MTM services remained unchanged. PMID:21829269

  20. Trends in Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Qin, Yolanda; Young, Theo; Thomas, Zachary; Spivey, Christina A.; Solomon, David K.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background To increase the enrollment rate of medication therapy management (MTM) programs in Medicare Part D plans, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) lowered the allowable eligibility thresholds based on the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs for Medicare Part D plans for 2010 and after. However, an increase in MTM enrollment rates has not been realized. Objectives To describe trends in MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans and to identify patterns that may hinder enrollment in MTM programs. Methods This study analyzed data extracted from the Medicare Part D MTM Programs Fact Sheets (2008–2014). The annual percentages of utilizing each threshold value of the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs, as well as other aspects of MTM enrollment practices, were analyzed among Medicare MTM programs that were established by Medicare Part D plans. Results For 2010 and after, increased proportions of Medicare Part D plans set their eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. For example, in 2008, 48.7% of Medicare Part D plans (N = 347:712) opened MTM enrollment to Medicare beneficiaries with only 2 chronic disease states (specific diseases varied between plans), whereas the other half restricted enrollment to patients with a minimum of 3 to 5 chronic disease states. After 2010, only approximately 20% of plans opened their MTM enrollment to patients with 2 chronic disease states, with the remaining 80% restricting enrollment to patients with 3 or more chronic diseases. Conclusion The policy change by CMS for 2010 and after is associated with increased proportions of plans setting their MTM eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. Changes to the eligibility thresholds by Medicare Part D plans might have acted as a barrier for increased MTM enrollment. Thus, CMS may need to identify alternative strategies to increase MTM enrollment in Medicare plans. PMID:26380030

  1. 78 FR 61363 - Correction-Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Medication Therapy Management The original date of publication for this Federal Register notice was September 17, 2013, 78 FR 57159. On this publication, the Web site that appears under ADDRESSES is incorrect...

  2. Eligibility For And Enrollment In Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Programs Varies By Plan Sponsor.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Hendrick, Franklin B; Shen, Xian; Dai, Mingliang; Tom, Sarah E; Dougherty, J Samantha; Miller, Laura M

    2016-09-01

    Medicare Part D prescription drug plans must offer medication therapy management to beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions and high drug expenditures. However, plan sponsors have considerable latitude in setting eligibility criteria. Newly available data indicate that enrollment rates in medication therapy management among stand-alone prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage drug plans averaged only 10 percent in 2012. The enrollment variation across plan sponsors-from less than 0.2 percent to more than 57.0 percent-was associated with the restrictiveness of their eligibility criteria. For example, enrollment was 16.4 percent in plans requiring two chronic conditions versus 9.2 percent in plans requiring three, and 12.7 percent in plans requiring the use of any Part D drug versus 4.4 percent in plans requiring the use of drugs in specific classes. This variation represents inequities in access to medication therapy management across plans and results in missed opportunities for interventions that might improve therapeutic outcomes and reduce spending. The new Part D Enhanced Medication Therapy Management model of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has the potential to significantly increase the impact of medication therapy management by aligning financial incentives with improvements in medication use and encouraging innovation. PMID:27605635

  3. “Keeping the Boogie Man Away”: Medication Self-Management among Women Receiving Anastrozole Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Karen; Happ, Mary Beth; Bender, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The oral hormonal agent anastrozole improves clinical outcomes for women with breast cancer, but women have difficulty taking it for the five-year course. The unique medication-taking experiences related to self-management of anastrozole therapy for women with early stage breast cancer are not known. Our purpose was to describe the medication-taking experiences for postmenopausal women with early stage breast cancer who were prescribed a course of anastrozole therapy. Twelve women aged 58 to 67 years, midway through therapy, participated in audio-recorded interviews. Women's medication-taking experiences involved a belief in their importance and an imperative to take anastrozole. We found that women's side effect experiences, particularly menopausal symptoms, were significant, but only one woman stopped anastrozole due to side effects. Medication-taking included routinization interconnected with remembering/forgetting and a storage strategy. Some women noted a mutual medication-taking experience with their spouse, but most felt taking anastrozole was something they had to do alone. Our results provide insight into the way some women with early stage breast cancer manage their hormonal therapy at approximately the midpoint of treatment. Next steps should include examinations of patient-provider communication, potential medication-taking differences between pre- and postmenopausal women, and the effects of medication-taking on clinical outcomes. PMID:23326655

  4. Medical therapy of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Micali, S; Grande, M; Sighinolfi, M C; De Carne, C; De Stefani, S; Bianchi, G

    2006-11-01

    Nephrolithiasis treatment has become easier and less invasive with the development of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) and endourologic techniques. However, medical therapy represents a well-established and complementary approach that can improve the efficacy of SWL and endourology. During recent decades, pharmacologic intervention has become more effective in stone disease: drugs can control the pain of renal colic, interfere at various levels in lithogenesis, and contribute to the expulsion of stones. It is well known that lithogenesis is a multifactorial process influenced by environmental-nutritional factors (low urinary volume, diet rich in animal protein, etc) and metabolic alterations; i.e., hypercalciuria, hyperuricosuria, and deficiency of stone-inhibiting factors (citrate, magnesium, glycosaminoglycans [GAGs]). Specific drugs such as citrate, allopurinol, and thiazide represent highly effective treatments for the promoting factors. Furthermore, recent findings suggest an interesting role for a phytotherapeutic agent, Phillantus niruri, and its inhibitory action on calcium oxalate crystallization related to the higher incorporation of GAGs into the calculi. Another step forward in medical management of stone disease is expulsive therapy. Many studies have proven the efficacy of medical expulsive therapy with nifedipine and alpha-blockers: their specific action on ureteral smooth muscle in association with anti-edema drugs accounts for their efficacy in expelling ureteral stones. In this paper, we provide an update on the medical treatment of stone disease, focusing our attention on what is known and what is new in renal colic and litholithic and expulsive medical therapy. PMID:17144848

  5. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in a Student-Staffed Medication Therapy Management Call Center

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anna M.; Roane, Teresa E.; Mistry, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) designed to contribute to student pharmacists’ confidence and abilities in providing MTM. Design. Sixty-four student pharmacists provided MTM services during an APPE in a communication and care center. Assessment. Students conducted 1,495 comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) identifying 6,056 medication-related problems. Ninety-eight percent of the students who completed a survey instrument (52 of 53) following the APPE expressed that they had the necessary knowledge and skills to provide MTM services. Most respondents felt that pharmacist participation in providing Medicare MTM could move the profession of pharmacy forward and that pharmacists will have some role in deciding the specific provisions of the Medicare MTM program (92% and 91%, respectively). Conclusion. Students completing the MTM APPE received patient-centered experiences that supplemented their confidence, knowledge, and skill in providing MTM services in the future. PMID:22919086

  6. Optimal management for alcoholic liver disease: Conventional medications, natural therapy or combination?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Sun; Ong, Madeleine; Qu, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is defined by histological lesions on the liver that can range from simple hepatic steatosis to more advanced stages such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. As one of the oldest forms of liver injury known to humans, ALD is still a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality and the burden is exerting on medical systems with hospitalization and management costs rising constantly worldwide. Although the biological mechanisms, including increasing of acetaldehyde, oxidative stress with induction of cytochrome p450 2E1, inflammatory cytokine release, abnormal lipid metabolism and induction of hepatocyte apoptosis, by which chronic alcohol consumption triggers serious complex progression of ALD is well established, there is no universally accepted therapy to prevent or reverse. In this article, we have briefly reviewed the pathogenesis of ALD and the molecular targets for development of novel therapies. This review is focused on current therapeutic strategies for ALD, including lifestyle modification with nutrition supplements, available pharmacological drugs and new agents that are under development, liver transplantation, application of complementary medicines, and their combination. The relevant molecular mechanisms of each conventional medication and natural agent have been reviewed according to current available knowledge in the literature. We also summarized efficacy vs safety on conventional and herbal medicines which are specifically used for the prevention and treatment of ALD. Through a system review, this article highlighted that the combination of pharmaceutical drugs with naturally occurring agents may offer an optimal management for ALD and its complications. It is worthwhile to conduct large-scale, multiple centre clinical trials to further prove the safety and benefits for

  7. A Review of Pharmacological Interactions Between HIV or HCV Medications and Opioid Agonist Therapy: Implications and Management for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Moody, David E.; Altice, Frederick L.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Global access to opioid agonist therapy and HIV/HCV treatment is expanding but when used concurrently, problematic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions may occur. Review of articles from 1966 into 2012 in Medline using the following keywords: HIV, AIDS, HIV therapy, HCV, HCV therapy, antiretroviral therapy, HAART, drug interactions, methadone, and buprenorphine. Additionally, abstracts from national and international meetings and a review of conference proceedings were conducted; selected reports were reviewed as well. The metabolism of both opioid and antiretroviral therapies, description of their known interactions, and clinical implications and management of these interactions are reviewed. Important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions affecting either methadone or HIV medications have been demonstrated within each class of antiretroviral agents. Drug interactions between methadone, buprenorphine and HIV medications are known and may have important clinical consequences. Clinicians must be alert to these interactions and have a basic knowledge regarding their management. PMID:23656339

  8. Community pharmacy-based medication therapy management services: financial impact for patients

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Sarah E.; Ruisinger, Janelle F.; Howard, Patricia A.; Hare, Sarah E.; Barnes, Brian J.

    Objective To determine the direct financial impact for patients resulting from Medication Therapy Management (MTM) interventions made by community pharmacists. Secondary objectives include evaluating the patient and physician acceptance rates of the community pharmacists' recommended MTM interventions. Methods This was a retrospective observational study conducted at 20 Price Chopper and Hen House grocery store chain pharmacies in the Kansas City metro area from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Study patients were Medicare Part D beneficiaries eligible for MTM services. The primary outcome was the change in patient out-of-pocket prescription medication expense as a result of MTM services. Results Of 128 patients included in this study, 68% experienced no out-of-pocket financial impact on their medication expenses as a result of MTM services. A total of 27% of the patients realized a cost-savings (USD440.50 per year, (SD=289.69)) while another 5% of patients saw a cost increase in out-of-pocket expense (USD255.66 per year, (SD=324.48)). The net financial impact for all 128 patients who participated in MTM services was an average savings of USD102.83 per patient per year (SD=269.18, p<0.0001). Pharmacists attempted a total of 732 recommendations; 391 (53%) were accepted by both the patient and their prescriber. A total of 341 (47%) recommendations were not accepted because of patient refusal (290, 85%) or prescriber refusal (51, 15%). Conclusions Patient participation in MTM services reduces patient out-of-pocket medication expense. However, this savings is driven by only 32% of subjects who are experiencing a financial impact on out-of-pocket medication expense. Additionally, the majority of the pharmacists' recommended interventions (53%) were accepted by patients and prescribers. PMID:24155827

  9. Role of Medical Nutrition Therapy in the Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Cristina; Mauricio, Didac; Hernandez, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and accordingly, it has a significant impact on women and newborns. The primary objective of MNT is to ensure adequate pregnancy weight gain and fetus growth while maintaining euglycemia and avoiding ketones. However, the optimal diet (energy content, macronutrient distribution, its quality and amount, among others) remains an outstanding question. Overall, the nutritional requirements of GDM are similar for all pregnancies, but special attention is paid to carbohydrates. Despite the classical intervention of restricting carbohydrates, the latest evidence, although limited, seems to favor a low-glycemic index diet. There is general agreement in the literature about caloric restrictions in the case of being overweight or obese. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to investigate the optimal MNT for GDM; this knowledge could yield health benefits and cost savings. PMID:26879305

  10. Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia in Apparently Normal Hearts: Medical Therapy Should be the First Step in Management.

    PubMed

    Saeid, Ali Kazemi; Klein, George J; Leong-Sit, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia or repetitive premature ventricular complexes can be seen in patients with structurally normal hearts. Among these types of patients, the prognosis is predominantly benign and the treatment mostly focused on elimination of symptoms rather than improving survival or reduction of mortality. This article focuses on the pharmacologic options for management and compares them with invasive options. Based on the current literature, we demonstrate that medical therapies should be used as first-line management and favored over invasive therapies. Understanding the arrhythmia mechanism is critical in choosing the appropriate medication among the wide variety of antiarrhythmic drugs available. PMID:27521096

  11. Contingent Valuation and Pharmacists' Acceptable Levels of Compensation for Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Hong, Song Hee

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacists' acceptable level of compensation for medication therapy management (MTM) services needs to be determined using various economic evaluation techniques. Objectives Using contingent valuation method, determine pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for MTM services. Methods A mailing survey was used to elicit Tennessee (US) pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for a 30-minute MTM session for a new patient with 2 medical conditions, 8 medications, and an annual drug cost of $2,000. Three versions of a series of double-bounded, closed-ended, binary discrete choice questions were asked of pharmacists for their willingness-to-accept (WTA) for an original monetary value ($30, $60, or $90) and then follow-up higher or lower value depending on their responses to the original value. A Kaplan-Meier approach was taken to analyze pharmacists' WTA, and Cox's proportional hazards model was used to examine the effects of pharmacist characteristics on their WTA. Results Three hundred and forty-eight pharmacists responded to the survey. Pharmacists' WTA for the given MTM session had a mean of $63.31 and median of $60. The proportions of pharmacists willing to accept $30, $60, and $90 for the given MTM session were 30.61%, 85.19%, and 91.01%, respectively. Pharmacists' characteristics had statistically significant association with their WTA rates. Conclusions Pharmacists' WTA for the given MTM session is higher than current Medicare MTM programs' compensation levels of $15 to $50 and patients' willingness-to-pay of less than $40. Besides advocating for higher MTM compensation levels by third-party payers, pharmacists also may need to charge patients to reach sufficient compensation levels for MTM services. PMID:22436583

  12. Pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) program impacts outcomes for employees with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sharrel L; Kumar, Jinender; Partha, Gautam; Bechtol, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this prospective, pre-post longitudinal study was to assess the impact of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services on employees' health and well-being by evaluating their clinical and humanistic outcomes. City of Toledo employees and/or their spouses and dependents with diabetes with or without comorbid conditions were enrolled in the pharmacist-conducted MTM program. Participants scheduled consultations with the pharmacist at predetermined intervals. Overall health outcomes, such as clinical markers, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), disease knowledge, and social and process measures, were documented at these visits and assessed for improvement. Changes in patient outcomes over time were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank and Friedman test at an a priori level of 0.05. Spearman correlation was used to measure the relationship between clinical and humanistic outcomes. A total of 101 patients enrolled in the program. At the end of 1 year, patients' A1c levels decreased on average by 0.27 from their baseline values. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure also decreased on average by 6.0 and 4.2 mmHg, respectively. Patient knowledge of disease conditions and certain aspects or components of HRQoL also improved. Improvements in social and process measures also were also observed. Improved clinical outcomes and quality of life can affect employee productivity and help reduce costs for employers by reducing disease-related missed days of work. Employers seeking to save costs and impact productivity can utilize the services provided by pharmacists. PMID:23848476

  13. Impact of Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management on Healthcare Quality and Utilization in Recently Discharged Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Jordan D.; Davis, Amanda Z.; Hoel, Robert W.; Armon, Jeffrey J.; Odell, Laura J.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimization of medication use during care transitions represents an opportunity to improve overall health-related outcomes. The utilization of clinical pharmacists during care transitions has demonstrated benefit, although the optimal method of integration during the care transition process remains unclear. Objective To evaluate the impact of pharmacist-provided telephonic medication therapy management (MTM) on care quality in a care transitions program (CTP) for high-risk older adults. Methods This prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted from December 8, 2011, through October 25, 2012, in a primary care work group at a tertiary care academic medical center in the midwestern United States. High-risk elderly (aged ≥60 years) patients were randomized to a pharmacist-provided MTM program via telephone or to usual care within an existing outpatient CTP. The primary outcome was the quality of medication prescribing and utilization based on the Screening Tool to Alert Doctors to the Right Treatment (START) and the Screening Tool of Older Persons’ Prescriptions (STOPP) scores. The secondary outcomes were medication utilization using a modified version of the Medication Appropriateness Index, hospital resource utilization within 30 days of discharge, and drug therapy problems. Results Of 222 eligible high-risk patients, 25 were included in the study and were randomized to the pharmacist MTM intervention (N = 13) or to usual care (N = 12). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in medications meeting the STOPP or START criteria. At 30-day follow-up, no significant differences were found between the 2 cohorts in medication utilization quality indicators or in hospital utilization. At 30-day follow-up, 3 (13.6%) patients had an emergency department visit or a hospital readmission since discharge. In all, 22 patients completed the study. Medication underuse was common, with 20 START criteria absent medications evident for

  14. [MEDICAL THERAPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PRETERM LABOR: IS THERE A FIRST LINE AGENT?].

    PubMed

    Garmi, Gali; Salim, Raed

    2015-10-01

    Preterm birth is defined as delivery before 37 weeks. It is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Spontaneous preterm birth accounts for approximately 70% of all preterm births. Postponing delivery for 48 hours in order to allow administration of corticosteroids, magnesium for neuroprotection and in order to transfer women to a center with neonatal intensive care unit are the goals of tocolytic therapy. The benefits of tocolytic therapy between 24.0 and 34.0 weeks of gestation outweigh the risk of maternal and fetal complications and it should be initiated provided no contraindications exist. Tocolytic agents that have been used are: prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, B-adrenergic agonists, magnesium and oxytocin receptor antagonists. All drugs have demonstrated limited benefit that consists mainly of prolonging the gestational age for 48 hours, without a reduction in the incidence of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Additionally, most available tocolytic agents carry inherent risks of adverse effects. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, there is no clear first line tocolytic drug to manage preterm labor. Other subjects of debate related to the use of tocolytic therapy include: The effectiveness of combination therapy, the use of tocolytic therapy in multiple pregnancies and the use of progesterone as an adjuvant therapy. We will address the efficacy and tolerability of the tocolytic agents available, the issue of maintenance therapy and debates mentioned above, and try to suggest a first line tocolytic agent based on a study performed at our institution. PMID:26742230

  15. Medical management after parathyroid intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Motoko; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D or vitamin D analogues pulse therapy is seldom effective in patients with at least one parathyroid gland with nodular hyperplasia, and surgical parathyroidectomy or parathyroid intervention is indicated. In parathyroid interventions, especially in selective percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT), the enlarged parathyroid gland(s) with nodular hyperplasia is selectively destroyed by ethanol injection, while other glands with diffuse hyperplasia are managed by medical therapy. Thus, medical management, e.g., use of appropriate dose of vitamin D or vitamin D analogues after the PEIT procedure, is as important as the destruction of the hyperplastic tissue itself. Recent studies showed that the combination of PEIT and intravenous vitamin D pulse therapy lead to reduce serum PTH level and calcium-phosphorus products in haemodialysis patients. In this article, we focus on the importance of medical therapy after PEIT, and review the efficacy of the combination of PEIT and intravenous vitamin D pulse therapy for haemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:25983966

  16. A Mass Merchandiser's Role in Enhancing Pharmacy Students’ Business Plan Development Skills for Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a relationship between a pharmacy management course and a mass merchandiser and to determine whether involving pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser in the course would enhance student skills in developing a business plan for medication therapy management services. Design. The pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser participated in lectures, provided panel discussions, and conducted a business plan competition. Learning was assessed by means of 4 examinations and 1 project (ie, the business plan). At the conclusion of the semester, surveys were administered to solicit student input and gain insight from pharmacy managers on the perceived value of this portion of the course. Assessment. Students’ average grade on the business plan assignment, which included the oral presentation, the peer assessment, and the written proposal, was 92.2%. Approximately 60% (n = 53) of surveyed students agreed or strongly agreed that their management skills had improved because of the participation of pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser. All of the managers enjoyed participating in the experience. Conclusions. The involvement of pharmacy managers from a mass merchandiser enhanced student learning in the classroom, and managers felt that their participation was an important contribution to the development of future pharmacists. PMID:21969719

  17. Medical expulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kyle D.; Gorbachinsky, Ilya; Gutierrez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review article is to present the current literature on medical expulsive therapy (MET) and help guide practitioners in the appropriate use of MET for treatment of stone disease. Kidney stones can be treated with multiple modalities including medical therapy, ureteroscopy, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrostolithotomy, open/laparoscopic stone removal, and/or combinations of these modalities. The choice of intervention depends on patient factors, anatomical considerations, surgeon preference, and stone location and characteristics. MET is an excellent treatment modality in the appropriately selected patient. The AUA/EAU guidelines suggest MET as a reasonable treatment choice in select patients. A review of the data suggests the use of alpha antagonist and calcium channel blockers can improve stone expulsion rates. Most data suggests alpha antagonists as superior to calcium channel blockers. There are numerous available alpha antagonists, all of which have supporting data for their use in MET. Evidence suggests that MET can decrease colic events, narcotic use, and hospital visits. MET may also reduce medical costs and prevent unnecessary surgeries and the associated risks. Further, there is a role for alpha antagonists and calcium channel blockers in improving stone passage and decreasing pain in those subjects treated with other modalities (i.e. SWL and ureteroscopy). Despite this evidence, MET remains underutilized as a treatment modality. PMID:24497685

  18. Polymyositis: Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Polymyositis (PM) is a highly treatable disease. ... Polymyositis (PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find MDA in your Community Grants ...

  19. Dermatomysitis: Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Dermatomysitis (DM) is a highly treatable disease. ... Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Living With Dermatomyositis (DM) News Not ...

  20. Assessing the effectiveness of pharmacist- directed medication therapy management in improving diabetes outcomes in patients with poorly controlled diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jeannine S.; Poe, Brett; Hopper, Rebecca; Boyer, Alaina; Wilkins, Consuelo H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare medication adherence rates and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) health outcomes in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM (HbA1C>7%) who had received pharmacist-directed medication therapy management (MTM) to those who had not received MTM. Methods A retrospective review of 100 patient records was conducted. For the MTM group, a pharmacist engaged patients in patient-centered services to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Non-MTM patients received usual care. Outcomes were HbA1C, medication adherence, blood pressure, lipids and creatinine. Group comparisons on clinical outcomes were analyzed before and after matching MTM and non-MTM patients on demographic characteristics. Results Before matching, the MTM group had a higher rate of medication adherence than the non-MTM group. Hemoglobin A1C levels were lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. Similarly, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. After matching, medication adherence rate remained higher in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. Similarly, HbA1C levels remained lower in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. Conclusions There is a paucity of research focused on behavioral interventions for improving health outcomes in underserved communities. Our results advance the existing literature by demonstrating a positive association between pharmacist-directed MTM, medication adherence, and glycemic control in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM. A prospective pharmacy intervention and examination of long-term effects of MTM on medication adherence and T2DM health outcomes in this population is warranted. PMID:26009557

  1. Managing complex therapies outside hospitals. An analysis of GPs practices of how to support medication at home.

    PubMed

    Piras, Enrico Maria; Miele, Francesco; Bruni, Attila; Coletta, Claudio; Zanutto, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Support systems for the management of prescriptions are commonplace in hospitals, whilst they are rarely found in general practice. This exploratory study draws on a qualitative survey conducted with focus groups to investigate the information needs of General Practitioners (GPs) in regard to the therapeutic management of complex patients, the purpose being to identify possible areas of application. The question addressed is whether the systems existing in hospitals can be usefully adapted and used by GPs or if a different approach needs to be adopted to design other tools. The analysis shows that the information needs of GPs relative to medication management are significantly different from those of their hospital colleagues because the former are not directly responsible for the administration but instead operate within a care network on which they cannot exercise direct control. This study suggests that support systems for therapy management should be designed on the assumption that it derives from cooperative work by a heterogeneous network of actors, and therefore with functionalities intended to satisfy the coordination needs of all the actors involved in the process. PMID:25160267

  2. Improving the economic and humanistic outcomes for diabetic patients: making a case for employer-sponsored medication therapy management

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sharrel L; Kumar, Jinender; Partha, Gautam; Bechtol, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the cost savings of a pharmacist-led, employer-sponsored medication therapy management (MTM) program for diabetic patients and to assess for any changes in patient satisfaction and self-reported medication adherence for enrollees. Methods Participants in this study were enrollees of an employer-sponsored MTM program. They were included if their primary medical insurance and prescription coverage was from the City of Toledo, they had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and whether or not they had been on medication or had been given a new prescription for diabetes treatment. The data were analyzed on a prospective, pre-post longitudinal basis, and tracked for one year following enrollment. Outcomes included economic costs, patient satisfaction, and self-reported patient adherence. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the population, calculate the number of visits, and determine the mean costs for each visit. Friedman’s test was used to determine changes in outcomes due to the nonparametric nature of the data. Results The mean number of visits to a physician’s office decreased from 10.22 to 7.07. The mean cost of these visits for patients increased from $47.70 to $66.41, but use of the emergency room and inpatient visits decreased by at least 50%. Employer spending on emergency room visits decreased by $24,214.17 and inpatient visit costs decreased by $166,610.84. Office visit spending increased by $11,776.41. A total cost savings of $179,047.80 was realized by the employer at the end of the program. Significant improvements in patient satisfaction and adherence were observed. Conclusion Pharmacist interventions provided through the employer-sponsored MTM program led to substantial cost savings to the employer with improved patient satisfaction and adherence on the part of employees at the conclusion of the program. PMID:23610526

  3. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  4. Assessment of biophysical therapy in the management of pain in current medical practice compared with ibuprofen and placebo: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Foletti, A; Baron, P; Sclauzero, E; Bucci, G; Rinaudo, A; Rocco, R

    2014-01-01

    Pain management is a daily part of current medical practice. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a biophysical procedure (Med Select 729) compared to a usual pain killer drug (Ibuprofen), and to placebo in order to disclose some effective procedures to be employed especially in elderly people with multiple comorbidities, in patients with allergy to chemical drugs or previous side effects, in non-responders to usual medications, and in chronic diseases to reduce overload. A total of 66 patients were divided in 3 groups. After one week of biophysical therapy they showed similar effect to ibuprofen and after one month the statistical significance was achieved with p less than 0.02 in comparison to placebo. We conclude that biophysical therapy was shown to be an effective and safe procedure for the management of pain in current medical practice. PMID:25316134

  5. Mycetoma Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma. PMID:25330342

  6. Medical waste management plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  7. Medical pedagogical resources management.

    PubMed

    Pouliquen, Bruno; Le Duff, Franck; Delamarre, Denis; Cuggia, Marc; Mougin, Fleur; Le Beux, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to help the management of training resources for students using a pedagogical network available at the Medical School of Rennes. With the increase of the number of connections and the number of medical documents available on this network, the management of new contents requires a lot of efforts for the webmaster. In order to improve the management of the resources, we implemented an automatic web engine for teachers, able to manage the links for the most interesting resources for their practice. PMID:14664034

  8. Evaluation of Prescriber Responses to Pharmacist Recommendations Communicated by Fax in a Medication Therapy Management Program (MTMP)

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Prasadini N.; Guy, Mignonne C.; Sweaney, Ashley M.; Boesen, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As defined by the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, medication therapy management programs (MTMPs) must be designed to decrease adverse drug events and improve patient outcomes by promoting appropriate medication use. WellPoint Inc. contracted with the pharmacist-run University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Medication Management Center (UA MMC) to provide a pilot telephone-based MTMP to approximately 5,000 high-risk beneficiaries from among its nearly 2 million Medicare prescription drug plan (PDP) beneficiaries. Eligibility for the program was determined by a minimum of 2 of 6 chronic diseases (dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; at least 1 of the latter 2 diseases must be present), at least 3 Part-D covered medications, and greater than $4,000 per year in predicted drug spending. In addition to these criteria, WellPoint Inc. used the Johns Hopkins adjusted clinical groups (ACG) predictive model to identify the high-risk beneficiaries to be enrolled in the program. Medication therapy reviews were conducted for these patients. If any medication-related problems (MRPs) were identified, the patient’s prescribers were contacted via a fax communication with recommendation(s) to resolve these MRPs. The UA MMC fax interventions were categorized as cost saving, guideline adherence, or safety concerns. OBJECTIVES To (a) determine prescriber responses to pharmacist-initiated recommendations in an MTMP for the 3 intervention categories, (b) compare prescriber responses between intervention categories, and (c) compare prescriber response by prescriber type (primary care physician [PCP] vs. specialist) within each intervention category. METHODS A retrospective analysis of pharmacist-initiated interventions from August through December 2008 was performed using data collected from the UA MMC database. Data were collected on

  9. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenker, B; Gratzke, C; Weidlich, P; Seitz, M; Reich, O; Stief, C G

    2007-08-16

    Primary aims of the medical therapy for BPH are improvement of subjective symptoms and quality of life as well as the prevention of long-term complications such as acute urinary retention and renal failure. Secondary goal is inhibition of disease progression. The medical therapy should be tailored to each patient according to the individual complaints and risk of progression. Plant extracts, alpha-blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors represent the most common prescribed substances. Recent data suggest beneficial effects for the use of antimuscarinic agents and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. PMID:17912863

  10. Medical Therapy for Pediatric Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Judith F.; Soni, Heather Mills; Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies (VAs) comprise a large variety of individual diagnoses that in different phases of treatment require a diverse number of medical specialists to provide optimal care. Medical therapies include agents usually associated with cancer chemotherapy, such as vincristine, as well more immunomodulatory types of drugs, such as glucocorticoids and sirolimus. These immunomodulating drugs are being successfully applied in cases that are typically categorized as vascular tumors, including kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma (TA), as well as some of the more invasive types of vascular malformations (i.e., microcystic lymphatic malformations and blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS). These therapies need to be combined with good supportive care, which often involves anticoagulation, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and comprehensive pain and symptom-relief strategies, as well as appropriate drug monitoring and management of side effects of medical treatment. The optimal care of these patients frequently involves close collaboration between surgeons, interventional and conventional radiologists, medical subspecialists, and nurses. PMID:25045333

  11. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women. PMID:26761932

  12. Medical management of thyroid eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dawn D.; Gonzalez, Mithra O.; Durairaj, Vikram D.

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most common cause of orbital disease in adults. The immunologic pathogenesis of TED has been an area of active research and considerable progress has resulted in an expansion of therapeutic options. Although surgical intervention may be required, a majority of TED patients can be managed with medical therapies. Of medical therapies, glucocorticoids remain the agent of choice in the control of TED activity. The objective of this review is to discuss the paradigm and options in medical management of TED. PMID:23960897

  13. Medical management of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S S; Prasad, R N

    1990-06-01

    Medical termination of abnormal pregnancy requires specific techniques since some conditions make therapy more effective, e.g., missed abortion intrauterine death and molar pregnancy, and others less so, e.g. anencephalic pregnancy. In all cases it is best to terminate the pregnancy as soon as possible to reduce anguish and risks of complications such as consumptive coagulopathy. Oxytocin is not consistently effective, but intraamniotic rivanol has oxytocic properties, and prostaglandins (PGs) are effective by several routes. Surgical methods are more popular in Japan and the US. A diagnostic flow chart is included and described. For missed abortion and fetal death vacuum aspiration or dilatation and evacuation are appropriate for early pregnancy, or PGs are used for later pregnancy, unless there are medical contraindications. Anencephalic pregnancy, usually diagnoses in 2nd or 3rd trimester, is resistant to medical therapy and must often be terminated by cesarean section. Molar pregnancy can be managed with vacuum aspiration at any length of gestation, but must be completed by curettage. Intraamniotic PGs are not advised for mole or fetal death. PG analogs can be administered intramuscularly, or vaginally in gel form. Other types of abnormal pregnancy that can be managed with PGs are spina bifida, hydrocephalus, hydrops fetalis, Dandy-Walker syndrome and Down's syndrome. Tubal pregnancy can be evacuated with intratubally administered PGs under laparoscopic control, thereby preserving tubal integrity. PMID:2225605

  14. Assessment of Assistance in Smoking Cessation Therapy by Pharmacies in Collaboration with Medical Institutions- Implementation of a Collaborative Drug Therapy Management Protocol Based on a Written Agreement between Physicians and Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiyuki; Shinohara, Kuniko; Dobashi, Akira; Amagai, Kenji; Hara, Kazuo; Kurata, Kaori; Iizima, Hideo; Shimakawa, Kiyoshi; Shimada, Masahiko; Abe, Sakurako; Takei, Keiji; Kamei, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    This study built a protocol for drug therapy management (hereinafter "the protocol") that would enable continuous support from the decision making of smoking cessation therapy to the completion of therapy through the collaboration of physicians and community pharmacists, after which we evaluated whether the use of this protocol would be helpful to smoking cessation therapy. This study utilized the "On the Promotion of Team-Based Medical Care", a Notification by the Health Policy Bureau as one of the resources for judgment, and referred to collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in the United States. After the implementation of this protocol, the success rate of smoking cessation at the participating medical institutions rose to approximately 70%, approximately 28-point improvement compared to the rate before the implementation. In addition to the benefits of the standard smoking cessation program, this result may have been affected by the intervention of pharmacists, who assisted in continuing cessation by advising to reduce drug dosage as necessary approximately one week after the smoking cessation, when side effects and the urge to smoke tend to occur. Additionally, the awareness survey for the intervention group revealed that all respondents, including patients who failed to quit smoking, answered that they were satisfied to the question on general satisfaction. The question about the reason for successful cessation revealed that the support by pharmacists was as important as, or more important than, that by physicians and nurses. This infers that the pharmacists' active engagement in drug therapy for individual patients was favorably acknowledged. PMID:27592827

  15. Medical therapy for calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shrawan K; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sharma, Sumit

    2011-02-01

    Urolithiasis is a common problem with a high recurrence rate. Medical therapy directed to relieve agonizing pain, expulsion of stone, dissolution of uric acid and cystine stone and prevention of recurrence. NSAIDs are superior to opioids for renoureteral colic because their use doesn't induce vomiting and there is lesser requirement of rescue analgesia. In randomized trials, anticholinergics were not found to be beneficial. Alpha blockers, particularly tamsulosin, reduce pain and facilitate expulsion of stone and fragments of stone following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy. Potassium citrate helps in chemodissolution of uric acid and cystine stones and is useful in prevention of stone recurrence in general and in those who have undergone SWL or percutaneious nephrolithotomy. Other measures for prevention of stone recurrence include fluid and dietary therapy, counteracting underlying metabolic abnormalities using suitable medications, phytotheurapeutic agents and probiotics. Once the role of nanobacteria is established in genesis of urinary stones, anti-nanobacteria therapy holds the promise of opening new horizons for prevention of urinary stones. PMID:21244607

  16. Pharmacists' Role in Improving Diabetes Medication Management

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Today there are significant gaps between reaching the goal of “optimal medication therapy” and the current state of medication use in the United States. Pharmacists are highly accessible and well-trained—yet often underutilized—key health care professionals who can move us closer toward achieving better medication therapy outcomes for patients. Diabetes medication management programs led by pharmacists are described. This is consistent with the “medical home” concept of care that promotes primary care providers working collaboratively to coordinate patient-centered care. Pharmacists utilize their clinical expertise in monitoring and managing diabetes medication plans to positively impact health outcomes and empower patients to actively manage their health. In addition, pharmacists can serve as a resource to other health care providers and payers to assure safe, appropriate, cost-effective diabetes medication use. PMID:20046662

  17. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  18. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 2: topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-11-01

    In part 1 of this 3-part series, an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women was provided. Proper selection and integration of skin care products is important in the management of AV in this patient population. Part 2 of this series includes a discussion of over-the-counter and prescription topical therapies for adult women with AV. A summary of key randomized controlled trials also is provided. Further well-designed studies are needed, as data on the use of topical agents in this subpopulation are limited. PMID:26682555

  19. Medical Art Therapy: Defining a Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A.

    Although art therapy has traditionally focused on the use of art expression in psychotherapy, the practice of medical art therapy has begun to grow rapidly. This paper provides a brief overview of the emerging specialty of medical art therapy and its importance as a counseling tool with people suffering from serious health problems. The paper…

  20. Endocrine therapy toxicity: management options.

    PubMed

    Henry, N Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with adjuvant endocrine therapy, including tamoxifen and the aromatase inhibitors, has resulted in notable improvements in disease-free and overall survival for patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Despite their proven benefit, however, adherence to and persistence with the medications is poor in part because of bothersome side effects that can negatively affect quality of life. Retrospective analyses have identified possible predictors of development of toxicity. Reports have also suggested that development of toxicity may be a biomarker of better response to therapy. In addition, there has been considerable research investment into the management of these side effects, which may lead to improved adherence and persistence with therapy. However, although notable advances have been made, much more remains to be done to provide patients with truly personalized therapy for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:24857109

  1. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. PMID:26358306

  2. Understanding awareness of pharmacist-led medication therapy management among primary care physicians in New York City using qualitative methods: part I.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vibhuti; Pinto, Sharrel; Singer, Jesse; Khan, Tasmiya

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacist-led medication therapy management (MTM) programs have been shown to be an effective method of optimizing patient therapy for multiple disease states through improved clinical outcomes and decreased healthcare costs. Physicians have recognized pharmacists' ability to identify and prevent prescription errors, and educate patients about safe and appropriate medication use. Pharmacist interventions may help ease the burden of chronic disease among primary care providers and pave the way for a team-based approach in caring for underserved patients with heavy disease burdens. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene performed a qualitative study to obtain a better understanding of the perceptions related to pharmacist-led MTM programs among primary care physicians in New York City. Key findings from our study suggest that educating physicians on MTM and the role of pharmacists in the healthcare team is crucial to building trusting relationships for collaborative patient care. Key concerns among physicians included demonstrated pharmacist competency, integration of documentation systems, impact on workload, and effective collaboration between physicians and pharmacists. In this article, we describe our study rationale, design, and preliminary findings. A more detailed report and potential impact of our findings will be provided in Part II of this article. PMID:24228367

  3. Medical therapy for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Mohee, Amar; Eardley, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual dysfunction. Advances in PE research have been hampered owing to a nonstandardized definition of PE, until the definition by the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM) in 2009. Once the diagnosis of PE is established through a thorough history, a variety of medical therapies is available, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), centrally acting opiates, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors and topical desensitizing creams. Most of these treatments increase the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and patient satisfaction scores, with the most convincing evidence for SSRIs and topical creams. Daily SSRIs such as paroxetine, although efficacious, do have a substantial and prolonged side effect profile. Dapoxetine, which is a on-demand SSRI, is the only licensed drug for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by a factor of 2.5 to 3 with limited and tolerable side effects. In the near future, the topical aerosol PSD502 is due to be licensed for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by up to a factor of 6 but having minimal local and negligible systemic side effects. PMID:22046199

  4. Medical therapy for premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Mohee, Amar; Eardley, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual dysfunction. Advances in PE research have been hampered owing to a nonstandardized definition of PE, until the definition by the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM) in 2009. Once the diagnosis of PE is established through a thorough history, a variety of medical therapies is available, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), centrally acting opiates, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors and topical desensitizing creams. Most of these treatments increase the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and patient satisfaction scores, with the most convincing evidence for SSRIs and topical creams. Daily SSRIs such as paroxetine, although efficacious, do have a substantial and prolonged side effect profile. Dapoxetine, which is a on-demand SSRI, is the only licensed drug for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by a factor of 2.5 to 3 with limited and tolerable side effects. In the near future, the topical aerosol PSD502 is due to be licensed for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by up to a factor of 6 but having minimal local and negligible systemic side effects. PMID:22046199

  5. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  6. [Managing antithrombotic therapy in vitreoretinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Gallice, M; Rouberol, F; Albaladejo, P; Brillat Zaratzian, E; Palombi, K; Aptel, F; Romanet, J-P; Chiquet, C

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing number of patients on antithrombotic therapy we are increasingly confronted with the management of this therapy before, during and after vitreoretinal surgery. In the absence of a consensus, the decision to withdraw antithrombotic therapy is based on the cardiovascular thromboembolism risk versus the theoretical risk of bleeding if the antithrombotic treatment is continued. As suggested by the literature, antiplatelet therapy (acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel) may be safely continued for vitreoretinal surgery, including retinal detachment repair. However, the risk/benefit ratio for patients being treated with two antiplatelet therapies is unknown. It appears that an International Normalized Ratio (INR) less than 3 for patients treated with anticoagulant therapy does not increase the perioperative risk of ocular bleeding. This risk has not been evaluated in patients treated by new antithrombotic therapies (prasugrel, ticagrelor as antiplatelet medication, or dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban as anticoagulant therapy), and there is a need to study it further. PMID:25577431

  7. Medical therapy for polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Dennison, A; Garcea, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin analogues and rapamycin inhibitors are two classes of drugs available for the management of polycystic liver disease but their overall impact is not clearly established. This article systematically reviews the literature on the medical management of polycystic liver disease. The outcomes assessed include reduction in liver volume and the impact on quality of life. Methods The English language literature published between 1966 and August 2014 was reviewed from a MEDLINE(®), PubMed, Embase™ and Cochrane Library search. Search terms included 'polycystic', 'liver', 'sirolimus', 'everolimus', 'PCLD', 'somatostatin', 'octreotide', 'lanreotide' and 'rapamycin'. Both randomised trials and controlled studies were included. References of the articles retrieved were also searched to identify any further eligible publications. The studies included were appraised using the Jadad score. Results Seven studies were included in the final review. Five studies, of which three were randomised trials, investigated the role of somatostatin analogues and the results showed a mean reduction in liver volume ranging from 2.9% at six months to 4.95 ±6.77% at one year. Only one randomised study examined the influence of rapamycin inhibitors. This trial compared dual therapy with everolimus and octreotide versus octreotide monotherapy. Liver volume reduced by 3.5% and 3.8% in the control and intervention groups respectively but no statistical difference was found between the two groups (p=0.73). Two randomised trials investigating somatostatin analogues assessed quality of life using SF-36(®). Only one subdomain score improved in one of the trials while two subdomain scores improved in the other with somatostatin analogue therapy. Conclusions Somatostatin analogues significantly reduce liver volumes after six months of therapy but have only a modest improvement on quality of life. Rapamycin inhibitors do not confer any additional advantage. PMID:26688394

  8. Role of Medical Therapy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Bardou, Marc; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mortality from UGIB has remained 5-10% over the past decade. This article presents current evidence-based recommendations for the medical management of UGIB. Preendoscopic management includes initial resuscitation, risk stratification, appropriate use of blood products, and consideration of nasogastric tube insertion, erythromycin, and proton pump inhibitor therapy. The use of postendoscopic intravenous proton pump inhibitors is strongly recommended for certain patient populations. Postendoscopic management also includes the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori, appropriate use of proton pump inhibitors and iron replacement therapy. PMID:26142032

  9. Role of Medical Management for Uterine Leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Banafsheh N; Centini, Gabriele; Morelli, Sara S; Weiss, Gerson; Petraglia, Felice

    2016-07-01

    Uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids, are the most common benign tumor in reproductive aged women. Affected women may remain asymptomatic or may report symptoms related to abnormal uterine bleeding, infertility, or pelvic pain and pressure. Depending on a patient's symptomatology and reproductive plans, treatment options include expectant management, medical management (hormonal and non-hormonal), or surgical management (myomectomy or hysterectomy). In those wishing to defer surgical management, non-hormonal therapies such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tranexamic acid have been shown to decrease menstrual blood loss. In patients with more symptomatic leiomyomas, hormonal therapies such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists and selective progesterone receptor modulators are effective at reducing leiomyoma volume, uterine size, and menstrual blood loss. This manuscript will detail the available and emerging hormonal and non-hormonal treatments for symptomatic uterine leiomyomas. PMID:26796059

  10. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists. PMID:22457686

  12. [Quality management in medical laboratories].

    PubMed

    Fritzer-Szekeres, M

    2010-05-01

    During the 20th century understanding for quality has changed and international and national requirements for quality have been published. Therefore also medical branches started to establish quality management systems. Quality assurance has always been important for medical laboratories. Certification according to the standard ISO 9001 and accreditation according to the standard ISO 17025 have been the proof of fulfilling quality requirements. The relatively new standard ISO 15189 is the first standard for medical laboratories. This standard includes technical and management requirements for the medical laboratory. The main focus is the proof of competence within the personnel. As this standard is accepted throughout the European Union an increase in accreditations of medical laboratories is predictable. PMID:20454753

  13. Space Management for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Dino

    1978-01-01

    A reference on current methods and procedures for managing space in academic medical centers is provided. Focus is on elements of space management systems that can enhance the effectiveness of space allocation decisions. These include: space inventory, space standards, evaluation of space utilization, and space allocation. A bibliography is…

  14. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  15. A Smartwatch-Driven Medication Management System Compliant to the German Medication Plan.

    PubMed

    Keil, Andreas; Gegier, Konstantin; Pobiruchin, Monika; Wiesner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is an important factor for the outcome of medical therapies. To support high adherence levels, smartwatches can be used to assist the patient. However, a successful integration of such devices into clinicians' or general practitioners' information systems requires the use of standards. In this paper, a medication management system supplied with smartwatch generated feedback events is presented. It allows physicians to manage their patients' medications and track their adherence in real time. Moreover, it fosters interoperability via a ISO/IEC 16022 data matrix which encodes related medication data in compliance with the German Medication Plan specification. PMID:27577368

  16. [Alternative therapies, homeopathy and medical science].

    PubMed

    Martins e Silva, J

    1990-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the impact of regularly promoted alternative therapies within portuguese society. The origins, attractions and acceptance of alternative therapies, homeopathic included, are discussed. Recent homeopathic studies published in renowned scientific journals provoked comments and reports claiming for more objective explanations and better criticism. Accordingly, homeopathy is presently an unacceptable system with no physical basis, supported by inexplicable observations and a mixture of magic effects. Also alternatives therapies may provide an area of conflict with health and medical care, particularly in most severe diseases that require advanced resources of orthodox medicine. Improved education of the population, more qualified medical personal, and better understanding of medical problems, difficulties and progress by the media are final recommendations. PMID:2077840

  17. Medical Management of Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Portalatin, Meredith; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Constipation is a common clinical problem. Initial management of chronic constipation should include lifestyle maneuvers, and increased fiber and fluids. Polyethylene glycol, sodium picosulfate, bisacodyl, prucalopride, lubiprostone, and linaclotide were all more effective than placebo for treating chronic idiopathic constipation. Many commonly used agents lack quality evidence supporting their use. PMID:23449608

  18. Optimizing therapy and management of neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians managing patients with neurogenic bladder (NGB) and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) are faced with a myriad of complex choices when deciding on appropriate medical and/or surgical interventions to relieve bothersome symptoms associated with NGB and NDO, especially urinary incontinence. Therapies must provide maximum benefits while minimizing patients' risk for adverse events. A thorough knowledge and understanding of available and emerging medical and surgical treatment options for NGB/NDO is vital to assist clinicians in choosing appropriate treatment pathways and optimize response to therapy and individual outcomes. PMID:24495241

  19. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article. PMID:16796335

  20. Medical management of adult headache.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Frederick G; Schloemer, Fallon

    2014-04-01

    We review the therapies for primary headache disorders: migraine, chronic migraine, tension-type headache, and cluster headache. Recommendations follow the evidence-based treatments so far as is possible with expert opinion to give clinical guidance. Headache has 2 levels of care: acute treatments designed to stop a headache from progressing and alleviate all symptoms associated with the headache and preventive therapies for patients whose headache frequency is such that by itself produces significant disability and impact on quality of life, or where the frequency of use of acute medications, regardless of efficacy, poses risks in terms of overuse or adverse events. PMID:24680490

  1. Hormone therapy, dilemmas, medical decisions.

    PubMed

    Schulkin, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The decision for women to go on hormone therapy (HT) remains controversial. An historical oscillation of beliefs exists related in part to expectations of the medicinal value of HT over longer-term use beyond the initial peri-menonpausal period. Studies thought to resolve issues surrounding the efficacy of HT were perhaps overstated as confusion still permeates the decision making with regard to HT. Overzealous advertising and exaggerated understanding of the results (negative or positive) undermine patient and physician decision making. There remains no magic bullet with regard to HT. What remains is still the possibility of HT longer-term efficacy on diverse end organ systems with pockets of clinical and scientific ambiguity while working to engender reasonable expectations. PMID:18315763

  2. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  3. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  4. Medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Tai, Betty; Saxon, Andrew J; Ling, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The "Medication-Assisted Therapy for Opioid Addiction" session was chaired by Dr. Betty Tai and had three presenters. The presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Andrew J. Saxon (Methadone and Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction and HIV Risk Reduction), Dr. Walter Ling (Opioid Antagonist Treatment for Opioid Addiction), and Dr. Betty Tai (Chronic Care Model for Substance Use Disorder). PMID:25264415

  5. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  6. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  7. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  8. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  9. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  11. Medical management of Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2009-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is a wound-healing disorder in which a fibrotic plaque forms in the tunica albuginea layer of the penis. It clinically presents as any combination of penile pain, angulation, and erectile dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that PD has a prevalence of 3%-9% in adult men. Although the exact etiology has not been established, PD likely results from a predisposing genetic susceptibility combined with an inciting event such as microtrauma during intercourse. During the initial acute phase (6-18 months), the condition may progress, stabilize, or regress. For this reason authorities recommend a more conservative treatment approach, with a trial of oral and/or intralesional pharmacotherapy, before surgical reconstruction is considered. Oral therapies most commonly employed include tocopherol (vitamin E) and paraaminobenzoate (Potaba), with colchicine, tamoxifen, propoleum, and acetyl-L-carnitine being used less often. There are a limited number of long-term placebo-controlled studies with these oral agents, and for the most part, studies have failed to show a consistent beneficial effect. Intralesional injection therapy for PD is more commonly used as a first-line therapy. The current standard of care includes injection with interferon-alpha-2b, verapamil, or collagenase. Interferon-alpha-2b, in particular, has been documented in a large, multicenter, placebo-controlled study to show significant benefit over placebo in decreasing penile curvature, plaque size, penile pain, and plaque density. However, intralesional interferon is associated with posttreatment flu-like symptoms unless patients are premedicated with a nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agent. Other available therapies that have not consistently shown efficacy in placebo-controlled studies include corticosteroids, orgotein, radiation, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Surgery is considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative or medical therapy for approximately 1 year and

  12. Medical therapy in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Straumann, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is a chronic-inflammatory disease of the oesophagus. If left untreated, eosinophilic inflammation induces fibrosis, angiogenesis and stricture formation, resulting finally in a so called remodelling with structural and functional damage of the organ. In addition, patients with untreated EoE are permanently at risk of experiencing food impactions. It is therefore widely accepted that active EoE should be treated. Any treatment applied in EoE should ideally achieve two therapeutic goals: first, resolution of symptoms, and, second, control of inflammation. Avoidance of food allergens by elimination diets as well as anti-inflammatory drugs have both the ability to achieve these goals. Among the pharmacological options, only corticosteroids have documented efficacy, whereas alternatives have shown rather disappointing results or are still under evaluation. Of note, swallowed topical corticosteroids are at least as efficient as systemically administered corticosteroids but have fewer side effects. As such topical corticosteroids are widely used as first-line drug in the treatment of EoE, even though this compound is currently not approved for this indication by regulatory authorities. Unfortunately, complete resolution of symptoms can be achieved with swallowed topical corticosteroids only in approximately 70% of patients despite appropriate dosing and despite correct administration of these compounds. Control of inflammation is even harder to achieve, as only in approximately 50% of patients tissue eosinophilia disappears completely under this anti-inflammatory medication. For this group of "difficult to treat" patients, therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Fortunately several anti-allergic drugs and several biologicals are currently under investigation. PMID:26552779

  13. [Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Mitsuru

    2013-03-01

    The Ibaraki Medical Association established the Committee for Alternative Dispute Resolution called the Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee in 2006. Among 64 claims presented to the committee, 29 were settled through mediation or consultation. Patients were generally satisfied that their claims were considered fairly by the committee and that they were able to talk directly with healthcare professionals. However, some did not consider the committee to be completely neutral. The healthcare professionals involved rated the committee highly because they felt that the processes were neutral and no emotional aspects were involved. PMID:23617190

  14. Complementary and alternative medical therapies in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Aysegul Jale; Gur, Ali

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the studies that have been performed evaluating complementary or alternative medical (CAM) therapies for efficacy and some adverse events fibromyalgia (FM). There is no permanent cure for FM; therefore, adequate symptom control should be goal of treatment. Clinicians can choose from a variety of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities. Unfortunately, controlled studies of most current treatments have failed to demonstrate sustained, clinically significant responses. CAM has gained increasing popularity, particularly among individuals with FM for which traditional medicine has generally been ineffective. Some herbal and nutritional supplements (magnesium, S- adenosylmethionine) and massage therapy have the best evidence for effectiveness with FM. Other CAM therapies such as chlorella, biofeedback, relaxation have either been evaluated in only one randomised controlled trials (RCT) with positive results, in multiple RCTs with mixed results (magnet therapies) or have positive results from studies with methodological flaws (homeopathy, botanical oils, balneotherapy, anthocyanidins and dietary modifications). Another CAM therapy such as chiropractic care has neither well-designed studies nor positive results and is not currently recommended for FM treatment. Once CAM therapies have been better evaluated for safety and long-term efficacy in randomised, placebo-controlled trials, they may prove to be beneficial in treatments for FM. It would then be important to assess studies assessing cost-benefit analyses comparing conventional therapies and CAM. PMID:16454724

  15. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  16. Medical and dietary therapy for kidney stone prevention.

    PubMed

    Gul, Zeynep; Monga, Manoj

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of kidney stone disease is increasing, and newer research is finding that stones are associated with several serious morbidities. These facts suggest that emphasis needs to be placed not only on stone treatment but also stone prevention. However, there is a relative dearth of information on dietary and medical therapies to treat and avoid nephrolithiasis. In addition, studies have shown that there are many misconceptions among both the general community and physicians about how stones should be managed. This article is meant to serve as a review of the current literature on dietary and drug therapies for stone prevention. PMID:25512810

  17. Medical and Dietary Therapy for Kidney Stone Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stone disease is increasing, and newer research is finding that stones are associated with several serious morbidities. These facts suggest that emphasis needs to be placed not only on stone treatment but also stone prevention. However, there is a relative dearth of information on dietary and medical therapies to treat and avoid nephrolithiasis. In addition, studies have shown that there are many misconceptions among both the general community and physicians about how stones should be managed. This article is meant to serve as a review of the current literature on dietary and drug therapies for stone prevention. PMID:25512810

  18. Management studies in medical education.

    PubMed

    Noor Ghani, S; Saimy, I

    2005-08-01

    In 1977, the World Health Assembly (WHA) set the social target--the "Health For All" goal and in 1995, urged member states to "re-orientate medical education and medical practice for "Health For All" (resolution WHA 48.8). This led to World Health Organisation to enunciate the "5-star doctor" needing skills in healthcare management, quality assurance and health economics. The Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya introduced the New Integrated Curriculum (NIC) in 1995. The objective was aimed at producing a competent doctor with a holistic approach to the practice of medicine. This was to be achieved by having 3 strands of studies i.e. The Scientific Basis of Medicine (SBM), the Doctor, Patient, Health and Society (DPHS), and Personal and Professional Development (PPD) over the 5-year programme, split into 3 phases. Elements of the "5-star doctor" were introduced in strand 2--DPHS and strand 3--PPD. Management studies were introduced in the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) strand. This led to an instructional module--"Principles of Management in Health Care Services (PMGT)" comprising of the Management of Self, Resources and People and incorporating a three week field programme. Evaluation is undertaken at the end of the phase IIIA of the studies. This NIC approach will be able to produce a "5-star doctor", a team player, leader, communicator and an effective manager. PMID:16315627

  19. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  20. Endarterectomy vs. stenting vs. medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-07-01

    In recent trials, after deducting the risks in the 30-day periprocedural period, the long-term risk of stroke or death was similar with carotid stenting (CAS) and endarterectomy (CEA) for asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) - approximately 0.5% per year. These findings may exacerbate the problem of inappropriate routine intervention in ACS, being justified on the basis of an invalid comparison of the risks in the medical arms of clinical trials conducted decades ago (˜ 2% per year) to the risks in modern trials of CAS vs. CEA with no medical arm. Intervention is regarded as justified if it can be carried out with a risk below 3%. The annual risk of ipsilateral stroke or death in ACS with intensive medical therapy is now ˜ 0.5% - similar to the long-term risk after the periprocedural period in recent trials of intervention. However, periprocedural risk was ˜ 3% for CAS and 1.7% for CEA. Thus with modern CAS and CEA, the risk remains much higher than with modern medical therapy, even with careful vetting of the surgeons and interventionalists. In real world practice, documented in registries, the risks are much higher. National differences - 90% of carotid intervention for ACS in the US vs. 0% in Denmark - bring into question the advisability and ethics of routine intervention. A moratorium on routine intervention for ACS should be respected except in ongoing randomized trials comparing CAS, CEA and modern intensive medical therapy. Patients with high-risk ACS can be identified for appropriate intervention. PMID:27256474

  1. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  2. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule...

  3. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule...

  4. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  5. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  6. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  7. Angina Treatment -- Medical Versus Interventional Therapy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop the progression of the disease and thereby prolong life. MEDICAL ANGINA TREATMENT — Medical treatment for coronary ... be recommended. Stenting has not been shown to prolong life compared with medical therapy. It is used ...

  8. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  9. Microwave resonance therapy in medical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumskoy, L. L.

    1994-08-01

    Consideration is being given to the problems of organizing treatment of patients with quantum medicine methods by Prof. S.P. Sit'ko at 660 hospitals of Ukraine and Russia. Analyzed are teaching of doctors and treatment of 250,000 patients for 82 nozologic cases in 1990 through 1993. In the State of Ukraine, the Government has adopted a State Target-oriented Program of Large- scale Promotion of Microwave Resonance Therapy Into Medical Practice as presented by the Ministry of Health care in 1989. According to the Program, it was planned, during the three year period, to provide MRT rooms in 325 medical institutions. The Program was based on a discovery by Prof. S.P. Sit'ko DSc (Physics & Mathematics), of a new non-morphological structure of man, i.e. an electromagnetic framework that is manifested by eigenfrequencies in the millimeter range and disturbance of which results in disease while repair returns the organism to health. This idea was subjected to national and international expert evaluation. This evaluation was done by a panel of 12 universally acknowledged scientists headed by the founder of the theory of superconductivity, professor of the Liverpool University (Great Britain) h. Frohlich and director of the Madrid medical center Prof. Alzina. The USA was represented by Dr. W. Rogers, chief of the Center of Radiation, Institute of Bioinformation Research. The stated that Professor S.P. Sit'ko and his coworkers had established a new line of inquiry in medicine, i.e. microwave resonance therapy. To implement the State Target-oriented Program, the Government chose the Interbranch Scientific and Engineering Center on Physics of the Alive and Microwave Resonance Therapy 'Vidhuk'.

  10. Medical Therapy in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Katerina M; Wuyts, Wim; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Wells, Athol U

    2016-06-01

    Medical therapy for idiopathic fibrosis remains controversial. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) was uniformly a disease that progressed inexorably, typically leading to death within 3 to 5 years from onset of symptoms. Until recently, lung transplantation was the only effective transplant option. Within the past decade, several placebo-controlled trials failed to show benefit in patients with IPF. However, within the past 2 years, two novel antifibrotic agents (pirfenidone and nintedanib) were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States and European Medicines Agency (EMA) based upon pivotal studies that showed benefit (specifically slowing of the rate of disease progression) with both agents. Short-term outcomes (12 months) showed less deterioration of physiological parameters (e.g., change in forced vital capacity), although survival benefit has not convincingly been established with either agent. Nonetheless, these agents bring a glimmer of hope to patients with this deadly disease. The appropriate indications for initiating therapy, best candidates for therapy, and possible role for combination therapy remain controversial. Additional studies using agents that attenuate or abrogate profibrotic cytokines and chemokines may provide even further improvement in the future. PMID:27231861

  11. Novel psoriasis therapies and patient outcomes, part 1: topical medications.

    PubMed

    Feely, Meghan A; Smith, Barry L; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, advances in our understanding of inflammatory mediators and the underlying pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have shed light on potential therapeutic targets, which has led to the development of several new promising treatments. In this article, key clinical trials, mechanisms of action, patient outcomes, and relevant safety information for these novel topical medications will be evaluated. This article is the first in a 3-part series on treatments presently in the pipeline for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis including topical agents, biologic treatments, and systemic therapies in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials. With novel approaches to the disease process, these therapies may afford more targeted individualized treatment regimens and offer hope to patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis who have reported a suboptimal therapeutic response to conventional therapies. PMID:25844785

  12. [Medical audit: a modern undervalued management tool].

    PubMed

    Osorio, Guido; Sayes, Nilda; Fernández, Lautaro; Araya, Ester; Poblete, Dennis

    2002-02-01

    Medical audit is defined as the critical and periodical assessment of the quality of medical care, through the revision on medical records and hospital statistics. This review defines the work of the medical auditor and shows the fields of action of medical audit, emphasizing its importance and usefulness as a management tool. The authors propose that every hospital should create an audit system, should provide the necessary tools to carry out medical audits and should form an audit committee. PMID:11974537

  13. Update on medical therapy for male LUTS

    PubMed Central

    Radomski, Sidney B.

    2014-01-01

    The medical management of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is aimed at addressing voiding and storage symptoms in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) symptoms with or without an over-active bladder (OAB). Current available options for BPH include alpha-blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. For OAB, options include antimuscarinics, with or without an alpha-blocker, the beta-3-adrenergic agonist mirabegron and the synthetic diuretic desmopressin. With the availability of numerous options and combinations available for the treatment of LUTS, individual patient assessment is the key to optimal symptom control and management of adverse effects. PMID:25243039

  14. Medical Therapy of Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Martin; Schmidt, Carsten; Teich, Niels; Stallmach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Medical therapy of mild and moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) of any extent is evidence-based and standardized by national and international guidelines. However, patients with steroid-refractory UC still represent a challenge. Methods A literature search using PubMed (search terms: ulcerative colitis, therapy, new, 1-2008-2015) resulted in 821 publications. For the current article, 88 citations were extracted including 36 randomized controlled studies, 18 reviews, and 8 meta-analyses. Results In steroid-refractory UC, early intensive therapy using anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies or the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus is indicated in any case to prevent progression to a toxic megacolon and/or to avoid proctocolectomy. In patients with chronic disease activity, treatment with anti-TNF antibodies has a higher level of evidence than azathioprine therapy and should therefore be preferred. However, there is a subgroup of UC patients who may achieve prolonged steroid-free remission on azathioprine monotherapy. The importance of vedolizumab, a newly registered inhibiting antibody against integrin, has not yet been fully clarified since direct comparison studies are lacking, in particular in relation to anti-TNF antibodies. Conclusion There is a great need for additional innovative therapies, especially in cases of primary non-response or secondary loss of response to anti-TNF antibodies. New small molecules (Janus kinase inhibitors) are promising with an acceptable safety profile and efficacy in UC. Further, strategies that target the intestinal microbiome are currently considered for patients with active or relapsing UC, and may in the future open up new therapeutic options. PMID:26557831

  15. [Pain management and music therapy].

    PubMed

    Hoareau, Sophie Gwenaelle; De Diego, Emmanuelle; Guétin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of music in the treatment of pain is now recognised. The U sequence is a music therapy technique specifically developed for this purpose. It improves the overall management of pain and facilitates patient support. Its standardised use by caregivers has been made possible thanks to the development of a digital application. PMID:26743370

  16. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  17. Medical management of a cutaneous contamination.

    PubMed

    Berard, Philippe; Michel, Xavier; Menetrier, Florence; Laroche, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    The authors propose a process to improve the medical management of a cutaneous contamination in two ways: firstly by analysis of practices and products of decontamination used; secondly, by developing computer tools for the occupational physicians. This software will allow them to have a rapid dosimetric assessment in the event of a skin contamination by radioactive particles and will help them in their diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. A standardized data sheet was created allowing the exhaustive collection of adequate information in order to evaluate the skin dose. The selection of appropriate monitoring equipment with a 1 cm2 detector, depending on the place and on the surface of the contaminated area, will allow the evaluation and the quantification of the surface activities. A tool has been made as a software package, named Cutadose®, allowing the assessment of the skin dose in situ as well as the efficacy of the prescribed therapy. PMID:20838101

  18. Stress Management in Medical Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Shauna L.; Shapiro, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Gary E. R.

    2000-01-01

    Review of clinical studies providing empirical data on stress management programs in medical education found that student participants in such programs demonstrated improved immunologic functioning, decreased depression and anxiety, increased spirituality and empathy, enhanced knowledge of alternative therapies, improved knowledge of stress…

  19. Dietary and medical management of recurrent nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Silvi; Calle, Juan Camilo

    2016-06-01

    Dietary approaches and medical treatment can prevent recurrence of urinary stones. Some interventions are appropriate for all types of stones, but there are particular risk factors that may need directed therapy. PMID:27281259

  20. Paperless medical physics QA in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Yau, S; White, S; Wilfert, L

    2012-06-01

    Physics quality assurance (QA) is an integral part of a medical physicist's role in the radiotherapy centre. Management of physics QA documents is an issue with a long-term accumulation. Storage space, archive administration and paper consumption are just some of the difficulties faced by physicists. Plotting trends and drawing meaningful conclusions from these results can be challenging using traditional QA methods. Remote checking of QA within a hospital network can also be problematic. The aim of this project is introduce a paperless QA system that will provide solutions to many of these issues. PMID:22678953

  1. Acne: the role of medical nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Burris, Jennifer; Rietkerk, William; Woolf, Kathleen

    2013-03-01

    Acne is a common disease in Westernized nations, particularly among adolescents and young adults. Acne has substantial effects on quality of life, making treatment essential. Medical nutrition therapy as a potential treatment for acne is not new, although the literature examining diet and acne during the past 100 years is mixed. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, diet was commonly used as an adjunct treatment for acne. During the 1960s, however, the diet-acne connection fell out of favor. In recent years, dermatologists and registered dietitians have revisited the idea and become increasingly interested in the role of medical nutrition therapy in acne treatment. This article reviews the history and existing literature examining the association between diet and acne. Although the total number of studies conducted within the past 40 years is relatively small, the growing body of epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests a relationship between diet and acne. Compared with other dietary factors, more research examines dietary glycemic load. The evidence is more convincing for high glycemic load diets, compared with other dietary factors. To date there are no randomized controlled trials investigating the relationship between frequent dairy or milk consumption and acne. Similarly, the number of research studies examining the relationship between dietary fat and/or n-3 fatty acids is sparse and the evidence is less robust. Taken together, several methodologic limitations need to be addressed, and additional research, preferably randomized controlled trials, is warranted before comprehensive evidence-based guidelines can be established. While dermatologists and registered dietitians continue to debate and research the potential relationship between diet and acne, the best dietary approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling. PMID:23438493

  2. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  3. Medical Therapy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jais, Xavier; Channick, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare but life-threatening condition resulting from unresolved thromboembolic obstructions. Pulmonary endarterectomy surgery is currently the standard of treatment, as it is potentially curative; however, not all cases are amenable to surgical intervention due to distal distribution of the organized thromboembolic material or the presence of comorbidities. Up to one-third of patients have persistent or recurrent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy. In addition to the occlusive organized thromboembolic material, there is a small-vessel vasculopathy in nonoccluded parts of the pulmonary circulation that is histologically similar to that described in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This observation has led to frequent off-license use of approved pulmonary arterial hypertension therapies in CTEPH. Small uncontrolled trials have investigated prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in CTEPH with mixed results. A phase III study of the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan met only one of its two coprimary end points. The first large randomized controlled trial showing a positive treatment effect was the Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Trial (CHEST). This study led to the licensing of riociguat for use in inoperable or persistent recurrent CTEPH. Rigorous randomized controlled trials of medical therapy for CTEPH are needed, and several are underway or planned. In the future, outcomes research may be facilitated by identification of novel end points specific to CTEPH. PMID:27571006

  4. Perioperative Management of Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, James D.; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Mayr, Michael; Jaffer, Amir K.; Eckman, Mark H.; Dunn, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline addresses the management of patients who are receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy and require an elective surgery or procedure. Methods: The methods herein follow those discussed in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines article of this supplement. Results: In patients requiring vitamin K antagonist (VKA) interruption before surgery, we recommend stopping VKAs 5 days before surgery instead of a shorter time before surgery (Grade 1B). In patients with a mechanical heart valve, atrial fibrillation, or VTE at high risk for thromboembolism, we suggest bridging anticoagulation instead of no bridging during VKA interruption (Grade 2C); in patients at low risk, we suggest no bridging instead of bridging (Grade 2C). In patients who require a dental procedure, we suggest continuing VKAs with an oral prohemostatic agent or stopping VKAs 2 to 3 days before the procedure instead of alternative strategies (Grade 2C). In moderate- to high-risk patients who are receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and require noncardiac surgery, we suggest continuing ASA around the time of surgery instead of stopping ASA 7 to 10 days before surgery (Grade 2C). In patients with a coronary stent who require surgery, we recommend deferring surgery > 6 weeks after bare-metal stent placement and > 6 months after drug-eluting stent placement instead of undertaking surgery within these time periods (Grade 1C); in patients requiring surgery within 6 weeks of bare-metal stent placement or within 6 months of drug-eluting stent placement, we suggest continuing antiplatelet therapy perioperatively instead of stopping therapy 7 to 10 days before surgery (Grade 2C). Conclusions: Perioperative antithrombotic management is based on risk assessment for thromboembolism and

  5. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process. PMID:25241525

  6. Medical therapy for patients with subclinical and clinical carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, E; Bacarella, D; Coppola, G; Rizzo, M; Muratori, I; Dell'oglio, S; Nugara, C; Ferrara, F; Novo, S

    2012-02-01

    The management of carotid artery disease includes both modifications in life style as well treatment of vascular risk factors. However, strict risk factor modification, including improved antihypertensive therapy, lipid management, smoking cessation, and antiplatelet therapy, promise for reducing the vascular event rate in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. The best medical management for stroke prevention was highlighted in clinical practice guidelines issued jointly in 2006 by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association, and co-sponsored by the Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention and the American Academy of Neurology. Lowering blood pressure to a target below 120/80 mm Hg by life style interventions and antihypertensive treatment. Glucose control to near-normoglycemic levels (target hemoglobin A1C ≤7%) is recommended among diabetics to reduce micro-vascular complications and, with lesser certainty, macrovascular complications. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current evidence and standards for the advanced diagnostic and management strategies used in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:22330618

  7. The management of schizophrenia: cognitive behavioural therapy.

    PubMed

    Siddle, R; Kingdon, D

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade advances in the management of schizophrenia in the community have involved increasing emphasis on the psychosocial dynamics of care, coordinated through a care programme approach, and the introduction of new medication. In particular, the use of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective means of tackling symptoms associated with schizophrenia (Jones et al, 1998). While some of the techniques used in CBT may be too advanced for untrained therapists to use, the approach described in this article may be used by registered mental health nurses and community professionals. This approach includes medication adherence, coping strategies, questioning style, the prevention of patient relapse and dealing with relatives. PMID:12784789

  8. [Medical management of cholangiocarcinomas in 2015].

    PubMed

    Marret, Grégoire; Neuzillet, Cindy; Rousseau, Benoît; Tournigand, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignancy carrying a poor prognosis. Most patients are diagnosed with advanced-stage disease and are then ineligible for surgical resection, which is the only potentially curative therapeutic modality. The aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review of medical management of patients with cholangiocarcinoma. The benefit of adjuvant therapy in patients undergoing curative-intent surgery is under evaluation. Combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and platinum is the standard first-line treatment for patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Targeted agents are not currently recommended due to limited data on use in this setting. The role of second-line chemotherapy is not established in advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Identification of predictive and prognostic markers to select patients who could benefit from second-line therapy is a major issue. A better understanding of the biological and molecular mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis and the phenotypic heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma may path the way of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26922666

  9. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  10. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Y.; Adam, J. F.; Berkvens, P.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Vautrin, M.; Deman, P.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Elleaume, H.; Estève, F.; Bravin, A.

    2010-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT). The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  11. New medical therapies for heart failure.

    PubMed

    von Lueder, Thomas G; Krum, Henry

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) can rightfully be called the epidemic of the 21(st) century. Historically, the only available medical treatment options for HF have been diuretics and digoxin, but the capacity of these agents to alter outcomes has been brought into question by the scrutiny of modern clinical trials. In the past 4 decades, neurohormonal blockers have been introduced into clinical practice, leading to marked reductions in morbidity and mortality in chronic HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Despite these major advances in pharmacotherapy, our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms of HF from epidemiological, clinical, pathophysiological, molecular, and genetic standpoints remains incomplete. This knowledge gap is particularly evident with respect to acute decompensated HF and HF with normal (preserved) LVEF. For these clinical phenotypes, no drug has been shown to reduce long-term clinical event rates substantially. Ongoing developments in the pharmacotherapy of HF are likely to challenge our current best-practice algorithms. Novel agents for HF therapy include dual-acting neurohormonal modulators, contractility-enhancing agents, vasoactive and anti-inflammatory peptides, and myocardial protectants. These novel compounds have the potential to enhance our armamentarium of HF therapeutics. PMID:26416006

  12. Intelligent distributed medical image management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hong-Mei C.; Yun, David Y.

    1995-05-01

    The rapid advancements in high performance global communication have accelerated cooperative image-based medical services to a new frontier. Traditional image-based medical services such as radiology and diagnostic consultation can now fully utilize multimedia technologies in order to provide novel services, including remote cooperative medical triage, distributed virtual simulation of operations, as well as cross-country collaborative medical research and training. Fast (efficient) and easy (flexible) retrieval of relevant images remains a critical requirement for the provision of remote medical services. This paper describes the database system requirements, identifies technological building blocks for meeting the requirements, and presents a system architecture for our target image database system, MISSION-DBS, which has been designed to fulfill the goals of Project MISSION (medical imaging support via satellite integrated optical network) -- an experimental high performance gigabit satellite communication network with access to remote supercomputing power, medical image databases, and 3D visualization capabilities in addition to medical expertise anywhere and anytime around the country. The MISSION-DBS design employs a synergistic fusion of techniques in distributed databases (DDB) and artificial intelligence (AI) for storing, migrating, accessing, and exploring images. The efficient storage and retrieval of voluminous image information is achieved by integrating DDB modeling and AI techniques for image processing while the flexible retrieval mechanisms are accomplished by combining attribute- based and content-based retrievals.

  13. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300 Section 892.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron...

  14. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300 Section 892.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron...

  15. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300 Section 892.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300 Section 892.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron...

  17. Medical management considerations for upper airway disease.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, G L

    1992-06-01

    The conducting airways, also commonly referred to as the upper airways, provide for the passage of air to and from the atmosphere and lungs. Anatomical components include the nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and mainstem bronchi. Clinical problems involving the conducting airways can be manifested by relatively mild clinical signs of stertorous breathing, by life-threatening dyspnea, or by chronic bouts of inspiratory stridor and cough. Concurrent disease of the lower respiratory system (ie, chronic bronchitis) as well as other organ systems (ie, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine) may significantly contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of upper airway disease. Diagnosis of the diseases of the conducting airways is primarily based on history and physical examination. The dynamic nature of some conditions, related to the phases of respiration, can make diagnosis more difficult. In addition to direct visualization, radiographic and endoscopic evaluation are often useful. Many upper airway problems, especially congenital conditions, lend themselves to surgical palliation that should be performed as early in life as possible. Medical management is often directed at treating underlying diseases and the relief of clinical signs. Historically, the use of variety of drugs have been advocated and frequently include decongestants, cough suppressants, bronchodilators, glucocorticoids, and antibiotics. However, their use may be detrimental and contraindicated. In addition, therapy for some conditions (ie, laryngeal paralysis and intrathoracic tracheal collapse) may be better directed at increasing airway muscle tone in order to stabilized airway patency. Therapeutic agents that may be useful include aspirin and digitalis. The overall objective to medical management must be to balance potential therapeutic benefit against untoward effects in order to minimize clinical signs and to improve the animal's quality of life. PMID:1643322

  18. Total quality management approach improves medication replacement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L K

    1994-07-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is based on understanding customer needs, improving key processes that affect customer satisfaction, and creating cross-functional teams to resolve process problems. This article describes application of TQM principles and problem-solving processes to improve one OR's medication exchange system. The problem was excessive monthly pharmacy medication replacement costs. The goal was to reduce the monthly medication replacement costs by 50%. Within four months, monthly medication replacement charges decreased from $656 to $302, and by one year, monthly charges decreased to $160. The new process had fewer steps, fewer staff members involved, and fewer delays in medication replacement. PMID:8085806

  19. Resource Letter MPRT-1: Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Steven T.

    2009-09-01

    This resource letter provides a guide to the literature on medical physics in the field of radiation therapy. Journal articles, books, and websites are cited for the following topics: radiological physics, particle accelerators, radiation dose measurements, protocols for radiation dose measurements, radiation shielding and radiation protection, neutron, proton, and heavy-ion therapies, imaging for radiation therapy, brachytherapy, quality assurance, treatment planning, dose calculations, and intensity-modulated and image-guided therapy.

  20. Medical and Surgical Management of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Sadri-Ardekani, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    This article is the review of the book “Medical & Surgical Management of Male Infertility” edited by Botros RMB Rizk, Nabil Aziz, Ashok Agarwal and Edmund Sabanegh Jr. This book (hardcover) was published by Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishing, New Delhi.London.Philadelphia.Panama on September 2013 (1st edition). The contents of the book and its relevance to medical education are discussed in this invited review.

  1. Collaborative drug therapy management and its application to pharmaceutical compounding.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Derick

    2007-01-01

    Patient care within the US healthcare system is changing constantly, as are the roles of healthcare practitioners, including pharmacists. For over 30 years, pharmacists have promoted the concept of clinical pharmacy, which places pharmacists in a central role in patient medication management. The goal is to allow the pharmacist to become a vital part of treatment planning by individualizing patients' therapeutic regimens. The Collaborative Drug Therapy Management agreement is a step toward that goal. The combination of drug therapy management and compounding pharmacy can be powerful in meeting patients' specific needs. PMID:23974486

  2. Pros and Cons of Medical Management of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Shen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation limited to the colon and rectum. Although a complete medical cure may not be possible, UC can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. The medical management of this disease continues to evolve with a goal to avoid colectomy and ultimately alter the natural history of UC. Emergence of antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) agents has expanded the medical armamentarium. 5-Aminosalicylates continue to be used in mild to moderate UC and corticosteroids are mainly used for induction of remission with immunomodulators (6-mercaptopurine/azathiopurine/methotrexate) being applied as steroid-sparing agents for maintenance therapy. Infliximab has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and used in the treatment of moderate to severe UC; nevertheless, its use may be associated with significant adverse effects and have a negative impact on the postoperative course should the patients undergo restorative proctocolectomy. In addition, there is always a concern about patients' compliance to medical therapy, cost of medications, and risk for UC-associated dysplasia. The authors discuss the pros and cons of medications used in the treatment of UC. PMID:22131893

  3. An update on the role of medical treatment including antioxidant therapy in varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Harshit; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele-associated male infertility has classically been managed using surgery or assisted reproductive techniques. With increasing evidence of oxidative stress as a pathophysiological factor in varicocele-associated infertility, medical therapy especially antioxidants might become a treatment option with lower risks. We reviewed the existing literature on the role of various medical agents in the management of male infertility attributed to varicoceles. Medical therapy is typically evaluated in three different situations such as (a) comparison of two drugs or one drug with placebo, (b) comparison of drugs versus surgery, and (c) comparison of drugs as adjuvant therapy with surgery versus drug therapy alone. Due to heterogeneity of data and lack of well-conducted studies, there is insufficient data to recommend routine use of medical therapy for men with varicocele-associated infertility and surgery remains the treatment of choice. Pregnancy and live birth rates are usually not reported in most studies and mere improvement in sperm parameters or antioxidant capacity is insufficient to support its routine use. Antioxidant therapy is a potential option due to its theoretical benefit, data from preclinical studies, and lack of major side effects. Adjuvant therapy with antioxidants after surgical repair of varicocele may improve the outcome and is a potential area for further research. PMID:26763549

  4. Endovascular Versus Medical Therapy for Atherosclerotic Renovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mark Shipeng; Folt, David A.; Drummond, Christopher A.; Haller, Steven T.; Cooper, Emily L.; Brewster, Pamela; Evans, Kaleigh L.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS) has become increasingly common in part due to greater awareness of ischemic renal disease and increased use of diagnostic techniques. Over 90 % of RAS cases are caused by atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD). Patients with ARVD are at high risk for fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular and renal events. The mortality rate in patients with ARVD is high, especially with other cardiovascular or renal comorbidities. Recent clinical studies have provided substantial evidence concerning medical therapy and endovascular interventional therapeutic approaches for ARVD. Despite previous randomized clinical trials, the optimal therapy for ARVD remained uncertain until the results of the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial were released recently. CORAL demonstrated that optimal medical therapy was equally effective to endovascular therapy in the treatment of ARVD. Clinicians can now practice with more evidence-based medicine to treat ARVD and potentially decrease mortality in patients with ARVD using optimal medical therapy. PMID:25301353

  5. [The Traceability Management for Qualification Documents of Medical Instruments].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang; Xu, Xia; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The management for qualification documents of medical instruments is very important work to management department of medical instruments. Because the number of qualification documents of medical instruments is very large and they have an expiry date, it is difficult to manage them. This article discussed how to manage qualification documents of medical instruments, and an information management system that has a function of traceability management has been developed. This information management system standardizes management for qualification documents of medical instruments, and ensures that qualification documents of medical instruments are available and can be traced. Besides, it can reduce the amount of work for medical instruments management. PMID:27197505

  6. Optimal perioperative medical management of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saket; Maldonado, Yasdet; Taylor, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative medical management of patients undergoing vascular surgery can be challenging because they represent the surgical population at highest risk. β-Blockers should be continued perioperatively in patients already taking them preoperatively. Statins may be used in the perioperative period in patients who are not on statin therapy preoperatively. Institutional guidelines should be used to guide insulin replacement. Recent research suggests that measurement of troponins may provide some risk stratification in clinically stable patients following vascular surgery. Multimodal pain therapy including nonopioid strategies is necessary to improve the efficacy of pain relief and decrease the risk of side effects and complications. PMID:25113724

  7. Stress Management Training in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An effort to teach medical students practical stress management skills is discussed. A group of students volunteered to participate in a six-session program that taught them personal stress management techniques including self-relaxation training, schedule-planning, priority-setting, leisure time-planning, and cognitive modification techniques.…

  8. Communicating Medical Needs to Non-Medical Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Miller, Robert; Doerr, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Differences in communication styles and languages between groups often lead to miscommunication, confusion, and/or frustration. Engineers, computer specialists, clinicians, and managers often utilize the English language in very different ways, with different groups using the same words to represent different concepts ("complaint" is a typical example). In addition, medical issues are often perceived as "off-nominal" and not "primary mission tasks" by managers, which can cause them to assign lower priorities to medical training time and resources. Knowledge bases differ due to variations in training and skill sets, and the goals (both immediate and long-term) of the communicators may also vary, with managers being primarily concerned with overall mission objectives, while clinicians focus on individual or group health issues. Furthermore, true communication is only possible when clinicians possess a deep understanding of mission requirements as well as the ability to communicate medical requirements on a priority basis using risk assessment, added value, and cost benefit analysis. These understandable differences may contribute to difficulties in expressing concerns and ideas in an efficient manner, particularly in projects, such as the space program or many military operations, where these varied groups must collaborate, and where the final decisions must be made by fully informed mission commanders. Methods: Three scenario-based approaches were developed utilizing decision trees and problem based learning, to help define and integrate these concepts. Results: Use of these techniques by NASA and military personnel will be presented. Discussion: To enhance communication, particularly of medical needs, one must identify the concerns and motivating factors for the other groups; for example, members of management may focus on financial concerns, a desire for risk mitigation, public perceptions, mission objectives, etc. Training clinicians to frame issues in these

  9. Strategies for diagnosing and managing medication-induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Edmeads, J. G.; Gawel, M. J.; Vickers, J.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED: Headache is a common clinical disorder. Nearly 50% of patients with headaches use prescription medications, and 90% regularly use nonprescription drugs. Medication-induced headaches (MIH) are chronic daily headaches caused by overuse of medicine. OBJECTIVES: To summarize the diagnostic criteria for MIH, to determine the investigations necessary to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other possible diagnoses, and to establish recommendations for managing MIH. MAIN FINDINGS: Diagnosis of MIH is based on patient's history and the clinical characteristics of the headache. Treatment includes patient education and support, withdrawal of offending medications, relief of withdrawal symptoms, and specific treatment of residual headache. When migraine and other causes of headache are adequately addressed, patients will not seek additional pain relief. CONCLUSION: Medication-induced headache is preventable. The key to prevention is appropriate drug therapy to relieve the primary headache. All patients with MIH can be treated and most cured. PMID:9241463

  10. Prolactinomas, Cushing's disease and acromegaly: debating the role of medical therapy for secretory pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are associated with a variety of clinical manifestations resulting from excessive hormone secretion and tumor mass effects, and require a multidisciplinary management approach. This article discusses the treatment modalities for the management of patients with a prolactinoma, Cushing's disease and acromegaly, and summarizes the options for medical therapy in these patients. First-line treatment of prolactinomas is pharmacotherapy with dopamine agonists; recent reports of cardiac valve abnormalities associated with this class of medication in Parkinson's disease has prompted study in hyperprolactinemic populations. Patients with resistance to dopamine agonists may require other treatment. First-line treatment of Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery by a surgeon with experience in this condition. Current medical options for Cushing's disease block adrenal cortisol production, but do not treat the underlying disease. Pituitary-directed medical therapies are now being explored. In several small studies, the dopamine agonist cabergoline normalized urinary free cortisol in some patients. The multi-receptor targeted somatostatin analogue pasireotide (SOM230) shows promise as a pituitary-directed medical therapy in Cushing's disease; further studies will determine its efficacy and safety. Radiation therapy, with medical adrenal blockade while awaiting the effects of radiation, and bilateral adrenalectomy remain standard treatment options for patients not cured with pituitary surgery. In patients with acromegaly, surgery remains the first-line treatment option when the tumor is likely to be completely resected, or for debulking, especially when the tumor is compressing neurovisual structures. Primary therapy with somatostatin analogues has been used in some patients with large extrasellar tumors not amenable to surgical cure, patients at high surgical risk and patients who decline surgery. Pegvisomant is indicated in patients who have not responded to

  11. Medical management of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Monica S C; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing in industrialized nations, resulting in a corresponding rise in economic burden. Nephrolithiasis is now recognized as both a chronic and systemic condition, which further underscores the impact of the disease. Diet and environment play an important role in stone disease, presumably by modulating urine composition. Dietary modification as a preventive treatment to decrease lithogenic risk factors and prevent stone recurrence has gained interest because of its potential to be safer and more economical than drug treatment. However, not all abnormalities are likely to be amenable to dietary therapy, and in some cases drugs are necessary to reduce the risk of stone formation. Unfortunately, no new drugs have been developed for stone prevention since the 1980s when potassium citrate was introduced, perhaps because the long observation period needed to demonstrate efficacy discourages investigators from embarking on clinical trials. Nonetheless, effective established treatment regimens are currently available for stone prevention. PMID:26977089

  12. A medical nutrition therapy primer for childhood asthma: current and emerging perspectives.

    PubMed

    McCloud, Emily; Papoutsakis, Constantina

    2011-07-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children. Prevalence has increased in the past 2 decades and has reached a plateau of approximately 9% of children in the United States, affecting about 6.7 million children. The increased prevalence of childhood asthma has paralleled the increased prevalence in childhood obesity. Changes in diet have also been implicated in the increased prevalence of asthma, among other risk factors. The main symptoms of asthma (ie, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness) require medical evaluation and monitoring. The cornerstone of asthma management is medication therapy, frequently consisting of inhaled bronchodilators and corticosteroids and, when needed, therapy of corticosteroids by mouth. As part of the multidisciplinary management of this chronic disease, nutrition assessment and follow-up in childhood asthma is necessary to identify and address relevant nutrition-related problems. These problems can involve food-medication interactions, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease, food allergies, and other issues; therefore, individualized medical nutrition therapy is warranted. Finally, counseling to achieve a healthy balanced diet is recommended for overall health and weight management. A recent but small number of descriptive investigations agree that adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern can be associated with a decreased risk of current asthma symptoms in children. Although this evidence is promising, food interventions are required to substantiate an evidence-based foundation for medical nutrition therapy in childhood asthma. At this time, there is no known health risk if a Mediterranean diet is adopted. PMID:21703384

  13. Management of medical waste in Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manyele, S V; Anicetus, H

    2006-09-01

    A survey was conducted to study the existing medical waste management (MWM) systems in Tanzanian hospitals during a nationwide health-care waste management-training programme conducted from 2003 to 2005. The aim of the programme was to enable health workers to establish MWM systems in their health facilities aimed at improving infection prevention and control and occupational health aspects. During the training sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and circulated to collect information on the MWM practices existing in hospitals in eight regions of the Tanzania. The analysis showed that increased population and poor MWM systems as well as expanded use of disposables were the main reasons for increased medical wastes in hospitals. The main disposal methods comprised of open pit burning (50%) and burying (30%) of the waste. A large proportion (71%) of the hospitals used dust bins for transporting waste from generation points to incinerator without plastic bags. Most hospitals had low incineration capacity, with few of them having fire brick incinerators. Most of the respondents preferred on-site versus off-site waste incineration. Some hospitals were using untrained casual labourers in medical waste management and general cleanliness. The knowledge level in MWM issues was low among the health workers. It is concluded that hospital waste management in Tanzania is poor. There is need for proper training and management regarding awareness and practices of medical waste management to cover all carders of health workers in the country. PMID:18254511

  14. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  15. Medical management of paraquat ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Gawarammana, Indika B; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2011-01-01

    Poisoning by paraquat herbicide is a major medical problem in parts of Asia while sporadic cases occur elsewhere. The very high case fatality of paraquat is due to inherent toxicity and lack of effective treatments. We conducted a systematic search for human studies that report toxicokinetics, mechanisms, clinical features, prognosis and treatment. Paraquat is rapidly but incompletely absorbed and then largely eliminated unchanged in urine within 12–24 h. Clinical features are largely due to intracellular effects. Paraquat generates reactive oxygen species which cause cellular damage via lipid peroxidation, activation of NF-κB, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis in many organs. Kinetics of distribution into these target tissues can be described by a two-compartment model. Paraquat is actively taken up against a concentration gradient into lung tissue leading to pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Paraquat also causes renal and liver injury. Plasma paraquat concentrations, urine and plasma dithionite tests and clinical features provide a good guide to prognosis. Activated charcoal and Fuller's earth are routinely given to minimize further absorption. Gastric lavage should not be performed. Elimination methods such as haemodialysis and haemoperfusion are unlikely to change the clinical course. Immunosuppression with dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone is widely practised, but evidence for efficacy is very weak. Antioxidants such as acetylcysteine and salicylate might be beneficial through free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory and NF-κB inhibitory actions. However, there are no published human trials. The case fatality is very high in all centres despite large variations in treatment. PMID:21615775

  16. Medical management of paraquat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Gawarammana, Indika B; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2011-11-01

    Poisoning by paraquat herbicide is a major medical problem in parts of Asia while sporadic cases occur elsewhere. The very high case fatality of paraquat is due to inherent toxicity and lack of effective treatments. We conducted a systematic search for human studies that report toxicokinetics, mechanisms, clinical features, prognosis and treatment. Paraquat is rapidly but incompletely absorbed and then largely eliminated unchanged in urine within 12-24 h. Clinical features are largely due to intracellular effects. Paraquat generates reactive oxygen species which cause cellular damage via lipid peroxidation, activation of NF-κB, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis in many organs. Kinetics of distribution into these target tissues can be described by a two-compartment model. Paraquat is actively taken up against a concentration gradient into lung tissue leading to pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Paraquat also causes renal and liver injury. Plasma paraquat concentrations, urine and plasma dithionite tests and clinical features provide a good guide to prognosis. Activated charcoal and Fuller's earth are routinely given to minimize further absorption. Gastric lavage should not be performed. Elimination methods such as haemodialysis and haemoperfusion are unlikely to change the clinical course. Immunosuppression with dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone is widely practised, but evidence for efficacy is very weak. Antioxidants such as acetylcysteine and salicylate might be beneficial through free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory and NF-κB inhibitory actions. However, there are no published human trials. The case fatality is very high in all centres despite large variations in treatment. PMID:21615775

  17. Knowledge Management within the Medical University.

    PubMed

    Rauzina, Svetlana Ye; Tikhonova, Tatiana A; Karpenko, Dmitriy S; Bogopolskiy, Gennady A; Zarubina, Tatiana V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is studying the possibilities of ontological engineering in managing of medical knowledge. And also practical implementation of knowledge management system (KMS) in medical university. The educational process model is established that allows analyzing learning results within time scale. Glossary sub-system has been developed; ontologies of educational disciplines are constructed; environment for setup and solution of situational cases is established; ontological approach to assess competencies is developed. The possibilities of the system for solving situation tasks have been described. The approach to the evaluation of competence has been developed. PMID:26152966

  18. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    PubMed

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain. PMID:26373552

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... priorities, and trends Funding Process Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and ...

  20. Implementing cognitive behavioral therapy in specialty medical settings

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Weisberg, Risa B.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the second issue of a two-part Special Series on integrating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into medical settings. The first issue focused on integrating CBT into primary care, and this issue focuses on implementing CBT in other specialty medical settings, including cancer treatment, HIV care, and specialized pediatric medical clinics. Models for treatment delivery to improve ease of implementation are also discussed, including telehealth and home-delivered treatment. The six articles in this series provide examples of how to transport CBT techniques that are largely designed for implementation in outpatient mental health settings to specialized medical settings, and discuss unique considerations and recommendations for implementation.

  1. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  2. Purchasing a decentralized medication management system.

    PubMed

    2006-03-01

    Decentralized medication management systems (DMMSs) are used in hospitals, long-term care facilities, prisons, outpatient clinics, surgery centers, and other places to manage the distribution of drugs. DMMSs consist of storage compartments for medications, with an internal computer that controls and records the administration of drugs. Some DMMSs are stationary cabinets and others are mobile carts. There have been important advances in DMMS technology since we evaluated these products in 1996, including enhanced computer memory and processing power, wider adoption of wireless networking, better user interfaces, and greater integration with other hospital information systems. To get the most out of a DMMS purchase or upgrade, facilities will need careful planning that involves assessing their own needs, selecting hardware and software configurations that meet those needs, and then choosing the right vendor and model. A properly selected DMMS can help to enforce medication distribution policies, prevent errors, and streamline processes. PMID:16610453

  3. District nurses' role in managing medication dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2016-08-01

    A survey commissioned by the Patients Association (2015) has shown that the risky practice of altering solid-form medication to assist patients with swallowing difficulties is a daily occurrence in care homes. District nurses and community matrons who provide care to patients and assist staff in care homes are well-placed to raise awareness of the impact that tampering with tablets has on patient safety. It is essential that district nurses and community matrons discharge their duty of care to patients in care homes by supporting effective medication management that meets the individual needs of those patients. This article considers the legal and professional standards that must inform a district nurse's support of medication management for a patient with swallowing difficulties residing in a care home. PMID:27479856

  4. Medical technology management: from planning to application.

    PubMed

    David, Y; Jahnke, E

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate deployment of technological innovation contributes to improvement in the quality of healthcare delivered, the containment of cost, and access to the healthcare system. Hospitals have been allocating a significant portion of their resources to procuring and managing capital assets; they are continuously faced with demands for new medical equipment and are asked to manage existing inventory for which they are not well prepared. To objectively manage their investment, hospitals are developing medical technology management programs that need pertinent information and planning methodology for integrating new equipment into existing operations as well as for optimizing costs of ownership of all equipment. Clinical engineers can identify technological solutions based on the matching of new medical equipment with hospital's objectives. They can review their institution's overall technological position, determine strengths and weaknesses, develop equipment-selection criteria, supervise installations, train users and monitor post procurement performance to assure meeting of goals. This program, together with cost accounting analysis, will objectively guide the capital assets decision-making process. Cost accounting analysis is a multivariate function that includes determining the amount, based upon a strategic plan and financial resources, of funding to be allocated annually for medical equipment acquisition and replacement. Often this function works closely with clinical engineering to establish equipment useful life and prioritization of acquisition, upgrade, and replacement of inventory within budget confines and without conducting time consuming, individual financial capital project evaluations. PMID:17282142

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Programs & Contacts Research program and staff ...

  6. Photodynamic therapy--aspects of pain management.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christine; Enk, Alexander; Gholam, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a highly effective and safe treatment method for actinic keratoses with an excellent cosmetic outcome and is commonly used for the therapy of large areas of photodamaged skin with multiple clinically manifest and subclinical lesions. However, the major drawback of photodynamic therapy is the pain experienced during the treatment that can be intense and sometimes even intolerable for patients, requiring interruption or termination of the process. Several strategies for controlling pain during photodynamic therapy have been studied but few effective methods are currently available. Therefore, this review puts the spotlight on predictors on pain intensity and aspects of pain management during photodynamic therapy. PMID:25640485

  7. Plasmonic nanoprobes: from chemical sensing to medical diagnostics and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Fales, Andrew M.; Griffin, Guy D.; Khoury, Christopher G.; Liu, Yang; Ngo, Hoan; Norton, Stephen J.; Register, Janna K.; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Yuan, Hsiangkuo

    2013-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and applications of plasmonics-active nanoprobes in our laboratory for chemical sensing, medical diagnostics and therapy. Molecular Sentinel nanoprobes provide a unique tool for DNA/RNA biomarker detection both in a homogeneous solution or on a chip platform for medical diagnostics. The possibility of combining spectral selectivity and high sensitivity of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) process with the inherent molecular specificity of nanoprobes provides an important multiplex diagnostic modality. Gold nanostars can provide an excellent multi-modality platform, combining two-photon luminescence with photothermal therapy as well as Raman imaging with photodynamic therapy. Several examples of optical detection using SERS and photonics-based treatments are presented to illustrate the usefulness and potential of the plasmonic nanoprobes for theranostics, which seamlessly combines diagnostics and therapy.

  8. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... Bureau institution considered medically appropriate, or to a community hospital....

  9. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2012-05-08

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing fixed field magnets.

  10. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2013-04-23

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of superconducting, variable field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of variable field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing variable field magnets.

  11. Medical and alternative therapies in urinary tract stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuvanc, Ercan; Yilmaz, Erdal; Tuglu, Devrim; Batislam, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a serious problem for both patients and the health system. Recurrence stands out as a significant problem in urinary system stone disease, the prevalence of which is increasing gradually. If recurrence is not prevented, patients may go through recurrent operations due to nephrolithiasis. While classical therapeutic options are available for all stone types, the number of randomized controlled studies and extensive meta-analyses focusing on their efficiency are inadequate. Various alternative therapeutic options to these medical therapies also stand out in recent years. The etiology of urolithiasis is multifactorial and not always related to nutritional factors. Nutrition therapy seems to be useful, either along with pharmacological therapy or as a monotherapy. General nutrition guidelines are useful in promoting public health and developing nutrition plans that reduce the risk or attenuate the effects of diseases affected by nutrition. Nutrition therapy involves the evaluation of a patient’s nutritional state and intake, the diagnosis of nutrition risk factors, and the organization and application of a nutrition program. The main target is the reduction or prevention of calculus formation and growth via decreasing lithogenic risk factors and increasing lithogenic inhibitors in urine. This review focuses briefly on classical medical therapy, along with alternative options, related diets, and medical expulsive therapy. PMID:26558186

  12. The medical management of unintentional radionuclide intakes.

    PubMed

    Breitenstein, B D

    2003-01-01

    As a general medical problem, radionuclide intakes that may cause significant health effects are uncommon events. In preparing to manage a radionuclide accident, planning is the key. The medical aspects of such an accident are only one part of the management, and a professional team approach is required. Specific priorities and sequencing are necessary in medically managing a radionuclide intake. As soon as is reasonably practical, promptly remove the victim(s) from further radionuclide, radiation field, or chemical exposure. Life and limb-saving medical aid takes precedence over ionising radiation concerns in nearly all cases. Next are the prevention and/or minimisation of internal intake of radionuclides and evaluation and control of external radionuclide contamination, followed by institution of treatment to minimise the retained radionuclide. Communication with the accident victim, and his or her family, and public affairs/media issues are important. Finally, follow-up treatment for internal intakes that may cause delayed health effects is given. PMID:14527016

  13. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  14. Medical management of chronic stable angina

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Yong; Burns, Kylie; Bett, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stable angina pectoris is characterised by typical exertional chest pain that is relieved by rest or nitrates. Risk stratification of patients is important to define prognosis, to guide medical management and to select patients suitable for revascularisation. Medical treatment aims to relieve angina and prevent cardiovascular events. Beta blockers and calcium channel antagonists are first-line options for treatment. Short-acting nitrates can be used for symptom relief. Low-dose aspirin and statins are prescribed to prevent cardiovascular events. PMID:26648642

  15. The Charcot foot: medical and surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Ulbrecht, Jan S; Wukich, Dane K

    2008-12-01

    Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN) is among the most devastating complications of neuropathy and now most commonly occurs in the feet of diabetic patients. Because it is relatively rare and because most patients and practitioners do not expect major bone pathology in the absence of significant pain, CN is often misdiagnosed as cellulitis, deep venous thrombosis, or gout. Also, radiographs early in the process are often relatively unremarkable. Although MRI findings are characteristic, treatment should not wait for the MRI result. The hot swollen erythematous neuropathic foot suspected to be CN should be emergently mechanically protected, usually in an irremovable total contact cast. Mechanical protection is the mainstay of conservative therapy, but surgical reconstruction of a deformed foot can usually also be successful. Unless diagnosed very early, significant decrements in quality of life result. Controlled studies are urgently needed to identify best practices. PMID:18990300

  16. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  17. Bespoke microbiome therapy to manage plant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Murali; Gupta, Alka; Thomas, George V.

    2013-01-01

    Information gathered with advanced nucleotide sequencing technologies, small molecule detection systems and computational biology is revealing that a community of microbes and their genes, now termed “the microbiome,” located in gut and rhizosphere, is responsible for maintaining the health of human beings and plants, respectively. Within the complete microbiome a “core-microbiome” exists that plays the pivotal role in well being of humans and plants. Recent studies in medicine have shown that an artificial mixture of bacteria representing the core gut microbiome of healthy person when transferred into gut of diseased person results in re-establishment of normal microflora in the latter leading to alleviation from diseased condition. In agriculture, though not exactly in similar manner as in medicine, success in plant disease management has been achieved through transfer of microbiome by mixing disease suppressive soils with disease conducive soils. A study more similar to artificial gut microbiome transfer in medical field has been recently reported in agriculture, in which transfer of microbiome via soil solutions (filtered and unfiltered) has shown ability to alleviate drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the exact practice of transferring artificially cultivated core-microbiome as in medicine has not thus far been attempted in plant disease management. Nonetheless, as the gut and rhizosphere microbiome are known to share many common traits, there exists a good scope for accomplishing similar studies in agriculture. Based upon the information drawn from all recent works in microbiome studies of gut and rhizosphere, we propose that tailor-made core-microbiome transfer therapy can be a success in agriculture too and it could become a viable strategy for management of plant diseases in future. PMID:24348466

  18. In-Flight Personalized Medication Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peletskaya, E.; Griko, Y. V.

    2016-01-01

    , technologies capable of predicting and managing medication side effects, interactions, and toxicity of drugs during spaceflight are needed. We propose to develop and customize for NASAs applications available on the market Personalized Prescribing System (PPS) that would provide a comprehensive, non-invasive solution for safer, targeted medication management for every crew member resulting in safer and more effective treatment and, consequently, better performance. PPS will function as both decision support and record-keeping tool for flight surgeons and astronauts in applying the recommended medications for situations arising in flight. The information on individual drug sensitivity will translate into personalized risk assessment for adverse drug reactions and treatment failures for each drug from the medication kit as well as predefined outcome of any combination of them. Dosage recommendations will also be made individually. The mobile app will facilitate ease of use by crew and medical professionals during training and flight missions.

  19. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning: Emergency management and hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Severance, H.W.; Kolb, J.C.; Carlton, F.B.; Jorden, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    An ice storm in February 1989 resulted in numerous incidences of carbon monoxide poisoning in central Mississippi secondary to exposure to open fires in unventilated living spaces. Sixteen cases were treated during this period at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and 6 received Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy. These 6 cases and the mechanisms of CO poisoning are discussed and recommendations for emergency management are reviewed.10 references.

  20. Dyslexia and Learning Disabilities: Medical Diagnosis with Educational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, S. Thomas; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Ways of diagnosing dyslexia are discussed along with the developmental symptoms, which include balancing and hearing deficiencies, reversal of letters or words and unusual posture. Medical treatment with antihistamines and other drugs is described. Approximately 75 percent of individuals are shown to respond favorably to therapy. (CM)

  1. Thymoma: current medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Kenneth A; Wright, Cameron D; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2004-03-01

    Thymoma is a rare neoplasm usually with an indolent growth pattern; however, local invasion and/or dissemination may occur. Surgery has been the standard of care for early stage disease with good to excellent cure rates anticipated. This neoplasm has been found to be relatively sensitive to cisplatinum-based chemotherapy as compared with most other epithelial tumors. Aggressive multimodality therapy therefore can result in long-term disease-free survival for patients presenting with locally advanced or even disseminated disease. This chapter outlines the current medical and surgical treatment options for thymoma. PMID:15229793

  2. Medical therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Tomas; Zayas, Nayeli; de Mendieta, Maitane Alonso; Plascencia, Karen; Escobar, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary Arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance due to severe remodeling of the small pulmonary arteries. In PAH, the endothelial cells fail to maintain their homeostatic balance, with the consequent impaired production of vasodilators and over-expression of vasoconstrictors and proliferators. Current treatment of PAH is based on the discovery of three main pathways of endothelial dysfunction (prostacyclin, nitric oxide and endothelin-1), and includes drugs such as prostacyclin analogs, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs). Recently approved drugs that act through these classic pathways include riociguat (cyclic GMP stimulator) and macitentan (a tissue specific dual ERA). However, several new drugs and new pathways are under study. New targeted therapies include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Rho kinase inhibitors and serotonin receptor blockers. There are now ten drugs approved for the treatment of PAH that, alone or in combination, have changed the natural history of this disease. The new drugs will allow us to further modified the patients' life expectancy and move towards a cure. PMID:26791159

  3. Laser therapy and photosensitive medication: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Ryan L; Lister, Tom; Cole, Richard

    2014-07-01

    In the 2009 guidelines from the BMLA, the use of non-essential aesthetic lasers was contraindicated in patients receiving medication that causes whole-body photosensitisation as well as those causing local light sensitisation. Following this and anecdotal advice, many laser centres refuse to treat patients who are on known photosensitive medication. Therefore, specific patient cohorts that would benefit from laser therapy are being denied because of medications, such as long-term antibiotics for chronic facial acne. This article reviews the published literature on lasers and photosensitive medications, the mechanisms of photosensitivity and the role of laser in its production. The aim is to analyse the available evidence regarding adverse reactions to laser treatment related to photosensitive medication. A PubMed review of published article titles and abstracts was performed using the search term Laser with each of the following terms individually: photosensitive, photosensitiser, photosensitizer, phototoxicity, photoallergy, complications, case-report, tetracycline, minocycline, amiodarone, nitrofurantoin and medication. Four publications were identified, none of which reported any complication in the use of laser in patients taking photosensitising medication. As there are no published accounts of adverse effects of laser in patients with photosensitive medication, we performed a review of the mechanism of photosensitivity by compiling a list of photosensitive medication and the peak wavelength of radiation required to activate the drug. We recommend a national database of drugs and the wavelengths causing photosensitive reactions of each which a laser department can access prior to treatment. PMID:24590242

  4. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema

    Tijana Rajh

    2010-01-08

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology ? an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  5. Treatment of Chronic Constipation: Prescription Medications and Surgical Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Everhart, Kelly; Lacy, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a highly prevalent disorder that affects people regardless of age, race, gender, or socioeconomic status. For many patients, constipation is a chronic condition that reduces quality of life. Chronic constipation also imposes a significant economic burden on the health care system. The treatment of constipation remains problematic for both patients and providers for a variety of reasons, including a lack of specificity of symptoms, an inconsistent relationship between underlying pathophysiology and symptom generation, and different and unpredictable patient responses to medications. A large number of over-the-counter agents are used to treat symptoms of constipation, although many of these agents are not effective, and data to support their use are limited and generally of poor quality. Patients referred for consultation typically have failed therapy with over-the-counter agents and require prescription medications or possibly even surgical therapy. This article discusses medical treatments and surgical options for chronic idiopathic constipation. PMID:27099579

  6. Treatment of Chronic Constipation: Prescription Medications and Surgical Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zilla H; Everhart, Kelly; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-02-01

    Constipation is a highly prevalent disorder that affects people regardless of age, race, gender, or socioeconomic status. For many patients, constipation is a chronic condition that reduces quality of life. Chronic constipation also imposes a significant economic burden on the health care system. The treatment of constipation remains problematic for both patients and providers for a variety of reasons, including a lack of specificity of symptoms, an inconsistent relationship between underlying pathophysiology and symptom generation, and different and unpredictable patient responses to medications. A large number of over-the-counter agents are used to treat symptoms of constipation, although many of these agents are not effective, and data to support their use are limited and generally of poor quality. Patients referred for consultation typically have failed therapy with over-the-counter agents and require prescription medications or possibly even surgical therapy. This article discusses medical treatments and surgical options for chronic idiopathic constipation. PMID:27099579

  7. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future. PMID:25547538

  8. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  9. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  10. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  11. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3)...

  12. Improvement in medication adherence and self-management of diabetes with a clinical pharmacy program: a randomized controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cani, Catarina Gomes; da Silva Girão Lopes, Laura; Queiroz, Márcia; Nery, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a clinical pharmacy program on health outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital in Brazil. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was performed in 70 adults, aged 45 years or older, with type 2 diabetes who were taking insulin and who had an HbA1c level ≥8%. Patients in the control group (CG) (n = 36) received standard care, patients in the intervention group (IG) (n = 34) received an individualized pharmacotherapeutic care plan and diabetes education. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes included diabetes and medication knowledge, adherence to medication, insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques and diabetes-related quality of life. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline and 6 months using questionnaires. RESULTS: Diabetes knowledge, medication knowledge, adherence to medication and correct insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques significantly improved in the intervention group but remained unchanged in the control group. At the end of the study, mean HbA1c values in the control group remained unchanged but were significantly reduced in the intervention group. Diabetes-related quality of life significantly improved in the intervention group but worsened significantly in the control group. CONCLUSION: The program improved health outcomes and resulted in better glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy. PMID:25789518

  13. Monitoring of girls undergoing medical therapy for isosexual precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, M M; Hernanz-Schulman, M; Genieser, N B; Sklar, C A; Fefferman, N R; David, R

    1994-07-01

    We evaluated the use of sonography in monitoring the efficacy of suppressive therapy with a gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in girls being treated for isosexual precocious puberty. Ten girls 5 to 9 years of age underwent serial sonography and hormonal stimulation tests on the same day. Sonographic trends of decreasing ovarian volume and uterine length indicated early suppression even when absolute values were above threshold. Changes in ovarian volume were the most sensitive predictor of pituitary-gonadal suppression. Sonography is a sensitive and accurate method of monitoring medical therapy; ovarian volume and analysis of interval change are the most sensitive barometers of change. PMID:7933011

  14. Nonadherence to Medication Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Saurav; Castelino, Ronald L.; Lioufas, Nicole M.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2015-01-01

    Background End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are often prescribed multiple medications. Together with a demanding weekly schedule of dialysis sessions, increased number of medicines and associated regimen complexity pre-dispose them at high risk of medication nonadherence. This review summarizes existing literature on nonadherence and identifies factors associated with nonadherence to medication therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews covering the period from 1970 through November 2014 was performed following a predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reference lists from relevant materials were reviewed. Data on study characteristics, measures of nonadherence, prevalence rates and factors associated with nonadherence were collected. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was followed in conducting this systematic review. Results Of 920 relevant publications, 44 were included. The prevalence of medication nonadherence varied from 12.5% to 98.6%, with widespread heterogeneity in measures and definitions employed. Most common patient-related factors significantly associated with nonadherence were younger age, non-Caucasian ethnicity, illness interfering family life, being a smoker, and living single and being divorced or widowed. Similarly, disease-related factors include longevity of haemodialysis, recurrent hospitalization, depressive symptoms and having concomitant illness like diabetes and hypertension. Medication-related factors such as daily tablet count, total pill burden, number of phosphate binders prescribed and complexity of medication regimen were also associated with poor adherence. Conclusions A number of patient-, disease-, and medication-related factors are associated with medication nonadherence in haemodialysis patients. Clinicians should be aware of such factors so that

  15. Medical therapy of maxillary sinus inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Ki Hwan; Kim, June Sun; Song, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) in the maxillary sinus is a diagnostic challenge. As IMT has various names, it has various findings in magnetic resonance image. Although destructive pattern in computed tomography and hypermetabolism in PET CT suggest malignancy, it is debatable whether it is a tumor or inflammatory lesion. Treatment of IMT usually includes surgery. However, IMT can be dealt with medical treatment according to histologic type and localization. We report a rare case of IMT in the maxillary sinus which is controlled by medical therapy. PMID:27038822

  16. Robotic automation of medication-use management.

    PubMed

    Enright, S M

    1993-11-01

    In the October 1993 issue of Physician Assistant, we published "Robots for Health Care," the first of two articles on the medical applications of robotics. That article discussed ways in which robots could help patients with manipulative disabilities to perform activities of daily living and hold paid employment; transfer patients from bed to chair and back again; add precision to the most exacting surgical procedures; and someday carry out diagnostic and therapeutic techniques from within the human body. This month, we are pleased to offer an article by Sharon Enright, an authority on pharmacy operations, who considers how an automated medication-management system that makes use of bar-code technology is capable of streamlining drug dispensing, controlling safety, increasing cost-effectiveness, and ensuring accurate and complete record-keeping. PMID:10130909

  17. The medical and surgical therapy of pseudofolliculitis barbae.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman-Shah, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) is a common, chronic, inflammatory skin disorder seen mainly in individuals with curly hair. This condition is seen most frequently in black men who shave their beards but may also be seen in women of all races who wax or shave the axillary and pubic skin. The etiology of PFB is multifactorial, and heretofore a cure has been considered impossible for those desiring a clean-shaven face. The following article serves to discuss the current medical and surgical therapies available for this condition. Medical treatments for this condition include various combinations of topical antibiotics, corticosteroids, and retinoids. In the surgical arena, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of PFB and has enabled cure for the first time for those plagued by this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable. PMID:15113283

  18. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Immunoprophylaxis by Antiradiation Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: Traditionally, the treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) includes supportive therapy, cytokine therapy, blood component transfusions and even stem cell transplantation. Recommendations for ARS treatment are based on clinical symptoms, laboratory results, radiation exposure doses and information received from medical examinations. However, the current medical management of ARS does not include immune prophylaxis based on antiradiation vaccines or immune therapy with hyperimmune antiradiation serum. Immuneprophylaxis of ARS could result from stimulating the immune system via immunization with small doses of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) that possess significant immuno-stimulatory properties. Methods: Principles of immuno-toxicology were used to derive this method of immune prophylaxis. An antiradiation vaccine containing a mixture of Hematotoxic, Neurotoxic and Non-bacterial (GI) radiation toxins, underwent modification into a toxoid forms of the original SRD radiation toxins. The vaccine was administered to animals at different times prior to irradiation. The animals were subjected to lethal doses of radiation that induced different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. Survival rates and clinical symptoms were observed in both control and vaccine-treated animals. Results: Vaccination with non-toxic doses of Radiation toxoids induced immunity from the elaborated Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) toxins. Neutralization of radiation toxins by specific antiradiation antibodies resulted in significantly improved clinical symptoms in the severe forms of ARS and observed survival rates of 60-80% in animals subjected to lethal doses of radiation expected to induce different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. The most effective vaccination schedule for the antiradiation vaccine consisted of repeated injections 24 and 34 days before irradiation. The vaccine remained effective for the next two years, although the specific immune memory probably

  19. Etiology and medical management of NEC.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Paria, Anshuman

    2016-06-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a serious infection of the bowel that predominantly affects preterm infants and is a leading cause for mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. It involves a spectrum of pathology including widespread inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, invasion of the immature gut by enteric gas forming bacteria, dissection of the gut wall and portal veins by this gas, often culminating in ischemic necrosis of the intestine. This article provides an overview of the incidence, etio-pathological risk factors, preventive strategies and medical management of NEC. PMID:27080373

  20. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements. PMID:24286654

  1. [Management of osteoarthritis: oral therapies].

    PubMed

    Richette, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    According to the European League of Associations of Rheumatology (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), acetaminophen should be used as a first-line therapy in patients with osteoarthritis, because of its safety and effectiveness. NSAID should be considered in patients unresponsive to acetaminophen, and should be prescribed at the lowest effective dose and for the shortest duration. The use of stronger analgesics, such as weak opioids and narcotic analgesics, is only indicated when other drugs, such as NSAID, have been ineffective or are contraindicated. Symptomatic slow acting drugs (avocado soybean unsaponifiable, chondroitin sulphate, diacerein, glucosamine sulphate) have mild symptomatic effects and may reduce the consumption of NSAID. PMID:22730795

  2. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy. PMID:26142033

  3. Management of Newer Medications for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder In Commercial Health Plans

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Horgan, Constance M.; Quinn, Amity E.; Merrick, Elizabeth; Stewart, Maureen T.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In the US, many individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) pay for their medications using private health insurance coverage. As in other drug classes, private insurers are actively seeking to influence utilization and costs, particularly for newer and costlier medications. The approaches that insurers use may have important effects on patients’ access to medications. This paper examines approaches (e.g., copayments, prior authorization, and step therapy) that commercial health plans are employing to manage newer medications used to treat ADHD and changes in approaches since 2003. Methods Data are from a nationally representative survey of commercial health plans in 60 market areas regarding alcohol, drug abuse and mental health services in 2010. Responses were obtained from 389 plans (89% response rate), reporting on 925 insurance products. For each of six branded ADHD medications, respondents were asked whether the plan covered the medication and if so, on what copayment tier each medication was placed, and whether it was subject to prior authorization or step therapy. Measures of management approach were constructed for each medication and for the group of medications. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to test for association of the management approach with various health plan characteristics. Findings There was considerable variation across these 6 medications in how tightly they were managed by health plans, with newer medications being subject to more stringent management. The proportion of insurance products relying solely on copay tiering to manage novel ADHD medications appears to have decreased since 2003. Less than half of insurance products (43%) managed these 6 medications solely by use of Tier 3/4 placement, and most of the remainder (48%) used other restrictions (with or without Tier 3/4 placement). The average insurance product restricted access to at least 3 of the 6 brand-only medications examined

  4. Medical and surgical therapies for alopecias in black women.

    PubMed

    Callender, Valerie D; McMichael, Amy J; Cohen, George F

    2004-01-01

    Hair loss is a common problem that challenges the patient and clinician with a host of cosmetic, psychological and medical issues. Alopecia occurs in both men and women, and in all racial and ethnic populations, but the etiology varies considerably from group to group. In black women, many forms of alopecia are associated with hair-care practices (e.g., traction alopecia, trichorrhexis nodosa, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia). The use of thermal or chemical hair straightening, and hair braiding or weaving are examples of styling techniques that place African American women at high risk for various "traumatic" alopecias. Although the exact cause of these alopecias is unknown, a multifactorial etiology including both genetic and environmental factors is suspected. A careful history and physical examination, together with an acute sensitivity to the patient's perceptions (e.g., self-esteem and social problems), are critical in determining the best therapy course. Therapeutic options for these patients range from alteration of current hair grooming practices or products, to use of specific medical treatments, to hair replacement surgery. Since early intervention is often a key to preventing irreversible alopecia, the purpose of the present article is to educate the dermatologist on all aspects of therapy for hair loss in black women--including not only a discussion of the main medical and surgical therapies but also an overview of ethnic hair cosmetics, specific suggestions for alterations of hair-care practices, and recommendations for patient education and compliance. PMID:15113284

  5. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  6. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB. PMID:26175768

  7. The role of medical physics in prostate cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Claudio; Seuntjens, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Medical physics, both as a scientific discipline and clinical service, hugely contributed and still contributes to the advances in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The traditional translational role in developing and safely implementing new technology and methods for better optimizing, delivering and monitoring the treatment is rapidly expanding to include new fields such as quantitative morphological and functional imaging and the possibility of individually predicting outcome and toxicity. The pivotal position of medical physicists in treatment personalization probably represents the main challenge of current and next years and needs a gradual change of vision and training, without losing the traditional and fundamental role of physicists to guarantee a high quality of the treatment. The current focus issue is intended to cover traditional and new fields of investigation in prostate cancer radiation therapy with the aim to provide up-to-date reference material to medical physicists daily working to cure prostate cancer patients. The papers presented in this focus issue touch upon present and upcoming challenges that need to be met in order to further advance prostate cancer radiation therapy. We suggest that there is a smart future for medical physicists willing to perform research and innovate, while they continue to provide high-quality clinical service. However, physicists are increasingly expected to actively integrate their implicitly translational, flexible and high-level skills within multi-disciplinary teams including many clinical figures (first of all radiation oncologists) as well as scientists from other disciplines. PMID:27095755

  8. New Receptor Targets for Medical Therapy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite setbacks to the approval of new medications for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, interim guidelines on endpoints for IBS trials have enhanced interest as new targets for medical therapy are proposed based on novel mechanisms or chemical entities. Aim To review the approved lubiprostone, two targets that are not meeting expectations (tachykinins and corticotrophin-releasing hormone), the efficacy and safety of new 5-HT4 agonists, intestinal secretagogues (chloride channel activators, and guanylate cyclase-C agonists), bile acid modulation, anti-inflammatory agents and visceral analgesics. Methods Review of selected articles based on PubMed search and clinically relevant information on mechanism of action, safety, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy Conclusions The spectrum of peripheral targets of medical therapy address chiefly the bowel dysfunction of IBS, and these effects are associated with pain relief. There are less clear targets related to the abdominal pain or visceral sensation in IBS. The new 5-HT4 agonists are more specific than older agents, and show cardiovascular safety to date. Secretory agents have high specificity, low bioavailability, and efficacy. The potential risks of agents “borrowed” from other indications (like hyperlipidemia, inflammatory bowel disease or somatic pain) deserve further study. There is reason for optimism in medical treatment of IBS. PMID:19785622

  9. Primary care physician versus urologist: how does their medical management of LUTS associated with BPH differ?

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin M

    2009-07-01

    Medical and surgical therapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are based largely on the results from adherence to the 2003 American Urological Association Guidelines. However, with the emergenceof medical therapies as first-line treatment and the expansion of medical therapy for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) into the primary care office, the evaluation and management of men presenting with urinary symptoms can vary depending on provider type. This review explains the basis for BPH medical management in primary care with the review of three key studies. In addition, this review utilizes the data provided by the first longitudinal, observational BPH registry to evaluate patient outcomes and practice patterns in both urologist and primary care offices. From these data, we can conclude that men seeing urologists were more likely to be on medical therapy than men seeing primary care physicians (PCPs), who more often utilized watchful waiting. Urologists also were more likely to prescribe 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), combination therapy with an alpha-blocker and 5ARI, and anticholinergic therapy. In contrast, the use of nonselective alpha-blockerswas appreciably greater among men seeing PCPs than men seeing urologists. PMID:19570485

  10. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Neena S; Naik, Aanand D; Street, Richard L; Castillo, Diana L; Deswal, Anita; Richardson, Peter A; Hartman, Christine M; Shelton, George; Fraenkel, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT]) to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA). As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence. Patients and methods An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk–benefit trade-offs, revealing patients’ preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents regarding their perception of the ACA and the preference elicitation experience. Results Participants prioritized 5-year cardiovascular benefit over preventing adverse events. Medication side effects, medication-associated activity restrictions, and regimen complexity were less important than bleeding risk and cardioprotective benefit. One year after the ACA survey, a 15% increase in adherence was observed in patients prescribed a preference-concordant CAT strategy. An increase of only 6% was noted in patients prescribed a preference-discordant strategy. Qualitative interviews showed that the ACA exercise contributed to increase inpatient activation, patient awareness of preferences, and patient engagement with clinicians about treatment decisions. Conclusion By working through trade-offs, patients actively clarified their

  11. Medical Management of Osteoporosis for Elective Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Dalkin, Alan C

    2016-05-01

    Over 50 million Americans have low bone mass. Poor bone quality is known to complicate spinal fusion surgery, which relies on strong bony purchase to be effective. Unfortunately, many spine surgeons do not perform routine workups for either osteoporosis or osteomalacia. Effective screening and risk factor assessment can allow for appropriate medical management of osteoporosis in the perioperative setting, improving outcomes. Medical management can be grouped into several different categories: vitamins and minerals, bisphosphonates, recombinant parathyroid hormone, estrogen replacement or modification, inhibitors of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL), and calcitonin. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are the least expensive to prescribe, with minimal side effects and promising animal studies, and thus should be provided to most osteoporotic patients. Recombinant parathyroid hormone can also be considered, as clinical studies have demonstrated impressive results in spine fusion patients. Bisphosphonates, estrogen therapy or selective estrogen receptor modulators, and calcitonin should all be avoided in this patient population given unproven benefit and potentially harmful side-effect profiles. Denosumab is potentially an option, but may not be first line given the general lack of supporting data for its use in perioperative management of spine surgery patients. PMID:27100945

  12. Current status of pharmacologic therapies in patient blood management.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-01-01

    Patient blood management(1,2) incorporates patient-centered, evidence-based medical and surgical approaches to improve patient outcomes by relying on the patient's own (autologous) blood rather than allogeneic blood. Particular attention is paid to preemptive measures such as anemia management. The emphasis on the approaches being "patient-centered" is to distinguish them from previous approaches in transfusion medicine, which have been "product-centered" and focused on blood risks, costs, and inventory concerns rather than on patient outcomes. Patient blood management(3) structures its goals by avoiding blood transfusion(4) with effective use of alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion.(5) These alternatives include autologous blood procurement, preoperative autologous blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, and intra/postoperative red blood cell (RBC) salvage and reinfusion. Reviewed here are the available pharmacologic tools for anemia and blood management: erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), iron therapy, hemostatic agents, and potentially, artificial oxygen carriers. PMID:23223098

  13. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  14. Combination pharmacological therapies for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth A; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2012-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent condition of older men caused by unregulated growth of the prostate gland. Clinical trials of medical therapy for BPH have consistently demonstrated that combined therapy with an α(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist and a 5α-reductase inhibitor is superior to either agent alone. The addition of anticholinergic therapy to a treatment regimen could effectively improve symptoms in men with persistent storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) who have not seen a benefit with an α(1)-AR antagonist or 5α-reductase inhibitor. Among α(1)-AR antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, tamsulosin, and alfuzosin, although with slight differences in adverse event profiles, are equivalent in effectiveness and efficacy. No data in the form of direct comparator trials exist to suggest a difference in clinical efficacy of finasteride and dutasteride, the two 5α-reductase inhibitors currently available. Current American Urological Association guidelines do not recommend phytotherapy or dietary supplements in any combination for the medical management of BPH. The current literature supports the safety and efficacy of the combination of an α(1)-AR antagonist and a 5α-reductase inhibitor in the treatment of symptomatic BPH and, in select patients, the use of an α(1)-AR antagonist and anticholinergic medication in the treatment of LUTS suggestive of BPH. PMID:22428659

  15. Predicting relapse following medical therapy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Wilson, R.; Pearson, D.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Jenkins, C.; Caine, S.; Thomson, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 40 patients with Graves' disease (35 female, 5 male; mean age at presentation = 38 yrs) the authors examined the ability of thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake and serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobins (TSI) to identify patients who would relapse after a course of medical therapy. Serum TSI and 20 minute thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake were estimated every 3 months during a 12 month course of carbimazole and tri iodothyronine. TSI levels were estimated by inhibition of receptor binding and expressed as an index (normal value <25). 17 patients (Group 1) remained biochemically euthyroid for at least 1 year after cessation of therapy. 23 (Group II) developed recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid hormone level did not differ between Groups I and II at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake did not differ significantly in the two groups at presentation and overlap of values persisted throughout therapy. 3 patients had undetectable TSI levels at presentation and throughout follow-up. In the remaining 37, TSI levels at presentation were significantly higher in Group II and all 7 patients with initial values >80 relapsed. After 12 months therapy a TSI level of >25 was present in 1 Group I patient and 16 Group II patients who had detectable TSI at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake was a poor predictor of relapse of thyrotoxicosis. A very high TSI level at presentation (>80) was associated with relapse. An abnormal TSI on completion of 12 months medical therapy had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 94% for prediction of relapse of thyrotoxicosis in the subsequent year.

  16. Medical Management of Vulvar Vestibulitis: Results of a Sequential Treatment Plan

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Meredith

    1995-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy of medical management for vulvar vestibulitis and to examine several historical variables and determine their predictive values as to which treatments will be most successful. Methods: Seventy-four patients diagnosed with vulvar vestibulitis were evaluated. Each patient was treated using a sequence of consecutive medical therapies for vulvar vestibulitis. These therapies were topical aqueous 4% lidocaine with intercourse, topical corticosteroid therapy, oral amitriptyline, topical low-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream, intralesional alpha-interferon, and a low-oxalate diet in combination with oral calcium citrate. The patients were followed over 3–30 months and their responses to therapy were assessed. In addition, a statistical analysis was performed to determine the positive predictive values of certain historical variables and specific treatment successes. Results: Forty-nine patients reported positive responses to one of the initiated therapies. More specifically, 18.1% of the patients who used lidocaine, 33.8% who used topical corticosteroids, 57.1% who used amitriptyline, 16.7% who used 5-FU, none who received interferon, and 50% who tried a low-oxalate diet had positive responses to therapy. No historical variables were predictive of which therapies would have the most successful outcome. Conclusions: Medical management is effective in alleviating the symptoms of vulvar vestibulitis. Various aspects of a patient's history are not helpful in selecting the therapy that will be most effective. PMID:18472890

  17. Recent trends: Medical management of infectious keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Sneha; Rathi, Manisha; Khanduja, Sumeet; Dhull, C.S.; Sachdeva, Sumit; Phogat, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    This review article highlights the newer diagnostic modalities and approaches in the medical management of infectious keratitis. A Medline literature search conducted to March 2014 has been included. Recent studies or publications were selected from international indexed journals using suitable key words. Development of specular microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has a promising role as diagnostic modalities in infectious keratitis, especially in refractory cases. Previously fortified antibiotics have been the mainstay of treatment for bacterial keratitis. Recently, the advent of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones monotherapy has shown promising results in the management of bacterial keratitis. Corneal collagen cross-linking is being considered in the refractory cases. Topical natamycin and amphotericin B should be considered as the first choice anti-fungal agents in suspected filamentous or yeast infection respectively. Voriconazole and newer routes of administration such as intrastromal and intracameral injection of conventional anti-fungal agents have demonstrated a positive clinical response. Ganciclovir is a newer anti-viral agent with promising results in herpes simplex keratitis. Thus, introduction of newer diagnostic modalities and collagen cross-linking along with fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and newer azoles have a promising role in the management of infectious keratitis. PMID:26622133

  18. Current medical management of duodenal ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Badley, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Each of three agents used in the treatment of duodenal ulcer--magnesium--aluminum antacids in high doses, cimetidine and carbenoxolone sodium--appears to enhance the rate at which ulcers heal, although their ability to control symptoms has been less clearly demonstrated. Since a large proportion of ulcers heal either without treatment or when the patient is given a placebo, a rational management plan should emphasize the removal of known irritants and the provision of symptomatic relief while spontaneous healing is allowed to occur. Lack of response to such a regimen warrants more specific investigation and therapy. On the basis of current evidence, cimetidine appears to be the preferred therapeutic agent. PMID:603851

  19. [Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute medical care: myths versus reality].

    PubMed

    von Düring, Stephan; Bruchez, Stéphanie; Suppan, Laurent; Niquille, Marc

    2015-08-12

    Oxygen adiministration for both medical and traumatic emergencies is regarded as an essential component of resuscitation. However, many recent studies suggest that the use of oxygen should be more restrictive. Detrimental effects of normobaric oxygen therapy in patients suffering from hypercapnic respiratory diseases have been demonstrated, especially because of the suppression of the hypoxic drive. Apart from this particular situation, correction of hypoxemia is still a widely accepted treatment target, although there is growing evidence that hyperoxemia could be harmful in acute coronary syndromes and cardio-respiratory arrests. In other pathologies, such as stroke or hemorragic shock, the situation is still unclear, and further studies are needed to clarify the situation. Generally speaking, oxygen therapy should from now on be goal-directed, and early monitoring of both pulse oximetry and arterial blood gases is advised. PMID:26449100

  20. The limits of oral therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian-Qian; Jing, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease in which remodeling of the small pulmonary arteries leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and right-sided heart failure. Over the past decade, new treatments for PAH, such as the use of ERAs, PDE-5 inhibitors and prostacyclin analogs, have brought about dramatic improvements in clinical outcomes. Epoprostenol infusion therapy has been shown to improve hemodynamics, functional status, and survival, and it remains the gold standard for treatment of patients with severe PAH. Many agents, approved for PAH are always delivered in pill form. Although oral therapy occupies an important position, it has some drawbacks and limitations in PAH management. For patients in World Health Organization functional class IV and with severe right heart failure, there are few data on the long-term survival of patients treated with oral medications. Further research, exploration, and clinical experience with oral therapy in severe PAH and combination therapy will redefine its position in PAH management. PMID:26648729

  1. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  2. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  3. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an... therapy; or (b)(1) A production or utilization facility the construction or operation of which...

  4. Neutron beam studies for a medical therapy reactor.

    PubMed

    Neuman, W A

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Medical Therapy Reactor (MTR) for neutron capture therapy (NCT) has been performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The initial emphasis of the conceptual design was toward the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and other presently incurable cancers. The design goal of the facility is to provide routine patient treatments both in brief time intervals (approximately 10 minutes) and inexpensively. The conceptual study has shown this goal to be achievable by locating an MTR at a major medical facility. This paper addresses the next step in the conceptual design process: a guide to the optimization of the epithermal-neutron filter and collimator assembly for the treatment of brain tumors. The current scope includes the sensitivity of the treatment beam to variations in filter length, gamma shield length, and collimator lengths as well as exit beam aperture size. The study shows the areas which can provide the greatest latitude in improving beam intensity and quality. Suggestions are given for future areas of optimization of beam filtering and collimation. PMID:2268234

  5. Determinants of Medication Adherence to Topical Glaucoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dreer, Laura E.; Girkin, Christopher; Mansberger, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose To determine the associations between medical, demographic, socioeconomic, and ocular factors and adherence to topical glaucoma ocular hypotensive therapy. Methods One-hundred and sixteen patients with ocular hypertension or open angle glaucoma from two tertiary glaucoma services participated in this prospective study. Adherence to ocular hypotensive therapy was measured using an electronic dose monitor (Travatan Dosing Aid, Alcon Laboratories Inc., Fort Worth, TX) and collected data at 3-months after enrollment. We used 3 different definitions of adherence: 1) Definition 1: the proportion of days taking the prescribed number of drops within 3 hours of the prescribed dosing time; 2) Definition 2: the proportion of days taking any drops within 3 hours of the prescribed dosing time; and 3) Definition 3: the proportion of days taking any drops within 6 hours of the prescribed dosing time. Univariate and multivariate models were used to determine the association between the three adherence definitions, medical, demographic, socioeconomic, and ocular factors at 3-month follow-up. The main outcome measures for this study were risk factors for poor objective medication adherence. Results Adherence, using Definition 1, Definition 2, and Definition 3, was 64%, 75%, and 80%, respectively. Age, total number of other eye diseases, and race were significantly associated with full treatment adherence (Definition 1), with race alone significantly predicting 11% of full treatment adherence. For Definition 2, age, income, level of education, and total number of eye diseases were significantly associated with partial adherence (3 hours), again race alone significantly predicted 15% of partial adherence (any drops within 3 hours). For Definition 3, race, income, level of education, and total number of other eye diseases significantly predicted partial adherence (any drops within 6 hours), both race and income predicted 19% of partial treatment adherence

  6. Suggested Minimum Data Set for Speech Therapy Centers Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Damanabi, Shahla; Abdolnejad, Shawbo; Karimi, Gelavizh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The minimum data considered as a conceptual framework, based on the achievement of effectiveness indicators and it ensures to access of precise and clear health data. The aims of the present study were identified and proposed a data element set of speech therapy centers affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This study that was cross – sectional type, performed in 9 speech therapy clinic from medical university in 2014. Firstly, the minimum data elements set evaluated using the check list in these centers. Using the findings from the first step and survey of internal and external documentation forms, designed a questionnaire containing a minimum data speech therapy files and it shared between 36 Speech therapy experts using 5 options of Likert scale. Validity of questionnaire was examined through its validity and reliability of content by retest. For data analysis, data processing was performed using descriptive statistics by SPSS21 software. Results: The minimum data set for speech therapy were divided into two categories: clinical and administrative data. The Name and surname, date of birth, gender, address, telephone number, date of admission and the number of treatments, the patient’s complaint, the time of occurrence of injury or disorder, reason and age of disease considered as the most important elements for management data and health history. For the most important elements of clinical information were selected Short-term and long-term aims and development of speech history. Conclusion: The design and implementation of suitable data collection of speech therapy for gathering of data, we recommended planning for the control and prevention of speech disorders to providing high quality and good care of patient in speech therapy centers. PMID:26483600

  7. Traditional Chinese medical comprehensive therapy for cancer-related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Li, Tian-Tian; Chu, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ke; Tian, Shao-Dan; Chen, Xin-Yi; Yang, Guo-Wang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common and one of the most severe symptom in the period of onset, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation process of cancer. But there are no confirmed measures to relieve this problem at present. Traditional Chinese medical comprehensive therapy has its advantages in dealing with this condition. Based on the research status of CRF, the following problems have been analyzed and solved: the term of CRF has been defined and recommended, and the definition has been made clear; the disease mechanism is proposed, i.e. healthy qi has been impaired in the long-term disease duration, in the process of surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and biology disturbing; it is clear that the clinical manifestations are related to six Chinese medicine patterns: decreased functioning of the Pi (Spleen) and Wei (Stomach), deficiency of the Pi with dampness retention, deficiency of the Xin (Heart) and Pi, disharmony between the Gan (Liver) and Pi, deficiency of the Pi and Shen (Kidney), and deficiency of the Fei (Lung) and Shen. Based on its severity, the mild patients are advised to have non-drug psychological intervention and sleep treatment in cooperation with appropriate exercise; diet therapy are recommended to moderate patients together with sleep treatment and acupuncture, severe patients are recommended to have herbal treatment based on pattern differentiation together with physiological sleep therapy. PMID:26108523

  8. Patients’ Perspective on the Value of Medication Management Appointments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Mario; Cruz, Robyn Flaum; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: There is ongoing concern that psychiatric medication management appointments add little value to care. The present study attempted to address this concern by capturing depressed patients’ views and opinions about the value of psychiatric medication management appointments. Methods: Seventy-eight semi-structured interviews were performed with white and African American depressed patients post medication management appointments. These interviews tapped patients’ views and opinions about the value of attending medication management appointments. Analysis: An iterative thematic analysis was performed. Findings: Patients reported greater appointment value when appointments included obtaining medications, discussing the need for medication changes or dose adjustments, and discussing the impact of medications on their illness. Additionally, greater appointment value was perceived by patients when there were non-medical conversations about life issues, immediate outcomes from the appointment such as motivation to continue in care, and specific qualities of providers that were appealing to patients. Conclusions: Patients’ perceived value of psychiatric medication management appointments is complex. Though important patient outcomes are obtaining medicine and perceiving improvement in their mental health, there are other valued appointment and provider factors. Some of these other valued factors embedded within medication management appointments could have therapeutic properties. These findings have implications for future clinical research and service delivery.

  9. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  10. Medical foods: products for the management of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sarah L; Baggott, Joseph E

    2006-11-01

    Medical foods are a specific category of therapeutic agents created under the Orphan Drug Act of 1988, which separated medical foods from drugs for regulatory purposes. Products in this category share the requirements that they are intended for the nutritional management of a specific disease, are used under the guidance of a physician, and contain ingredients that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). An example of medical foods are formulations intended to manage patients with inborn errors in amino acid metabolism. Newer medical foods are designed to manage hyperhomocysteinemia, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, inflammatory conditions, cancer cachexia, and other diseases. PMID:17131945

  11. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis medications and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Funakubo Asanuma, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects mainly women during their childbearing years. As aging of childbirth advances in Japan, women who plan pregnancy would increase after they developed RA. Recent findings showed that high disease activity of RA might impair fertility. Planning pregnancy is preferable after female patients achive and maintain low disease activity or remission of RA. Women on methotrexate, which is the anchor drug for RA, need to discontinue the medication with a high risk of causing birth defects during conception and pregnancy. Data of RA patients exposed TNF inhibitors during pregnancy has been accumulating in recent years. These data suggest that increased risk of spontaneous abortion and congenital abnomalies has not been observed. Although there is insufficient data about safety of breastfeeding while using TNF inhibitors, the secretion of the drugs in breast milk is very little and fetal toxicity has not been observed. Since long term safety of children exposed TNF inhibitors in uterus has not been established, we should discontinue the drugs as soon as pregnancy is recognized. TNF inhibitors may be an useful tools for management of active RA resistant to conventional DMARDs in women who desire to bear children. PMID:25765688

  12. Managed care and medical education: hard cases and hard choices.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E

    1997-05-01

    As managed care becomes more and more dominant in U.S. health care, it is coming into conflict with medical education. There are historical reasons for this: medical education traditionally excluded physicians who chose to work in health plans, and for profit managed care has tended to avoid subsidizing medical education. In order to improve the climate, three changes are necessary: medical education must understand the tense history of discord between the two; distinctions must be made between responsible and irresponsible managed care plans; and medical educators should not assume they own the moral high ground. Arrogance, a gross oversupply of physicians and especially specialists, scandals and fraud, an often callous attitude toward the poor, and other sins can be laid at medical education's door. The worse threat for both sides is that the public and payers could simply abandon both, leading to underfunding for health professions education, a society that does not trust its health care system, and the loss of superb teaching organizations. To prevent this, managed care and medical education should work together to solve several difficult problems: how to shrink the medical education infrastructure; how to report honestly the uses to which medical education funds are put; and how to identify and end irresponsible behavior on the part of health plans and medical education entities alike. If the two sides can exercise leadership in these areas, they will be able to protect and enhance the singular place of honor that medical education holds in this society. PMID:9159575

  13. [Combination therapy in the medical treatment of glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Hommer, A

    2013-02-01

    A combination of antiglaucoma medications is indicated if monotherapy is not sufficient to achieve the predefined target pressure and/or in case of a progression of glaucomatous damage or conversion from ocular hypertension to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Most recently many fixed combinations with two active compounds have become available for the medical treatment of glaucoma. Compared to non-fixed combinations, these drugs offer a much easier use for the patients. Fixed combinations have to be applied less frequently which may improve adherence. Furthermore, they most likely contain a lower amount of toxic preservatives compared to non-fixed combinations. And finally, fixed combinations may eliminate the risk of a "washout" of the first medication by using the second product of a non-fixed combination too soon after the first drop has been installed. This review aims to examine the most important aspects of IOP-lowering fixed and non-fixed combinations in glaucoma management with a clear focus on the results obtained with fixed combinations. In Germany, fixed combinations with the compositions dorzolamide/timolol (FCDT), brinzolamide/timolol (FCBRINT), latanoprost/timolol (FCLT), travoprost/timolol (FCTT), bimatoprost/timolol (FCBIMT), brimonidine/timolol (FCBT), pilocarpine/timolol (FCPT) and metipranolol/timolol (FCMT) are approved for the medical management of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. The results of clinical studies comparing fixed combinations with their active ingredients and with the corresponding non-fixed combinations will be discussed. Furthermore - if available - the results of direct comparisons of the efficacy and safety of different IOP-lowering fixed combinations are summarised. PMID:23335083

  14. Medication Adherence and the Use of Generic Drug Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Briesacher, Becky A.; Andrade, Susan E.; Fouayzi, Hassan; Chan, K. Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Objective to assess if the lower copayments often charged for generic drugs explains the improved drug adherence associated with use of generic drugs. Methods We analyzed 2001–2004 healthcare claims data from 45 large employers. Study subjects were aged 18 years +, had 1 or more of 5 study conditions (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, hypothyroidism, seizure disorders, and type 2 diabetes), and new use of generic-only or brand-only drug therapy for that condition. We measured adherence as the medication possession ratio (MPR), and adequate adherence as MPR >= 80%. Logistic regressions were conducted to assess adequate adherence adjusting for copayments. Results We identified 327,629 new users of drug therapy for the study conditions. Proportion of individuals starting generic therapies ranged from 9% in hypothyroidism to 45% in hypertension. After 1 year of therapy, 66.2% of individuals with hypothyroidism achieved MPR >= 80% compared to 53.4% with hypertension, 53.2% with hypercholesterolemia, 52.0% with diabetes, and 42.2% with seizure disorders. Logistic regressions of adequate adherence showed generics were associated with higher adherence relative to brands in 2 conditions (hypercholesterolemia AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.44–1.60; diabetes AOR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01–1.12, p<.05), with lower adherence in 2 conditions (hypertension AOR 0.75, 95% CI:.73-.77; hypothyroidism AOR 0.86, 95% CI:.78-.94, p<.05), and no difference in seizure disorders. In comparison, the likelihood of achieving MPR >= 80% with $0 copayments relative to $1-$9 ranged from AOR 1.32 for seizure disorders (95% CI: 1.41–1.43) to AOR 1.45 for hypothyroidism (95% CI: 1.43–1.48). Conclusion Generic prescribing was associated with improved medication adherence in 2 of 5 study conditions, and the effect was modest. Copayments of $0 were associated with improved adherence across all study conditions. PMID:19589012

  15. Design of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, Scott; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with recent transient ischemic attack or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery are at high risk of recurrent stroke on usual medical management, suggesting the need for alternative therapies for this disease. Methods The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial is an ongoing, randomized, multicenter, two-arm trial that will determine whether intracranial angioplasty and stenting adds benefit to aggressive medical management alone for preventing the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after any revascularization procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up, or stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days) during a mean follow-up of 2 years in patients with recent TIA or stroke caused by 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery. Aggressive medical management in both arms consists of aspirin 325 mg per day, clopidogrel 75mg per day for 90 days after enrollment, intensive risk factor management primarily targeting systolic blood pressure < 140 mm Hg (< 130 mm Hg in diabetics) and low density cholesterol < 70 mg / dl, and a lifetsyle modification program. The sample size required todetect a 35% reduction in the rate of the primary endpoint from angioplasty and stenting based on the log-rank test with an alpha of 0.05, 80% power, and adjusting for a 2% loss to follow-up and 5% crossover from the medical to the stenting arm is 382 patients per group. Conclusion This is the first randomized trial to compare intracranial angioplasty and stenting with medical therapy and to incorporate intensive management of multiple risk factors and a lifestyle modification program in the study design. Hopefully, the results of the trial will lead to more effective therapy for this high-risk disease. PMID:21729789

  16. An Evidence-based Approach to the Medical Management of Fibroids: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Chantal B; Cayton, Kamaria C; Chuong, Farah S; Holthouser, Kristine; Mehr, Sara A; Abraham, Tara; Segars, James H

    2016-03-01

    Fibroids are the most common tumor of the female reproductive tract, but approved medical treatments are limited. Patients demand uterine-sparing treatments which preserve fertility and avoid surgery. We systematically reviewed PubMed and Cochrane databases from January 1985 to November 2015 for evidence-based medical therapies for fibroids in the context of disease prevention, treatment of early disease, treatment of symptomatic disease, and preoperative management. We identified 2182 studies, of which 52 studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Published data affirm the efficacy of multiple agents, which are promising avenues for the development of medical alternatives to surgery. PMID:26756261

  17. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  18. Managing Medical System Development Through Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Hanmer, Jean

    1980-01-01

    Health Care administrators managing a computer system development project need tools to control the project. This paper describes the concept of management control, its purpose and techniques for exercising it. Preparation of system documentation provides a vehicle for management control which can guide the behavior of the contractor, the institution's managers and staff. Techniques for managing and reviewing documentation in a management control framework are presented.

  19. [Evidence-based management of medical disposable materials].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai

    2009-03-01

    Evidence-based management of medical disposable materials pays attention to collect evidence comprehensively and systematically, accumulate and create evidence through its own work and also evaluate evidence strictly. This can be used as a function to guide out job. Medical disposable materials evidence system contains product register qualification, product quality certification, supplier's behavior, internal and external communication evidence. Managers can find different ways in creating and using evidence referring to specific inside and outside condition. Evidence-based management can help accelerating the development of management of medical disposable materials from traditional experience pattern to a systematic and scientific pattern. It also has the very important meaning to improve medical quality, control the unreasonable growth of medical expense and make purchase and supply chain be more efficient. PMID:19565800

  20. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved. PMID:25147130

  1. Anonymization of DICOM Electronic Medical Records for Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1 minute per patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved. PMID:25147130

  2. Treating asthma by the guidelines: developing a medication management information system for use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Twiggs, Joan E; Fifield, J; Jackson, E; Cushman, R; Apter, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and assess an automated asthma medication management information system (MMIS) that provides patient-specific evaluative guidance based on 1997 NAEPP clinical consensus guidelines. MMIS was developed and implemented in primary care settings within a pediatric asthma disease management program. MMIS infrastructure featured a centralized database with Internet access. MMIS collects detailed patient asthma medication data, evaluates pharmacotherapy relative to practitioner-reported disease severity, symptom control and model of guideline-recommended severity-appropriate medications and produces a patient-specific "curbside consult" feedback report. A system algorithm translates actual detailed medication data into actual severity-specific medication-class combinations. A table-driven computer program compares actual medication-class combinations to a guideline-based medication-class combinations model. Methodology determines whether the patient was prescribed a "severity-appropriate" amount or an amount "more" or "less" medication than indicated for patient's reported severity. Feedback messages comment on comparison. Missing data, unrecognized amounts of controller medication or unrecognized medication combinations create error cases. Post hoc review analyzed error cases to determine prevalence of non-guideline medicating practices among these practitioners. Proportion of valid and error cases across two clinical visits before and after post hoc clinical review were measured, as well as proportion of severity-appropriate, out-of-severity and non-guideline medications. MMIS produced a valid feedback report for 83% of patient visits. Missing data accounted for 60% of error cases. Practitioners used severity-appropriate medications for 60% of cases. When non-severity-appropriate medications were used they tended to be "too much" rather than "too little" (22%, 5%), suggesting appropriate use of guideline-recommended "step

  3. The role of combination medical therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Greco, K A; McVary, K T

    2008-12-01

    To review key trials of monotherapy and combination therapy of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists (alpha(1)-ARAs), 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5alphaRIs) and anti-muscarinic agents in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). To assess the safety and efficacy of combination therapies for LUTS associated with BPH, a search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases (1976-2008) was conducted for relevant trials and reviews using the terms benign prostatic hyperplasia, lower urinary tract symptoms, alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists, 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, anti-muscarinics, anticholinergics, combination therapy, alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, terazosin, dutasteride, finasteride, tolterodine, flavoxate, propiverine, oxybutynin, erectile dysfunction, sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil. Data from the Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms (MTOPS) study indicated a role for long-term use of alpha(1)-ARAs and 5alphaRIs in combination. In the MTOPS study, combination therapy with the alpha(1)-ARA doxazosin and the 5alphaRI finasteride was significantly more effective than either component alone in reducing symptoms (P=0.006 vs doxazosin monotherapy; P<0.001 vs finasteride monotherapy) and in lowering the rate of clinical progression (P<0.001 vs either monotherapy). These findings were confirmed by the 2-year preliminary results of the Combination of Avodart and Tamsulosin study. In this study, combination therapy of the alpha(1)-ARA tamsulosin and the 5alphaRI dutasteride resulted in a significantly greater decrease in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) when compared with either monotherapy. Several recent trials have studied the efficacy of combining alpha(1)-ARAs and anti-muscarinic agents in the treatment of BPH. These studies have found this combination to result in statistically significant benefits in quality of life scores, patient satisfaction, urinary frequency, storage

  4. Overview of implantable cardioverter defibrillator and cardiac resynchronisation therapy in heart failure management

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pow-Li; Foo, David

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials have established the benefits of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) in the treatment of heart failure patients. As adjuncts to guideline-directed medical therapy, ICDs confer mortality benefits from sudden cardiac arrest, while CRT reduces mortality, hospitalisation rates and improves functional capacity. This review discusses the use of ICDs and CRT devices in heart failure management, outlining the evidence supporting their use, indications and contraindications. PMID:27440409

  5. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction. PMID:27273960

  6. Trends in Medical Management of Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Filson, Christopher P.; Wei, John T.; Hollingsworth, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine trends in medical management of men with BPH/LUTS in relation to sentinel events specific to particular medication regimens. Methods Using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (1993–2010), we identified outpatient visits by men with BPH/LUTS. We ascertained prescriptions for medical therapy and distinguished between treatment with α-blocker (AB) monotherapy, 5-α reductase inhibitor monotherapy, combination therapy, and anticholinergic therapy. We evaluated temporal trends in prescription patterns, and assessed for changes after sentinel events related to each regimen (e.g., FDA approval for tamsulosin and AB monotherapy). Finally, we used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with each treatment strategy. Results From 1993–2010, there were over 101 million outpatient visits for men with a diagnosis of BPH/LUTS. Among these visits, use of BPH medication increased from 14% of visits in 1993–1995 to over 40% of visits in 2008–2010 (p<0.001). After tamsulosin was FDA approved, providers were twice as likely to prescribe ABs (OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.60 – 3.43). Providers were five times as likely to prescribe combination therapy after level 1 evidence supported its use (OR 5.13, 95% CI 3.35 – 7.86). Conclusions Over the past 15 years, there has been a steady increase in use of medications to manage men with BPH. Providers seem to have readily adopted novel medications and treatment regimens in response to FDA approval and supportive level 1 evidence. PMID:24269224

  7. Medical borderlands: engineering the body with plastic surgery and hormonal therapies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Alexander; Sanabria, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores medical borderlands where health and enhancement practices are entangled. It draws on fieldwork carried out in the context of two distinct research projects in Brazil on plastic surgery and sex hormone therapies. These two therapies have significant clinical overlap. Both are made available in private and public healthcare in ways that reveal the class dynamics underlying Brazilian medicine. They also have an important experimental dimension rooted in Brazil's regulatory context and societal expectations placed on medicine as a means for managing women's reproductive and sexual health. Off-label and experimental medical use of these treatments is linked to experimental social use: how women adopt them to respond to the pressures, anxieties and aspirations of work and intimate life. The paper argues that these experimental techniques are becoming morally authorized as routine management of women's health, integrated into mainstream Ob-Gyn healthcare, and subtly blurred with practices of cuidar-se (self-care) seen in Brazil as essential for modern femininity. PMID:25175295

  8. Personnel Administration: Management of Large Medical Libraries *

    PubMed Central

    Kronick, David A.

    1965-01-01

    Machines themselves are not dehumanizing. Employed with proper management in total systems they enable us better to achieve human goals. Large libraries are complex systems involving man-machine relationships which must be studied with the new management techniques of systems analysis and operations research. Management science deals with a wide variety of problems encountered in the economy of the modern library. Librarians must know about these techniques if they are to fulfill their roles as managers of information services and systems. Good management also involves taking cognizance of the human factors in the old meaning of the term. Some parallels may be found between child rearing and personnel management, but the primary one is that managers must pay the same kind of thoughtful attention to their problems. Good management techniques may be learned empirically by trial and error, but they are better acquired systematically through consultation and study. PMID:5897259

  9. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an..., manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, possess, or use. (a) A utilization facility for use in...

  10. Case Study: Successful Medication Withdrawal Using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for a Preadolescent with OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallinen, Bethany J.; Nangle, Douglas W.; O'Grady, April C.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy to a medication regimen of clomipramine and fluoxetine and the withdrawal of medication during cognitive-behavioral therapy. The participant was an 11-year-old girl with symptoms of obsessive thoughts about germs and illness and…

  11. When medication is not enough: nonpharmacologic management of pain.

    PubMed

    Gatlin, Christine G; Schulmeister, Lisa

    2007-10-01

    Patients with cancer commonly experience pain, which typically is controlled pharmacologically. Despite advances in pain management, pain continues to be undertreated. Nonpharmacologic measures may effectively manage pain but often are overlooked or underused. Nurses who are familiar with simple, noninvasive, nonpharmacologic measures, such as patient positioning, thermal measures, massage therapy, aromatherapy, and mind-body therapies, can identify and educate patients who may benefit from nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:17962177

  12. Medical management of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Arai, A. E.; Greenberg, B. H.

    1990-01-01

    The syndrome of congestive heart failure can result from a variety of cardiac disorders of which left ventricular dysfunction is the most common. The clinical presentation is determined by the interaction between cardiac dysfunction and a series of compensatory mechanisms that are activated throughout the body. Therapy for this disorder is best approached through an understanding of this complex relationship and an appreciation for the influence of preload, afterload, and contractility on cardiac performance. Recent important advances in therapy include the use of combined diuretic therapy, a better understanding of the value of the digitalis glycosides, and evidence that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors can relieve symptoms and prolong life. More intensive therapy earlier in the course of congestive heart failure appears to have some clinical benefit. The use of ACE inhibitors during this phase may delay progression of the underlying left ventricular dysfunction. Future therapy will be influenced by the results of ongoing trials that are testing both new agents and expanded indications for drugs that are currently available. PMID:2244376

  13. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for interstitial cystitis: an update from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Megan Danielle; Shah, Nima M.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) has shifted from organ-specific to a multifactorial, multidisciplinary and individualized approach. Patients with refractory and debilitating symptoms may respond to complementary and alternative medical treatments (CAM). Through CAM therapies, practitioners assist the patient to be at the center of their care, empowering them to be emotionally and physically involved. Multi-disciplinary care, including urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, neurology, psychology, physiotherapy and pain medicine, is also identified to be the crux of adequate management of patients with chronic pelvic pain because of its variable etiology. The purpose of this review is to emphasize these changes and discuss management strategies. PMID:26816868

  14. Medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia: Results from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bishr, Mohamed; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Dell’Oglio, Paolo; Schiffmann, Jonas; Jeldres, Claudio; Sun, Maxine; Shariat, Sharokh F.; Graefen, Markus; Saad, Fred; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In men with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), medical treatment usually represents the first line. We examined the patterns of medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the Montreal metropolitan area, within the context of a case control study focusing on incident prostate cancer. Methods: Cases were 1933 men with incident prostate cancer. Population controls included 1994 age-matched men. In-person interviews collected sociodemographic characteristics and medical history, including BPH diagnosis, its duration, and type of medical treatment received. Baseline characteristics were compared by the chi-square likelihood test for categorical variables and by the students t-test for continuously coded variables. Results: Overall, 1120 participants had history of BPH; of those 53.7% received medical treatment for BPH. Individuals with medically treated BPH, compared to individuals with medically untreated BPH, were older at index date [mean: 66.9 vs. 64.9 years, p<0.001)] and at diagnosis of BPH [mean: 62.3 vs. 60.3 years, p<0.001]. They also had a longer duration of BPH-history [mean: 4.7 vs. 4.0 years, p=0.02]. Regarding medical treatment, mono-therapy was more often used than combination therapy [87.6% vs. 12.4%, p<0.001]. Alpha-blockers (69.9%) were most commonly used as monotherapy, followed by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) (26.6%). Alpha-blockers plus 5ARIs were the most common combination therapy (97.3%). Conclusions: Despite evidence from randomized, controlled trials for better efficacy with use of combination therapy, monotherapy consisting of alpha-blockers or 5ARI, in that order, is most frequently used. Additionally, 5ARI use was more common than previously reported (27% vs. 15%). PMID:26977208

  15. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315 Section 880.6315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315...

  16. Medication Management Assessment for Older Adults in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwig, Denise; Brandt, Nicole; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the Medication Management Instrument for Deficiencies in the Elderly (MedMaIDE) and to provide results of reliability and validity testing. Design and Methods: Participants were 50 older adults, aged 65 and older, who lived in the community, took at least one prescription medication, and were then…

  17. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315 Section 880.6315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315...

  18. Application of data mining to medical risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumoto, Shusaku; Matsuoka, Kimiko; Yokoyama, Shigeki

    2008-03-01

    This paper proposes an application of data mining to medical risk management, where data mining techniques were applied to detection, analysis and evaluation of risks potentially existing in clinical environments. We applied this technique to the following two medical domains: risk aversion of nurse incidents and infection control. The results show that data mining methods were effective to detection and aversion of risk factors.

  19. Beta-blocker therapy: identification and management of side effects.

    PubMed

    Dennis, K E; Froman, D; Morrison, A S; Holmes, K D; Howes, D G

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a new beta-Blocker Visual Analog Scale designed to identify and quantify the impact that the side effects of beta-blocker therapy have on people's lives, and the self-management practices people use to mediate their influence. Instruments included the 20-item beta-Blocker Visual Analog Scale and the Profile of Mood States. Subjects had hypertension; 51 men were involved in a larger study involving antihypertensive medications and exercise, and 19 men and women were receiving beta-blocker therapy as first-line drug of choice. Estimates of internal consistency reliability, content validity, and concurrent and discriminant validity were moderately strong. The most problematic side effects were related to lack of sleep, vivid or active dreams, lack of energy and pep, diminished interest in sexual activity, and changes in vision. Among self-management practices used to mediate side effects were planning rest and activity periods, thinking carefully before reacting, and seeking out others for support. PMID:1680114

  20. Medical group management: a marketing orientation.

    PubMed

    Bopp, K D; Allcorn, S

    1986-09-01

    This article considers the pragmatic aspects of conducting a situation/marketing audit for group medical practices. This audit is a key component in the formulation of a competitive strategy and the development of a marketing program. Given are a series of questions that may be used by medical groups to guide assessment of the opportunities and threats present in the environment as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the organization in meeting the environmental challenges. Furthermore, the article provides a framework for thinking about strategy and the variables that should be considered and aligned to achieve effective implementation of strategy. Finally, the parameters are outlined for deciding on a marketing program: the mix of marketing tools (service design, distribution channels, pricing and promotion) that should be employed to offensively and/or defensively position the medical group in the competitive marketplace. PMID:10301113

  1. Self-management of medical abortion: a qualitative evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Megan; Colvin, Christopher J; Swartz, Alison; Leon, Natalie

    2016-05-01

    Medical abortion is a method of pregnancy termination that by its nature enables more active involvement of women in the process of managing, and sometimes even administering the medications for, their abortions. This qualitative evidence synthesis reviewed the global evidence on experiences with, preferences for, and concerns about greater self-management of medical abortion with lesser health professional involvement. We focused on qualitative research from multiple perspectives on women's experiences of self-management of first trimester medical abortion (<12weeks gestation). We included research from both legal and legally-restricted contexts whether medical abortion was accessed through formal or informal systems. A review team of four identified 36 studies meeting inclusion criteria, extracted data from these studies, and synthesized review findings. Review findings were organized under the following themes: general perceptions of self-management, preparation for self-management, logistical considerations, issues of choice and control, and meaning and experience. The synthesis highlights that the qualitative evidence base is still small, but that the available evidence points to the overall acceptability of self-administration of medical abortion. We highlight particular considerations when offering self-management options, and identify key areas for future research. Further qualitative research is needed to strengthen this important evidence base. PMID:27578349

  2. Improving undergraduate medical education about pain assessment and management: A qualitative descriptive study of stakeholders’ perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Ware, Mark A; Posel, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain is one of the most common reasons for individuals to seek medical advice, yet it remains poorly managed. One of the main reasons that poor pain management persists is the lack of adequate knowledge and skills of practicing clinicians, which stems from a perceived lack of pain education during the training of undergraduate medical students. OBJECTIVE: To identify gaps in knowledge with respect to pain management as perceived by students, patients and educators. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were generated through six focus groups with second- and fourth-year medical students, four focus groups with patients and individual semistructured interviews with nine educators. All interviews were audiotaped and an inductive thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 70 individuals participated in the present study. Five main themes were identified: assessment of physical and psychosocial aspects of pain; clinical management of pain with pharmacology and alternative therapies; communication and the development of a good therapeutic relationship; ethical considerations surrounding pain; and institutional context of medical education about pain. CONCLUSION: Participating patients, students and pain experts recognized a need for additional medical education about pain assessment and management. Educational approaches need to teach students to gather appropriate information about pain, to acquire knowledge of a broad spectrum of therapeutic options, to develop a mutual, trusting relationship with patients and to become aware of their own biases and prejudice toward patients with pain. The results of the present study should be used to develop and enhance existing pain curricula content. PMID:23985579

  3. Total Artificial Heart and Physical Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the total artificial heart (TAH) device as a bridge to heart transplantation (BTT), and related physical therapy management, while comparisons to left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are made. Summary: The SynCardia CardioWest Temporary TAH System is the only TAH approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Health Canada and Consultants Europe (CE) for BTT. CardioWest implantation involves cardiectomy thus avoiding pulmonary hypertension, right heart failure, inotropic or anti-arrhythmic agents, myocardial and valve related problems. CardioWest has a fixed beat rate and cardiac output is dependent upon venous return and preload. Both TAH and LVADs are adaptive with exercise, increasing cardiac output during activities, allowing for conditioning to occur peripherally. Left ventricular assist devices have portable drivers permitting discharge home, while the CardioWest's large driver console necessitates inpatient therapy. Exercise progression, positioning, and monitoring of exercise intolerance are similar with LVAD and TAH. Ventricular fill volumes in TAH dictate cardiac output and require close attention. Cardiectomy in TAH prevents electrocardiography, telemetry, and native pulse rate monitoring. Conclusion: While mechanical differences exist between TAH and LVAD, physical therapists can provide evidence-based treatment for patients with TAH using previously established guidelines for patients with heart failure and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:20520759

  4. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asim Ali; Jahangir, Umar; Urooj, Shaista

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6(th) day; 9-11(th) day and 14(th) day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration. PMID:24350053

  5. Pruritus: Management Algorithms and Experimental Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Martin; Cevikbas, Ferda; Ikoma, Akihiko; Berger, Timothy G.

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus (itch) is a major symptom in many dermatologic as well as systemic diseases and has a dramatic impact on the quality of life in these patients. The symptom of itch has to be treated on the basis of its pathophysiology and its underlying disease. In daily practice, a “quick” diagnosis of the underlying disease is often difficult, although a rapid relief of the itch is desired. We often treat patients on the basis of the symptomatology. A rational therapeutic ladder for a symptomatic therapy is useful until the final diagnosis has been confirmed. There are probably many subtypes of pruritus, just as there are many diseases that cause itch. The pathophysiology in many subtypes of pruritus is still poorly understood, hindering a rapid and targeted treatment strategy. An extensive diagnostic workup is often required to determine the final cause(s) of the itch. Thus, in daily life, physicians often start with a more or less rational therapeutic strategy to combat the debilitating itch. We present possible therapeutic ladders that form the basis for effective therapeutic itch strategies in various diseases. On the basis of our current knowledge about the different pathophysiologies of itch, on clinical trials or case reports, and our own clinical experience, we aim to present therapeutic ladders for the rapid as well as long-term management of itch. Finally, we summarize current exciting developments of experimental strategies in itch research and in clinical development for itch therapy. PMID:21767775

  6. Flexible medical image management using service-oriented architecture.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Oded; Melament, Alex; Barak-Corren, Yuval; Kostirev, Igor; Shmueli, Noam; Peres, Yardena

    2012-01-01

    Management of medical images increasingly involves the need for integration with a variety of information systems. To address this need, we developed Content Management Offering (CMO), a platform for medical image management supporting interoperability through compliance with standards. CMO is based on the principles of service-oriented architecture, implemented with emphasis on three areas: clarity of business process definition, consolidation of service configuration management, and system scalability. Owing to the flexibility of this platform, a small team is able to accommodate requirements of customers varying in scale and in business needs. We describe two deployments of CMO, highlighting the platform's value to customers. CMO represents a flexible approach to medical image management, which can be applied to a variety of information technology challenges in healthcare and life sciences organizations. PMID:22874344

  7. Medical and Surgical Management of Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Siordia, Juan A

    2015-07-01

    Carney complex is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic disorder that consists of multiple myxomatous lesions and endocrine abnormalities, including skin lesions, cardiac myxomas, primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, and acromegaly. This review discusses the medical and surgical treatment of patients with Carney complex. PMID:25996461

  8. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system. 892.5050 Section 892.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5050 Medical...

  9. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system. 892.5050 Section 892.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5050 Medical...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system. 892.5050 Section 892.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5050 Medical...

  11. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system. 892.5050 Section 892.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5050 Medical...

  12. Deep brain stimulation plus best medical therapy versus best medical therapy alone for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD SURG trial): a randomised, open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adrian; Gill, Steven; Varma, Thelekat; Jenkinson, Crispin; Quinn, Niall; Mitchell, Rosalind; Scott, Richard; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline; Daniels, Jane; Patel, Smitaa; Wheatley, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Surgical intervention for advanced Parkinson's disease is an option if medical therapy fails to control symptoms adequately. We aimed to assess whether surgery and best medical therapy improved self-reported quality of life more than best medical therapy alone in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Methods The PD SURG trial is an ongoing randomised, open-label trial. At 13 neurosurgical centres in the UK, between November, 2000, and December, 2006, patients with Parkinson's disease that was not adequately controlled by medical therapy were randomly assigned by use of a computerised minimisation procedure to immediate surgery (lesioning or deep brain stimulation at the discretion of the local clinician) and best medical therapy or to best medical therapy alone. Patients were analysed in the treatment group to which they were randomised, irrespective of whether they received their allocated treatment. The primary endpoint was patient self-reported quality of life on the 39-item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39). Changes between baseline and 1 year were compared by use of t tests. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN34111222. Findings 366 patients were randomly assigned to receive immediate surgery and best medical therapy (183) or best medical therapy alone (183). All patients who had surgery had deep brain stimulation. At 1 year, the mean improvement in PDQ-39 summary index score compared with baseline was 5·0 points in the surgery group and 0·3 points in the medical therapy group (difference −4·7, 95% CI −7·6 to −1·8; p=0·001); the difference in mean change in PDQ-39 score in the mobility domain between the surgery group and the best medical therapy group was −8·9 (95% CI −13·8 to −4·0; p=0·0004), in the activities of daily living domain was −12·4 (−17·3 to −7·5; p<0·0001), and in the bodily discomfort domain was −7·5 (−12·6 to −2·4; p=0·004). Differences

  13. Understanding Patient Portal Use: Implications for Medication Management

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Wallston, Kenneth A; Johnson, Kevin B; Elasy, Tom A

    2013-01-01

    Background The Internet can be leveraged to provide disease management support, including medication adherence promotion that, when tailored, can effectively improve adherence to medications. The growing adoption of patient portals represents an opportunity to support medication management and adherence more broadly, but virtually no data exist about the real and potential impact of existing portals on these outcomes. Objective We sought to (1) understand who uses an existing patient portal and reasons for use and nonuse, (2) understand how portal users are using a portal to manage their medications, and (3) explore participants’ ideas for improving portal functionality for medication management and adherence support. Methods A total of 75 adults with type 2 diabetes participated in a mixed-methods study involving focus groups, a survey, and a medical chart review. We used quantitative data to identify differences between portal users and nonusers, and to test the relationship between the frequency of portal use and glycemic control among users. We used qualitative methods to understand how and why participants use a portal and their ideas for improving its medication management functionality. Results Of the enrolled participants, 81% (61/75) attended a focus group and/or completed a survey; portal users were more likely than nonusers to participate in that capacity (Fisher exact test; P=.01). Users were also more likely than nonusers to be Caucasian/white (Fisher exact test; P<.001), have higher incomes (Fisher exact test; P=.005), and be privately insured (Fisher exact test; P<.001). Users also tended to have more education than nonusers (Mann–Whitney U; P=.05), although this relationship was not significant at P<.05. Among users, more frequent use of a portal was associated with better A1C (Spearman rho =–0.30; P=.02). Reasons for nonuse included not knowing about the portal (n=3), not having access to a computer (n=3), or having a family member serve as

  14. Movement Disorders: A Brief Guide in Medication Management.

    PubMed

    Julius, Anthony; Longfellow, Katelan

    2016-07-01

    Movement disorders can be challenging to manage and often use a specific set of medications. Because it is a complex and broad field within neurology, many providers are unfamiliar with the classes of medications. This paper details medications used for specific conditions, explains why these medications are helpful, and shares pearls and pitfalls related to each agent, focusing on parameters such as dose titration, side effect profiles, and specific drug-drug interactions and challenges. We focus on the most commonly encountered movement disorders, including essential tremor, Parkinson's disease, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and restless leg syndrome. PMID:27235613

  15. The effectiveness of risk management program on pediatric nurses’ medication error

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Bayat, Fariba; Salehi, Tahmineh; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medication therapy is one of the most complex and high-risk clinical processes that nurses deal with. Medication error is the most common type of error that brings about damage and death to patients, especially pediatric ones. However, these errors are preventable. Identifying and preventing undesirable events leading to medication errors are the main risk management activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a risk management program on the pediatric nurses’ medication error rate. Materials and Methods: This study is a quasi-experimental one with a comparison group. In this study, 200 nurses were recruited from two main pediatric hospitals in Tehran. In the experimental hospital, we applied the risk management program for a period of 6 months. Nurses of the control hospital did the hospital routine schedule. A pre- and post-test was performed to measure the frequency of the medication error events. SPSS software, t-test, and regression analysis were used for data analysis. Results: After the intervention, the medication error rate of nurses at the experimental hospital was significantly lower (P < 0.001) and the error-reporting rate was higher (P < 0.007) compared to before the intervention and also in comparison to the nurses of the control hospital. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study and taking into account the high-risk nature of the medical environment, applying the quality-control programs such as risk management can effectively prevent the occurrence of the hospital undesirable events. Nursing mangers can reduce the medication error rate by applying risk management programs. However, this program cannot succeed without nurses’ cooperation. PMID:24403939

  16. Managing adverse effects of glaucoma medications

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive disease in which retinal ganglion cells disappear and subsequent, gradual reductions in the visual field ensues. Glaucoma eye drops have hypotensive effects and like all other medications are associated with adverse effects. Adverse reactions may either result from the main agent or from preservatives used in the drug vehicle. The preservative benzalkonium chloride, is one such compound that causes frequent adverse reactions such as superficial punctate keratitis, corneal erosion, conjunctival allergy, and conjunctival injection. Adverse reactions related to main hypotensive agents have been divided into those affecting the eye and those affecting the entire body. In particular, β-blockers frequently cause systematic adverse reactions, including bradycardia, decrease in blood pressure, irregular pulse and asthma attacks. Prostaglandin analogs have distinctive local adverse reactions, including eyelash bristling/lengthening, eyelid pigmentation, iris pigmentation, and upper eyelid deepening. No systemic adverse reactions have been linked to prostaglandin analog eye drop usage. These adverse reactions may be minimized when they are detected early and prevented by reducing the number of different eye drops used (via fixed combination eye drops), reducing the number of times eye drops are administered, using benzalkonium chloride-free eye drops, using lower concentration eye drops, and providing proper drop instillation training. Additionally, a one-time topical medication can be given to patients to allow observation of any adverse reactions, thereafter the preparation of a topical medication with the fewest known adverse reactions can be prescribed. This does require precise patient monitoring and inquiries about patient symptoms following medication use. PMID:24872675

  17. [Compassionate care and management in the medical-social sector].

    PubMed

    Lambert Barraquier, Arièle

    2016-05-01

    Compassionate care can appear ambiguous when subject to critical examination. The spotlight falls on the responsibility and activity of management with regard to policy guidance and the management of activities in the medical-social field. Discussion around this subject enables an assessment of current standards and ethical progress to be carried out. PMID:27157562

  18. Gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy: a valid method to manage pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Fierro, Maria Teresa; Salomone, Marco; Fava, Paolo; Zingarelli, Enrico M; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Bernengo, Maria G; Bruschi, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon ulcerative, non-infective chronic inflammatory skin disorder of unknown aetiology. Systemic therapies are necessary to control the associated medical diseases, and, due to the inflammatory nature of PG, topical or systemic immunosuppressant agents are effective, but wound healing is usually slow. Negative wound pressure therapy (NPWT) has become an important tool for the management of complex skin ulcers, and usage in PG has been recently described in the literature: we present four cases of classic PG in which NPWT in association with systemic therapy achieved wound healing and a drastic pain reduction. PMID:22891652

  19. Life-threatening complications following multidose methotrexate for medical management of ectopic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Papa; Sagili, Haritha

    2012-01-01

    A 25-year-old primigravida was diagnosed to be suffering from unruptured ectopic pregnancy. The serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin levels were 2851 mIU/l and the ectopic gestational sac was 2.7×2.7 cm without any fetal pole. It was decided to manage her by expectant therapy. But she received medical therapy with multidose methotrexate because of misinterpretation of expectant therapy as medical therapy. She suffered from methotrexate toxicity, which manifested as high-grade fever, vomiting, melena, oral ulcerations, pneumonitis, subconjunctival haemorrhages and skin pigmentation. She developed severe third space fluid collection and shock, which was mistaken for rupture ectopic gestation. Her haematological picture showed severe neutropaenia and thrombocytopaenia which confirmed the clinical picture to be due to methotrexate toxicity. She also developed septicaemia and candidal infection secondary to immunosuppression. She was managed in intensive care unit with ventilatory support, high-dose leucovorin and injection filgastrim. She responded well to the therapy with dramatic recovery in 4 days. PMID:22922914

  20. Heart Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Medical Treatment Guidelines, and Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Chad; Bush, Nathania

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating chronic disease and is expected to increase in upcoming years due to demographic changes. Nurses in all settings have an essential role in supporting patients in managing this disease. This article describes the pathophysiology of HF, diagnosis, medical management, and nursing interventions. It is crucial for nurses to understand the pathophysiology of HF and the importance that nursing actions have on enhancing medical management to alleviate symptoms and to deter the advancement of the pathophysiologic state. Such an understanding can ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality and optimize quality of life in patients with HF. PMID:26596665

  1. Worldwide management of oral anticoagulant therapy: the ISAM study.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Vittorio; Pegoraro, Cinzia; Cucchini, Umberto; Iliceto, Sabino

    2006-02-01

    A multicenter, observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients, receiving oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) for stroke prophylaxis in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) was conducted in the US, Canada, France, Italy and Spain according to their predominant model of care [routine medical care (RMC) or Anticoagulation Clinic care (ACC)]. The study objectives were to assess anticoagulation control (time in target range), and to describe the features of the local model of care. Consecutive patients were recruited on the basis of a minimum of 60 days of oral anticoagulant treatment over a 12 month period, and clinic and physician details were captured by means of a structured face-to-face or telephone interview. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by using linear interpolation between INR values. A total of 1511 patients were recruited, of whom 1445 were included in the analysis of TTR. TTR was higher in ACC (69.5% and 64.9% for Italy and Spain, respectively) with respect to RMC (58.1%, 62.8% and 59.3% for the US, Canada and France, respectively). Mean intervals between INR determinations were between 3 and 4 weeks. Dose changes in case of INR outside therapeutic range were more frequent in Spain and less frequent in France. Striking differences were observed in type of VKA used, specialists involved in patient management, and dosage instructions. Studying of anticoagulation management based on local models of care highlights important discrepancies among countries and suggests further standardization of the management of this important therapy is necessary. PMID:16475046

  2. Medication management of cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Ian B; Reed, Brent N; Moranville, Michael P

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a common complication following heart transplantation (HT), resulting in diminished graft survival. The preferred strategy for preventing CAV is optimal medical management; however, for patients who develop CAV, delaying disease progression through effective medication management is equally important. A review of the literature regarding medication management of CAV was conducted via a search of the MEDLINE database. Studies were included if they were published in English, conducted in humans ≥ 18 years of age or older, and used noninvestigational medications. Immunosuppressive medications such as the antiproliferative mycophenolate, the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus, and the proliferation signal inhibitors sirolimus and everolimus have been shown to prevent the development of CAV. Certain cardiovascular medications, such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), gemfibrozil, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, have also demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease process. Prevention of CAV has also been observed with prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus infection and antioxidant medications. Despite being commonly used in HT patients, neither antiplatelet agents nor glycemic control have proved effective at preventing CAV. Only sirolimus has been shown to arrest the progress of existing CAV. PMID:26011142

  3. Demystifying the Medical Management of Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, Michael E; Preminger, Glenn M

    2011-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common problem associated with significant costs to the health care system. Its prevalence continues to increase, particularly in women, which is attributed to changes in diet and lifestyle. The costs associated with the evaluation and management of nephrolithiasis in the United States has been estimated to be $1.83 billion, and, without any intervention, the risk of recurrence is high. This article reviews the management options for nephrolithiasis including a new formulation of potassium citrate, Urocit®-K 15 mEq, that allows for dosing flexibility which can lead to improved compliance and tolerability. PMID:21826126

  4. Medical therapies in pituitary adenomas: Current rationale for the use and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Thomas; Barlier, Anne; Feelders, Richard; Weryha, Georges; Hofland, Leo J; Ferone, Diego; Gatto, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PA) represent in the majority of cases, benign tumors whose treatment currently associate surgery, medical therapies and radiotherapy in a multidisciplinary approach. While trans-sphenoidal surgery remains, except for prolactin-secreting adenomas, the first-line treatment of PA, it can considerably be hampered by the existence of an invasive and/or aggressive tumor for which medical therapies are often requested. In this review, we extensively discuss, both at molecular and clinical levels, the medical therapies currently used and in development in the different phenotypes of pituitary adenomas. PMID:25556152

  5. Safety and tolerability of medications approved for chronic weight management.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Ken

    2015-04-01

    In 2014 we have 4 new weight loss medications and one older medication with very different mechanisms of action – all approved for chronic weight management. Each medication has its own unique risk profile that makes patient selection important. Knowledge of the contraindications and safety issues can guide physicians to the most appropriate choice for a particular patient. Obesity medicine is entering a new era where our available options for prescribing have been very well studied. There should be no surprises, because bupropion, naltrexone, phentermine, topiramate and liraglutide have been prescribed for many years in millions of patients and lorcaserin has high specificity for a single receptor subtype. The FDA demanded very detailed risk-oriented studies to have these medications approved. In addition, the FDA has established REMS programs or risk management strategies to help ensure that the patients do not receive inappropriate medications. These medications were approved by the US FDA after very thorough testing. The decision to approve these medications was based on the benefits out-weighing the risks. Thus, if following the appropriate guidelines according to package labels, the practitioner can feel safe in prescribing these medications. PMID:25900872

  6. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget. PMID:20480774

  7. Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within

  8. [A Medical Devices Management Information System Supporting Full Life-Cycle Process Management].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2015-07-01

    Medical equipments are essential supplies to carry out medical work. How to ensure the safety and reliability of the medical equipments in diagnosis, and reduce procurement and maintenance costs is a topic of concern to everyone. In this paper, product lifecycle management (PLM) and enterprise resource planning (ERP) are cited to establish a lifecycle management information system. Through integrative and analysis of the various stages of the relevant data in life-cycle, it can ensure safety and reliability of medical equipments in the operation and provide the convincing data for meticulous management. PMID:26665958

  9. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27074696

  10. Analysis of medical equipment management in relation to the mandatory medical equipment safety manager (MESM) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Hirose, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Tsuruta, Harukazu; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Half a decade has passed since the fifth revision of the medical law and mandatory appointment of a medical equipment safety manager (MESM) in hospitals in Japan. During this period, circumstances have changed regarding maintenance of medical equipment (ME). We conducted a survey to examine these changes and the current situation in ME management. Maintenance of ME and related work were found to have increased in many hospitals, but the number of clinical engineering technologists (CETs) has only slightly increased. The appointed MESM was a CET or physician in most hospitals. In hospitals where physicians were appointed as the MESM, 81% had operation managers. Many respondents commented that it was difficult for one person to cover all the tasks required by the MESM, due to a lack of knowledge, too much work, or other reasons. This suggests the importance of an operation manager for ME to work under the MESM. PMID:25193371

  11. MEDEMAS -Medical Device Management and Maintenance System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Ülkü Balcı; Dogan, Mehmet Ugur; Ülgen, Yekta; Özkan, Mehmed

    In the proposed study, a medical device maintenance management system (MEDEMAS) is designed and implemented which provides a data pool of medical devices, the maintenance protocols and other required information for these devices. The system also contains complete repair and maintenance history of a specific device. MEDEMAS creates optimal maintenance schedule for devices and enables the service technician to carry out and report maintenance/repair processes via remote access. Thus predicted future failures are possible to prevent or minimize. Maintenance and repair is essential for patient safety and proper functioning of the medical devices, as it prevents performance decrease of the devices, deterioration of the equipment, and detrimental effects on the health of a patient, the user or other interacting people. The study aims to make the maintenance process more accurate, more efficient, faster and easier to manage and organize; and much less confusing. The accumulated history of medical devices and maintenance personnel helps efficient facility planning.

  12. Quality management for the processing of medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Klosz, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    Rules on the reprocessing of medical devices were put into place in Germany in 2001. The present article explains the background situation and the provisions that are currently in force. The implementation of these statutory requirements is described using the example of the quality management system of Germany’s market leader, Vanguard AG. This quality management system was successfully certified pursuant to DIN EN ISO 13485:2003 for the scope "reprocessing of medical devices", including class “critical C”, in accordance with the recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) on the “Hygiene requirements for reprocessing of medical devices”. PMID:20204094

  13. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary OD

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  14. Medical management of heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Maybin, Jacqueline A; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-01-01

    Women with benign heavy menstrual bleeding have the choice of a number of medical treatment options to reduce their blood loss and improve quality of life. The role of the clinician is to provide information to facilitate women in making an appropriate choice. Unfortunately, many options can be associated with hormonal side effects, prevention of fertility and lack of efficacy, leading to discontinuation and progression to surgical interventions. Herein, we discuss the various options currently available to women, including antifibrinolytics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory preparations, oral contraceptive pills and oral, injectable and intrauterine progestogens. In addition, we describe the more novel option of selective progesterone receptor modulators and their current benefits and limitations. PMID:26695687

  15. Retention in Care and Medication Adherence: Current Challenges to Antiretroviral Therapy Success

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Carol W.; Brady, Kathleen A.; Yehia, Baligh R.

    2015-01-01

    Health behaviors, such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g. mental illness, substance abuse), patient enabling factors (e.g. social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and health care environment factors (e.g. pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include 1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; 2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; 3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems 4) provision of reminder devices and tools; 5) general education and counseling; 6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; 7) case management; and 8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the health care environment. PMID:25792300

  16. Retention in care and medication adherence: current challenges to antiretroviral therapy success.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Carol W; Brady, Kathleen A; Yehia, Baligh R

    2015-04-01

    Health behaviors such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g., mental illness, substance abuse), patient-enabling factors (e.g., social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and healthcare environment factors (e.g., pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include (1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; (2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; (3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems; (4) provision of reminder devices and tools; (5) general education and counseling; (6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; (7) case management; and (8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the healthcare environment. PMID:25792300

  17. Monitors Enable Medication Management in Patients' Homes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to ZIN Technologies to develop a platform that could incorporate sensors quantifying an astronaut’s health status and then communicate with the ground. ZIN created a device, developed the system further, and then formed Cleveland-based FlexLife Health to commercialize the technology. Today it is part of an anti-coagulation management system for people with cardiovascular disease.

  18. MIRMAID: A Content Management System for Medical Image Analysis Research.

    PubMed

    Korfiatis, Panagiotis D; Kline, Timothy L; Blezek, Daniel J; Langer, Steve G; Ryan, William J; Erickson, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Today, a typical clinical study can involve thousands of participants, with imaging data acquired over several time points across multiple institutions. The additional associated information (metadata) accompanying these data can cause data management to be a study-hindering bottleneck. Consistent data management is crucial for large-scale modern clinical imaging research studies. If the study is to be used for regulatory submissions, such systems must be able to meet regulatory compliance requirements for systems that manage clinical image trials, including protecting patient privacy. Our aim was to develop a system to address these needs by leveraging the capabilities of an open-source content management system (CMS) that has a highly configurable workflow; has a single interface that can store, manage, and retrieve imaging-based studies; and can handle the requirement for data auditing and project management. We developed a Web-accessible CMS for medical images called Medical Imaging Research Management and Associated Information Database (MIRMAID). From its inception, MIRMAID was developed to be highly flexible and to meet the needs of diverse studies. It fulfills the need for a complete system for medical imaging research management. PMID:26284301

  19. Does managed care affect the diffusion of psychotropic medications?

    PubMed Central

    Domino, Marisa E.

    2011-01-01

    Newer technologies to treat many mental illnesses have shown substantial heterogeneity in diffusion rates across states. In this paper, I investigate whether variation in the level of managed care penetration is associated with changes in state-level diffusion of three newer classes of psychotropic medications in fee-for-service Medicaid programs from 1991-2005. Three different types of managed care programs are examined: capitated managed care, any type of managed care and behavioral health carve-outs. A fourth order polynomial fixed effect regression model is used to model the diffusion path of newer antidepressant and antipsychotic medications controlling for time-varying state characteristics. Substantial differences are found in the diffusion paths by the degree of managed care use in each state Medicaid program. The largest effect is seen through spillover effects of capitated managed care programs; states with greater capitated managed care have greater initial shares of newer psychotropic medications. The influence of carve-outs and of all types of managed care combined on the diffusion path was modest. PMID:21384465

  20. Opinions of disease management programs among medical directors of managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Algozzine, T; Pannone, R; Kozma, C M

    1998-05-15

    Medical directors of managed care organizations (MCOs) were surveyed about their views on disease management programs in their facilities. A survey was mailed to 600 MCO medical directors. The survey consisted of 14 Likert-type items related to disease management programs, 4 demographic items, and 1 item related to satisfaction. Seventy-nine usable surveys were received, for a net response rate of 14%. There were 48 medical directors (61%) with disease management programs at their MCO; 25 (52%) were working independently. A majority (71%) of programs were targeted at asthma. Seventy percent of the 48 medical directors were completely to somewhat satisfied and 13% dissatisfied to some extent with their disease management programs. Satisfaction was significantly related to the MCO's partnerships for these programs. A majority of medical directors agreed or strongly agreed that disease management programs could improve outcomes and decrease health care costs at their MCO, that an independent consultant could help analyze their MCO's prescription and medical data, and that they would be willing to accept grants or funds from pharmaceutical companies to initiate and support an independent disease management program at their MCO. MCO medical directors who responded to a national survey indicated that their organization could benefit from disease management programs, that internal resources might be insufficient to manage these programs, and that their MCO might be willing to contract with external organizations for support. PMID:9606454

  1. Facilitating Redundancy-Oriented Management with Gene-Therapy-Oriented Management Against Disaster.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoo-Man

    2016-06-01

    This article tests the hypothesis that "if redundancy-oriented management has negative aspects, then it could be facilitated by gene-therapy-oriented management." Negative aspects include disadvantages, misjudgments, or miscalculations. The article provides a newly revised principle of disaster management by studying gene-therapy-oriented management. Based on qualitative analysis, redundancy-oriented and gene-therapy-oriented management are analyzed via five variables: governments, business, volunteers, households, and the international community. The article is valuable because an analytical frame on gene-therapy-oriented management is systematically reconceptualized for the field of disaster management via three elements: unhealthy proteins (problems or failed measures), a vector (new or modified solutions), and target cells (positive outcomes). In accepting the hypothesis, the key tenet is that stakeholders have to assist the progress of redundancy-oriented management with gene-therapy-oriented management by paying attention to the genes of each disaster. PMID:26720173

  2. The Role of Evaluation Pharmacy Information System in Management of Medication Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Ehteshami, Asghar; Janesari, Hassan; Feizi, Avat; Mirzaeian, Razieh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As a natural phenomenon in the patient’s medication therapy, medication clinical complications potentially or concretely interrupt medical care consequential productivity for the patients. Medication related clinical complications include drug errors, drug side effects, drug interactions and drug usage-related challenges. The present research intends to explore the role that the Pharmacy Information System (PIS) may play in the management of medication complications with reference to the pharmaceutical societies of America and Australia in selected teaching, private and social services hospitals of the city of Isfahan. Methodology As an applied, descriptive-analytical study, this study has been conducted in teaching, private and social services hospitals situated in the city of Isfahan in 2011. The research population consisted of the PISs used in the hospitals under study. Research sample was the same as the population. The data collection instrument used was a self-designed checklist developed based on the guidelines of the American Society of Health System Pharmacists and Pharmaceutical Society of Australia validity of which was assessed by expert professors’ views. The data, collected by observation and interview methods, were put into SPSS 18 software to be analyzed. Findings The findings of the study revealed that among the 19 hospitals in question, the highest and lowest ranks in observing the societies of the pharmacists’ established standards related to medication therapy, i.e. registration of drug use status and drug interactions belonged to social services hospitals (mean score of %10.1) and private hospitals (mean score of %6.24), respectively. Conclusion Based on the findings, it can be claimed that the hospitals in question did not pay due attention to standards established by the societies of pharmacists regarding the medication therapy including register of drug usage status, drug interactions and drug side effects in their PISs

  3. Medical management of youth baseball and softball tournaments.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Matthew; Ray, Tracy R

    2013-01-01

    The medical management of youth baseball and softball tournaments requires both proper planning and a basic awareness of commonly seen sport-specific injuries. While youth sporting events are designed to be a fun experience for all, injuries and emergencies will occur. With proper planning, and supplies, the impact of these issues can be minimized. This article will outline some basic principles for the medical personnel that may be involved in youth baseball and softball events. PMID:23669084

  4. Medical wastes management in the south of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.E. da

    2005-07-01

    In developing countries, solid wastes have not received sufficient attention. In many countries, hazardous and medical wastes are still handled and disposed together with domestic wastes, thus creating a great health risk to municipal workers, the public and the environment. Medical waste management has been evaluated at the Vacacai river basin in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A total of 91 healthcare facilities, including hospitals (21), health centers (48) and clinical laboratories (22) were surveyed to provide information about the management, segregation, generation, storage and disposal of medical wastes. The results about management aspects indicate that practices in most healthcare facilities do not comply with the principles stated in Brazilian legislation. All facilities demonstrated a priority on segregation of infectious-biological wastes. Average generation rates of total and infectious-biological wastes in the hospitals were estimated to be 3.245 and 0.570 kg/bed-day, respectively.

  5. Risk management in the design of medical device software systems.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul L; Jorgens, Joseph; Taylor, Alford R; Weber, Markus

    2002-01-01

    The safety of any medical device system is dependent on the application of a disciplined, well-defined, risk management process throughout the product life cycle. Hardware, software, human, and environmental interactions must be assessed in terms of intended use, risk, and cost/benefit criteria. This article addresses these issues in the context of medical devices that incorporate software. The article explains the principles of risk management, using terminology and examples from the domain of software engineering. It may serve as a guide to those new to the concepts of risk management and as an aide-memoire for medical device system/software engineers who are more familiar with the topic. PMID:12162111

  6. Evaluating an interprofessional disease state and medication management review model.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Forman, Dawn; Hughes, Jeffery

    2014-03-01

    There is lack of literature data reporting an incorporation of medication management reviews in students' interprofessional education (IPE) and practice programs in aged care settings. This pilot study reports how an interprofessional disease state and medication management review program (DSMMR) was established in a residential aged care facility in Perth, Western Australia. Students from the professions of nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy focused on a wellness check in the areas of cognition, falls and continence while integrating a medication management review. Students' attitudes were explored using a pre- and post-placement questionnaire. Students indicated positive experience with the IPE DSMMR program which also resulted in their positive attitudinal shift towards IPE and practice. These findings indicated that aged care can be a suitable setting for student interprofessional programs focusing on DSMMR. PMID:24246025

  7. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    PubMed

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. PMID:22944485

  8. Managing medical comorbidities in patients with depression to improve prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Medical comorbidities contribute to poor antidepressant response, treatment resistance, and poor outcomes in many patients with depression. Depression can co-occur with thyroid conditions, chronic pain conditions, central nervous system disorders, and more. Inflammatory conditions such as diabetes and obesity are also associated with depression, and the connection between inflammation and depression may lead to testing that could better match patients to specific antidepressant treatment. Interventions for patients with depression and a comorbid medical condition include careful selection of antidepressant therapy as well as psychotherapy and adjunctive agents. PMID:26829434

  9. [Neoadjuvant therapy for tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract : Complication management].

    PubMed

    Gockel, I; Hoffmeister, A; Lordick, F

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies could demonstrate that neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for esophageal and gastric cancer do not significantly increase the risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality as compared to surgery alone. With respect to patient safety and effectiveness of neoadjuvant concepts, quality assured performance of each treatment modality and close interdisciplinary cooperation play an important role. The majority of potential side effects and complications, which might occur during neoadjuvant therapy can be adequately controlled by correct prophylaxis and professional medical complication management. Complications before, during and after neoadjuvant therapy of upper gastrointestinal tract tumors can also be caused by the tumor itself or by medicinal therapy. These comprise bleeding, fistulas, perforations and stenoses. Modern endoscopic techniques are the therapy of choice in these situations. Preoperative conditioning during the period of neoadjuvant therapy opens the possibility of reduced postoperative complications to patients with tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26374651

  10. Managing waiting times in diagnostic medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nuti, Sabina; Vainieri, Milena

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper aims to analyse the variation in the delivery of diagnostic imaging services in order to suggest possible solutions for the reduction of waiting times, increase the quality of services and reduce financial costs. Design This study provides a logic model to manage waiting times in a regional context. Waiting times measured per day were compared on the basis of the variability in the use rates of CT and MRI examinations in Tuscany for the population, as well as on the basis of the capacity offered with respect to the number of radiologists available. The analysis was performed at the local health authority level to support the decision-making process of local managers. Setting Diagnostic imaging services, in particular the CT and MRI examinations. The study involved all the 12 local health authorities that provide services for 3.7 million inhabitants of the Italian Tuscany Region. Primary and secondary outcome measures Participants: the study uses regional administrative data on outpatients and survey data on inpatient diagnostic examinations in order to measure productivity. Primary and secondary outcome measures The study uses the volumes per 1000 inhabitants, the days of waiting times and the number of examinations per radiologist. Variability was measured using the traditional SD measures. Results A significant variation in areas considered homogeneous in terms of age, gender or mortality may indicate that the use of radiological services is not optimal and underuse or overuse occurs and that there is room for improvement in the service organisation. Conclusions Considering that there is a high level of variability among district use rates and waiting times, this study provides managers with a specific tool to find the cause of the problem, identify a possible solution, assess the financial impact and initiate the eventual reduction of waste. PMID:23242480

  11. Integrated medication management in mHealth applications.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Hubert; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Kastner, Peter; Schreier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Continuous medication monitoring is essential for successful management of heart failure patients. Experiences with the recently established heart failure network HerzMobil Tirol show that medication monitoring limited to heart failure specific drugs could be insufficient, in particular for general practitioners. Additionally, some patients are confused about monitoring only part of their prescribed drugs. Sometimes medication will be changed without informing the responsible physician. As part of the upcoming Austrian electronic health record system ELGA, the eMedication system will collect prescription and dispensing data of drugs and these data will be accessible to authorized healthcare professionals on an inter-institutional level. Therefore, we propose two concepts on integrated medication management in mHealth applications that integrate ELGA eMedication and closed-loop mHealth-based telemonitoring. As a next step, we will implement these concepts and analyze--in a feasibility study--usability and practicability as well as legal aspects with respect to automatic data transfer from the ELGA eMedication service. PMID:24825709

  12. Detrimental Effects of Standard Medical Therapy in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kays, David W.; Langham, Max R.; Ledbetter, Daniel J.; Talbert, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a nonstandard ventilation strategy on survival in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Background Despite recent advances, including nitric oxide, CDH remains an unsolved problem with a mortality rate of 35% to 50%. Hyperventilation and alkalization remain common therapies. Methods In 1992, the authors prospectively abandoned hyperventilation and alkalization. Patients are lightly sedated and ventilated with the lowest pressure providing adequate chest movement, and the rate is set to patient comfort. Nitric oxide and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are reserved for life-threatening instability. Surgical repair is delayed 1 to 5 days. Sixty consecutive patients are compared with 29 previous patients treated with hyperventilation and alkalization, 13 before and 16 after the availability of ECMO. Results Overall, 47 of 60 patients (78%) in study era 3 survived compared with 2 of 13 (15%) in the hyperventilation era and 7 of 16 (44%) in the hyperventilation/ECMO era (p < 0.0001). The disease severity and the incidence of associated anomalies did not differ between groups. To compare management strategies, patients who had treatment withheld because of lethal associated conditions were then removed from analysis. Peak inspiratory pressure and arterial pH were lower (p < 0.0001) and PaCO2 was higher (p < 0.05) in era 3 than in the previous eras. The rate of pneumothorax (1.9%) decreased (p < 0.0001). In era 3, survival was 47 of 53 (89%) treated patients, and 23 of 25 inborn patients with isolated CDH survived (92%). Conclusions Nonstandard ventilatory support of patients with CDH has led to significantly improved survival rates. This study sets a survival benchmark and strongly suggests the negative effects of hyperventilation and alkalization. PMID:10493481

  13. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  14. Impact of appropriate pharmaceutical therapy for chronic conditions on direct medical costs and workplace productivity: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Neil; Weston, Christine; Hartmann, Christine W; Sikirica, Mirko; Crawford, Albert; He, Hope; Howell, Jamie; Maio, Vittorio; Clarke, Janice; Nuthulaganti, Bhaskar; Cobb, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a literature review investigating the economic impact of appropriate pharmaceutical therapy in treating four prevalent chronic conditions - asthma, diabetes, heart failure, and migraine. The goal of the review was to identify high-quality studies examining the extent to which appropriate pharmaceutical therapy impacts overall medical expenditure (direct costs) and workplace productivity (indirect costs). The working hypothesis in conducting the review was that the costs of pharmaceuticals for the selected chronic conditions are offset by savings in direct and indirect costs in other areas. The literature provides evidence that appropriate drug therapy improves the health status and quality of life of individuals with chronic illnesses while reducing costs associated with utilization of emergency room, inpatient, and other medical services. A growing body of evidence also suggests that workers whose chronic conditions are effectively controlled with medications are more productive. For employers, the evidence translates into potential direct and indirect cost savings. The findings also confirm the importance of pharmaceutical management as a cornerstone of disease management. PMID:15035834

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  16. Management of expatriate medical assistance in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Vio, Ferruccio

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses how Mozambique coped with the health system needs in terms of specialized doctors since independence, in a troubled context of war, lack of financial resources and modifying settings of foreign aid. The Ministry of Health (MOH) managed to make up for its severe scarcity of specialist MDs especially through contracting expatriate technical assistance. Different scenarios, partnerships and contract schemes that have evolved since independence are briefly described, as well as self-reliance option possibility and implications. Lessons learned about donor initiatives aimed at contracting specialists from other developing countries are singled out. The issue of obtaining expertise and knowledge in the global market as cheap as possible is stressed, and realistic figures of cost planning are highlighted, as determined by the overall health system necessities and budget limitations. PMID:17140454

  17. Diagnosis and management of the postoperative surgical and medical complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Montravers, Philippe; Augustin, Pascal; Zappella, Nathalie; Dufour, Guillaume; Arapis, Konstantinos; Chosidow, Denis; Fournier, Pierre; Ribeiro-Parienti, Lara; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Desmard, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Perioperative complications following bariatric surgery (BS) have been poorly analysed and their management is not clearly assessed. The associated frequency of ICU admission is difficult to estimate. Among surgical complications, digestive perforations are the most frequent. The most common postoperative complications of sleeve gastrectomy are fistulas, but bleeding on the stapling line is also commonly reported. Complication rates are higher after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, mainly due to anastomotic leaks. Medical complications are mainly thromboembolic or respiratory complications. All these surgical and medical complications are not easily detected; clinical signs can be atypical or insidious, often resulting in delayed management. Respiratory signs can be predominant and lead erroneously to pulmonary or thromboembolic diseases. Diagnostic criteria are based on minor clinical signs, tachycardia being probably the most frequent one. Lately, complications are revealed by haemodynamic instability, respiratory failure or renal dysfunction and radiographic findings. Management decision according to these abnormal signs is based on a combined multidisciplanary approach including surgical and/or endoscopic procedures and medical care, depending on the nature and severity of the surgical complication. Medical management is based on supportive ICU care of organ dysfunctions, curative anticoagulation if required, nutritional support, and appropriate anti-infective therapy. Pharmacological data are limited in morbidly obese patients and the appropriate doses are debated, especially for anti-infective agents. Complicated BS cases have a poor outcome, probably largely related to delayed diagnosis and reoperation. PMID:25829315

  18. Revolutionary advances in medical waste management. The Sanitec system.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Borel, Lise; Jensen, H Gordon; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Becker, Daniel G; Chang, Dillon E; Korngold, Jonathan; Chitwood, W Randolph; Lin, Kant Y; Nichter, Larry S; Berenson, Susan; Britt, L D; Tafel, John A

    2006-01-01

    It is the purpose of this collective review to provide a detailed outline of a revolutionary medical waste disposal system that should be used in all medical centers in the world to prevent pollution of our planet from medical waste. The Sanitec medical waste disposal system consists of the following seven components: (1) an all-weather steel enclosure of the waste management system, allowing it to be used inside or outside of the hospital center; (2) an automatic mechanical lift-and-load system that protects the workers from devastating back injuries; (3) a sophisticated shredding system designed for medical waste; (4) a series of air filters including the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter; (5) microwave disinfection of the medical waste material; (6) a waste compactor or dumpster; and (7) an onboard microprocessor. It must be emphasized that this waste management system can be used either inside or outside the hospital. From start to finish, the Sanitec Microwave Disinfection system is designed to provide process and engineering controls that assure complete disinfection and destruction, while minimizing the operator's exposure to risk. There are numerous technologic benefits to the Sanitec systems, including environmental, operational, physical, and disinfection efficiency as well as waste residue disinfection. Wastes treated through the Sanitec system are thoroughly disinfected, unrecognizable, and reduced in volume by approximately 80% (saving valuable landfill space and reducing hauling requirements and costs). They are acceptable in any municipal solid waste program. Sanitec's Zero Pollution Advantage is augmented by a complete range of services, including installation, startup, testing, training, maintenance, and repair, over the life of this system. The Sanitec waste management system has essentially been designed to provide the best overall solution to the customer, when that customer actually looks at the total cost of dealing with the

  19. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  20. [Rehabilitation management categories. A new approach to case mix in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Spyra, K; Müller-Fahrnow, W

    1998-06-01

    Creating typical treatment case groups in medical rehabilitation, in short: Rehabilitee Management Categories (RMKs, Rehabilitanden-Management-Kategorien), is a key issue for quality assurance within the frame of modern concepts of Total Quality Management (TQM), not least utilizing current organization and management concepts (Managed Care). So far, the problem of creating highly homogeneous case groups has remained unsolved on the basis of the present methodological framework. Critical prerequisites for any further scientific work on this problem are being established in the field of medical rehabilitation with the help of the Classification of Therapeutic Services (CTS) as well as development of instruments documenting therapy plans for typical rehabilitation case groups, process-relevant quality features and definitions of therapy goals as a basis for quality screening under the Pension Insurance quality assurance programme in medical rehabilitation. These developments have clearly contributed to expanding the theoretical foundations as well as the prerequisites for empirical grounding of Rehabilitee Management Categories in medical rehabilitation under the Pension Insurance scheme. A project for determination of rehabilitation case groups which is based on these developments, is due to start at the Humboldt University and Technical University, Berlin in the near future within a rehab promotion initiative of the German Pension Insurance system in cooperation with the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. Conceptually, the determination of Rehabilitee Management Categories by far exceeds all previous approaches as (1) it will be generated by an iterative process of empirical service descriptions and theoretical consensus building among experts, (2) not only static parameters but also process-related details will be recorded, and (3) quality requirements will be defined for the rehabilitation process and outcome. As a result, rehabilitation-relevant case

  1. Patterns of Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapy Use in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Helen H. L.; Smith, Ronald G.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy use in children with chronic illnesses is higher than in children in the general population. In this study, we investigated patterns of CAM therapy use in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, n = 50) as compared to a control population of children…

  2. LAN: A strategy for managing medical data and programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-10

    Sandia National Laboratories Occupational Medicine Center has primary responsibility for industrial medicine services, applied epidemiology, workers' compensation and sickness absence benefit management, Human Studies Board, employee assistance and health promotion. Each discipline has unique needs for data management, standard and ad hoc reporting and data analysis. The Medical Organization has established a local area network as the preferred computing environment to meet these diverse needs. Numerous applications have been implemented on the LAN supporting some 80 users.

  3. Supervising Family Therapy Trainees in Primary Care Medical Settings: Context Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and describe four essential skills for effective supervision of family therapy trainees in primary care medical settings. The supervision skills described include: (1) Understand medical culture; (2) Locate the trainee in the treatment system; (3) Investigate the biological/health issues; and (4) Be…

  4. Management information system of medical equipment using mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, C.; Castro, D.

    2011-09-01

    The large numbers of technologies currently incorporated into mobile devices transform them into excellent tools for capture and to manage the information, because of the increasing computing power and storage that allow to add many miscellaneous applications. In order to obtain benefits of these technologies, in the biomedical engineering field, it was developed a mobile information system for medical equipment management. The central platform for the system it's a mobile phone, which by a connection with a web server, it's capable to send and receive information relative to any medical equipment. Decoding a type of barcodes, known as QR-Codes, the management process is simplified and improved. These barcodes identified the medical equipments in a database, when these codes are photographed and decoded with the mobile device, you can access to relevant information about the medical equipment in question. This Project in it's actual state is a basic support tool for the maintenance of medical equipment. It is also a modern alternative, competitive and economic in the actual market.

  5. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  6. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, David W.; Wemple, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  7. Germ-line gene therapy and the medical imperative.

    PubMed

    Munson, Ronald; Davis, Lawrence H

    1992-06-01

    Somatic cell gene therapy has yielded promising results. If germ cell gene therapy can be developed, the promise is even greater: hundreds of genetic diseases might be virtually eliminated. But some claim the procedure is morally unacceptable. We thoroughly and sympathetically examine several possible reasons for this claim but find them inadequate. There is no moral reason, then, not to develop and employ germ-line gene therapy. Taking the offensive, we argue next that medicine has a prima facie moral obligation to do so. PMID:11645742

  8. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  9. Facilitating Virtual Health Management Using Medical Device Integration.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, John R

    2015-01-01

    Data from connected medical devices (CMDS) provides an objective and rich source of information to augment patient care management and clinical decision making. A principal reason is measurements of patient properties made through bedside CMDs are not typically subject to errors associated with misinterpretation, incorrect recording, and incorrect time stamping. Furthermore, data from CMDs can be collected regularly, ensuring a dense and robust data record on a given patient. The ability to remotely manage and monitor patients is greatly facilitated by access to data, as measurements represent an objective source of information that facilitate clinical decision making. In my recent book, Connected Medical Devices: Integrating Patient Care Data in Healthcare System, I discuss the topic of medical device integration (MDI) in relation to implementing CMDs in healthcare settings as a guide to assist hospitals in this undertaking. The following discussion about MDI are the opening paragraphs from this text, followed by a discussion of MDI architectures. PMID:26571635

  10. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  11. Ohio Medical Office Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document provides a framework for a broad-based secondary and postsecondary curriculum to prepare students for employment in medical office management. The first part of the technical competency profile (TCP) contains the following items: an explanation of the purpose and scope of Ohio's TCPs; college tech prep program standards; an overview…

  12. Getting Personal: Harvard Medical School's Approach to Debt Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program of the financial aid office at Harvard University Medical School (Massachusetts) that helps students with debt management and personal financial planning through presentations to seniors by professionals in insurance and financial planning and by offering two individual consultations with a physician financial planning…

  13. Radiation accidents and nuclear energy: medical consequences and therapy.

    PubMed

    Champlin, R E; Kastenberg, W E; Gale, R P

    1988-11-01

    After the accidents at Chernobyl, the Soviet Union, and in Goiania, Brazil, there is increasing concern about the medical risks from radiation accidents. This overview summarizes the principles of nuclear energy, the biologic effects of accidental radiation exposure, the emergency response to nuclear accidents, and approaches to treating radiation injuries. Also discussed are the related issues of reactor safety, the disposal of radioactive waste, and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. With the increasing use of radioactive materials for power, weapons, and medical diagnostics, the medical community needs to understand the health consequences of radiation exposure. PMID:3056171

  14. POTENTIAL OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN MODERN MEDICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hakim Mohammed

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses in this paper the potentialities of Herbal medicine in modern therapy. Also he throws some light on the importance of natural drugs which bring about cure without generation side-effects. PMID:22557447

  15. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  16. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  17. Management of Newer Antidepressant Medications in U.S. Commercial Health Plans

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Horgan, Constance M.; Creedon, Timothy B.; Merrick, Elizabeth L.; Stewart, Maureen T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Private health insurance plays a large role in the US health system, including for many individuals with depression. Private insurers have been actively trying to influence pharmaceutical utilization and costs, particularly for newer and costlier medications. The approaches that insurers use may have important effects on patients’ access to antidepressant medications. Aims of the Study To report which approaches (e.g., tiered copayments, prior authorization, and step therapy) commercial health plans are employing to manage newer antidepressant medications, and how the use of these approaches has changed since 2003. Methods Data are from a nationally representative survey of commercial health plans in 60 market areas regarding alcohol, drug abuse and mental health services in 2010. Responses were obtained from 389 plans (89% response rate), reporting on 925 insurance products. For each of six branded antidepressant medications, respondents were asked whether the plan covered the medication and if so, on what copayment tier, and whether it was subject to prior authorization or step therapy. Measures of management approach were constructed for each medication and for the group of medications. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to test for association of the management approach with various health plan characteristics. Results Less than 1% of health plan products excluded any of the six antidepressants studied. Medications were more likely to be subjected to restrictions if they were newer, more expensive or were reformulations. 55% of products used placement on a high cost-sharing tier (3 or 4) as their only form of restriction for newer branded antidepressants. This proportion was lower than in 2003, when 71% of products took this approach. In addition, only 2% of products left all the newer branded medications unrestricted, down from 25% in 2003. Multivariate analysis indicated that preferred provider organizations were more likely than other

  18. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  19. Surveillance and medical therapy following endovascular treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas L; Harris, Jeremy R; Kribs, Stewart W

    2012-06-01

    The debate regarding the possible link between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis (MS) is continuously becoming more and more contentious due to the current lack of level 1 evidence from randomized trials. Regardless of this continued uncertainty surrounding the safety and efficacy of this therapy, MS patients from Canada, and other jurisdictions, are traveling abroad to receive central venous angioplasty and, unfortunately, some also receive venous stents. They often return home with few instructions regarding follow-up or medical therapy. In response we propose some interim, practical recommendations for post-procedural surveillance and medical therapy, until further information is available. PMID:22577160

  20. Medically Reversible Limbal Stem Cell Disease: Clinical Features and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bryan Y; Riaz, Kamran M; Bakhtiari, Pejman; Chan, Clara C; Welder, Jeffrey D; Holland, Edward J; Basti, Surendra; Djalilian, Ali R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features and management strategies in patients whose limbal stem cell (LSC) disease reversed with medical therapy. Design Retrospective case series. Participants 22 eyes of 15 patients seen at 3 tertiary referral centers between 2007 and 2011 with 3 or more months of follow-up. Methods Medical records of patients with medically reversible LSC disease were reviewed. Demographic data, etiologies, location and duration of disease and medical inventions were analyzed. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes assessed included resolution of signs of LSC disease and improvement in visual acuity. Results Etiologies of the LSC disease included contact lens wear only (13 eyes), contact lens wear in the setting of ocular rosacea (3 eyes), benzalkonium chloride toxicity (2 eyes) and idiopathic (4 eyes). Ophthalmologic findings included loss of limbal architecture, a whorl-like epitheliopathy or an opaque epithelium arising from the limbus with late fluorescein staining. The superior limbus was the most common site of involvement (95%). The corneal epithelial phenotype returned to normal with only conservative measures including lubrication and discontinuing contact lens wear in 4 patients (4 eyes) while in 11 patients (18 eyes) additional interventions were required after at least 3 months of conservative therapy. Medical interventions included topical corticosteroids, topical cyclosporine, topical vitamin A, oral doxycycline, and/or punctal occlusion. All eyes achieved a stable ocular surface over a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 4–60 months). Visual acuity improved from a mean of 20/42 to 20/26 (P <0.0184). Conclusions Disturbances to the LSC function and/or niche may be potentially reversible by medical therapy. These cases, which represent a subset of patients with LSC deficiency, may be considered to have LSC niche dysfunction. PMID:24908203

  1. Management of Discourse in Group Therapy for Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Elman, Roberta J.; Holland, Audrey L.; Damico, Jack S.

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative study of group therapy for aphasia was undertaken in order to discover interaction patterns and discourse management strategies that help define "social" or "conversation" group therapy for aphasia. Specifically, an analysis of the discourse of clients and therapists was conducted to identify patterns across therapists and settings.…

  2. Revisiting the Medical Management of Parkinson's Disease: Levodopa versus Dopamine Agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinglin; Tan, Louis Chew-Seng

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for Parkinson's disease has been debated for decades. The introduction of levodopa (LD) treatment is frequently delayed because of theoretical concerns about its toxicity or the risk of drug-induced motor complications. These concerns have resulted in "LD phobia" with clinicians selecting dopamine agonist (DA) over LD as initial therapy. More recently, a shift in the treatment approach towards initial LD use appears to be occurring. It is therefore necessary to review current evidence for the use of LD and DA. This review discusses the medical management of Parkinson's disease with regards to the use of LD versus DA. Pendulum swings in treatment strategies between LD-first and DA-first therapies should be avoided. A balanced perspective is needed as there is a place for both drugs in the management of PD. PMID:26644151

  3. Healthcare managers' construction of the manager role in relation to the medical profession.

    PubMed

    von Knorring, Mia; Alexanderson, Kristina; Eliasson, Miriam A

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare managers construct the manager role in relation to the medical profession in their organisations. Design/methodology/approach - In total, 18 of Sweden's 20 healthcare chief executive officers (CEOs) and 20 clinical department managers (CDMs) were interviewed about their views on management of physicians. Interviews were performed in the context of one aspect of healthcare management; i.e., management of physicians' sickness certification practice. A discourse analysis approach was used for data analysis. Findings - Few managers used a management-based discourse to construct the manager role. Instead, a profession-based discourse dominated and managers frequently used the attributes "physician" or "non-physician" to categorise themselves or other managers in their managerial roles. Some managers, both CEOs and CDMs, shifted between the management- and profession-based discourses, resulting in a kind of "yes, but […]" approach to management in the organisations. The dominating profession-based discourse served to reproduce the power and status of physicians within the organisation, thereby rendering the manager role weaker than the medical profession for both physician and non-physician managers. Research limitations/implications - Further studies are needed to explore the impact of gender, managerial level, and basic profession on how managers construct the manager role in relation to physicians. Practical implications - The results suggest that there is a need to address the organisational conditions for managers' role taking in healthcare organisations. Originality/value - Despite the general strengthening of the manager position in healthcare through political reforms during the last decades, this study shows that a profession-based discourse clearly dominated in how the managers constructed the manager role in relation to the medical profession on the workplace level in their organisations. PMID

  4. [Assessment of medical waste management in a Palestinian hospital].

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A; Khatib, R A

    2006-01-01

    We studied medical waste management in a Palestinian hospital in the West Bank and the role of municipality in this management. In general, "good management practices" were inadequate; there was insufficient separation between hazardous and non-hazardous wastes, an absence of necessary rules and regulations for the collection of wastes from the hospital wards and the on-site transport to a temporary storage location inside and outside the hospital and inadequate waste treatment and disposal of hospital wastes along with municipal garbage. Moreover, training of personnel was lacking and protective equipment and measures for staff were not available. No special landfills for hazardous wastes were found within the municipality. PMID:17037705

  5. Managed care, medical privacy, and the paradigm of consent.

    PubMed

    Bloche, M Gregg

    1997-12-01

    The market success of managed health plans in the 1990s is bringing to medicine the easy availability of electronically stored information that is characteristic of the securities and consumer credit industries. Protection for medical confidentiality, however, has not kept pace with this information revolution. Employers, the managed care industry, and legal and ethics commentators frequently look to the concept of informed consent to justify particular uses of health information, but the elastic use of informed consent as a way of responding to managed care health plans' disclosure of information to third parties fails to address underlying questions involving substantive value choices. PMID:11655370

  6. Evaluating User Perceptions of Mobile Medication Management Applications With Older Adults: A Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication nonadherence has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals with chronic disease. Several mobile medication management applications are available to help users track, remember, and read about their medication therapy. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the usability and usefulness of existing medication management applications for older adults. Methods We recruited 35 participants aged 50 and over to participate in a 2-hour usability session. The average age ranged from 52-78 years (mean 67 years) and 71% (25/35) of participants were female. Each participant was provided with an iPad loaded with four medication management applications: MyMedRec, DrugHub, Pillboxie, and PocketPharmacist. These applications were evaluated using the 10 item System Usability Scale (SUS) and visual analog scale. An investigator-moderated 30-minute discussion followed, and was recorded. We used a grounded theory (GT) approach to analyze qualitative data. Results When assessing mobile medication management applications, participants struggled to think of a need for the applications in their own lives. Many were satisfied with their current management system and proposed future use only if cognition and health declined. Most participants felt capable of using the applications after a period of time and training, but were frustrated by their initial experiences with the applications. The early experiences of participants highlighted the benefits of linear navigation and clear wording (eg, “undo” vs “cancel”) when designing for older users. While there was no order effect, participants attributed their poor performance to the order in which they tried the applications. They also described being a part of a technology generation that did not encounter the computer until adulthood. Of the four applications, PocketPharmacist was found to be the least usable with a score of 42/100 (P<.0001) though it offered a drug interaction

  7. Medical Device Risk Management For Performance Assurance Optimization and Prioritization.

    PubMed

    Gaamangwe, Tidimogo; Babbar, Vishvek; Krivoy, Agustina; Moore, Michael; Kresta, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Performance assurance (PA) is an integral component of clinical engineering medical device risk management. For that reason, the clinical engineering (CE) community has made concerted efforts to define appropriate risk factors and develop quantitative risk models for efficient data processing and improved PA program operational decision making. However, a common framework that relates the various processes of a quantitative risk system does not exist. This article provides a perspective that focuses on medical device quality and risk-based elements of the PA program, which include device inclusion/exclusion, schedule optimization, and inspection prioritization. A PA risk management framework is provided, and previous quantitative models that have contributed to the advancement of PA risk management are examined. A general model for quantitative risk systems is proposed, and further perspective on possible future directions in the area of PA technology is also provided. PMID:26618842

  8. Mortality Associated with Medical Therapy Versus Elective Colectomy in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bewtra, Meenakshi; Newcomb, Craig W.; Wu, Qufei; Chen, Lang; Xie, Fenglong; Roy, Jason A.; Aarons, Cary B.; Osterman, Mark T.; Forde, Kimberly A.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis (UC) can be treated with surgery or medications. Patients often must choose between long-term immunosuppressive therapy or total colectomy. It is uncertain if there is a mortality benefit to one of these treatment approaches. Objective To determine whether patients with advanced UC treated with elective colectomy have an improved survival compared to patients treated with medical therapy. Design Retrospective matched cohort study Setting 50-state Medicaid and beneficiaries (2000–2005), Medicare-beneficiaries (2006–2011) and dual-eligible individuals (2000–2011) Patients 830 UC patients pursuing elective colectomy surgery and 7,541 matched UC patients pursuing medical therapy. Measurements The primary outcome was time to death. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the survival of advanced UC patients treated with elective colectomy or medical therapy. The models controlled for significant comorbidities through matched and adjusted analysis. Results The mortality rates associated with elective surgery and medical therapy were 34 and 54 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. Elective colectomy was associated with improved survival compared to pursuing chronic medical therapy (adjusted HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52–0.87) although not all results remained statistically significant in the sensitivity analyses. Post-hoc analysis by age group showed improved survival with surgery in patients 50 years and older with advanced UC (HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.45–0.79, age by treatment interaction p=0.032). Limitation Retrospective non-randomized analysis can be subject to residual confounding. The source cohort was derived from different databases across the study period. Sensitivity and secondary analyses had reduced statistical power. Conclusion Elective colectomy surgery appeared to be associated with an improved survival rate relative to medical therapy among patients 50 years and older with advanced UC. PMID:26168366

  9. Medication Management in Schools: A Systems Approach to Reducing Risk and Strengthening Quality in School Medication Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This paper and the invitational meeting for which it has been prepared make certain assumptions about the challenge of strengthening the quality of medication management in school. The participants believe that recent research on improving the safety and quality of patient care has relevance for health services in school, particularly the safety…

  10. An update on medical therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; O'Callaghan, Dermot S; Humbert, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, great progress has been made in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Available therapies target one of three principal pathways: the endothelin (ET), nitric oxide (NO) or the prostacyclin (PGI2) pathway. Evidence shows that current drugs, used either as monotherapy or in different combinations, can improve exercise capacity, clinical symptoms, hemodynamics and even survival in PAH. Unfortunately, the disease remains incurable and the prognosis of the disease is still poor. However, existing and novel potent antiproliferative therapies are being explored, and new agents targeting different and/or additional pathways are likely to become available to clinicians in the near future. Promising candidates include tyrosine kinase antagonists (e.g. imatinib); soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators (riociguat); an oral analog of prostacyclin (selexipag); and a tissue targeting endothelin receptor antagonist (macitentan). Phase II or III trials have either been completed or are underway to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these various therapies. PMID:24122306

  11. Fertility preservation for boys and adolescents facing sterilizing medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ahmed A.; Tran, Nam D.

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in childhood cancer survival have allowed boys and their families to increasingly focus on quality of life after therapy, particularly their future ability to father children. Treatments should maintain comprehensive cancer care goals and consider the long-term quality of life of these children. While semen cryopreservation is a well-established method of fertility preservation for post-pubertal children, the use of cryopreserved pre-treatment testicular tissue represents a promising, yet experimental method of fertility preservation for prepubertal males facing sterilizing therapy. Healthcare providers should counsel families about the fertility risks of therapy, discuss or refer patients for standard fertility preservation options, and consider experimental approaches to fertility preservation while being mindful of the ethical questions these treatments raise. PMID:26816794

  12. Medical waste management in Ibadan, Nigeria: Obstacles and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Akinwale Sangodoyin, Abimbola; Sridhar, Mynepalli; Booth, Colin; Olomolaiye, Paul; Hammond, Felix

    2009-02-15

    Quantification and characterization of medical waste generated in healthcare facilities (HCFs) in a developing African nation has been conducted to provide insights into existing waste collection and disposal approaches, so as to provide sustainable avenues for institutional policy improvement. The study, in Ibadan city, Nigeria, entailed a representative classification of nearly 400 healthcare facilities, from 11 local government areas (LGA) of Ibadan, into tertiary, secondary, primary, and diagnostic HCFs, of which, 52 HCFs were strategically selected. Primary data sources included field measurements, waste sampling and analysis and a questionnaire, while secondary information sources included public and private records from hospitals and government ministries. Results indicate secondary HCFs generate the greatest amounts of medical waste (mean of 10,238 kg/day per facility) followed by tertiary, primary and diagnostic HCFs, respectively. Characterised waste revealed that only {approx}3% was deemed infectious and highlights opportunities for composting, reuse and recycling. Furthermore, the management practices in most facilities expose patients, staff, waste handlers and the populace to unnecessary health risks. This study proffers recommendations to include (i) a need for sustained cooperation among all key actors (government, hospitals and waste managers) in implementing a safe and reliable medical waste management strategy, not only in legislation and policy formation but also particularly in its monitoring and enforcement and (ii) an obligation for each HCF to ensure a safe and hygienic system of medical waste handling, segregation, collection, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal, with minimal risk to handlers, public health and the environment.

  13. Therapy of endocrine disease: the challenges in managing giant prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Maiter, Dominique; Delgrange, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Giant prolactinomas are rare tumours, representing only 2-3% of all prolactin (PRL)-secreting tumours and raising special diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Based on several considerations developed in this review, their definition should be restricted to pituitary adenomas with a diameter of 40  mm or more, significant extrasellar extension, very high PRL concentrations (usually above 1000  μg/l) and no concomitant GH or ACTH secretion. Giant prolactinomas are much more frequent in young to middle-aged men than in women, with a male to female ratio of about 9:1. Endocrine symptoms are often present but overlooked for a long period of time, and diagnosis is eventually made when neurologic complications arise from massive extension into the surrounding structures, leading to cranial nerve palsies, hydrocephalus, temporal epilepsy or exophthalmos. PRL concentrations are usually in the range of 1000-100,000  μg/l, but may be underestimated by the so-called 'high-dose hook effect'. As in every prolactinoma, dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment allowing rapid alleviation of neurologic symptoms in the majority of the cases, a significant reduction in tumour size in three-fourths of the patients and PRL normalization in 60-70%. These extensive tumours are usually not completely resectable and neurosurgery has significant morbidity and mortality. It should therefore be restricted to acute complications such as apoplexy or leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (often induced by medical treatment) or to patients with insufficient tumoural response or progression. Irradiation and temozolomide are useful adjuvant therapies in a subset of patients with aggressive/invasive tumours, which are not controlled despite combined medical and surgical treatments. Because of these various challenges, we advocate a multidisciplinary management of these giant tumours in expert centres. PMID:24536090

  14. Medical Skepticism and Complementary Therapy Use among Older Rural African-Americans and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Quandt, Sara A.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Lang, Wei; Nguyen, Ha; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study documents demographic, health, and complementary therapy (CT) correlates of medical skepticism among rural older adults. Methods Older (≥65 years) African Americans and Whites in rural North Carolina (N=198) were interviewed. Medical skepticism was assessed using the four items from the Medical Expenditure Survey. Bivariate associations between medical skepticism and demographic and health characteristics and CT use were assessed, and independent effects on CT use. Findings Positive responses to medical skepticism questions ranged from 19.7% (can overcome illness without help) to 59.6% (believes own behavior determines their health). Medical skepticism indicators were associated with few demographic and health characteristics, and one CT category. Conclusions This study shows a high degree of medical skepticism among rural older adults, but limited associations with demographic and health characteristics and CT use. Further research is needed to understand relationships of attitudes towards conventional care and CT use in this population. PMID:23728044

  15. [DGRW-update: exercise therapy in medical rehabilitation--effects, quality, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, K; Sudeck, G; Brüggemann, S; Huber, G

    2010-08-01

    Exercise therapy constitutes the better part of rehabilitative treatment. However, in rehabilitation research the scientific analysis of exercise therapy only plays a minor role. Taking the theoretical model of rehabilitation and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) into account, we propose a heuristic model of aims and effects of exercise therapy and define a system of methodological target setting. This system offers a background for an expanded scientific discussion about biopsychosocial determinants and effects of exercise therapy as well as quality development and the evaluation of exercise treatment concepts within and across indications in the context of multimodal medical rehabilitation. PMID:20677118

  16. Unstable angina: comparison of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Hultgren, H N; Pfeifer, J F; Angell, W W; Lipton, M J; Bilisoly, J

    1977-05-01

    Medical versus surgical treatment of unstable angina was compared in a prospective nonrandomized study of 118 patients. Acute transient ST-T wave changes were present during chest pain in all patients. Acute infarction was excluded by serial electrocardiograms and enzyme studies. All patients admitted to the coronary care unit from 1970 to 1975 who fulfilled the entry criteria were included in the study. The starting point for data evaluation was 5 days after hospital admission. Characteristics at entry were similar in 66 medically treated patients and 52 patients who had coronary bypass vein graft surgery. During a mean follow-up period of 23 months in 66 medically treated patients with unstable angina the incidence rate of nonfatal myocardial infarction was 17% and the total mortality rate 21 percent compared with respective rates of 19% and 5.8% in 52 surgically treated patients. In the surgical group 8 patients (15%) had a perioperative infarction and only 2 (4%) had a late infarction; one patient (2%) died at operation. Symptomatic improvement was observed more frequently in the surgically treated group. Sixty percent of surgically treated patients were free of angina compared with 21% of medically treated patients. Eight medically treated patients (12%) required late surgical treatment for persistent severe angina despite optimal medical management. PMID:67799

  17. Pain management among medical in-patients in Blantyre, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Muula, Adamson S; Misiri, Humphreys E

    2009-01-01

    Background Pain is a leading symptom which influences patients to seek medical attention. The management of pain among patients attending in-patient care in southern African countries has been little described. Information regarding the prevalence of pain and the quality of its management may be useful in guiding clinical decisions, training of health workers and health care quality improvements. Methods A hospital-based audit was conducted to estimate the prevalence of pain and examine the quality of its management among patients admitted to adult medical wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi in 2004. Data were abstracted from ward charts of consecutive patients' who had been either been discharged or had died within a specified period. Characteristics of interest included; socio-demographic data, presence or absence of pain at admission, characterization or description of pain when present, and drug treatment given. Data were analyzed to obtain frequencies and proportions of the characteristics and assess the prevalence of pain and quality of care. Results A total of 121 patients' case notes were reviewed and the prevalence of pain was recorded for 91 (75.2%) of the patients. Clinicians had recorded pertinent information regarding pain management with the following frequency: pain severity or intensity 5/91 (5.5%), alleviating factors 5 (5.5%), pain radiation 7 (7.7%), exacerbating factors in 9 (9.9%) and periodicity in 43 (47.3%) of the cases. Males with pain were more than 3 times more likely to receive analgesic as compared to females, p < 0.01. Paracetamol was the commonest analgesic prescribed. Conclusion Inadequate management of pain among patients attending medical wards at QECH was found. There is need for prospective studies to further characterize pain management and identify pain management gaps in Malawi. Interviews of clinicians and documentation of observations within clinical practice are likely to be of value. PMID

  18. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials. PMID:25970869

  19. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer: medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M J

    2001-12-01

    The indolent nature of estrogen-dependent breast cancer is the most important obstacle for development of new adjuvant endocrine treatments. Clinical trials require thousands of study participants and at least a decade of clinical investigation. How can we be sure that a new endocrine agent warrants this extraordinary level of investment? Traditionally, we have relied on advanced breast cancer trials to determine which drugs are suitable for adjuvant studies. However, with endocrine agents the high incidence of resistance in metastatic breast cancer may mask important advances in efficacy. Recent clinical results with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole suggest that neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is a highly informative additional approach to consider when planning adjuvant studies. In this report, new neoadjuvant endocrine therapy study designs are discussed that address the following issues: (a) the scientific opportunities afforded by gene microarray studies and other genetic technologies to investigate the molecular basis of estrogen-dependent breast cancer; (b) studies that address critical drug development questions as a prelude to adjuvant studies; and (c) the conduct of randomized trials that compare neoadjuvant chemotherapy with neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy to establish a place for neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in routine clinical practice. PMID:11916229

  20. Differential change in specific depressive symptoms during antidepressant medication or cognitive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jay C; DeRubeis, Robert J; Hollon, Steven D; Gallop, Robert; Shelton, Richard C; Amsterdam, Jay D

    2013-07-01

    Cognitive therapy and antidepressant medications are effective treatments for depression, but little is known about their relative efficacy in reducing individual depressive symptoms. Using data from a recent clinical trial comparing cognitive therapy, antidepressant medication, and placebo in the treatment of moderate-to-severe depression, we examined whether there was a relative advantage of any treatment in reducing the severity of specific depressive symptom clusters. The sample consisted of 231 depressed outpatients randomly assigned to: cognitive therapy for 16 weeks (n = 58); paroxetine treatment for 16 weeks (n = 116); or pill placebo for 8 weeks (n = 57). Differential change in five subsets of depressive symptoms was examined: mood, cognitive/suicide, anxiety, typical-vegetative, and atypical-vegetative symptoms. Medication led to a greater reduction in cognitive/suicide symptoms relative to placebo by 4 weeks, and both active treatments reduced these symptoms more than did placebo by 8 weeks. Cognitive therapy reduced the atypical-vegetative symptoms more than placebo by 8 weeks and more than medications throughout the trial. These findings suggest that medications and cognitive therapy led to different patterns of response to specific symptoms of depression and that the general efficacy of these two well-validated treatments may be driven in large part by changes in cognitive or atypical-vegetative symptoms. PMID:23644038

  1. Triple therapy for the management of COPD: a review.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Kathryn; McIvor, R Andrew; Xie, Feng; Blackhouse, Gord; Robertson, Diana; Assasi, Nazila; Hernandez, Paul; Goeree, Ron

    2011-06-01

    Triple therapy for COPD consists of a long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator, a long-acting beta-agonist bronchodilator, and an inhaled corticosteroid. Guidelines from the Canadian Thoracic Society advocate triple therapy for some patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence based clinical efficacy of triple therapy compared to dual bronchodilator therapy (long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator + beta-agonist bronchodilator) or long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator monotherapy for managing COPD. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify relevant clinical evaluations of triple therapy in the management of moderate to severe COPD. Databases searched included: Medline; EMBASE; CINAHL and PubMed (non-Medline records only). Of 2,314 publications, 4 articles evaluated triple therapy for the management of COPD. Hospitalization rates for COPD exacerbations, reported in 2 trials, were significantly reduced with triple therapy compared to long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator monotherapy, with reported relative risks of 0.53 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.86, p = 0.01) and 0.35 (95% CI: 0.16-0.78, p = 0.011). Exacerbation data is inconsistent between the two trials reporting this outcome. Lung function, dyspnea and quality of life data show statistical significant changes with triple therapy compared to long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator monotherapy but the changes do not reach clinical importance. Triple therapy does decrease the number of hospitalizations for severe/acute COPD exacerbations compared with long-acting anti-cholinergic bronchodilator monotherapy. There is insufficient evidence to determine if triple therapy is superior to dual bronchodilator therapy. PMID:21513437

  2. Repositioning therapy for thyroid cancer: new insights on established medications.

    PubMed

    Kushchayeva, Yevgeniya; Jensen, Kirk; Burman, Kenneth D; Vasko, Vasyl

    2014-06-01

    Repositioning of established non-cancer pharmacotherapeutic agents with well-known activity and side-effect profiles is a promising avenue for the development of new treatment modalities for multiple cancer types. We have analyzed some of the medications with mechanism of action that may have relevance to thyroid cancer (TC). Experimental in vitro and in vivo evidences, as well as results of clinical studies, have indicated that molecular targets for medications currently available for the treatment of mood disorders, sexually transmitted diseases, metabolic disorders, and diabetes may be active and relevant in TC. For instance, the derivatives of cannabis and an anti-diabetic agent, metformin, both are able to inhibit ERK, which is commonly activated in TC cells. We present here several examples of well-known medications that have the potential to become new therapeutics for patients with TC. Repositioning of established medications for the treatment of TC could broaden the scope of current therapeutic strategies. These diverse treatment choices could allow physicians to provide an individualized approach to optimize treatment for patients with TC. PMID:24446492

  3. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, Charlotte Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  4. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention with medical therapy in stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sabu; Gokhale, Rohit; Boden, William E; Devereaux, P J

    2013-04-01

    There continues to remain uncertainty regarding the effect of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) vs medical therapy in patients with stable angina. We therefore performed a systematic review and study-level meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of patients with stable angina comparing PCI vs medical therapy for each of the following individual outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), and angina relief. We used 8 strategies to identify eligible trials including bibliographic database searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry until November 2011. Two independent reviewers undertook decisions about study eligibility and data abstraction. Data were pooled using a random effects model. Ten prospective randomized controlled trials fulfilled our eligibility criteria and they included a total of 6752 patients. We did not detect differences between PCI vs medical therapy for all-cause mortality (663 events; relative risk [RR], 0.97 [confidence interval (CI), 0.84-1.12]; I(2) = 0%), CV mortality (214 events; RR, 0.91 [CI, 0.70-1.17]; I(2) = 0%), MI (472 events; RR, 1.09 [CI, 0.92-1.29]; I(2) = 0%), or angina relief at the end of follow-up (2016 events; RR, 1.10 [CI, 0.97-1.26]; I(2)=85%). PCI was not associated with reductions in all-cause or CV mortality, MI, or angina relief. Considering the cost implication and the lack of clear clinical benefit, these findings continue to support existing clinical practice guidelines that medical therapy be considered the most appropriate initial clinical management for patients with stable angina. PMID:23010084

  5. Management of asthma in adults: current therapy and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Green, R; Brightling, C; Pavord, I; Wardlaw, A

    2003-01-01

    Asthma is increasing in prevalence worldwide and results in significant use of healthcare resources. Although most patients with asthma can be adequately treated with inhaled corticosteroids, an important number of patients require additional therapy and an increasing number of options are available. A further minority of patients develop severe persistent asthma which remains difficult to manage despite current pharmacological therapies. This review discusses the various treatment options currently available for each stage of asthma severity, highlights some of the limitations of current management, and outlines directions which may improve the management of asthma in the future. PMID:12782771

  6. Medical simulation: Overview, and application to wound modelling and management

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Dinker R.; Singh, Simerjit

    2012-01-01

    Simulation in medical education is progressing in leaps and bounds. The need for simulation in medical education and training is increasing because of a) overall increase in the number of medical students vis-à-vis the availability of patients; b) increasing awareness among patients of their rights and consequent increase in litigations and c) tremendous improvement in simulation technology which makes simulation more and more realistic. Simulation in wound care can be divided into use of simulation in wound modelling (to test the effect of projectiles on the body) and simulation for training in wound management. Though this science is still in its infancy, more and more researchers are now devising both low-technology and high-technology (virtual reality) simulators in this field. It is believed that simulator training will eventually translate into better wound care in real patients, though this will be the subject of further research. PMID:23162218

  7. The effective management of medical isotope production in research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, D.T. )

    1993-01-01

    During the 50-yr history of the use of radioisotopes for medical applications, research reactors have played a pivotal role in the production of many if not most of the key products. The marriage between research reactors and production operations is subject to significant challenges on two fronts. The medical applications of the radioisotope products impose some unique constraints and requirements on the production process. In addition, the mandates and priorities of a research reactor are not always congruent with the demands of a production environment. This paper briefly reviews the historical development of medical isotope production, identifies the unique challenges facing this endeavor, and discusses the management of the relationship between the isotope producer and the research reactor operator. Finally, the key elements of a successful relationship are identified.

  8. Update on Medical Management of Clinical Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulation of normal kidney functions in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to several pathophysiologic abnormalities that have the potential to significantly clinically affect the CKD patient. This article discusses the clinical impact of hypertension, hypokalemia, anemia, dysrexia, nausea/vomiting, and constipation in the CKD patient and therapies for these conditions. These clinical manifestations of disease may not occur in every patient and may also develop later during the progression of disease. Therefore, monitoring for, identifying, and addressing these factors is considered an important part of the medical management of CKD. PMID:27593576

  9. Detecting and Managing Adverse Effects of Antipsychotic Medications: Current State of Play.

    PubMed

    Ames, Donna; Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Gutierrez, Mary A; Pierre, Joseph M; Rosen, Jennifer A; Shakib, Susan; Yudofsky, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Antipsychotics are some of the most frequently prescribed medications not only for psychotic disorders and symptoms but also for a wide range of on-label and off-label indications. Because second-generation antipsychotics have largely replaced first-generation antipsychotics as first-line options due to their substantially decreased risk of extrapyramidal side effects, attention has shifted to other clinically concerning adverse events associated with antipsychotic therapy. The focus of this article is to update the nonextrapyramidal side effects associated with second-generation antipsychotics. Issues surrounding diagnosis and monitoring as well as clinical management are addressed. PMID:27216904

  10. Comparative efficacy of tadalafil versus tamsulosin as the medical expulsive therapy in lower ureteric stone: a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Aggarwal, Kuldeep; Patil, Avinash; Joshi, Prarthan; Desigowda, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, medical expulsive therapy has been used in the management of distal ureteric stones as a supplement to conservative treatment. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized study to evaluate the possible role of tadalafil individually in comparison with proven tamsulosin therapy in ureteric stone expulsion. The aim of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (tadalafil) and an α-1 blocker (tamsulosin) as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric calculi. Material and methods Between August 2014 and October 2015, 207 patients who presented with distal ureteric stones of size 5–10 mm were randomly divided into two groups: tadalafil (Group A) and tamsulosin (Group B). Therapy was given for a maximum of 4 weeks. Stone expulsion rate, time to stone expulsion, analgesic use, number of hospital visits for pain, follow-up, endoscopic treatment and adverse effects of drugs were noted. Both groups were compared for normally distributed data by percentage, analysis of variance, and T-test. All the classified and categorical data were analyzed for both groups using the chi-square test. Results A statistically significant expulsion rate of 84.0% in Group A compared with 68.0% in Group B (P value = 0.0130), and shorter stone expulsion time in Group A (14.7±3.8) in comparison to Group B (16.8 ±4.5) was observed. Statistically significant differences were noted in renal colic episodes and analgesic requirement in Group A than Group B. No serious adverse effects were noted. Conclusions Tadalafil is safe, efficacious, and well tolerated as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric stones. This study showed that tadalafil increases ureteric stone expulsion quite significantly along with better control of pain and significantly lower analgesic requirement. PMID:27551555

  11. Medical management of suspected Paecilomyces sp. deep keratitis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Lee; Lee, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed a deep keratitis presenting with an endothelial plaque without overlying stromal involvement. Owing to the characteristic clinical appearance, she was provisionally diagnosed with a Paecilomyces sp. keratitis. Corneal scrapings and aqueous humour samples were culture negative. The difficulties in diagnosing Paecilomyces sp. keratitis are discussed. The patient's keratitis was managed with a combination of topical, oral and intracameral injections of voriconazole. This medical management strategy was successful in achieving good infection control and visual outcome. We report a rarely encountered presentation of keratitis in which the clinical appearance and response to voriconazole are highly suggestive evidence of a Paecilomyces sp. keratitis. We believe the combination of topical, oral and intracameral injections of voriconazole represents a novel treatment approach for Paecilomyces sp. keratitis. Our case supports the potential for a medical approach as initial treatment in this otherwise devastating form of oculomycosis. PMID:26135494

  12. Medical management of patients on clozapine: A guide for internists.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Wynne; Azzam, Pierre N; Gopalan, Priya; Ross, Clinton A

    2015-08-01

    Clozapine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1989 for the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and has since proven to reduce symptom burden and suicide risk, increase quality of life, and reduce substance use in individuals with psychotic disorders. Nevertheless, clozapine's psychiatric benefits have been matched by its adverse effect profile. Because they are likely to encounter medical complications of clozapine during admissions or consultations for other services, hospitalists are compelled to maintain an appreciation for these iatrogenic conditions. The authors outline common (eg, constipation, sialorrhea, weight gain) and serious (eg, agranulocytosis, seizures, myocarditis) medical complications of clozapine treatment, with internist-targeted recommendations for management, including indications for clozapine discontinuation. PMID:25809850

  13. Biometric identity management for standard mobile medical networks.

    PubMed

    Egner, Alexandru; Soceanu, Alexandru; Moldoveanu, Florica

    2012-01-01

    The explosion of healthcare costs over the last decade has prompted the ICT industry to respond with solutions for reducing costs while improving healthcare quality. The ISO/IEEE 11073 family of standards recently released is the first step towards interoperability of mobile medical devices used in patient environments. The standards do not, however, tackle security problems, such as identity management, or the secure exchange of medical data. This paper proposes an enhancement of the ISO/IEEE 11073-20601 protocol with an identity management system based on biometry. The paper describes a novel biometric-based authentication process, together with the biometric key generation algorithm. The proposed extension of the ISO/IEEE 11073-20601 is also presented. PMID:23366356

  14. Legal obstacles to medical communities' full participation in managed care.

    PubMed

    Hilgers, D W

    1995-01-01

    Strong physician-driven delivery systems are vital to the creation of a quality medical system for the United States. To compete with employers, insurers, hospitals, and the government, physicians must consolidate. Physicians do not generally have the necessary capital, management skills, or desire to manage large organizations, however. In addition, antitrust restrictions, antireferral statutes, insurance regulation, and malpractice liability risks are major legal obstacles that restrain physicians from consolidating. The government needs to recognize the problems that federal and state laws have created for the development of physician-driven delivery systems. The benefit to the medical system by relaxing these laws will outweigh any potential risk of loss to the public. PMID:7600242

  15. Managing the adverse effects of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Berkey, Franklin J

    2010-08-15

    Nearly two thirds of patients with cancer will undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment plan. Given the increased use of radiation therapy and the growing number of cancer survivors, family physicians will increasingly care for patients experiencing adverse effects of radiation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to significantly improve symptoms of depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy, although they have little effect on cancer-related fatigue. Radiation dermatitis is treated with topical steroids and emollient creams. Skin washing with a mild, unscented soap is acceptable. Cardiovascular disease is a well-established adverse effect in patients receiving radiation therapy, although there are no consensus recommendations for cardiovascular screening in this population. Radiation pneumonitis is treated with oral prednisone and pentoxifylline. Radiation esophagitis is treated with dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, and viscous lidocaine. Radiation-induced emesis is ameliorated with 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and steroids. Symptomatic treatments for chronic radiation cystitis include anticholinergic agents and phenazopyridine. Sexual dysfunction from radiation therapy includes erectile dysfunction and vaginal stenosis, which are treated with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vaginal dilators, respectively. PMID:20704169

  16. Managing Medicare reimbursement on medical-psychiatry units.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Simundson, S

    1991-09-01

    Many general hospitals are confronting issues of financial strain precipitated to a large extent by Medicare payment reductions. The viability of psychiatry programs within general hospitals more than ever depends upon some demonstration of their financial as well as clinical contribution. The aim of this study is to review some of the basic parameters governing Part A (hospital) Medicare reimbursement of DRG-exempt general hospital psychiatry units and to provide options for improving their financial viability. There are a number of specific mechanisms involved in managing Medicare cost and reimbursement. Establishing a system for gatekeeping is important because significant control of payor mix and length of stay resides with the unit gatekeeper. Establishing liaison for short-stay patients with nursing home papers is important because Medicare pays on a target cost per discharge. The identification of short-stay patients is financially very favorable, and often critical to balance the unavoidable longer-stay patients. This paper also discusses how medical-psychiatric units can interface most effectively with medical-surgical units. Finally, there is some discussion of the need to develop pre- and postadmission outpatient medical-psychiatric programs. The financial aspects of medical-psychiatry care, if not the increasing scrutiny of managed care, will force further development of such outpatient programs. PMID:1743500

  17. Graphene-based nanovehicles for photodynamic medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Dong, Haiqing; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives such as graphene oxide (GO) have been widely explored as promising drug delivery vehicles for improved cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on their applications in photodynamic therapy. The large specific surface area of GO facilitates efficient loading of the photosensitizers and biological molecules via various surface functional groups. By incorporation of targeting ligands or activatable agents responsive to specific biological stimulations, smart nanovehicles are established, enabling tumor-triggering release or tumor-selective accumulation of photosensitizer for effective therapy with minimum side effects. Graphene-based nanosystems have been shown to improve the stability, bioavailability, and photodynamic efficiency of organic photosensitizer molecules. They have also been shown to behave as electron sinks for enhanced visible-light photodynamic activities. Owing to its intrinsic near infrared absorption properties, GO can be designed to combine both photodynamic and photothermal hyperthermia for optimum therapeutic efficiency. Critical issues and future aspects of photodynamic therapy research are addressed in this review. PMID:25848263

  18. Graphene-based nanovehicles for photodynamic medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Dong, Haiqing; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives such as graphene oxide (GO) have been widely explored as promising drug delivery vehicles for improved cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on their applications in photodynamic therapy. The large specific surface area of GO facilitates efficient loading of the photosensitizers and biological molecules via various surface functional groups. By incorporation of targeting ligands or activatable agents responsive to specific biological stimulations, smart nanovehicles are established, enabling tumor-triggering release or tumor-selective accumulation of photosensitizer for effective therapy with minimum side effects. Graphene-based nanosystems have been shown to improve the stability, bioavailability, and photodynamic efficiency of organic photosensitizer molecules. They have also been shown to behave as electron sinks for enhanced visible-light photodynamic activities. Owing to its intrinsic near infrared absorption properties, GO can be designed to combine both photodynamic and photothermal hyperthermia for optimum therapeutic efficiency. Critical issues and future aspects of photodynamic therapy research are addressed in this review. PMID:25848263

  19. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy from holistic and medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Herrick, C A; Douglas, V; Carlson, J H

    1996-01-01

    Myths and other issues surrounding menopause are examined on the basis of historical and current literature from medicine, psychiatry, and psychiatric nursing, and on current research. Changes in the psychiatric view of menopause and mental illness reflect a more holistic view of menopause. Some effects of menopause during this normal transitional phase of a woman's life are explored with respect to the developmental, physiological, and cognitive/psychosocial domains. Concepts of menopause as disease or as normal development are discussed as well as issues related to "care or cure" interventions for menopausal women. Evidence supports the need for systematic longitudinal research studies on the use of hormone therapies to provide information on their long-term effects on the menopausal woman. The use of hormone therapies alone or in conjunction with other holistic interventions is discussed. Nurses have a professional responsibility to come to terms with the continuing conflict related to hormone therapies so that they may provide appropriate nursing interventions to celebrate this passage rather than deny it. PMID:8707535

  20. A proposed approach for safety management in medical software design.

    PubMed

    Rafeh, Reza

    2013-02-01

    Safe behavior of modern medical systems is the most important issue in this industry. Software has to follow safety instructions to keep the system away from any error situation. This paper proposes a new approach for safety management which can be used in different phases of software development before implementation and disposal phase. In the proposed approach safety begins from requirements as the infrastructure of design and continues through other phases of software production. PMID:23321965

  1. Implementing electronic medication management at an Australian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Day, Richard O; Roffe, David J; Richardson, Katrina L; Baysari, Melissa T; Brennan, Nicholas J; Beveridge, Sandy; Melocco, Teresa; Ainge, John; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2011-11-01

    We describe the implementation of an electronic medication management system (eMMS) in an Australian teaching hospital, to inform future similar exercises. The success of eMMS implementation depends on: a positive workplace culture (leadership, teamwork and clinician ownership); acceptance of the major impact on work practices by all staff; timely system response to user feedback; training and support for clinicians; a usable system; adequate decision support. PMID:22060071

  2. Medication Management of Jaw Lesions for Dental Patients.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Orrett E; Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra

    2016-04-01

    Most pathologic lesions of the jaws or of oral mucosa are treated successfully by surgical interventions. For treatment of the central giant cell lesion, aneurysmal bone cysts, histiocytosis of the mandible, hemangioma, odontogenic keratocyst, Paget disease, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral lichen planus, medical management consisting of intralesional injections, sclerosing agents, and systemic bisphosphonates is as successful as surgical procedures with fewer complications. Pharmacology of agents used and protocols are presented. PMID:27040297

  3. The medical management of renal artery stenosis in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jachuck, S J; Wilkinson, R; Uldall, P R; Elliott, R W; Taylor, R M; Hacking, P M

    1979-01-01

    The investigation, management and clinical course of 12 patients developing stenosis of the renal artery following transplantation are described. The possible aetiology of the three arteriographic patterns of stenosis is discussed. Surgical correction of graft arterial stenosis is difficult and may lead to graft loss, whereas the outcome with antihypertensive drug treatment with or without anticoagulants is good. Surgery should only be contemplated if medical treatment is failing or if renal function is deteriorating. PMID:369641

  4. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  5. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  6. Barriers to Medical Computing: History, Diagnosis, and Therapy for the Medical Computing ‘Lag’

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bonnie

    1985-01-01

    Widespread concern that computer use in medicine lags behind its potential, and its use in other fields, often is coupled with discussion of physician resistance to computers. A historical study of these phenomena indicates that concern with the medical computing lag dates to the early days of the field. This paper analyzes the lag and questions whether physicians are, or have been, resistant to computers in medicine. The analysis indicates that a fear of physician resistance may be counter-productive, and itself contribute to the lag in medical computing. Then, a discussion of the differential adoption of medical computer applications suggests some ways of overcoming the lag due to physician resistance.

  7. Understanding patient management: the need for medication adherence and persistence.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yc

    2008-01-01

    Poor patient adherence to medication is one of the major factors contributing to poor disease control, in particular in asymptomatic chronic diseases like hypertension and dyslipidaemia. The physical and economic burden on patients and the health care system as a result of non-adherence is great. It is estimated that poor adherence to hypertension medication accounts for as many as 7.1 million preventable deaths annually. Hence recognising and identifying non-adherence is the first step to addressing this problem. Medication adherence can be measured in various ways including self-report to electronic monitoring. In order to be more successful in managing non-adherence, attention must be paid to barriers to adherence, namely the interplay of patient factors, the health care providers themselves and the health care system itself. Taking these into account will probably have the greatest impact on improving medication adherence. Consequently strategies to help overcome these barriers are of paramount importance. Some of these strategies will include education of patients, improving communication between patients and health care providers, improving dose scheduling, providing drugs with less adverse effects, and improving accessibility to health care. Poor mediation adherence continues to be a huge challenge. While the patient is ultimately responsible for the taking of medication, good communication, involving the patient in decision making about their care and simplifying drug regimens go a long way in improving it. PMID:25606104

  8. Efficacy comparison of medications approved for chronic weight management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rekha B; Aronne, Louis J

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, patients who are obese are able to benefit from 5 different FDA approved pharmacologic agents for chronic weight management. Although weight loss from all of these medications was limited to 5% to 10% of total body weight loss in the Phase III clinical trials, patients are capable of losing more weight when a cumulative approach of diet, exercise, and multiple medications are used. A pilot study of adding phentermine to lorcaserin yielded double the weight loss than lorcaserin alone. A higher percentage of total body weight is lost with use of combination phentermine/topiramate compared to orlistat, lorcaserin, and bupropion/naltrexone but there are more contraindications to its use and potential cardiovascular adverse effects due to adrenergic agonism. Lorcaserin and bupropion/naltrexone yielded similar weight loss but carry different adverse effect profiles and interactions with other psychiatric medications may preclude use of one over the other. When choosing a medication for obesity, several factors need to be considered, such as comorbidities, medication interactions, and risk of potential adverse effects. PMID:25900871

  9. UbiMMS: an ubiquitous medication monitoring system based on remote device management methods.

    PubMed

    Pak, JuGeon; Park, KeeHyun

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence is one of the most important factors in treating chronic diseases. However, current medication dispensers, which are devices that deliver medication to chronic disease patients according to predetermined schedules, are not equipped with internal remote management functions. Here, we propose a ubiquitous medication monitoring system (UbiMMS) that provides remote functions for medication status transmission, configuration management, software management, and real-time error management. We provide an overview and performance evaluation of the UbiMMS, and show that the proposed system is adequate for remotely monitoring and managing a medication dispenser in real time. PMID:22754967

  10. [The experience of usage of alginate contain medication in complex therapy at children with GERD disease].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, P L; Lobanov, Iu F; Fugol, D S; Shilova, A V

    2009-01-01

    GERD Therapy at children is complicated task because of Physiological features of a children's body, which reflects on the processes of acid production, motility in upper gastro-intestinal tract and on the metabolism of pharmaceutical products. Some of these medications have age usage limitations due to lack of investigation of side effects in treatment of children. Usage of alginate contain medication in complex therapy of such pathological condition brings to not only fast and effective relief of such symptoms as heartburn, eructation and in positive endoscopy dynamics. PMID:20201310

  11. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  12. Biofield therapies in cardiovascular disease management: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2011-01-01

    Though there have been advances over the last 30 years in the therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart disease and stroke remain the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Many medical therapies for CVD are associated with a number of side effects, often leading patients to seek non-pharmacological treatments to complement standard care. Referred to as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), these therapies consist of a heterogeneous group of modalities used in addition to conventional health care. Biofield therapies exist within this CAM domain and involve the direction of healing energy to facilitate general health and well-being by modifying the energy field. What follows is a brief overview of three biofield therapies developed or used within the field of nursing (Therapeutic Touch, Reiki, and Healing Touch), surveying the use of these interventions for individuals with CVD, and outcomes that may impact CVD risk factors and health-related quality of life. PMID:21697661

  13. Management of Blood Glucose with Noninsulin Therapies in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    George, Christa M; Brujin, Lucy L; Will, Kayley; Howard-Thompson, Amanda

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive, collaborative approach is necessary for optimal treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Treatment guidelines focus on nutrition, exercise, and pharmacologic therapies to prevent and manage complications. Patients with prediabetes or new-onset diabetes should receive individualized medical nutrition therapy, preferably from a registered dietitian, as needed to achieve treatment goals. Patients should be treated initially with metformin because it is the only medication shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce mortality and complications. Additional medications such as sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 inhibitors, thiazolidinediones, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists should be added as needed in a patient-centered fashion. However, there is no evidence that any of these medications reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications, cardiovascular mortality, or all-cause mortality. There is insufficient evidence on which combination of hypoglycemic agents best improves health outcomes before escalating to insulin therapy. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1C goal of less than 7% for many nonpregnant adults, with the option of a less stringent goal of less than 8% for patients with short life expectancy, cardiovascular risk factors, or long-standing diabetes. Randomized trials in middle-aged patients with cardiovascular risk factors have shown no mortality benefit and in some cases increased mortality with more stringent A1C targets. PMID:26132124

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  15. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC “usability”. To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found “easy to use” (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post

  16. Prostaglandin E1 versus sex therapy in the management of psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Baum, N; Randrup, E; Junot, D; Hass, S

    2000-06-01

    The treatment for psychogenic erectile dysfunction has been previously managed by non-medical methods consisting of counseling with a psychiatrist, psychologist or sex therapist. The success rate for treatment with counseling has not been uniformly successful. This paper compares the treatment of psychogenic erectile dysfunction using standard sex therapy and self-injection therapy using low-dose PGE1. Fifty men with psychogenic impotence were divided into two groups: standard sex therapy for twelve weeks or treatment using low-dose (2.5 - 5.0 microg) of PGE1. The results showed that men treated with low-dose PGE1 had a 47% improvement of obtaining an unaided erection compared to 58% improvement rate with sex therapy. 69% of patients in the PGE1 group were satisfied with their treatment compared to 75% receiving sex therapy. The frequency of intercourse reported in patient diaries for the two groups was similar (20.5 per month for PGE1 vs 20.0 per month for sex therapy. The reported duration of erection by patients receiving PGE1 therapy was longer than that reported by those receiving sex therapy (35 min vs 10 min). The comparison of the cost of treatment of the two treatment groups reveals that the sex therapy is approximately 25% more expensive than the PGE1 treatment. This pilot study demonstrates that the efficacy of PGE1 was numerically, though not statistically, less than sex therapy in the treatment of psychogenic impotence. The cost per positive outcome with PGE1 treatment is lower than that of sex therapy treatment making PGE1 more cost-effective. PMID:11045914

  17. [Medical therapy for ureteral stones: high versus low fluid intake].

    PubMed

    Hauser, Johannes; Caviezel, Alessandro; Iselin, Christophe

    2010-12-01

    The mainstays of renal colic medical treatment are first to provide efficient pain relief, and second to facilitate migration of the ureteral stone or dissolve it. In the ambulatory setting, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the treatment of choice of pain relief. To facilitate stone migration, the debate between hydric restriction and hyperhydration remains somewhat open. Besides that, alpha-blockers and anti-calcic agents appear to speed up stone explusion, whereas stone chemolysis acts on a longer time scale. PMID:21290866

  18. Migraine preventive therapy: selection of appropriate patients and general principles of management.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Domenico; Lanteri-Minet, Michel

    2006-08-01

    The goal of this review is to communicate the rationale and the possible benefits of migraine preventive treatments to clinicians and patients, and to address the many problematic issues created by missed diagnosis or misdiagnoses and inadequate migraine management. Successful implementation of migraine preventive treatment requires appropriate patient selection based on several factors, including the frequency of migraine attacks (> or =2-3 attacks/month), the level of disability incurred and the frequency of acute medication usage. Unfortunately, several epidemiologic surveys indicate that preventive therapies are significantly underutilized, which supports the need for greater dialog concerning migraine prevention between consumers and physicians. Effective migraine preventive therapy should reduce the frequency, duration, and severity of migraine, and also improve function, reduce disability, and possibly reduce the risk of worsening the headache syndrome, through acute medication overuse. PMID:16893343

  19. Publication ethics and the ghost management of medical publication.

    PubMed

    Sismondo, Sergio; Doucet, Mathieu

    2010-07-01

    It is by now no secret that some scientific articles are ghost authored - that is, written by someone other than the person whose name appears at the top of the article. Ghost authorship, however, is only one sort of ghosting. In this article, we present evidence that pharmaceutical companies engage in the ghost management of the scientific literature, by controlling or shaping several crucial steps in the research, writing, and publication of scientific articles. Ghost management allows the pharmaceutical industry to shape the literature in ways that serve its interests. This article aims to reinforce and expand publication ethics as an important area of concern for bioethics. Since ghost-managed research is primarily undertaken in the interests of marketing, large quantities of medical research violate not just publication norms but also research ethics. Much of this research involves human subjects, and yet is performed not primarily to increase knowledge for broad human benefit, but to disseminate results in the service of profits. Those who sponsor, manage, conduct, and publish such research therefore behave unethically, since they put patients at risk without justification. This leads us to a strong conclusion: if medical journals want to ensure that the research they publish is ethically sound, they should not publish articles that are commercially sponsored. PMID:19222451

  20. Pharmacoeconomic review of medical management of persistent asthma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy W M; Arnold, Renée J Goldberg

    2008-01-01

    Asthma affects 20 million Americans and causes a substantial loss of productivity. Medications help to increase symptom-free days and improve quality of life. Examining the cost-effectiveness of different treatments, in addition to their clinical efficacy, allows us to choose the optimal strategy in managing patients. This study reviews published pharmacoeconomic analyses of different medications used for asthma management, with a focus on medications available in the United States. English language, peer-reviewed articles, or abstracts were identified from MEDLINE and Current Contents databases (both 1966 to March 1, 2006) using the search terms asthma, pharmacoeconomics, cost-effectiveness, steroids, beta(2)-agonists, cromolyn, methylxanthines, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and omalizumab. Citations from available articles were reviewed also for additional references. Pharmacoeconomic analysis from a payer's perspective has shown that salmeterol/fluticasone is a cost-effective treatment option for moderate persistent asthma management, when compared with fluticasone with or without the addition of leukotriene modifiers. Leukotriene modifiers are less cost-effective than inhaled corticosteroids or combined inhaled steroids and long-acting beta(2)-agonists for mild or moderate persistent asthma. Anti-IgE antibody has been shown inconsistently, to be cost-effective in patients with moderate to severe allergic asthma. Although the acquisition cost of levalbuterol is higher, one study showed that it may be more cost-effective than albuterol after taking into account reduction in hospitalizations. Cost-effectiveness analyses and clinical efficacy of medications, together with other patient-specific factors, are important information to be considered when selecting treatment regimens for asthma. Future economic analysis should focus on finding better ways to evaluate productivity lost due to asthma, in addition to hospitalization. PMID:18430307

  1. Oral medications regarding their safety and efficacy in the management of patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Oncel, Mehmet Yekta; Erdeve, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a common clinical condition in preterm infants which is inversely related to birth weight and gestational age. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as indomethacin and ibuprofen which block the prostaglandin conversion from arachidonic acid are the most commonly used drugs for ductal closure. This review focuses on the safety and efficacy oral medications in the management of PDA in preterm infants. Ibuprofen seems to be the first choice due to its higher safety profile, as it is associated with fewer gastrointestinal and renal side effects when compared to indomethacin. PDA closure rates are better with oral than with intravenous ibuprofen probably due to the pharmacokinetic of the drug. However, these medications were reported to be associated with several adverse including transient renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation, hyperbilirubinemia and platelet dysfunction. Paracetamol seems be an alternative to PDA therapy with lower adverse events and side effects. PMID:26862505

  2. Restless legs syndrome-current therapies and management of augmentation.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Winkelmann, Juliane; Inoue, Yuichi; Paulus, Walter

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS) can severely affect quality of life and disturb sleep, so that pharmacological treatment is necessary, especially for elderly patients. Treatment guidelines recommend initiation of therapy with dopamine agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole or the rotigotine transdermal patch, all approved in most countries) or α-2-δ ligands (gabapentin enacarbil, approved in the USA and Japan), depending on the country and availability. Where approved, opioids (prolonged release oxycodone-naloxone, approved in Europe) are also recommended as a second-line therapy for severe RLS. Several iron formulations can be effective but are not yet approved for RLS therapy, whereas benzodiazepines and other anticonvulsants are not recommended or approved. Less is known about effective management of RLS that is associated with other conditions, such as uraemia or pregnancy. Furthermore, very little data are available on the management of RLS when first-line treatment fails or patients experience augmentation. In this Review, we summarize state-of-the-art therapies for RLS in the context of the diagnostic criteria and available guidelines, based on knowledge ranging from Class I evidence for the treatment of idiopathic RLS to Class IV evidence for the treatment of complications such as augmentation. We consider therapies, including combination therapies, that are used in clinical practice for long-term management of RLS, despite a lack of trials and approval, and highlight the need for practical long-term evaluation of current trials. PMID:26215616

  3. Re-launch of the South African Society of Medical Managers (previously known as the Medical Administrators Group).

    PubMed

    Dudley, L; Selebano, T E; Nathan, R; Kirsten, R; Ciapparelli, P; Mutshekwane, M N; Basu, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical management is a recognised specialty in many developing and developed countries, including Australia, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. In South Africa it was recognised as a sub-specialty in the 1990s, but this is no longer the case. The South African Society of Medical Managers, in close collaboration with the Division of Medical Management of the College of Public Health Medicine of South Africa, has been working to re-establish the specialty of medical management in South Africa. Well-trained specialist medical managers would play a significant role in the effective and efficient implementation of National Health Insurance and primary healthcare re-engineering through the practice of evidence-based health care, clinical economics and administrative medicine. PMID:23237117

  4. Intrathecal Morphine Infusion Therapy in Management of Chronic Pain: Present and Future Implementation in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Moon, Jee Youn; Park, Keun Suk; Yoo, Yong Jae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intrathecal morphine pump (ITMP) infusion therapy is efficient in managing malignant and nonmalignant chronic pain refractory to standard treatment. However, the high cost of an ITMP is the greatest barrier for starting a patient on ITMP infusion therapy. Using the revised Korean reimbursement guidelines, we investigated the cost effectiveness of ITMP infusion therapy and conducted a patient survey. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart review of 12 patients who underwent ITMP implantation was performed. Morphine dose escalation rates were calculated, and numeric rating scale (NRS) scores were compared before and after ITMP implantation. We surveyed patients who were already using an ITMP as well as those who were candidates for an ITMP. All survey data were collected through in-person interviews over 3 months. Data on the cost of medical treatment were collected and projected over time. Results The NRS score decreased during the follow-up period. The median morphine dose increased by 36.9% over the first year, and the median time required to reach a financial break-even point was 24.2 months. Patients were more satisfied with the efficacy of ITMP infusion therapy than with conventional therapy. The expected cost of ITMP implantation was KRW 4000000–5000000 in more than half of ITMP candidates scheduled to undergo implantation. Conclusion The high cost of initiating ITMP infusion therapy is challenging; however, the present results may encourage more patients to consider ITMP therapy. PMID:26847303

  5. Diabetes: Christian Worldview, Medical Distrust & Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbuah, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To inform development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N=44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical mistrust, and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African American community to improve health outcomes. PMID:25735754

  6. Diabetes: Christian worldview, medical distrust and self-management.

    PubMed

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbauh, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-06-01

    To inform the development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N = 44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical distrust and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest that diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African-American community to improve health outcomes. PMID:25735754

  7. Medical Management of Functioning Pituitary Adenoma: An Update

    PubMed Central

    OKI, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of functioning pituitary adenoma (FPA) must achieve endocrinological remission as well as tumor size reduction. The first-line treatment of FPA except prolactinoma is transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Medical treatments and/or radiation will be applied as adjuvant therapies succeeding to TSS. In patients with prolactinoma, dopamine agonists, especially cabergoline, are quite efficient. Dopamine agonists decrease plasma prolactin levels and induce shrinkage in most patients and can be ceased in some of them. In patients with acromegaly, dopamine agonists, somatostatin analogues, and growth hormone receptor antagonist have been used as a monotherapy or the combination, and the high remission rate can be achieved. Pasireotide having high affinity to type 5 somatostatin receptors will be available for the patients presenting resistance against type 2 receptor agonists, such as octreotide and lanreotide. The preceding treatment with somatostatin analogues is beneficial for improving the success rate of TSS. The chimera compounds of somatostatin analogues and dopamine agonists have been investigated. The medical treatments of Cushing's disease are challenging, if TSS is not successful. To suppress ACTH secretion, dopamine agonists and somatostatin analogues have been examined, but neither came to show a sufficient effect. Pasireotide reduces urinary cortisol excretion with a high remission rate. Adrenal enzyme inhibitors (AEIs), such as metyrapone, can inhibit cortisol synthesis form adrenal glands promptly and sufficiently in most of patients. LCI699, a newly developed AEI, is more potent than metyrapone and will be available. We should use available medical treatments for improving the prognosis and quality of life. PMID:25446388

  8. Medical management of the patient with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mask, A G

    2000-06-01

    periodontal patients. Epinephrine use should be avoided or utilized cautiously in patients with pacemakers or automatic defibrillator devices because of the possibility of refractory arrhythmia. Consultation with patient's cardiologist is advised. Anticoagulation with coumadin is not a contraindication to dental procedures. The prothrombin time or international normalized ratio laboratory values should be checked on the day of the procedure to assure that it is in an acceptable range. Aspirin therapy is not a problem unless the patient is on very high doses for severe arthritis. Continuing medical and dental education credits should emphasize cross-training in both areas to insure comprehensive treatment of the patient with periodontal disease. Smoking cessation, regular exercise, a low-fat diet and good dental hygiene contribute to a healthy cardiovascular system. Patients should understand as best we know the relationship between periodontal and cardiovascular disease to afford them an opportunity to improve their overall dental and physical health. PMID:11276761

  9. Nonadherence with antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia: challenges and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Peter M; Brain, Cecilia; Scott, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence with medication occurs in all chronic medical disorders. It is a particular challenge in schizophrenia due to the illness’s association with social isolation, stigma, and comorbid substance misuse, plus the effect of symptom domains on adherence, including positive and negative symptoms, lack of insight, depression, and cognitive impairment. Nonadherence lies on a spectrum, is often covert, and is underestimated by clinicians, but affects more than one third of patients with schizophrenia per annum. It increases the risk of relapse, rehospitalization, and self-harm, increases inpatient costs, and lowers quality of life. It results from multiple patient, clinician, illness, medication, and service factors, but a useful distinction is between intentional and unintentional nonadherence. There is no gold standard approach to the measurement of adherence as all methods have pros and cons. Interventions to improve adherence include psychoeducation and other psychosocial interventions, antipsychotic long-acting injections, electronic reminders, service-based interventions, and financial incentives. These overlap, all have some evidence of effectiveness, and the intervention adopted should be tailored to the individual. Psychosocial interventions that utilize combined approaches seem more effective than unidimensional approaches. There is increasing interest in electronic reminders and monitoring systems to enhance adherence, eg, Short Message Service text messaging and real-time medication monitoring linked to smart pill containers or an electronic ingestible event marker. Financial incentives to enhance antipsychotic adherence raise ethical issues, and their place in practice remains unclear. Simple pragmatic strategies to improve medication adherence include shared decision-making, regular assessment of adherence, simplification of the medication regimen, ensuring that treatment is effective and that side effects are managed, and promoting a positive

  10. Nonadherence with antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia: challenges and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Peter M; Brain, Cecilia; Scott, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nonadherence with medication occurs in all chronic medical disorders. It is a particular challenge in schizophrenia due to the illness's association with social isolation, stigma, and comorbid substance misuse, plus the effect of symptom domains on adherence, including positive and negative symptoms, lack of insight, depression, and cognitive impairment. Nonadherence lies on a spectrum, is often covert, and is underestimated by clinicians, but affects more than one third of patients with schizophrenia per annum. It increases the risk of relapse, rehospitalization, and self-harm, increases inpatient costs, and lowers quality of life. It results from multiple patient, clinician, illness, medication, and service factors, but a useful distinction is between intentional and unintentional nonadherence. There is no gold standard approach to the measurement of adherence as all methods have pros and cons. Interventions to improve adherence include psychoeducation and other psychosocial interventions, antipsychotic long-acting injections, electronic reminders, service-based interventions, and financial incentives. These overlap, all have some evidence of effectiveness, and the intervention adopted should be tailored to the individual. Psychosocial interventions that utilize combined approaches seem more effective than unidimensional approaches. There is increasing interest in electronic reminders and monitoring systems to enhance adherence, eg, Short Message Service text messaging and real-time medication monitoring linked to smart pill containers or an electronic ingestible event marker. Financial incentives to enhance antipsychotic adherence raise ethical issues, and their place in practice remains unclear. Simple pragmatic strategies to improve medication adherence include shared decision-making, regular assessment of adherence, simplification of the medication regimen, ensuring that treatment is effective and that side effects are managed, and promoting a positive

  11. Anesthetic management for implantation of a treatment device: the Rheos Baroreflex Hypertensive Therapy System.

    PubMed

    Thai, Nina N

    2012-02-01

    Resistant hypertension is a prevalent dilemma. Despite all available antihypertensive medications and multiple strategies such as healthier diets and exercise programs, many patients are still unable to maintain or reach a therapeutic goal for systolic blood pressure. Because of this major health concern, CVRx, Inc has developed a treatment involving baroreflex activation therapy (Rheos Baroreflex Hypertension Therapy System) to treat patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure. The surgical implantation of this system is similar to a carotid endarterectomy procedure; however, the anesthetic management for this procedure is unique and challenging. This case report describes a 45-year-old African American woman with a history of hypertension who was receiving multiple antihypertensive medications and, thus, was a qualified candidate for implantation of this device. The goal of anesthetic management during implantation of this hypertension therapy system is to preserve the carotid sinus baroreceptor sensitivity by avoiding administering anesthetic agents that inhibit the baroreceptor reflex during electrode placement and the testing period. Because of the restriction of some of the anesthetic agents that an anesthesia provider can use, this procedure poses major challenges to the anesthesia provider in planning for anesthesia care and managing risks to the patient. PMID:22474800

  12. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wendy; Newmark, Sanford

    2007-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are commonly used by parents for their children who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorders. The use of these therapies is well documented, yet the evidence of the safety and efficacy of these treatments in children is limited. This article describes the current evidence-based CAM therapies for ADHD and autism, focusing on nutritional interventions; natural health products, including essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and other health supplements; biofeedback; and reducing environmental toxins. The CAM evidence in ADHD is addressed, as is the CAM literature in autism. PMID:18061787

  13. Medication management concerns of ethnic minority family caregivers of people living with dementia.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Robyn J; Harrison, Lindsey; Mullan, Judy

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the medication management experiences of Australian ethnic minority family caregivers of people living with dementia. From the perspective of this group of caregivers, medication management was a source of stress resulting from the progressive loss of ability of care recipients to manage their own medications; the complexity of the medication regime and the caregiver's lack of trust of the care recipient to safely and effectively manage medications. Caregivers used various strategies to manage medications and avoid conflict with care recipients including being watchful and involving other family members in medication management tasks. Family caregivers indicated that a lack of information and access to support to inform their medication management role added to their stress, which was exacerbated in some cases by limited English proficiency. Supportive factors noted by caregivers included a well-established relationship with a community pharmacist, involvement of a geriatrician, family support and caregiver support group participation. PMID:24339089

  14. Medical Management of Oral Lichen Planus: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Krunal; Desai, Sachin; Malu, Rahul; Chokshi, Achala

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune oral mucosal disease with unclear aetiology. The clinical management of OLP poses considerable difficulties to the oral physician. Aim The aim was to assess the efficacy of any form of intervention used to medically manage OLP. Materials and Methods We searched and analysed the following databases (from January 1990 to December 2014):- Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. All Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) for the medical management of OLP which compared active treatment with placebo or between active treatments were considered in this systematic review. Participants of any age, gender or race having symptomatic OLP (including mixed forms), unconnected to any identifiable cause (e.g. lichenoid drug reactions) and confirmed by histopathology have been included. Interventions of all types, including topical treatments or systemic drugs of variable dosage, duration & frequency of delivery have been considered. All the trials identified were appraised by five review authors and the data for all the trials were synthesised using specifically designed data extraction form. Binary data has been presented as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and continuous data as mean differences (MD) with 95% CIs. Results A total of 35 RCTs were included in this systematic review on medical management of OLP. No strong evidence suggesting superiority of any specific intervention in reducing pain and clinical signs of OLP were shown by the RCTs included here. Conclusion Future RCTs on a larger scale, adopting standardized outcome assessing parameters should be considered. PMID:27042598

  15. Liposarcoma: Multimodality Management and Future Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Crago, Aimee M; Dickson, Mark A

    2016-10-01

    There are 3 biologic groups of liposarcoma: well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcoma, myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, and pleomorphic liposarcoma. In all 3 groups, complete surgical resection is central in treatment aimed at cure and is based on grade. Radiation can reduce risk of local recurrence in high-grade lesions or minimize surgical morbidity in the myxoid/round cell liposarcoma group. The groups differ in chemosensitivity, so adjuvant chemotherapy is selectively used in histologies with metastatic potential but not in the resistant subtype dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Improved understanding of the genetic aberrations that lead to liposarcoma initiation is allowing for the rapid development of targeted therapies for liposarcoma. PMID:27591497

  16. Aiming at the target: improved adjuvant medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Bedard, Philippe L; Dinh, Phuong; Sotiriou, Christos; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J

    2009-10-01

    The 2007 St. Gallen Expert Panel recognized the existence of molecular tools for risk stratification, but recommended the use of high-quality standard pathological testing alone for risk allocation and treatment selection. Over the last two years, much has been learned about these novel molecular tools: they demonstrate similar prognostic power; their performance appears to be driven by improved quantification of cellular proliferation; tumour burden remains an important determinant of long-term outcome; and their prediction of responsiveness to systemic therapy is suboptimal. In the meantime, great effort has continued to be invested in evaluating individual predictive markers to guide treatment selection. A number of putative targets that showed early promise--such as HER-2 and TOP2A gene amplification for anthracyclines, Myc amplification for trastuzumab, and Tau expression for taxanes--have yielded disappointing results when subjected to subsequent validation. These failings underscore the difficulty of accurate, reproducible target measurement and the inherent complexity of early breast cancer which is unlikely to be captured by a single gene or protein alteration. Future progress in adjuvant treatment tailoring will require a fundamental shift towards multi-dimensional thinking--with the development of multi-parameter assays that integrate tumour biology, disease burden, and host-related factors. The traditional model of post hoc predictive marker validation appears unlikely to produce tangible gains in the era of targeted systemic therapy. It is hoped that coupling prospective biomarker discovery with new drug development in earlier stages of disease will yield additional targets that can be used to guide clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:19914538

  17. Hypnosis: adjunct therapy for cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers' lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  18. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers’ lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  19. A personalized framework for medication treatment management in chronic care.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis G; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Malousi, Andigoni; Giaglis, Georgios D; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-03-01

    The ongoing efforts toward continuity of care and the recent advances in information and communication technologies have led to a number of successful personal health systems for the management of chronic care. These systems are mostly focused on monitoring efficiently the patient's medical status at home. This paper aims at extending home care services delivery by introducing a novel framework for monitoring the patient's condition and safety with respect to the medication treatment administered. For this purpose, considering a body area network (BAN) with advanced sensors and a mobile base unit as the central communication hub from the one side, and the clinical environment from the other side, an architecture was developed, offering monitoring patterns definition for the detection of possible adverse drug events and the assessment of medication response, supported by mechanisms enabling bidirectional communication between the BAN and the clinical site. Particular emphasis was given on communication and information flow aspects that have been addressed by defining/adopting appropriate formal information structures as well as the service-oriented architecture paradigm. The proposed framework is illustrated via an application scenario concerning hypertension management. PMID:20007042

  20. Injection therapy for the management of superficial subcutaneous lipomas.

    PubMed

    Amber, Kyle T; Ovadia, Steven; Camacho, Ivan

    2014-06-01

    Superficial subcutaneous lipomas are common benign tumors of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Removal of superficial subcutaneous lipomas is achieved with simple surgical excision for the purposes of improved cosmesis, removing painful lipomas, or for the removal of a lipoma affecting function through mass effect. As research in localized fat reduction has improved, therapies successful in this domain have been applied to the management of lipomas as a surgical alternative. In this review article, the authors review the basic science of injection therapies used in the management of lipomas as well as their potential efficacy and limitations. PMID:25013540

  1. Injection Therapy for the Management of Superficial Subcutaneous Lipomas

    PubMed Central

    Ovadia, Steven; Camacho, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Superficial subcutaneous lipomas are common benign tumors of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Removal of superficial subcutaneous lipomas is achieved with simple surgical excision for the purposes of improved cosmesis, removing painful lipomas, or for the removal of a lipoma affecting function through mass effect. As research in localized fat reduction has improved, therapies successful in this domain have been applied to the management of lipomas as a surgical alternative. In this review article, the authors review the basic science of injection therapies used in the management of lipomas as well as their potential efficacy and limitations. PMID:25013540

  2. [Geriatric dentistry: medical problems as well as disease- and therapy-induced oral disorders].

    PubMed

    Koller, M M

    1994-03-01

    As in pediatric dentistry, management of the oral problems in elderly patients does not depend on the development of new technical skills, but rather on the knowledge of: biological, psychological and social aspects of primary (physiological or age-related) and secondary (pathological or disease-related) aging; atypical presentations of disease; multiple pathological conditions (polymorbidity, polypathophysiology, polypharmacy); an underreporting of disease; the importance of functional status; the role of an interdisciplinary team; Geriatric medicine refers to social, psychological and clinical aspects of disease in older adults. Geriatric dentistry deals with the respective aspects concerning oral diseases. Chronic conditions as well as their treatment (e.g. medication) are more common with advancing age. They may have major implications for dental practice, leading to changes in oral health behavior and attitudes of the elderly patient with sometimes detrimental effects on oral health. Therefore, different concepts in prevention, diagnosis and therapy of oral diseases are required for the oral care of older adults. Two important consequences must be considered: Firstly, the medical education of the dentist and the dental team must be improved. The dental team must become a member of the group of health-care professionals caring for an aging population (geriatric medicine) to meet the heterogeneous needs of as much as 75% of our future patients. Secondly, there is great need for education of all health-care professionals dealing with elderly patients about possible negative impacts medicine can have on oral health. Identification and diagnosis of oral disease as well as preventive measures must be stressed. PMID:8153504

  3. Pediatric glaucoma medical therapy: who more accurately reports medication adherence, the caregiver or the child?

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Daniel B; Neustein, Rebecca F; Jones, Sarah K; Robin, Alan L; Muir, Kelly W

    2015-01-01

    As they grow older, most children with glaucoma must eventually face the transition to self-administering medications. We previously reported factors associated with better or worse medication adherence in children with glaucoma, using an objective, electronic monitor. Utilizing the same data set, the purpose of the current study was to determine whose report (the caregiver’s or the child’s) corresponded better with electronically monitored adherence. Of the 46 participants (22 girls), the mean age of children primarily responsible, and caregiver primarily responsible for medication administration was 15±2 and 10±2 years, respectively. For the children whose caregiver regularly administered the eyedrops, the caregiver’s assessment of drop adherence was associated with measured adherence (P=0.012), but the child’s was not (P=0.476). For the children who self-administered eyedrops, neither the child’s (P=0.218) nor the caregiver’s (P=0.395) assessment was associated with measured percent adherence. This study highlights potential errors when relying on self-reporting of compliance in patients and caregivers with pediatric glaucoma, particularly when the child is responsible for administering their own eyedrops. Frank discussions about the importance of medication adherence and how to improve compliance may help both the child and caregiver better communicate with the treating provider. PMID:26648687

  4. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  5. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  6. Teaching Electroconvulsive Therapy to Medical Students: Effects of Instructional Method on Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnell, Ronald L.; Duk, Anthony D.; Christison, George W.; Haviland, Mark G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of learning about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) via live observation to learning via an instructional videotape. Method: During their psychiatry clerkship, 122 medical students were randomized using these two educational methods, and their ECT knowledge and attitudes were assessed during the first and last weeks…

  7. Traditional Chinese medical herbs staged therapy in infertile women with endometriosis: a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaorong; Lian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease defined as the presence of endometrioid tissue (glands and stroma) outside the uterus. About 30 to 40% patients with endometriosis are infertile. In traditional Chinese medical system, endometriosis associated infertility is mostly caused by kidney deficiency and blood stasis. The herb of reinforcing kidney and removing blood stasis is designed to treat the disease. Material and methods: All the 80 up-to-standard patients were divided into two different groups exactly according to the random principle. They were treated with hormone and traditional Chinese medical herb separately. After half year’s therapy, all the patients received one year’s follow-up. Their transvaginal ultrasonographic changes, serum hormone levels and pregnancy rate were recorded to analysis the effect. Results: No significant difference happened in two groups’ demographic and clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the treatment, the effect on serum hormone levels and specific markers are significant (P < 0.05). The transvaginal ultrasonographic changes were positive, too. The text on hepatic and renal function confirmed to the safety of the herb. Compared to hormone therapy, the traditional Chinese medical herb is safe and effective for endometriosis patients with infertility. Conclusion: Compared with hormone therapy, traditional Chinese medical herb’s two-staged therapy is effective and safe for endometriosis patients with infertility. PMID:26550373

  8. A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adolescents Receiving Antidepressant Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Gregory; DeBar, Lynn; Lynch, Frances; Powell, James; Gale, John; O'Connor, Elizabeth; Ludman, Evette; Bush, Terry; Lin, Elizabeth H. B.; Von Korff, Michael; Hertert, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test a collaborative-care, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program adjunctive to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in HMO pediatric primary care. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial comparing a treatment-as-usual (TAU) control condition consisting primarily of SSRI medication delivered outside the…

  9. Comparing Two Cooperative Small Group Formats Used with Physical Therapy and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eon, Marcel; Proctor, Peggy; Reeder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study compared "Structured Controversy" (a semi-formal debate like small group activity) with a traditional open discussion format for medical and physical therapy students. We found that those students who had participated in Structured Controversy changed their personal opinion on the topic more than those who were in the Open Discussion…

  10. Medical Family Therapy for a Woman with End-stage Crohn's Disease and Her Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Harkness, Jennifer L.; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    Medical family therapy grew out of the experiences of family therapists working with other professionals to provide comprehensive, integrated healthcare for patients. This is the story of one such patient and provides an account of the experience through quotes from videotaped sessions and electronic mail communications that occurred throughout…

  11. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module III. Shock and Fluid Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on shock and fluid therapy is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) body fluids, electrolytes and their effect on the body, and the general principles of fluid and acid base balances; (2) characteristics of…

  12. Computerized medication administration records decrease medication occurrences.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Hill, J J; Wilson, R G; Nipper, K; Kwon, I W

    1997-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that medication errors occur at a number of locations in the continuum between ordering of drug therapy and administration of the medication. Computer management of patient medication profiles offers the opportunity to enhance communication between pharmacists and nurses, and to decrease medication errors and delays in delivery of therapy. A number of authors have postulated that computerization of medication profiles would enhance medication delivery accuracy and timeliness, but no study has demonstrated this improvement. We report the results of a retrospective analysis undertaken to assess the improvements resulting from sharing a computerized medication record. We used a broader definition of medication occurrences that includes the more traditional definition, and averted errors, delays in delivery of medications and information, and disagreements between pharmacy and nursing medication profiles. We compared medication occurrences reported through an existing internal system between two periods; the first when separate pharmacy and nursing medication records were used, and the second period when a shared medication record was used by pharmacy and nursing. Average medication occurrences per admission decreased from 0.1084 to 0.0658 (p < 0.01). Medication occurrences per dose decreased from 0.0005 to 0.0003 (p < 0.01). The use of a shared medication record by pharmacy and nursing led to a statistically significant decrease in medication occurrences. Information shared between the two professions allowed timely resolution of discrepancies in medication orders, leading to better execution of drug therapy, decreased medication occurrences, and increased efficiency. PMID:10166241

  13. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  14. [The realization way and lean management about medical consumable material in clinical use].

    PubMed

    Shang, Changhao; Cheng, Junpei; Xu, Hailin; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    The medical consumable material management is an important part of logistic support in the management of hospital, but the hospital has many weak links in the management of supplies. This paper aims to explore the common problems (especially in clinical use) existing in the management of medical consumables and years of management experience in Changhai hospital's practice, then discusses lean management from the perspective of lean management PMID:26027302

  15. Gains in employment status following antidepressant medication or cognitive therapy for depression

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Amsterdam, Jay; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression can adversely affect employment status. Aims To examine whether there is a relative advantage of cognitive therapy or antidepressant medication in improving employment status following treatment, using data from a previously reported trial. Method Random assignment to cognitive therapy (n = 48) or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (n = 93) for 4 months; treatment responders were followed for up to 24 months. Differential effects of treatment on employment status were examined. Results At the end of 28 months, cognitive therapy led to higher rates of full-time employment (88.9%) than did antidepressant medication among treatment responders (70.8%), χ21 = 5.78, P = 0.02, odds ratio (OR) = 5.66, 95% CI 1.16–27.69. In the shorter-term, the main effect of treatment on employment status was not significant following acute treatment (χ21 = 1.74, P = 0.19, OR = 1.77, 95% CI 0.75–4.17); however, we observed a site×treatment interaction (χ21 = 6.87, P = 0.009) whereby cognitive therapy led to a higher rate of full-time employment at one site but not at the other. Conclusions Cognitive therapy may produce greater improvements in employment v. medication, particularly over the longer term. PMID:24925985

  16. Medical therapy options for aging men with benign prostatic hyperplasia: focus on alfuzosin 10 mg once daily

    PubMed Central

    Roehrborn, Claus G; Rosen, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) are common in aging men and can significantly affect quality of life. Men with bothersome LUTS/BPH often present with various other age-related conditions, including sexual dysfunction, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome, which can complicate management decisions. Therefore, healthcare providers should be familiar with first-line treatment options for LUTS/BPH and their differing safety profiles, particularly with respect to cardiovascular and sexual function side effects. This article presents a review of first-line medical therapy options for managing aging men with LUTS/BPH and patient considerations when evaluating and selecting these therapies, with a focus on the clinical efficacy and cardiovascular and sexual function safety profiles of the uroselective α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist alfuzosin 10 mg once daily. Alfuzosin improves LUTS, peak urinary flow rates, and disease-specific quality of life, reduces the long-term risk of overall BPH progression, and is well tolerated in aging men, with minimal vasodilatory and sexual function side effects, even in those with comorbidities. Alfuzosin is well tolerated when used in combination with antihypertensive medications and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. The long-term clinical efficacy and good cardiovascular and sexual function safety profile of alfuzosin can contribute to an improved quality of life for aging men with LUTS/BPH. PMID:18982921

  17. Medical management of brain tumors and the sequelae of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, David; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Norden, Andrew D.; Reardon, David A.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with malignant brain tumors are prone to complications that negatively impact their quality of life and sometimes their overall survival as well. Tumors may directly provoke seizures, hypercoagulable states with resultant venous thromboembolism, and mood and cognitive disorders. Antitumor treatments and supportive therapies also produce side effects. In this review, we discuss major aspects of supportive care for patients with malignant brain tumors, with particular attention to management of seizures, venous thromboembolism, corticosteroids and their complications, chemotherapy including bevacizumab, and fatigue, mood, and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25358508

  18. The charisma and deception of reparative therapies: when medical science beds religion.

    PubMed

    Grace, André P

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I examine the history and resurgence of interest in sexual reorientation or reparative therapies. I begin with a critique of the contemporary "ex-gay" movement, interrogating Exodus as the prototype of a politico-religious transformational ministry that works to "cure" homosexuals, and examine how Exodus utilizes ex-gay testimony to deceive harried homosexuals looking for escape from the effects of internalized and cultural homophobia. Next, I investigate how reparative therapies function as orthodox treatments that charismatically meld conservative religious perspectives with medical science to produce a pseudoscience promising to treat homosexuality effectively. In this regard, I assess the ongoing debate regarding gay-affirming versus reparative therapies by first looking at the history of medicalizing homosexuality and then surveying the debate spurred by Robert L. Spitzer's research. I conclude with a consideration of research needed to measure whether efficacious change in sexual orientation is possible. PMID:19064479

  19. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    PubMed

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives. PMID:26665690

  20. Sickle cell disease pain management and the medical home.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jean L; Oyeku, Suzette O

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common cause for hospitalization and acute morbidity in sickle cell disease (SCD). The consequences of SCD-related pain are substantial, affecting both the individual and the health care system. The emergence of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) provides new opportunities to align efforts to improve SCD management with innovative and potentially cost-effective models of patient-centered care. The Department of Health and Human Services has designated SCD as a priority area with emphasis on creating PCMHs for affected patients. The question for patients, clinicians, scientists, and policy-makers is how the PCMH can be designed to address pain, the hallmark feature of SCD. This article provides a framework of pain management within the PCMH model. We present an overview of pain and pain management in SCD, gaps in pain management, and current care models used by patients and discuss core PCMH concepts and multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for SCD pain management. PMID:24319216

  1. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  2. Practice management/role of the medical director.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Douglas G

    2014-06-01

    Although the nature of ambulatory surgery has changed over the years, the ideal role of the medical director mirrors its earliest iterations, focusing on excellent customer service and high quality of care. These efforts are supported by 3 modern methods of quality management borrowed from industry: intentional process improvement, standard care pathways, and monitoring outcomes to determine the efficacy of each. These methods are critical to master in order to lead the facility and providers to the highest quality of care and service. PMID:24882136

  3. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events. PMID:26390952

  4. Successful management of renal mucormycosis with antifungal therapy and drainage

    PubMed Central

    Devana, Sudheer K.; Bora, Girdhar S.; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.; Panwar, Pankaj; Kakkar, Nandita; Mandal, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of isolated extensive renal mucormycosis in an immunocompetent adult, who was successfully managed conservatively without surgical debridement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where antifungal therapy alone was sufficient even with such an extensive involvement. PMID:27127360

  5. Rational-Emotive Therapy: Contributions to Teacher Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Susan G.

    1990-01-01

    Notes that irrational beliefs are significantly related to teacher stress levels and that teacher stress management interventions having most evidence of effectiveness employ cognitive restructuring components based on rational-emotive therapy procedures. Notes that programs use stress inoculation training framework and provide behavioral and…

  6. Managing Rosacea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Patients All About Rosacea Faces of Rosacea Treatment Photos Rosacea FAQ Management Options Medical Therapy When ... or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, ...

  7. [Medical economics in tuberculosis management: what will come after the TB ward?].

    PubMed

    Yotsumoto, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Current unprofitability of medical services in tuberculosis (TB) ward in Japan has been induced by low medical fee and long-term hospital stays, aggravated by unoccupied beds due to the decrease in the number of patients. For the solution of this issue, the increase of medical fee, shortening of the length of hospital stay and drastic reduction of oversupplied beds are essential. An increment of medical fee by the change in the system would be appreciated, but even under the current system, the balance between revenue and expenditure could be obtained by reducing the length of hospital stay toward 4 weeks, and the elimination of deficit in TB ward could be accomplished by these efforts; shortening of length of hospital stay and reduction of TB beds. Although the latter might result in the difficulty of sustaining TB wards, these patients could be treated in the infectious disease ward. The integration of TB Control Law to Infectious Disease Control Law suggests that TB is not a special disease in Japan. If a true "short course therapy" era would be realized by novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, a dramatic change in TB management would occur in the near future. PMID:19999596

  8. The medical management of abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Linda D; Gueye, Ndeye-Aicha

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, once a thorough history, physical examination, and indicated imaging studies are performed and all significant structural causes are excluded, medical management is the first-line approach. Determining the acuity of the bleeding, the patient's medical history, assessing risk factors, and establishing a diagnosis will individualize their medical regimen. In acute abnormal uterine bleeding with a normal uterus, parenteral estrogen, a multidose combined oral contraceptive regimen, a multidose progestin-only regimen, and tranexamic acid are all viable options, given the appropriate clinical scenario. Heavy menstrual bleeding can be treated with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, continuous oral progestins, and tranexamic acid with high efficacy. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be utilized with hormonal methods and tranexamic acid to decrease menstrual bleeding. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are indicated in patients with leiomyoma and abnormal uterine bleeding in preparation for surgical interventions. In women with inherited bleeding disorders all hormonal methods as well as tranexamic acid can be used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. Women on anticoagulation therapy should consider using progestin-only methods as well as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to treat their heavy menstrual bleeding. Given these myriad options for medical treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, many patients may avoid surgical intervention. PMID:26254516

  9. Persistence and compliance with medication management in the treatment of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Heon

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common and chronic condition that impacts patients' daily activities and quality of life. Pharmaco-therapy for OAB is a mainstay of treatment. Antimuscarinics and β3-adrenoceptor agonists are the two major classes of oral pharmacotherapy and have similar efficacy for treating the symptoms of OAB. Owing to the chronic nature of OAB, long-term use of medication is essential for OAB symptom control and positive health outcomes. However, many patients elect to stop their medications during the treatment period. Unmet expectations of treatment and side effects seem to be the major factors for discontinuing OAB pharmacotherapy. Furthermore, the short- and long-term persistence and compliance with medication management are markedly worse in OAB than in other chronic medical conditions. Improvement in persistence and compliance with OAB pharmacotherapy is a hot topic in OAB treatment and should be an important goal in the treatment of OAB. Effective strategies should be identified to improve persistence and compliance. In this review, we outline what is known about persistence and compliance and the factors affecting persistence with pharmacotherapy in patients with OAB. PMID:26981589

  10. Management of In-Flight Medical Emergencies: Are Senior Medical Students Prepared to Respond to this Community Need?

    PubMed Central

    Katzer, Robert J.; Duong, David; Weber, Matthew; Memmer, Amy; Buchanan, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In-flight medical emergencies on commercial aircraft are common in both domestic and international flights. We hypothesized that fourth-year medical students feel inadequately prepared to lend assistance during in-flight medical emergencies. This multicenter study of two U.S. medical schools obtains a baseline assessment of knowledge and confidence in managing in-flight medical emergencies. Methods A 25-question survey was administered to fourth-year medical students at two United States medical schools. Questions included baseline knowledge of in-flight medicine (10 questions) and perceived ability to respond to in-flight medical emergencies. Results 229 participants completed the survey (75% response rate). The average score on the fund of knowledge questions was 64%. Responses to the 5-point Likert scale questions indicated that, on average, students did not feel confident or competent responding to an in-flight medical emergency. Participants on average also disagreed with statements that they had adequate understanding of supplies, flight crew training, and ground-based management. Conclusion This multicenter survey indicates that fourth-year medical students do not feel adequately prepared to respond to in-flight medical emergencies and may have sub-optimal knowledge. This study provides an initial step in identifying a deficiency in current medical education. PMID:25493155

  11. Can managed care reduce employers' retiree medical liability?

    PubMed

    Taylor, R S; Newton, B

    1991-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has forced U.S. companies to look squarely at their current retiree health obligations and their future commitments. Accounting Statement No. 106 (FAS 106) requires employers to accrue liabilities for retiree health benefits during employees' active service, rather than record the costs as benefits are paid. Employers are scrambling to find ways to reduce the statement's effect on corporate balance sheets. While managed health care has been increasingly employed to control benefit costs in active employee health plans, it has not been as popular in retiree plans. This article reviews important demographic and health trends in the retiree population and summarizes employers' early responses to FAS 106. It explores why managed health care has thus far played a limited role in reducing employers' postretirement medical liability, and offers insight into how that role could be increased in the future. PMID:10116958

  12. Medical & Surgical Management of Pelvic Floor Disorders Affecting Defecation

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Ron; Cromwell, John; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders that affect stool evacuation include structural (example: rectocele) and functional disorders (example: dyssynergic defecation). Meticulous history, digital rectal examination, and physiological tests such as anorectal manometry, colonic transit study, balloon expulsion and imaging studies such as anal ultrasound, defecography, and static and dynamic MRI can facilitate an objective diagnosis and optimal treatment. Management consists of education and counseling regarding bowel function, diet, laxatives, most importantly behavioral and biofeedback therapies, and lastly surgery. Randomized clinical trials have established that biofeedback therapy is effective in treating dyssynergic defecation. Because dyssynergic defecation may co-exist with conditions such as solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS), and rectocele, before considering surgery, biofeedback therapy should be tried and an accurate assessment of the entire pelvis and its function should be performed. Several surgical approaches have been advocated for the treatment of pelvic floor disorders including open, laparoscopic and trans-abdominal approach, stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR), and robotic colon and rectal resections. However, there is lack of well controlled randomized studies and efficacy of these surgical procedures remains to be established. PMID:22907620

  13. Infectious waste management in Japan: A revised regulation and a management process in medical institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, M. . E-mail: motonobu@cis.fukuoka-u.ac.jp; Une, H.

    2005-07-01

    In Japan, the waste management practice is carried out in accordance with the Waste Disposal Law of 1970. The first rule of infectious waste management was regulated in 1992, and infectious wastes are defined as the waste materials generated in medical institutions as a result of medical care or research which contain pathogens that have the potential to transmit infectious diseases. Revised criteria for infectious waste management were promulgated by the Ministry of Environment in 2004. Infectious waste materials are divided into three categories: the form of waste; the place of waste generation; the kind of infectious diseases. A reduction of infectious waste is expected. We introduce a summary of the revised regulation of infectious waste management in this article.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of CBT therapy for adults with ADHD with and without medication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies of psychological treatment in adults with ADHD have not controlled for medication status and include either medicated participants or mixed samples of medicated and unmedicated participants. The objective of this study is to examine whether use of medication improves outcome of therapy. Method This was a secondary analysis comparing 23 participants randomized to CBT and Dextroamphetamine vs. 25 participants randomized to CBT and placebo. Both patients and investigators were blind to treatment assignment. Two co-primary outcomes were used: ADHD symptoms on the ADHD-RS-Inv completed by the investigator and improvement in functioning as reported by the patient on the Sheehan Disability Scale. Results Both groups showed robust improvement in both symptoms and functioning, but the use of medication did not significantly improve outcome over and above use of CBT and placebo. Conclusion This study replicates previous work demonstrating that CBT is an effective treatment for ADHD in adults. Within the limits of this pilot, secondary analysis we were not able to demonstrate that medication significantly augments the outcome of CBT therapy for adults with ADHD. The study was funded by GlaxoSmithKline, Clinical Trials Registry #GSK707. PMID:22480189

  15. Management of patients with hepatitis B who require immunosuppressive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Lok, Anna S.-F.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic HBV infection are at risk of reactivation of HBV should they require immunosuppressive therapies for a variety of clinical settings, including chemotherapy for patients with cancer, immunosuppression for solid organ and stem cell transplant recipients, and use of anti-CD20 antibodies, TNF inhibitors, or corticosteroids in patients with oncological, gastrointestinal, rheumatological or dermatological conditions. The key to preventing HBV reactivation is the identification of patients with HBV infection prior to immunosuppressive therapy, initiation of prophylactic antiviral therapy in patients at moderate or high risk of HBV reactivation, and close monitoring of other patients so that antiviral therapy can be initiated at the first sign of HBV reactivation. Unfortunately, many patients infected with HBV are unaware of their infection or risk factors, and physicians often do not have sufficient time to systematically assess patients for risk factors for HBV prior to starting immunosuppressive therapy. In this article, we review the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of HBV reactivation, and the efficacy of antiviral therapy in preventing its occurrence. We also propose an algorithm for managing patients with HBV infection who require immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:24247262

  16. [Contemporary medical management of the benign prostatic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, S; Michel, M C; Dreikorn, K

    2008-02-01

    Two groups of drugs, alpha blockers and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARI), are currently widely used for the medical treatment of benign prostatic syndrome (BPS). Alpha blockers are characterized by a rapid onset of efficacy. If given at an adequate dose, all alpha blockers have a similar efficacy, yet quantitative differences regarding side effects exist. The onset of clinical efficacy of 5ARIs is delayed and dependent on prostate volume. Symptom improvement is generally less pronounced than with alpha blockers, yet this difference declines with time. 5ARI, in contrast to alpha blockers, reduce prostate volume and the risk of long-term BPS complications such as prostate surgery or acute urinary retention. The combination therapy of alpha blockers and 5ARI is superior to either monotherapy; however, this superiority becomes evident only after prolonged (>1 year) therapy. Because of additive side effects, this combination should be reserved for BPS patients with a high risk of progression. Regarding plant extracts, no definitive recommendation can be given because of a limited number of high-quality clinical trials. The use of antimuscarinics in men with BPS with a dominance of storage symptoms and without significant obstruction is promising, although further trials, particularly with a longer study duration, are required. PMID:18210072

  17. Genetic Predictors of Response to Different Medical Therapies in Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Bernabeu, Ignacio; Sampedro-Núñez, Miguel; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    In the era of predictive medicine, management of diseases is evolving into a more personal and individualized approach, as more data are available regarding clinical, biochemical, radiological, molecular, histopathological, and genetic aspects. In the particular setting of acromegaly, which is a rare, chronic, debilitating, and disfiguring disease, an optimized approach deems even more necessary, especially because of an associated increased morbidity and mortality, the impact on patients' quality of life, and the increased cost of frequently necessary life-long treatments. In this paper, we review the available studies that address potential genetic influences on acromegaly, their role in the outcome, and response to treatments, as well as their contribution to the risk of developing side effects. We focus mainly on pharmacogenetic factors involved during treatment with dopamine agonists, somatostatin analogs, and pegvisomant. Specifically, mutations in dopamine receptors, somatostatin receptors, growth hormone receptors, and metabolic pathways involved in growth hormone action; polymorphisms in the insulin-like growth factor and the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins; and polymorphisms in other genes that may determine differences in the frequency of developing adverse events. PMID:26940388

  18. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medical (CAM) Therapies Among Youth with Mental Health Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kathi J; Gardiner, Paula; Birdee, Gurjeet S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies is common among adults with mental health concerns, but little is known about CAM use among adolescents with mental health concerns. Methods Data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed for youth from 7–17 years old. The study focused on three common mental health conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, and depression. CAM use was identified by criteria from the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NIH NCCAM). Results In a sample of 5651 individuals, representing seven million youth, with one or more mental health concerns in the past 12 months, 28.9% used one or more types of CAM excluding vitamins/minerals. In contrast, only 11.6% of those without mental health concerns reported CAM use (P<0.05). Among youth with one or more mental health conditions, the most commonly used CAM therapies were mind-body therapies (16.3%) and biologically-based therapies (11%); use was higher for therapies that could be directly accessed (18.6%), than for therapies delivered in groups (11.8%) or through a health professional (10.2%). In the multivariable regression model, demographic factors significantly associated with CAM use were higher household income, higher parental education, having other chronic health conditions, use of prescription medications, and difficulty affording mental health counseling. Conclusion Readily accessible CAM therapies are commonly used by youth with ADHD, depression, and anxiety, particularly those who have co-morbid chronic health conditions, take prescription medications, and difficulty affording counseling. Clinicians can use this data to guide inquiries and counseling. Researchers should explore the longitudinal relationship between access to coordinated care within a medical home and use of CAM therapies among youth with mental health concerns. What’s New Use of CAM is

  19. [Physiopathologic consequences of underwater diving and medical management of divers].

    PubMed

    Méliet, J L

    1996-05-01

    Underwater diving is a very closely medically managed activity. Performing it, the human organism is under the physical laws of pressure and following consequences. The expiratory flows are significatively reduced, enhancing the risk of alveolar hypoventilation at exertion, the central nervous system is the privileged target during inopportune tissue degassing related accidents (leaving 20% of sequellae), barotraumatic injuries threaten middle and inner ear or lung (pulmonary barotrauma is the most severe accident), the toxicity of gas under pressure (i.e. oxygen, nitrogen) exposes to specific risks of loss of consciousness. Lastly, the adaptative mechanisms to immersion can be overflown, leading to pulmonary oedema. Facing these constraints, the practitioner's role begins just before the diver's activity starts by looking for contraindications to diving. It continues during tuition time by teaching him the physiopathology of accidents, their prevention and first cares. Finally, in case of accident, a specialized medical team acts in diagnosis and treatment. From these points of view, diving medicine is a multispecialty medical matter. PMID:8963716

  20. Neuronal dysfunction and medical therapy in heart failure: can an imaging biomarker help to "personalize" therapy?

    PubMed

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Udelson, James E

    2015-06-01

    (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging is a tool for evaluating one of the fundamental pathophysiologic abnormalities seen in heart failure (HF), that of an upregulated sympathetic nervous system and its effect on the myocardium. Although this imaging technique offers information about prognosis for patients treated with contemporary guideline-based HF therapies and improves risk stratification, there are neither rigorous nor sufficient outcome data to suggest that this imaging tool can guide therapeutic decision making or better target subsets of patients with HF for particular therapies. PMID:26033899

  1. MEDICAL AND INSTITUTIONAL WASTE INCINERATION: REGULATIONS, MANAGEMENT, TECHNOLOGY, EMISSIONS, AND OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a series of seminars to assist those responsible for managing medical waste in understanding the applicable regulations; developing waste management plans; selecting appropriate waste management options, including incinerat...

  2. A multilingual medical thesaurus browser for patients and medical content managers.

    PubMed

    Göbel, G; Andreatta, S; Masser, J; Pfeiffer, K P

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces a user-friendly browser interface which integrates multilingual search and browsing functionalities within medical thesauri via the internet. The tool is being developed as part of the GIN Austria Patient Information System and is based on an adapted datamodel of the MeSH thesaurus. A prototype offers the possibility to build up queries and export lists of MeSH main headings collected during browsing the relevant MeSH trees. The thesaurus browser can be used both by patients and citizens to build queries based on a controlled vocabulary to match them with existing documents within GIN and by medical information managers to find out appropriate keywords for interactive tagging or indexing of medical contents. A key component of this tool is the flexible choice of different languages of the MeSH datasource as well as of the user interface. Both can be changed independently at any point during a session. Another central aspect is the use of the UMLS Metathesaurus in combination with localized Thesaurus versions due to existing international character set problems. PMID:11604758

  3. Medical management of three workers following a radiation exposure incident

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.A.; Sax, S.E.; Rumack, E.R.; Holness, D.L. )

    1992-01-01

    The medical management of three individuals involved in an exposure incident to whole-body radiation at a nuclear generating plant of a Canadian electrical utility is described. The exposure incident resulted in the two highest whole-body radiation doses ever received in a single event by workers in a Canadian nuclear power plant. The individual whole-body doses (127.4 mSv, 92.0 mSv, 22.4 mSv) were below the threshold for acute radiation sickness but the exposures still presented medical management problems related to assessment and counseling. Serial blood counting and lymphocyte cytogenetic analysis to corroborate the physical dosimetry were performed. All three employees experienced somatic symptoms due to stress and one employee developed post-traumatic stress disorder. This incident indicates that there is a need in such radiation exposure accidents for early and continued counseling of exposed employees to minimize the risk of development of stress-related symptoms.

  4. Preventing and managing unprofessionalism in medical school faculties.

    PubMed

    Binder, Renee; Friedli, Amy; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Professionalism is a required competency for medical students, residents, practicing physicians, and academic faculty. Faculty members must adhere to codes of conduct or risk discipline. The authors describe issues of unprofessionalism that culminate in allegations of faculty misconduct or filing of grievances in academic medicine and outline strategies for early intervention and prevention. The authors, vice and associate deans and executive director of the office of faculty affairs at a large U.S. medical school, have handled many allegations of unprofessional conduct over the past decade. They present case examples based on behaviors such as lack of respect, inappropriate language and behavior, failure to cooperate with members of the health care team, and sexual harassment/discrimination. They discuss factors complicating evaluation of these behaviors, including variable definitions of respect, different cultural norms, and false allegations. The authors make recommendations for prevention and intervention, including early identification, performance management, education about sexual harassment, and referrals to professional coaches, anger management classes, and faculty-staff assistance programs. PMID:25470311

  5. Improving the medical records department processes by lean management

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh; Sadeghian, Akram; Saghaeinnejad-Isfahani, Sakine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lean management is a process improvement technique to identify waste actions and processes to eliminate them. The benefits of Lean for healthcare organizations are that first, the quality of the outcomes in terms of mistakes and errors improves. The second is that the amount of time taken through the whole process significantly improves. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to improve the Medical Records Department (MRD) processes at Ayatolah-Kashani Hospital in Isfahan, Iran by utilizing Lean management. Materials and Methods: This research was applied and an interventional study. The data have been collected by brainstorming, observation, interview, and workflow review. The study population included MRD staff and other expert staff within the hospital who were stakeholders and users of the MRD. Statistical Analysis Used: The MRD were initially taught the concepts of Lean management and then formed into the MRD Lean team. The team then identified and reviewed the current processes subsequently; they identified wastes and values, and proposed solutions. Results: The findings showed that the MRD units (Archive, Coding, Statistics, and Admission) had 17 current processes, 28 wastes, and 11 values were identified. In addition, they offered 27 comments for eliminating the wastes. Conclusion: The MRD is the critical department for the hospital information system and, therefore, the continuous improvement of its services and processes, through scientific methods such as Lean management, are essential. Originality/Value: The study represents one of the few attempts trying to eliminate wastes in the MRD. PMID:26097862

  6. Multiple sclerosis medical image analysis and information management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Meier, Dominik; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Karkocha, Pawel; Bakshi, Rohit; Guttmann, Charles R G

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a central tool for patient management, as well as research, in multiple sclerosis (MS). Measurements of disease burden and activity derived from MRI through quantitative image analysis techniques are increasingly being used. There are many complexities and challenges in building computerized processing pipelines to ensure efficiency, reproducibility, and quality control for MRI scans from MS patients. Such paradigms require advanced image processing and analysis technologies, as well as integrated database management systems to ensure the most utility for clinical and research purposes. This article reviews pipelines available for quantitative clinical MRI research in MS, including image segmentation, registration, time-series analysis, performance validation, visualization techniques, and advanced medical imaging software packages. To address the complex demands of the sequential processes, the authors developed a workflow management system that uses a centralized database and distributed computing system for image processing and analysis. The implementation of their system includes a web-form-based Oracle database application for information management and event dispatching, and multiple modules for image processing and analysis. The seamless integration of processing pipelines with the database makes it more efficient for users to navigate complex, multistep analysis protocols, reduces the user's learning curve, reduces the time needed for combining and activating different computing modules, and allows for close monitoring for quality-control purposes. The authors' system can be extended to general applications in clinical trials and to routine processing for image-based clinical research. PMID:16385023

  7. Things to come: postmodern digital knowledge management and medical informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, N W

    1995-01-01

    The overarching informatics grand challenge facing society is the creation of knowledge management systems that can acquire, conserve, organize, retrieve, display, and distribute what is known today in a manner that informs and educates, facilitates the discovery and creation of new knowledge, and contributes to the health and welfare of the planet. At one time the private, national, and university libraries of the world collectively constituted the memory of society's intellectual history. In the future, these new digital knowledge management systems will constitute human memory in its entirety. The current model of multiple local collections of duplicated resources will give way to specialized sole-source servers. In this new environment all scholarly scientific knowledge should be public domain knowledge: managed by scientists, organized for the advancement of knowledge, and readily available to all. Over the next decade, the challenge for the field of medical informatics and for the libraries that serve as the continuous memory for the biomedical sciences will be to come together to form a new organization that will lead to the development of postmodern digital knowledge management systems for medicine. These systems will form a portion of the evolving world brain of the 21st century. PMID:7743318

  8. [Survey on antiemetic therapy in ambulatory cancer chemotherapy and medical economics for standardization].

    PubMed

    Sato, Junya; Terui, Kazufumi; Souma, Akemi; Fujita, Shoko; Hayakari, Makoto

    2007-10-01

    A cancer chemotherapy unit was established to support therapy for outpatients with cancer in Hirosaki University Hospital. It is essential to standardize antiemetic therapy, since a wide variety of the therapy provided to the unit from the diagnosis and treatment departments were conventional and empirical. We surveyed the use conditions and compatibility of the therapy based on reliable guidelines, and then considered the medical economics for standardization. In moderate-grade emetogenic chemotherapy, 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists tended to be used frequently instead of the recommended steroids. From this survey, the standardization of the cost of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists and the relatively inexpensive steroids used in cancer chemotherapy might reduce either the nausea or vomiting suffered by patients with cancer and their economic burden as well. PMID:17940380

  9. CEO must have authority to coordinate governance, management, medical staff.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R L

    1984-04-01

    As hospitals attempt to survive in today's new competitive environment, they will find that the traditional organizational structure does not work. This structure can be characterized as a three-legged stool. Governance, management, and medical staff existed in relative harmony, with each able to attend to its own distinct, separate responsibilities. The medical staff regulated itself, the governing board had no serious difficulties in coping with the institution's finances, and the CEO was concerned solely with the physical plant and hospital personnel. In a riskless economic environment, this three-legged stool could remain stable. In the coming years,however, a hospital will need a clear-cut, identifiable leader if it is to survive. To centralize authority primarily in the CEO's hands will be a difficult step for nonprofit hospitals, particularly those sponsored by religious institutions, because of their tradition of operating much as a charitable social agency rather than a business. But this step must be taken, even to the extent of naming the CEO as chairman of the board, for a leader is required who has the authority to make quick decisions in the competitive marketplace. Timeliness is of strategic importance in such an environment, and governing boards increasingly will find it impossible to make timely decisions on a collective basis. Moreover, CEOs will have to coordinate the activities of management, medical staff, and the governing board. They will need to play a strong role in ensuring that target levels in DRG costs are met, and they will need the authority to mediate in issues in which the hospital's economic interests are pitted against physicians'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10265817

  10. Performance of Clinical Nurse Educators in Teaching Pharmacology and Medication Management: Nursing Students’ Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Ghamari Zare, Zohre; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacological knowledge and medication management skills of student nurses greatly depend on the clinical nurse educators’ performance in this critical issue. However, the Iranian nurse educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management are not adequately studied. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the nursing students’ perceptions on the status of clinical pharmaceutical and medication management education. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on all 152 nursing students registered in the seventh and eighth semesters at the Qom and Naragh branches of Islamic Azad University, and Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2013 - 2014 academic year. The students’ perceptions on the performance of clinical nurse educators in teaching pharmacology and medication management were assessed using a researcher made questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 31 items regarding clinical educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management and two questions about students’ satisfaction with their level of knowledge and skills in pharmacology and medication management. Descriptive statistics was employed and analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean of scores of teaching pharmacology and medication management in the three universities. Results Among a total of 152 subjects, 82.9% were female and their mean age was 22.57 ± 1.55 years. According to the students, instructors had the weakest performance in the three items of teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the students’ learning needs, teaching medication management through a patient-centered method and teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the course plan. The students’ satisfaction regarding their own knowledge and skill of pharmacology and medication management was at medium level. Conclusions Nursing students gave a relatively low score in several aspects of

  11. Redefining the Role of the Pharmacist: Medication Therapy Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilsenrath, Peter; Woelfel, Joseph; Shek, Allen; Ordanza, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore better use of pharmacists in rural communities as a partial solution to scarcity of physicians and other health care providers. It discusses expected reduction in public subsidies for rural health care and the changing market for pharmacists. The paper emphasizes the use of pharmacists as a backdrop…

  12. Prescriptions for medical research. I--Management within the Medical Research Council.

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, R; Harrow, J

    1993-01-01

    In their submission to the government in advance of the white paper on science policy in the United Kingdom the Medical Research Council commends the MRC's own approach to managing directly funded research. But a series of semi-structured interviews with the directors of some of the MRC's units suggests a gap between the MRC's model of managed research and the reality. Although such units are theoretically managed from MRC head office (and units are charged an overhead for this), in practice each unit runs its own affairs. Between major reviews average contact time with the head office contact person is seven hours a year. The first paper argues that a purchaser-provider split would recognise the benefits of decentralisation and allow units to bid for research funds from several sources, the successful ones guaranteeing their survival through a rolling series of research programmes. The second paper criticises the MRC's cumbersome peer review system. Reliance on outside experts atrophies the scientific skills of head office staff and builds delays into decision making. A purchaser-provider model would allow the head office scientific staff to act like commercial research and development managers, commissioning research, and using the outcome, rather than peer review, as a criterion for continued funding. PMID:8324441

  13. Medical therapies for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: an evolving treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bresser, Paul; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jaïs, Xavier; Humbert, Marc; Hoeper, Marius M

    2006-09-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is recommended as the treatment of choice for eligible patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). However, only a proportion of patients fulfill the criteria for surgical intervention. In addition, operated patients with CTEPH may experience a gradual hemodynamic and symptomatic decline related to a secondary hypertensive arteriopathy in the small precapillary pulmonary vessels. It has also been questioned what can be done to reduce risks from PEA surgery to improve outcome in "high risk" patients with CTEPH with substantial impairment of pulmonary hemodynamics before surgery. Such patients may benefit from preoperative reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance by means of medical therapy. Conventional medical treatments, such as anticoagulation, diuretics, digitalis, and chronic oxygen therapy, show low efficacy in the treatment of CTEPH as they do not affect underlying disease processes. Over the last decade, several novel therapies have been developed for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including prostacyclin analogs (epoprostenol, beraprost, iloprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (sildenafil). Evidence of efficacy in PAH, coupled with studies showing histopathologic similarities between CTEPH and PAH, provides a rationale to extend the use of some of these medications to the treatment of CTEPH. However, direct evidence from clinical trials in CTEPH is limited to date. This article reviews evidence supporting, and issues surrounding, the possible use of novel PAH medications in CTEPH. PMID:16963540

  14. Hybrid Therapy in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Because of the sub-optimal outcomes and associated risks of medical therapy as well as the recent advances in non-pharmacologic strategies, a multitude of combined (hybrid) algorithms have been introduced that improve efficacy of standalone therapies while maintaining a high safety profile. Antiarrhythmic administration enhances success rate of electrical cardioversion. Catheter ablation of antiarrhythmic drug-induced typical atrial flutter may prevent recurrent atrial fibrillation. Through simple ablation in the right atrium, suppression of atrial fibrillation may be achieved in patients with previously ineffective antiarrhythmic therapy. Efficacy of complex catheter ablation in the left atrium is improved with antiarrhythmic drugs. Catheter ablation followed by permanent pacemaker implantation is an effective and safe treatment option for selected patients. Additional strategies include pacing therapies such as atrial pacing with permanent pacemakers, preventive pacing algorithms, and/or implantable dual-chamber defibrillators are available. Modern hybrid strategies combining both epicardial and endocardial approaches in order to create a complex set of radiofrequency lesions in the left atrium have demonstrated a high rate of success and warrant further research. Hybrid therapy for atrial fibrillation reviews history of development of non-pharmacological treatment strategies and outlines avenues of ongoing research in this field. PMID:25028165

  15. Ulipristal acetate: a novel option for the medical management of symptomatic uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Talaulikar, Vikram S; Manyonda, Isaac T

    2012-08-01

    Fibroids, the most common tumor in women of reproductive age, impact negatively on women's health and quality of life, and have significant cost implications for their management. The current mainstay treatments are surgical (myomectomy and hysterectomy) and more recently radiological (UAE and focused ultrasound surgery). Hysterectomy is curative but precludes future fertility, whereas the impact of the other treatments on reproduction is uncertain. With women in Western societies deferring childbearing to their 30s and 40s, when fibroids are most symptomatic, there is a pressing need for a uterus-sparing medical therapy that is cheap, effective, and enhances reproductive potential. Serendipity and meticulous translational research has shown that progesterone augments fibroid proliferation, raising the possibility that progesterone receptor modulators could inhibit fibroid growth; this research has culminated in the emergence of ulipristal acetate (UA), a first-in-class, oral selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) that has successfully completed phase III clinical trials. It has been licensed in Western Europe for short-term clinical use prior to surgery, and has shown efficacy with a significant reduction in uterine bleeding, fibroid volume, and improved quality of life, without the side effects associated with other medications such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists. As with all new medicines, there are concerns surrounding UA, not least its effect on the endometrium and the long-term impact on general health and reproduction. Research to date has tended to be industry led, and therefore, there is a need for researcher/clinician-led studies to address the wider issues concerning SPRMs. UA may not turn out to be the "Holy Grail" of medical therapy in the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids, but it has rightly given cause for a huge optimism. Further laboratory and clinical research into PRMs and related compounds will no doubt lead

  16. Managing major depressive disorder through the use of adjunct therapies.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin A

    2014-12-01

    Although many treatments for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) exist, only half of all patients respond to initial trial of pharmacotherapy and only a third will achieve remission with that trial. First-line therapies for the management of MDD include psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy, alone or in combination. Given the disappointing rates of response and remission to initial therapy, clinicians are looking for methods to improve the management of MDD, such as through the use of adjunct therapies. The first article in this series, by Katzman and Chokka, discusses gaps in the treatment of MDD and proposes measures to change and strengthen future practice guidelines. Epstein et al. summarize the findings of clinical studies, systematic analyses, and reviews of trials supporting the use of adjunct therapy for the treatment of MDD. Velehorschi et al. review emerging research identifying common pathophysiological processes between MDD and three of its comorbidities. Lastly, Cameron and Habert highlight the challenges that primary care physicians face in the management of MDD. Ultimately, the goal of treatment is to not only relieve symptoms of MDD, but achieve sustained remission. This supplement was written to address the issues of less than ideal outcomes and approaches to enhancing response and remission rates. PMID:25539870

  17. Profile of St. Jude Medical's Allure Quadra quadripolar pacemaker system for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Corbisiero, Raffaele; Muller, David

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major public health epidemic and economic burden in the USA and worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an effective therapy for treating congestive heart failure in conjunction with pharmacologic therapy. The average congestive heart failure admission costs approximately US$ 8 billion annually. Current cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker systems from various manufacturers deliver therapy-utilizing bipolar leads including the left ventricle, with electrode spacing ranging from 8 to 22 mm. The Quartet LV™ lead model 1458Q (St. Jude Medical Sylmar, CA) is a quadripolar lead with a 4.0 Fr. tip electrode and three 4.7 Fr. ring electrodes located 20, 30 and 47 mm from the tip. The Quartet lead and Allure Quadra TM allows 14 pacing configurations, providing benefits, including reductions in phrenic nerve stimulation, reduced pacing thresholds, improved battery longevity and potential reductions, in non-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, there is cost benefit data from utilizing quadripolar technology compared with traditional bipolar cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25418543

  18. Long-term management of gout: nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Chaichian, Yashaar; Chohan, Saima; Becker, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    Gout is a common disorder with clinical signs and symptoms resulting from inflammatory responses to monosodium urate crystals deposited in tissues from extracellular fluids saturated for urate. Long-term management of gout focuses on nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic means to achieve and maintain serum urate levels in a subsaturating range. Despite a firm understanding of gout pathophysiology, means to achieve certain diagnosis, and a variety of effective therapies, treatment outcomes remain suboptimal. In this review, available nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies for chronic gout are discussed and a framework is provided for successful achievement and maintenance of goal-range serum urate levels. PMID:24703352

  19. Complications of head and neck radiation therapy and their management

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmeier, R.L.; King, G.E.

    1983-04-01

    Patients who receive radiation therapy to the head and neck suffer potential complications and undesirable side-effects of this therapy. The extent of undesirable responses is dependent on the source of irradiation, the fields of irradiation, and the dose. The radiotherapist determines these factors by the extent, location, and radiosensitivity of the tumor. The potential undesirable side-effects are xerostomia, mucositis, fibrosis, trismus, dermatitis, photosensitivity, radiation caries, soft tissue necrosis, and osteoradionecrosis. Each of these clinical entities and their proposed management have been discussed.

  20. [Intrathecal baclofen therapy and management of severe spasticity].

    PubMed

    Naito, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    Continuous infusion of intrathecal baclofen (ITB), via implanted pump, is a powerful tool in the management of severe spasticity in neurological disorders. The advantages of ITB therapy are that it is non-destructive, reversible, and programmable, allowing for neuromodulation. Patients reported significant subjective improvements and decreases in muscle tone after baclofen injection, but excessive doses of ITB resulted in motor weakness. Few complications and adverse effects were reported. ITB therapy appears to be a promising treatment to improve residual motor control in patients with severe spasticity. PMID:25200576

  1. Role of neoadjuvant therapy in management of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer; however, majority of patients present with advanced unresectable disease upon diagnosis. Treatment of nonmetastatic, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) continues to require multidisciplinary bimodality or trimodality approach. Neoadjuvant therapies have been investigated for LAPC given its established role in other solid cancers such as breast cancer, gastric cancer, and rectal cancer. This strategy is now moving forward to management of potentially resectable disease as well. This meeting highlight focuses on recent updates on neoadjuvant therapy for both borderline resectable disease and potentially resectable disease, Abstracts #4120, #e15189, #e15226 and #TPS4158 will be discussed. PMID:25076342

  2. Modern medical management of obesity: the role of pharmaceutical intervention.

    PubMed

    Aronne, L J

    1998-10-01

    . Many new antiobesity agents are in the early stages of development, and our understanding of the body's weight-regulating mechanisms is advancing steadily. Human trials of recombinant leptin are underway. Other promising compounds include those that block the Neuropeptide Y5 and Y1 (NY5, NY1) and Melanocortin-4 (MC4) receptors, stimulate uncoupling proteins, and unbind corticotrophin-releasing factor from its binding protein. As better medical treatments for obesity become available, the focus in dietary prescription may shift away from reducing energy intake toward healthier eating for disease prevention. At present, a comprehensive approach, which, in some patients, may include medical therapy as an adjunct, is necessary to treat obesity effectively. PMID:9787732

  3. Enabling medication management through health information technology (Health IT).

    PubMed Central

    McKibbon, K Ann; Lokker, Cynthia; Handler, Steve M; Dolovich, Lisa R; Holbrook, Anne M; O'Reilly, Daria; Tamblyn, Robyn; J Hemens, Brian; Basu, Runki; Troyan, Sue; Roshanov, Pavel S; Archer, Norman P; Raina, Parminder

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research. DATA SOURCES We searched peer-reviewed electronic databases, grey literature, and performed hand searches. Databases searched included MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Compendex, Inspec (which includes IEEE Xplore), Library and Information Science Abstracts, E-Prints in Library and Information Science, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Business Source Complete. Grey literature searching involved Internet searching, reviewing relevant Web sites, and searching electronic databases of grey literatures. AHRQ also provided all references in their e-Prescribing, bar coding, and CPOE knowledge libraries. METHODS Paired reviewers looked at citations to identify studies on a range of health IT used to assist in the medication management process (MMIT) during multiple levels of screening (titles and abstracts, full text and final review for assignment of questions and data abstrction). Randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and case series studies were independently assessed for quality. All data were abstracted by one reviewer and examined by one of two different reviewers with content and methods expertise. RESULTS 40,582 articles were retrieved. After duplicates were removed, 32,785 articles were screened at the title and abstract phase. 4,578 full text articles were assessed and 789 articles were included in the final report. Of these, 361 met only content criteria and were listed without further abstraction. The final report included data

  4. Stress management as a component of occupational therapy in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Affleck, A; Bianchi, E; Cleckley, M; Donaldson, K; McCormack, G; Polon, J

    1984-01-01

    The recent explosion of stress literature in the medical community has created a new awareness of "stress" as a potentially destructive force in itself. Contributing the physical and psychological dysfunction, stress has now been linked with a wide range of diagnoses including cancer, cardiac disease and arthritis. The importance of incorporating stress management activities into daily life is increasingly apparent. Occupational therapists concerned with patients' ability to achieve health enhancing independent living skills are in a key position to help patients master stress management skills and incorporate them into activities of daily living. This article will explore the incorporation of stress management into occupational therapy programming for a variety of acute care patients. It will review the components of stress, the stress cycle, the relaxation response, the occupational therapy role based on a model of human occupation, and will review current programs through case study of four patients: one diagnosed with cancer (leukemia), one with anorexia nervosa, one with chronic pain and the fourth, a patient in medical intensive care. PMID:23947299

  5. Pathophysiology of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Insights From Medical Therapy for the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has its roots in the early 1970s. During this era, the first clinical trials investigating α-blockade and androgen deprivation therapy were reported for men with clinical BPH. The observation that clinical BPH was improved following administration of both α-blockers and androgen deprivation therapy supported the evolving paradigm that clinical BPH resulted from dynamic and static pathways. During the past several decades, the evolution of α-blockers for the treatment of BPH has been impacted by innovations targeted to simplify the administration and improve tolerability while maintaining their effectiveness. PMID:20126609

  6. Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do about Changes When You Urinate

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects What to do about changes when you urinate “ ... drinking enough each day. Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: Changes when you urinate Ask about drinks or ...

  7. Prescription medication misuse among HIV-infected individuals taking antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newville, Howard; Roley, Jason; Sorensen, James L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV has become a highly treatable disease due to advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Additionally, HIV-infected individuals often take opiates, barbiturates, and benzodiazepines to treat co-occurring conditions, including pain and symptoms of HIV. We sought to examine prescription medication misuse by surveying 295 HIV-infected patients receiving ART. Participants answered questions about their demographics, alcohol and other drug use, psychiatric diagnoses, ART adherence and side effects, and quality of life. 11% of our sample acknowledged prescription medication misuse. In regression analysis, prescription medication misusers were more likely to report any drinking to intoxication (OR=4.31, 95% CI: 1.35-13.76, p=0.013), reported greater severity of ART side effects (OR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10, p=0.041), and demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, p=0.048) compared to those who did not misuse prescription medications. Special care should be taken by medical providers before prescribing medications that may be abused or diverted. Patients should also be screened for aberrant use, even if not prescribed. ART side effects, cognitive deficits, and alcohol abuse may serve as risk factors or indicators of prescription medication misuse, and should be monitored. PMID:25245428

  8. Managing diverse occupational therapy resources in a creative, corporate model.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, S

    1993-10-01

    Two occupational therapy departments were amalgamated into a corporate whole and charged with the development of a workable, corporate structure. The departmental model which was developed served to enhance the concepts of quality of working life, employee autonomy, management team and quality circle theory. This paper provides a background from business and organizational literature, and outlines the development of the departmental model, in concert with the adoption of the client-centred model of occupational performance as a department basis for practice. This development was taking place concurrently with larger, institutional changes into a decentralized clinical programme management model. Discussion highlights the level of staff satisfaction with the changes, areas of concern during the development of the system and plans for the future growth. During this period of massive and critical change in the delivery of health care services, there has been a trend in restructuring health care institutions towards decentralized models. This paper will describe the experience of one occupational therapy department in developing an innovative departmental structure involving participatory management amalgamation. It is believed that the experience of the past occupational therapy work units with one viable option for a renewed management model. Staff skill sets can be maximized and optimal potential realized while faced with inevitable resource shrinkage and service reorganization. PMID:10129023

  9. Teaching older adults to self-manage medications: preventing adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Curry, Linda Cox; Walker, Charles; Hogstel, Mildred O; Burns, Paulette

    2005-04-01

    Older adults use more prescription and OTC medications than any other age group. Because their medication regimens often are complicated by many medications and different doses, times, and administration methods, older adults are at high risk for medication mismanagement. The most common errors associated with medication mismanagement include mixing OTC and prescription medications, discontinuing prescriptions, taking wrong dosages, using incorrect techniques, and consuming inappropriate foods with specific medications. Both human and environmental factors contribute to medication mismanagement among older adults. Human factors include faulty communication between the health care provider and the patient; the patient's lack of knowledge; ADRs; alcohol-drug interactions; use of OTC medications and herbal products; cognitive, sensory, and motor impairments; and polypharmacy. Environmental factors include high cost of prescribed medications, improper medication storage, and absence of clearly marked expiration dates. Nurses need to take advantage of both formal and informal teaching opportunities in all settings to prepare a patient for medication self-management. Teaching should be individualized and based on a thorough assessment of the patient's abilities to administer medication safely and the specific medication regimen. By involving older adults as active partners in their health care, many errors and medication-related health problems can be prevented. New technologies and devices have the potential for improving the patient's self-management of medications. The role of nurses in educating older adults and their families about proper medication management is vital. PMID:15839523

  10. Resistance to medical educational change: management and communication.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan

    2007-01-01

    Medical education in Taiwan is currently undergoing active renovation. Reform and changes always bring resistance from the levels of individuals, institution and even the society. As an educational leader, to be able to manage resistance is a key to successful reform. This review article provides management strategies and communication skills to solve the resistance problem. The best solution to the problem is "to prevent" resistance from happening through identifying those who may be reluctant to change, and the reasons behind the potential resistance. Some of the reasons for resistance are threatening of self-interest and a loss of face, excess uncertainty, conservatism, fear of personal-worth declination in the organization, and different assessment or perception. The management and communication strategies are suggested to adjust to fit reform process, i.e., recognizing the needs for change, planning process, implementation, and institutionalization innovation. Finally, it is only with respect, empathy, sincerity and support that the resistance to changes can be resolved and difficulties can be overcome. PMID:19653408

  11. Improvised explosive devices: pathophysiology, injury profiles and current medical management.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Clasper, J C

    2009-12-01

    The improvised explosive device (IED), in all its forms, has become the most significant threat to troops operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices range from rudimentary home made explosives to sophisticated weapon systems containing high-grade explosives. Within this broad definition they may be classified as roadside explosives and blast mines, explosive formed pojectile (EFP) devices and suicide bombings. Each of these groups causeinjury through a number of different mechanisms and can result in vastly different injury profiles. The "Global War on Terror" has meant that incidents which were previously exclusively seen in conflict areas, can occur anywhere, and clinicians who are involved in emergency trauma care may be required to manage casualties from similar terrorist attacks. An understanding of the types of devices and their pathophysiological effects is necessary to allow proper planning of mass casualty events and to allow appropriate management of the complex poly-trauma casualties they invariably cause. The aim of this review article is to firstly describe the physics and injury profile from these different devices and secondly to present the current clinical evidence that underpins their medical management. PMID:20397601

  12. Managing the Learning Environment in Undergraduate Medical Education: The Sheffield Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Chris; Lawson, Mary; Newble, David; Self, Ashley

    2003-01-01

    Describes one possible model for e-learning in undergraduate medical education with an emphasis on supporting and managing curriculum development. The Sheffield Networked Learning Environment (NLE) was developed in collaboration with other medical schools. (Author/SOE)

  13. 75 FR 391 - Medical Device Quality System Regulation Educational Forum on Risk Management Through the Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Quality System Regulation Educational Forum... ``Medical Device Quality System Regulation Educational Forum on Risk Management through the Product...

  14. Factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Singh, Vishwajeet; Ali, Wahid; Natu, S. M.; Singh, Bhupendra Pal; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Dalela, Divakar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Filarial chyluria is a common problem in filarial endemic countries. Its management begins with medical therapy but some patients progress to require surgery. The present study aimed to determine factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria. Materials and Methods: This prospective study conducted between August 2008 and November 2012, included conservatively managed patients of chyluria. Demographic profile, clinical presentation, treatment history and urinary triglycerides (TGs) and cholesterol levels at baseline were compared between the responders and non-responders. Apart from the clinical grade of chyluria, hematuria was evaluated as an independent risk factor. Results: Out of the 222 patients (mean age, 37.99 ± 13.29 years, 129 males), 31 patients failed to respond while 35 had a recurrence after initial response; the overall success rate being 70.3% at a mean follow-up of 25 months. No difference was observed in demographics, clinical presentation, presence of hematuria, disease duration and mean urinary TGs loss between responders and non-responders. On multivariate analysis, patients with treatment failure were found to have a higher-grade disease (14.3% Grade-I, 36.6% Grades-II and 60% Grade-III), higher number of pretreatment courses (1.59 ± 1.08 vs. 1.02 ± 0.79) and heavier cholesterol (26.54 ± 23.46 vs. 8.81 ± 8.55 mg/dl) loss at baseline compared with responders (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Conservative management has a success rate in excess of 70%, not affected by the disease chronicity, previous episodes and recurrent nature. However, higher-grade disease, extensive pre-treatment with drugs and higher urinary cholesterol loss at baseline are the predictors of poor response. Hematuria is not an independent poor risk factor for conservative management. PMID:24497677

  15. Diagnosis, Management, and Investigational Therapies for Food Allergies

    PubMed Central

    Kulis, Mike; Wright, Benjamin L.; Jones, Stacie M.; Burks, A. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies have increased in prevalence over the past 20 years, now becoming an important public health concern. Although there are no therapies currently available for routine clinical care, recent reports have indicated that immunotherapies targeting the mucosal immune system may be effective. Oral immunotherapy is conducted by administering small, increasing amounts of food allergen; it has shown promise for desensitizing individuals with peanut, egg, or milk allergies. Sublingual immunotherapy also desensitizes allergic patients to foods—2 major studies have examined the effects of sublingual immunotherapy in subjects with peanut allergies. We review the complex nature of IgE-mediated food allergies and the therapies being evaluated in clinical trials. We focus on the diagnosis and management of food allergies and investigational therapies. PMID:25633563

  16. Perspectives on Withdrawing Pacemaker and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapies at End of Life: Results of a Survey of Medical and Legal Professionals and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapa, Suraj; Mueller, Paul S.; Hayes, David L.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the opinions of medical professionals, legal professionals, and patients regarding the withdrawal of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and pacemaker therapy at the end of life. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: A survey regarding 5 cases that focused on withdrawal of ICD or pacemaker therapy at the end of life was constructed and sent to 5270 medical professionals, legal professionals, and patients. The survey was administered from March 1, 2008, to March 1, 2009. RESULTS: Of the 5270 recipients of the survey, 658 (12%) responded. In a terminally ill patient requesting that his ICD be turned off, most legal professionals (90% [63/70]), medical professionals (98% [330/336]), and patients (85% [200/236]) agreed the ICD should be turned off. Most legal professionals (89%), medical professionals (87%), and patients (79%) also considered withdrawal of pacemaker therapy in a non–pacemaker-dependent patient appropriate. However, significantly more legal (81%) than medical professionals (58%; P<.001) or patients (68%, P=.02) agreed with turning off a pacemaker in the pacemaker-dependent patient. A similar number of legal professionals thought turning off a device was legal regardless of whether it was an ICD or pacemaker (45% vs 38%; P=.50). However, medical professionals were more likely to perceive turning off an ICD as legal than turning off a pacemaker (85% vs 41%; P<.001). CONCLUSION: Most respondents thought device therapy should be withdrawn if the patient requested its withdrawal at the end of life. However, opinions of medical professionals and patients tended to be dependent on the type of device, with turning off ICDs being perceived as more acceptable than turning off pacemakers, whereas legal professionals tended to perceive all devices as similar. Thus, education and discussion regarding managing devices at the end of life are important when having end-of-life discussions and making end-of-life decisions to better understand

  17. Management of Low-Level Radioactive Waste from Research, Hospitals and Nuclear Medical Centers in Egypt - 13469

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.A.; Selim, Y.T.; Lasheen, Y.F.

    2013-07-01

    The application of radioisotopes and radiation sources in medical diagnosis and therapy is an important issue. Physicians can use radioisotopes to diagnose and treat diseases. Methods of treatment, conditioning and management of low level radioactive wastes from the use of radiation sources and radioisotopes in hospitals and nuclear medicine application, are described. Solid Radioactive waste with low-level activity after accumulation, minimization, segregation and measurement, are burned or compressed in a compactor according to the international standards. Conditioned drums are transported to the interim storage site at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) represented in Hot Labs and Waste Management Center (HLWMC) for storage and monitoring. (authors)

  18. [The management of implantable medical device and the application of the internet of things in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Xu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    Implantable medical device is a special product which belongs to medical devices. It not only possesses product characteristics in common, but also has specificity for safety and effectiveness. Implantable medical device must be managed by the relevant laws and regulations of the State Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, we have used cardiac pacemakers as an example to describe the significance of the management of implantable medical device products and the application of the internet of things in hospitals. PMID:22379772

  19. AN INTRODUCTION TO ESSENTIALS OF BIO-MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Singh, Z; Bhalwar, R; Jayaram, J; Tilak, V W

    2001-04-01

    The issue of biomedical waste management has assumed great significance in recent times particularly in view of the rapid upsurge of HIV infection. Government of India has made proper handling and disposal of this category of waste a statutory requirement with the publication of gazette notification no 460 dated 27 July 1998. The provisions are equally applicable to our service hospitals and hence there is a need for all the service medical, dental, nursing officers, other paramedical staff and safaiwalas to be well aware of the basic principles of handling, treatment and disposal of biomedical waste. The present article deals with such basic issues as definition, categories and principles of handling and disposal of biomedical waste. PMID:27407320

  20. The Fukushima radiation accident: consequences for radiation accident medical management.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Viktor; Dörr, Harald

    2012-08-01

    The March 2011 radiation accident in Fukushima, Japan, is a textbook example of a radiation accident of global significance. In view of the global dimensions of the accident, it is important to consider the lessons learned. In this context, emphasis must be placed on consequences for planning appropriate medical management for radiation accidents including, for example, estimates of necessary human and material resources. The specific characteristics of the radiation accident in Fukushima are thematically divided into five groups: the exceptional environmental influences on the Fukushima radiation accident, particular circumstances of the accident, differences in risk perception, changed psychosocial factors in the age of the Internet and globalization, and the ignorance of the effects of ionizing radiation both among the general public and health care professionals. Conclusions like the need for reviewing international communication, interfacing, and interface definitions will be drawn from the Fukushima radiation accident. PMID:22951483