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Sample records for medicine curriculum vitae

  1. How to present a curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J

    1985-10-01

    At times, as for example when candlelight flickers on bottle and glasses, it is not unpleasant to look into a pair of warm and friendly eyes and respond to the words "Tell me about yourself." Completing a curriculum vitae (CV), however, is a less attractive proposition, especially when applying for an appointment. Even those who are fond of talking about themselves can find it difficult. Some find it embarrassing. Some, judging from the poorly presented data which frequently accompany applications even for senior posts, are unaware of the important part the CV plays in the selection process. PMID:4092136

  2. Rutherford's curriculum vitae, 1894-1907.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    1995-06-01

    A single page, handwritten document was discovered when the Macdonald Physics building of McGill University in Montreal was gutted in 1978. This proved to be the draft of Ernest Rutherford's curriculum vitae (C.V.) covering the years 1894-1907, probably written in the autumn of 1906 when Rutherford was preparing to leave McGill. The C.V. contains 21 headings in chronological order, referring to research and other activities of Rutherford and his coauthors (especially Soddy and Barnes), plus a further set of headings relating to the associated investigations of Rutherford's team, including Eve and Hahn. A transcript of the document is provided, although in several places, Rutherford's handwriting is difficult to interpret, and the significance of his abbreviations is not always clear. Each of the items in the C.V. is discussed briefly in this review, in the light both of Rutherford's personal career and of the contribution of his team to the development and understanding of radioactivity. This contribution included the cause and nature of radioactivity (with Soddy), energy aspects of radioactive decay (with Barnes), elucidation of the uranium-radium, thorium and actinium series (Godlewski and Hahn), the radioactivity of the earth and atmosphere (Eve), the nature of the gamma rays (Eve) and, perhaps most important of all, the nature and properties of the alpha particle (Rutherford himself). The latter investigations led directly to Rutherford's later work in Manchester, including the nuclear model of the atom and artificial disintegration of the nucleus. PMID:7565376

  3. Curriculum vitae: An important tool for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W; Roberts, Mary Ellen E

    2016-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) should maintain a curriculum vitae (CV) that comprehensively reflects the individual's work and professional accomplishments. This article guides APNs through best practices for development of a CV. Tips are offered to help guide the content, format, and maintenance of the CV. PMID:27135762

  4. Preparing a successful, role-specific curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2014-10-01

    An internet search reveals just how many articles there are on preparing a curriculum vitae (CV). The preparation of a CV should not be regarded as a 'one-off' event, to be updated periodically. A successful CV requires thoughtful preparation to ensure it is directed towards a specific post and should consider two important perspectives. First, an understanding of what is required of the practitioner in the nursing post (demand), and second, what the nurse can offer in terms of his or her skills, experience, qualities and qualifications (supply). The demands of the post will also include meeting professional standards, such as those that have emerged following consideration of the Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry (Francis 2013). This article explores how to prepare a successful CV for a specific role, using a demand and supply perspective--where a nurse seeks to match the specific requirements of the post by summarising what he or she has to offer. PMID:25270484

  5. Using the Curriculum Vita To Study the Career Paths of Scientists and Engineers: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Eliesh O'Neil; Dietz, James S.; Chompalov, Ivan; Bozeman, Barry; Park, Jongwon

    The usefulness of the curriculum vita (CV) as a data source for examining the career paths of scientists and engineers was studied. CVs were obtained in response to an e-mail message sent to researchers working in the area of biotechnology who were funded by the National Science Foundation (55 responses) or listed as authors (industry only) in the…

  6. Beyond Curriculum Reform: Confronting Medicine's Hidden Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafferty, Frederic W.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the existence of three curricula in medical schools (formal, informal, and hidden) and suggests that educators and administrators investigate the hidden curriculum by examining four areas: institutional policies; evaluation practices; resource-allocation decisions; and institutional "slang." Needed reforms in accreditation standards are…

  7. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents. PMID:26477900

  8. Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

  9. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  10. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) developed a musculoskeletal ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships in 2010. As the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound in sports medicine has evolved, it became clear that the curriculum needed to be updated. Furthermore, the name 'musculoskeletal ultrasound' was changed to 'sports ultrasound' (SPORTS US) to reflect the broad range of diagnostic and interventional applications of ultrasound in sports medicine. This document was created to outline the core competencies of SPORTS US and to provide sports medicine fellowship directors and others interested in SPORTS US education with a guide to create a SPORTS US curriculum. By completing this SPORTS US curriculum, sports medicine fellows and physicians can attain proficiency in the core competencies of SPORTS US required for the practice of sports medicine. PMID:25361787

  11. The curriculum is dead! Long live the curriculum! Designing an undergraduate medicine and surgery curriculum for the future.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Where changing social circumstances demand reform of medicine, this in turn provokes new thinking in medical education. Curriculum changes, however, are often ill conceived, consisting of syllabus (content) modification, rather than careful consideration of fundamental principles and theory shaping a curriculum process initiative. The undergraduate medicine and surgery curriculum of the future must address some basic fault lines in current provision, such as medical culture's failure to democratise work practices ensuring patient safety. While acquiring a reputation as innovative and progressive, and after a decade of success with current provision, Peninsula Medical School (UK) has recognised the need to develop its curriculum for the future. Such a curriculum will be guided by best evidence from medical education to inform pedagogical practices and by sophisticated curriculum theory. Drawing on social learning pedagogies and curriculum reconceptualisation models for guidance, and incorporating evaluation of its current provision and published evaluations of other curricula (particularly Longitudinal Integrated models), fundamental principles were conceived to guide curriculum reform. PMID:22632276

  12. Terror Medicine as Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Leonard A.; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D.; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training. PMID:25309891

  13. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored. PMID:26806664

  14. [Design of a Curriculum Clinical Social Medicine].

    PubMed

    Gostomzyk, J G; Simoes, E; Mittelstaedt, G V

    2015-09-01

    The economic transformation of health care systems, which is supported by both the economic and the political sector, is in demand of constant humane correction. Legal regulations of social systems securing health corresponding to the code of social law are guard rails for a responsible use of limited resources and are subject to constant development. All doctors caring for patients should be in a position to reflect the real life context of their patients as both causal and modifying influence for health and disease from a social medical perspective, apart from their specific medical field of expertise.Accordingly 3 parts of sub-specialization training are suggested: clinical tasks of social medicine as detailed in the code of social law, clinical social medicine in health care according to the 5(th) book of the code of social law and social medicine in clinical social medicine/participation. Higher level-of-care hospitals, as well as rehabilitation clinics, should offer sub-specialization in social medicine without interruption of employment contracts. Corresponding criteria for the regulation on further education should be formulated by the German Society of Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP) as the competent scientific association and presented to the committee on further education of the Federal Medical Association. This aims at strengthening social medicine in clinical care. PMID:26154260

  15. Addiction medicine: a model osteopathic medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lande, R Gregory; Wyatt, Stephen A; Przekop, Peter R

    2010-03-01

    The World Health Organization has identified nicotine, alcohol, and illicit drugs as among the top 10 contributors of morbidity and mortality in the world. Substance use disorders are preventable conditions that are major contributors to poor health, family dysfunction, and various social problems in the United States-problems that have a profound economic impact. The American Osteopathic Academy of Addiction Medicine seeks to promote teaching of addiction medicine at colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs), which-honoring the osteopathic concepts of holistic medicine and disease prevention-are well poised to develop a model addiction medicine curriculum. Educators and students at COMs can use guidelines from Project MAINSTREAM, a core addiction medicine curriculum designed to improve education of health professionals in substance abuse, for developing addiction medicine curricula and for gauging their professional growth. These guidelines should be incorporated into the first 2 years of osteopathic medical students' basic science didactics. The authors encourage the development of addiction medicine courses and curricula at all COMs. PMID:20386021

  16. African Americans in Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Invention, Curriculum Guide. A Multicultural Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester City School District, NY.

    "The Contributions of African Americans to Science, Medicine, and Invention" is a 39-minute videotape developed for elementary and middle school students and staff. The video, the script, and the curriculum guide in this kit provide significant historical information that is not often available. The video uses student actors to stress the economic…

  17. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The following sports ultrasound (SPORTS US) curriculum is a revision of the curriculum developed by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) in 2010. Several changes have been made to the curriculum with the primary aim of providing a pathway by which a sports medicine fellow can obtain sufficient SPORTS US training to become proficient in the core competencies of SPORTS US. The core competencies of SPORTS US are outlined in the learning objectives section of this document. The term "SPORTS US" was purposefully chosen rather than "musculoskeletal ultrasound" (MSK US) because it was recognized by the panel that the evolving field of SPORTS US encompasses non-MSK applications of ultrasound such as the FAST examination (focused assessment with sonography for trauma). Although the SPORTS US core competencies in this curriculum are all MSK in nature, they represent the minimum SPORTS US knowledge a sports medicine fellow should acquire during fellowship. However, additional training in more advanced MSK and non-MSK applications of ultrasound can be provided at the fellowship director's discretion. Completion of this SPORTS US curriculum fulfills the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine's (AIUM) requirements to perform an MSK US examination and the prerequisites for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography's (ARDMS) MSK sonography certification examination. PMID:25536482

  18. Vita Genomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Shih-Hsin Wu, Lawrence; Su, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ellson

    2007-06-01

    Vita Genomics, Inc., centered in Taiwan and China, aims to be a premier genomics-based biotechnological and biopharmaceutical company in the Asia-Pacific region. The company focuses on conducting pharmacogenomics research, in vitro diagnosis product development and specialty contract research services in both genomics and pharmacogenomics fields. We are now initiating a drug rescue program designed to resurrect drugs that have failed in the previous clinical trials owing to low efficacies. This program applies pharmacogenomics approaches using biomarkers to screen subsets of patients who may respond better or avoid adverse responses to the test drugs. Vita Genomics, Inc. has envisioned itself as an important player in the healthcare industry offering advanced molecular diagnostic products and services, revolutionizing thedrug-development process and providing pharmacogenomic solutions. PMID:17559355

  19. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training

  20. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  1. Training on Exercise is Medicine® Within an Integrative Medicine Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hill, Linda L; Nichols, Jeanne; Wing, David; Waalen, Jill; Friedman, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Physicians are increasingly approached by individuals seeking integrative approaches to health care and well-being. Many integrative modalities include a physical activity component. Patients seek guidance from primary and specialty care providers on the safe and effective incorporation of these modalities into their lifestyle. Physicians and other health professionals receive very limited training in the clinical applications of exercise science. This paper reports on a curriculum designed to teach health professionals key exercise constructs for application to clinical practice for prevention and management of lifestyle-related disease, and incorporating the curriculum into a preventive medicine residency training program. The course was developed in 2012-2013, data collected in 2013-2015, and analysis was done in 2015. Six modules were developed as part of a 24-hour course. Each module included didactic, laboratory, and case examples. The modules included energetics, exercise and cardiorespiratory health, bone health, obesity and sarcopenia, balance and fall prevention, and behavior change and the use of technologies. The delivery was found feasible for all three components, delivered in 2-4-hour segments. The incorporation into the residency curriculum was feasible, efficacious, well received, and easily incorporated into the existing curriculum. This comprehensive curriculum has the potential to close the gap in medical school, residency, graduate, nursing, and integrative curricula on this important topic. Current practitioners would benefit in primary care and geriatric settings. This curriculum would also be useful for cross-disciplinary researchers, including public health, health behaviors, and integrative medicine practitioners. PMID:26477904

  2. Validation of a Canadian curriculum in obstetric medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cumyn, Annabelle; Gibson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive curriculum for obstetric medicine was created through review and synthesis of several existing sources including a recent textbook, published curricula and a review of cases seen in a specialized clinical setting. The preliminary curriculum document then underwent local validation and reformulation of educational objectives with reference to the CanMEDS framework promoted by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. This draft ‘Canadian’ Curriculum Content Validation Instrument, covering 34 medical conditions, was then distributed to a cohort of 29 Canadian obstetric internists (the study group) for review. All responders gave feedback on each of the 402 curricular items, with a high level of inter-rater agreement. A subgroup was subsequently convened (n = 15) and Delphi methodology was used to review the major recommendations from the group, as well as nine additional problematic items, achieving a consensus on 38/43 survey items (88%). The final validated document was presented at the North American Society of Obstetric Medicine meeting in April 2010 in Toronto, Canada and distributed to study group members for local adaptation and implementation. Wider dissemination is planned in the near future.

  3. Assimilating Traditional Healing Into Preventive Medicine Residency Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Denece O; Hopkins, L Olivia; Torres, Eliseo; Prasad, Arti

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive cultural competency includes knowledge and awareness of culturally based healing and wellness practices. Healthcare providers should be aware of the individual patient's beliefs, culture, and use of culturally based health practices because patients may adopt such practices for general wellness or as adjunct therapies without the benefit of discussion with their healthcare provider. This article describes the culturally based traditional healing curriculum that has been implemented in the University of New Mexico Public Health and General Preventive Medicine Residency Program in order to fulfill this knowledge necessity. Curricular elements were added in a stepwise manner starting in 2011, with the full content as described implemented starting in 2013. Data were collected annually with evaluation of the full curriculum occurring in 2015. New Mexico has a diverse population base that includes predominantly Hispanic and Native American cultures, making the inclusion of curriculum regarding traditional healing practices very pertinent. Residents at the University of New Mexico were educated through several curricular components about topics such as Curanderismo, the art of Mexican Folk Healing. An innovative approach was used, with a compendium of training methods that included learning directly from traditional healers and participation in healing practices. The incorporation of this residency curriculum resulted in a means to produce physicians well trained in approaching patient care and population health with knowledge of culturally based health practices in order to facilitate healthy patients and communities. PMID:26477902

  4. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. PMID:21692900

  5. The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

    2014-01-01

    With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum. PMID:24280841

  6. Hospice and palliative medicine: curriculum evaluation and learner assessment in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra; Ross, Jeanette S

    2012-01-01

    Major efforts have been pursued to improve palliative care education for physicians at all levels of their training. Such changes include the incorporation of palliative care curriculum and guidelines, an established process for competency-based evaluation and certification, faculty development, innovative educational experiences, the improvement of textbooks, and the establishment of accredited palliative medicine fellowships. Hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) has been clearly defined as a subspecialty and a crucial area of medical education. As innovative curricular approaches have become available to educate medical and other interprofessional trainees, this article aims to describe different models and methods applied in curriculum evaluation, tailoring such approaches to the field of palliative medicine. A stepwise process of curriculum development and evaluation is described, focusing on available curriculum evaluation competency-based tools for each level of learners. As HPM evolves and its educational programs grow, curriculum evaluation will provides invaluable feedback to institutions and programs in many ways. PMID:22268408

  7. A Problem Solving Curriculum for Active Learning at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, Indiana University School of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iatridis, Panayotis G.

    An innovative curriculum called the "Regional Center Alternative Pathway," recently adopted by the Northwest Center for Medical Education (part of Indiana University's School of Medicine), is presented. The curriculum combines the traditional structure's didactic approach with a new problem-based tutorial curriculum. In this curriculum the…

  8. Using the Curriculum Vitae in Leadership Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bawazeer, Wazerah; Gunter, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Professional biography research with those who hold formal positions in educational organizations is an established approach to researching leaders, leading and leadership. A key focus is on the oral account of a life story, and this can include family and wider life experiences. What is less of a feature is how the respondent codifies their…

  9. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  10. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum. PMID:26211797

  11. [Kampo Medicine in the New Model Core Curriculum of Pharmaceutical Education].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    What should we educate for Kampo medicine in the model core curriculum of pharmaceutical education? The curricular core should be discussed considering the points mentioned below. (1) Positioning of Kampo medicine in the Japanese medical care system. Kampo medicine is an authorized medical care category in the National Health Insurance (NHI) program in Japan. The NHI drug price list carries 148 Kampo formulations. According to the report of the Japan Kampo Medicines Manufacturers Association in 2011, approximately 90% of Japanese physicians prescribe Kampo medicines. (2) Differences between Kampo medicine and western medicine: In Kampo medicine, the most suitable formula among various Kampo formulas to normalize the psychophysical state of individual patients is selected. In other words, if there is a complaint, there are always some treatments. (3) A strong point of Kampo medicine: Kampo medicine enables physicians to deal with difficult-to-treat conditions by western medicine alone. Also, by using the scale of Kampo medicine, each patient can grasp his or her own systemic state and improve their lifestyle. To extend healthy life expectancy, a basic knowledge of Kampo medicine may play a significant role in integrated health care. "The guide book of the approval standards for OTC Kampo products", "the pharmaceutical advanced educational guideline", and "the manual of the exam questions preparation for registered sales clerks" should also be consulted before selecting the area and contents that should be covered. PMID:26935081

  12. Building a Vita for the Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    Vita review is used by most prospective employers to determine which applicants will be interviewed for a particular position opening in clinical practice. Most graduate students have little knowledge and no training in this topic, which is vital for professional development. Specific examples of vitae construction are provided for one of the…

  13. Computers, Curriculum, and Classrooms: Panacea or Patent Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Alan W.

    1997-01-01

    Clifford Stoll's skeptical look at the computer mania besetting education raises issues about computerization and networking costs, the relationship between accessing information and becoming educated, and the role of human interaction in learning. By placing the computer before the curriculum, are proponents providing the best education possible…

  14. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project at the University of Vermont College of Medicine: The Vermont Generalist Curriculum (VGC) Experience.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, J; First, L R; Levine, M; Reardon, M; Magrane, D

    2001-04-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine received its Vermont Generalist Curriculum (VGC) subcontract as one of the second-cycle Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project schools from 1995 to 1998. The Vermont program was jointly codirected by the chairs of family practice and pediatrics and the program director for internal medicine on a rotating basis and was overseen by a multidisciplinary steering committee that included generalists, basic scientists, specialists, and students. This committee provided guidance and support in recruitment of preceptors, continuous assessment and improvement of the courses, development of a clinical correlation manual for students in clinical offices, and cooperation around a jointly sponsored annual primary care meeting that included a joint scientific program, a research forum, and a faculty development workshop. The VGC has provided a pilot for many innovative curricular changes that have served as models for the school-wide curriculum redesign process currently under way at VERMONT: While the funding for this project ended in 1998, the changes, innovations, and collaboration born out of the project are valuable enough for the dean's office to maintain the VGC's funding and its steering committee for the future. PMID:11299185

  15. Incorporation of Medicinal Chemistry into the Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Application of concepts presented in organic chemistry lecture using a virtual project involving the sythesis of medicinally important compounds is emphasized. The importance of reinforcing the concepts from lecture in lab, thus providing a powerful instructional means is discussed.

  16. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University.

    PubMed

    Veitia, M; McCarty, S; Kelly, P; Szarek, J; Harvey, H

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project was designed to enhance interest in and support of generalism during the first two years of medical education. The original goals at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University included the design and implementation of a core curriculum, Introduction to Patient Care (IPC), and enhancement of teaching excellence through faculty development. The core curriculum facilitated integration with the basic sciences and early introduction of physical examination skills, which were further developed in longitudinal clinical experiences with mentors. Although it was not originally intended to include basic scientists in the preceptor groups, they became important additions and created additional opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and reciprocal learning. The mentor program, another well-received and intended curriculum change, evolved from a structured experience to a more flexible component of the curriculum. The program met the requirements of the IGC Project but 53% of the originally intended mentor time was achievable, due to curriculum constraints. Faculty development, another success, was originally intended to target IPC faculty but ultimately became a university-wide effort. The changes implemented as a result of the IGC Project continue to flourish beyond the funding period and have become integral aspects of the curriculum and the medical school. PMID:11299178

  17. The synergy of medicine and art in the curriculum.

    PubMed

    Mullangi, Samyukta

    2013-07-01

    This is a commentary in which a fourth-year medical student argues for the relevance of the arts and humanities and the need to sustain medical students' exposure to these through the medical curriculum. She writes that the point of incorporating the visual arts, literature, music, and other arts into the curriculum is not necessarily to "teach" professionalism but, rather, to offer students a viable, lifelong tool to reorient themselves as they move along in their training. The advantages that the humanities offer are multifactorial: They offer a space for discussion about topics such as death and dying-and coping with dying patients-such that students can feel safe and objective in sharing thoughts; they remind students of the patient experience; they eloquently distill muddy feelings into nuanced words; and they serve as an anchoring point for a state of mind that nurtures reflection over the disdain encouraged by the "hidden curriculum" of the wards. The author closes the commentary with excerpts from literature. PMID:23799442

  18. All Health Is Global Health, All Medicine Is Social Medicine: Integrating the Social Sciences Into the Preclinical Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer; Greene, Jeremy A; Farmer, Paul E; Jones, David S

    2016-05-01

    As physicians work to achieve optimal health outcomes for their patients, they often struggle to address the issues that arise outside the clinic. Social, economic, and political factors influence patients' burden of disease, access to treatment, and health outcomes. This challenge has motivated recent calls for increased attention to the social determinants of health. At the same time, advocates have called for increased attention to global health. Each year, more U.S. medical students participate in global health experiences. Yet, the global health training that is available varies widely. The discipline of social medicine, which attends to the social determinants of disease, social meanings of disease, and social responses to disease, offers a solution to both challenges. The analyses and techniques of social medicine provide an invaluable toolkit for providing health care in the United States and abroad.In 2007, Harvard Medical School implemented a new course, required for all first-year students, that teaches social medicine in a way that integrates global health. In this article, the authors argue for the importance of including social medicine and global health in the preclinical curriculum; describe Harvard Medical School's innovative, integrated approach to teaching these disciplines, which can be used at other medical schools; and explore the barriers that educators may face in implementing such a curriculum, including resistance from students. Such a course can equip medical students with the knowledge and tools that they will need to address complex health problems in the United States and abroad. PMID:26703416

  19. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Runyan, Christine; Savageau, Judith A.; Potts, Stacy; Weinreb, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction. PMID:27282276

  20. Impact of an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum Based on Adult Learning Theory

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael L; Ellis, Peter J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop and implement an evidence-based medicine (EBM) curriculum and determine its effectiveness in improving residents' EBM behaviors and skills. DESIGN Description of the curriculum and a multifaceted evaluation, including a pretest-posttest controlled trial. SETTING University-based primary care internal medicine residency program. PARTICIPANTS Second- and third-year internal medicine residents (N =34). INTERVENTIONS A 7-week EBM curriculum in which residents work through the steps of evidence-based decisions for their own patients. Based on adult learning theory, the educational strategy included a resident-directed tutorial format, use of real clinical encounters, and specific EBM facilitating techniques for faculty. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Behaviors and self-assessed competencies in EBM were measured with questionnaires. Evidence-based medicine skills were assessed with a 17-point test, which required free text responses to questions based on a clinical vignette and a test article. After the intervention, residents participating in the curriculum (case subjects) increased their use of original studies to answer clinical questions, their examination of methods and results sections of articles, and their self-assessed EBM competence in three of five domains of EBM, while the control subjects did not. The case subjects significantly improved their scores on the EBM skills test (8.5 to 11.0, p =.001), while the control subjects did not (8.5 to 7.1, p =.09). The difference in the posttest scores of the two groups was 3.9 points (p =.001, 95% confidence interval 1.9, 5.9). CONCLUSIONS An EBM curriculum based on adult learning theory improves residents' EBM skills and certain EBM behaviors. The description and multifaceted evaluation can guide medical educators involved in EBM training. PMID:9436893

  1. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine into the Health Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Sheila M.; Graf, Helen M.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches in health education, suggesting a proposed CAM course for health education professional preparation and offering a course outline which can be used as a self- standing course or integrated into existing courses. It includes a proposed course description and goals,…

  2. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  3. Designing a Competency-Based Program in Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine for the Professional Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Lloyd A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A five-day workshop was successful in fulfilling its prime objective, development of a competency-based curriculum for veterinary public health and preventive medicine (VPH & PM). The model now may be used to re-evaluate and, where necessary, revise existing curriculums. (LBH)

  4. EC Project 'GUIDELINES ON MPE': proposed qualification and curriculum frameworks and the MPE in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruana, C. J.

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of EC project 'Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert' are to provide for improved implementation of the provisions relating to the Medical Physics Expert within Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM and the proposed recast Basic Safety Standards directive. This includes harmonisation of the mission statement for Medical Physics Services as well as the education and training of the MPE. It also includes detailed knowledge-skills-competence inventories for the Medical Physics Expert in each of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy. This paper presents the proposed Qualification and Curriculum Frameworks and their application to the Medical Physics Expert in Nuclear Medicine.

  5. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR): Description of a New Online Educational Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary; Dodds, Sally; Brooks, Audrey J.; Brenner, Michelle G.; Brown, Melanie L.; Frazer, Paige; Mark, John D.; Weydert, Joy A.; Wilcox, Graciela M. G.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Maizes, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Use of integrative medicine (IM) is prevalent in children, yet availability of training opportunities is limited. The Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) program was designed to address this training gap. The PIMR program is a 100-hour online educational curriculum, modeled on the successful Integrative Medicine in Residency program in family medicine. Preliminary data on site characteristics, resident experience with and interest in IM, and residents’ self-assessments of perceived knowledge and skills in IM are presented. The embedded multimodal evaluation is described. Less than one-third of residents had IM coursework in medical school or personal experience with IM. Yet most (66%) were interested in learning IM, and 71% were interested in applying IM after graduation. Less than half of the residents endorsed pre-existing IM knowledge/skills. Average score on IM medical knowledge exam was 51%. Sites endorsed 1–8 of 11 site characteristics, with most (80%) indicating they had an IM practitioner onsite and IM trained faculty. Preliminary results indicate that the PIMR online curriculum targets identified knowledge gaps. Residents had minimal prior IM exposure, yet expressed strong interest in IM education. PIMR training site surveys identified both strengths and areas needing further development to support successful PIMR program implementation.

  6. Social media in the emergency medicine residency curriculum: social media responses to the residents' perspective article.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Bryan D; Kobner, Scott; Trueger, N Seth; Yiu, Stella; Lin, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    In July to August 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum" by Scott et al. The objective was to describe a 14-day worldwide clinician dialogue about evidence, opinions, and early relevant innovations revolving around the featured article and made possible by the immediacy of social media technologies. Six online facilitators hosted the multimodal discussion on the ALiEM Web site, Twitter, and YouTube, which featured 3 preselected questions. Engagement was tracked through various Web analytic tools, and themes were identified by content curation. The dialogue resulted in 1,222 unique page views from 325 cities in 32 countries on the ALiEM Web site, 569,403 Twitter impressions, and 120 views of the video interview with the authors. Five major themes we identified in the discussion included curriculum design, pedagogy, and learning theory; digital curation skills of the 21st-century emergency medicine practitioner; engagement challenges; proposed solutions; and best practice examples. The immediacy of social media technologies provides clinicians the unique opportunity to engage a worldwide audience within a relatively short time frame. PMID:25725591

  7. [Curriculum reform in dental medicine at the University of Ghent].

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A

    2004-01-01

    The need for dental and oral treatment in the society is constantly changing. Epidemiological studies show that in the rapidly aging population in Western Europe, caries (except for root caries) is declining but more complex periodontal treatment is needed. The number of completely edentulous patients is decreasing. Patients have a longer life expectancy but are medically and psychologically more compromised. Many more patients are at high risk for medical complications. Therefore, a more medical orientation of the dental education is needed. The basic cellular and molecular knowledge in medicine is rapidly expanding. The practical application of this expanded knowledge has been introduced in dentistry such as use of DNA probes, genetic testing, vaccines etc. The graduating dentist should be aware of the scientific progress and be able to apply this technology in his future practice. Therefore, the urgent need was felt to reform the dental education fundamentally and to give it a more medical orientation. Teaching is organised in coherent blocks of lectures covering specific parts of' a discipline and discussing the content from different angles by different lecturers. Basic information (eg. physiology, microscopy, microbiology) is provided in the same block as the clinical and therapeutic information. Preclinical laboratories prepare the student for the clinical phase of a discipline and are not any longer devoted to dental technical laboratory work. More time is given to prosthetic planning, communication with the dental technician and to analyse the biological effects of prosthetic appliances. In the final year a large number of teaching hours is devoted to general medical pathology including physiopathology, dermatology, general head and neck pathology and surgery (ENT, oncology, orthognathic surgery) as well as gerodontology including general medical, psychological and nutritional themes. Finally, clinically the student has a multidisciplinary approach in his

  8. The Doctoring Curriculum at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine: Leadership and Participant Roles for Psychiatry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, James A.; Ton, Hendry; Onate, John; McCarthy, Tracy; Stevenson, Frazier T.; Servis, Mark E.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe in detail the 3-year model of the Doctoring curriculum plus an elective fourth-year Doctoring course at University of California, Davis School of Medicine (UCDSOM) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine and the critical role for psychiatry faculty leadership and participation. Methods:…

  9. Evaluating and Enhancing a Women's Health Curriculum in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Diane B; DaRosa, Debra A

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Resident education in women's health is required but is often underemphasized. Our aim was to identify women's health topics with the most relevance to our graduates’ practices and to determine how well they were prepared to address women's health issues. DESIGN Postgraduate survey. SETTING University-affiliated internal medicine residency program. PARTICIPANTS Program graduates in general internal medicine practice. METHODS A survey was drafted listing the 65 topics described in a published residency curriculum in women's health. Respondents indicated the extent to which each item was relevant to their practice and the adequacy of instruction received on a Likert-type scale of 1 (not relevant/inadequate) to 5 (highly relevant/adequate). RESULTS The response rate was 86%. Many of the items were highly relevant to our graduates’ practices. Learning needs were found in all areas as none of the topics were rated as “adequately” taught during residency. Many areas in the curriculum had low relevance scores. Few differences were seen in the perceived relevance of women's health problems or the adequacy of instruction received based on gender, practice type and setting, or amount of ambulatory training during residency. CONCLUSIONS Use of this survey has allowed us to tailor and prioritize learning issues in women's health to meet the needs of our graduates. Increased time in ambulatory rotations alone may not be sufficient to prepare residents to provide comprehensive care in this field. Further study of the effectiveness of a dedicated curriculum in women's heath is needed. PMID:15209589

  10. [Curriculum reform at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile School of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Marcela; Rivera, Solange; Sirhan, Marisol; Thone, Natalie; Valdés, Claudia; Pertuzé, Julio; Puschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The career of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile was established from the beginning (1929), with a classical Flexner curriculum design. In seven years, the career is divided in three cycles: basic sciences, clinics and internship. It obtained Chilean accreditation and fulfilled American Association of Medical Colleges accreditation requirements. Changes in the Chilean epidemiological profile and health system, and new teaching methods in medicine, stimulated a process of deep curricular analysis, identifying strengths and weaknesses of the medical career. The curricular strengths were well-developed scientific and clinical components, fully committed students and faculties, well defined learning objectives and excellent clinical campuses. Curricular weaknesses included a poor vertical and horizontal integration, few student centered methodologies and a weak emphasis concerning doctor’s professionalism. Subsequently, the whole community of teachers, students and medical educators worked on the design of a new curriculum, establishing a new graduate profile and designed it oriented by learning objectives, of six years of duration, with an optimized course sequence that melds basic science and clinical concepts, with strong emphasis on humanities and professionalism. It prioritizes an early contact with patients from the first year and expands teaching methods. The main objective of this process was to achieve a new curriculum with an integrative structure. This was implemented in 2015 with an approved protocol to evaluate the outcomes. PMID:26998988

  11. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    PubMed Central

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  12. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; Shmalberg, J; Adair, H S; Allweiler, S; Bryan, J N; Cantwell, S; Carr, E; Chrisman, C; Egger, C M; Greene, S; Haussler, K K; Hershey, B; Holyoak, G R; Johnson, M; Jeune, S Le; Looney, A; McConnico, R S; Medina, C; Morton, A J; Munsterman, A; Nie, G J; Park, N; Parsons-Doherty, M; Perdrizet, J A; Peyton, J L; Raditic, D; Ramirez, H P; Saik, J; Robertson, S; Sleeper, M; Dyke, J Van; Wakshlag, J

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  13. The Maps in Medicine program: An evaluation of the development and implementation of life sciences curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Jennifer

    There has been a downward trend in both science proficiency and interest in science in the United States, especially among minority students and students of a disadvantaged background. This has led to a downturn in the number of individuals within these groups considering a career in the sciences or a related field. Studies have identified many potential causes for this problem including the current structure of science curriculum, lack of teacher preparedness, and the lack of quality education and support for those students currently underrepresented in the sciences. Among the solutions to this problem include redesigning the science curriculum, offering high-quality professional development opportunities to teachers, and creating programs to give support to individuals currently underrepresented in the sciences, so that they may have a better chance of pursuing and obtaining a science career. The Maps in Medicine program (MiM) has been designed to incorporate all of the aforementioned solutions and apply them to the current science education problem. The Maps in Medicine (MiM) program was established at the University of Missouri -- Columbia, and is funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Newly developed MiM curricula and student activities are intended to promote positive attitude changes in those students who are currently underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, with the program also providing professional development to high school science teachers. It was important to determine if the MiM program's solution to the science education problem has been successful, and so the program evaluation piece was integral. A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate the MiM program. Formative evaluation results indicated a positive response from teachers and students regarding curriculum and professional development, and student activities. These results have also lead to the identification of appropriate improvements

  14. A Day in the Life at DaVita Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company name means "giving life," the bar for learning and development programs is held high. In this article, the author describes what it takes to graduate from DaVita Academy, the soft skills training program dialysis services company DaVita offers all its employees. DaVita's chief executive officer, Kent Thiry, states that the Academy…

  15. How we developed a comprehensive resuscitation-based simulation curriculum in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; McGraw, Robert; Howes, Daniel; Messenger, David; Bruder, Eric; Hall, Andrew; Chaplin, Timothy; Szulewski, Adam; Kaul, Tom; O'Brien, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, simulation-based education has emerged as a new and exciting adjunct to traditional bedside teaching and learning. Simulation-based education seems particularly relevant to emergency medicine training where residents have to master a very broad skill set, and may not have sufficient real clinical opportunities to achieve competence in each and every skill. In 2006, the Emergency Medicine program at Queen's University set out to enhance our core curriculum by developing and implementing a series of simulation-based teaching sessions with a focus on resuscitative care. The sessions were developed in such as way as to satisfy the four conditions associated with optimum learning and improvement of performance; appropriate difficulty of skill, repetitive practice, motivation, and immediate feedback. The content of the sessions was determined with consideration of the national training requirements set out by the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada. Sessions were introduced in a stepwise fashion, starting with a cardiac resuscitation series based on the AHA ACLS guidelines, and leading up to a more advanced resuscitation series as staff became more adept at teaching with simulation, and as residents became more comfortable with this style of learning. The result is a longitudinal resuscitation curriculum that begins with fundamental skills of resuscitation and crisis resource management (CRM) in the first 2 years of residency and progresses through increasingly complex resuscitation cases where senior residents are expected to play a leadership role. This paper documents how we developed, implemented, and evaluated this resuscitation-based simulation curriculum for Emergency Medicine postgraduate trainees, with discussion of some of the challenges encountered. PMID:25410350

  16. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned. PMID:26477903

  17. Beyond journal clubs. Moving toward an integrated evidence-based medicine curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Rose; Keitz, Sheri A; Wilson, Mark C; Guyatt, Gordon

    2006-05-01

    Incorporating evidence-based medicine (EBM) into clinical practice is an important competency that residency training must address. Residency program directors, and the clinical educators who work with them, should develop curricula to enhance residents' capacity for independent evidence-based practice. In this article, the authors argue that residency programs must move beyond journal club formats to promote the practice of EBM by trainees. The authors highlight the limitations of journal club, and suggest additional curricular approaches for an integrated EBM curriculum. Helping residents become effective evidence users will require a sustained effort on the part of residents, faculty, and their educational institutions. PMID:16704406

  18. The business of emergency medicine: a nonclinical curriculum proposal for emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Falvo, Thomas; McKniff, Sueanne; Smolin, Gregory; Vega, David; Amsterdam, James T

    2009-09-01

    Over the course of their postgraduate medical education, physicians are expected not only to acquire an extensive knowledge of clinical medicine and sound procedural skills, but also to develop competence in their other professional roles as communicator, collaborator, mediator, manager, teacher, and patient advocate. Although the need for physicians to develop stronger service delivery skills is well recognized, residency programs may underemphasize formal training in nonclinical proficiencies. As a result, graduates can begin their professional careers with an incomplete understanding of the operation of health care systems and how to utilize system resources in the manner best suited to their patients' needs. This article proposes the content, educational strategy, and needs assessment for an academic program entitled The Business of Emergency Medicine (BOEM). Developed as an adjunct to the (predominantly) clinical content of traditional emergency medicine (EM) training programs, BOEM is designed to enhance the existing academic curricula with additional learning opportunities by which EM residents can acquire a fundamental understanding of the nonclinical skills of their specialty. PMID:19689483

  19. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of...

  20. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND...

  1. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of...

  2. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of...

  3. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of...

  4. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guides for Pediatrics Faculty: Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series, Medicine 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milman, Doris H.; And Others

    This document provides two separate curriculum guides for pediatrics faculty to use in teaching medical students. The first section contains the alcohol abuse curriculum guide; the second section contains the drug abuse curriculum guide. The drug abuse guide concentrates on cannabis as a paradigm for all nonalcoholic drugs of abuse. Each guide…

  5. Genetics in medical school curriculum: A look at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Deanne M.; Fong, Chin-To

    2008-01-01

    Genetics is assuming an increasingly important role in medicine. As a result, the teaching of genetics should also be increased proportionally to ensure that future physicians will be able to take advantage of the new genetic technology, and to understand the associated ethical, legal and social issues. At the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, we have been able to incorporate genetic education into a four-year medical curriculum in a fully integrated fashion. This model may serve as a template for other medical curriculum still in development. PMID:18196607

  6. The undergraduate curriculum of Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak in terms of Harden's 10 questions.

    PubMed

    Malik, Alam Sher; Malik, Rukhsana Hussain

    2002-11-01

    The curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS) is designed particularly to cater for the health needs of the State of Sarawak, Malaysia. The framework of the curriculum is built on four strands: biological knowledge, clinical skills, behavioural and population aspects. The training is community based and a graduate of FMHS is expected to possess the ability to deal with many ethnic groups with different cultures and beliefs; expertise in tropical infectious diseases; skills to deal with emergencies such as snakebite and near drowning; qualities of an administrator, problem-solver and community leader; and proficiency in information and communication technology. The content of the curriculum strives for commitment to lifelong learning and professional values. The FMHS has adopted a 'mixed economy' of education strategies and a 'mixed menu approach' to test a wide range of curriculum outcomes. The FMHS fosters intellectual and academic pursuits, encourages friendliness and a sense of social responsibility and businesslike efficiency. PMID:12623455

  7. 75 FR 22437 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available... Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Demonstration Program for tax return preparation is...

  8. [From stand-alone solution to longitudinal communication curriculum--development and implementation at the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg].

    PubMed

    Sator, Marlene; Jünger, Jana

    2015-05-01

    At the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg, implementation of an interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum was started in 2001 with the goal of achieving sustained promotion of communicative and clinical competences. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of Heidelberg's longitudinal communication curriculum. Furthermore, innovative aspects and strategies are discussed. The methodological approaches for development and implementation were Kern's "Six-step Approach" and a SWOT analysis. The process resulted in an innovative communication curriculum that starts with an integrated curriculum for developing clinical and communicative competence in the pre-clinical phase and continues in the clinical phase with medical communication and interactive training. Satisfaction with the communication curriculum and its effectiveness were rated highly by students. Residents who had graduated from Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg rated the extent to which they had communicative competencies at the time of their graduation at their disposal significantly higher than residents who had graduated from the other 4 medical faculties in Baden-Württemberg. The experiences gained in Heidelberg can be applied by other faculties. PMID:25941988

  9. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  10. Developing an "evidence-based medicine and use of the biomedical literature" component as a longitudinal theme of an outcomes-based medical school curriculum: year 1.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Suzetta; Moore, Kelly; Arriaga, Joaquin; Paulaitis, Gediminas; Lemkau, Henry L

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the new outcomes-based curriculum at the University of Miami School of Medicine, a model curriculum for the first decade of the twenty-first century. The new curriculum has a strong emphasis on evidence-based medicine (EBM), implemented throughout its four years as a component of one of its longitudinal themes. The "EBM and Use of the Biomedical Literature" component, which begins at orientation, was developed and is implemented by the Louis Calder Memorial Library, the center of EBM focus and activity for the curriculum and other initiatives at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center. The authors are unaware of any published reports of library-centric EBM initiatives as part of a longitudinal theme of a four-year outcomes-based curriculum. Other innovations of the EBM component in the new curriculum to date include use of Blackboard and CATmaker software programs for self-paced, interactive educational opportunities. PMID:12568156

  11. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people's perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program's objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent's reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient's parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows' self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent emotions

  12. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people’s perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program’s objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent’s reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient’s parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows’ self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent

  13. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, Shannon L.; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program’s curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. Discussion These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. Conclusion While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices. PMID:27330668

  14. How we implemented a resident-led medical simulation curriculum in a large internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Susan K; Miloslavsky, Eli M; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando M; Milosh-Zinkus, Tanya; Hayden, Emily M; Gordon, James A; Currier, Paul F

    2014-04-01

    Mannequin-based simulation in graduate medical education has gained widespread acceptance. Its use in non-procedural training within internal medicine (IM) remains scant, possibly due to the logistical barriers to implementation of simulation curricula in large residency programs. We report the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine's scale-up of a voluntary pilot program to a mandatory longitudinal simulation curriculum in a large IM residency program (n = 54). We utilized an eight-case curriculum implemented over the first four months of the academic year. An intensive care unit curriculum was piloted in the spring. In order to administer a comprehensive curriculum in a large residency program where faculty resources are limited, thirty second-year and third-year residents served as session facilitators and two senior residents served as chairpersons of the program. Post-session anonymous survey revealed high learner satisfaction scores for the mandatory program, similar to those of the voluntary pilot program. Most interns believed the sessions should continue to be mandatory. Utilizing residents as volunteer facilitators and program leaders allowed the implementation of a well-received mandatory simulation program in a large IM residency program and facilitated program sustainability. PMID:24495251

  15. A Curriculum Vitae of Teeth: Evolution, Generation, Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koussoulakou, Despina S.; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Koussoulakos, Stauros L.

    2009-01-01

    The ancestor of recent vertebrate teeth was a tooth-like structure on the outer body surface of jawless fishes. Over the course of 500,000,000 years of evolution, many of those structures migrated into the mouth cavity. In addition, the total number of teeth per dentition generally decreased and teeth morphological complexity increased. Teeth form mainly on the jaws within the mouth cavity through mutual, delicate interactions between dental epithelium and oral ectomesenchyme. These interactions involve spatially restricted expression of several, teeth-related genes and the secretion of various transcription and signaling factors. Congenital disturbances in tooth formation, acquired dental diseases and odontogenic tumors affect millions of people and rank human oral pathology as the second most frequent clinical problem. On the basis of substantial experimental evidence and advances in bioengineering, many scientists strongly believe that a deep knowledge of the evolutionary relationships and the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of a given tooth in its natural position, in vivo, will be useful in the near future to prevent and treat teeth pathologies and malformations and for in vitro and in vivo teeth tissue regeneration. PMID:19266065

  16. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guide for Psychiatry Faculty. Medicine 2. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resource Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Donald S.

    This guide, one of a series of publications written for medical school faculty to use in designing substance abuse instruction, focuses on curriculum content for drug and alcohol abuse instruction. Following a brief introduction, discussions of positive attitude development toward substance abuse patients, and the psychological, cultural, and…

  17. Historical and biochemical aspects of a seventeenth century gold-based aurum vitae recipe.

    PubMed

    Rubbiani, Riccardo; Wahrig, Bettina; Ott, Ingo

    2014-08-01

    The medicinal chemistry and biomedical applications of gold complexes have been intensively studied over the last decades. Some complexes have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and a considerable number of new metallodrug candidates have been developed as new anticancer drugs and anti-infectives. However, the therapeutic use of gold and its complexes goes back to ancient times and was also of great importance for alchemists until the modern age. In this report, we give an overview of the alchemic medicine between the sixteenth and the early eighteenth century and describe the cytotoxicity and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibition of a typical "aurum vitae" medicine, which was prepared according to a recipe by Bartholomäus Kretschmar from the seventeenth century. "Aurum vitae" consists of a mixture of gold, mercury and antimony complexes and shows the expected cytotoxic and TrxR inhibitory properties providing some rationale for therapeutic effects of this kind of historical medicinal preparation. PMID:24748221

  18. Communication Skills Curriculum for Foreign Medical Graduates in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. Methods The workshop consisted of 2 interactive sessions, in a small group with 2 learners and 1-2 facilitators, during the Geriatrics block of the internship year. Twenty-three IM interns were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and at 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence and skill in communication, and asked about any challenges to effective communication with older patients. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. Results On a 4-point Likert scale, there was an average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which sustained at 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician and system barriers to effective communication. Conclusion Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in sustained increase in overall confidence among IM interns in communication with older adults, and may help overcome certain patient and physician-specific communication barriers. PMID:25354834

  19. From the community to the classroom: the Aboriginal health curriculum at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jacklin, Kristen; Strasser, Roger; Peltier, Ian

    2014-01-01

    More undergraduate medical education programs are including curricula concerning the health, culture and history of Aboriginal people. This is in response to growing international recognition of the large divide in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, and the role medical education may play in achieving health equity. In this paper, we describe the development and delivery of the Aboriginal health curriculum at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM). We describe a process for curriculum development and delivery, which includes ongoing engagement with Aboriginal communities as well as faculty expertise. Aboriginal health is delivered as a core curriculum, and learning is evaluated in summative assessments. Aboriginal health objectives are present in 4 of 5 required courses, primarily in years 1 and 2. Students attend a required 4-week Aboriginal cultural immersion placement at the end of year 1. Resources of Aboriginal knowledge are integrated into learning. In this paper, we reflect on the key challenges encountered in the development and delivery of the Aboriginal health curriculum. These include differences in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal knowledge; risk of reinforcing stereotypes in case presentations; negotiation of curricular time; and faculty readiness and development. An organizational commitment to social accountability and the resulting community engagement model have been instrumental in creating a robust, sustainable program in Aboriginal health at NOSM. PMID:25291039

  20. Visual Interpretation with Three-Dimensional Annotations (VITA): three-dimensional image interpretation tool for radiological reporting.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Brown, Michael S; Shih, George L

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces a software framework called Visual Interpretation with Three-Dimensional Annotations (VITA) that is able to automatically generate three-dimensional (3D) visual summaries based on radiological annotations made during routine exam reporting. VITA summaries are in the form of rotating 3D volumes where radiological annotations are highlighted to place important clinical observations into a 3D context. The rendered volume is produced as a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) object and is automatically added to the study for archival in Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). In addition, a video summary (e.g., MPEG4) can be generated for sharing with patients and for situations where DICOM viewers are not readily available to referring physicians. The current version of VITA is compatible with ClearCanvas; however, VITA can work with any PACS workstation that has a structured annotation implementation (e.g., Extendible Markup Language, Health Level 7, Annotation and Image Markup) and is able to seamlessly integrate into the existing reporting workflow. In a survey with referring physicians, the vast majority strongly agreed that 3D visual summaries improve the communication of the radiologists' reports and aid communication with patients. PMID:23979113

  1. Fitting it all in: integration of 12 cross-cutting themes into a School of Medicine curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Judith A; Savich, Renate D; Kalishman, Summers; Sander, John C; Prasad, Arti; Morris, Christine R; Timm, Craig

    2007-06-01

    Changing demographic, social, economic and technological trends have impacted the expectations of the Academic Health Center in preparing physicians to serve the needs of the American society, resulting in revisions to current curricula. In addition to the traditional basic sciences and clinical disciplines, accredited medical schools are required to provide curriculum exposure in behavioral health, communication skills, diversity and cultural awareness, ethics, evidence-based medicine, geriatrics, integrative medicine, pain management, palliative care, public health, socio-economic dynamics, and domestic violence. These themes are considered 'cross-cutting' since it is recognized these important curricular components apply across all years of medical school. In this article, the authors describe a strategic model developed at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine (UNMSOM) to integrate horizontally and vertically 12 cross-cutting themes as an evolving interdisciplinary curriculum reform process. These areas were defined through a combination of internal self-study, external requirements, and student and faculty interest. In the early stage of use of this model at UNMSOM, the authors describe the new cross-cutting themes that have been integrated. Minimal disruption and a spirit of cooperation and acceptance have characterized the curricular change that has been required. Preliminary assessment indicates that the program has been successful. PMID:17885970

  2. [Benefits of the Curriculum "Social Medicine for the Rehabilitation Team" in Rehabilitation Practise].

    PubMed

    Worringen, U; Hoppe, A; Derra, C; Kalwa, M; Brüggemann, S

    2016-08-01

    The Federal German Pension Insurance in cooperation with professional organisations developed a curriculum for further socio-medical education of psychologists/psychotherapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, sports therapists and social workers/social pedagogues involved in medical rehabilitation. This curriculum aims to improve the professional competence of the therapeutic groups named above with regards to their contributions to the socio-medical capacity evaluation and related communication within the rehabilitation team. The curriculum was implemented for the first time in 2013. Using the results of the usibility evaluation the continued education concept was revised and manualised. The manual allows for a wide dissemination of the education concept. PMID:27529301

  3. An Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum Improves General Surgery Residents' Standardized Test Scores in Research and Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Trickey, Amber W.; Crosby, Moira E.; Singh, Monika; Dort, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The application of evidence-based medicine to patient care requires unique skills of the physician. Advancing residents' abilities to accurately evaluate the quality of evidence is built on understanding of fundamental research concepts. The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) provides a relevant measure of surgical residents' knowledge of research design and statistics. Objective We implemented a research education curriculum in an independent academic medical center general residency program, and assessed the effect on ABSITE scores. Methods The curriculum consisted of five 1-hour monthly research and statistics lectures. The lectures were presented before the 2012 and 2013 examinations. Forty residents completing ABSITE examinations from 2007 to 2013 were included in the study. Two investigators independently identified research-related item topics from examination summary reports. Correct and incorrect responses were compared precurriculum and postcurriculum. Regression models were calculated to estimate improvement in postcurriculum scores, adjusted for individuals' scores over time and postgraduate year level. Results Residents demonstrated significant improvement in postcurriculum examination scores for research and statistics items. Correct responses increased 27% (P < .001). Residents were 5 times more likely to achieve a perfect score on research and statistics items postcurriculum (P < .001). Conclusions Residents at all levels demonstrated improved research and statistics scores after receiving the curriculum. Because the ABSITE includes a wide spectrum of research topics, sustained improvements suggest a genuine level of understanding that will promote lifelong evaluation and clinical application of the surgical literature. PMID:26140115

  4. A review of the integration of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine into the curriculum of South African medical schools

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional, complementary and alternative (TCAM) medicine is consumed by a large majority of the South African population. In the context of increasing overall demand for healthcare this paper investigates the extent to which South African medical schools have incorporated TCAM into their curriculum because of the increased legislative and policy interest in formally incorporating TCAM into the health care system since democracy in 1994. Methods Heads of School from seven South African medical schools were surveyed telephonically. Results One school was teaching both Traditional African Medicine (TM) and CAM, five were teaching either TM or CAM and another was not teaching any aspect of TCAM. Conclusions In conclusion, there is a paucity of curricula which incorporate TCAM. Medical schools have not responded to government policies or the contextual realities by incorporating TCAM into the curriculum for their students. South African medical schools need to review their curricula to increase their students’ knowledge of TCAM given the demands of the population and the legislative realities. PMID:24575843

  5. A curricular model for the training of physician scientists: the evolution of the Duke University School of Medicine curriculum.

    PubMed

    O'Connor Grochowski, Colleen; Halperin, Edward Charles; Buckley, Edward George

    2007-04-01

    Duke University School of Medicine offers an unusual doctor of medicine educational program. The core basic sciences are taught in year one, core clinical clerkships are completed in the second year, the entire third year is devoted to scholarly investigation, and elective rotations are fulfilled in the fourth year. The creation of this unique structure presented many challenges and is the product of a desire of key faculty 40 years ago to change radically the way medical education was taught. Over the years, improvements have been made, but the underlying principles of these visionary leaders have been retained: inquire not just acquire, flexibility of choice, and in-depth exploration. In the spirit of innovation that was established 40 years ago, leaders and faculty at Duke developed a new curricular model in 2004, called Foundation for Excellence, which is anchored in integrated, interdisciplinary innovation. The authors describe the process of curricular reform and provide a detailed overview of this unique approach to medical education. In keeping with Duke's mission to graduate clinician-researchers and clinician-educators, reducing the basic science curriculum to one year created a year saved, which students are now required to devote to scholarly pursuits. The authors argue that adopting a similar one-year basic science curriculum would make instructional time available for other schools to achieve their own institutional goals. PMID:17414195

  6. An Innovative Approach to Developing a Cultural Competency Curriculum; Efforts at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Native Hawaiian Health

    PubMed Central

    Kamaka, Martina L; Kaulukukui, C Malina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Initial efforts to teach cultural competency at the University of Hawai‘i John A. Burns School of Medicine began in the late 1990s through the Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence. With the formation of the Department of Native Hawaiian Health in 2003, cultural competency training was added as a key area of focus for the department. A multidisciplinary team was formed to do the ground work. Physicians (Family Medicine and Internal Medicine) and an administrator (MBA now at Queens Medical Center) from the Department of Native Hawaiian Health were joined by a cultural anthropologist (Department of Family Medicine and Community Health), a social worker (UH Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work), and a retired DrPH/Registered Dietician from the State Department of Health to form the cultural competency curriculum team. All but one of the team members is Native Hawaiian. Discussion As cultural competency training is a relatively new, rapidly developing field, there is no consensus on how to teach it. The department decided early on to focus on a variety of methodologies using Native Hawaiian health as the curriculum's foundation. Many different paths were taken toward the development of the present curriculum which utilized different components within the medical school's curriculum. This paper describes the process and development of a cultural competency training curriculum at the University of Hawai‘i medical school. Recent literature recommendations by experts in the field reinforce the current curricular content that resulted from this developmental process. PMID:22235152

  7. Exploring the Realities of Curriculum-by-Random-Opportunity: The Case of Geriatrics on the Internal Medicine Clerkship Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Diachun, Laura; Charise, Andrea; Goldszmidt, Mark; Hui, Yin; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    Background While major clerkship blocks may have objectives related to specialized areas such as geriatrics, gay and lesbian bisexual transgender health, and palliative care, there is concern that teaching activities may not attend sufficiently to these objectives. Rather, these objectives are assumed to be met “by random opportunity”.(1) This study explored the case of geriatric learning opportunities on internal medicine clinical teaching units, to better understand the affordances and limitations of curriculum by random opportunity. Methods Using audio-recordings of morning case review discussions of 13 patients > 65 years old and the Canadian geriatric core competencies for medical students, we conducted a content analysis of each case for potential geriatric and non-geriatric learning opportunities. These learning opportunities were compared with attendings’ case review teaching discussions. The 13 cases contained 40 geriatric-related and 110 non-geriatric-related issues. While many of the geriatric issues (e.g., delirium, falls) were directly relevant to the presenting illness, attendings’ teaching discussions focused almost exclusively on non-geriatric medical issues, such as management of diabetes and anemia, many of which were less directly relevant to the reason for presenting to hospital. Results The authors found that the general medicine rotation provides opportunities to acquire geriatric competencies. However, the rare uptake of opportunities in this study suggests that, in curriculum-by-random-opportunity, presence of an opportunity does not justify the assumption that learning objectives will be met. Conclusions More studies are required to investigate whether these findings are transferrable to other vulnerable populations about which undergraduate students are expected to learn through curriculum by random opportunity. PMID:25452825

  8. Can Social Semantic Web Techniques Foster Collaborative Curriculum Mapping In Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Sonja; Cremer, Jan; Schenkat, Hennig

    2013-01-01

    Background Curriculum mapping, which is aimed at the systematic realignment of the planned, taught, and learned curriculum, is considered a challenging and ongoing effort in medical education. Second-generation curriculum managing systems foster knowledge management processes including curriculum mapping in order to give comprehensive support to learners, teachers, and administrators. The large quantity of custom-built software in this field indicates a shortcoming of available IT tools and standards. Objective The project reported here aims at the systematic adoption of techniques and standards of the Social Semantic Web to implement collaborative curriculum mapping for a complete medical model curriculum. Methods A semantic MediaWiki (SMW)-based Web application has been introduced as a platform for the elicitation and revision process of the Aachen Catalogue of Learning Objectives (ACLO). The semantic wiki uses a domain model of the curricular context and offers structured (form-based) data entry, multiple views, structured querying, semantic indexing, and commenting for learning objectives (“LOs”). Semantic indexing of learning objectives relies on both a controlled vocabulary of international medical classifications (ICD, MeSH) and a folksonomy maintained by the users. An additional module supporting the global checking of consistency complements the semantic wiki. Statements of the Object Constraint Language define the consistency criteria. We evaluated the application by a scenario-based formative usability study, where the participants solved tasks in the (fictional) context of 7 typical situations and answered a questionnaire containing Likert-scaled items and free-text questions. Results At present, ACLO contains roughly 5350 operational (ie, specific and measurable) objectives acquired during the last 25 months. The wiki-based user interface uses 13 online forms for data entry and 4 online forms for flexible searches of LOs, and all the forms are

  9. Globalizing the Science Curriculum: An Undergraduate Course on Traditional Chinese Medicine as a Complementary Approach to Western Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Robert; Lin, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A course has been created to examine the ways in which China and the West have approached human health and medicine. Though fundamentally different, these two systems are complementary in a number of ways. This course is a model for a global science course in an educational initiative that incorporates Asian themes into science and engineering…

  10. Nationwide program of education for undergraduates in the field of disaster medicine: development of a core curriculum centered on blended learning and simulation tools.

    PubMed

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Carenzo, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, effective models of disaster medicine curricula for medical schools have been established. However, only a small percentage of medical schools worldwide have considered at least basic disaster medicine teaching in their study program. In Italy, disaster medicine has not yet been included in the medical school curriculum. Perceiving the lack of a specific course on disaster medicine, the Segretariato Italiano Studenti in Medicina (SISM) contacted the Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale in Medicina di Emergenza e dei Disastri ed Informatica applicata alla didattica e alla pratica Medica (CRIMEDIM) with a proposal for a nationwide program in this field. Seven modules (introduction to disaster medicine, prehospital disaster management, definition of triage, characteristics of hospital disaster plans, treatment of the health consequences of different disasters, psychosocial care, and presentation of past disasters) were developed using an e-learning platform and a 12-hour classroom session which involved problem-based learning (PBL) activities, table-top exercises, and a computerized simulation (Table 1). The modules were designed as a framework for a disaster medicine curriculum for undergraduates and covered the three main disciplines (clinical and psychosocial, public health, and emergency and risk management) of the core of "Disaster Health" according to the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) international guidelines for disaster medicine education. From January 2011 through May 2013, 21 editions of the course were delivered to 21 different medical schools, and 524 students attended the course. The blended approach and the use of simulation tools were appreciated by all participants and successfully increased participants' knowledge of disaster medicine and basic competencies in performing mass-casualty triage. This manuscript reports on the designing process and the initial outcomes with respect to learners

  11. 77 FR 20694 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available....Office@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority for the Community Volunteer Income Tax...

  12. 78 FR 17776 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax ] Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available....Office@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority for the Community Volunteer Income Tax...

  13. Determination of Clinically Relevant Content for a Musculoskeletal Anatomy Curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F.; Loh, Eldon Y.; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M. R.; Woods, Nicole N.

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi…

  14. Evolution of Students' Reasoning Skills on a Two Year Basis in a PBL Curriculum in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Denis; And Others

    A 2-year study at the University of Sherbrooke (Quebec) investigated the changes in six medical students' clinical reasoning processes as they participated in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. In each year, students performed a think-aloud protocol with two medical case problems to solve, one in cardiology and one in urology. In the…

  15. Integrating Prevention Education into the Medical School Curriculum: The Role of Departments of Family Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stine, Curtis; Kohrs, Francis P.; Little, David N.; Kaprielian, Victoria; Gatipon, Betty B.; Haq, Cynthia

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of departments of family medicine in teaching preventive medicine through required clinical experiences, required nonclinical courses, electives, collaborative interdisciplinary clerkships, and interdisciplinary nonclinical courses. Offers examples of innovative programs at the Universities of Michigan, Wisconsin, Vermont,…

  16. How Humanae vitae has advanced reproductive health1

    PubMed Central

    Doroski, Derek M.

    2014-01-01

    By encouraging doctors and scientists to improve the regulation of births through the observation of natural fertility rhythms, Humanae vitae promoted the development of natural family planning (NFP). The study of NFP has lead to NFP-based methodologies in reproductive healthcare that are promoting advances in treatment of infertility, miscarriage, and a number of reproductive health disorders. In contrast, the contraceptive mentality has stunted the development of reproductive healthcare. Humanae vitae has provided a great gift to science and reproductive healthcare that all Catholics should be proud of. PMID:25249708

  17. Globalizing the science curriculum: an undergraduate course on traditional Chinese medicine as a complementary approach to Western medicine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Robert; Lin, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A course has been created to examine the ways in which China and the West have approached human health and medicine. Though fundamentally different, these two systems are complementary in a number of ways. This course is a model for a global science course in an educational initiative that incorporates Asian themes into science and engineering courses. The course is designed around an active-learning platform that has as major components: team research projects, oral presentations, role play, and peer-review. The students investigate concepts of scientific proof, clinical efficacy, and the functional structure of two very different systems of health and medical care. PMID:18519613

  18. Building on existing models from human medical education to develop a communication curriculum in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Adams, Cindy L; Kurtz, Suzanne M

    2006-01-01

    Communication is a core clinical skill of veterinary medicine and one that needs to be taught and learned to the same degree as other clinical skills. To provide this education and essential expertise, veterinary schools in many countries, especially including North America, the United Kingdom, and Australia, have begun to develop programs and communication curricula. Human medical education, however, has 30 years' experience in developing communication curricula, and is thus an excellent resource upon which veterinary educators can build and shape their own communication programs. This article describes a skills-based communication course that has been successfully implemented for veterinary medical education at Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) and was based on the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine's well-established program. The Calgary-Cambridge Guides and supporting textbooks provide the scaffolding for teaching, learning, and evaluation in both programs. Resources such as space and materials to support the OVC program were also patterned after Calgary's program. Communication skills, and the methods for teaching and learning them, are equally applicable for the needs of both human medicine and veterinary medicine. The research evidence from human medicine is also very applicable for veterinary medicine and provides it the leverage it needs to move forward. With this extensive base available, veterinary medicine is in a position to move communication skills training forward rapidly. PMID:16767635

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Competencies of Nursing Students and Faculty: Results of Integrating CAM Into the Nursing Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Scott, Craig S.; Heitkemper, Margaret M.; Cornman, B. Jane; Lan, Ming-Chih; Bond, Eleanor F.; Swanson, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) R25 Education Grant Program, a faculty development program for integrating CAM into the nursing curriculum was instituted in 2003-2006. The Integrating CAM program comprised a number of elements; the primary strategy included a series of 4-week didactic and experiential summer CAM “camps,” attended by a total of 27 faculty members. Camps were designed to influence faculty integration of CAM material into course offerings. The Integrating CAM program was evaluated via a series of faculty and student surveys regarding CAM competencies, attitudes, and perceptions. For more than half of the faculty (out of the 43 who responded), the program yielded a moderate-to-strong influence on incorporation of CAM material into course content; and moderate-to-great increases in both enthusiasm for CAM and perceived CAM knowledge gains. Students at all levels (undergraduate, masters, doctoral; n = 184) reported that their courses contained CAM content; for 70% of students, their CAM knowledge increased; for 50% of students, level of CAM interest increased. Self-reported student CAM competencies were significantly greater in 2006-2007 (n = 191) than in 2003-2004 (n = 143). Results support the strategy of broadly infusing the nursing curriculum with CAM content via faculty development. PMID:20869029

  20. An evaluation of the elements of internal medicine physiopathology curriculum in general practice based on the perspectives of faculty members of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ESLAMI, JAMSHID; KHADEMI, MOHSEN

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An evaluation of the curriculum elements can be recognized as a necessity in curriculum dynamic and improvement. This study aimed at evaluating five main elements of a physiopathology curriculum in internal medicine (objectives, content, methods, evaluation, and management). Method The present study is of a descriptive-analytical type, and the studypopulation consisted of a total of 48 faculty members of internal medicine physiopathology departmentat Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Participants wereselected using Cochran’s sample size formula andthrough simple random sampling.Thedatawere collected using a 58-item questionnaire devised by the researcher, usingcurriculum planning experts. Face and content validity of the scale were obtained throughexpert views and modifications provided by 10 professors and experts in medical curriculum evaluation. Also, research reliability was calculated using Alpha Cronbachto be 0.99. Reliability value and coefficient was acceptable.Moreover, One-sample t-test, Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results Based on the faculty members’ views, of the five curriculum elements, objectives and content were in relatively good conditions (at an average level) while other elements including method, evaluation and management were in poor conditions (lower than average). According to results oftwo-way ANOVA, there wasa significant relationship between faculty members with various work experiencein terms of curriculum evaluation. Conclusion According to research findings, a comparative examination of the curriculum elements and their characteristics in physiopathology course can be conducted, resulting in identification of curriculum weaknesses and their pitfalls. Also, with regard to teaching, evaluation, management methods, weak and strong pointsof the course,efficiency, and effectiveness of the elements were identified. PMID:25927069

  1. Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Results Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Conclusions Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit. PMID:24883163

  2. VITA Experiential, Service-Learning, Learned Competencies, and Changed Mindsets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boneck, Robin; Barnes, Jeffrey N.; Stillman, Tyler F.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe how Southern Utah University has integrated the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Voluntary Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program as an experiential servicelearning activity for over a decade and a half. First, we describe the value of experiential servicelearning. Second, we detail the program, its oversight, its student…

  3. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Wilson, Bryan; Natal, Brenda; Nagurka, Roxanne; Anana, Michael; Sule, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of students rank Emergency Medicine (EM) as a top specialty choice, requiring medical schools to provide adequate exposure to EM. The Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges combined with the Milestone Project for EM residency training has attempted to standardize the undergraduate and graduate medical education goals. However, it remains unclear as to how the EPAs correlate to the milestones, and who owns the process of ensuring that an entering EM resident has competency at a certain minimum level. Recent trends establishing specialty-specific boot camps prepare students for residency and address the variability of skills of students coming from different medical schools. Objective Our project’s goal was therefore to perform a needs assessment to inform the design of an EM boot camp curriculum. Toward this goal, we 1) mapped the core EPAs for graduating medical students to the EM residency Level 1 milestones in order to identify the possible gaps/needs and 2) conducted a pilot procedure workshop that was designed to address some of the identified gaps/needs in procedural skills. Methods In order to inform the curriculum of an EM boot camp, we used a systematic approach to 1) identify gaps between the EPAs and EM milestones (Level 1) and 2) determine what essential and supplemental competencies/skills an incoming EM resident should ideally possess. We then piloted a 1-day, three-station advanced ABCs procedure workshop based on the identified needs. A pre-workshop test and survey assessed knowledge, preparedness, confidence, and perceived competence. A post-workshop survey evaluated the program, and a posttest combined with psychomotor skills test using three simulation cases assessed students’ skills. Results Students (n=9) reported increased confidence in the following procedures: intubation (1.5–2.1), thoracostomy (1.1–1.9), and central venous

  4. Donum Vitae: civil law and moral values.

    PubMed

    Byk, C

    1989-10-01

    The Instruction reminds us that reproductive medicine has become part of our social reality and as such justifies the intervention of public authorities. The Instruction suggests relevant principles which should guide appropriate legislation. This essay analyzes how far the French government has taken these fundamental principles into account. PMID:2691615

  5. Implicit bias against sexual minorities in medicine: cycles of professional influence and the role of the hidden curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fallin-Bennett, Keisa

    2015-05-01

    Despite many recent advances in rights for sexual and gender minorities in the United States, bias against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people still exists. In this Commentary, the author briefly reviews disparities with regard to LGBT health, in both health care and medical education, and discusses the implications of Burke and colleagues’ study of implicit and explicit biases against lesbian and gay people among heterosexual first-year medical students, published in this issue of Academic Medicine. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which physicians’ implicit bias against LGBT people can create a cycle that perpetuates a professional climate reinforcing the bias. The hidden curriculum in academic health centers is discussed as both a cause of this cycle and as a starting point for a research and intervention agenda. The findings from Burke and colleagues’ study, as well as other evidence, support raising awareness of LGBT discrimination, increasing exposure to LGBT individuals as colleagues and role models in academic health centers, and modifying medical education curricula as methods to break the cycle of implicit bias in medicine. PMID:25674911

  6. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training. PMID:26491565

  7. Developing a medical humanities concentration in the medical curriculum at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Spike, Jeffrey Philip

    2003-10-01

    To the author's knowledge, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry is the only medical school in the United States that offers a concentration or minor in medical humanities for medical students. This article presents how the author first thought of offering a concentration in medical humanities and explains the educational elements students must satisfy. In 1998, the university underwent a major curriculum revision, dubbed the "double-helix" curriculum because of its goal of intertwining basic science and clinical medicine over all four years of medical school. As course director of the Medical Humanities Seminars for more than ten years, the author saw this change as an opportunity to expand the humanities curriculum. The number of sessions and courses offered in the first two years doubled as part of the transition to the new curriculum. In addition, the author proposed to the medical school curriculum steering committee to approve a concentration in clinical ethics and humanities. The concentration option motivates students to continue to pursue their humanistic interests in the third and fourth years of medical school. About 25% of the student body has signed up in the first two years the concentration has been available. PMID:14534093

  8. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, W. J. L.; De Jong, C.; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A. N.; Achmad, Y. M.; Raya, R. P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet…

  9. What Are the Appropriate Curriculum Contents for Biochemistry Courses in Veterinary Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, A. A. D.; Correia, J. H. R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of the important items that the author's suggest should be included in a biochemistry course given to students in veterinary medicine. Presents a broad range of specific topics in biochemistry and strategies for covering as many topics as possible in one course. (LZ)

  10. Status of complementary and alternative medicine in the osteopathic medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Saxon, Dale W; Tunnicliff, Godfrey; Brokaw, James J; Raess, Beat U

    2004-03-01

    Reflecting society's interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), most allopathic medical schools in the United States offer instruction in CAM. Pertinent information about the teaching of CAM at osteopathic medical schools is lacking. The authors therefore sought to document the form and content of CAM instruction at osteopathic medical schools and compare their findings with those reported for allopathic medical schools in a recently published survey. Phone conversations with academic officials at each of the 19 colleges of osteopathic medicine revealed that only one school did not teach CAM. With the help of these officials, the authors identified 25 CAM instructors at 18 osteopathic medical schools and sent them questionnaires. All returned a completed form with details about CAM instruction at their schools. The authors found that CAM material was usually presented in required courses sponsored by clinical departments, was most likely taught in the first 2 years of medical school, and involved fewer than 20 contact hours of instruction. The topics most often taught were acupuncture (68%), herbs and botanicals (68%), spirituality (56%), dietary therapy (52%), and homeopathy (48%). Most (72%) CAM instructors were also practitioners of CAM modes of therapy. Few (12%) of the instructors taught CAM from an evidence-based perspective. The authors conclude that the form and content of CAM instruction at osteopathic medical schools is similar to that offered at allopathic medical schools and that both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools should strive to teach CAM with less advocacy and more reliance on evidence-based medicine. PMID:15083987

  11. Barriers to integration of behavioral and social sciences in the general medicine curriculum and recommended strategies to overcome them: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    TABATABAEI, ZAHRA; YAZDANI, SHAHRAM; SADEGHI, RAMIN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The integration of behavioral and social sciences (BSS) into the curriculum of medical students in order to equip them with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes is an essential issue, emphasized in many researches. Our aim is to investigate the barriers to integrate BSS into the general medicine curriculum as well as the recommended strategies to overcome such barriers through a systematic review of literature. Methods PubMed, ERIC, Scopus, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and OPENGREY were searched for studies on the barriers to integration of BSS into the general medicine curriculum as well as the strategies employed to overcome them until August 28, 2015. Results Sixteen relevant studies were included and the related domains were categorized as barriers and some strategies were recommended to overcome them. In addition, the quality of the included studies was assessed. Conclusion Despite the prominent role of BSS in the effectiveness of health care, these sciences have not been included in the curriculum of medical students effectively. The identified barriers and the strategies used to overcome them should be considered for all integration programs. Future studies should focus on the process of BSS integration in the medical curricula and should evaluate the efficacy of this integration in more detail. PMID:27382578

  12. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5-3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  13. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, N. V. Fomenko, A. N. Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  14. Connecting resident education to patient outcomes: the evolution of a quality improvement curriculum in an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad A; Diers, Tiffiny; Schauer, Daniel P; Warm, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System, residency programs must connect resident-physician education to improved patient care outcomes. Residency training programs, however, face multiple obstacles in doing so. Results from residency quality improvement (QI) curricula tend to show improvement in simple process-based measures but not in more complex outcomes of care such as diabetes or blood pressure control. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of their QI educational program for internal medicine residents at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center within the structure of a novel training model called the Ambulatory Long Block. They discuss a resident-run project that led to reduced rates of patients with uncontrolled diabetes as an example of improvement in outcome measures. Despite favorable results from that particular resident group, the successful intervention did not spread practice-wide. Using this example, they detail the phases of evolution and lessons learned from their curriculum from 2006 to 2014 within a framework of previously published general principles for successful QI education, including those of exemplary care and learning sites. Successful programs require leadership, faculty expertise and mentorship, data management, learner buy-in, and patient engagement. Their experience will hopefully be of help to others as they attempt to simultaneously improve care and education. Further research and innovation are needed in this area, including optimizing strategies for strengthening resident-driven projects through partnership with nursing, allied health, and longitudinally engaged faculty members. PMID:25054419

  15. 77 FR 6863 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for VITA/TCE Program Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for VITA/TCE Program Forms AGENCY: Internal...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning VITA/TCE Program Forms 14310, 8653... 20224, or through the Internet, at Allan.M.Hopkins@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title:...

  16. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone) in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections. PMID:15841280

  17. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties.

    PubMed

    Naser, Belal; Bodinet, Cornelia; Tegtmeier, Martin; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2005-03-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone) in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections. PMID:15841280

  18. The impact of 25 years of "Humanae Vitae".

    PubMed

    1993-08-01

    In 1968, Pope Paul VI reinforced the Catholic Church's position forbidding contraception in an encyclical known as "Humanae Vitae." The current Pope, John Paul II, has reiterated this position and stated that use of condoms is forbidden, even to prevent HIV transmission. Several public figures, including the IPPF President and the British Overseas Development Minister, have sought to initiate a dialogue with the Pope to express concern about population growth in developing countries. The Catholic Church is currently opposing efforts on the part of the Presidents of Peru and the Philippines to expand access to family planning (FP) programs. Many of the 500,000 women who die each year of pregnancy complications would have used contraceptives and lived, and an estimated 300 million developing world couples have no access to modern contraception, yet desire no more children. Many Catholics disagree with the Church's stance; 87% of US Catholics surveyed in 1992 stated that FP is the couple's choice. After 25 years of "Humanae Vitae," it is time for the Church to enter into dialogue and join efforts to improve life on earth in the next century. PMID:12345157

  19. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  20. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... you get better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring ... can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with food or other medicines you may be taking. They ...

  1. Documentation of quality improvement exposure by internal medicine residency applicants

    PubMed Central

    Kolade, Victor O.; Sethi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) has become an essential component of medical care in the United States. In residency programs, QI is a focus area of the Clinical Learning Environment Review visits conducted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The readiness of applicants to internal medicine residency to engage in QI on day one is unknown. Purpose To document the reporting of QI training or experience in residency applications. Methods Electronic Residency Application Service applications to a single internal medicine program were reviewed individually looking for reported QI involvement or actual projects in the curriculum vitae (CVs), personal statements (PSs), and letters of recommendation (LORs). CVs were also reviewed for evidence of education in QI such as completion of Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) modules. Results Of 204 candidates shortlisted for interview, seven had QI items on their CVs, including one basic IHI certificate. Three discussed their QI work in their PSs, and four had recommendation letters describing their involvement in QI. One applicant had both CV and LOR evidence, so that 13 (6%) documented QI engagement. Conclusion Practice of or instruction in QI is rarely mentioned in application documents of prospective internal medicine interns. PMID:26908376

  2. Learning Styles in Veterinary Medicine: Relation to Progression through the Professional Curriculum and Integration into the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Julia E.; Lloyd, James; Keller, Waldo F.; Cherney, Elaine

    1999-01-01

    Collected Kolb Learning Style Inventory data from veterinary medical students upon matriculation and 13-14 years later and compared the data with transcript and career data. Found that students have diverse learning styles that do not appear to influence completion of the curriculum or future professional activities. (EV)

  3. The Senior Mentor Program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: An Innovative Geriatric Longitudinal Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ellen; Richeson, Nancy A.; Thornhill, Joshua T., IV; Corwin, Sara J.; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development, implementation, and evaluation strategies of a longitudinal geriatric curriculum, the Senior Mentor Program (SMP). The rationale for exposing undergraduate medical students to healthy, community-dwelling older adults is to use the relationship and activities as vehicles for improving knowledge of aging and…

  4. Using direct observation, formal evaluation, and an interactive curriculum to improve the sign-out practices of internal medicine interns.

    PubMed

    Gakhar, Bhavna; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-07-01

    The safe transfer (handoff) of responsibility for patient care from one physician to another requires that health care facilities have rigorous sign-out systems and that physicians develop effective communication skills. In 2007 and 2008, to improve the spoken and written sign-out practices of the 25 interns at Allegheny General Hospital (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), the authors designed and administered Likert scale surveys about training in and satisfaction with current sign-out practices; directly observed and evaluated interns performing spoken sign-outs; assessed and graded interns' sign-out sheets; and compared sign-out sheets with patient records to evaluate their accuracy. On the basis of their findings, the authors developed a new curriculum with didactic and interactive components to target intern-level and system-level problems. The curriculum emphasized the importance of complete and accurate sign-outs, provided examples of good and poor sign-outs, and assigned interns to work in small groups to practice sign-out skills and receive feedback from peers and program leaders. Reevaluation of interns two months after curriculum implementation revealed not only better performance on each of the seven items evaluated for spoken sign-out but also substantial improvement in the completeness of sign-out sheets and the accuracy of reporting of identification data, code status, and medications data. The curriculum was well received by interns, and it helped them develop skills required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, including competencies in communication, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice. PMID:20375830

  5. Impact resistance of oil-immersed lignum vitae

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wei; Shan, Lei; Lu, Hongyu; Zheng, Yelong; Han, Zhiwu; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Biological materials immersed in vegetable and mineral oil, such as rattan armor and wooden sleepers, have been extensively used since ancient times because of their excellent mechanical properties. This study quantitatively investigated the viscoelasticity and tribological performance of lignum vitae immersed in poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and tung oils (Aleuritesfordii Hemsl.) to reveal the mechanism of impact resistance. The acceleration of samples immersed in tung oil was higher than that of dry and PAO-immersed samples in the first impact. The elastic modulus of the samples immersed in tung oil increased slightly. The impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was reduced because of the low friction coefficient (0.07) resulted in a low wear rate. The extent of impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was approximately 34% and 58% lower than that on the dry and PAO oil-immersed samples, respectively, under an angle of 20° and a height of 10 cm. The impact damage on the PAO-immersed samples was reduced because of low friction coefficient. However, impact damage increased because of large elastic modulus. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for the application of modified biological materials with high strength and wear resistance. PMID:27425829

  6. Impact resistance of oil-immersed lignum vitae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Shan, Lei; Lu, Hongyu; Zheng, Yelong; Han, Zhiwu; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Biological materials immersed in vegetable and mineral oil, such as rattan armor and wooden sleepers, have been extensively used since ancient times because of their excellent mechanical properties. This study quantitatively investigated the viscoelasticity and tribological performance of lignum vitae immersed in poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and tung oils (Aleuritesfordii Hemsl.) to reveal the mechanism of impact resistance. The acceleration of samples immersed in tung oil was higher than that of dry and PAO-immersed samples in the first impact. The elastic modulus of the samples immersed in tung oil increased slightly. The impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was reduced because of the low friction coefficient (0.07) resulted in a low wear rate. The extent of impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was approximately 34% and 58% lower than that on the dry and PAO oil-immersed samples, respectively, under an angle of 20° and a height of 10 cm. The impact damage on the PAO-immersed samples was reduced because of low friction coefficient. However, impact damage increased because of large elastic modulus. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for the application of modified biological materials with high strength and wear resistance. PMID:27425829

  7. Study of medicine 2.0 due to Web 2.0?! - Risks and opportunities for the curriculum in Leipzig

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Gunther; Neef, Martin; Rotzoll, Daisy; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 is changing the study of medicine by opening up totally new ways of learning and teaching in an ongoing process. Global social networking services like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google Drive and Xing already play an important part in communication both among students and between students and teaching staff. Moreover, local portals (such as the platform [http://www.leipzig-medizin.de] established in 2003) have also caught on and in some cases eclipsed the use of the well-known location-independent social media. The many possibilities and rapid changes brought about by social networks need to be publicized within medical faculties. Therefore, an E-learning and New Media Working Group was set up at the Faculty of Medicine of Universität Leipzig in order to harness the opportunities of Web 2.0, analyse the resulting processes of change in the study of medicine, and curb the risks of the Internet. With Web 2.0 and the social web already influencing the study of medicine, the opportunities of the Internet now need to be utilized to improve the teaching of medicine. PMID:23467440

  8. A focus Group Study of Medical Students’ Views of an Integrated Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Curriculum: Students Teaching Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Désirée; Shapiro, Johanna; Pardee, Sarah; Najm, Wadie

    2008-01-01

    Background: Student views of new curricula can shape training outcomes. This qualitative study elicited student opinions of CAM instruction to examine and distill best strategies. Methods: 49 second, third and fourth year students participated in focus groups using a predefined question route. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Results: Students successfully differentiated CAM curricula from other academic content and were supportive of a longitudinal integrated approach. They had positive disposition toward CAM use for themselves but this did not necessarily translate into patient recommendations. They agreed that goals of the CAM curriculum should center on awareness of patient use and evidence and information relevant to clinical practice. They advocated a case-based, hands-on, experiential strategy vs lectures. Students proposed greater institutional commitment to strengthen curricular effectiveness. The majority did not intend to practice CAM modalities but valued skills to assess them. Patient-centeredness was recognized. As training progressed, students exhibited a growing tendency to evaluate CAM efficacy, and therefore value, exclusively according to evidence. Conclusions: In-depth student input allowed examination of the effectiveness of a CAM curriculum, permitting improvement and assessment of program effectiveness. PMID:19823690

  9. 76 FR 56455 - DaVita, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... terms of the Consent Agreement, DaVita is required to divest 28 dialysis clinics and terminate one... Commission Act, as amended, 15 U.S.C. 45, by lessening competition for the provision of outpatient dialysis... provider of outpatient dialysis services in the United States. DaVita operates 1,612 outpatient...

  10. Antimicrobial Potential and Chemical Characterization of Serbian Liverwort (Porella arboris-vitae): SEM and TEM Observations.

    PubMed

    Kumar Tyagi, Amit; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Veljic, Milan; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Malik, Anushree; Marin, Petar D

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of Porella arboris-vitae extracts was determined by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS), and 66 constituents were identified. The dominant compounds in methanol extract of P. arboris-vitae were β-caryophyllene (14.7%), α-gurjunene (10.9%), α-selinene (10.8%), β-elemene (5.6%), γ-muurolene (4.6%), and allo-aromadendrene (4.3%) and in ethanol extract, β-caryophyllene (11.8%), α-selinene (9.6%), α-gurjunene (9.4%), isopentyl alcohol (8.8%), 2-hexanol (3.7%), β-elemene (3.7%), allo-aromadendrene (3.7%), and γ-muurolene (3.3%) were the major components. In ethyl acetate extract of P. arboris-vitae, undecane (11.3%), β-caryophyllene (8.4%), dodecane (6.4%), α-gurjunene (6%), 2-methyldecane (5.1%), hemimellitene (4.9%), and D-limonene (3.9%) were major components. The antimicrobial activity of different P. arboris-vitae extracts was evaluated against selected food spoilage microorganisms using microbroth dilution method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) varied from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/mL and 1.25 to 2 mg/mL for yeast and bacterial strains, respectively. Significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations due to the effect of methanolic and ethanolic P. arboris-vitae extracts on S. Enteritidis have also been observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results provide the evidence of antimicrobial potential of P. arboris-vitae extracts and suggest its potential as natural antimicrobial agents for food preservation. PMID:23365607

  11. Antimicrobial Potential and Chemical Characterization of Serbian Liverwort (Porella arboris-vitae): SEM and TEM Observations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Tyagi, Amit; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Veljic, Milan; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Malik, Anushree; Marin, Petar D.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of Porella arboris-vitae extracts was determined by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS), and 66 constituents were identified. The dominant compounds in methanol extract of P. arboris-vitae were β-caryophyllene (14.7%), α-gurjunene (10.9%), α-selinene (10.8%), β-elemene (5.6%), γ-muurolene (4.6%), and allo-aromadendrene (4.3%) and in ethanol extract, β-caryophyllene (11.8%), α-selinene (9.6%), α-gurjunene (9.4%), isopentyl alcohol (8.8%), 2-hexanol (3.7%), β-elemene (3.7%), allo-aromadendrene (3.7%), and γ-muurolene (3.3%) were the major components. In ethyl acetate extract of P. arboris-vitae, undecane (11.3%), β-caryophyllene (8.4%), dodecane (6.4%), α-gurjunene (6%), 2-methyldecane (5.1%), hemimellitene (4.9%), and D-limonene (3.9%) were major components. The antimicrobial activity of different P. arboris-vitae extracts was evaluated against selected food spoilage microorganisms using microbroth dilution method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) varied from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/mL and 1.25 to 2 mg/mL for yeast and bacterial strains, respectively. Significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations due to the effect of methanolic and ethanolic P. arboris-vitae extracts on S. Enteritidis have also been observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results provide the evidence of antimicrobial potential of P. arboris-vitae extracts and suggest its potential as natural antimicrobial agents for food preservation. PMID:23365607

  12. 75 FR 25314 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Wednesday, April 28, 2010 (75 FR 22437). This notice provides notice of the availability of application...) Matching Grant Program, which was the subject of FR Doc. 2010-9771, is corrected as follows: On page...

  13. The Vita Activa as Compass: Navigating Uncertainty in Teaching with Hannah Arendt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carrie Ann Barnes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is an exploration of stories of uncertainty in the lives of elementary teachers and the value that the ideas of Hannah Arendt lend to the discussion around uncertainty. In "The Human Condition" (1958) Hannah Arendt theorizes the life of action, the "vita activa". Arendtian action is inherently uncertain because to be "capable of…

  14. 76 FR 30243 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... electronically through Grants.gov or via hardcopy by the United States Postal Service, mail, or private delivery... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program--Availability of Application Packages AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice....

  15. Curriculum Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatthorn, Allan A.

    This book is a manual for educators to use in curriculum planning and development. Chapter 1 examines the nature of curriculum and its relationship to instruction by (1) defining curriculum and the four main levels of curriculum work (curriculum policy, field of study, program of studies, and course) and (2) distinguishing between six types of…

  16. Preparing for Fellowship in Internal Medicine. Steps for Success with a Focus on Pulmonary and/or Critical Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Bosslet, Gabriel T; Burkart, Kristin M; Miles, Matthew C; Lenz, Peter H; Huebert, Candace A; McCallister, Jennifer W

    2015-04-01

    This paper outlines specific tips for those applying to pulmonary and/or critical care medicine fellowship training in the United States using the PAIR-Match steps: preparation, application, interview, ranking, and match. Preparation for fellowship begins long before the application process with an assessment of one's long-term goals (to the extent that these are known). The cornerstone of the application is the curriculum vitae, which should highlight applicants' pulmonary and critical care-related experiences and scholarly work. Applicants should obtain letters of recommendation from faculty members who know them well and can write a letter that speaks to their strengths in clinical, scholarly, or leadership areas. The personal statement is an opportunity to share experiences not otherwise shared in the application and is an opportunity to explain any breaks in training or performance lapses. When selecting programs to which they will apply, applicants should pay close attention to the areas of education and curriculum, clinical experience, scholarly opportunity, and personal factors. Preparing for interviews should include a review of the program at which one is interviewing and development of relevant questions regarding details of the program. The interview day is the applicant's opportunity to see the "personality" of the program by meeting with the program director, faculty, and current fellows and to assess whether the program is a good fit for their goals. Applicants should only rank those programs they are willing to attend, in order of preference; they should be aware that the match process is binding. PMID:25742296

  17. Effective Design and Evaluation of Serious Games: The Case of the e-VITA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappa, Dimitra; Pannese, Lucia

    Learning and training are presently facing new challenges and a strong transformation. The use of electronic games for education (game-based learning) promotes an agile, immersive and stimulating form of learning that fosters learner engagement and motivation. Nonetheless, the design of effective and engaging educational games is a creative process that is unique to each situation. This paper discusses the inherent challenges of building intellectually appropriate and engaging games and presents the methodology adopted in the case of the e-VITA project that applies GBL to promote knowledge sharing and transfer for intergenerational learning. The paper analyses the e-VITAframework for SGs evaluation, which is central to the project's iterative development approach. Early findings stemming from the validation of the e-VITA prototype game are also presented.

  18. Curriculum Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatthorn, Allan A.

    This textbook provides curriculum leaders and those preparing to become curriculum leaders with the knowledge and skills needed to exercise their leadership at several levels and in many roles. The first of the book's four sections explores the foundations of the field in chapters on the general concept of curriculum, the history of curriculum,…

  19. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Asim A.; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine’s dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site’s competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees’ work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine

  20. The linear shade guide design of Vita 3D-master performs as well as the original design of the Vita 3D-master.

    PubMed

    Corcodel, N; Rammelsberg, P; Jakstat, H; Moldovan, O; Schwarz, S; Hassel, A J

    2010-11-01

    Visual tooth colour assessment by use of the Vita 3D-Master(®) (3D; Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany) is well documented. To improve handling, a new linear arrangement of the shade tabs has been introduced (LG; Linearguide 3D-Master(®) ). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the linear design has an effect on shade matching. Fifty-six students underwent identical, theoretical and practical training, by use of an Internet learning module [Toothguide Training Software(®) (TT)] and a standardised training programme [Toothguide Training Box(®) (TTB)]. Each student then matched 30 randomly chosen shade tabs presented in an intra-oral setting by a standardised device [Toothguide Check Box(®) (TCB)]; 15 matches were made using the 3D and 15 using the LG shade guide system, under a daylight lamp (840 matches for each guide). It was recorded to what extent the presented and selected shade tabs, or the lightness group of the tabs, matched, also the needed time for colour matching. The results showed that 35% of perfect matches were observed for the 3D and 32% for the LG. The lightness group was correct in 59% of cases for 3D and 56% for LG. Mean time needed for matching of tabs and lightness group was no different between groups (no significant difference for any assessment). Within the limitations of the study design, the colour assessment with regard to performance and time needed in shade matching was not different with the LG or the 3D. Therefore, the user should choose which shade tab arrangement is more applicable. PMID:20633072

  1. Second generation video imaging technique for assessing dermal exposure (VITAE System).

    PubMed

    Fenske, R A; Birnbaum, S G

    1997-09-01

    Development of a second-generation video imaging technique for assessing occupational skin exposure (VITAE) is described, its performance evaluated, and new procedures for exposure quantification are presented. The current VITAE system has higher resolution in regard to both its picture element array and gray scale when compared with the prototype system. System performance was evaluated during extended field deployment: variability was 3-4% during data acquisition for individual worker evaluation session, and 10% over a 22-day study period. Variabilities attributable to subject positioning and image outlining procedures were 2.7 and 1.2%, respectively. Visual observations of fluorescent tracer deposition on skin were used to classify specific body regions as either exposed of unexposed, and two computer-based classification criteria were tested against the visual classification. These criteria were generally better at minimizing false negative and false positive classification; sensitivity and predictive value reached 95 and 99%, respectively, when analysis was preceded by presampling of a subset of images. Variability in skin pigmentation was found to have a substantial effect on fluorescent tracer qualification, leading to development of new calibration procedures. Standard curves were generated by spotting a range of tracer concentrations on volunteer subjects and quantifying fluorescence with the VITAE system. These data were then grouped either by subject or by the magnitude of the background signal of the unexposed skin. The ability to control for the effects of skin pigmentation was found to be comparable for these grouping methods, indicating that calibration curves can be developed without the creation of a unique curve for each subject. PMID:9291561

  2. Curriculum Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Central Network for Curriculum Coordination. Springfield, IL.

    This matrix and these word lists are intended for use as a practical working tool in the area of competency-based curriculum. In the curriculum terminology matrix, inclusions are primarily concepts critical to curriculum development. The matrix indicates whether terms are found in word lists for Pennsylvania, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland,…

  3. Design and implementation of a longitudinal ambulatory clerkship in the first-year curriculum at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rosalyn; Dlhosh, Sharon; Marino, Christine; Thomas, Patricia; McGuire, Maura J.

    2011-01-01

    In response to calls for medical education reform we designed and implemented a new Longitudinal Ambulatory Clerkship (LAC) at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The LAC provides first-year medical students with their initial exposure to clinical medicine during a 12-month experience consisting of weekly clinic sessions with a practicing physician-mentor (preceptor) and longitudinal experience with a population of patients. The LAC allows students to experience firsthand many of the personal, professional, and organizational issues that impact the practice of medicine. This paper reviews the rationale, development, and challenges during implementation of this clerkship. PMID:23882320

  4. Design, implementation and evaluation of a community health training program in an integrated problem-based medical curriculum: a fifteen-year experience at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chastonay, Philippe; Vu, Nu Viet; Humair, Jean-Paul; Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele; Bernheim, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Background In the literature the need for relevance in medical education and training has been stressed. In the last 40 years medical schools have been challenged to train doctors competent to respond to community health needs. In the mid-90s the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine introduced an integrated medical curriculum. In this initiative a particular emphasis was put in introducing a 6-year longitudinal and multidisciplinary Community Health Program (CHP). Objectives The aims of the present article are to describe the conception, elaboration and implementation of the CHP as well as its evolution over 15 years and the evaluation of its outcomes. Methods The CHP was at its origin elaborated by a small group of highly motivated teachers and later on developed by a multi-disciplinary group of primary care physicians, epidemiologists, public health and bio-ethics specialists, occupational health professionals, lawyers and historians. Evaluation of the program outcomes included educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Results The CHP learning objectives and teaching modalities were defined by the multi-disciplinary group in consensus meetings which triggered a collaborative spirit among teachers and facilitated further developments. The evaluation procedures allowed the monitoring of students’ satisfaction which remained high over the years, students’ active participation which decreased over time and success at certifying exams which was globally as good as in basic life sciences. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Conclusion As suggested in the literature, our experience shows that the students’ direct exposure and practice in the community health environment is an effective training approach to broaden students’ education by offering them a community

  5. The Professoriate in the Field of Educational Administration: Insights from an Analysis of Journal Authors' Curricula Vitae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Based on a qualitative content analysis of 57 curricula vitae of authors who published their work in the major journals of the educational administration (EA) field, this paper seeks to display the career of EA authors and to suggest some epistemological implications for the field. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on…

  6. A Writing Curriculum for Physician Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Constance C.; Bland, Carole J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of a faculty development project in which the domain of written communication was analyzed and incorporated into a training curriculum for family medicine faculty members. A wealth of literature was found to support 47 requisite competencies. The recommended curriculum integrates expert consultation with seminars,…

  7. A Program To Teach Curriculum Development to Junior Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Evaluted the outcomes of the Curriculum Workshop Series for junior faculty participating in the Harbor-UCLA Family Medicine Faculty Development Fellowship. Participants were to create an individual curriculum project using six fundamental steps of curriculum development. Six of eight projects were implemented in residency programs; outside experts…

  8. Donum Vitae on homologous interventions: is IVF-ET a less acceptable gift than "GIFT"?

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W

    1989-10-01

    Donum Vitae argues that, by failing to respect the connection between the conjugal act and procreation, in vitro fertilization-even in the homologous or "simple case", where both gametes come from a married couple and the resulting embryo is transferred to the wife-shows itself to be morally unacceptable. On the other hand, the document refers approvingly to other technological interventions which "facilitate" or "assist" the conjugal act in achieving its objective. Although none of the latter interventions are mentioned by name, the recently developed gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) and certain associated techniques have found favor with many orthodox Roman Catholic thinkers, as well with some church authorities. The present article explores this situation in the Catholic moral tradition, and offers reasons for believing that, given relevantly similar conditions, if GIFT is morally acceptable so also is homologous IVF-ET. PMID:2607242

  9. Out of their comfort zone. Dialysis provider DaVita needs to integrate big physician practice to move toward integrated care.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-09-16

    DaVita's acquisition of multispecialty group HealthCare Partners hasn't come without growing pains. But the deal has put the dialysis provider in a position to go beyond kidneys to serving the whole patient. The goal of the merger, says DaVita Co-chairman and CEO Kent Thiry, left, is to prepare for a time when DaVita is expected not only to provide dialysis, but also help keep nephrology patients out of the hospital and manage their other chronic conditions. PMID:24199234

  10. Alumni-Faculty Feedback for Curriculum Revision, Final Report. Appendix A: Report on Survey of Graduates (1969-73) Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA.

    A survey of 270 graduates of Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM) during 1969 to 1973 was conducted to determine what graduates did in their jobs and how their SPHTM learning experiences related to their jobs. The methodology used in the survey is described and results are presented in tabular form with…

  11. Masonry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This curriculum guide, written at the Arizona Vocational Educator's Curriculum Academy during July and August, 1985, was developed to complement the Arizona validated competency lists for construction trades. The writing team included tradespeople, secondary vocational educators, community college vocational instructors, and university professors…

  12. International Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  13. Curriculum Autonomy through Curriculum Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimley, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    The author argues that the decisions primary teachers make about the curriculum need to be informed by well-developed expertise in the subjects they are planning and teaching. This expertise is necessary when teachers are exercising professional autonomy in areas such as curriculum design, securing breadth and balance, and managing curriculum…

  14. [Core competencies in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Casademont, J; Conthe, P; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; García-Alegría, J

    2011-06-01

    The working group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) on "Competencies of the Internist" has defined the basic medical knowledge, skills and attitudes that all internists in Spain should have. This list of competencies represents the Internal Medicine core curriculum within the context of the future educational framework of medical specialties in Health Sciences. PMID:21531405

  15. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  16. Curriculum Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, David H.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the materials included in the Self-Paced Investigations for Elementary Science (SPIES) program, developed by Silver Burdett Company, is provided. In summary SPIES strongly reflects the strategies and format of Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). (SL)

  17. Integrating Discovery-Based Research Experiences into the Undergraduate STEM Curriculum: A Convocation Report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, L. A.; Ambos, E. L.; Brenner, K.; Asher, P. M.; Ryan, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    New possibilities and challenges to providing and scaling up opportunities for large numbers of undergraduates to engage in discovery-based research and related activities reflect both the evidence base and the current systemic infrastructure of higher education. The National Research Council hosted a Convocation in May 2015 on this very topic, inspired by the 2012 PCAST report "Engage to Excel," which urged the STEM education community and funding agencies to "advocate and provide support for replacing standard laboratory courses with discovery-based research courses." The Convocation report "Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate STEM Curriculum" on which this session is based explores a number of critical issues: Is our current knowledge base robust enough to recommend best practices? Is offering such experiences actually beneficial for all undergraduates? What institutional changes will be required to make such opportunities available to large numbers of students? Can such programs drive institutional change? How can we manage the cost/benefit parameters of such programs? Exploring these important and connected issues is critical for allowing undergraduates to participate in meaningful and relevant research through their coursework, for faculty and administrators to examine and document the evidence for their impact, and institutions to identify variations in what works at different types of colleges and universities.

  18. Integrative Medical Education: Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Curriculum at the University of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maizes, Victoria; Schneider, Craig; Bell, Iris; Weil, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes the University of Arizona's approach to developing and implementing a comprehensive curriculum in integrative medicine, which integrates the best of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with the best of conventional medicine. Describes the curriculum, educational programs, clinical education, goals, and results, and suggests…

  19. Giving curriculum planners an edge

    PubMed Central

    Oandasan, Ivy F.; Archibald, Douglas; Authier, Louise; Lawrence, Kathrine; McEwen, Laura April; Palacios, Maria; Parkkari, Marie; Plant, Heidi; Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To pilot a survey of family medicine residents entering residency, describing their exposure to family medicine and their perspectives related to their future intentions to practise family medicine, in order to inform curriculum planners; and to test the methodology, feasibility, and utility of delivering a longitudinal survey to multiple residency programs. Design Pilot study using surveys. Setting Five Canadian residency programs. Participants A total of 454 first-year family medicine residents were surveyed. Main outcome measures Residents’ previous exposure to family medicine, perspectives on family medicine, and future practice intentions. Results Overall, 70% of first-year residents surveyed responded (n = 317). Although only 5 residency programs participated, respondents included graduates from each of the medical schools in Canada, as well as international medical graduates. Among respondents, 92% felt positive or strongly positive about their choice to be family physicians. Most (73%) indicated they had strong or very strong exposure to family medicine in medical school, yet more than 40% had no or minimal exposure to key clinical domains of family medicine like palliative care, home care, and care of underserved groups. Similar responses were found about residents’ lack of intention to practise in these domains. Conclusion Exposure to clinical domains in family medicine could influence future practice intentions. Surveys at entrance to residency can help medical school and family medicine residency planners consider important learning experiences to include in training. PMID:26052601

  20. Teaching Prevention in Internal Medicine Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsinger, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the rationale for including prevention in the clinical medicine clerkship. Summarizes current guidelines, presents examples of curricula in several medical schools, and proposes a future direction that stresses integrating teaching preventive medicine into internal medicine clerkships and across the entire four-year medical curriculum. (DB)

  1. Electronics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This document presents results of research conducted by industry representatives regarding tasks performed by electronic technicians and line manufacturing electro-mechanical technicians in Arizona electronics industries. Based on this research, a competency-based curriculum was developed for training entry-level electronics technicians. Twelve…

  2. Electrical Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This curriculum guide was developed to complement the Arizona validated competency lists for construction trades. The writing team included tradespeople, secondary vocational educators, community college vocational instructors, and university professors of construction technology programs. The guide lists 15 competencies to be mastered by…

  3. Tourism Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of tourism education programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan tourism employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various components of the…

  4. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  5. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  6. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  7. Delivering Better Quality of Care: Relentless Focus and Starting with the End in Mind at DaVita.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2016-01-01

    The care of patients with end-stage renal disease has been evolving since the implementation of the Medicare entitlement for ESRD in 1973. Over the past 43 years, patients with ESRD have become increasingly complex with multiple comorbid conditions and the average age of new ESRD patients has continued to climb. Despite these challenges, progress has been made in improving mortality and morbidity, but the pace has generally been slow. The consolidation of the US dialysis industry has afforded large providers to achieve economies of scale and efficiencies. By reinvesting resources in innovative programs, the improvements in outcomes have accelerated. At DaVita, we have reimagined care for our ESRD patients by creating a Patient-Focused Quality Pyramid, an approach to holistic, patient-centered care that builds on the foundation of well-known dialysis metrics like adequacy and anemia management to drive more complex programs like fluid, medication, diabetes, and infection management. The ultimate goal is to improve survival, keep patients healthy and out of the hospital, enhance the patient experience of care, and thereby achieve optimal health-related quality of life. For two consecutive years, DaVita facilities, using this approach, have achieved superior performance in the CMS 5-Star rating program, most recently with 46% of facilities achieving 4 or 5 stars compared with only 23% of facilities outside of DaVita receiving 4 or 5 stars. This rating system has components of fundamentals, and more complex outcomes and our results are an external validation of the success of our approach in improving the lives of patients. PMID:26749498

  8. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Kindergarten Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this kindergarten nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (learning to identify foods and food sources); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing the relationship between body growth and the ingestion of food); (3) Food is made up of…

  9. Curriculum in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, A. I., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Four articles on higher education curriculum are presented. In "The Articulate Curriculum" an approach to curriculum description is presented that is designed to have minimal ambiguity concerning the intention, content, and processes of the curriculum and that will lead to questioning several discrete factors in the curriculum planning process. It…

  10. Pharmacy Curriculum and Health Care Needs in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Sowaygh, Ibrahim A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Based on recognized health care needs, a curriculum revision was undertaken at the College of Pharmacy at Saudi Arabia's University of Riyadh. The revised curriculum included a unified basic health sciences core program for Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Medical Sciences. (Author/MLW)

  11. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  12. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  13. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  14. Curriculum concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, Andrew; Huber, Michael; Smith, Juneille

    2008-08-01

    Jonathan Osborne's positive views on the current GCSE science curricula for 14-16 year olds in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (June p20) fail to impress, given that whatever we are preparing now will be replaced in a few years' time. The last syllabus, for example, lasted just six years. I agree that it will take several years before most science teachers are fully competent to teach the present curriculum; it is a shame, therefore, that a small group of non-scientists are probably already planning the next one.

  15. A Behavioral Medicine Course for Postgraduate Trainees in Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Lawrence S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An interdisciplinary faculty of the University of Califiornia at Los Angeles School of Medicine has developed a behavioral science program to teach interns the interpersonal skills necessary for effective physician patient encounters. Curriculum topics include interviewing, problem identification, and situational stress. (JMD)

  16. Knowledge and Curriculum in Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Tim

    2002-01-01

    Although medical curricula are perceived as scientifically based, much discipline-based material is used as procedural knowledge. Educators must ensure that students have both enough certainty to be effective diagnosticians and enough doubt to question assumptions about the nature of scientific knowledge. (Contains 60 references.) (SK)

  17. A Study Skills Curriculum for Pipeline Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saks, Norma Susswein, Ed.; Killeya, Ley A., Ed.; Rushton, Joan, Ed.

    This study skills curriculum is part of a "pipeline" program designed to recruit, matriculate, and graduate educationally disadvantaged students at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (UMDNJ-RWJMS). It is an integral part of the Biomedical Careers Program (BCP) and the Science Enrichment…

  18. Optometric Education's Challenge: AIDS in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    A national survey of schools of optometry suggests that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) needs to be more thoroughly addressed in some curricula. Suggestions are made for curriculum development in the areas of public health, basic coursework, immunology, clinical medicine, psychology, ocular manifestations, and contact lenses. (MSE)

  19. Retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) inhibitors from Vitae Pharmaceuticals (WO2015116904) and structure proposal for their Phase I candidate VTP-43742.

    PubMed

    Gege, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor gamma t (RORγt or RORC2) is a key transcription factor for the differentiation of naïve proinflammatory CD4(+) T cells and the production of T helper-17 (TH17) cells. Inhibiting RORγt activity is thought to be beneficial in targeting a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, however current candidates remain to be validated in the clinic. Recently Vitae Pharmaceuticals successfully finished its Phase 1 single ascending dose clinical study with their proprietary RORγt inverse agonist VTP-43742. On the basis of the reported promising results, Vitae Pharmaceuticals could currently be considered as having the leading clinical candidate in the RORγt inverse agonist category. This prompts the interest on the exact chemical structure of their clinical candidate. The first relevant patent application (WO2014179564) from Vitae Pharmaceuticals describes RORγt inverse agonists with a 5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]thiazole core, while in the second and latest patent application (WO2015116904) this element has changed towards a 6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[3,4-b]pyridine core. By combining information from Vitae's patent applications and trustworthy online information, the potential elucidation of the chemical structure of clinical candidate VTP-43742 is described. PMID:26895086

  20. Gender and Power in Family Medicine Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burge, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses several articles in this issue that demonstrate the influence of gender and power on family medicine education. These articles show that both clinical and learning environments are influenced by gender and power. Recommends the study of gender and power as an overt component in the family medicine curriculum. (SLD)

  1. Contemporary Readings in Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Barbara Slater; Kysilka, Marcella L.

    2008-01-01

    This book provides beginning teachers and educational leaders with a series of articles that can help them build their curriculum knowledge base. Features include: (1) Provides a historical context of the curriculum field, giving educators a solid foundation for curriculum knowledge; (2) Describes the political nature of curriculum and how we must…

  2. Elementary Integrated Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Elementary Integrated Curriculum (EIC) Framework is the guiding curriculum document for the Elementary Integrated Curriculum and represents the elementary portion of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) Pre-K-12 Curriculum Frameworks. The EIC Framework contains the detailed indicators and objectives that describe what…

  3. Revisiting Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the notion of curriculum potential by revisiting the ideas of Miriam Ben-Peretz and Joseph Schwab. Invoking the German "Didaktik" tradition and by way of a curriculum-making framework, the paper argues that interpreting curriculum materials for curriculum potential requires a careful analysis and unpacking of the meanings and…

  4. Fundamental Curriculum Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick W., Ed.

    This yearbook provides a readable, usable, and practical summary of the most commonly applied elements of curriculum development on the contemporary educational scene. Separate chapters discuss: (1) "Contemporary Curriculum Circumstances" (Fenwick W. English); (2) "Curriculum Thinking" (George A. Beauchamp); (3) "Curriculum Content" ( B. Othanel…

  5. Mitochondrial genotype and risk for Alzheimer's disease: cross-sectional data from the Vienna-Transdanube-Aging "VITA" study.

    PubMed

    Mostafaie, N; Rossmanith, W; Hombauer, H; Dechat, T; Raffelsberger, T; Bauer, K; Worofka, B; Kittl, E; Hofmann, J; Hejtman, M; Kirchmeyr, W; Schreiber, W; Weissgram, S; Jungwirth, S; Fischer, P; Bittner, R; Huber, K

    2004-09-01

    The Vienna Transdanube Aging (VITA) study searches for early markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by examining the mental status in a community-based cohort of 606, 75-years old volunteers that are then related to various clinical and genetic analyses. To determine whether mutations in mtDNA are involved in expression of AD, the mtDNA of 79 "control" participants is screened for alterations by sequencing of "hot-spot-regions". This study on mtDNA mutations has eliminated the influence of aging on the occurrence of mtDNA alterations by sequencing samples from persons at the age of exactly 75 years. Thus, our cohort reveals a snap-shot of mitochondrial sequences of elderly persons. So far, a high percentage (56%) of persons with known or unknown mutations in the fragments analyzed were found. These data will be compared in due time to a cohort of participants with proven late-onset AD. PMID:15338331

  6. Consumer Health Education in a Medical School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Nancy H.

    1977-01-01

    Experience at the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey suggests that consumer health education can be incorporated into a medical school curriculum. It can be included in the existing courses in occupational medicine, behavioral sciences, and psychiatry and other preclinical and clinical areas. (LBH)

  7. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  8. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  9. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  10. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  11. Prudentia: A Medical School's Solution to Curriculum Mapping and Curriculum Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steketee, Carole

    2015-01-01

    During early accreditation visits by the Australian Medical Council (AMC), staff in the School of Medicine (SoM) were asked to demonstrate how and when AMC student outcome statements were being integrated into the MBBS course. As a result, the School Executive committed to developing a curriculum mapping system (CMS) that could systematically…

  12. Toward an Informal Curriculum that Teaches Professionalism

    PubMed Central

    Suchman, Anthony L; Williamson, Penelope R; Litzelman, Debra K; Frankel, Richard M; Mossbarger, David L; Inui, Thomas S

    2004-01-01

    The social environment or “informal” curriculum of a medical school profoundly influences students’ values and professional identities. The Indiana University School of Medicine is seeking to foster a social environment that consistently embodies and reinforces the values of its formal competency-based curriculum. Using an appreciative narrative-based approach, we have been encouraging students, residents, and faculty to be more mindful of relationship dynamics throughout the school. As participants discover how much relational capacity already exists and how widespread is the desire for a more collaborative environment, their perceptions of the school seem to shift, evoking behavior change and hopeful expectations for the future. PMID:15109312

  13. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  14. Systematic Curriculum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feisel, Lyle D.; Schmitz, Ronald J.

    1979-01-01

    Among the benefits derived from a detailed curriculum analysis is the actual analysis process itself. Creating a curriculum diagram can lead to better understanding of what can and should be taught. (Author/BB)

  15. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    PubMed

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs. PMID:26477906

  16. Evaluation of Teaching Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nairobi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, U. B.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in the field of veterinary medicine is reported. Areas covered include curriculum; teaching techniques; quality of faculty; and examinations. (JMF)

  17. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  18. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  19. Curriculum Development: Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    In order for curriculum development to be effective and schools to be successful, teachers must be involved in the development process. An effective curriculum should reflect the philosophy, goals, objectives, learning experiences, instructional resources, and assessments that comprise a specific educational program ("Guide to curriculum…

  20. Cultures of Curriculum. Studies in Curriculum Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Pamela Bolotin; Bravmann, Stephanie Luster; Windschitl, Mark A.; Mikel, Edward R.; Green, Nancy Stewart

    This book is designed to foster awareness, examination, and deliberation about the curricula planned for and carried out in classrooms and schools. The framework of inquiry elucidates the concept of curriculum as culture; highlights patterns of curricular thinking that have influenced the development of the concept of cultures of curriculum; gives…

  1. Problematic Curriculum Development: Normative Inquiry in Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Louise M.

    1988-01-01

    Normative inquiry in curriculum (NIC) is concerned with a substantive, integrative approach to values so that the curriculum possesses integrity, consistency, and congruity. This article explores definitions and characteristics of NIC, analyzes the role of curricular influences and realities, provides suggestions for getting started, and answers…

  2. Physical Therapist Assistant Curriculum Development. Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackhawk Technical Inst., Janesville, WI.

    This publication contains a number of materials related to the Blackhawk Technical College (Wisconsin) Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program. Contents include a schedule and curriculum outline for the PTA I course; a brochure on the associate degree program; curriculum outline for the associate degree program; and admission procedures and…

  3. Integrated Career Development Curriculum: Curriculum Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrell, Russell G.; Steffens, Herbert R.

    The Integrated Career Development Curriculum Project was designed to improve career preparation opportunities for youth who attend small, rural schools by developing a curriculum for grades 9 through 12 that would enhance career opportunities for these youth. The rationale and specifications for the project were discussed in terms of basic…

  4. Comparative assessment of the organization of the colors of the Vita Classical color pallet by digital images and visual analysis for dental bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Júnior, O. B.; Cioffi, Mariana S.; Cesnik, R. M.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Corrêa-dos-Santos, Diego R.; Fornazari, Fabio P.

    2009-02-01

    New formularizations, techniques and devices have become the dental whitening most safe and with better results. Although this, the verification of the levels whitening is being continued for visual comparison, that is an empirical, subjective method, subject to errors and dependent of the individual interpretation. Normally the result of the whitening is express for the amplitude of displacement between the initial and the final color, being take like reference the tonalities of a scale of color commanded of darkest for more clearly. Although to be the most used scale , the ordinance of the Vita Classical ® - Vita, according to recommendations of the manufacturer, reveals inadequate for the evaluation of the whitening. From digital images and of algorithm OER (ordinance of the reference scale), especially developed for the ScanWhite ©, the ordinance of the tonalities of the scale Vita Classical® was made. For such, the values of the canals of color R, G, and B of medium part average of the crowns was adopted as reference for evaluation. The images had been taken with the camera Sony Cybershoot DSC F828. The results of the computational ordinance had been compared with the sequence proposal for the manufacturer and with the earned one for the visual evaluation, carried through by 10 volunteers, under standardized conditions of illumination. It statistics analyzes demonstrated significant differences between the ordinances.

  5. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  6. The Senior Mentor Program at Duke University School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heflin, Mitchell T.

    2006-01-01

    The Duke University School of Medicine has a unique curriculum in which students complete basic sciences in year 1 and clinical clerkships in year 2, making way for an entire year of independent study in year 3. Into this compact curriculum, education in geriatrics has been successfully introduced through focused exercises and activities…

  7. Special Curriculum Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Bridget N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Foreword" (O'Connor, Fidoten); "Organizational and End-User Information Systems (OEIS)" (Regan); "Curriculum Development" (Bronner); "OEIS Model Curriculum" (O'Connor); "OEIS Model Curriculum: A Template for Implementation" (Moses, Rehwaldt); "Status of Model Curricula Development" (Caouette, Lutz); "Training in Industry and Education"…

  8. Autobody Technology Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction in auto body technology. Following a curriculum framework that explains major content, laboratory activities, and intended outcomes, the document lists all tasks covered in the curriculum. The bulk of the document consists of…

  9. Designing the Reading Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The design of the reading curriculum presents a vision of what will be stressed in reading instruction. A first ingredient to discuss in developing the reading curriculum emphasizes the degree to which different curriculum areas should be related in teaching and learning. Reading then could be taught as a separate subject matter area from the…

  10. Manufacturing Education Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umstattd, William D.

    The Manufacturing Education Curriculum Project's feasibility study concerned with industrial arts curriculum development in manufacturing for the senior high school level is described. The need for an industrial arts curriculum which meets and reflects present and future trends is discussed in the introduction, followed by a review of the…

  11. The Holistic Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    Although the primary focus of this book is on curriculum and instruction, the social, psychological, and historical context of the holistic curriculum are also considered. This curriculum seeks to develop the whole individual by fostering a sense of connectedness within oneself and with others. Various connections--between logic and intuition,…

  12. Toward a Contact Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantini, Mario D.; Weinstein, Gerald

    A series of eight summary statements, expressed as "from-to" movements for the improvement of curriculum design, serves as an outline for a discussion of efforts to relate curriculums more meaningfully to the education of disadvantaged youth: (1) From a curriculum that is rigidly scheduled and uniform to one that is flexible and geared to the…

  13. Curriculum Materials 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Washington, DC.

    This publication catalogs the materials received by the Curriculum Materials Committee for the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development's 1973 annual conference. The materials referenced offer a broad representation of current curriculum materials issued throughout the nation. Materials are referenced under general curriculum…

  14. Multiculturalism in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitch, Diane S.

    This document contrasts the concept of multiculturalism as it appears in the proposed New York State curriculum guide, "A Curriculum of Inclusion," and as it appears in the California State history/social sciences curriculum. California uses the following approaches to reflect the multiracial, multicultural nature of American society: (1)…

  15. Marketing Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook contains a competency-based curriculum for teaching marketing education in Alaska. The handbook is organized in seven sections. Section 1 introduces the competency-based curriculum, while Section 2 provides the scope and sequence and hierarchy of marketing education competencies. Section 3, the core of the curriculum, includes the…

  16. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  17. Automotive Technology Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction in automotive technology. The document begins with a list of all tasks covered by the curriculum, a short course outline, and a curriculum framework that explains major content, laboratory activities, and intended outcomes.…

  18. Applied Algebra Curriculum Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Marshall.

    This collection of 11 applied algebra curriculum modules can be used independently as supplemental modules for an existing algebra curriculum. They represent diverse curriculum styles that should stimulate the teacher's creativity to adapt them to other algebra concepts. The selected topics have been determined to be those most needed by students…

  19. Assessing the National Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hear, Philip, Ed.; White, John, Ed.

    In this collection, educators from the United Kingdom debate the history, purposes, achievements, and future direction of the National Curriculum. Differing points of view about the value of the National Curriculum are expressed. More than half of the essays focus on specific aspects of the curriculum. The selections are: (1) "What Place for…

  20. Paths to New Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clem, Stephen C.; Wilson, Z. Vance

    After acknowledging the complexity and importance of curriculum change, this document offers suggestions for involving students, parents, board members, and graduates in curriculum review. Information on empowering teachers, promoting growth in all adults, and encouraging collaboration is provided as well as necessary steps in curriculum review.…

  1. Deepening Democratic Curriculum Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, James G.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the longstanding argument between advocates of curriculum development and critical curriculum studies from the perspective of democratic inquiry artistry, highlighting the curriculum perspectives of Wraga (1999) and Pinar (1999). Suggests that the daily enactment of democratic inquiry artistry can help educational researchers by informing…

  2. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D

    2015-11-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents' attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  3. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M.; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents’ attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  4. Integrating information literacy across a BSN curriculum.

    PubMed

    Flood, Lisa Sue; Gasiewicz, Nanci; Delpier, Terry

    2010-02-01

    Although research regarding effective informatics teaching strategies is sparse and informatics competencies have not yet been finalized, nurse educators have been challenged to include informatics throughout the curriculum. Nurse educators are confronted with how best to incorporate informatics into an already burgeoning curriculum. This article offers a systematic approach to incorporating information literacy, a vital component of informatics, across a baccalaureate of science in nursing curriculum. Motivated by the Institute of Medicine report, guided by the initial Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform competency framework, and using the specific Quality and Safety Education for Nurses informatics competencies, the proposed integrated approach emphasizes clinical applications. The five assignments are designed to incrementally increase students' abilities to recognize the need for information (i.e., knowledge); advance students' abilities to locate, evaluate, and use information (i.e., skills); and foster a positive appreciation for information literacy (i.e., attitudes) when planning safe, effective patient care. PMID:19877568

  5. Theoretical model for VITA-educed coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landahl, Marten T.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments on wall-bounded shear flows (channel flows and boundary layers) have indicated that the turbulence in the region close to the wall exhibits a characteristic intermittently formed pattern of coherent structures. For a quantitative study of coherent structures it is necessary to make use of conditional sampling. One particularly successful sampling technique is the Variable Integration Time Averaging technique (VITA) first explored by Blackwelder and Kaplan (1976). In this, an event is assumed to occur when the short time variance exceeds a certain threshold multiple of the mean square signal. The analysis presented removes some assumptions in the earlier models in that the effects of pressure and viscosity are taken into account in an approximation based on the assumption that the near-wall structures are highly elongated in the streamwise direction. The appropriateness of this is suggested by the observations but is also self consistent with the results of the model which show that the streamwise dimension of the structure grows with time, so that the approximation should improve with the age of the structure.

  6. Educating Internists in Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Arthur B.; Kobernick, Marc E.

    1984-01-01

    The education of internists in emergency medicine needs to be thoughtfully planned by those involved in their education. Objectives for their emergency medicine rotation include the recognition and initial treatment of true medical and surgical emergencies, clinical experience with and knowledge of common acute primary care problems, the ability to handle several patients with problems having different degrees of urgency, effective use of consultants in the follow-up and management of difficult patients and a knowledge of and clinical experience with the prehospital care system. A curriculum should be designed to give the resident a core of didactic material in addition to supervised clinical experience. The rotation should be evaluated by both residents and faculty from internal medicine and emergency medicine to determine if it is accomplishing the objectives set forth. PMID:6506692

  7. Veterinary medicine and the medical school library.

    PubMed

    Bishop, D

    1969-07-01

    The study of veterinary medicine is becoming increasingly important in the progress of human medicine, and as a consequence the literature of veterinary medicine is assuming increased importance in the libraries of schools of human medicine. In the past decade programs in comparative medicine have been initiated in many centers, reestablishing the linkage between veterinary and human medicine. Since 1966 the National Library of Medicine has assumed extra responsibilities in the collection and control of veterinary medical literature. increased indexing has thus far been the major result, with a resultant increase in the need to consult veterinary journals. Advances in the veterinary curriculum and continued veterinary education have also increased demand for veterinary publications. Such demand must be foreseen and met by medical school libraries if they are to fulfill their obligations to the scholarly medical community. PMID:5789821

  8. Medicine and hagiography in Italy c. 800-c. 1000.

    PubMed

    Pilsworth, C

    2000-08-01

    A vast range of sources, from chronicles, hagiography and the liturgy to medical manuscripts and charters, is at our disposal for the study of health and healing in Italy between the ninth and eleventh centuries. What is needed in order to exploit this material is a methodology for the careful examination of sources in their regional, social and political context. I focus on what hagiography can contribute to the study of medicine and disease, discussing in detail two ninth-century episcopal hagiographies, the Milanese second Vita Ambrosii, and the Vita Barbati from Benevento in southern Italy. At the same time, however, I stress the limitations of studying texts in isolation, given that one region, city, or community could be simultaneously producing a number of different kinds of evidence, with possibly more than one view of sickness and healing. There is great potential for medical history in further investigation of the archaeological, liturgical, and charter evidence from early medieval Italy. The study of all surviving manuscripts from this period, not just medical words, can provide a bridge between the detailed examination of a particular text and a discussion of the wider literary and cultural traditions into which they fitted. PMID:14535255

  9. Clinical prevention and population health: curriculum framework for health professions.

    PubMed

    Allan, Janet; Barwick, Timi Agar; Cashman, Suzanne; Cawley, James F; Day, Chris; Douglass, Chester W; Evans, Clyde H; Garr, David R; Maeshiro, Rika; McCarthy, Robert L; Meyer, Susan M; Riegelman, Richard; Seifer, Sarena D; Stanley, Joan; Swenson, Melinda; Teitelbaum, Howard S; Timothe, Peggy; Werner, Kathryn E; Wood, Douglas

    2004-12-01

    The Clinical Prevention and Population Health Curriculum Framework is the initial product of the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force convened by the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine and the Association of Academic Health Centers. The Task Force includes representatives of allopathic and osteopathic medicine, nursing and nurse practitioners, dentistry, pharmacy, and physician assistants. The Task Force aims to accomplish the Healthy People 2010 goal of increasing the prevention content of clinical health professional education. The Curriculum Framework provides a structure for organizing curriculum, monitoring curriculum, and communicating within and among professions. The Framework contains four components: evidence base for practice, clinical preventive services-health promotion, health systems and health policy, and community aspects of practice. The full Framework includes 19 domains. The title "Clinical Prevention and Population Health" has been carefully chosen to include both individual- and population-oriented prevention efforts. It is recommended that all participating clinical health professions use this title when referring to this area of curriculum. The Task Force recommends that each profession systematically determine whether appropriate items in the Curriculum Framework are included in its standardized examinations for licensure and certification and for program accreditation. PMID:15556746

  10. New Jersey Curriculum Management Center: Curriculum Dissemination Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Gordon F., Jr.

    A description of the curriculum dissemination system of the New Jersey Curriculum Management Center (NJCMC) is provided for the use of educators needing these services and for other states who wish to establish similar curriculum dissemination systems. As a curriculum management center in the National Network for Curriculum Coordination in…

  11. Population medicine in a curricular revision at Case Western Reserve.

    PubMed

    Ornt, Daniel B; Aron, David C; King, Nicholas B; Clementz, Laura M; Frank, Scott; Wolpaw, Terry; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy; Wolpaw, Daniel; Allan, Terrence M; Carroll, Matthew; Thompson-Shaheen, Karen; Altose, Murray D; Horwitz, Ralph I

    2008-04-01

    Inclusion of population medicine in a medical school curriculum has received growing attention. Recently, the Association of American Medical Colleges has highlighted this issue through support of the Regional Medicine and Public Health Education Centers initiative. The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine joined this consortium while implementing a new curriculum in which population medicine would be an underlying theme woven with the classic science elements of disease. The organization for the first two years of the new curriculum, which was implemented in 2006, is a six-block structure during which the basic sciences are learned with key concepts of population medicine woven throughout. The focus for this article is Block One, in which population medicine is the major emphasis of the introduction to medicine. The first week, students learn social determinants, impact on communities, and social aspects of diabetes mellitus, even before addressing a patient's clinical presentation. Emphasis on student-centered learning is undertaken as part of the new curriculum, using a series of weekly, case-based, small-group sessions. This type of group learning is used throughout Block One as students encounter key components of population medicine. A thesis requirement was also introduced as a mechanism to emphasize research with opportunities for research in population medicine as well as other medical sciences. A variety of mechanisms are described to measure the outcomes of Block One. PMID:18367889

  12. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  13. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  14. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  15. Medicine Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

    Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

  16. The Concept of Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Peretz, Miriam

    1975-01-01

    Explores the concept of curriculum potential and argues for its utility as a construct in curriculum theory. Discusses the limitations of viewing curriculum materials strictly in accordance with their developers' objectives, and examines the concept of curriculum potential as an alternative approach to curriculum implementation and evaluation.…

  17. [Guidance for education on medicines in school].

    PubMed

    Kito, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    To promote the education on medicines in school, guidance is, as a rule, to be given in the health education of the Subject, "Health and Physical Education" indicated as a curriculum standard in lower and upper secondary school, and in the health guidance, which carry out in Special Activities and Integrated Studies, etc. Guidance is mainly carried by the teacher for health and physical in health education and school nurse teacher (yogo teacher) in health guidance. In health education we have only limited school hours, and generally use the text book. Some teachers feel resistance to teach medicines because of needs on the special knowledge, however teachers should deal with medicines based on curriculum standard. School pharmacist is a member of school, and has a special knowledge for medicines, and he/she can support teachers as a provider of teaching materials, an adviser, and for a guest teacher. It is important for school pharmacist to understand the contents indicated in curriculum standard and to use glossary to be able to understand for children. In the guidance of health, it is not necessary to teach based on curriculum standard, and it can deal with advanced contents on medicines. However it is important to understand for children what are appropriate contents according to the development stage. To use the packages and instructions for medicines provided at home are good materials for children to have interest the medicines in their guidance. The objectives of education on medicines enable children to cultivate practical abilities for the maintenance and improvement of health. PMID:24292178

  18. A Competency-Based Medical Student Curriculum Targeting Key Geriatric Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zuilen, Maria H.; Rodriguez, Osvaldo; Mintzer, Michael J.; Paniagua, Miguel A.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Kaiser, Robert M.; Roos, Bernard A.

    2008-01-01

    The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM) has developed and implemented a competency-based undergraduate medical education (UME) curriculum that targets 61 learning objectives for three geriattic syndromes: dementia, falls, and delirium. This curriculum redesign changed the educational focus from what is taught to what is learned.…

  19. Building a Sense of Ownership to Facilitate Change: The New Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernandez-Escobar, Claudia; Ayala-Aguirre, Francisco; Aguilar, Graciela Medina

    2008-01-01

    Just as trends in medical education are changing continuously, so must curricula. To keep pace with such trends the School of Medicine Tec de Monterrey, Mexico, underwent a curriculum reform process with the goal of developing a new educational model and reducing resistance to change. The Curriculum Committee created seven subcommittees involving…

  20. Care at the End of Life: A Novel Curriculum Module Implemented by Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnani, Jared W.; Minor, Melissa A.; Aldrich, Jon Matthew

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a curriculum module on end-of-life care developed by medical students and implemented at Stanford University School of Medicine. The curriculum teaches students a protocol for communicating with patients when breaking bad news and discussing treatment options. (EV)

  1. Undergraduate Medical Education and the Elective System: Experience with the Duke Curriculum, 1966-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, James F., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    In view of increased public demand since 1965 for medical curriculum re-evaluation, the Duke University School of Medicine offered the first new model of medical education responsive to social pressures for change. The new Duke curriculum included presentation by each basic science department of the core of principles and information considered…

  2. What Makes the Learning of Physiology in a PBL Medical Curriculum Challenging? Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts, Mark A.; Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Physiology is an integral component of any medical curriculum. Traditionally, the learning of physiology has relied heavily on systems-based didactic lectures. In 2001, the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine (NRMSM; Durban, South Africa) embarked on a problem-based curriculum in which the learning of physiology was integrated with relevant…

  3. Classroom Curriculum Development in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Brian

    1974-01-01

    A review of reference literature in curriculum development and a short sample curriculum, "Economic Aspects of the Local Environment," are presented to help guide economics teachers in making curriculum revisions. (JH)

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education in United States Pharmacy Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Donna M.; Kroll, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey of 50 pharmacy schools investigated the degree to which instruction in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was included in the pharmacy curriculum, and use of alternative practitioners as instructors. Almost three-quarters offered coursework in herbal medicine or other areas of CAM; about half offered other alternative medicine…

  5. Internal Medicine Training in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Di Francesco; Pistoria, Michael J; Auerbach, Andrew D; Nardino, Robert J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Although the inpatient setting has served as the predominant educational site of internal medicine training programs, many changes and factors are currently affecting education in this setting. As a result, many educational organizations are calling for reforms in inpatient training. This report reviews the available literature on specific internal medicine inpatient educational interventions and proposes recommendations for improving internal medicine training in this setting. METHOD We searched Medline for articles published between 1966 and August 2004 which focused on internal medicine training interventions in the inpatient setting; bibliographies of Medline-identified articles, as well as articles suggested by experts in the field provided additional citations. We then reviewed, classified, and abstracted only articles where an assessment of learner outcomes was included. RESULTS Thirteen studies of inpatient internal medicine educational interventions were found that included an outcome assessment. All were single institution studies. The majority of these studies was of poor methodological quality and focused on specific content areas of internal medicine. None assessed the effectiveness or impact of internal medicine core inpatient experiences or curriculum. CONCLUSION This review identifies significant gaps in our understanding of what constitutes effective inpatient education. The paucity of high quality research in the internal medicine inpatient setting highlights the urgent need to formally define and study what constitutes an effective “core” inpatient curriculum. PMID:16423111

  6. Developing and Implementing a Multispecialty Graduate Medical Education Curriculum on Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Green, Michael L.; Martino, Steve; Thung, Stephen F.; Degutis, Linda C.; Ryan, Sheryl A.; Martel, Shara; Pantalon, Michael V.; Bernstein, Steven L.; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Fiellin, David A.; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of initiating a Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use curriculum across multiple residency programs. SBIRT project faculty in the internal medicine (traditional, primary care internal medicine, medicine/pediatrics),…

  7. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process. PMID:27544982

  8. Language, Culture and Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candlin, Christopher N.

    1992-01-01

    Paper seeks a principled way to integrate second and foreign language teaching with a study of the cultures of those languages and the learners' cultures within the curriculum framework of purposes, content, and evaluation. It examines current contexts in language education then discusses integrating language, culture, and curriculum. (SM)

  9. Surgical Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide, developed for 10-month postsecondary programs in Connecticut, outlines a program for training surgical technicians. The program is divided into two components, didactic and clinical. Following a list of six general objectives of the program, the guide provides a curriculum outline by major areas with the number of hours…

  10. Perspectives of Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, M. Frances; And Others

    A model has been developed that proposes five different perspectives on the curriculum--the ideal, formal, perceived, operational, and experiential. Each perspective has a different data source, and it is hypothesized that each perspective will produce a different picture of "the curriculum." Data collection for a national study of schooling will…

  11. State Librarianship: Modular Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Jane; Powell, Anne

    This modular curriculum on state librarianship is designed to be used as a basis for a full-length library science course, instructional segments of several courses, continuing education courses, or workshops. The 20 curriculum modules cover the many facets of state libraries and their activities--history, functions, social and political…

  12. Curriculum Guides for SSSQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Lawrence; And Others

    The curriculum guide was designed to teach prevocational and independent living skills to students with a wide range of handicapping conditions. The SSSQ (Street Survival Skills Questionnaire) curriculum presents information on objectives, materials, suggested performance criteria, teacher strategies, and specific students activities for the…

  13. The Business Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, William H., Jr.

    The publication is designed to serve as a guide for those responsible for business education in Pennsylvania, emphasizing curriculum planning and the development of course guidelines. Chapter one deals with planning the business education program within the framework of the principles of curriculum construction. Program implementation at the…

  14. Elementary Drama Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    Intended for elementary school teachers, this curriculum guide intends to (1) show that drama is a unique body of knowledge with a definite place in the curriculum; (2) demonstrate the use of drama as an effective teaching tool; (3) alleviate fears teachers have about introducing drama and provide experienced teachers with further rationale,…

  15. Constituting the Workplace Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper advances some bases for a workplace curriculum. These are premised on conceptions of curriculum as intents directed to individual's progression towards full and effective workplace performance, yet whose enactment is shaped by workplace factors and is ultimately experienced by workers as learners. So whether the intentions will be…

  16. Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train mechanical engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of mechanical engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard mechanical engineering…

  17. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities designed for specific curriculum units. Curriculum areas represented include reading and language arts (proverbs and fables, letters of the alphabet, and biographies); science (the study of Gregor Mendel and genetics, oil resources); and social studies (global awareness). (LRW)

  18. Language Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intermountain School, Brigham City, UT.

    Based on a coordinated aural-oral approach, this language arts curriculum guide was developed to teach Navajo students English as a second language. The design of the curriculum provides for longitudinal and horizontal movements to favor concept formation by inductive experience. The plan gears instruction to three instructional levels: low (the…

  19. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  20. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  1. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Plumbing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    This document is a curriculum guide for instructors teaching vocational preparation for plumbing to special needs students. The purpose of the curriculum guide is to provide minimum skills for disadvantaged and handicapped students entering the mainstream; to supplement vocational skills of those students already in a regular training program…

  2. Curriculum Development in Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, David, Ed.

    This book reproduces sixteen papers on recent developments in economics curriculum in Britain. The papers, presented and examined at a two-day conference at the University of Manchester in January, 1973, offer a comprehensive look at the current state of economic education and research. Directed to economics teachers and curriculum specialists,…

  3. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  4. Influences in Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Glenys G., Ed.; Leeper, Robert R., Ed.

    This report contains conference addresses that (1) deal with social and psychological forces influencing curriculum change and (2) discuss actual changes now taking place in a number of subject fields. Insights into the forces acting on the curriculum are presented by the authors of Part I. Arthur W. Foshay challenges educators to recognize the…

  5. Head Start Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clare Coe; And Others

    One of a series of guides for preschool teachers and aides, the book offers a Head Start curriculum guide to help achieve goals regarding social behavior, general attitudes, academic skills, health, and parent development. Information on curriculum is divided into areas of bloc time outline, classroom arrangement, building concepts (such as…

  6. Analyzing the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Richard D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a general description of curriculum studies made in the sociology of education and comparative education in the past decade. Discusses structural/functional studies, studies in the "new" sociology of education, and ethnomethodological studies. Argues that ethnomethodology provides the most heuristic approach to curriculum studies.…

  7. A Curriculum for Curiosity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Michael Gove has correctly lambasted the current curriculum for information and communication technology (ICT): his proposed solution is as wrong as the current curriculum, as findings from the Penceil Research Project on how to engage non-users of ICTs demonstrate. Learning how to use a word processor and a spreadsheet is a useful low-level…

  8. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horry County Board of Education, Conway, SC.

    This curriculum guide was developed, based on sound principles of human growth and development, to present the most recently available information on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The curriculum presents information on the known facts about AIDS and the AIDS virus infection. It also addresses the potential for adolescents and adults…

  9. Criticism and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Paul; Foulke, Robert D.

    1964-01-01

    A revised English curriculum, based upon different kinds of literary criticism, is counseled in this two-part paper. Part 1 identifies four kinds of criticism--formalist, synoptic, extrinsic, and stylistic. A conventional English Curriculum is briefly outlined. Curricular theories are discussed and positive and negative attempts to define…

  10. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  11. Business Mathematics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide for teaching business mathematics in the Connecticut Vocational-Technical School System is based on the latest thinking of instructors in the field, suggestions from mathematics authorities, and current instructional approaches in education. The curriculum guide consists of six sections: (1) career relationships and…

  12. Writing across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara Leigh, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The writing across the curriculum movement is discussed in six articles. Barbara Leigh Smith's introductory article, "Writing Across the Curriculum: What's at Stake?" reviews the rationale for this movement, including the declining emphasis on writing in high schools and colleges. In the "Winds of Change: Thomas Kuhn and the Revolution in the…

  13. Brownstone Afterschool Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    Acknowledging the changes that poor and homeless students have experienced, this curriculum guide uses change to focus on the challenges found in transitioning into a new environment. The premise underlying the curriculum is that the forces that shape human life are constantly changing, and in order to give meaning to these changes, students must…

  14. [Tennessee Kindergarten Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    Provided are Tennessee's state kindergarten curriculum guides in the 6 areas of health, social studies, language arts, science, physical education, and mathematics. The health curriculum guide centers on developing and maintaining good health. The social studies guide aids children in understanding self as an individual and in relation to other…

  15. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  16. Winthrop College Transformed Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawisher, Margaret F.

    Dealing with the issue of a changing society and recognizing that teacher education has remained basically unchanged for 100 years, the faculty of the Winthrop College School of Education agreed to take the risk involved with transforming the teacher education curriculum. Three interdisciplinary teams have identified curriculum to be taught to…

  17. A Curriculum for 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the kinds of knowledge and range of skills that will be needed to teach the curriculum of 2020. He contends that young people will need to prepare themselves for occupations different from those known today, and that the vocationally-focused, narrowly-instrumental curriculum in which secondary pupils acquire…

  18. Rhizomatic Explorations in Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smitka, Julie A. M.

    2012-01-01

    A visual and theatrical exercise anchored in the Grades 11 and 12 Ontario Curriculum for Media Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies was enacted and recorded as individual experiences of each participant. The event was re-mastered in a graphic representation that depicts the forces, pushes and pulls of curriculum and students' needs which educators…

  19. Marketing Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide a common core of competencies from which to design an effective secondary marketing education program. Introductory materials include a definition of marketing education, objectives, outline of instructional content, and questions and answers regarding the curriculum guide. These practical materials are…

  20. Training Student Organizers Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamm, Michael; Hurtado, Denise

    The purpose of this curriculum is to help teachers and field supervisors at the college, high school, and advanced junior high school level train students to organize environmental improvement projects. It can also be used by graduate/undergraduate students who are supervising secondary school students. The curriculum may be started at any point…

  1. Medical Services Assistant Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Phyllis A.

    Designed to develop 12th-grade multiple competencies courses, this curriculum prepares the student to assist a physician, dentist, or other health professional with the management of a medical office and to perform basic health services procedures. Course descriptions are provided for the two courses in the curriculum: medical services assistant…

  2. Developing An ESOL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Amelia

    Prepared for instructors in adult literacy programs, this paper summarizes a reading curriculum designed to meet the needs of a predominantly Spanish-speaking community. The reading instruction curriculum is presented as a sequence of educational objectives under five headings: basic skills, structural analysis, vocabulary, comprehension, and…

  3. Measuring Curriculum Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Using curriculum-specific tools for measuring fidelity of implementation is an essential yet often overlooked aspect of examining relationships among textbooks, teaching, and student learning. This "Brief Report" describes the variety of ways that curriculum implementation is measured and argues that there is an urgent need to develop…

  4. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund

    This guide outlines an information systems curriculum that has been developed for postsecondary institutions in Texas. The curriculum, which is intended to help students acquire the competencies necessary to function in automated offices in business and industry, includes the following core courses: computer business applications I and II,…

  5. Illinois Manufacturing Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffe, Roger; And Others

    This manufacturing technology curriculum involves students in learning problem-solving, communication, team building, quality control, safety, math, science, and technical skills. The document begins with a section on implementation, which gives background information on the purposes and development of the curriculum, explains its rationale,…

  6. Renewing the Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2007-01-01

    The core curriculum accompanied the development of the academic discipline with multiple names such as Kinesiology, Exercise and Sport Science, and Health and Human Performance. It provides commonalties for undergraduate majors. It is timely to renew this curriculum. Renewal involves strategic reappraisals. It may stimulate change or reaffirm the…

  7. When Students Create Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Marsha

    1999-01-01

    Providing opportunities for students to generate their own curriculum requires courage. Student interests are unpredictable. Teachers should garner support, start small, use library resources, eschew curriculum guides, develop assessment tools, allow for noise, schedule record keeping, allow a routine to emerge, be learners, communicate…

  8. Curriculum Development and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Ralph W.

    Ralph W. Tyler's paper on "Curriculum Development and Research" contains examples of research findings which were or were not used in efforts to change or develop curriculum. The roles, use, and importance of action research, formulation of objectives, planning and organization of learning experiences, program assessment, relationship between…

  9. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  10. Teachers Guide Curriculum Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gretka, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    The duties teachers are expected to implement continue to increase. Many times teachers are responsible for instructing students and creating curriculum. With the duties multiplying, teachers' frustrations intensify. The purpose of the project was to explore the teachers' feelings about the district's current language arts curriculum, and identify…

  11. Curriculum Integration: A Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Pat; Paige, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Curriculum integration and working in teams are two key characteristics of middle schooling in Australia today. As part of a new primary/middle teacher education program an interdisciplinary team of academics has developed a course that aims to teach pre service teachers how to plan for and teach an integrated curriculum unit in an authentic…

  12. Curriculum Guide Construction Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Ken

    As part of a model construction cluster curriculum development project, this guide was developed and implemented in the Beaverton (Oregon) School District. The curriculum guide contains 16 units covering the following topics: introduction to construction jobs; safety and first aid; blueprint readings; basic mathematics; site work; framing; roofing…

  13. Indian Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lu Celia, Ed.

    Designed in Oklahoma as a teaching aid for teachers in Indian education, this booklet is organized according to the subject areas of the curriculum. It provides a ready resource on Indian culture and should thus be of value to teachers who work with both Indian and non-Indian students. Guidelines for curriculum development in multicultural…

  14. The West: Curriculum Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Broadcasting Service, Alexandria, VA.

    This document consists of the printed components only of a PBS curriculum package intended to be used with the 9-videotape PBS documentary series entitled "The West." The complete curriculum package includes a teacher's guide, lesson plans, a student guide, audio tapes, a video index, and promotional poster. The teacher's guide and lesson plans…

  15. A Permanently Tentative Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apelman, Maja

    In this paper the author relates her experiences as an advisor to elementary school teachers on the subject of building curriculum. The philosophy expressed in her narrative is that learning begins when children seek the answers to their own questions and that curriculum can be developed out of children's immediate environment. The teacher must…

  16. Electronics Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electronics engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electronics engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard electronics engineering…

  17. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  18. A Preventive Health Care and Safety Curriculum for an Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Kathleen R.

    The preventive health care curriculum described in this paper was designed for the employees of Autotech Automatic Test Equipment Division in Los Angeles, California. First, the paper describes Autotech, and its health insurance and on-site health facilities. Next, a rationale is provided for offering employees classes on preventive medicine and…

  19. Residents’ perceptions of an integrated longitudinal curriculum: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Rebecca; Lee, Joseph; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore family medicine residents’ perceptions of a newly restructured integrated longitudinal curriculum. Method A purposeful sample of 16 family medicine residents participated in focus group interviews conducted from a grounded theory perspective to identify the characteristics of this training model that contribute to and that challenge learning. Results Eight key themes were identified: continuity of care, relevance to family medicine, autonomy, program-focused preparation, professional development as facilitated by role modeling, patient volume, clarity of expectations for learners, and logistics. Positive learning experiences were marked by high levels of autonomy, continuity, and relevance to family medicine. Less favorable learning experiences were characterized by limited opportunities for continuity of care, limited relevance to family medicine practice and unclear expectations for the resident’s role. Family physician-led learning experiences contributed to residents’ understanding of the full scope of family medicine practice, more so than specialist-led experiences. The logistics of implementing the integrated block were challenging and negatively impacted continuity and learning. Conclusions This study suggests that an integrated longitudinalized family medicine block training model has the potential to support the principles of a longitudinal integrated competency-based curriculum to effectively prepare residents for family medicine practice. PMID:27004074

  20. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education

    PubMed Central

    Komenda, Martin; Víta, Martin; Vaitsis, Christos; Schwarz, Daniel; Pokorná, Andrea; Zary, Nabil; Dušek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution’s curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets. Objective We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations. Methods We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom’s taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets. Results We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent

  1. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  2. Family Medicine Training in the Care of Older Adults--Has the Retreat Been Sounded?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Charles P.; Parker, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the trend away from geriatrics training in family medicine residency despite the growing need in society. Asserts that family medicine is failing to seize an opportunity to advance the care of older adults and discusses what would constitute acceptable training in geriatrics and how it should fit into the family medicine curriculum. (EV)

  3. Clinical nutrition in the hepatogastroenterology curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Chris JJ; Wanten, Geert JA; Semrad, Carol E; Jeppesen, Palle B; Kruizenga, Hinke M; Wierdsma, Nicolette J; Grasman, Matthijs E; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroenterology (GE) used to be considered a subspecialty of internal medicine. Today, GE is generally recognized as a wide-ranging specialty incorporating capacities, such as hepatology, oncology and interventional endoscopy, necessitating GE-expert differentiation. Although the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology has defined specific expertise areas in Advanced endoscopy, hepatology, digestive oncology and clinical nutrition, training for the latter topic is lacking in the current hepatogastroenterology (HGE) curriculum. Given its relevance for HGE practice, and being at the core of gastrointestinal functioning, there is an obvious need for training in nutrition and related issues including the treatment of disease-related malnutrition and obesity and its associated metabolic derangements. This document aims to be a starting point for the integration of nutritional expertise in the HGE curriculum, allowing a central role in the management of malnutrition and obesity. We suggest minimum endpoints for nutritional knowledge and expertise in the standard curriculum and recommend a focus period of training in nutrition issues in order to produce well-trained HGE specialists. This article provides a road map for the organization of such a training program. We would highly welcome the World Gastroenterology Organisation, the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterology Association and other (inter)national Gastroenterology societies support the necessary certifications for this item in the HGE-curriculum. PMID:26855532

  4. Vulnerable Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  5. Medicine Tracker

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine! TIME MEDICINE DOSAGE Name: Physician’s Information Name: Phone Number: NOTES ✓ Mon 11/19 Morning Antibiotic 1 tsp. With food ✓ For more useful tools, visit www.aapcc.org POISON HELP LINE: 1-800-222-1222 Lost track of your meds? Think you may have taken ...

  6. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2003-03-01

    Complementary medicine has become an important subject for rheumatologists, not least because many patients try complementary treatments. Recent clinical trials yield promising results. In particular, evidence suggests that several herbal medicines and dietary supplements can alleviate the pain of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Clearly, rigorous testing of complementary treatments is possible, and considering their popularity, should be encouraged. PMID:12598804

  7. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

  8. Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

  9. The Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, John R.; Waters, William M., Jr.

    This report begins with a brief historical sketch of the origins of the mathematics curriculum and the responsiveness of mathematics curriculum to the demands of society. The current North Carolina mathematics curriculum is then described and evaluated. A "strands" approach to the development of curriculum and a framework for planning are then…

  10. Classroom-Level Curriculum Development: EFL Teachers as Curriculum-Developers, Curriculum-Makers and Curriculum-Transmitters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore teacher curriculum approaches and the strategies attached to each approach because they influence the taught curriculum, teacher development and student learning. The study was therefore grounded in teacher curriculum development, curriculum implementation, teacher development, student cognitive and…

  11. Oregon Agriculture I Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum package was developed to be used as a guide for high school vocational agriculture teachers in Oregon preparing a curriculum to meet local community/regional needs. A second goal of this curriculum is to eliminate sex-bias or sex-role stereotyping in vocational agriculture classes. The curriculum contains 20 units. Topics covered…

  12. Curriculum: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    "Curriculum: From Theory to Practice" introduces readers to curriculum theory and how it relates to classroom practice. Wesley Null provides a unique organization of the curriculum field into five traditions: systematic, existential, radical, pragmatic, and deliberative. He discusses the philosophical foundations of curriculum as well as…

  13. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  14. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Second Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this second grade nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (identifying basic food groups, classifying processed foods into basic food groups, and identifying food varieties produced locally); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing how…

  15. Nutrition Education Curriculum. First Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this first grade nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (identifying basic food groups and classifying processed foods into basic food groups); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing how food choices are related to a healthy body,…

  16. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Third Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this third grade nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (identifying basic food groups, classifying processed foods into basic food groups, and identifying food varieties produced locally); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing how food…

  17. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project: A National Medical School Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Norman B., Jr.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project was developed to encourage schools of medicine and colleges of osteopathic medicine to implement interdisciplinary generalist curricula in the preclinical years. Five sites were competitively established as demonstration projects, and rigorous attention to creating and maintaining an…

  18. Analyzing the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Richard D.

    1981-12-01

    The paper presents a general description of curriculum studies made in sociology of education and comparative education in the past decade. It discusses what the author thinks are examples of general areas of this research, falling under the headings of (1) structural/functional studies; (2) studies in the `new' sociology of education; and (3) ethnomethodological studies. The author argues that the first two areas take, as resources, items which need to be made topics of study. He further contends that ethnomethodology provides the most heuristic approach to curriculum studies because it makes the ontology of the curriculum and all its features problematic.

  19. Beginning Your "Vita Contemplativa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartunek, Jean M.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I describe some of the topics intellectual autobiographies might include, summarize some of what I and others have said in intellectual autobiographies published in "Organization Studies", and invite readers to begin the process of constructing their own. To this end, I suggest some questions and a process readers might use.…

  20. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Implementation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Burton, Dee; Trask, Jennifer; Sandvold, Irene; Amr, Sania; Chaudry, Sajida S; Debay, Marc

    2015-11-01

    In September 2012, the Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 preventive medicine residency programs to participate in a 2-year project aimed at incorporating integrative medicine (IM) into their residency training programs. The grantees were asked to incorporate competencies for IM into their respective preventive medicine residency curricula and to provide for faculty development in IM. The analysis conducted in 2014-2015 used the following evidence to assess residency programs' achievements and challenges in implementation: progress and performance measures reports, curriculum mapping of program activities to IM competencies, records of webinar participation, and post-project individual semi-structured phone interviews with the 12 grantee project leaders. Key findings are: (1) IM activities offered to residents increased by 50% during the 2 years; (2) Accessing IM resources already in existence at local grantee sites was the primary facilitator of moving the integration of IM into preventive medicine residencies forward; (3) Among all activities offered residents, rotations were perceived by grantees as by far the most valuable contributor to acquiring IM competencies; (4) Online training was considered a greater contributor to preventive medicine residents' medical knowledge in IM than faculty lectures or courses; (5) Faculty were offered a rich variety of opportunities for professional development in IM, but some programs lacked a system to ensure faculty participation; and (6) Perceived lack of evidence for IM was a barrier to full program implementation at some sites. Grantees expect implemented programs to continue post-funding, but with decreased intensity owing to perceived faculty and curriculum time constraints. PMID:26477899

  1. Wilderness medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sward, Douglas G.; Bennett, Brad L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human activity in wilderness areas has increased globally in recent decades, leading to increased risk of injury and illness. Wilderness medicine has developed in response to both need and interest. METHODS: The field of wilderness medicine encompasses many areas of interest. Some focus on special circumstances (such as avalanches) while others have a broader scope (such as trauma care). Several core areas of key interest within wilderness medicine are discussed in this study. RESULTS: Wilderness medicine is characterized by remote and improvised care of patients with routine or exotic illnesses or trauma, limited resources and manpower, and delayed evacuation to definitive care. Wilderness medicine is developing rapidly and draws from the breadth of medical and surgical subspecialties as well as the technical fields of mountaineering, climbing, and diving. Research, epidemiology, and evidence-based guidelines are evolving. A hallmark of this field is injury prevention and risk mitigation. The range of topics encompasses high-altitude cerebral edema, decompression sickness, snake envenomation, lightning injury, extremity trauma, and gastroenteritis. Several professional societies, academic fellowships, and training organizations offer education and resources for laypeople and health care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The future of wilderness medicine is unfolding on multiple fronts: education, research, training, technology, communications, and environment. Although wilderness medicine research is technically difficult to perform, it is essential to deepening our understanding of the contribution of specific techniques in achieving improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:25215140

  2. Emergency medicine in modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Thomas; Fulde, Gordian

    2007-08-01

    Emergency medicine in the highly advanced world is traditionally performed in two different ways. The first is the well-known Anglo-American system with skilled EDs, and a pre-hospital emergency medical service utilizing paramedics. The second is the so-called Franco-German system, with a highly developed pre-hospital emergency physician service, but only a basic organization of hospital-based emergency medicine. This gap is now closing fast because of the rapid advancement of hospital-based emergency medicine in Europe. Four criteria might be used to measure this: the recognition as a specialty, the specialist training programme, the professional organization of emergency physicians and the presence of academic centres in Europe. Eleven of the 27 European countries recognize hospital-based emergency medicine as a specialty already. These include Belgium, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovenia and the United Kingdom. Other nations are striving to do so, for example Sweden, France, Germany and Greece. There is no doubt that emergency medicine is gaining momentum and other countries will follow. Training for the specialty of emergency medicine is advanced already. Several curricula presently exist in the respective European countries. A task force, governed by the European Society for Emergency Medicine has been working hard to create a model curriculum for all of Europe, which is expected to be published in 2007. This comprises a 5-year specialty training, with three of them spent in an ED. The curriculum follows a symptom-oriented approach to emergency medicine, and includes a skilled description of the key competencies of the future trained emergency physicians. Given the century-long history of the pre-hospital emergency physician service in some European countries, a number of professional bodies exist representing pre-hospital emergency doctors. Within the last few years, ED physicians followed suit forming

  3. Nanomedicine concepts in the general medical curriculum: initiating a discussion

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Aldrin E

    2015-01-01

    Various applications of nanoscale science to the field of medicine have resulted in the ongoing development of the subfield of nanomedicine. Within the past several years, there has been a concurrent proliferation of academic journals, textbooks, and other professional literature addressing fundamental basic science research and seminal clinical developments in nanomedicine. Additionally, there is now broad consensus among medical researchers and practitioners that along with personalized medicine and regenerative medicine, nanomedicine is likely to revolutionize our definitions of what constitutes human disease and its treatment. In light of these developments, incorporation of key nanomedicine concepts into the general medical curriculum ought to be considered. Here, I offer for consideration five key nanomedicine concepts, along with suggestions regarding the manner in which they might be incorporated effectively into the general medical curriculum. Related curricular issues and implications for medical education also are presented. PMID:26677322

  4. Medicines management.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    All newly registered graduate nurses are required to have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to perform the skills required for patient care, specifically the competencies identified in the Nursing and Midwifery Council's essential skills clusters. This article focuses on the fifth essential skills cluster – medicines management. Nursing students should work to attain the knowledge and skills required for effective medicines management throughout their pre-registration education. The roles and responsibilities of the newly registered graduate nurse in the area of medicines management are discussed in this the final article of the essential skills cluster series. PMID:25872850

  5. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, D; Stroud, P; Fyfe, A

    1998-01-01

    The widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine techniques, often explored by patients without discussion with their primary care physician, is seen as a request from patients for care as well as cure. In this article, we discuss the reasons for the growth of and interest in complementary and alternative medicine in an era of rapidly advancing medical technology. There is, for instance, evidence of the efficacy of supportive techniques such as group psychotherapy in improving adjustment and increasing survival time of cancer patients. We describe current and developing complementary medicine programs as well as opportunities for integration of some complementary techniques into standard medical care. PMID:9584661

  6. Curriculum and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf held in Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970. Discussed are concepts of curriculum development, cognitive development, and educational methods with implications for the handicapped. (CB)

  7. The Didactic Therapeutics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Jimmy D.

    1986-01-01

    Considerations to be made in designing an optometry curriculum for treating patients with eye diseases are reviewed, including the scope of practice and specific areas of instruction in the biomedical, basic vision, and clinical vision sciences. (MSE)

  8. Curriculum: Which Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2010-01-01

    Curriculum has two major approaches, technical and scientific approach and the nontechnical-nonscientific approach. Both are different and distinct. Schools need to distinguish which approach is suited for their students.

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines describe the interrelationships of this and other dental fields, give an overview of the curriculum and its primary educational objectives, and outline the suggested prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, and faculty requirements. (MSE)

  10. Converting Curriculum to Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancu, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Examines the process of developing a school design, from the curriculum plan to building schematics. General phases discussed include advance preparation, educational specifications development, steering committee feedback, and architectural design review and critique. (GR)

  11. Materials Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Evan R.

    1987-01-01

    Presents perspectives on the aims and content of materials science courses and materials engineering courses. Outlines a proposed curriculum for a four-year degree course in engineering and identifies technical and social skills necessary for engineers. (ML)

  12. Ayurvedic Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... in varying forms in Southeast Asia. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ... and integrative health approaches you use. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Ayurvedic Medicine Research ...

  13. Taking Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, it is converted into products called metabolites. Usually, these metabolites are not as strong as the original drug. ... by too much medicine in the body. Drug metabolites often return to the liver and are chemically ...

  14. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    An herb is a plant or plant part used for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are ... go through the testing that drugs do. Some herbs, such as comfrey and ephedra, can cause serious ...

  15. Ratings of Students' Performances in a Third-Year Internal Medicine Clerkship: A Comparison between Problem-Based and Lecture-Based Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Boyd F.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study compared the performances of Wake Forest University (North Carolina) medical students rotating through an internal medicine program, 88 in a problem-based curriculum and 364 in a lecture-based curriculum. Students in the problem-based curriculum received significantly higher ratings from house staff and faculty on four clinical rating…

  16. The Central Nervous System and Alcohol Use. Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians. Training Unit [and] Participant Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Cecelia; And Others

    The Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians uses the Medicine Circle and the "new science paradigm" to study the science of alcohol through a culturally relevant holistic approach. Intended for teachers and other educational personnel involved with American Indians, this curriculum aims to present a framework for alcohol education that…

  17. The Digestive System and Alcohol Use. Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians. Training Unit [and] Participant Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Cecelia; And Others

    The Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians uses the Medicine Circle and the "new science paradigm" to study the science of alcohol through a culturally relevant holistic approach. Intended for teachers and other educational personnel involved with American Indians, this curriculum presents a framework for alcohol education that…

  18. ["Non naturals" in Islamic medicine].

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Naohide

    2010-03-01

    "Non naturals," which appear frequently in the history of Western medicine, means things not controlled by human nature, contrary to natural components of a body. It covers such a wide range of factors as physiological or psychological things, and the external envionment. Generally, these are classified into six categories; ambient air, food and drink, exercise and rest, sleep and wakefulness, excretion and retention, and the passions of soul. In medieval times the knowledge of these "six non naturals" constituted a kind of hygiene or regimen. People cannot avoid the effects of these elements in their lifetime, so physicians were required to learn about them not only to treat diseases but to preserve health and to prevent diseases. This became so common that it was included in the curriculum of medical schools. Although these factors were already known to have an effect on the health of humans in the early stage of Greek medicine, it took a long time to be formed into the theory of "six non naturals." Its origin can be traced back to Galen's "Ars medica," but he does not use the name "non naturals." With the later development of medicine in the Islamic world, which received Greek medicine through translation, the number and the contents of related factors differ from author to author. Moreover, they use different names; few authors use the name "non naturals." It seems that "six non naturals" had not been established as theory until the later stage of the history of medicine in Islam. PMID:20614733

  19. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Take these simple steps to avoid problems with medicines. Follow the directions on the medicine label carefully. ...

  20. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. Methods The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Results Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Conclusions Focused

  1. The Growing Need To Teach about Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Questions and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Moshe; Ben Ayre, Eran

    2001-01-01

    Reports on curriculum developments in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Germany, Canada, and the United States that illustrate various approaches to the question, "What should be taught in a CAM course?" In most cases, the approach is to teach about CAM therapies, although some curriculum planners are integrating such therapies when…

  2. Mesopotamian medicine.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots. PMID:17378276

  3. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  4. An in vitro investigation to compare the surface roughness of auto glazed, reglazed and chair side polished surfaces of Ivoclar and Vita feldspathic porcelain.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sumit; Kakade, Dilip; Jambhekar, Shantanu; Jain, Vinay

    2013-12-01

    The change in surface roughness after different surface finishing techniques has attracted the attention of several prosthodontists regarding wear of opposing teeth or restorative material and the strength; plaque retention and appearance of the restoration. However, there is considerable controversy concerning the best methods to achieve the smoothest and strongest porcelain restorations after chair side clinical adjustments. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the average surface roughness of a self-glazed surface, a chair side polished surface and a reglazed surface of ceramic. Two feldspathic porcelain, namely VITA VMK94 (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Sachingen, Germany) and IVOCLAR CLASSIC (Vivadent AG, FL-9494 Schaan, Liechtenstein) were selected to fabricate 20 specimens of each in the shape of shade guide tabs. A medium-grit diamond rotary cutting instrument was used to remove the glaze layer, and then the surface of half the specimens were re-glazed and the other half were polished using a well-defined sequence of polishing comprising of: Shofu porcelain polishing system, White gloss disc/polishing wheel, Silicone cone with diamond polishing paste and finally with small buff wheel with pumice slurry. The surface roughness (Ra) (μm) of the specimens was evaluated using a profilometer and scanning electron microscope. The data were statistically analyzed by using Student's t test. The results had shown that there is no statistically significant difference both quantitatively and qualitatively, between the surface roughness of reglazed and chair-side polished surface. In addition, both reglazed and chair-side polished surfaces are better than the autoglazed surface. Within all the groups, there is no significant difference between companies. Polishing an adjusted porcelain surface with the suggested sequence of polishing will lead to a finish similar to a re-glazed surface. Therefore chair-side polishing can be a good alternative to reglazing for

  5. Hidden Curriculum as One of Current Issue of Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    There are several issues in the education system, especially in the curriculum field that affect education. Hidden curriculum is one of current controversial curriculum issues. Many hidden curricular issues are the result of assumptions and expectations that are not formally communicated, established, or conveyed within the learning environment.…

  6. Mathematics: Common Curriculum Goals. Curriculum Mapping: End of Eleventh Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document is designed to help school personnel analyze their current curriculum for grades 9, 10, and 11 in terms of the Mathematics Common Curriculum for Oregon. The common curriculum goals are organized into nine content strands: (1) number and numeration; (2) appropriate computational skills; (3) problem solving; (4) geometry and…

  7. Mathematics: Common Curriculum Goals. Curriculum Mapping: End of Fifth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document is designed to help school personnel analyze their current curriculum for grades 4 and 5 in terms of the Mathematics Common Curriculum for Oregon. The common curriculum goals are organized into nine content strands: (1) number and numeration; (2) appropriate computational skills; (3) problem solving; (4) geometry and visualization…

  8. Mathematics: Common Curriculum Goals. Curriculum Mapping: End of Eighth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document is designed to help school personnel analyze their current curriculum for grades 6, 7, and 8 in terms of the Mathematics Common Curriculum for Oregon. The common curriculum goals are organized into nine content strands: (1) number and numeration; (2) appropriate computational skills; (3) problem solving; (4) geometry and…

  9. Mathematics: Common Curriculum Goals. Curriculum Mapping: End of Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document is designed to help school personnel analyze their current curriculum for grades 1, 2, and 3 in terms of the Mathematics Common Curriculum for Oregon. The common curriculum goals are organized into nine content strands: (1) number and numeration; (2) appropriate computational skills; (3) problem solving; (4) geometry and…

  10. The Student-Centered Curriculum: A Concept in Curriculum Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.

    1969-01-01

    The student-centered curriculum concept is "described in terms of a series of postulates which provide a basic definition of what the student-centered curriculum is to be. From these postulates, propositions are then derived which describe the way the student-centered curriculum would be constructed and how it would operate. This paper was…

  11. Wilderness Medicine.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Whitney; Bright, Steven; Burns, Patrick; Townes, David

    2016-03-01

    Wilderness medicine encompasses prevention and treatment of illness and injury, education and training, emergency medical services, and search and rescue in the wilderness. Although traumatic injuries, including minor injuries, outnumber medical illness as the cause of morbidity in the wilderness, basic understanding of the prevention and management of injury and illness, including recognition, identification, treatment, initial management, and stabilization, is essential, in addition to the ability to facilitate evacuation of affected patients. An important theme throughout wilderness medicine is planning and preparation for the best- and worst-case scenarios, and being ready for the unexpected. PMID:26900118

  12. The Preparation for Life Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews "The Preparation for Life Curriculum" (Wilcox, Dunn, Lavercombe and Burn, 1984), which is a case study of a British career education curriculum development project in four secondary schools. (JDH)

  13. Humane Education: A Curriculum Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Robert W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a curriculum-based approach to humane education and addresses the role of humane education in the school curriculum as well as the relationship's of education to other facets of animal welfare work. (Author/DS)

  14. Theme: In-Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Seven theme articles review the history and philosophy of vocational agriculture, its relationship to the national goals for education, the place of sustainable agriculture and supervised experience in the curriculum, diversifying the curriculum, and fisheries education programs in Alaska. (SK)

  15. Global Uses in Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Beverly E.; Molnar, Alex

    1994-01-01

    Considers the ambiguity surrounding curriculum workers' conceptualizations of global education. Adopting a framework that encompasses nationalist, international commerce, and humanist perspectives, the article highlights how each viewpoint affects curriculum development, recommending that all three perspectives be considered and synthesized during…

  16. ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric E. . E-mail: eklein@radonc.wustl.edu; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Price, Robert A.; Balter, James M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  17. What shall we do for family medicine?

    PubMed

    Grainge Biggs, John Sydney

    2016-06-01

    In November 2014 the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council directed that Family Medicine should be taught to final year medical students. Family Medicine will be strengthened as a result. This paper considers some implications of the decision, identifying first the need for more information on primary care services, especially in the private sector, to enable planning of the curriculum and attachments to public and private units. The challenges to medical colleges in providing what will be largely experiential learning are described and the importance of training practitioners is emphasised. The urgent need to overcome the virtual absence in Pakistan of postgraduate training in Family Medicine described, and the quality standards of primary care are explored and the need for attention in the face of student learning is described. Recommendations are offered, including an advisory board on Family Medicine to audit its introduction and performance. PMID:27339579

  18. Reading, writing, and doctoring: literature and medicine.

    PubMed

    Charon, R

    2000-05-01

    Literature and medicine share an inherently enduring relationship. Doctors turn to literature--both its plots and its forms--to understand what occurs in their patients' lives, to increase their own narrative competence, to interpret accurately the texts of medicine, to develop empathy, and to deepen their capacities for reflection and self-knowledge. Together, these skills, attitudes, and bodies of knowledge contribute to the effective practice of medicine. Literature is now taught in almost three quarters of the medical schools in the United States. Different goals, agendas, and methods are appropriate at each developmental stage of a physician's training, from the premedical curriculum to the continuing education of a practicing physician. A vigorous and growing scholarship and body of experience is propelling the field of literature and medicine to understand all the more clearly how acts of reading and acts of writing might illuminate acts of doctoring. PMID:10830551

  19. Rural family medicine training in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, J. T.; Rourke, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the status of postgraduate family medicine training that occurs in rural family practice settings in Canada and to identify problems and how they are addressed. DESIGN: A retrospective questionnaire sent to all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs followed by a focus group discussion of results. SETTING: Canadian university family medicine training programs. PARTICIPANTS: Chairs or program directors of all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs and people attending a workshop at the Section of Teachers of Family Medicine annual meeting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Extent of training offered, educational models used, common problems for residents and teachers. RESULTS: Nine of 18 programs offer some family medicine training in a rural practice setting to some or all of their first-year family medicine residents, and 99 of 684 first-year family medicine residents did some training in a rural practice. All programs offer some training in a rural practice to some or all of the second-year residents, and 567 of 702 second-year residents did some training in a rural setting. In 12 of 18 programs, a rural family medicine block is compulsory. Education models for training for rural family practice vary widely. Isolation, accommodation, and supervision are common problems for rural family medicine residents. Isolation and faculty development are common problems for rural physician-teachers. Programs use various approaches to address these problems. CONCLUSIONS: The variety of postgraduate training models for rural family practice used in the 18 training programs reflects different regional health care needs and resources. There is no common rural family medicine curriculum. Networking through a rural physician-teachers group or a faculty of rural medicine could further the development of education for rural family practice. PMID:7780331

  20. Problem-based learning curriculum in medical education at Kaohsiung Medical University.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Tsai, Wen-Chan

    2009-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was first introduced to Kaohsiung Medical University in 1997 and was incorporated into the reform of the medical curriculum in 2005. An action committee was organized to manage PBL activities at Kaohsiung Medical University. A 2-year PBL curriculum with 14 blocks was delivered both in the School of Medicine and School of Post-Baccalaureate Medicine. Each block consists of lectures of basic and clinical science, clinical skills, and three PBL tutorials. Fifty-three well-edited PBL cases were created during the past 4 years. Some issues have arisen from the PBL curriculum including lack of tutors, low tutor numbers in tutorials, tutor training, and adequacy of assessment. Therefore, faculty development and a better system of evaluation and assessment are now our major tasks. We hope that our efforts to improve the PBL curriculum will provide students with a better education system. PMID:19502148

  1. Curriculum Inquiry, Theory, and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumet, Madeleine R.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of four chapters in "Part III, Section F: Inquiring into Curriculum" of "The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" (F. M. Connelly, M. F. He, J. I. Phillion, Eds.; Sage Publications, 2008). In her review of these chapters ["Curriculum Inquiry" (William H. Schubert. Chapter 19, pp. 399-419); "Reenvisioning the…

  2. Process Accountability in Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooler, Dennis D.; Grotelueschen, Arden

    This paper urges the curriculum developer to assume the accountability for his decisions necessitated by the actual ways our society functions. The curriculum developer is encouraged to recognize that he is a salesman with a commodity (the curriculum). He is urged to realize that if he cannot market the package to the customers (the various…

  3. Curriculum Process in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamčíková, Veronika; Tarábek, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Physics/science education in the communicative conception is defined as the continuous transfer of the knowledge and methods of physics into the minds of individuals who have not participated in creating them. This process, called the educational communication of physics/science, is performed by various educational agents—teachers, curriculum makers, textbook designers, university teachers and does not mean only a simple transfer of information, but it also involves teaching and instruction at all levels of the school system, the study, learning, and cognition of pupils, students and all other learners, the assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, curriculum composition and design, the production of textbooks and other means of educational communication and, in addition, university education and the further training of teachers. The educational communication is carried out by the curriculum process of physics/science, which is a sequence of variant forms of curriculum mutually interconnected by curriculum transformations. The variant forms of curriculum are as follows: conceptual curriculum, intended curriculum, project (written) curriculum, operational curriculum, implemented curriculum, and attained curriculum.

  4. Manufacturing Curriculum Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarborough, Jule Dee

    A manufacturing curriculum for secondary vocational programs was designed to bridge the gap between grades 9-10 level courses and the community college-level curriculum of the Illinois Plan for Industrial Education. During the project, a literature review of manufacturing curriculum materials was conducted, a manufacturing conceptual framework was…

  5. Curriculum Decision Making in TAFE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeath, Clare

    A study examined the decision-making stage in the curriculum development process in vocational programs throughout Australia. Data were collected from interviews from a network of persons currently involved in curriculum development and case studies of the curriculum development process in action at 16 vocational schools throughout Australia.…

  6. The Concept of Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Robin

    This paper approaches the concept of curriculum design from a philosophical perspective, arguing that the concept of "design" in curriculum is fundamentally misleading. The paper begins with a series of comments questioning the assumption that curriculum design involves a set of discrete skills or procedures in which one may attain expertise, like…

  7. Restructuring for an Interdisciplinary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, John M., Ed.; Tanner, Daniel, Ed.

    Articles for developing an integrated secondary curriculum are presented in this book. The articles include: "Synthesis Versus Fragmentation: The Way Out of Curriculum Confusion," by Daniel Tanner; "The Interrelated Curriculum," by Steven S. Means; "Integrated Teaching and Learning in Essential Schools," by Richard Lear; "Interdisciplinary Teaming…

  8. Mississippi Substance Abuse Prevention Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Bureau of School Improvement.

    This document presents the Substance Abuse Prevention Curriculum developed for use in Mississippi elementary and secondary schools. The curriculum uses a developmental approach to substance abuse prevention which emphasizes helping students gain information needed to make sound decisions about drug use. Incorporated into the curriculum are all…

  9. Research Visibility: Vocational Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, George L., Ed.

    1970-01-01

    Sixteen research reviews are organized under these topics: (1) Curriculum Development, treating a national conference report, a guide for the development of a curriculum, occupational analysis as a basis for curriculum development, and a shared-time concept for area programs, (2) Agricultural Education, reviewing innovative aspects of off-farm…

  10. Forestry Occupations. A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, R. J., Ed.

    Developed as a part of a larger project to revise the total agricultural education curriculum in South Carolina, this curriculum guide is designed for a 2-year course in forestry occupations. A paradigm accompanies the document and illustrates a possible time frame and sequence. The units covered by the curriculum include an orientation to…

  11. Curriculum Orientations of Virtual Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Nicole Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the curriculum orientation preferences of K-12 public school teachers who provided instruction in virtual settings (n = 47) in a midwestern state. Curriculum orientations were explored using a mixed-methods design. Quantitative assessments data revealed a pattern of curriculum orientations similar to teachers working in…

  12. A Vocationalized School Science Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Jacqueline; Donnelly, Jim

    2006-01-01

    This article is concerned with the meaning and legitimacy of the view that the secondary science curriculum can be given a vocational emphasis, and with a current attempt to create such a curriculum. Although this perspective on the science curriculum has a long history, in recent decades it has received little attention. This article examines…

  13. Bioenergetic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss a specific therapeutic strategy we call ‘bioenergetic medicine’. Bioenergetic medicine refers to the manipulation of bioenergetic fluxes to positively affect health. Bioenergetic medicine approaches rely heavily on the law of mass action, and impact systems that monitor and respond to the manipulated flux. Since classically defined energy metabolism pathways intersect and intertwine, targeting one flux also tends to change other fluxes, which complicates treatment design. Such indirect effects, fortunately, are to some extent predictable, and from a therapeutic perspective may also be desirable. Bioenergetic medicine-based interventions already exist for some diseases, and because bioenergetic medicine interventions are presently feasible, new approaches to treat certain conditions, including some neurodegenerative conditions and cancers, are beginning to transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24004341

  14. Medicinal Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  15. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  16. [Osteopathic medicine].

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Lepers, Y; Salem, W

    2011-09-01

    Osteopathy is originated in the 19th century in the United States. Andrew Taylor Still seek for an alternative medical system to the orthodox medicine largely empirical and advocating bloodletting, calomel, etc., all of which was resumed with terms like" heroic medicine". Osteopathy as other alternative medical practices (homeopathy, eclecticism, etc.) based on rational and metaphysical postulates as vitalism or the fact that man is a divinely ordained machine. Still's approach was essentially manual and based on manipulation of the joints. Today osteopaths challenge these dogmas and seek to agree their practice within scientific biomedical standards. Even if strong randomized clinical trials are lacking, several surveys report how osteopathy gained public notoriety. Several recent meta-analyses pinpoint the benefit of the spinal manipulative treatment and even if there is no evidence that such an approach is superior to other advocated therapies there is no evidence that these therapies are more effective than the first one. The major indications for such a treatment are cervical and low back pain, either chronic or acute. The quality of the relationship between the practitioner and patient together with the placebo effect are important components of a treatment effect. Osteopathic education is an important aspect and only higher education institutions, i.e. universities can achieve and maintain adequate standards. Materia medica and surgery represent the two major therapeutic mainstreams in medicine; osteopathy considered as manual medicine could be the third one. PMID:22034767

  17. Managing Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... other strategies that don’t use medicine have • Call the ADEAR Center toll-free: 1-800-438-4380 been tried. ... dose, patient’s name, dosage frequency, and expiration date. • ... Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center is a service of the National Institute on ...

  18. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern medical practice in New York State is presented. After an overview of professional regulation in the state, licensing requirements/procedures for medicine are described including education and postgraduate training requirements, state licensing examinations, and application…

  19. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    New York State education law, rules, and regulations concerning the practice of medicine are presented, along with requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a physician. State statutory provisions cover: duration and registration of a license, practice and regulation of the profession, supervision by the Board…

  20. Zoological medicine and public health.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B; Osburn, Bennie I

    2006-01-01

    Public-health issues regarding zoological collections and free-ranging wildlife have historically been linked to the risk of transmission of zoonotic diseases and accidents relating to bites or injection of venom or toxins by venomous animals. It is only recently that major consideration has been given worldwide to the role of the veterinary profession in contributing to investigating zoonotic diseases in free-ranging wildlife and integrating the concept of public health into the management activities of game preserves and wildlife parks. At the veterinary undergraduate level, courses in basic epidemiology, which should include outbreak investigation and disease surveillance, but also in population medicine, in infectious and parasitic diseases (especially new and emerging or re-emerging zoonoses), and in ecology should be part of the core curriculum. Foreign diseases, especially dealing with zoonotic diseases that are major threats because of possible agro-terrorism or spread of zoonoses, need to be taught in veterinary college curricula. Furthermore, knowledge of the principles of ecology and ecosystems should be acquired either during pre-veterinary studies or, at least, at the beginning of the veterinary curriculum. At the post-graduate level, master's degrees in preventive veterinary medicine, ecology and environmental health, or public health with an emphasis on infectious diseases should be offered to veterinarians seeking job opportunities in public health and wildlife management. PMID:17035205

  1. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  2. Curriculum Study, Curriculum History, and Curriculum Theory: The Reason of Reason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkewitz, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the intersection of curriculum studies/curriculum history/curriculum theory through the study of systems of reason that order reflection and action. Words about "learning", "empowerment", "problem-solving", "self-realization", "community", and so on, are not merely there in order that educators should "grasp" some reality to…

  3. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…

  4. Energy Awareness Curriculum, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains course content for a series of "mini-courses" that can be presented in an adult continuing education program in area technical-vocational schools and community colleges. The program consists of nine modules, each divided into units and including learning objectives and student handouts. The modules cover the…

  5. Designing a Comprehensive Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, T. L.

    1970-01-01

    A comprehensive rural "agribusiness industry" curriculum might include: (1) The World of Work (Grade 7 or 8), (2) Vocational Orientation (Grade 9), (3) Basic Agriculture and Industry (Grade 10), (4) Specialized Agribusiness Industry (Grade 11), and (5) Advanced Agribusiness Industry (Grade 12). (DM)

  6. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents seven library media activities to be used with specific curriculum areas: "Into the Past with Historical Fiction" and "Critical Reading to Figure It Out" (Reading and Language Arts); "Electricity Experiments,""Classifying Insects," and "Fish" (Science); and "Citizenship and the Law" and "Transporting Goods" (Social Studies). (EM)

  7. Universal Teller Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPage Area Vocational Education Authority, Addison, IL.

    This curriculum guide has been designed to provide the teacher with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the career field of universal teller, and to allow the teacher and learner maximum flexibility. The teaching or instruction, in both educational and financial institutions, can be accomplished through large formal groups, small…

  8. Solar Curriculum Guides, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This document contains an outline for a curriculum to train solar energy technicians in community colleges. The guide contains eight courses, each of which is divided into one to five modules. Modules, in turn, are divided into units, and units contain student handouts appropriate to the material. The following eight courses are included in this…

  9. Surgical Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a 10-month postsecondary program to educate qualified adults to function as surgical technicians in association with surgeons and nurses in operating rooms and delivery rooms. The program provides for both a didactic and a clinical component. Contents include general information, a listing of major…

  10. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  11. Curriculum Materials Examination System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, David J.

    This document is a guideline for selection and evaluation of social studies curriculum materials developed by the Marin Social Studies Project. Questions are presented which will help in the examination of materials so that specific strengths and weaknesses in the materials can be determined. Consideration is given to the objectives and rationale…

  12. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used with specific curriculum units. Highlights include elementary school activities for reading and language arts (using the "World Almanac," identifying a story's sequence of events, and using autobiographies); science (causes of wind and learning about squirrels); and…

  13. The Second Language Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert Keith, Ed.

    The aim of this collection is to present "state of the art" papers in language curriculum studies by writers who have been actively involved in shaping theory in the field and who, between them, have applied that theory in almost every part of the world and in a variety of contexts. Papers include the following: "A Decision-Making Framework for…

  14. Electro-Mechanical Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This electromechanical technician curriculum covers the following general areas: (1) basic soldering; (2) reading diagrams and following schematics; and (3) repairing circuitry and mechanics common to major appliances, vending machines, amusement equipment, and small office machines. The manual includes the following sections: (1) course…

  15. Internationalizing the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sypris, Theo, Ed.

    Prepared as a resource for community college practitioners seeking to internationalize their courses, this report presents 50 internationalized course modules in 22 subject areas developed as part of curriculum development project undertaken at Michigan's Kalamazoo Valley Community College. The 50 modules are presented in the areas of accounting,…

  16. Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Bureau of Vocational Services.

    Designed for use in the Connecticut Regional Vocational Agriculture Centers, this curriculum provides exploratory and specialization units for four major areas of agriculture. These are Agriculture Mechanics, Animal Science, Natural Resources, and Plant Science. The exploratory units are required for grades 9 and 10, while the specialization units…

  17. The Curriculum Superhighway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A superhighway is being built across today's education landscape, extending from preschool to graduate school, writes Armstrong. This superhighway bypasses all the byways, narrow routes, and winding paths that have traditionally filled the road from early childhood to early adulthood. As schools race to move students through the curriculum at…

  18. Job Search Workshop Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, Carole

    This bilingual curriculum was developed by job search counselors at a Seattle nonprofit social service agency in conjunction with Washington state's welfare reform initiative, WorkFirst. The workshops were 30-hours long and were given over a 2-week period. The classes were conducted in the students' native language, as well as in English by an…

  19. Singing across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bintz, William P.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one attempt to use singing as an instructional strategy to help all students learn across the curriculum. It begins with background on the author's early experiences with singing. Then, it shares professional literature on the relationship between singing, song, and literacy development. Next, it describes singing as an…

  20. EMH Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwinnett County Schools, GA.

    The guide consists of behaviorally stated, developmentally sequenced curriculum objectives for mentally retarded students from preprimary through high school levels. Five major sections present detailed skill objectives in the following areas: (1) basic academic skills (motor development, perceptual development, language development, reading,…

  1. Designing a Mathematics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Lee Peng

    2010-01-01

    A decade of PMRI saw the changes in the classroom in some of the primary schools in Indonesia. Based on observation, we can say that though the mathematics syllabus in Indonesia did not change, its curriculum has changed under the movement of PMRI. In this article, we put in writing some of the experience gained through the involvement in…

  2. Why the Holistic Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jack

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates how conventional education has contributed to the fragmentation of life into divisions of "us" and "them" while problems such as environmental destruction and the threat of nuclear war require concerted action. Describes holistic education as an alternative, examining it in relation to three curriculum positions: transmission,…

  3. Curriculum: Hierarchy or Decalage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buell, Robert R.

    The assumptions of curriculum based upon external reinforcement psychology and subject-content mastery by remands and punishments are 1) a stable pupil IQ, 2) largely environmentally determined, 3) essentially evaluated through problem-solving to get answers, 4) a one-to-one correspondence with concept and conceptual-scheme hierarchical learning…

  4. Curriculum Challenges in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Louise

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study that examined the extent and types of challenges to curriculum in California school districts. A survey of school districts conducted in 1990 yielded 421 usable responses. The second survey, sent in 1991, elicited 379 responses, a 37.5 percent response rate. Findings indicate that the number…

  5. School Curriculum in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  6. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Provides five fully developed library media activities designed for use with specific curriculum units in art, health and nutrition, mathematics, science, and social studies. Library media skills, objectives, grade levels, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Specific topics include aardvarks,…

  7. Offshore Outsourcing Drives Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction to Application Development was completely reworked. Less emphasis was placed on programming and more emphasis on developing and communicating user requirements. Many items used in training industry were incorporated into the CPT 180 course. The paper will detail the change in focus in this course and overall how our curriculum is…

  8. Industrial Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook contains a competency-based curriculum for teaching industrial education in Alaska. Competencies are listed for the following areas: employability, auto maintenance, building maintenance, commercial fishing, communications, construction, drafting, electronics, energy and power, forestry and logging, graphics, high technology,…

  9. Driver Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brum, Herbert D.; And Others

    Intended for driver education instructors in Ohio, the guide is designed to acquaint teachers with special characteristics, capacities, and needs of the handicapped student population and to provide resources, information, and ideas for meeting those special needs. An introductory section discusses the purpose and use of the curriculum. Section 2…

  10. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    A unified science approach is incorporated in this K-6 curriculum mode. The program is organized into six major cycles. These include: (1) science, math, and technology cycle; (2) universe cycle; (3) life cycle; (4) water cycle; (5) plate tectonics cycle; and (6) rock cycle. An overview is provided of each cycle's major concepts. The topic…

  11. Language & Literature. Curriculum Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livonia Public Schools, MI.

    The global education curriculum presented in this booklet is offered as a model, of integrated, interdisciplinary English studies, that involves participants in cultural, scientific, ecological, and economic issues while promoting student awareness of the nature and development of world literature, languages, the arts, and their…

  12. Arts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manner, Jane Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes how curriculum integration can help art enhance learning during times when the arts may be considered dispensable and removed from education, presenting examples of how classroom teachers have examined art as a link to expanded understanding of history, science, math, reading, current events, geography, cultural studies, emotions,…

  13. Language Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde Park Central School District, NY.

    Designed to provide teachers with a listing of sequentially ordered objectives in specific language arts areas, this curriculum guide for kindergarten through grade eight was developed in Hyde Park, New York, as a foundation for a total communication development program. The course descriptions, arranged according to grade, are classified under…

  14. The Counseling & Guidance Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Counseling and guidance services are vital in any school curriculum. Counselors may themselves be dealing with students of diverse abilities and handicaps. Counselors may have to work with students affected by drug addiction, fetal alcohol syndrome, homelessness, poverty, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and divorce. Students may present…

  15. 100 Winning Curriculum Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Boards Association, Alexandria, VA.

    The editors of "The American School Board Journal" and "The Executive Educator" magazines recently invited school leaders from across North America to send in curriculum ideas that work. From among the 1,026 entries that were submitted, a panel of judges selected 100, which are published in this special report. Criteria for selection included (1)…

  16. A Multidisciplinary Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Trace

    2002-01-01

    Describes New York University's commitment to general mathematics and science education for undergraduate students, embodied in the College of Arts and Science's core curriculum, the Morse Academic Plan, which includes a three-course sequence, Foundations of Scientific Inquiry, specifically designed for non-majors. (EV)

  17. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides fully-developed library media activities designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units in mathematics (consumer education); reading and language arts ("Foolish People in Folk Tales"); science (dinosaurs); and social studies (Roman cities and Third World countries). (Author/EM)

  18. Grasshopping across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Blanche F.

    A writing across the curriculum project at Trumbull High School (Connecticut) is based on a cross section of English, science, and career education courses: advanced composition, science fiction, physics, chemistry, biology, and vocational agriculture. It focuses on writing as a mode of learning; extending and refining the students' processes of…

  19. The Curriculum Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of updating curriculum to align with Common Core State Standards is a national one felt by states, districts, and teachers alike. Teachers generally express enthusiasm for the Common Core, but consistently cite a lack of high-quality curricula as an impediment to teaching them. The demand for core-aligned quality materials has far…

  20. Insight: An Energy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, Herb

    1979-01-01

    The author explains some of the activities he uses in his upper elementary energy curriculum when dealing with these topics: the definition of energy; gasoline consumption; energy conversion; solar energy; and the politics of energy. Resource agencies to which students may write for information are listed. (SJL)

  1. Facilitating Holistic Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Daniel F.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a case study that illustrates how internal curriculum assessment processes used by an environmental science and policy department led to the creation of an innovative tenure-track faculty line for someone whose primary activities and scholarship focus not on traditional disciplinary scholarship but instead on coordinating the holistic…

  2. Beauvoir Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sylvia, Ed.

    This health curriculum, developed by an elementary school faculty, provides three sets of lesson plans. Lesson plans include lessons taught by the school nurse, resource teachers, and classroom teachers. The topics considered in the lessons taught by the school nurse include hygiene, germs and diseases, safety, nutrition, and drugs. Topics…

  3. Managing Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl A.; Anderson, Mike

    This document, which is intended for mangers at post-16 educational institutions in the United Kingdom, presents guidelines for managing curriculum change that were developed on the basis of case studies of the following further education (FE) colleges: Grey Skies College; Midshire College; and Happy Days College. The introduction explains how the…

  4. A Curriculum for Resiliency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Glenn E.; Nixon, Clair J.

    1997-01-01

    The 33 modules of a Utah district's successful Resilient Youth Curriculum pilot program provide guidelines for initially working through students' protected exteriors to establish trust and facilitate the resiliency-building process. Students then develop ownership of the program by participating in planning, shaping, and implementing the…

  5. Across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Elementary across-the-curriculum ideas include hands-on science activities that investigate animal survival, civics education via bicycle safety instruction, writing skills development by illumination, and math instruction by reading a story then solving problems. An end-of-the-year theme unit has students read poems then play related games. (SM)

  6. Comprehensive Communication Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, M. Diane; And Others

    The Comprehensive Communication Curriculum is designed for teaching basic communication skills to severely or profoundly retarded, physically handicapped students. An introductory section mentions the purpose of five major program components: caregiver interview, identification of child's wants and needs, training the child to request wants and…

  7. Handbook on Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This study examines current problems surrounding curriculum development in the classroom. Part one describes the state of the art in terms of definition, theory and practices, methods, types, and unresolved questions. Part two contains descriptions of the following 12 selected innovative projects: (a) "Learning Objectives for Vocational Schools:…

  8. ACCESS PENNSYLVANIA Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg.

    This curriculum guide was prepared as a tool for teaching students the purpose and function of the ACCESS PENNSYLVANIA database in the total concept of information literacy. The database on compact laser disc contains information about the holdings of hundreds of school, public, academic, and special use libraries. The database can be searched at…

  9. Picture This Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet of teacher-developed lesson plans, intended for use with students in middle and/or high schools, focuses on student involvement in community projects. The first lesson plan, "Physics Park" (Scott McQuerry), aims for students to construct a playground and the examine the physics behind the playground's equipment. Students use…

  10. Women's History Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthsdotter, Mary, Ed.; Eisenberg, Bonnie, Ed.

    This curriculum guide is designed to facilitate teachers' first efforts to introduce information about women in U.S. history. The guide promotes a multicultural awareness of women's history beginning with the Native Americans and proceeding to current issues of diversity. Activities are divided for grades 1-6 and 7-12 but may be adapted as…

  11. Business Education Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This revised curriculum gives information on the skills and knowledge students should acquire through a business education program. The competencies listed reflect the skills that employers see as necessary for success in clerical and accounting occupations. The handbook is organized in seven sections that cover the following: (1) the concept of…

  12. Distributive Education. Selling. Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankford, Dave; Comte, Don

    Nineteen lesson plans on selling are presented in this performance-based curriculum unit for distributive education. This unit is self-contained and consists of the following components: introduction (provides overview of unit content and describes why mastery of the objectives is important); performance objectives; pre-assessment instrument…

  13. Developing Workplace Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing/delivering workplace education programs, explains the process of developing a functional context workplace education curriculum. Discussed first are the following: the types of information needed to develop a functional context…

  14. Evaluating Sexuality Education Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David C.; Terlosky, Beverly

    2000-01-01

    In contrast to studies of abstinence-only programs, studies of abstinence-plus curricula indicate that students do not increase sexual activity. Parents, teachers, and administrators should evaluate all sexuality education programs according to three important criteria: credibility of training materials, curriculum content, and curriculum…

  15. The Disappearing Moral Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    Compares the stated educational philosophy of several colleges and universities in 1896-97 with the contemporary version, focusing on the role of moral values in the curriculum. Institutions discussed include the University of Maine, University of North Dakota, Washington State University, Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania), Stetson University…

  16. Occupational Clothing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Annette J.

    Designed to provide individualized, hands-on experience for secondary or postsecondary students in gainful homemaking programs, this occupational clothing curriculum contains eight learning modules. The following topics are covered in the modules: plant production for the needle trades (needle trade structure and operation, terminology, history,…

  17. Vocational Carpentry Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    The carpentry curriculum guide was developed as a basic guide to be used by instructors in formulating their own courses of study. The material is designed for use in vocational carpentry classes at grade levels 10, 11, and 12. Planned as a two-year sequence, it incorporates 1080 class hours of instruction and emphasizes light or residential type…

  18. Reinventing the Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.; Van Scotter, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    For many, the dominant model of curriculum development in science includes generating a topic, clarifying science content, identifying activities associated with the topic, and figuring out an assessment. Unfortunately, this approach tends to overemphasize activities and underemphasize mastery of science concepts and the process of scientific…

  19. ESL VI Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flander, Leonard

    This curriculum guide for English as a Second Language (ESL) Level VI is the sixth of six in a Guam Community College ESL project series. The other five guides, a companion teacher's guide and pre- and post-tests are available separately (see note). The entire project centers around the Peabody Kits P, Level P, Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, and the…

  20. Connect Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Four elementary teachers describe how they support an interdisciplinary curriculum using integrated units. One builds tall towers of spaghetti. Another touches on all subjects using baseball card games. The third turns the playground into an archeological dig. The last sails the ocean along with the Pilgrims. (SM)

  1. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  2. Manufacturing Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the cluster concept, manufacturing technology. One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, it suggests activities that allow students (1) to become familiar with and use some of the tools, materials, and processes…

  3. Psychopharmacology Curriculum Field Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Benjamin, Sheldon; Beresin, Eugene; Goldberg, David A.; Jibson, Michael D.; Thrall, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Objective: As part of an effort to improve psychopharmacology training in psychiatric residency programs, a committee of residency training directors and associate directors adapted an introductory schizophrenia presentation from the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology's Model Psychopharmacology Curriculum to develop a multimodal,…

  4. ESL V Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flander, Leonard

    This curriculum guide for English as a Second Language (ESL) Level V is the fifth of six in the Guam Community College ESL project series. The other five guides, a companion teacher's guide, and pre- and post-tests are available separately (see note). The entire project centers around the Peabody Kits P, Level P, Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, and the…

  5. Accounting & Computing Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.; And Others

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a competency-based accounting and computing course that is designed to prepare students for employability in the following occupational areas: inventory control clerk, invoice clerk, payroll clerk, traffic clerk, general ledger bookkeeper, accounting clerk, account information clerk,…

  6. Pharmacy Technician Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Ray R.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction designed to prepare entry-level pharmacy technicians or help already employed pharmacy technicians retain their jobs or advance in their field. Following a list of tasks and an introduction, the bulk of the document consists…

  7. ISSUES. Teacher Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Continent Regional Educational Lab., Inc., Kansas City, MO.

    Innovative Social Studies: Urban Elementary Schools, known as ISSUES, is a social studies program actively pursuing the profound social problems of our times by daily student involvement with solutions as part of the curriculum. Upper elementary and junior high students increase their understanding in active participation in community problem…

  8. Systems of Justice Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Phil James, Comp.

    The high school curriculum guide on law consists of an outline of the American legal system. A major objective is to provide students with legal knowledge in order to better understand the reasons for keeping the law. Both the public and individual's responsibilities toward law enforcement are dealt with. The guide is divided into five units. Unit…

  9. Plumbing and Heating Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    Theory and experience in the following areas are included in this plumbing curriculum: (1) plumbing fixtures and heating; (2) city water service; (3) fixture roughing; (4) venting; and (5) solar heating systems. The plumbing program manual includes the following sections: (1) general objectives for grades 10, 11, and 12; (2) a list of 33 major…

  10. Curriculum Mapping. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Getting through the choppy seas of curriculum reform and high stakes testing, as well as meeting predetermined standards and adequate yearly progress, is often difficult for a teacher, let alone a school or district, to ascertain what specific content should be taught and what is actually being taught. Teachers often do not know what has been…

  11. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…

  12. Revisiting the Rhetorical Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Kris; Soetaert, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the special strand on "Revisiting the rhetorical curriculum" is to explore the educational potential of a new rhetorical perspective, specifically in relation to different traditions within educational and rhetorical studies. This implies that we do not only look at education "in" rhetoric, but that we position education also "as" a…

  13. A Curriculum for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Alexander, Ed.

    This publication contains seven papers, six of which were presented at a 1968 conference sponsored by the Elementary Education Advisory Council of the ASCD in cooperation with the Department of Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery Education of the NEA. Topics covered include elements and issues in curriculum-making for children, present trends in…

  14. Incentives from Curriculum Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koerselman, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum tracking creates incentives in the years before its start, and we should therefore expect test scores to be higher during those years. I find robust evidence for incentive effects of tracking in the UK based on the UK comprehensive school reform. Results from the Swedish comprehensive school reform are inconclusive. Internationally, I…

  15. Music Curriculum for Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picht, Harriet

    This kindergarten music curriculum provides a year-long program of a sequenced series of activities designed to develop music concepts. Topics of the units in this guide are: self-concept (beginning of the year), fall, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, winter, a circus, Valentine's Day, spring, and farms. A scope and sequence chart of concepts…

  16. Biology Curriculum Support Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This biology curriculum supplement includes the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Goals, helpful resources, and suggested activities supported by inquiry-based laboratory activities. Contents include a detailed description of content which provides the goals and standards being sough), a materials list for inquiry support labs and…

  17. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    Designed to be a workable guide for instructors serving the occupational needs of various categories of disadvantaged and handicapped students, this welding curriculum contains fourteen units of self-paced and self-contained instructional materials. The instructional units cover the following topics: job opportunities in welding, safety rules in…

  18. Freshman English Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershner, Ivan; Holt, Pol

    This leveled curriculum guide, composed of assignment and evaluation sheets, is divided into five different sections. Freshmen Grammar deals with such topics as subject-verb agreement, punctuation and capitalization, possessives, complete sentences, parts of speech, correct verb form, simple and complex sentences, and correct word form. Freshman…

  19. A Curriculum for Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Richard L.

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the educational needs of persons engaged in purchasing and materials management functions in order to develop a curriculum plan which would adequately prepare personnel for entry and career progression within the field of purchasing. In addition to literature reviews and analyses on the subject,…

  20. A Curriculum for Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Richard LaDoyt

    The objective of this research was to identify the necessary educational organization required to form a curriculum plan for the field of purchasing and to investigate the nature of the industrial purchasing function. The dissertation delineates the critical areas of business operation: industrial purchasing, procurement, and material management.…

  1. The Shadow Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pamela U.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter will explore the "shadow curriculum" (a term used by those who question the assumption that direct selling to students who are compelled to attend school is questionable on several levels--ethical, moral, and democratic) and its connection to media literacy. The author first summarizes the kinds of marketing in schools that have…

  2. Box City Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet contains two lesson plans about cities and architecture intended for use with students in upper elementary grades and middle schools. The first lesson plan, "City People, City Stories" (Jan Ham), states that understanding architecture and cities must begin with an understanding of the people of the city. The children create…

  3. Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeds, Andrew, Ed.

    Designed primarily for adult literacy teachers and tutors, this curriculum describes the content of what should be taught in numeracy programs in order to meet the individual needs of adults through the selection and teaching of skills appropriate to those adults' needs. An introduction describes national standards and qualifications, learners,…

  4. The Making of Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Ivor

    The study of how subjects are or are not accepted for inclusion into the curriculum is an area which has largely been ignored but which offers opportunities for a new integration of historical, sociological, and educational approaches. Some of the areas open for such study include the structural and political factors influencing the making of…

  5. A Curriculum For Choosing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winocur, S. Lee

    This guide addresses the problem of decision-making in young children and the effect of a particular curriculum on the improvement of children's ability in this area. The term and the process of decision-making are defined, and career implications are discussed. The last section of the guide outlines a program designed to help teachers assist…

  6. Drafting. Competency Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Al; And Others

    This competency based drafting curriculum is presented in seven specialization sections with units in each section containing a competency statement, performance objective, learning activities, evaluation, and quiz or problem sheets. Some units also contain answer sheets and/or handout sheets. Sections and number of units presented are (1) basic…

  7. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used with specific curriculum units. Highlights include elementary student activities for art (winter holiday crafts); reading/language arts (fantasy in stories, elements of folk stories from India, writing sequels to fairy tales); science (animal symbiosis); and social…

  8. Food Service Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook presents a competency-based curriculum that provides information to teachers and administrators planning a secondary food service program in Alaska. The organization of the handbook is similar to the work stations commonly found in food service operations, although some competency areas, such as sanitation and safety and the care and…

  9. Mathematics: Common Curriculum Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document defines what are considered to be the essentials in a strong mathematics program for the state of Oregon for grades K-12. The common curriculum goals are organized into nine content strands: (1) number and numeration; (2) appropriate computational skills; (3) problem solving; (4) geometry and visualization skills; (5) measurement;…

  10. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units, including foreign language (Spanish); reading and language arts (expository writing and use of a thesaurus); science and social studies (land biomes, state birds, and country's flags). (LRW)

  11. Metal Trades Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a metal trades technology course of study at the high school level. Its stated purpose is to help students acquire the trade knowledge necessary to function effectively in the shipfitting, welding, and piping trades. Contents include: a course description, a list of general objectives; lists of…

  12. Engine & Vehicle Mechanics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum includes all competencies a student will acquire in an engine and vehicle mechanics educational program. It follows guidelines established for automobile technician training programs leading toward certification and addresses requirements of the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). The…

  13. Aquatic Resources Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, C. Boyd; Sosin, Mark

    Fishing is one of the oldest and most popular outdoor activities. Like most activities, fishing requires basic knowledge and skill for success. The Aquatic Resources Education Curriculum is designed to assist beginning anglers in learning the basic concepts of how, when, and where to fish as well as what tackle to use. The manual is designed to be…

  14. Curriculum Guide for Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed through a cooperative effort by industry and education, this curriculum guide outlines the basic knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level competencies in the broad field of agriculture, or for entrance into a post-high school program. This guide is one of several developed for Oregon's new approach to secondary education called…

  15. Carpentry. Vocational Preparation Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herd, Amon

    Intended for instructors serving the occupational needs of disadvantaged and handicapped students, this curriculum guide contains nine units for a carpentry program. Its purposes are to provide minimum skills for students entering the mainstream, supplement vocational skills of students already mainstreamed, and provide vocational instructional…

  16. Degrassi Health Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Robin J.

    This health curriculum is intended to help teachers deal with some of today's adolescent health issues: (1) alcoholism (issues surrounding family alcoholism); (2) relationships (stereotyping and teen friendships); (3) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) (insight into what it is like to live with HIV);…

  17. Carnival in the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herne, Steve; Burgess-Macey, Celia; Rogers, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on a carnival in the curriculum project designed to revitalise the arts in the experience of students in Higher Education preparing to become primary school teachers. It argues the relevance of a combined arts or trans-disciplinary artform in the remit of a visual arts education journal and explores carnival as a complex,…

  18. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units. Highlights include music (the music of Africa), language arts (American Black poets), science (the work of George Washington Carver), and social studies (Laura Ingalls Wilder and the movement West). (LRW)

  19. Curriculum for Discussion Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhoff, Mary E.

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in implementing two 10-meeting series of group discussions designed to enhance the process of the socialialization of students enrolled in an associate degree nursing program. Addressed in the discussion sessions are the following topics: developing an awareness of self-concept and gaining…

  20. Latin Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Instructional Services.

    North Carolina's Latin curriculum guide describes the overarching concepts for Latin study, particularly at the secondary level, and outlines what students should know and be able to do at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. It is designed to provide directions to school districts as they plan and/or continue to improve their Latin…

  1. Uncovering the Math Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Teachers often express to Marulyn Burns their worry about the need to "cover the curriculum." In response, she draws on one of her favorite quotes: "You don't want to cover a subject; you want to uncover it." This quote is from "The Having of Wonderful Ideas and Other Essays on Teaching and Learning" by Eleanor…

  2. Rethinking the MSW Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Ira C.

    2013-01-01

    The foundation year and specialization year of study are the accepted framework for graduate social work education. A common belief among educators is that accreditation standards are prescriptive by design, resulting in a rigidity that neither encourages nor supports curricular innovation. This article outlines a newly developed curriculum model…

  3. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  4. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  5. The Changing Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    Science, as a curriculum area, has gone through many changes recently with the oncoming of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), as well as the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Science is a part of everyday life which individuals experience. Even the drying up of a puddle of…

  6. Construction Trades Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum is designed to be a handbook for the construction trades. It includes all competencies a student will acquire in the course of building a complete house. Based on a survey of Alaskan construction employers and employees, the handbook stresses both principles and skills. The 23 units are presented in the sequence…

  7. Special Needs Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Board of Vocational Education, Boise.

    The curriculum guide was designed for Vocational Special Needs Programs in Idaho and concentrates on preparing handicapped and disadvantaged students to succeed in regular vocational programs. The subjects, pre-vocational in nature, include: Living Skills (self concept, life management, community resources, food and nutrition, clothing and…

  8. A Curriculum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpes, Donald K.

    1978-01-01

    A model for curriculum development patterns or themes relevant to American Indians is presented. These themes include: energy and matter; language and culture; spirit and life; law and economics; physical development and health. Assuming the environment as the central theme, a sample curricular unit is presented. (JC)

  9. Small Business Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for an elective course for 11th- or 12th-grade students in small business development. It is intended to meet three times each week for 18 weeks. Introductory materials include instructor objectives; anticipated student outcomes; and correlations with Connecticut's common core of learning. Each of the eight…

  10. Child Safety Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Safety Center, Malibu, CA.

    This document presents a set of child safety curriculum guidelines intended to help prevent child victimization and to promote safer living and learning environments for children and adolescents across America. These guidelines were developed to help educators, law enforcement personnel, and members of other youth-serving agencies teach children…

  11. Creative Curriculum Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Dale L.

    This book deals with the process dimensions of curriculum development through the prism of creative imagination and self-expression. Its theme is that personal and professional growth can occur in tandem. It shows how to create settings and learning communities that empower people to identify and use their talents. Case studies of critical…

  12. Beyond Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz, Richard R.

    The methodology of research and the technology of development in education have advanced beyond "curriculum development," as activities associated with that rubric are popularly practiced. These advances provide the experiential basis for five actionable conclusions: (1) Programmatic development of integrated resources for use by students,…

  13. Engineering Technology Curriculum Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershon, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes curriculum guidelines for the following engineering technologies: chemical, industrial, mining, petroleum, nuclear, civil, mechanical, electrical, automotive, and manufacturing. In a few years, these Engineering Council for Professional Development committee guidelines are intended to become the criteria by which programs will be judged…

  14. Writing across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Margaret, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Noting that in order to introduce and maintain writing across the curriculum programs in the schools English teachers must unite with colleagues to stress learning of all kinds, and that recommendations for the use of writing in content areas do not frighten away students who are apprehensive about writing, the articles in this focused journal…

  15. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  16. Multimedia, Curriculum, & Public Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutts, Glen

    2004-01-01

    As an illustration of meaningful exploration of public art, Coutts provides a tour of a multimedia curriculum project based on art works in Glasgow, Scotland. He explores the potential of multimedia to engage students and teachers in a debate about public art for students at the interface of primary and secondary schools. Scanning the City, a…

  17. Exploratory Business Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for Arkansas ninth-grade students to explore business careers through the use of competency-based instructional materials. Exploratory business teachers are asked to incorporate the twenty-three units of study into a sequence best suited to their teaching style. Units include such topics as "Social Security,""What…

  18. Raising awareness of the hidden curriculum in veterinary medical education: a review and call for research.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L

    2014-01-01

    The hidden curriculum is characterized by information that is tacitly conveyed to and among students about the cultural and moral environment in which they find themselves. Although the hidden curriculum is often defined as a distinct entity, tacit information is conveyed to students throughout all aspects of formal and informal curricula. This unconsciously communicated knowledge has been identified across a wide spectrum of educational environments and is known to have lasting and powerful impacts, both positive and negative. Recently, medical education research on the hidden curriculum of becoming a doctor has come to the forefront as institutions struggle with inconsistencies between formal and hidden curricula that hinder the practice of patient-centered medicine. Similarly, the complex ethical questions that arise during the practice and teaching of veterinary medicine have the potential to cause disagreement between what the institution sets out to teach and what is actually learned. However, the hidden curriculum remains largely unexplored for this field. Because the hidden curriculum is retained effectively by students, elucidating its underlying messages can be a key component of program refinement. A review of recent literature about the hidden curriculum in a variety of fields, including medical education, will be used to explore potential hidden curricula in veterinary medicine and draw attention to the need for further investigation. PMID:25335646

  19. Resident education curriculum in pediatric and adolescent gynecology: the short curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nathalie; Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie; Browner-Elhanan, Karen J; Huguelet, Patricia S; Kaul, Paritosh; Talib, Hina J; Wheeler, Carol; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-04-01

    The degree of exposure to Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (PAG) varies across academic programs in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Adolescent Medicine. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible to train residents and provide opportunities within their training programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by disseminating the Short Curriculum with specific learning objectives and list of essential resources where key concepts in PAG can be covered. PMID:24602305

  20. Dance medicine.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, S R

    1984-08-01

    Dance medicine is a subdivision of sports medicine that utilizes the same basic orthopedic concepts. It studies motions common to dance, which may not be common to other athletic activity, and the injuries that develop secondary to these peculiar movements. The best defense mechanism against injury and overuse syndrome development is a well-toned, strong, flexible body. Appropriate alignment and range of motion of large joints are necessities for dance activity. Biomechanical analyses are useful in treating and guiding the dancer through injuries that she may incur as well as prevention of such injuries. "Forcing the turnout" is a common problem with many dancers. This motion causes pedal pronation and a myriad of overuse syndromes that can be related to pronatory changes. PMID:6536400