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Sample records for medicine gene therapy

  1. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients. PMID:26374219

  2. Gene mutation-based and specific therapies in precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    Precision medicine has been initiated and gains more and more attention from preclinical and clinical scientists. A number of key elements or critical parts in precision medicine have been described and emphasized to establish a systems understanding of precision medicine. The principle of precision medicine is to treat patients on the basis of genetic alterations after gene mutations are identified, although questions and challenges still remain before clinical application. Therapeutic strategies of precision medicine should be considered according to gene mutation, after biological and functional mechanisms of mutated gene expression or epigenetics, or the correspondent protein, are clearly validated. It is time to explore and develop a strategy to target and correct mutated genes by direct elimination, restoration, correction or repair of mutated sequences/genes. Nevertheless, there are still numerous challenges to integrating widespread genomic testing into individual cancer therapies and into decision making for one or another treatment. There are wide-ranging and complex issues to be solved before precision medicine becomes clinical reality. Thus, the precision medicine can be considered as an extension and part of clinical and translational medicine, a new alternative of clinical therapies and strategies, and have an important impact on disease cures and patient prognoses. PMID:26994883

  3. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases. PMID:24372817

  4. Gene and cell therapy for children--new medicines, new challenges?

    PubMed

    Buckland, Karen F; Bobby Gaspar, H

    2014-06-01

    The range of possible gene and cell therapy applications is expanding at an extremely rapid rate and advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are currently the hottest topic in novel medicines, particularly for inherited diseases. Paediatric patients stand to gain enormously from these novel therapies as it now seems plausible to develop a gene or cell therapy for a vast number of inherited diseases. There are a wide variety of potential gene and cell therapies in various stages of development. Patients who received first gene therapy treatments for primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are reaching 10 and 15 years post-treatment, with robust and sustained immune recovery. Cell therapy clinical trials are underway for a variety of tissues including corneal, retinal and muscle repair and islet cell transplantation. Various cell therapy approaches are also being trialled to enhance the safety of bone marrow transplants, which should improve survival rates in childhood cancers and PIDs. Progress in genetic engineering of lymphocyte populations to target and kill cancerous cells is also described. If successful these ATMPs may enhance or replace the existing chemo-ablative therapy for several paediatric cancers. Emerging applications of gene therapy now include skin and neurological disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa, epilepsy and leukodystrophy. Gene therapy trials for haemophilia, muscular dystrophy and a range of metabolic disorders are underway. There is a vast array of potential advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and these are likely to be more cost effective than existing medicines. However, the first clinical trials have not been without setbacks and some of the key adverse events are discussed. Furthermore, the arrival of this novel class of therapies brings many new challenges for the healthcare industry. We present a summary of the key non-clinical factors required for successful delivery of these potential treatments. Technological advances

  5. Gene and cell therapy for children — New medicines, new challenges?☆

    PubMed Central

    Buckland, Karen F.; Bobby Gaspar, H.

    2014-01-01

    The range of possible gene and cell therapy applications is expanding at an extremely rapid rate and advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are currently the hottest topic in novel medicines, particularly for inherited diseases. Paediatric patients stand to gain enormously from these novel therapies as it now seems plausible to develop a gene or cell therapy for a vast number of inherited diseases. There are a wide variety of potential gene and cell therapies in various stages of development. Patients who received first gene therapy treatments for primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are reaching 10 and 15 years post-treatment, with robust and sustained immune recovery. Cell therapy clinical trials are underway for a variety of tissues including corneal, retinal and muscle repair and islet cell transplantation. Various cell therapy approaches are also being trialled to enhance the safety of bone marrow transplants, which should improve survival rates in childhood cancers and PIDs. Progress in genetic engineering of lymphocyte populations to target and kill cancerous cells is also described. If successful these ATMPs may enhance or replace the existing chemo-ablative therapy for several paediatric cancers. Emerging applications of gene therapy now include skin and neurological disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa, epilepsy and leukodystrophy. Gene therapy trials for haemophilia, muscular dystrophy and a range of metabolic disorders are underway. There is a vast array of potential advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and these are likely to be more cost effective than existing medicines. However, the first clinical trials have not been without setbacks and some of the key adverse events are discussed. Furthermore, the arrival of this novel class of therapies brings many new challenges for the healthcare industry. We present a summary of the key non-clinical factors required for successful delivery of these potential treatments. Technological advances

  6. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program. PMID:22365782

  7. EMEA and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products Development in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMEA) via the centralized procedure is the only available regulatory procedure for obtaining marketing authorization for gene therapy (GT) medicinal products in the European Union. The responsibility for the authorization of clinical trials remains with the national competent authorities (NCA) acting in a harmonized framework from the scientific viewpoint. With the entry into force of a new directive on good clinical practice implementation in clinical trials as of 1 May 2004, procedural aspects will also be harmonized at EU level. Scientifically sound development of medicinal products is the key for the successful registration of dossiers and for contributing to the promotion and protection of public health. The objective of this paper is to introduce the EMEA regulatory processes and scientific activities relevant to GT medicinal products. PMID:12686717

  8. Gene therapy for inherited muscle diseases: Where genetics meets rehabilitation medicine

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Robynne; Wang, Zejing; Mack, David L.; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical vectors to correct genetic mutations that cause inherited myopathies and related disorders of skeletal muscle is advancing at an impressive rate. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are attractive for clinical use because (i) AAVs do not cause human disease, and (ii) these vectors are able to persist for years. New vectors are now becoming available as gene therapy delivery tools, and recent preclinical experiments have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of gene therapy with AAV for long-term correction of muscle pathology and weakness in myotubularin-deficient canine and murine disease models. In this review, we present recent advances in the application of gene therapies to treat inherited muscle disorders including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and X-linked Myotubular Myopathy. Potential areas for therapeutic synergies between rehabilitation medicine and genetics are also discussed. PMID:25313664

  9. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  10. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  11. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  12. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. PMID:23618815

  13. [Therapy and internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, P; Pasche, O; Michaelis-Conus, K; Willi, C; Favrat, B; Cornuz, J

    2007-01-31

    This review is based on five articles published in 2006 and dealing with therapies in general internal medicine: in case of acute non complicated rhino-sinusitis, the use of topical corticoids in mono-therapy is indicated; cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins is less frequent than established so far. In our daily practice we should be more "pro-active" in prescribing probiotics which have proved their efficacy in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoeas; an antibiotic treatment of three days is recommended in case of non complicated cystitis in women less than 65 years of age. Finally, every patient treated with bisphosphonates must be regularly followed by a dentist. PMID:17319397

  14. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... screenings or other regular exams. previous continue The Future of Gene Therapy To cure genetic diseases, scientists ... Gene therapy's potential to revolutionize medicine in the future is exciting, and hopes are high for its ...

  15. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000 this month to find cures. Loading... Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies SHARE: Print Glossary ...

  16. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation. PMID:26427458

  17. [Complementary therapy in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Hübner, J; Stoll, C

    2011-01-01

    Even in the palliative context complementary therapy has a high value for patients and their relatives. In contrast to the methods of conventional medicine naturopathy as a holistic system has positive meanings for patients and their family. Complementary medicine in the palliative setting can be used as a supportive therapy in carefully selected cases. Doctors and patients should be careful regarding effect and side effects and should make sure that supportive therapy is given adequately and in effective doses. Complementary therapy should not be used in order to avoid the question of life and death. An adequate approach to the topic is mandatory, which acknowledges the needs of patients but also looks for their safety. Patients following alternative therapies sometimes neglect helpful therapeutic options. Carefully providing information on these therapies is mandatory. Physicians should avoid losing patients' confidence in their competence and attention in their final course of disease. Also in palliative medicine a sensitive approach to the topic of complementary medicine is mandatory, which accounts for the eligible wishes of patients and their relatives but puts the patients safety first. PMID:21181106

  18. Gene therapy: progress and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Mary; Thrasher, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The first clinical gene delivery, which involved insertion of a marker gene into lymphocytes from cancer patients, was published 25 years ago. In this review, we describe progress since then in gene therapy. Patients with some inherited single-gene defects can now be treated with their own bone marrow stem cells that have been engineered with a viral vector carrying the missing gene. Patients with inherited retinopathies and haemophilia B can also be treated by local or systemic injection of viral vectors. There are also a number of promising gene therapy approaches for cancer and infectious disease. We predict that the next 25 years will see improvements in safety, efficacy and manufacture of gene delivery vectors and introduction of gene-editing technologies to the clinic. Gene delivery may also prove a cost-effective method for the delivery of biological medicines. PMID:26702034

  19. Cardiac Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaanine, Antoine H.; Kalman, Jill; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic progressive disorder where frequent and recurrent hospitalizations are associated with high mortality and morbidity. The incidence and the prevalence of this disease will increase with the increase in the number of the aging population of the United States. Understanding the molecular pathology and pathophysiology of this disease will uncover novel targets and therapies that can restore the function or attenuate the damage of malfunctioning cardiomyocytes by gene therapy that becomes an interesting and a promising field for the treatment of heart failure as well as other diseases in the future. Of equal importance is developing vectors and delivery methods that can efficiently transduce the majority of the cardiomyocytes, that can offer a long term expression and that can escape the host immune response. Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors have the potential to become a promising novel therapeutic vehicles for molecular medicine in the future. PMID:21092890

  20. Medicinal plants in therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Norman R.; Akerele, Olayiwola; Bingel, Audrey S.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Guo, Zhengang

    1985-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for the success of primary health care is the availability and use of suitable drugs. Plants have always been a common source of medicaments, either in the form of traditional preparations or as pure active principles. It is thus reasonable for decision-makers to identify locally available plants or plant extracts that could usefully be added to the national list of drugs, or that could even replace some pharmaceutical preparations that need to be purchased and imported. This update article presents a list of plant-derived drugs, with the names of the plant sources, and their actions or uses in therapy. PMID:3879679

  1. Complementary Therapies and Medicines and Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caroline A; Armour, Mike; Ee, Carolyn

    2016-03-01

    Complementary therapies and medicines are a broad and diverse range of treatments, and are frequently used by women and their partners during the preconception period to assist with infertility, and to address pregnancy-related conditions. Despite frequent use, the evidence examining the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety for many modalities is lacking, with variable study quality. In this article, we provide an overview of research evidence with the aim of examining the evidence to inform clinical practice. During the preconception period, there is mixed evidence for acupuncture to improve ovulation, or increase pregnancy rates. Acupuncture may improve sperm quality, but there is insufficient evidence to determine whether this results in improved pregnancy and live birth rates. Acupuncture can be described as a low-risk intervention. Chinese and Western herbal medicines may increase pregnancy rates; however, study quality is low. The evaluation of efficacy, effectiveness, and safety during the first trimester of pregnancy has most commonly reported on herbs, supplements, and practices such as acupuncture. There is high-quality evidence reporting the benefits of herbal medicines and acupuncture to treat nausea in pregnancy. The benefit from ginger to manage symptoms of nausea in early pregnancy is incorporated in national clinical guidelines, and vitamin B6 is recommended as a first-line treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. The safety of ginger and vitamin B6 is considered to be well established, and is based on epidemiological studies. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce back pain and improve function for women in early pregnancy. There is little evidence to support the use of cranberries in pregnancy for prevention of urinary tract infections, and chiropractic treatment for back pain. Overall the numbers of studies are small and of low quality, although the modalities appear to be low risk of harm. PMID:26866600

  2. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  3. Vaginal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Isla, Arantxazu; Solinís, María Angeles

    2015-09-15

    In the last years, vaginal gene therapy has gained increasing attention mainly for the treatment and control of sexually transmitted infections. DNA delivery has been also suggested to improve reproductive outcomes for women with deficiencies in the female reproductive tract. Although no product has reached clinical phase, preclinical investigations reveal the potential of the vaginal tract as an effective administration route for gene delivery. This review focuses on the main advantages and challenges of vaginal gene therapy, and on the most used nucleic acid delivery systems, including viral and non-viral vectors. Additionally, the advances in the application of vaginal gene therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of infectious diseases such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human papillomavirus (HPV) or the herpes simplex virus (HSV) are presented. PMID:26189799

  4. Gene therapy in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Riban, Véronique; Fitzsimons, Helen L.; During, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Results from animal models suggest gene therapy is a promising new approach for the treatment of epilepsy. Several candidate genes such as neuropeptide Y and galanin have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to have a positive effect on seizure activity. For a successful gene therapy-based treatment, efficient delivery of a transgene to target neurons is also essential. To this end, advances have been made in the areas of cell transplantation and in the development of recombinant viral vectors for gene delivery. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors in particular show promise for gene therapy of neurological disorders due to their neuronal tropism, lack of toxicity, and stable persistence in neurons, which results in robust, long-term expression of the transgene. rAAV vectors have been recently used in phase I clinical trials of Parkinson’s disease with an excellent safety profile. Prior to commencement of phase I trials for gene therapy of epilepsy, further preclinical studies are ongoing including evaluation of the therapeutic benefit in chronicmodels of epileptogenesis, as well as assessment of safety intoxicological studies. PMID:18717707

  5. Biofield therapies: energy medicine and primary care.

    PubMed

    Rindfleisch, J Adam

    2010-03-01

    Energy medicine modalities, also known as biofield therapies, are perhaps the most mysterious and controversial complementary alternative medicine therapies. Although many of these approaches have existed for millennia, scientific investigation of these techniques is in its early stages; much remains to be learned about mechanisms of action and efficacy. These techniques are increasingly used in clinical and hospital settings and can be incorporated into an integrative primary care practice. This article describes several energy medicine and biofield therapies and outlines key elements they hold in common. Several specific approaches are described. Research findings related to the efficacy of energy medicine are summarized, and proposed mechanisms of action and safety issues are discussed. Guidelines are offered for primary care providers wishing to advise patients about energy medicine or to integrate it into their practices, and Internet and other resources for obtaining additional information are provided. PMID:20189005

  6. Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.7 Necessity of Patient-Specific Dose Planning in Radionuclide Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

  7. Gene Therapy for "Bubble Boy" Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan

    2016-07-14

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency results in the accumulation of toxic metabolites that destroy the immune system, causing severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), often referred to as the "bubble boy" disease. Strimvelis is a European Medicines Agency approved gene therapy for ADA-SCID patients without a suitable bone marrow donor. PMID:27419862

  8. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  9. nanosheets for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Zhongyang; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Renshun; Chen, Huabin; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gao, Ling; Wang, Bin; Guo, Zhaoji; Xue, Xiaofeng; Cao, Wei; Guo, Liang

    2014-10-01

    A new class of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 which have fantastic physical and chemical properties, has drawn tremendous attention in different fields recently. Herein, we for the first time take advantage of the great potential of MoS2 with well-engineered surface as a novel type of 2D nanocarriers for gene delivery and therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged MoS2-PEG-PEI is synthesized with lipoic acid-modified polyethylene glycol (LA-PEG) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The amino end of positively charged nanomaterials can bind to the negatively charged small interfering RNA (siRNA). After detection of physical and chemical characteristics of the nanomaterial, cell toxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) was investigated as a well-known oncogene, which was a critical regulator of cell cycle transmission at multiple levels. Through knockdown of PLK1 with siRNA carried by novel nanovector, qPCR and Western blot were used to measure the interfering efficiency; apoptosis assay was used to detect the transfection effect of PLK1. All results showed that the novel nanocarrier revealed good biocompatibility, reduced cytotoxicity, as well as high gene-carrying ability without serum interference, thus would have great potential for gene delivery and therapy.

  10. Saporin suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, Natasa; Vago, Riccardo; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2009-01-01

    New genes useful in suicide gene therapy are those encoding toxins such as plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), which can irreversibly block protein synthesis, triggering apoptotic cell death. Plasmids expressing a cytosolic saporin (SAP) gene from common soapwort (Saponaria officinalis) are generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant toxin under the control of strong viral promoters and may be placed under tumor-specific promoters. The ability of the resulting constructs to inhibit protein synthesis is tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. SAP expression driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrates that only 10 ng ofplasmid DNA per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 melanoma cells drastically reduces luciferase reporter activity to 18% of that in control cells (1). Direct intratumoral injections are performed in an aggressive melanoma model. B16 melanoma-bearing mice injected with pCI-SAP complexed with lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) show a noteworthy attenuation in tumor growth, and this effect is significantly augmented by repeated administrations of the DNA complexes. Here, we describe in detail this cost-effective and safe suicide gene approach. PMID:19565907

  11. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  12. Regenerative medicine: Current therapies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Angelo S.; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Organ and tissue loss through disease and injury motivate the development of therapies that can regenerate tissues and decrease reliance on transplantations. Regenerative medicine, an interdisciplinary field that applies engineering and life science principles to promote regeneration, can potentially restore diseased and injured tissues and whole organs. Since the inception of the field several decades ago, a number of regenerative medicine therapies, including those designed for wound healing and orthopedics applications, have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and are now commercially available. These therapies and other regenerative medicine approaches currently being studied in preclinical and clinical settings will be covered in this review. Specifically, developments in fabricating sophisticated grafts and tissue mimics and technologies for integrating grafts with host vasculature will be discussed. Enhancing the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the host by altering its environment, whether with cell injections or immune modulation, will be addressed, as well as methods for exploiting recently developed cell sources. Finally, we propose directions for current and future regenerative medicine therapies. PMID:26598661

  13. Regenerative medicine: Current therapies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mao, Angelo S; Mooney, David J

    2015-11-24

    Organ and tissue loss through disease and injury motivate the development of therapies that can regenerate tissues and decrease reliance on transplantations. Regenerative medicine, an interdisciplinary field that applies engineering and life science principles to promote regeneration, can potentially restore diseased and injured tissues and whole organs. Since the inception of the field several decades ago, a number of regenerative medicine therapies, including those designed for wound healing and orthopedics applications, have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and are now commercially available. These therapies and other regenerative medicine approaches currently being studied in preclinical and clinical settings will be covered in this review. Specifically, developments in fabricating sophisticated grafts and tissue mimics and technologies for integrating grafts with host vasculature will be discussed. Enhancing the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the host by altering its environment, whether with cell injections or immune modulation, will be addressed, as well as methods for exploiting recently developed cell sources. Finally, we propose directions for current and future regenerative medicine therapies. PMID:26598661

  14. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Farjadnia, Mahgol; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable. PMID:25709266

  15. Personalized medicine: risk prediction, targeted therapies and mobile health technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is increasingly being employed across many areas of clinical practice, as genes associated with specific diseases are discovered and targeted therapies are developed. Mobile apps are also beginning to be used in medicine with the aim of providing a personalized approach to disease management. In some areas of medicine, patient-tailored risk prediction and treatment are applied routinely in the clinic, whereas in other fields, more work is required to translate scientific advances into individualized treatment. In this forum article, we asked specialists in oncology, neurology, endocrinology and mobile health technology to discuss where we are in terms of personalized medicine, and address their visions for the future and the challenges that remain in their respective fields. PMID:24580858

  16. Prospects for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Robin R

    2004-01-01

    Inherited retinal disease, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), affects about 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by gradual loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of 60 or so different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Many of the disease genes are photoreceptor- or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell specific. Since adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can be used for efficient gene transfer to these two cell types, we are developing AAV-mediated gene therapy approaches for inherited retinal degeneration using animal models that have defects in these cells. The retinal degeneration slow (rds or Prph2Rd2/Rd) mouse, a model of recessive RP, lacks a functional gene encoding peripherin 2, which is a photoreceptor-specific protein required for the formation of outer segment discs. We have previously demonstrated restoration of photoreceptor ultrastructure and function by AAV-mediated gene transfer of peripherin 2. We have now extended our assessment to central visual neuronal responses in order to show an improvement of central visual function. The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, provides another model of recessive RP. Here the defect is due to a defect in Mertk, a gene that is expressed in the RPE and encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is thought to be involved in the recognition and binding of outer segment debris. The gene defect results in the inability of the RPE to phagocytose the shed outer segments from photoreceptor cells. The resulting accumulation of debris between the RPE and the neuroretina leads to progressive loss of photoreceptor cells. AAV-mediated delivery of Mertk to the RPE results in reduction of debris indicating that the phagocytosing function of the RPE is restored and delays the degeneration of the

  17. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  18. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vectors are engineered to replicate preferentially in cancer cells and to destroy cancer cells through the natural process of lytic virus replication. Many clinical trials indicate that replication-defective and replication-competent adenovirus vectors are safe and have therapeutic activity. PMID:24279313

  19. Regenerative medicine: challenges and perspectives for successful therapies.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Joshi, C

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative Medicine (RM) has the promise to revolutionize the treatment of many debilitating diseases for which the current therapies are inadequate. To realize the full potential of RM, a pragmatic approach needs to be taken by all stakeholders keeping in mind the lessons learnt from recombinant protein manufacturing, gene therapy trials, etc., to develop novel service delivery models for economic viability and regulatory processes in the absence of long-term data. In this chapter, we focus on the three main drivers of RM field and discuss the potential pitfalls and possible ways to mitigate them in order to move the field closer to clinical implementation. PMID:23208552

  20. Gene therapy progress and prospects: gene therapy for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has long been targeted, as yet unsuccessfully, as being curable with gene therapy. The main hurdles have not only been vector-related toxicity but also the lack of physiological regulation of the expressed insulin. Recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of beta-cells and the transcriptional cascade that drives it have enabled both in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy combined with cell therapy to be used in animal models of diabetes with success. The associated developments in the stem cell biology and immunology have opened up further opportunities for gene therapy to be applied to target autoimmune diabetes. PMID:15496957

  1. Adjunctive analgesic therapy in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Leigh A

    2008-11-01

    Adjunctive analgesic therapies are interventions for pain that involve agents or techniques other than the traditional analgesics (opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and local anesthetics). Adjunctive therapies may be pharmacologic or nonpharmacologic in nature. The focus of this article is on pharmacologic interventions with potential utility as adjunctive analgesics in veterinary medicine. Pharmacology of selected agents, including medetomidine, ketamine, amantadine, gabapentin, systemic lidocaine, and pamidronate, is discussed in addition to evidence for their safety and efficacy and guidelines for their use in veterinary patients. PMID:18954680

  2. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years. PMID:25708106

  3. Gene Insertion Into Genomic Safe Harbors for Human Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Schambach, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Genomic safe harbors (GSHs) are sites in the genome able to accommodate the integration of new genetic material in a manner that ensures that the newly inserted genetic elements: (i) function predictably and (ii) do not cause alterations of the host genome posing a risk to the host cell or organism. GSHs are thus ideal sites for transgene insertion whose use can empower functional genetics studies in basic research and therapeutic applications in human gene therapy. Currently, no fully validated GSHs exist in the human genome. Here, we review our formerly proposed GSH criteria and discuss additional considerations on extending these criteria, on strategies for the identification and validation of GSHs, as well as future prospects on GSH targeting for therapeutic applications. In view of recent advances in genome biology, gene targeting technologies, and regenerative medicine, gene insertion into GSHs can potentially catalyze nearly all applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26867951

  4. Noninvasive Tracking of Gene Transcript and Neuroprotection after Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqian; Chen, Y. Iris; Liu, Christina H.; Chen, Po-Chih; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen; Liu, Philip K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) cDNA encoded in scAAV-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy, and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer’s dementia, Parkinson’s disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  5. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  6. PDX1 associated therapy in translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juehua; Liu, Shi-He; Sanchez, Robbi; Nemunaitis, John; Rozengurt, Enrique; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis and a low median survival due to lack of the early and reliable detection and effective therapeutic options, despite improvements observed for many other cancers in last decade. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), which is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor and a key regulator for insulin gene expression, β cell maturation and proper β cell function maintenance in the pancreas. Our previous studies revealed that PDX1 promotes tumorigenesis and it is a promising therapeutic target for PDAC. For translational purposes, we developed three therapeutic platforms utilizing RNA interference (RNAi), gene therapy and small inhibitory drug targeting PDX1, and further validated them in PDAC preclinical models both in vitro and in vivo. These PDX1 targeted therapies significantly inhibited PDX1 expression in PDAC cells, ablated PDX1-expressing human PDAC xenograft tumor growth, and prolonged survival in the PDAC mouse models. The data from these preclinical studies proved the translational potentials of PDX1 targeted therapies in PDAC and suggest that the strategy of developing PDX1 targeted therapies would permit a rapid bench-to-bedside translation of other relevant gene therapies, which would eventually benefit the patients suffering from this deadly disease. PMID:27386488

  7. PDX1 associated therapy in translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juehua; Liu, Shi-He; Sanchez, Robbi; Nemunaitis, John; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis and a low median survival due to lack of the early and reliable detection and effective therapeutic options, despite improvements observed for many other cancers in last decade. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), which is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor and a key regulator for insulin gene expression, β cell maturation and proper β cell function maintenance in the pancreas. Our previous studies revealed that PDX1 promotes tumorigenesis and it is a promising therapeutic target for PDAC. For translational purposes, we developed three therapeutic platforms utilizing RNA interference (RNAi), gene therapy and small inhibitory drug targeting PDX1, and further validated them in PDAC preclinical models both in vitro and in vivo. These PDX1 targeted therapies significantly inhibited PDX1 expression in PDAC cells, ablated PDX1-expressing human PDAC xenograft tumor growth, and prolonged survival in the PDAC mouse models. The data from these preclinical studies proved the translational potentials of PDX1 targeted therapies in PDAC and suggest that the strategy of developing PDX1 targeted therapies would permit a rapid bench-to-bedside translation of other relevant gene therapies, which would eventually benefit the patients suffering from this deadly disease. PMID:27386488

  8. Gene Therapy for Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Samiy, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has a growing research potential particularly in the field of ophthalmic and retinal diseases owing to three main characteristics of the eye; accessibility in terms of injections and surgical interventions, its immune-privileged status facilitating the accommodation to the antigenicity of a viral vector, and tight blood-ocular barriers which save other organs from unwanted contamination. Gene therapy has tremendous potential for different ocular diseases. In fact, the perspective of gene therapy in the field of eye research does not confine to exclusive monogenic ophthalmic problems and it has the potential to include gene based pharmacotherapies for non-monogenic problems such as age related macular disease and diabetic retinopathy. The present article has focused on how gene transfer into the eye has been developed and used to treat retinal disorders with no available therapy at present. PMID:25709778

  9. Applied photonic therapy in veterinary medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Terry R.; McLaren, Brian C.

    2005-04-01

    There can be no question that specific systemic physiological results occur, when red light (660nm) is applied to the skin, it is now more a question of detailed mechanisms. Before gathering statistically signifcant clinical trial data, it is important to first enumerate the type of results observed in practice. Case histories are presented highlighting the use of photonic therapy in veterinary medicine. Over 900 surgical procedures have been performed and documented, utilizing the principles of photonic therapy, and while hemostasis, pain relief, and nausea relief, were the primary goals, the peri-operative death rate, the post-operative seroma, and post-operative infection were reduced to almost zero, and there was a noticeable increase in the healing rate. Scientifically applied photonic therapy, rather than supplanting conventional veterinary medicine, compliments and increases the veterinarian's set of skills. This paper proposes a hypothesis of how 660 nm light applied to specific points on the skin, produces various physiological changes in animals. By using animals, there can be no placebo, hypnotic or psychosomatic confounding effects.

  10. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  11. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers. PMID:9034598

  12. Gene expression analysis in RA: towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Burska, A N; Roget, K; Blits, M; Soto Gomez, L; van de Loo, F; Hazelwood, L D; Verweij, C L; Rowe, A; Goulielmos, G N; van Baarsen, L G M; Ponchel, F

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression has recently been at the forefront of advance in personalized medicine, notably in the field of cancer and transplantation, providing a rational for a similar approach in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a prototypic inflammatory autoimmune disease with a poorly understood etiopathogenesis. Inflammation is the main feature of RA; however, many biological processes are involved at different stages of the disease. Gene expression signatures offer management tools to meet the current needs for personalization of RA patient's care. This review analyses currently available information with respect to RA diagnostic, prognostic and prediction of response to therapy with a view to highlight the abundance of data, whose comparison is often inconclusive due to the mixed use of material source, experimental methodologies and analysis tools, reinforcing the need for harmonization if gene expression signatures are to become a useful clinical tool in personalized medicine for RA patients. PMID:24589910

  13. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  14. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  15. Gene Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has seen substantial advances in the development of gene therapy strategies and vector technology for the treatment of a diverse number of diseases, with a view to translating the successes observed in animal models into the clinic. Perhaps the overwhelming drive for the increase in vascular gene transfer studies is the current lack of successful long-term pharmacological treatments for complex cardiovascular diseases. The increase in cardiovascular disease to epidemic proportions has also led many to conclude that drug therapy may have reached a plateau in its efficacy and that gene therapy may represent a realistic solution to a long-term problem. Here, we discuss gene delivery approaches and target diseases. PMID:12721517

  16. Music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yinger, Olivia Swedberg; Gooding, Lori

    2014-07-01

    This article summarizes the research on music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents with diagnoses commonly treated by psychiatrists. Music therapy and music medicine are defined, effects of music on the brain are described, and music therapy research in psychiatric treatment is discussed. Music therapy research with specific child/adolescent populations is summarized, including disorders usually diagnosed in childhood, substance abuse, mood/anxiety disorders, and eating disorders. Clinical implications are listed, including suggestions for health care professionals seeking to use music medicine techniques. Strengths and weaknesses of music therapy treatment are discussed, as well as areas for future research. PMID:24975624

  17. Germ-line gene therapy and the medical imperative.

    PubMed

    Munson, Ronald; Davis, Lawrence H

    1992-06-01

    Somatic cell gene therapy has yielded promising results. If germ cell gene therapy can be developed, the promise is even greater: hundreds of genetic diseases might be virtually eliminated. But some claim the procedure is morally unacceptable. We thoroughly and sympathetically examine several possible reasons for this claim but find them inadequate. There is no moral reason, then, not to develop and employ germ-line gene therapy. Taking the offensive, we argue next that medicine has a prima facie moral obligation to do so. PMID:11645742

  18. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  19. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Patricia A; During, Matthew J

    2004-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder arising from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and subsequent depletion of striatal dopamine levels, which results in distressing motor symptoms. The current standard pharmacological treatment for PD is direct replacement of dopamine by treatment with its precursor, levodopa (L-dopa). However, this does not significantly alter disease progression and might contribute to the ongoing pathology. Several features of PD make this disease one of the most promising targets for clinical gene therapy of any neurological disease. The confinement of the major pathology to a compact, localised neuronal population and the anatomy of the basal ganglia circuitry mean that global gene transfer is not required and there are well-defined sites for gene transfer. The multifactorial aetiology of idiopathic PD means that it is unlikely any single gene will cure the disease, and as a result at least three separate gene-transfer strategies are currently being pursued: transfer of genes for enzymes involved in dopamine production; transfer of genes for growth factors involved in dopaminergic cell survival and regeneration; and transfer of genes to reset neuronal circuitry by switching cellular phenotype. The merits of these strategies are discussed here, along with remaining hurdles that might impede transfer of gene therapy technology to the clinic as a treatment for PD. PMID:15000692

  20. [Review of cancer gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Tani, K

    2000-09-01

    Since the first introduction of gene-marking technology to the clinical field in 1989 by Rosenberg et al, more than 4,000 patients have participated gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. Most of those patients had malignancies. Nearly 90% of clinical trials, however, are still in phase I-II stage, and only 3 protocols are in the phase III stage in early 2000. As current clinical gene therapy protocols are intended essentially to examine the safety and feasibility of the new strategy, more careful and steady steps may be required before these clinical trials really produce clinical benefits. Focused on cancer gene therapy, direct and indirect approaches are undertaken. In the direct approach, HSV-TK, HLA-B7, or p53 tumor suppressor gene therapies are the three major approaches historically. In for the indirect approach, cytokine or adhesion molecule gene-transferred tumor cells or immunocompetent cells are considered to be promising to enhance patients' antitumor immunity. In particular, we have concentrated on developing immuno gene therapy using GM-CSF-transduced autologous tumor cells. We have already recruited three patients with stage IV renal cell cancer. In all patients, peripheral blood T cells were mobilized after vaccination with GM-CSF-transduced tumor cells, and two of the three patients showed the persistence of cytotoxic T cells against autologous tumor cells. Clinically, one patient has been followed up with stable disease for more than one year since the start of vaccination. Further clinical studies are required to obtain conclusive results. PMID:11022677

  1. Retinitis Pigmentosa Treatment with Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Peng, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Current management of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) includes an attempt at slowing down the degenerative process through therapies that use either Western or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Novel therapies in Western medicine (WM) include use of tailor-made gene therapy, transplantation of stem cells, or neuroprotection treatment. TCM treatment includes two major approaches. These are orally applied herbal decoctions and acupuncture. In fact, all TCM treatments are based on the differentiation of a symptom-complex, which is the characteristic essence of TCM. Thus, diagnosed RP may be treated via the liver, the kidney, and the spleen. The principle behind these treatments is to invigorate the blood and brighten the eyes by toning up the liver and the kidney. Also treatments to cope with deficiencies in the two concepts that are unique and fundamental to TCM are considered: Qi or “vital energy” and Yin and Yang or the harmony of all the opposite elements and forces that make up existence. In particular, the Qi deficiency that results from blood stasis is addressed in these treatments. This paper also puts forward the existing problems and the prospect of the future development on integrating TCM with WM. PMID:26124961

  2. Gene therapy for paediatric leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R F; Bollard, C M; Heslop, H E

    2001-07-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for paediatric leukaemia. However, there are still important problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid the concerns regarding the toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene therapy and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biological issues in the therapy of leukaemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukaemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumour function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal haematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of paediatric leukaemia in the future. PMID:11727502

  3. Suicide Gene Therapy for Cancer - Current Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Sakkas, Antonios; Yarmus, Lonny; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2013-08-01

    Current cancer treatments may create profound iatrogenic outcomes. The adverse effects of these treatments still remain, as the serious problems that practicing physicians have to cope with in clinical practice. Although, non-specific cytotoxic agents constitute an effective treatment modality against cancer cells, they also tend to kill normal, quickly dividing cells. On the other hand, therapies targeting the genome of the tumors are both under investigation, and some others are already streamlined to clinical practice. Several approaches have been investigated in order to find a treatment targeting the cancer cells, while not affecting the normal cells. Suicide gene therapy is a therapeutic strategy, in which cell suicide inducing transgenes are introduced into cancer cells. The two major suicide gene therapeutic strategies currently pursued are: cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine and the herpes simplex virus/ganciclovir. The novel strategies include silencing gene expression, expression of intracellular antibodies blocking cells' vital pathways, and transgenic expression of caspases and DNases. We analyze various elements of cancer cells' suicide inducing strategies including: targets, vectors, and mechanisms. These strategies have been extensively investigated in various types of cancers, while exploring multiple delivery routes including viruses, non-viral vectors, liposomes, nanoparticles, and stem cells. We discuss various stages of streamlining of the suicide gene therapy into clinical oncology as applied to different types of cancer. Moreover, suicide gene therapy is in the center of attention as a strategy preventing cancer from developing in patients participating in the clinical trials of regenerative medicine. In oncology, these clinical trials are aimed at regenerating, with the aid of stem cells, of the patients' organs damaged by pathologic and/or iatrogenic factors. However, the stem cells carry the risk of neoplasmic transformation. We discuss

  4. 78 FR 43889 - Synergizing Efforts in Standards Development for Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...: Standardization efforts concerning the clinical development of cellular therapies and regenerative medicine... Therapies and Regenerative Medicine Products; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Development for Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine Products.'' The purpose of the public workshop...

  5. Experimental therapies: gene therapies and oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Cho, Choi-Fong; Chiocca, E Antonio; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Over the past three decades, the overall survival time has only improved by a few months, therefore novel alternative treatment modalities are needed to improve clinical management strategies. Such strategies should ultimately extend patient survival. At present, the extensive insight into the molecular biology of gliomas, as well as into genetic engineering techniques, has led to better decision processes when it comes to modifying the genome to accommodate suicide genes, cytokine genes, and tumor suppressor genes that may kill cancer cells, and boost the host defensive immune system against neoantigenic cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. Both nonreplicative viral vectors and replicating oncolytic viruses have been developed for brain cancer treatment. Stem cells, microRNAs, nanoparticles, and viruses have also been designed. These have been armed with transgenes or peptides, and have been used both in laboratory-based experiments as well as in clinical trials, with the aim of improving selective killing of malignant glioma cells while sparing normal brain tissue. This chapter reviews the current status of gene therapies for malignant gliomas and highlights the most promising viral and cell-based strategies under development. PMID:26948355

  6. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  7. Advanced therapy medicinal products: current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cécile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are innovative therapies that encompass gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products. These therapies are expected to bring important health benefits, but also to substantially impact the pharmaceuticals budget. Objective The aim of this study was to characterise the ATMPs in development and discuss future implications in terms of market access. Methods Clinical trials were searched in the following databases: EudraCT (EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials), ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization). Trials were classified by category of ATMP as defined by European regulation EC No. 1394/2007, as well as by development phase and disease area. Results The database search identified 939 clinical trials investigating ATMPs (85% ongoing, 15% completed). The majority of trials were in the early stages (Phase I, I/II: 64.3%, Phase II, II/III: 27.9%, Phase 3: 6.9%). Per category of ATMP, we identified 53.6% of trials for somatic cell therapies, 22.8% for tissue-engineered products, 22.4% for gene therapies, and 1.2% for combined products (incorporating a medical device). Disease areas included cancer (24.8%), cardiovascular diseases (19.4%), musculoskeletal (10.5%), immune system and inflammation (11.5%), neurology (9.1%), and others. Of the trials, 47.2% enrolled fewer than 25 patients. Due to the complexity and specificity of ATMPs, new clinical trial methodologies are being considered (e.g., small sample size, non-randomised trials, single-arm trials, surrogate endpoints, integrated protocols, and adaptive designs). Evidence generation post-launch will become unavoidable to address payers’ expectations. Conclusion ATMPs represent a fast-growing field of interest. Although most of the products are in an early development phase, the combined trial phase and the potential to cure severe chronic conditions suggest

  8. [Gene therapy for osteoarticular disorders].

    PubMed

    Gouze, Jean-Noël; Evans, Christopher H; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Gouze, Elvire

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarticular disorders are the major cause of disability in Europe and North America. It is estimated that rheumatoid arthritis affects 1 % of the population and that more than two third of people over age 55 develop osteoarthritis. Because there are no satisfactory treatments, gene therapy offers a new therapeutic approach. The delivery of cDNA encoding anti-arthritic proteins to articular cells has shown therapeutic efficacy in numerous animal models in vivo. Through the development and the experimental progresses that have been made for both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, this review discusses the different gene therapy strategies available today and the safety issues with which they may be associated. Among the different vectors available today, adeno-associated virus seems the best candidate for a direct in vivo gene delivery approach for the treatment of joint disorders. PMID:17349293

  9. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  10. [Realities and hopes of gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Zdanov, R I; Semenova, N V; Archakov, A I

    2000-01-01

    The work represents an introduction article of editors of special issue of the magazine devoted to gene therapy and therapeutics. The main results of clinical gene therapy in the past decade are critically considered in connection with a changes of paradigms of the field. They are: 1) change of the main target of genetic therapy--correction of defects in chromosomes--onto expression and/or output of target genes for gene therapy; 2) transfer from gene transplantation to cell transplantation; 3) tendency for the use of safe/non-viral vectors instead of viral ones.; and 4) conflict of interests in gene therapy. Outlooks in the field are discussed. PMID:11033881

  11. Behaviors of Providers of Traditional Korean Medicine Therapy and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun-Sang; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Ki-Kyong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Min-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide background knowledge for establishing a new policy with the management and quality control of CAM. Methods: Structured and well organized questionnaires were made, and 350 persons were surveyed concerning the providers of CAM or Korean oriental medicine. The questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Results: The questionnaires (182) were collected. The questionnaires identified a total of 73 known providers, such as medicinal professionals or other providers of CAM suppliers, 35.6% of whom had had experience with treating cancer patients (52.6% vs. 29.6%). The treatment methods were a little different: alternative therapy and nutritional therapy being preferred by medicinal professionals and mind body modulation therapy and alternative therapy being preferred by other CAM providers. Four patients (7.4%) experienced side effects, and 6 patients (12.5%) experienced legal problems. As the method for managing the therapy, CAM providers, medicinal professionals, and other CAM providers had different viewpoints. For example, some CAM providers stated that both legislation and an official education on CAM or a national examination were needed as a first step to establish the provider’s qualifications and that as a second step, a license test was needed for quality control. To the contrary, medicinal professionals stated that a license test was needed before legislation. Conclusion: Adequate management and quality control of CAM providers is thought to involve both education and

  12. Muscle Gene Therapy for Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Denise E.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle-directed gene therapy for hemophilia is an attractive strategy for expression of therapeutic levels of clotting factor as evident from preclinical studies and an early phase clinical trial. Notably, local FIX expression by AAV-mediated direct intramuscular injection to skeletal muscle persists for years. Development of intravascular delivery of AAV vector approaches to skeletal muscle resulted in vector in widespread areas of the limb and increased expression of FIX in hemophilia B dogs. The use of FIX variants with improved biological activity may provide the opportunity to increase the efficacy of these approaches. Studies for hemophilia A are less developed at this point, but utilizing transgenes that improve hemostasis independent of FIX and FVIII has potential therapeutic application for both hemophilia A and B. Continuous monitoring of humoral and T cell responses to the transgene and AAV capsid in human trials will be critical for the translation of these promising approaches for muscle gene therapy for hemophilia. PMID:24883231

  13. An Integrative Pharmacogenomic Approach Identifies Two-drug Combination Therapies for Personalized Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Fei, Teng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Brown, Myles; Zhang, Peng; Liu, X. Shirley; Wang, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    An individual tumor harbors multiple molecular alterations that promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis and differentiation. Drugs that target specific molecular alterations have been introduced into personalized cancer medicine, but their effects can be modulated by the activities of other genes or molecules. Previous studies aiming to identify multiple molecular alterations for combination therapies are limited by available data. Given the recent large scale of available pharmacogenomic data, it is possible to systematically identify multiple biomarkers that contribute jointly to drug sensitivity, and to identify combination therapies for personalized cancer medicine. In this study, we used pharmacogenomic profiling data provided from two independent cohorts in a systematic in silico investigation of perturbed genes cooperatively associated with drug sensitivity. Our study predicted many pairs of molecular biomarkers that may benefit from the use of combination therapies. One of our predicted biomarker pairs, a mutation in the BRAF gene and upregulated expression of the PIM1 gene, was experimentally validated to benefit from a therapy combining BRAF inhibitor and PIM1 inhibitor in lung cancer. This study demonstrates how pharmacogenomic data can be used to systematically identify potentially cooperative genes and provide novel insights to combination therapies in personalized cancer medicine. PMID:26916442

  14. An Integrative Pharmacogenomic Approach Identifies Two-drug Combination Therapies for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Fei, Teng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Brown, Myles; Zhang, Peng; Liu, X Shirley; Wang, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    An individual tumor harbors multiple molecular alterations that promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis and differentiation. Drugs that target specific molecular alterations have been introduced into personalized cancer medicine, but their effects can be modulated by the activities of other genes or molecules. Previous studies aiming to identify multiple molecular alterations for combination therapies are limited by available data. Given the recent large scale of available pharmacogenomic data, it is possible to systematically identify multiple biomarkers that contribute jointly to drug sensitivity, and to identify combination therapies for personalized cancer medicine. In this study, we used pharmacogenomic profiling data provided from two independent cohorts in a systematic in silico investigation of perturbed genes cooperatively associated with drug sensitivity. Our study predicted many pairs of molecular biomarkers that may benefit from the use of combination therapies. One of our predicted biomarker pairs, a mutation in the BRAF gene and upregulated expression of the PIM1 gene, was experimentally validated to benefit from a therapy combining BRAF inhibitor and PIM1 inhibitor in lung cancer. This study demonstrates how pharmacogenomic data can be used to systematically identify potentially cooperative genes and provide novel insights to combination therapies in personalized cancer medicine. PMID:26916442

  15. POTENTIAL OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN MODERN MEDICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hakim Mohammed

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses in this paper the potentialities of Herbal medicine in modern therapy. Also he throws some light on the importance of natural drugs which bring about cure without generation side-effects. PMID:22557447

  16. Medicinal leech therapy and Aeromonas spp. infection.

    PubMed

    Verriere, B; Sabatier, B; Carbonnelle, E; Mainardi, J L; Prognon, P; Whitaker, I; Lantieri, L; Hivelin, M

    2016-06-01

    While the use of medicinal leech therapy (MLT) in reconstructive and orthopaedic surgery is widely described, post-operative complications related to leeches remain a major concern. Aeromonas spp. strains are involved in the majority of reported cases. As surgical success rate is directly impacted, an adapted antibiotic prophylaxis should be instituted in order to minimize these complications. We assessed pharmaceutical process, microbiological control and related infections in order to provide data and choose the appropriate antibiotherapy for patients requiring MLT. We report a clinical and microbiological study over a 24-month period. Clinical data were collected from patients' database, and microbiological analysis both on leeches' tank water and crushed leeches were performed to characterize isolated strains and their susceptibility to antibiotics. A total of 595 leeches were used to treat 28 patients (12 in plastic surgery and 16 in orthopaedic surgery), and three documented cases of post-operative infections were reported. Aeromonas spp. isolates yielded from 62 % of analyzed batches (75 % of Aeromonas veronii). Eighteen Aeromonas spp. isolates yielded from 23 water samples and three crushed leeches. Isolates were similar in tank and crushed leeches. Strains were susceptible to fluoroquinolones, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, aminosides, and third-generation cephalosporins but resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and second-generation cephalosporins. According to collected data, routine tank water microbiological analyses are mandatory in order to identify leeches' batches containing resistant strains and to discard them. In this context, the surgeon is able to select an appropriated antibiotic prophylaxis in order to avoid MLT associated serious post-operative complications. PMID:27039338

  17. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. PMID:23566848

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M; Freeman, Marlene P

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine therapies are increasingly sought out by people with psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we review the evidence for several commonly used CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine, St John's Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence-based use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  19. Gene Therapy, Early Promises, Subsequent Problems, and Recent Breakthroughs

    PubMed Central

    Razi Soofiyani, Saeideh; Baradaran, Behzad; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Kazemi, Tohid; Mohammadnejad, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in medicine. The concept of gene delivery to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed around half a century, but scientist’s ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology made this purpose to reality. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. While gene therapy initially conceived as a way to treat life-threatening disorders (inborn errors, cancers) refractory to conventional treatment, to date gene therapy is considered for many non–life-threatening conditions including those adversely influence on a patient’s quality of life. Gene therapy has made significant progress, including tangible success, although much slower than was initially predicted. Although, gene therapies still at a fairly primitive stage, it is firmly science based. There is justifiable hope that with enhanced pathobiological understanding and biotechnological improvements, gene therapy will be a standard part of clinical practice within 20 years. PMID:24312844

  20. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Objective Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. Methods We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Results Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. Conclusion No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy: Lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    A milestone of molecular medicine is the identification of dystrophin gene mutation as the cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last 2 decades, major advances in dystrophin biology and gene delivery technology have created an opportunity to treat DMD with gene therapy. Remarkable success has been achieved in treating dystrophic mice. Several gene therapy strategies, including plasmid transfer, exon skipping, and adeno-associated virus-mediated microdystrophin therapy, have entered clinical trials. However, therapeutic benefit has not been realized in DMD patients. Bridging the gap between mice and humans is no doubt the most pressing issue facing DMD gene therapy now. In contrast to mice, dystrophin-deficient dogs are genetically and phenotypically similar to human patients. Preliminary gene therapy studies in the canine model may offer critical insights that cannot be obtained from murine studies. It is clear that the canine DMD model may represent an important link between mice and humans. Unfortunately, our current knowledge of dystrophic dogs is limited, and the full picture of disease progression remains to be clearly defined. We also lack rigorous outcome measures (such as in situ force measurement) to monitor therapeutic efficacy in dystrophic dogs. Undoubtedly, maintaining a dystrophic dog colony is technically demanding, and the cost of dog studies cannot be underestimated. A carefully coordinated effort from the entire DMD community is needed to make the best use of the precious dog resource. Successful DMD gene therapy may depend on valid translational studies in dystrophin-deficient dogs. PMID:21691429

  2. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Kendle, Andrew P.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26801060

  3. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Trials, Challenges, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael G; Fargnoli, Anthony S; Kendle, Andrew P; Hajjar, Roger J; Bridges, Charles R

    2016-06-01

    The concept of gene therapy was introduced in the 1970s after the development of recombinant DNA technology. Despite the initial great expectations, this field experienced early setbacks. Recent years have seen a revival of clinical programs of gene therapy in different fields of medicine. There are many promising targets for genetic therapy as an adjunct to cardiac surgery. The first positive long-term results were published for adenoviral administration of vascular endothelial growth factor with coronary artery bypass grafting. In this review we analyze the past, present, and future of gene therapy in cardiac surgery. The articles discussed were collected through PubMed and from author experience. The clinical trials referenced were found through the Wiley clinical trial database (http://www.wiley.com/legacy/wileychi/genmed/clinical/) as well as the National Institutes of Health clinical trial database (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26801060

  4. Gene Therapy in the Cornea: 2005-present

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rajiv R.; Tovey, Jonathan C.K.; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities have begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer towards establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea. PMID:21967960

  5. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy. PMID:26474040

  6. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  7. Systems medicine, personalized health and therapy.

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Auffray, Charles; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Murray, Helena; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Ansari, Marc; Marc, Janja; Jacobs, Peter; Meyer, Urs; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Müller, Mathias M; Wevers, Ron A; Simmaco, Maurizio; Kussmann, Martin; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Beastall, Graham; Németh, György

    2015-01-01

    The 7th Santorini Conference was held in Santorini, Greece, and brought together 200 participants from 40 countries in several continents, including Europe, USA but also Japan, Korea, Brazil and South Africa. The attendees had the opportunity to: listen to 60 oral presentations; participate in two lunch symposia; look at 103 posters, which were divided in two groups ('systems medicine and environment' and 'pharmacogenomics and cancer') and attend a dedicated exhibition with six companies. The meeting was organized by the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1122; IGE-PCV and by 'Biologie Prospective' with the collaboration of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT), under the auspices of international organizations (e.g., International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory medicine [IFCC], European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine [EFLM], European Diagnostic Manufacturers Association [EDMA], Federation of European Pharmacological Societies [EPHAR], European Science Foundation [ESF]). The 3 days of the conference stimulated intensive discussions on systems biology and the influence of omics technologies on personalized health. Sixty speakers were invited or selected from early abstracts and gave presentations on the following topics: From systems biology to systems medicine/pharmacology; Omics/translating pharmacogenomics/proteomic biomarkers/metabolomics; Human nutrition and health/personalized medicine. We are summarizing here the main topics and presentations, according to the successive sessions. PMID:26401575

  8. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Gailledrat, Marine; Desseaux, Carole; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis. PMID:23326647

  9. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, D.D.; Kishnani, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  10. Immunomodulatory gene therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Kishnani, Priya S

    2009-12-01

    Significant advances in therapy for lysosomal storage disorders have occurred with an accelerating pace over the past decade. Although enzyme replacement therapy has improved the outcome of lysosomal storage disorders, antibody responses have occurred and sometimes prevented efficacy, especially in cross-reacting immune material negative patients with Pompe disease. Preclinical gene therapy experiments have revealed the relevance of immune responses to long-term efficacy. The choice of regulatory cassette played a critical role in evading humoral and cellular immune responses to gene therapy in knockout mouse models, at least in adult animals. Liver-specific regulatory cassettes prevented antibody formation and enhanced the efficacy of gene therapy. Regulatory T cells prevented transgene directed immune responses, as shown by adoptive transfer of antigen-specific immune tolerance to enzyme therapy. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a very low vector dose could enhance the efficacy of enzyme therapy in Pompe disease and other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:19807648

  11. Cardiac gene therapy: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Matkar, P N; Leong-Poi, H; Singh, K K

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing throughout the world and is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality. Gene therapy to treat cardiac dysfunction is gaining importance because of the limited therapeutic benefit offered by pharmacotherapies. The growing knowledge of the complex signaling pathways and the development of sophisticated vectors and delivery systems, are facilitating identification and targeting of specific molecular candidates involved in initiation and progression of CVDs. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown the therapeutic efficiency of gene therapy in different disease models and patients. Hence, gene therapy might plausibly become an unconventional treatment modality for CVD patients. In this review, we summarize the gene delivery carriers, modes of delivery, recent preclinical/clinical studies and potential therapeutic targets. We also briefly discuss the existing limitations of gene therapy, technical challenges surrounding gene carriers and delivery systems, and some approaches to overcome these limitations for bringing CVD gene therapy one step closer to reality. PMID:27128687

  12. Cell Therapy Products in Menopausal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Ji; Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Kim, Jun-Mo; Lee, Arum; Song, Hyeon Jin; Park, Yoo Jin

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of postmenopausal diseases increases with the age of women. In this review, we introduce cell therapy products, a new treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis, which often occurs in postmenopausal women. We also figure out the trends of research on cell therapy products and emphasize the necessity and importance of this research for researchers and postmenopausal women. Finally, we suggest the direction for improvement of postmenopausal osteoporosis and research on cell therapy products. We investigated which medication have been used so far. We also examined the development and technical problems of technologies that are currently in use. PMID:27617240

  13. Cell Therapy Products in Menopausal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Ji; Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Jun-Mo; Lee, Arum; Song, Hyeon Jin; Park, Yoo Jin

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of postmenopausal diseases increases with the age of women. In this review, we introduce cell therapy products, a new treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis, which often occurs in postmenopausal women. We also figure out the trends of research on cell therapy products and emphasize the necessity and importance of this research for researchers and postmenopausal women. Finally, we suggest the direction for improvement of postmenopausal osteoporosis and research on cell therapy products. We investigated which medication have been used so far. We also examined the development and technical problems of technologies that are currently in use. PMID:27617240

  14. HOSPITAL PHYSICS: Nuclear medicine: diagnosis and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon-Brown, Ann; Soper, Nigel D. W.

    1996-03-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a small but unique speciality, and any physics student who already enjoys computing, image processing, human biology and physiology as well as physics and chemistry, will be fascinated by this medical speciality. Those who enter, whether they be clinical or scientific, rarely leave and remain under its spell for life.

  15. Photochemotherapy: Light Dependent Therapies in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zovinka, Edward P.; Sunseri, Danielle R.

    2002-11-01

    Light-dependent therapies, such as photodynamic therapy and extracorporeal photopheresis, are not new, but have remained of interest to chemists and health care professionals since the middle of the twentieth century. While most people link light-dependent therapies only to the treatment of cancer, these therapies may be of use for a diverse set of medical conditions, from acne to AIDS. The techniques arise directly from the application of chemical concepts, such as spectroscopy, MO theory, and organic chemical reactions. Because of its application to health care, the field of photochemistry provides a tool to demonstrate the significance of chemistry to a socially important issue.

    See Featured Molecules.

  16. [Origin and development of umbilical therapy in traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Wei; Jia, Hong-Ling

    2014-06-01

    The origin and development of umbilical therapy in traditional Chinese medicine is explored from related literature in the history. As a result, the Shang period is regarded as initial period of umbilical therapy, while periods from Han Dynasty, Jin Dynasty and Southern-Northern Dynasties to Sui Dynasty and Tang Dynasty could be taken as stage of primary development. Time from Song Dynasty, Jin Dynasty and Yuan Dynasty to Ming and Qing Dynasties is believed as mature stage. Also the manipulation, application principle, indications and contraindications of umbilical therapy are explained. A brief overview of modern development of umbilical therapy is also described. PMID:25112106

  17. Gene therapy in monogenic congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa A; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K

    2016-04-15

    Current treatment options for patients with monogenetic congenital myopathies (MCM) ameliorate the symptoms of the disorder without resolving the underlying cause. However, gene therapies are being developed where the mutated or deficient gene target is replaced. Preclinical findings in animal models appear promising, as illustrated by gene replacement for X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) in canine and murine models. Prospective applications and approaches to gene replacement therapy, using these disorders as examples, are discussed in this review. PMID:26454198

  18. [Application of music therapy in medicine].

    PubMed

    Zárate, P; Díaz, V

    2001-02-01

    Music therapy is a science that has been applied since many centuries ago, but it has been organized as a profession during the past century. This science studies the therapeutic effects of music in human beings. Professionals who practice this science are called "music therapists" and they must be trained not only in music theory and performance, but also in psychology, anatomy, research techniques, and other subjects. Today, we can find music therapy research in many areas such as the effects of music in children with autism, adults with psychiatric illnesses, elderly with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, people with brain injuries, among others. Numerous studies demonstrate the functionality of music therapy in patients with neurological disorders. These studies show that music helps patients to gain control over their walking patterns after a brain injury, stimulates long and short term memory in patients with Alzheimer disease, and increase self esteem and social interaction in elders. PMID:11351476

  19. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology. PMID:20122108

  20. Gene therapy of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ulrich; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2005-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease that is caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ASA). The deficiency results in the intralysosomal accumulation of the acidic sphingolipid 3-O-sulfogalactosyl-ceramide (sulfatide). Patients suffer from progressive demyelination and die from multiple neurological deficits. Curative treatment is not available. ASA bears mannose 6-phosphate residues which function as recognition markers in endosome/lysosome-specific targeting pathways. The endocytic targeting route can be exploited to deliver exogenous ASA to the lysosomes of ASA-deficient cells. ASA knockout mice, which develop a disorder related to MLD, have therefore been treated by ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy. Following transplantation of bone marrow cells overexpressing ASA from a retroviral vector, donor-type cells secrete ASA, which is endocytosed by recipient cells. The enzyme transfer results in the metabolic cross-correction of recipient cells and the improvement of biochemical, histological and clinical parameters. For the transfer of the ASA cDNA to non-dividing cells, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors have been constructed. Such vectors might be particularly advantageous for direct ASA gene delivery to the brain, which is the main site of disease in MLD. PMID:15709909

  1. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  2. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Brent A; Tilburt, Jon C; Sood, Amit; Li, Guang-Xi; Wang, Shi-Han

    2016-06-01

    Pain afflflicts over 50 million people in the US, with 30.7% US adults suffering with chronic pain. Despite advances in therapies, many patients will continue to deal with ongoing symptoms that are not fully addressed by the best conventional medicine has to offer them. The patients frequently turn to therapies outside the usual purview of conventional medicine (herbs, acupuncture, meditation, etc.) called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Academic and governmental groups are also starting to incorporate CAM recommendations into chronic pain management strategies. Thus, for any physician who care for patients with chronic pain, having some familiarity with these therapies-including risks and benefits-will be key to helping guide patients in making evidence-based, well informed decisions about whether or not to use such therapies. On the other hand, if a CAM therapy has evidence of both safety and efficacy then not making it available to a patient who is suffering does not meet the need of the patient. We summarize the current evidence of a wide variety of CAM modalities that have potential for helping patients with chronic pain in this article. The triad of chronic pain symptoms, ready access to information on the internet, and growing patient empowerment suggest that CAM therapies will remain a consistent part of the healthcare of patients dealing with chronic pain. PMID:27339090

  3. Review of Tumor Dormancy Therapy Using Traditional Oriental Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Ho; Koung, Fan-Pei; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Lee, Yeon-Weol; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Standard cancer therapy prolongs survival, but can be detrimental to the quality of life, compromise the immune system, and leave residual disease that can cause recurrence years or decades in the future. Tumor dormancy therapy is a novel therapeutic approach that may improve these shortcomings, promote quality of life, and prolong survival. The aim of this study was to analyze studies on dormancy therapy, especially studies using traditional Oriental herbal medicine, so as to evaluate the efficacy of dormancy therapy with traditional oriental herbal medicine. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review using Scientific and Technical Information Integration Services (NDSL), PubMed, and RISS. We searched for clinical reports, papers, and books related to tumor metastasis, recurrence, immunotherapy, tumor dormancy, and traditional oriental herbal medicine with anticancer effects. Seventy-nine (79) experimental and clinical articles in both Korean and English were reviewed. This study was conducted from March 1, 2012 to May 31, 2012. Results: This approach, Tumor dormancy therapy, rather than seeking to remove the tumor, includes combination of low-dose chemotherapy, immunotherapy, immunosurveillance, and other methods to stabilize tumor growth and to enhance the host is immunity against disseminated tumor cells and thus to manage cancer as a chronic disease while maintaining quality of life. In particular, integrative use of Oriental herbal medicine has been shown to induce or maintain tumor dormancy, increase the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, improve quality of life, and prolong survival. Conclusion: Tumor dormancy therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach that may be especially effective with Oriental herbal medicine. Further research is needed to determine its potential mechanisms and therapeutic applications. PMID:25780657

  4. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  5. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavroudi, Maria; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Lampaki, Sofia; Yarmus, Lonny; Malecki, Raf; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The statistics speak for themselves with the grim reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem cells’ guided gene therapy. Review of therapeutic strategies in preclinical and clinical trials Stem cells have the unique potential for self renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells only. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for

  6. Stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sha; Fu, XiaoBing

    2014-02-01

    Stem cells are the core of tissue repair and regeneration, and a promising cell source for novel therapies. In recent years, research into stem cell therapies has been particularly exciting in China. The remarkable advancements in basic stem cell research and clinically effective trials have led to fresh insights into regenerative medicine, such as treatments for sweat gland injury after burns, diabetes, and liver injury. High hopes have inspired numerous experimental and clinical trials. At the same time, government investment and policy support of research continues to increase markedly. However, numerous challenges must be overcome before novel stem cell therapies can achieve meaningful clinical outcomes. PMID:24430560

  7. [Gene therapy with cytokines against cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy is an excellent alternative for treatment of many diseases. Capacity to manipulate the DNA has allowed direct the gene therapy to correct the function of an altered gene, to increase the expression of a gene and to favour the activation of the immune response. This way, it can intend the use of the DNA like medication able to control, to correct or to cure many diseases. Gene therapy against cancer has an enormous potential, and actually the use of the DNA has increased to control diverse cancer in animal models, with very encouraging results that have allowed its applications in experimental protocols in human. This work concentrates a review of the foundations of the gene therapy and its application on cervical cancer, from the point of view of the alterations of the immune system focused on the tumour micro-environment, and the use of the cytokines as immunomodulators. PMID:16983992

  8. [The art of therapy in Islamic medicine].

    PubMed

    Masić, I

    1997-01-01

    History is a witness of the great importance and influence of islamic science from the period of "Golden Age of Arabic Civilisation". A famous scientist said: "Sciences has no country, it is international; we all share in fruits of investigations of people from different traditions and all ages." Scientists from the early period of islamic era had set fire of a stream of man's thought and progress, observation, experiments and tradition, that have become a weapon of modern science. All of that was based upon Quran and Hadiths, that have been their guidelines when setting free human mind from taboos. Medieval Arabian scientists have followed the words of Holly Prophet Mohammad s.a.v.s., saying that searching for knowledge have had to be the most important task for people, and that ink more saint than blood of the saints. These attitudes of Holly Prophet have awaken desire for studying with muslim scientists. The result of that desire became a key of scientific progress. There are many worldwide famous arabian scientists: El-Kindi, Er-Razi, Ibn Sina, El-Biruni, Ibu Hajsem, Ez-Zahravi, El-Farabi, Ibn Zuhr, Ibn Ruzd etc. These names, among several hundreds of arabian physicians, attribute "Golden Age" of islamic science. That period was characterised by movements, reprocessing of ideas. That reprocessing of ideas has gained the great minds together, and that process is continuous. That is why we have to be grateful to them. Famous Muslim physicians defined medicine as skill that dealt in keeping good health, coped with ills and health recovering. They have also modified many Greek writings and established basic principles of the art of medicine. What is significant is that, regardless of historical past and modern technical and technological presence, these principles are still accurate for understanding of medical science. These principles are what the author is discussing in detail in this paper about. PMID:9324575

  9. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program. PMID:25707195

  10. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review article focuses on those that use adenoviral vectors. PMID:24883229

  11. Mitochondrial replacement therapy in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Don P; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in disease and age-related infertility. Mitochondrial replacement therapies (MRT) in oocytes or zygotes, such as pronuclear (PNT), spindle (ST), or polar body (PBT) transfer, could prevent second-generation transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. PNT, associated with high levels of mtDNA carryover in mice but low levels in human embryos, carries ethical issues secondary to donor embryo destruction. ST, developed in primates, supports normal development to adults and low mtDNA carryover. PBT in mice, coupled with PN or ST, may increase the yield of reconstructed embryos with low mtDNA carryover. MRT also offers replacement of the deficient cytoplasm in oocytes from older patients, with the expectation of high pregnancy rates following in vitro fertilization. PMID:25573721

  12. Technology evaluation: VEGF165 gene therapy, Valentis Inc.

    PubMed

    Morse, M A

    2001-02-01

    Valentis Inc, formerly GeneMedicine, is developing a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) non-viral gene therapy using its proprietary PINC polymer for plasmid condensation. Two physician-initiated phase II angioplasty trials are ongoing, one for treating peripheral vascular disease and one for treating coronary artery disease [281714], [347153]. In February 2000, the trials were expected to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2000 [356225]; however, in October 2000, it was reported that the trial for peripheral vascular disease would be completed in the first quarter of 2001 [385232]. In March 2000, Valentis initiated a trial incorporating Valentis's DOTMA-based cationic lipid gene delivery system and the VEGF165 gene with Eurogene's local collar-reservoir delivery device. The trial is designed to demonstrate that the VEGF165 gene, delivered locally to the outside surface of a blood vessel, will transfect and express in the smooth muscle cells of the vessel wall [360683]. In March 1999, Valentis was awarded with a Phase II SBIR grant of $686,260. The aim of grant was to advance the development of non-viral gene therapies for ischemia. Specifically, Valentis intended to select an optimal promoter to be used with the VEGF expression plasmid. Valentis also intended to evaluate the gene therapy system in a rabbit ischemia model and complete the necessary preclinical studies for submission of an IND [318137]. PMID:11249737

  13. Clinical development of gene therapy needs a tailored approach: a regulatory perspective from the European Union.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Gopalan; Cossu, Giulio; Galli, Maria Cristina; Flory, Egbert; Ovelgonne, Hans; Salmikangas, Paula; Schneider, Christian K; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy is a rapidly evolving field that needs an integrated approach, as acknowledged in the concept article on the revision of the guideline on gene transfer medicinal products. The first gene therapy application for marketing authorization was approved in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) region in 2012, the product being Alipogene tiparvovec. The regulatory process for this product has been commented on extensively, highlighting the challenges posed by such a novel technology. Here, as current or previous members of the Committee for Advanced Therapies, we share our perspectives and views on gene therapy as a treatment modality based on current common understanding and regulatory experience of gene therapy products in the European Union to date. It is our view that a tailored approach is needed for a given gene therapy product in order to achieve successful marketing authorization. PMID:24649836

  14. Clinical development of Gene therapy needs a tailored approach: A regulatory perspective from the EU.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Gopalan; Salmikangas, Paula; Schneider, Christian K; Galli, Maria Cristina; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues; Flory, Egbert; Cossu, Giulio; Ovelgonne, Hans

    2014-02-18

    Gene therapy is a rapidly evolving field, which needs an integrated approach, as acknowledged in the Concept paper on the revision of the guideline on gene transfer medicinal products (Concept paper, EMA, 2009). The first gene therapy application for marketing authorisation was approved in the ICH region in 2012, the product being Alipogene tiparvovec (http, summary for the public, 2012). The regulatory process for this product has been commented on extensively, highlighting the challenges posed by such a novel technology (English, 2011; Flemming, 2012; Melchiorri et al, 2013; Miller, 2012). Here, as current or previous members of the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), we share our perspectives and views on gene therapy as a treatment modality based on current common understanding and regulatory experience of gene therapy products in the EU to date. It is our view that a tailored approach is needed for a given gene therapy product in order to achieve successful Marketing Authorisation. PMID:24547991

  15. Bone marrow derived stem cells in regenerative medicine as Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products

    PubMed Central

    Astori, Giuseppe; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Siclari, Francesco; Sürder, Daniel; Turchetto, Lucia; Soldati, Gianni; Moccetti, Tiziano

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow derived stem cells administered after minimal manipulation represent an important cell source for cellbased therapies. Clinical trial results, have revealed both safety and efficacy of the cell reinfusion procedure in many cardiovascular diseases. Many of these early clinical trials were performed in a period before the entry into force of the US and European regulation on cellbased therapies. As a result, conflicting data have been generated on the effectiveness of those therapies in certain conditions as acute myocardial infarction. As more academic medical centers and private companies move toward exploiting the full potential of cellbased medicinal products, needs arise for the development of the infrastructure necessary to support these investigations. This review describes the regulatory environment surrounding the production of cell based medicinal products and give practical aspects for cell isolation, characterization, production following Good Manufacturing Practice, focusing on the activities associated with the investigational new drug development. PMID:20589167

  16. Medicinal mushrooms and cancer therapy: translating a traditional practice into Western medicine.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Smith, John E; Rowan, Neil J

    2006-01-01

    Modern medical practice relies heavily on the use of highly purified pharmaceutical compounds whose purity can be easily assessed and whose pharmaceutical activity and toxicity show clear structure-function relationships. In contrast, many herbal medicines contain mixtures of natural compounds that have not undergone detailed chemical analyses and whose mechanism of action is not known. Traditional folk medicine and ethno-pharmacology coupled to bioprospecting have been an important source of many anticancer agents as well as other medicines. With the current decline in the number of new molecular entities from the pharmaceutical industry, novel anticancer agents are being sought from traditional medicine. As the example of medicinal mushrooms demonstrates, however, translating traditional Eastern practices into acceptable evidence-based Western therapies is difficult. Different manufacturing standards, criteria of purity, and under-powered clinical trials make assessment of efficacy and toxicity by Western standards of clinical evidence difficult. Purified bioactive compounds derived from medicinal mushrooms are a potentially important new source of anticancer agents; their assimilation into Western drug discovery programs and clinical trials also provides a framework for the study and use of other traditional medicines. PMID:16702701

  17. Regulatory Frameworks for Gene and Cell Therapies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Ishizuka, Takami; Hirata, Masakazu; Takekita, Kazuhiro; Sato, Daisaku

    2015-01-01

    The regulations for the human use of advanced therapy medical products such as gene and cell therapy products have evolved in accordance with advance of clinical experience, scientific knowledge, and social acceptance to these technologies. In Japan, two laws, the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices (PMD) Act and the Act on the Safety of Regenerative Medicine (ASRM), were enacted in November 2014. The PMD Act defines regenerative medical products for the first time and introduces a system for the conditional and time-limited marketing authorization of regenerative medical products. Under ASRM, the responsibilities of medical institutions to ensure the safety and provide transparency of such medical technologies are described. Amendments to accompanying guidelines for these two Acts are currently in preparation. It is expected that the new legislative frameworks will promote the timely development of new products and technologies, to bring safe and effective regenerative medicines to Japanese patients. PMID:26374217

  18. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  19. Convergence of gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bersenev, Alexey; Levine, Bruce L

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy and cell therapy have followed similar roller coaster paths of rising public expectations and disappointment over the past two decades. There is now reason to believe that momentum in the field has reached the point where the successes will be more frequent. The use of gene-modified cells has opened new avenues for engineering desired cell properties, for the use of cells as vehicles for gene delivery, and for tracking cells and controlling cell persistence after transplantation. Some notable recent clinical developments in cellular engineering by gene transfer offer lessons on how the field has emerged, and hint at additional future clinical applications. PMID:23210811

  20. Getting arthritis gene therapy into the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Ghivizzani, Steven C.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Gene transfer technologies enable the controlled, targeted and sustained expression of gene products at precise anatomical locations, such as the joint. In this way, they offer the potential for more-effective, less-expensive treatments of joint diseases with fewer extra-articular adverse effects. A large body of preclinical data confirms the utility of intra-articular gene therapy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. However, relatively few clinical trials have been conducted, only one of which has completed phase II. This article summarizes the status in 2010 of the clinical development of gene therapy for arthritis, identifies certain constraints to progress and suggests possible solutions. PMID:21135882

  1. European attitudes to gene therapy and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Hudson, John; Orviska, Marta

    2011-10-01

    Views on pharmacogenetics and gene therapy systematically differ across European countries. But despite a complex regulatory regime there is a balance of support, albeit laced with considerable uncertainty. PMID:21745587

  2. Gene therapy for CNS diseases - Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  3. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) ADA- ... in preclinical animal models of this disease. Other genetic disorders After many years of laboratory and preclinical ...

  4. Alternative medicine in periodontal therapy--a review.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Brijesh; Sugandhi, Ayushi; Kumathalli, Kanteshwari I; Sridhar, Raja

    2012-04-01

    Periodontal diseases continue to be most commonly occurring oral diseases in modern times. Many therapeutic modalities have been tried and tested to relieve these problems. The conventional therapy--scaling and root planing (SRP)--stands out to be the most used mode of treatment, and other treatments remain applicable as adjuncts to SRP, including acupuncture, acupressure, and aromatherapy. The present article discusses the applications of the abovementioned therapeutic modes and their relevance in current scenarios. Alternative medicine may be preferred as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy to relieve pain, bad breath, gingival inflammation, mouth ulcers, and mouth sores. PMID:22483182

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles: Applications in gene delivery and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Zeinali Sehrig, Fatemeh; Samiei, Mohammad; Milani, Morteza; Abbasi, Elham; Dadashzadeh, Kianoosh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the direct transfer of genetic material to tissues or cells for the treatment of inherited disorders and acquired diseases. For gene delivery, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are typically combined with a delivery platform to encapsulate the gene, and promote cell uptake. Delivery technologies that have been used with MNPs contain polymeric, viral, as well as non-viral platforms. In this review, we focus on targeted gene delivery using MNPs. PMID:25727710

  6. Human Studies of Angiogenic Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Tongers, Jörn; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medical, interventional, and surgical therapy for coronary and peripheral arterial disease, the burden of these illnesses remains high. To address this unmet need, the science of therapeutic angiogenesis has been evolving for almost two decades. Early pre-clinical studies and phase I clinical trials achieved promising results with growth factors administered as recombinant proteins or as single-agent gene therapies, and data accumulated through 10 years of clinical trials indicate that gene therapy has an acceptable safety profile. However, more rigorous phase II and phase III clinical trials have failed to unequivocally demonstrate that angiogenic agents are beneficial under the conditions and in the patients studied to date. Investigators have worked to understand the biology of the vascular system and to incorporate their findings into new treatments for patients with ischemic disease. Recent gene- and cell-therapy trials have demonstrated the bioactivity of several new agents and treatment strategies. Collectively, these observations have renewed interest in the mechanisms of angiogenesis and deepened our understanding of the complexity of vascular regeneration. Gene therapy that incorporates multiple growth factors, approaches that combine cell and gene therapy, and the administration of "master switch" agents that activate numerous downstream pathways are among the credible and plausible steps forward. In this review, we will examine the clinical development of angiogenic therapy, summarize several of the lessons learned during the conduct of these trials, and suggest how this prior experience may guide the conduct of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:19815827

  7. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy. PMID:24202446

  8. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Over 60 patients affected by SCID due to IL2RG deficiency (SCID-X1) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-SCID have received hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in the past 15 years using gammaretroviral vectors, resulting in immune reconstitution and clinical benefit in the majority of them. However, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in the SCID-X1 trials has led to the development of new clinical trials based on integrating vectors with improved safety design as well as investigation on new technologies for highly efficient gene targeting and site-specific gene editing. Here we will present the experience and perspectives of gene therapy for SCID-X1 and ADA-SCID and discuss the pros and cons of gene therapy in comparison to allogeneic transplantation. PMID:22981681

  9. Regulatory Oversight of Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minjoung; Han, Euiri; Lee, Sunmi; Kim, Taegyun; Shin, Won

    2015-01-01

    The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety regulates gene therapy and cell therapy products as biological products under the authority of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act. As with other medicinal products, gene therapy and cell therapy products are subject to approval for use in clinical trials and for a subsequent marketing authorization and to post-market surveillance. Research and development of gene therapy and cell therapy products have been progressing rapidly in Korea with extensive investment, offering great potential for the treatment of various serious diseases. To facilitate development of safe and effective products and provide more opportunities to patients suffering from severe diseases, several regulatory programs, such as the use of investigational products for emergency situations, fast-track approval, prereview of application packages, and intensive regulatory consultation, can be applied to these products. The regulatory approach for these innovative products is case by case and founded on science-based review that is flexible and balances the risks and benefits. PMID:26374218

  10. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric therapy part 2: adjuvant therapy].

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Jüttner, Björn

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), i. e. breathing pure oxygen at elevated ambient pressure, remains the gold standard of care in treating air or gas embolism and decompression illness. Guidelines are less clear on the value of HBOT in acute management of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning or clostridial necrosis. To evaluate the evidence of clinical efficacy of HBOT we performed a systematic literature review. Part 1 assesses acute indications such as air or gas embolism, decompression sickness, CO-poisoning, clostridialmyonecrosis, necrotizing problem wounds, acute traumatic wounds and arterial retinal occlusion. Part 2 discusses further uses of HBOT as adjuvant treatment and highlights problems in assessing the value of HBOT using evidence-based medicine criteria. PMID:26510108

  11. Gene Therapy Targeting Glaucoma: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuyang; Rasmussen, Carol A.; Gabelt, B’Ann T.; Brandt, Curtis R.; Kaufman, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    In a chronic disease such as glaucoma, a therapy that provides a long lasting local effect, with minimal systemic side effects, while circumventing the issue of patient compliance, is very attractive. The field of gene therapy is growing rapidly and ocular applications are expanding. Our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glaucoma is leading to greater specificity in ocular tissue targeting. Improvements in gene delivery techniques, refinement of vector construction methods, and development of better animal models combine to bring this potential therapy closer to reality. PMID:19539835

  12. Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in the Era of Precision Medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine is the selection of a treatment modality that is specifically tailored to the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of a particular patient’s disease. In cancer, the objective is to treat with agents that inhibit cell signaling pathways that drive uncontrolled proliferation and dissemination of the disease. To overcome the eventual resistance to pathway inhibition therapy, this treatment modality has been combined with chemotherapy. We propose that pathway inhibition therapy is more rationally combined with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT), a cytotoxic treatment that is also targeted. RPT exploits pharmaceuticals that either bind specifically to tumors or accumulate by a broad array of physiological mechanisms indigenous to the neoplastic cells to deliver radiation specifically to these cells. Consistent with pathway inhibition therapy and in contrast to chemotherapy, RPT is well tolerated. However, the potential of RPT has not been fully exploited; for the most part, treatment has been implemented without using the ability to customize RPT by imaging and deriving individual patient tumor and normal organ radiation absorbed doses. These are more closely related to biological response and their determination should enable RPT treatment administration to maximum therapeutic benefit by treating to normal organ tolerance or demonstrating futility via tumor dosimetry. This is the essence of precision medicine. PMID:24953565

  13. Prospects for retinal gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W; Ali, Robin R

    2009-04-01

    Inherited retinal degeneration, which includes conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), affects approximately 1/3000 of the population in the Western world. It is characterized by loss of vision and results from mutations in any one of >100 different genes. There are currently no effective treatments, but many of the genes have now been identified and their functions elucidated, providing a major impetus to develop gene-based treatments. Preliminary results from three clinical trials indicate that the treatment of a form of LCA by gene therapy can be safe and effective. Here, we discuss the potential for treating other forms of retinal degeneration by gene therapy, focusing on the gene defects that are likely to be the most amenable to treatment. PMID:19303164

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Freeman, Marlene P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies are increasingly sought out by patients with psychiatric disorders. This article provides a review of the evidence for several commonly utilized CAM therapies (i.e. omega-3 fatty acids, folate, S-adenosyl-methionine (SAMe), St. John’s Wort, bright light therapy, exercise, massage, and acupuncture) in the treatment of perinatal depression. A number of these treatments may be reasonable to consider for women during pregnancy or the postpartum, but the safety and efficacy of these relative to standard treatments must still be systematically determined. Evidence based use of CAM treatments for perinatal depression is discussed. Adequately powered systematic studies are necessary to determine the role of CAM in the treatment of perinatal depression. PMID:24041861

  15. Gene replacement therapy for hereditary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, A.

    1989-11-10

    Investigators suggest that human trials of gene therapy to correct a genetic disorder that usually leads to emphysema early in life may be only a few years away. Speaking at the American Lung Association's Second Annual Science Writers' Forum, R. G. Crystal, chief of the Pulmonary Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offered an explanation of how hereditary emphysema may be more amenable to genetic therapy than other such diseases. In persons who lack a functioning gene for alpha{sup 1}-antitrypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, neutrophil elastase, attacks the walls of the lungs' alveoli, eventually leading to progressive pulmonary function loss. Two animal models of gene insertion are described.

  16. Why commercialization of gene therapy stalled; examining the life cycles of gene therapy technologies.

    PubMed

    Ledley, F D; McNamee, L M; Uzdil, V; Morgan, I W

    2014-02-01

    This report examines the commercialization of gene therapy in the context of innovation theories that posit a relationship between the maturation of a technology through its life cycle and prospects for successful product development. We show that the field of gene therapy has matured steadily since the 1980s, with the congruent accumulation of >35 000 papers, >16 000 US patents, >1800 clinical trials and >$4.3 billion in capital investment in gene therapy companies. Gene therapy technologies comprise a series of dissimilar approaches for gene delivery, each of which has introduced a distinct product architecture. Using bibliometric methods, we quantify the maturation of each technology through a characteristic life cycle S-curve, from a Nascent stage, through a Growing stage of exponential advance, toward an Established stage and projected limit. Capital investment in gene therapy is shown to have occurred predominantly in Nascent stage technologies and to be negatively correlated with maturity. Gene therapy technologies are now achieving the level of maturity that innovation research and biotechnology experience suggest may be requisite for efficient product development. Asynchrony between the maturation of gene therapy technologies and capital investment in development-focused business models may have stalled the commercialization of gene therapy. PMID:24305420

  17. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms

  18. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine.

    PubMed

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors' perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the "integration" of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms of

  19. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  20. What Is Next for Retinal Gene Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2015-01-01

    The field of gene therapy for retinal blinding disorders is experiencing incredible momentum, justified by hopeful results in early stage clinical trials for inherited retinal degenerations. The premise of the use of the gene as a drug has come a long way, and may have found its niche in the treatment of retinal disease. Indeed, with only limited treatment options available for retinal indications, gene therapy has been proven feasible, safe, and effective and may lead to durable effects following a single injection. Here, we aim at putting into context the promise and potential, the technical, clinical, and economic boundaries limiting its application and development, and speculate on a future in which gene therapy is an integral component of ophthalmic clinical care. PMID:25877395

  1. Translational research: precision medicine, personalized medicine, targeted therapies: marketing or science?

    PubMed

    Marquet, Pierre; Longeray, Pierre-Henry; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ameye, Véronique; Augé, Pascale; Cazeneuve, Béatrice; Chatelut, Etienne; Diaz, Isabelle; Diviné, Marine; Froguel, Philippe; Goni, Sylvia; Gueyffier, François; Hoog-Labouret, Natalie; Mourah, Samia; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Perche, Olivier; Perin-Dureau, Florent; Pigeon, Martine; Tisseau, Anne; Verstuyft, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is based on: 1) improved clinical or non-clinical methods (including biomarkers) for a more discriminating and precise diagnosis of diseases; 2) targeted therapies of the choice or the best drug for each patient among those available; 3) dose adjustment methods to optimize the benefit-risk ratio of the drugs chosen; 4) biomarkers of efficacy, toxicity, treatment discontinuation, relapse, etc. Unfortunately, it is still too often a theoretical concept because of the lack of convenient diagnostic methods or treatments, particularly of drugs corresponding to each subtype of pathology, hence to each patient. Stratified medicine is a component of personalized medicine employing biomarkers and companion diagnostics to target the patients likely to present the best benefit-risk balance for a given active compound. The concept of targeted therapy, mostly used in cancer treatment, relies on the existence of a defined molecular target, involved or not in the pathological process, and/or on the existence of a biomarker able to identify the target population, which should logically be small as compared to the population presenting the disease considered. Targeted therapies and biomarkers represent important stakes for the pharmaceutical industry, in terms of market access, of return on investment and of image among the prescribers. At the same time, they probably represent only the first generation of products resulting from the combination of clinical, pathophysiological and molecular research, i.e. of translational research. PMID:25679189

  2. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26846804

  3. Integrating genomic and clinical medicine: Searching for susceptibility genes in complex lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    DESAI, ANKIT A.; HYSI, PIRRO; GARCIA, JOE G. N.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of molecular, genomic, and clinical medicine in the post-genome era provides the promise of novel information on genetic variation and pathophysiologic cascades. The current challenge is to translate these discoveries rapidly into viable biomarkers that identify susceptible populations and into the development of precisely targeted therapies. In this article, we describe the application of comparative genomics, microarray platforms, genetic epidemiology, statistical genetics, and bioinformatic approaches within examples of complex pulmonary pathobiology. Our search for candidate genes, which are gene variations that drive susceptibility to and severity of enigmatic acute and chronic lung disorders, provides a logical framework to understand better the evolution of genomic medicine. The dissection of the genetic basis of complex diseases and the development of highly individualized therapies remain lofty but achievable goals. PMID:18355765

  4. Gene Therapy for Neurologic Manifestations of Mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel A.; Banerjee, Sharbani; Hackett, Perry B.; Whitley, Chester B.; McIvor, R. Scott; Low, Walter C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidoses are a family of lysosomal disorders caused by mutations in genes that encode enzymes involved in the catabolism of glycoaminoglycans. These mutations affect multiple organ systems and can be particularly deleterious to the nervous system. At the present time, enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem-cell therapy are used to treat patients with different forms of these disorders. However, to a great extent the nervous system is not adequately responsive to current therapeutic approaches. Areas Covered Recent advances in gene therapy show great promise for treating mucopolysaccharidoses. This article reviews the current state of the art for routes of delivery in developing genetic therapies for treating the neurologic manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. Expert Opinion Gene therapy for treating neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses can be achieved by intraventricular, intrathecal, intranasal, and systemic administration. The intraventricular route of administration appears to provide the most wide-spread distribution of gene therapy vectors to the brain. The intrathecal route of delivery results in predominant distribution to the caudal areas of the brain while the intranasal route of delivery results in good distribution to the rostral areas of brain. The systemic route of delivery via intravenous delivery can also achieve wide spread delivery to the CNS, however, the distribution to the brain is greatly dependent on the vector system. Intravenous delivery using lentiviral vectors appear to be less effective than adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Moreover, some subtypes of AAV vectors are more effective than others in crossing the blood-brain-barrier. In summary, the recent advances in gene vector technology and routes of delivery to the CNS will facilitate the clinical translation of gene therapy for the treatment of the neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. PMID:25510418

  5. Gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bleijs, D A; Haenen, I T W C; Bergmans, J E N

    2007-10-01

    Several regulatory organisations are involved in the assessment of clinical gene therapy trials involving genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in The Netherlands. Medical, ethical and scientific aspects are, for instance, evaluated by the Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO). The Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) is the competent authority for the environmental risk assessment according to the deliberate release Directive 2001/18/EC. A Gene Therapy Office has been established in order to streamline the different national review processes and to enable the official procedures to be completed as quickly as possible. Although the Gene Therapy Office improved the application process at the national level, there is a difference of opinion between the EU member states with respect to the EU Directive according to which gene therapy trials are assessed, that urges for harmonisation. This review summarises the gene therapy legislation in The Netherlands and in particular The Netherlands rationale to follow Directive 2001/18/EC for the environmental risk assessment. PMID:17721872

  6. International perceptions and approval of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Macer, D R; Akiyama, S; Alora, A T; Asada, Y; Azariah, J; Azariah, H; Boost, M V; Chatwachirawong, P; Kato, Y; Kaushik, V

    1995-06-01

    Gene therapy is in clinical trials in a number of countries, raising the question of whether different ethical standards can be justified in different countries. One key issue is how divergent are the perceptions and bioethical reasoning of peoples around the world. An International Bioethics Survey with 150 questions, including 35 open ones, was developed to look at how people think about diseases, life, nature, and selected issues of science and technology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, genetic screening, and gene therapy. The mail response survey was conducted in 1993 among the public in Australia, India, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Russia, and Thailand, and the same written survey was conducted among university students in Australia, Hong Kong, India, Japan, New Zealand, The Philippines, Russia, Singapore, and Thailand. Similar questions were included in an international high school education bioethics survey among high school teachers in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand. Further international comparisons to the United States and Europe are made. About three-quarters of all samples supported personal use of gene therapy, with higher support for children's use of gene therapy. The diversity of views was generally similar within each country. The major reasons given were to save life and increase the quality of life. About 5-7% rejected gene therapy, considering it to be playing God, or unnatural. There was very little concern about eugenics (0.5-2%), and more respondents gave supportive reasons like "improving genes," especially in Thailand and India. Support for specific applications was significantly less for "improving physical characters," "improving intelligence," or "making people more ethical" than for curing diseases like cancer or diabetes, but there was little difference between inheritable or noninheritable gene therapy. PMID:7548279

  7. Gene aberrations for precision medicine against lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motonobu; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kunitoh, Hideo; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma (LADC), the most frequent histological type of lung cancer, is often triggered by an aberration in a driver oncogene in tumor cells. Examples of such aberrations are EGFR mutation and ALK fusion. Lung adenocarcinoma harboring such mutations can be treated with anticancer drugs that target the aberrant gene products. Additional oncogene aberrations, including RET, ROS1, and NRG1 fusions, skipping of exon 14 of MET, and mutations in BRAF, HER2, NF1, and MEK1, were recently added to the list of such "druggable" driver oncogene aberrations, and their responses to targeted therapies are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, approximately 30% and 50% of LADCs in patients in Japan and Europe/USA, respectively, lack the driver oncogene aberrations listed above. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies, such as those that exploit the vulnerabilities of cancer cells with non-oncogene aberrations, are urgently required. This review summarizes the current status of research on precision medicine against LADC and enumerates the research priorities for the near future. PMID:27027665

  8. NIH modifies gene therapy research guidelines.

    PubMed

    Levine, Carol

    1985-06-01

    In response to public comments on the first draft of its "Points to Consider in the Design and Submission of Human Somatic-Cell Gene Therapy Protocols," the Working Group on Human Gene Therapy of the National Institutes of Health has issued a revised set of guidelines for researchers. This second draft spells out the need for public review of gene therapy protocols, the Working Group's willingness to review selected protocols before the completion of animal studies, and requirements for informed consent to long-term follow-up and to autopsy in the event of death. The document also expresses the Working Group's concern that researchers and the public be kept fully informed of the results of such studies. PMID:11643786

  9. Evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration for Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Susan; Kimbrough, Elizabeth; Cheng, Ker; Berman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Cochrane Collaboration, an international not-for-profit organization that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of randomized trials of health care therapies, has produced reviews summarizing much of the evidence on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our objective was to review the evidence base according to Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods In order to detect reviews focusing on TCM, we searched the titles and abstracts of all reviews in Issue 4, 2008 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each review, we extracted data on the number of trials included and the total number of participants. We provided an indication of the strength of the review findings by assessing the reviewers' abstract conclusions statement. We supplemented our assessment of the abstract conclusions statements with a listing of the comparisons and outcomes showing statistically significant meta-analyses results. Results We identified 70 Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM, primarily acupuncture (n = 26) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 42), and 1 each of moxibustion and t'ai chi. Nineteen (19) of 26 acupuncture reviews and 22/42 herbal medicine reviews concluded that there was not enough good quality trial evidence to make any conclusion about the efficacy of the evaluated treatment, while the remaining 7 acupuncture and 20 herbal medicine reviews and each of the moxibustion and t'ai chi reviews indicated a suggestion of benefit, which was qualified by a caveat about the poor quality and quantity of studies. Most reviews included many distinct interventions, controls, outcomes, and populations, and a large number of different comparisons were made, each with a distinct forest plot. Conclusions Most Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM are inconclusive, due specifically to the poor methodology and heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Some systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence of Chinese medicine's benefits to certain patient populations

  10. CAR-T Cell Therapies From the Transfusion Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew; Lin, ChieYu; Siegel, Don L; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies has generated significant excitement over the last several years. From a transfusion medicine perspective, the implementation of CAR-T therapy as a potential mainstay treatment for not only hematologic but also solid-organ malignancies represents a significant opportunity for growth and expansion. In this review, we will describe the rationale for the development of genetically redirected T cells as a cancer therapeutic, the different elements that are required to engineer these cells, as well as an overview of the process by which patient cells are harvested and processed to create and subsequently validate CAR-T cells. Finally, we will briefly describe some of the toxicities and clinical efficacy of CAR-T cells in the setting of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27067907

  11. The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Babul, S; Rhodes, E C

    2000-12-01

    During the past decade, we have seen a growing number of individuals participating in sport and recreational activities. All indications show an increase in sport participation at every age level. However, the number of sport and recreational injuries as a result of this increase has also risen. Unfortunately, a primary cost related to injury recovery is the time lost from participating in and resuming normal functional activity. This has compelled health care professionals to seek more efficient and effective therapeutic interventions in treating such injuries. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy may serve to provide a means of therapy to facilitate a speedier resumption to pre-injury activity levels as well as improve the short and long term prognosis of the injury. Although a growing interest in sports medicine is becoming evident in the literature, the use of HBO as an intervention in this field has received a great deal of cynicism. To date, numerous professional athletic teams, including hockey (NHL), football (NFL), basketball (NBA) and soccer (MLS), utilise and rely on the use of HBO as adjuvant therapy for numerous sports-related injuries acquired from playing competitive sports. However, to date, very little has been published on the application benefits of hyperbaric therapy and sports injuries. The majority of clinical studies examining the efficacy of HBO in treating soft tissue injuries have been limited in their sample size and study design. Further research needs to be conducted suggesting and validating the significant effects of this treatment modality and further grounding its importance in sports medicine. PMID:11132122

  12. Moving forward: cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Alton, Eric W F W

    2013-10-15

    Since cloning of the CFTR gene more than 20 years ago a large number of pre-clinical and clinical CF gene therapy studies have been performed and a vast amount of information and know-how has been generated. Here, we will review key studies with a particular emphasis on clinical findings. We have learnt that the lung is a more difficult target than originally anticipated, and we describe the strength and weaknesses of the most commonly used airway gene transfer agents (GTAs). In our view, one of the most significant developments in recent years is the generation of lentiviral vectors, which efficiently transduce lung tissue. However, focused and co-ordinated efforts assessing lentiviral vector safety and scaling up of production will be required to move this vector into clinical lung gene therapy studies. PMID:23918661

  13. Direct Gene Therapy for Bone Regeneration: Gene Delivery, Animal Models, and Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Pelled, Gadi; Ben-Arav, Ayelet; Hock, Colleen; Reynolds, David G.; Yazici, Cemal; Zilberman, Yoram; Gazit, Zulma; Awad, Hani; Gazit, Dan

    2010-01-01

    While various problems with bone healing remain, the greatest clinical change is the absence of an effective approach to manage large segmental defects in limbs and craniofacial bones caused by trauma or cancer. Thus, nontraditional forms of medicine, such as gene therapy, have been investigated as a potential solution. The use of osteogenic genes has shown great potential in bone regeneration and fracture healing. Several methods for gene delivery to the fracture site have been described. The majority of them include a cellular component as the carrying vector, an approach known as cell-mediated gene therapy. Yet, the complexity involved with cell isolation and culture emphasizes the advantages of direct gene delivery as an alternative strategy. Here we review the various approaches of direct gene delivery for bone repair, the choice of animal models, and the various outcome measures required to evaluate the efficiency and safety of each technique. Special emphasis is given to noninvasive, quantitative, in vivo monitoring of gene expression and biodistribution in live animals. Research efforts should aim at inducing a transient, localized osteogenic gene expression within a fracture site to generate an effective therapeutic approach that would eventually lead to clinical use. PMID:20143927

  14. Radiopharmaceutical and Gene Therapy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2006-02-09

    The objective of our research program was to determine whether novel receptors can be induced in solid cancers as a target for therapy with radiolabeled unmodified peptides that bind to the receptors. The hypothesis was that induction of a high number of receptors on the surface of these cancer cells would result in an increased uptake of the radiolabeled monomeric peptides as compared to published results with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides to naturally expressed antigens or receptors, and therefore a better therapeutic outcome. The following is a summary of published results.

  15. Anti-platelet therapy in small animal medicine.

    PubMed

    Thomason, J; Lunsford, K; Mackin, A

    2016-08-01

    Thromboembolism is a significant complication in many commonly encountered diseases, and can be a devastating sequel to otherwise treatable conditions. Platelets play an essential role in the hemostatic process and, consequently, are associated with thrombus formation. Platelets adhere to denuded vascular subendothelium, recruit additional platelets and cells, aggregate, and provide the catalytic surface for thrombin production and fibrin formation. Therapy to prevent unwanted thrombus formation and thromboembolic crises is essential in the management of hypercoagulable patients. Unfortunately, many of the medications used in veterinary medicine that inhibit or modulate coagulation factors, such as the heparins, are cost prohibitive, only effective when administered by injection or require frequent drug monitoring, and are therefore poor choices for long term at home therapy. While the role of the platelet in pathologic thrombus formation is not fully understood, veterinarians often resort to anti-platelet therapy in the management of patients at risk for thromboembolic complications, because many anti-platelet medications are inexpensive, require minimal drug monitoring, and can be given orally. The aim of this review is to discuss the anti-platelet therapies that are currently being used or being considered for use to inhibit platelet function and reduce thromboembolic complications in hypercoagulable dogs and cats. PMID:26969126

  16. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  17. Gene therapies for inherited skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Qasim, Waseem; McGrath, John A

    2014-06-01

    Skin is an amenable organ for gene replacement and gene editing therapeutics. Its accessibility makes it well-suited for direct topical gene delivery, grafting of genetically corrected cells, and monitoring of possible adverse events. Monogenic recessive disorders with a clinically severe or life-threatening phenotype provide the best candidate diseases for the introduction of a single normal copy of the gene into the target cell, usually keratinocytes. Preclinical studies have shown impressive results in terms of gene correction using both in vivo and ex vivo approaches. The clinical application of gene replacement or genomic editing as potential therapies for inherited skin disorders, however, has been held back by the inadequacy of delivery vectors and concerns from regulatory agencies regarding safety; thus translation to clinical trials has been slow. Over the past 15 years, cell culture and animal models have shown efficient gene correction techniques as preludes to treat inherited skin disorders such as junctional epidermolysis bullosa, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, xeroderma pigmentosum, lamellar ichthyosis and Netherton syndrome, but so far only one patient has been treated in a clinical trial. This article reviews the current status of gene therapies for patients with inherited skin diseases and explores future perspectives. PMID:25085667

  18. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  19. Suicide Gene Therapy for Cancer – Current Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Sakkas, Antonios; Yarmus, Lonny; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Malecki, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Current cancer treatments may create profound iatrogenic outcomes. The adverse effects of these treatments still remain, as the serious problems that practicing physicians have to cope with in clinical practice. Although, non-specific cytotoxic agents constitute an effective treatment modality against cancer cells, they also tend to kill normal, quickly dividing cells. On the other hand, therapies targeting the genome of the tumors are both under investigation, and some others are already streamlined to clinical practice. Several approaches have been investigated in order to find a treatment targeting the cancer cells, while not affecting the normal cells. Suicide gene therapy is a therapeutic strategy, in which cell suicide inducing transgenes are introduced into cancer cells. The two major suicide gene therapeutic strategies currently pursued are: cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine and the herpes simplex virus/ganciclovir. The novel strategies include silencing gene expression, expression of intracellular antibodies blocking cells’ vital pathways, and transgenic expression of caspases and DNases. We analyze various elements of cancer cells’ suicide inducing strategies including: targets, vectors, and mechanisms. These strategies have been extensively investigated in various types of cancers, while exploring multiple delivery routes including viruses, non-viral vectors, liposomes, nanoparticles, and stem cells. We discuss various stages of streamlining of the suicide gene therapy into clinical oncology as applied to different types of cancer. Moreover, suicide gene therapy is in the center of attention as a strategy preventing cancer from developing in patients participating in the clinical trials of regenerative medicine. In oncology, these clinical trials are aimed at regenerating, with the aid of stem cells, of the patients’ organs damaged by pathologic and/or iatrogenic factors. However, the stem cells carry the risk of neoplasmic transformation. We

  20. ORTHOPAEDIC GENE THERAPY – LOST IN TRANSLATION?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C.H.; Ghivizzani, S.C.; Robbins, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopaedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favourable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopaedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. PMID:21948071

  1. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  2. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted, this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:16457645

  3. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation. PMID:27424910

  4. Laser surgery and medicine including photodynamic therapy in China today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junheng

    2000-10-01

    The development of laser medicine in China is correlated with the development of laser science in China. After the first Chinese laser, ruby laser came into being in 1961, Chinese medical scientists began to do the studies about laser medicine in the middle 1960s. For example, ruby laser was adopted for the retina coagulation experiment in 1965. Since 1970s, through the free choice of utilizing Co2, He-Ne, Nd:YAG argon, ruby lasers, laser surgery and medicine has been widely applied to the treatment for diseases of the eyes, ENT, dermatology, surgery, gynecology, tumors and diseases suitable to physical therapy or acupuncture with satisfactory effects. In June 1977, a nation-wide laser medicine symposium was held at Wuhan, Hubei Province with 200 participants including medical doctors and laser technologies from 23 provinces and municipal towns. Till the end of seventies, utilization of lasers has been extended to Nd glass laser, N laser and tunable dye lasers. The scope covered most of the clinical sections. After Dr. Thomas J. Dougherty developed the PDT for cancers in Roswell Park Memorial Institute in Buffalo in late 1970s and Professor Yoshihiro Hayata successfully applied the PDT in clinical treatment for lung cancer in 1980, Chinese pharmacists successfully produced the Chinese HpD and the first case of PDT, a lower eyelid basal cell carcinoma patient was treated with the Chinese laser equipment in 1981 in Beijing. Its success brought attention establishing a research group supported by the government in 1982. The members of the group consisted the experts on preclinical and clinical research, pharmaceutical chemistry, laser physicists and technologists. A systemic research on PDT was then carried out and obvious result was achieved. The step taken for PDT also accelerated the researchers on other kinds of laser medicine and surgery because the medical doctors had begun to master the knowledge about laser science. The prosperous situation of rapid

  5. Designer Babies? Teacher Views on Gene Technology and Human Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the views of a sample of primary and high school teachers on the application of gene technology to human medicine. In general, high school teachers are more positive about these developments than primary teachers, and both groups of teachers are more positive than interested lay publics. Highlights ways in which this topic can be…

  6. The gene therapy revolution in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saikhan, Fahad I.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in gene therapy hold significant promise for the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Several studies using animal models have been published. Animal models on retinitis pigmentosa, Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), and Stargardt disease have involved the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver functional genes into mice and canines. Mice models have been used to show that a mutation in cGMP phosphodiesterase that results in retinitis pigmentosa can be corrected using rAAV vectors. Additionally, rAAV vectors have been successfully used to deliver ribozyme into mice with a subsequent improvement in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. By using dog models, researchers have made progress in studying X-linked retinitis pigmentosa which results from a RPGR gene mutation. Mouse and canine models have also been used in the study of LCA. The widely studied form of LCA is LCA2, resulting from a mutation in the gene RPE65. Mice and canines that were injected with normal copies of RPE65 gene showed signs such as improved retinal pigment epithelium transduction, visual acuity, and functional recovery. Studies on Stargardt disease have shown that mutations in the ABCA4 gene can be corrected with AAV vectors, or nanoparticles. Gene therapy for the treatment of red–green color blindness was successful in squirrel monkeys. Plans are at an advanced stage to begin clinical trials. Researchers have also proved that CD59 can be used with AMD. Gene therapy is also able to treat primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in animal models, and studies show it is economically viable. PMID:24227970

  7. Treating Immunodeficiency through HSC Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Booth, Claire; Gaspar, H Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2016-04-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has been successfully employed as a therapeutic option to treat specific inherited immune deficiencies, including severe combined immune deficiencies (SCID) over the past two decades. Initial clinical trials using first-generation gamma-retroviral vectors to transfer corrective DNA demonstrated clinical benefit for patients, but were associated with leukemogenesis in a number of cases. Safer vectors have since been developed, affording comparable efficacy with an improved biosafety profile. These vectors are now in Phase I/II clinical trials for a number of immune disorders with more preclinical studies underway. Targeted gene editing allowing precise DNA correction via platforms such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 may now offer promising strategies to improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in the future. PMID:26993219

  8. Gene and splicing therapies for neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Benchaouir, Rachid; Robin, Valerie; Goyenvalle, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are heterogeneous group of genetic diseases characterized by muscle weakness and wasting. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common and severe forms in humans and although the molecular mechanisms of these diseases have been extensively investigated, there is currently no effective treatment. However, new gene-based therapies have recently emerged with particular noted advances in using conventional gene replacement strategies and RNA-based technology. Whilst proof of principle have been demonstrated in animal models, several clinical trials have recently been undertaken to investigate the feasibility of these strategies in patients. In particular, antisense mediated exon skipping has shown encouraging results and hold promise for the treatment of dystrophic muscle. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of therapeutic approaches to neuromuscular diseases, with an emphasis on gene therapy and splicing modulation for DMD and SMA, focusing on the advantages offered by these technologies but also their challenges. PMID:25961553

  9. Methods to improve cardiac gene therapy expression.

    PubMed

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Sydnes, Kate E; Zuppo, Daniel A; Koch, Walter J

    2014-11-01

    Gene therapy strategies are becoming a valuable approach for the treatment of heart failure. Some trials are ongoing and others are being organized. Vascular access in clinical experimentation is still the chosen modality of delivery, but many other approaches are in research and development. A successful gene therapy strategy involves not only the choice of the right vector and gene, but also the correct delivery strategy that allows for transduction of the highest percentage of cardiomyocytes, limited spilling of virus into other organs and the possibility to correlate the amount of injected virus to the rate of the expression within the cardiac tissue. The authors will first concentrate on clarifying what the barriers are that the virus has to overcome in order to reach the nuclei of the target organs and methodologies that have been tested to improve the range of expression. PMID:25340284

  10. Gene Therapy and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Eming, Sabine A.; Krieg, Thomas; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Wound repair involves the sequential interaction of various cell types, extracellular matrix molecules, and soluble mediators. During the past 10 years, much new information on signals controlling wound cell behavior has emerged. This knowledge has led to a number of novel_therapeutic strategies. In particular, the local delivery of pluripotent growth factor molecules to the injured tissue has been intensively investigated over the past decade. Limited success of clinical trails indicates that a crucial aspect of the growth factor wound-healing strategy is the effective delivery of these polypeptides to the wound site. A molecular approach in which genetically modified cells synthesize and deliver the desired growth factor in regulated fashion has been used to overcome the limitations associated with the (topical) application of recombinant growth factor proteins. We have summarized the molecular and cellular basis of repair mechanisms and their failure, and we give an overview of techniques and studies applied to gene transfer in tissue repair. PMID:17276205

  11. [Gene therapy in lysosomal diseases].

    PubMed

    Moullier, P; Salvetti, A; Bohl, D; Danos, O; Heard, J M

    1996-01-01

    The study of the mechanisms of secretion and recapture of lysosomal enzymes has lead to the proposal of a treatment of lysosomal diseases by enzyme replacement. Autologous implants of genetically modified cells which secrete enzymes ensure systemic distribution of the lacking enzyme. A procedure which permits reimplantation of genetically modified fibroblasts is described. The stable secretion of human glucuronidase by autologous fibroblasts was thus obtained in animal species. This approach should by applicable to the treatment of Hurler's syndrome by obtaining the production and distribution of alpha-L-iduronidase in patients lacking this enzyme by retroviral transfer of the human alpha-L-iduronidase gene to cultured fibroblasts and by preparation of implants. PMID:8881268

  12. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  13. [Irritable bowel syndrome: diet and complementary medicine therapies?].

    PubMed

    Gerkens, A

    2012-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent and invalidating functional bowel disorder with entangled mechanisms. Its therapeutic approach is therefore complex. Classical therapies, prescribed alone or in combination in light of the predominant symptom, consist of antispasmodics, fibers, laxatives, antidiarrheals, and psychotropic agents. Other emerging pharmacological therapies, such as prokinetics, prosecretory or serotoninergic agents, bile acid modulators and antibiotics have been recently studied in clinical trials. Dietary measures can include reduction of short-chain poorly absorbed carbohydrates (FODMAPs) and gluten restriction. Assessment of food allergy can be proposed in a subgroup of IBS patients. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies, that are generally low cost and safe, appear to be appreciated by patients. Probiotics have demonstrated action on the gut microbiote modulation, and may be helpful in a subset of patients. Peppermint oil has an established visceral analgesic effect. Hypnotherapy represents an original, global and effective approach. Finally, education, reassurance and listening to the patient, leading to a solid therapeutic relationship, represents an essential backdrop of remedy or diet effectiveness. PMID:23091952

  14. Marketing Regulatory Oversight of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs) in Europe: The EMA/CAT Perspective.

    PubMed

    Salmikangas, Paula; Schuessler-Lenz, Martina; Ruiz, Sol; Celis, Patrick; Reischl, Ilona; Menezes-Ferreira, Margarida; Flory, Egbert; Renner, Matthias; Ferry, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    With the release of Regulation 1394/2007, a new framework for gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue-engineered products was established in the European Union. For all three product classes, called advanced therapy medicinal products, a centralised marketing authorisation became mandatory. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) together with its Committee for Advanced Therapies, Committee for Human Medicinal Products and the network of national agencies is responsible for scientific evaluation of the marketing authorisation applications. For a new application, data and information relating to manufacturing processes and quality control of the active substance and the final product have to be submitted for evaluation together with data from non-clinical and clinical safety and efficacy studies. Technical requirements for ATMPs are defined in the legislation, and guidance for different products is available through several EMA/CAT guidelines. Due to the diversity of ATMPs, a tailored approach for regulating these products is considered necessary. Thus, a risk-based approach has been introduced for ATMPs allowing flexibility for the regulatory requirements. Since the regulatory framework for ATMPs was established, five products have been licenced in the European Union. However, the pipeline of new ATMPs is much bigger, as seen from the significant numbers of different products discussed by the CAT in scientific advice and classification procedures. In 2013, a public consultation on the ATMP Regulation was conducted by the European Commission, and the results were published in 2014. The report proposes several improvements for the current framework and established procedures for the regulation of ATMPs. PMID:26374215

  15. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  16. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ...

  17. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, N.; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy. PMID:24284874

  18. Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158046.html Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure Inserting new ... who suffer from heart failure: A trial using gene therapy appears to have boosted patients' cardiac function. "This ...

  19. Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158415.html Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease ... WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new gene therapy shows preliminary promise against so-called "Bubble ...

  20. Gene therapy for lysosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Naffakh, N; Bohl, D; Salvetti, A; Moullier, P; Danos, O; Heard, J M

    1994-01-01

    Genetic defects of lysosomal hydrolases result in severe storage diseases and treatments based on enzyme replacement have been proposed. In mice lacking beta-glucuronidase, which develop a disease homologous to human mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, sly syndrome), we have used autologous implants of genetically-modified cells for the continuous in vivo production of the enzyme. A retroviral vector containing the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA under the control of the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase promoter was used to infect primary skin fibroblasts, bone marrow cells, or myoblasts from mutant MPS VII animals. The fibroblasts were embedded into collagen lattices and reimplanted into the peritoneal cavity of recipient MPS VII mice. All animals, when analysed 10 to 155 days later, expressed beta-glucuronidase from the vascularised neo-organs that developed after implantation, and accumulated the enzyme in their tissues. A complete disappearance of the lysosomal storage lesions was observed in their liver and spleen. This procedure has been scaled up for long term lysosomal enzyme delivery in dogs. The bone marrow cells were used for partial hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated MPS VII mice. Five months after gene transfer, animals in which under 5% of genetically-modified hematopoietic cells were detected in the spleen showed a drastic reduction of lysosomal storage lesions in the liver and spleen. Genetically-modified myoblasts were transplanted into injured muscles, where they participated in the regeneration of a significant proportion of muscle fibers. Enzyme secretion and liver uptake were observed for at least one month.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8177709

  1. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  2. Gene and stem cell therapy for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calne, Roy Y; Ghoneim, Mohamed A; Lee, K O; Uin, Gan Shu

    2013-01-01

    Gene and stem cell therapy has been on the scientific agenda in many laboratories for more than 20 years. The literature is enormous, but practical applications have been few. Recently advances in stem cell biology and gene therapy are clarifying some of the issues. I have made a few observations concerning our own studies on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells cultured to produce a small percentage of insulin-producing cells and human insulin gene engineered into Lenti and AA viruses. The aim of clinical application would still seem to be several years away, if all goes well. The first step will be to produce enough insulin-secreting cells to be of potential value to patients. The next crucial question will be how to persuade the cells to respond to blood glucose levels swiftly and appropriately. With both stem cell and gene therapy, another important factor will be to ensure that any positive results will continue long enough to be preferable to insulin injections. PMID:25095498

  3. The future of replacement and restorative therapies: from organ transplantation to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Daar, A S

    2013-01-01

    As we continue to have severe shortages of organs for transplantation, we need to consider alternatives for the future. The most likely to make a real difference in the long term is regenerative medicine (RM), a field that has emerged from the conjunction of stem cell biology and cell therapies; gene therapy; biomaterials and tissue engineering; and organ transplantation. Transplantation and RM share the same essential goal: to replace or restore organ function. Herein I briefly review some major breakthroughs of RM that are relevant to the future of organ transplantation, with a focus on the needs of people in the developing world. A definition of RM is provided and the ethical, legal, and social issues are briefly highlighted. In conclusion, I provide a projection of what the future may be for RM. PMID:24314929

  4. Traditional Chinese medicine targeting apoptotic mechanisms for esophageal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-shuang; Shen, Qiang; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the world, and it demonstrates a distinct geographical distribution pattern in China. In the last decade, inducing apoptosis with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has become an active area in both fundamental and clinical research on cancer therapy. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms by which TCM induces apoptosis in esophageal cancer cells. These mechanisms are generally related but not limited to targeting the extrinsic death receptor pathway, the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. By using different monomers and composite prescriptions of TCM, it is possible to modulate the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, regulate the expression of caspase proteases and mitochondrial transmembrane potential, increase the expression of Fas and p53, down-regulate NF-κB pathway and the expression of Chop and survivin, and block cell cycle progression. PMID:26707140

  5. Systemically Administered, Target Organ-Specific Therapies for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and other agents that could potentially enhance tissue regeneration have been identified, but their therapeutic value in clinical medicine has been limited for reasons such as difficulty to maintain bioactivity of locally applied therapeutics in the protease-rich environment of regenerating tissues. Although human diseases are treated with systemically administered drugs in general, all current efforts aimed at enhancing tissue repair with biological drugs have been based on their local application. The systemic administration of growth factors has been ruled out due to concerns about their safety. These concerns are warranted. In addition, only a small proportion of systemically administered drugs reach their intended target. Selective delivery of the drug to the target tissue and use of functional protein domains capable of penetrating cells and tissues could alleviate these problems in certain circumstances. We will present in this review a novel approach utilizing unique molecular fingerprints (“Zip/postal codes”) in the vasculature of regenerating tissues that allows target organ-specific delivery of systemically administered therapeutic molecules by affinity-based physical targeting (using peptides or antibodies as an “address tag”) to injured tissues undergoing repair. The desired outcome of targeted therapies is increased local accumulation and lower systemic concentration of the therapeutic payload. We believe that the physical targeting of systemically administered therapeutic molecules could be rapidly adapted in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26437400

  6. Treatment of refractory diabetic gastroparesis: Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Bing; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Jun-Ling; Zhao, Lin-Hua; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Refractory diabetic gastroparesis (DGP), a disorder that occurs in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, is associated with severe symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting, and results in an economic burden on the health care system. In this article, the basic characteristics of refractory DGP are reviewed, followed by a discussion of therapeutic modalities, which encompasses the definitions and clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of refractory DGP. The diagnostic standards assumed in this study are those set forth in the published literature due to the absence of recognized diagnosis criteria that have been assessed by an international organization. The therapeutic modalities for refractory DGP are as follows: drug therapy, nutritional support, gastric electrical stimulation, pyloric botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic or surgical therapy, and traditional Chinese treatment. The therapeutic modalities may be used alone or in combination. The use of traditional Chinese treatments is prevalent in China. The effectiveness of these therapies appears to be supported by preliminary evidence and clinical experience, although the mechanisms that underlie these effects will require further research. The purpose of this article is to explore the potential of combined Western and traditional Chinese medicine treatment methods for improved patient outcomes in refractory DGP. PMID:24914371

  7. New gene therapy strategies for hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Montes, Adriana M; Hernández-Ortega, Luis D; Lucano-Landeros, Martha S; Armendariz-Borunda, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ of the body, which may suffer acute or chronic injury induced by many factors, leading to cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. Cirrhosis is the irreversible end result of fibrous scarring and hepatocellular regeneration, characterized by diffuse disorganization of the normal hepatic structure, regenerative nodules and fibrotic tissue. Cirrhosis is associated with a high co-morbidity and mortality without effective treatment, and much research has been aimed at developing new therapeutic strategies to guarantee recovery. Liver-based gene therapy has been used to downregulate specific genes, to block the expression of deleterious genes, to delivery therapeutic genes, to prevent allograft rejection and to augment liver regeneration. Viral and non-viral vectors have been used, with viral vectors proving to be more efficient. This review provides an overview of the main strategies used in liver-gene therapy represented by non-viral vectors, viral vectors, novel administration methods like hydrodynamic injection, hybrids of two viral vectors and blocking molecules, with the hope of translating findings from the laboratory to the patient´s bed-side. PMID:25852266

  8. GMP facilities for manufacturing of advanced therapy medicinal products for clinical trials: an overview for clinical researchers.

    PubMed

    Alici, Evren; Blomberg, Pontus

    2010-12-01

    To be able to produce advanced therapy medicinal products, compliance with regulatory standards while maintaining flexibility is mandatory. For this purpose, careful planning is vital in the design or upgrade of a facility. Similarly, extensive foresight is elemental to anticipate upcoming needs and requirements. Failing this may lead to the facility's in-ability to meet the demands. In this chapter we aimed to outline the current issues with regards to the European Union Directives (EUD) and the proposal for Advanced Therapies, which are of importance to cellular and gene therapy facilities in Europe. This chapter is an attempt to elucidate what the minimum requirements for GMP facilities for cell and gene therapy products are and what is considered necessary to comply with the regulations in Europe. PMID:21054243

  9. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  10. Gene therapy: prospects for glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich; Klein, Diana; Mansson, Jan Eric; D'Hooge, Rudi; DeDeyn, Peter D; Lüllmann Rauch, Renate; Hartmann, Dieter; Harzer, Klaus

    2003-05-29

    Lysosomal storage diseases comprise a group of about 40 disorders, which in most cases are due to the deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme. Since lysosomal enzymes are involved in the degradation of various compounds, the diseases can be further subdivided according to which pathway is affected. Thus, enzyme deficiencies in the degradation pathway of glycosaminoglycans cause mucopolysaccharidosis, and deficiencies affecting glycopeptides cause glycoproteinosis. In glycolipid storage diseases enzymes are deficient that are involved in the degradation of sphingolipids. Mouse models are available for most of these diseases, and some of these mouse models have been used to study the applicability of in vivo gene therapy. We review the rationale for gene therapy in lysosomal disorders and present data, in particular, about trials in an animal model of metachromatic leukodystrophy. The data of these trials are compared with those obtained with animal models of other lysosomal diseases. PMID:12803926

  11. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  12. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases. PMID:27508076

  13. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  14. EVIDENCE – BASED MEDICINE/PRACTICE IN SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Lehecka, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    A push for the use of evidence‐based medicine and evidence‐based practice patterns has permeated most health care disciplines. The use of evidence‐based practice in sports physical therapy may improve health care quality, reduce medical errors, help balance known benefits and risks, challenge views based on beliefs rather than evidence, and help to integrate patient preferences into decision‐making. In this era of health care utilization sports physical therapists are expected to integrate clinical experience with conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of research evidence in order to make clearly informed decisions in order to help maximize and optimize patient well‐being. One of the more common reasons for not using evidence in clinical practice is the perceived lack of skills and knowledge when searching for or appraising research. This clinical commentary was developed to educate the readership on what constitutes evidence‐based practice, and strategies used to seek evidence in the daily clinical practice of sports physical therapy. PMID:23091778

  15. [Cellular therapy and gene therapy: perspectives in neuromuscular pathology].

    PubMed

    Fardeau, M

    1993-10-01

    Identification of the gene coding for the protein (dystrophin) which is lacking or abnormal in Duchenne or Becker type human muscular dystrophies was a decisive turning point in neuro-muscular pathology. Since that time, a considerable number of gene abnormalities have been identified or at least localized. The severity of these diseases, their steady evolution and the absence of any efficient drug therapy, have lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches based on restoring the genetic capacities of the muscle cell. There are two possibilities for therapy. The first is based on the transfer of myogenic cells derived from the 'satellite' cells normally present at the periphery of muscle fibers. The results obtained from a murine model of Duchenne dystrophy ('mdx' mouse) were very promising. However, the results from application of the same techniques to the canine model (GRMDX) or to affected children are, at the present time, disappointing. A number of biological questions remain to be solved before this technique can be more extensively applied to humans. The second possibility is based on gene transfer, through a viral vector. The adenovirus is presently a possible vector. The first experimental results, on 'mdx' mice, are again very encouraging. Extension of these studies to the canine model is a necessary prerequisite for any human application. It should be noted that these two approaches are complementary. Their future applications may depend on the diffuse or selective nature of the skeletal muscle atrophy, and on whether cardiac and respiratory muscles are involved. PMID:8290312

  16. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted. PMID:23878787

  17. Dawn of ocular gene therapy: implications for molecular diagnosis in retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, ZANEVELD; Feng, WANG; Xia, WANG; Rui, CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to utilize genomic information about patients to tailor treatment. Gene replacement therapy for rare genetic disorders is perhaps the most extreme form of personalized medicine, in that the patients’ genome wholly determines their treatment regimen. Gene therapy for retinal disorders is poised to become a clinical reality. The eye is an optimal site for gene therapy due to the relative ease of precise vector delivery, immune system isolation, and availability for monitoring of any potential damage or side effects. Due to these advantages, clinical trials for gene therapy of retinal diseases are currently underway. A necessary precursor to such gene therapies is accurate molecular diagnosis of the mutation(s) underlying disease. In this review, we discuss the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to obtain such a diagnosis and identify disease causing genes, using retinal disorders as a case study. After reviewing ocular gene therapy, we discuss the application of NGS to the identification of novel Mendelian disease genes. We then compare current, array based mutation detection methods against next NGS-based methods in three retinal diseases: Leber’s Congenital Amaurosis, Retinitis Pigmentosa, and Stargardt’s disease. We conclude that next-generation sequencing based diagnosis offers several advantages over array based methods, including a higher rate of successful diagnosis and the ability to more deeply and efficiently assay a broad spectrum of mutations. However, the relative difficulty of interpreting sequence results and the development of standardized, reliable bioinformatic tools remain outstanding concerns. In this review, recent advances NGS based molecular diagnoses are discussed, as well as their implications for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:23393028

  18. Gene therapy approaches to regenerating bone

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Nadav Kimelman; Kallai, Ilan; Lieberman, Jay R.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Bone formation and regeneration therapies continue to require optimization and improvement because many skeletal disorders remain undertreated. Clinical solutions to nonunion fractures and osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, for example, remain suboptimal and better therapeutic approaches must be created. The widespread use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) for spine fusion was recently questioned by a series of reports in a special issue of The Spine Journal, which elucidated the side effects and complications of direct rhBMP treatments. Gene therapy—both direct (in vivo) and cell-mediated (ex vivo)—has long been studied extensively to provide much needed improvements in bone regeneration. In this article, we review recent advances in gene therapy research whose aims are in vivo or ex vivo bone regeneration or formation. We examine appropriate vectors, safety issues, and rates of bone formation. The use of animal models and their relevance for translation of research results to the clinical setting are also discussed in order to provide the reader with a critical view. Finally, we elucidate the main challenges and hurdles faced by gene therapy aimed at bone regeneration as well as expected future trends in this field. PMID:22429662

  19. Diagnostic classification and orthopaedic physical therapy practice: what we can learn from medicine.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Nancy J

    2004-03-01

    Concepts of diagnosis and classification have a long history in medicine, while formal schemes of diagnostic classification in physical therapy are relatively new. Basic differences exist between medicine and physical therapy in the phenomena which are diagnosed and classified. However, similarities in the diagnostic and classification process provide an opportunity to learn from medicine as the process now evolves in physical therapy. This paper provides a brief history of the development of the concept of diagnostic classification in medicine and physical therapy. Difficulties associated with the process are described. Knowledge of these difficulties is used to analyze some of the evolving concepts of diagnostic classification in physical therapy, especially those related to orthopaedic physical therapy practice. PMID:15089023

  20. Creating a cardiac pacemaker by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Traian M; Pogwizd, Steven M

    2007-02-01

    While electronic cardiac pacing in its various modalities represents standard of care for treatment of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias and heart failure, it has limitations ranging from absent or rudimentary autonomic modulation to severe complications. This has prompted experimental studies to design and validate a biological pacemaker that could supplement or replace electronic pacemakers. Advances in cardiac gene therapy have resulted in a number of strategies focused on beta-adrenergic receptors as well as specific ion currents that contribute to pacemaker function. This article reviews basic pacemaker physiology, as well as studies in which gene transfer approaches to develop a biological pacemaker have been designed and validated in vivo. Additional requirements and refinements necessary for successful biopacemaker function by gene transfer are discussed. PMID:17139515

  1. Concepts in Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Andre F.; Nöth, Ulrich; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Once articular cartilage is injured, it has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Although current surgical therapeutic procedures to cartilage repair are clinically useful, they cannot restore a normal articular surface. Current research offers a growing number of bioactive reagents, including proteins and nucleic acids, that may be used to augment different aspects of the repair process. As these agents are difficult to administer effectively, gene transfer approaches are being developed to provide their sustained synthesis at sites of repair. To augment regeneration of articular cartilage, therapeutic genes can be delivered to the synovium, or directly to the cartilage lesion. Gene delivery to the cells of the synovial lining is generally considered more suitable for chondroprotective approaches, based on the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators. Gene transfer targeted to cartilage defects can be achieved by either direct vector administration to cells located at or surrounding the defects, or by transplantation of genetically modified chondrogenic cells into the defect. Several studies have shown that exogenous cDNAs encoding growth factors can be delivered locally to sites of cartilage damage, where they are expressed at therapeutically relevant levels. Furthermore, data is beginning to emerge indicating, that efficient delivery and expression of these genes is capable of influencing a repair response toward the synthesis of a more hyaline cartilage repair tissue in vivo. This review presents the current status of gene therapy for cartilage healing and highlights some of the remaining challenges. PMID:18313477

  2. Biosensor-controlled gene therapy/drug delivery with nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Rose, William A.; Wang, Nan; Reece, Lisa M.; Lvov, Yuri; Leary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Nanomedicine involves cell-by-cell regenerative medicine, either repairing cells one at a time or triggering apoptotic pathways in cells that are not repairable. Multilayered nanoparticle systems are being constructed for the targeted delivery of gene therapy to single cells. Cleavable shells containing targeting, biosensing, and gene therapeutic molecules are being constructed to direct nanoparticles to desired intracellular targets. Therapeutic gene sequences are controlled by biosensor-activated control switches to provide the proper amount of gene therapy on a single cell basis. The central idea is to set up gene therapy "nanofactories" inside single living cells. Molecular biosensors linked to these genes control their expression. Gene delivery is started in response to a biosensor detected problem; gene delivery is halted when the cell response indicates that more gene therapy is not needed. Cell targeting of nanoparticles, both nanocrystals and nanocapsules, has been tested by a combination of fluorescent tracking dyes, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Intracellular targeting has been tested by confocal microscopy. Successful gene delivery has been visualized by use of GFP reporter sequences. DNA tethering techniques were used to increase the level of expression of these genes. Integrated nanomedical systems are being designed, constructed, and tested in-vitro, ex-vivo, and in small animals. While still in its infancy, nanomedicine represents a paradigm shift in thinking-from destruction of injured cells by surgery, radiation, chemotherapy to cell-by-cell repair within an organ and destruction of non-repairable cells by natural apoptosis.

  3. Re-examination of regulatory opinions in Europe: possible contribution for the approval of the first gene therapy product Glybera

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Natsumi; Yano, Kazuo; Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Okano, Teruo; Yamato, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The first commercially approved human gene therapy in the Western world is Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec), which is an adenoassociated viral vector encoding the lipoprotein lipase gene. Glybera was recommended for marketing authorization by the European Medicines Agency in 2012. The European Medicines Agency had only ever reviewed three marketing authorization applications for gene therapy medicinal products. Unlike in the case of Glybera, the applications of the first two products, Cerepro and Contusugene Ladenovec Gendux/Advexin, both of which were for cancer diseases, were withdrawn. In this report, we studied the European public assessment reports of the three gene therapy products. During the assessment process, Glybera was re-examined and reviewed for a fourth time. We therefore researched the re-examination procedure of the European Union regulatory process. Approximately 25% of the new medicinal products initially given negative opinions from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use were ultimately approved after re-examination from 2009 to 2013. The indications of most medicines were changed during the re-examination procedure, and the products were later approved with a mode of approval. These results suggested that the re-examination system in the European Union contributed to the approval of both several new drugs and the first gene therapy product. PMID:26052534

  4. Epigenetic therapies - a new direction in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Stein, R A

    2014-07-01

    A major biomedical advance from recent years was the finding that gene expression and phenotypic traits may be shaped by potentially reversible and heritable modifications that occur without altering the sequence of the nucleotides, and became known as epigenetic changes. The term 'epigenetics' dates back to the 1940s, when it was first used in context of cellular differentiation decisions that are made during development. Since then, our understanding of epigenetic modifications that govern development and disease expanded considerably. The contribution of epigenetic changes to shaping phenotypes brings at least two major clinically relevant benefits. One of these, stemming from the reversibility of epigenetic changes, involves the possibility to therapeutically revert epigenetic marks to re-establish prior gene expression patterns. The strength and the potential of this strategy are illustrated by the first four epigenetic drugs that were approved in recent years and by the additional candidates that are at various stages in preclinical studies and clinical trials. The second particularity is the finding that epigenetic changes precede the appearance of histopathological modifications. This has the potential to facilitate the emergence of epigenetic biomarkers, some of which already entered the clinical arena, catalysing a major shift in prophylactic and therapeutic strategies, and promising to fill a decades-old gap in preventive medicine. PMID:24845064

  5. Saporin as a novel suicide gene in anticancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, N; Vago, R; Soldà, T; Monaco, L; Fabbrini, M S

    2007-02-01

    We used a non-viral gene delivery approach to explore the potential of the plant saporin (SAP) gene as an alternative to the currently employed suicide genes in cancer therapy. Plasmids expressing cytosolic SAP were generated by placing the region encoding the mature plant ribosome-inactivating protein under the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus 40 (SV40) promoters. Their ability to inhibit protein synthesis was first tested in cultured tumor cells co-transfected with a luciferase reporter gene. In particular, SAP expression driven by CMV promoter (pCI-SAP) demonstrated that only 10 ng of plasmid per 1.6 x 10(4) B16 cells drastically reduced luciferase activity to 18% of that in control cells. Direct intratumoral injection of pCI-SAP complexed with either lipofectamine or N-(2,3-dioleoyloxy-1-propyl) trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP) in B16 melanoma-bearing mice resulted in a noteworthy attenuation of tumor growth. This antitumor effect was increased in mice that received repeated intratumoral injections. A SAP catalytic inactive mutant (SAP-KQ) failed to exert any antitumor effect demonstrating that this was specifically owing to the SAP N-glycosidase activity. Our overall data strongly suggest that the gene encoding SAP, owing to its rapid and effective action and its independence from the proliferative state of target cells might become a suitable candidate suicide gene for oncologic applications. PMID:17008932

  6. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide 1989-2004-an overview.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Michael L; Abedi, Mohammad R; Wixon, Jo; Edelstein, Richard M

    2004-06-01

    In 1989, Rosenberg et al. performed the first human gene therapy trial when they used a retrovirus to introduce the gene coding for resistance to neomycin into human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes before infusing them into five patients with advanced melanoma. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using retroviral gene transduction in humans and set the stage for further studies. Since then, over 900 clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. These trials have been designed to establish feasibility and safety, to demonstrate the reality of expression of therapeutic protein(s) in vivo by the genes transferred and, in some cases, to show therapeutic benefit. There is no single source of information that presents an overview of all the clinical trials undertaken worldwide. In 1997 we set up a database to bring all the information on clinical trials together as comprehensively and as globally as possible. The data were compiled and are regularly updated from official agency sources, the published literature, presentations at conferences and from information kindly provided by investigators or trial sponsors themselves. As of January 31, 2004, we have identified 918 trials in 24 countries. The USA accounts for two-thirds of these trials. Cancer is by far the most common disease indication, followed by inherited monogenic diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Viral vectors have been the most frequently used vehicles for transferring genes into human cells, with retroviruses and adenoviruses representing the vast majority. Plasmid (naked) DNA and other non-viral vectors have been used in one-quarter of the trials. Over 100 distinct genes have been transferred. This article aims to provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. Details of the data presented, including an interactive, searchable database that currently holds information on 918

  7. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  8. Attenuating Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Regulation: A Medicinal Chemistry Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus is tightly regulated by intricate networks of transcriptional regulators and two-component signal transduction systems. There is now an emerging body of evidence to suggest that the blockade of S. aureus virulence gene expression significantly attenuates infection in experimental models. In this Perspective, we will provide insights into medicinal chemistry strategies for the development of chemical reagents that have the capacity to inhibit staphylococcal virulence expression. These reagents can be broadly grouped into four categories: (1) competitive inhibitors of the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing system, (2) inhibitors of AgrA–DNA interactions, (3) RNAIII transcription inhibitors, and (4) inhibitors of the SarA family of transcriptional regulators. We discuss the potential of specific examples of antivirulence agents for the management and treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:23294220

  9. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  10. Gene therapy: Into the home stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Tumors cannot live without blood. Shut off the blood vessels that feed a tumor and the tumor will turn black and shrivel away. That simple idea lies behind the first attempt to cure a disease by gene therapy, expected to take place at the National Cancer Institute in the next few weeks. When it does, it will test a technique that worked like a charm in mice. When a potent natural killer called tumor necrosis factor, or TNF, is injected into the bloodstream of mice, it begins to shrink tumors within hours, sometimes even minutes. But so far, attempts to recreate that miracle in people with cancer have not fared as well. TNF has been given intravenously to more than 35 patients in experiments that were a failure. Researchers hope to deliver TNF in much larger doses directly to a tumor by packaging the gene for TNF inside special lymphocytes that have a natural affinity for cancer.

  11. Scientific Reports of Plasma Medicine and its Mechanism for Therapy in Plasma Bioscience Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-09-01

    Scientific reports of plasma medicine and its basic mechanism for therapy will be introduced, especially, performed in Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Korea. We have investigated enhanced anticancer effect of monocytes and macrophages activated by nonthermal plasma which act as immune-modulator on these immune cells. Further, we investigated the action of the nanosecond pulsed plasma activated media (NPPAM) on the lung cancer cells and its DNA oxidation pathway. We observed OD induced apoptosis on melanocytes G361 cancer cells through DNA damage signaling cascade. We also studied DNA oxidation by extracting DNA from treated cancer cell and analyzed the effects of OD/OH/D2O2/H2O2 on protein modification and oxidation. Additionally, we attempted molecular docking approaches to check the action of D2O2 on the apoptosis related genes.

  12. Medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus as an alternative cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    SLIVA, DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    Alternative cancer treatment with nutritional/dietary supplements containing a wide variety of herbal products is on the rise in Western countries. Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that mushrooms may prevent against different types of cancers. Phellinus linteus is a well-known Oriental medicinal fungus with a variety of biological activities, including immunomodulatory or direct antitumor activities. The activity of P. linteus and its extracts is associated with the presence of polysaccharides, their peptide/protein complexes and other low molecular weight complexes. Polysaccharide fractions isolated from P. linteus were found to be related to the increased activity of immune cells such as the production of cytokines by macrophages and B-cells or the increased cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells. Moreover, P. linteus was found to modulate the expression or activity of various genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasive behavior and chemoprevention. Finally, P. linteus extracts demonstrated tumor regression in three independent case reports, suggesting that an extract from P. linteus or a dietary supplement based on the extract from P. linteus may have potential use for the alternative treatment of cancer. PMID:22993555

  13. Retinal Gene Therapy: Current Progress and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cristy A.; Pennesi, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials treating inherited retinal dystrophy caused by RPE65 mutations had put retinal gene therapy at the forefront of gene therapy. Both successes and limitations in these clinical trials have fueled developments in gene vectors, which continue to further advance the field. These novel gene vectors aim to more safely and efficiently transduce retinal cells, expand the gene packaging capacity of AAV, and utilize new strategies to correct the varying mechanisms of dysfunction found with inherited retinal dystrophies. With recent clinical trials and numerous pre-clinical studies utilizing these novel vectors, the future of ocular gene therapy continues to hold vast potential. PMID:26609316

  14. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rowzee, Anne M.; Cawley, Niamh X.; Chiorini, John A.; Di Pasquale, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:21747830

  15. Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Gene Therapy May Offer Hope for 'Bubble Boy' Disease Preliminary research tries new approach to rebuild ... therapy shows preliminary promise against so-called "Bubble Boy" disease, researchers report. A small, early-stage trial ...

  16. Perspectives on best practices for gene therapy programs.

    PubMed

    Cheever, Thomas R; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H; Byrne, Barry J; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J; High, Katherine A; Kaspar, Brian K; Klinger, Katherine W; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H; Tagle, Danilo A; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J; Wilson, James M; Porter, John D; Gubitz, Amelie K

    2015-03-01

    With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on "Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs," with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  17. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  18. Prospectives for Gene Therapy of Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Thumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Retinal degenerations encompass a large number of diseases in which the retina and associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells progressively degenerate leading to severe visual disorders or blindness. Retinal degenerations can be divided into two groups, a group in which the defect has been linked to a specific gene and a second group that has a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic influences. The first group encompasses a number of relatively rare diseases with the most prevalent being Retinitis pigmentosa that affects approximately 1 million individuals worldwide. Attempts have been made to correct the defective gene by transfecting the appropriate cells with the wild-type gene and while these attempts have been successful in animal models, human gene therapy for these inherited retinal degenerations has only begun recently and the results are promising. To the second group belong glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). These retinal degenerations have a genetic component since they occur more often in families with affected probands but they are also linked to environmental factors, specifically elevated intraocular pressure, age and high blood sugar levels respectively. The economic and medical impact of these three diseases can be assessed by the number of individuals affected; AMD affects over 30 million, DR over 40 million and glaucoma over 65 million individuals worldwide. The basic defect in these diseases appears to be the relative lack of a neurogenic environment; the neovascularization that often accompanies these diseases has suggested that a decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), at least in part, may be responsible for the neurodegeneration since PEDF is not only an effective neurogenic and neuroprotective agent but also a potent inhibitor of neovascularization. In the last few years inhibitors of vascularization, especially antibodies against vascular endothelial cell

  19. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric therapy part 1: evidence-based emergency care].

    PubMed

    Jüttner, Björn; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), i. e. breathing pure oxygen at elevated ambient pressure, remains the gold standard of care in treating air or gas embolism and decompression illness. Guidelines are less clear on the value of HBOT in acute management of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning or clostridial necrosis. To evaluate the evidence of clinical efficacy of HBOT we performed a systematic literature review. Part 1 assesses acute indications such as air or gas embolism, decompression sickness, CO-poisoning, clostridialmyonecrosis, necrotizing problem wounds, acute traumatic wounds and arterial retinal occlusion. Part 2 discusses further uses of HBOT as adjuvant treatment and highlights problems in assessing the value of HBOT using evidence-based medicine criteria. PMID:26523604

  20. Gene and Stem Cell Therapy: Alone or in Combination?

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both gene and stem cell therapies hold great promise in the treatment of many genetic diseases and are currently focus of interest for many investigators. While both approaches are offering great and valuable treatment options for devastating and life-threatening diseases, they hold much greater promise in combination. Methods As there are multiple options in selecting gene transfer vehicles among the non-viral and viral vectors, there are also many options among the different transplantable cell types ranging from lineage-restricted progenitor cells to multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. Here, combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy is discussed. Results Several suc-cessful gene and stem cell therapies have been reported both in animal and human trials. Combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy can be carried out sequentially where the cell transplantation and the in vivo gene therapy are accomplished one after the other; or, as it is more commonly practiced, they can be carried out as ex vivo gene therapy where the transplantable cells are genetically modified outside the body before being transplanted into the body. Conclusion The combination of the stem-cell technology with gene therapy has the potential of providing both regenerative tissue and therapeutic material simultaneously; therefore, having the benefits of both technologies. PMID:23678430

  1. Nuclear medicine imaging and therapy: gender biases in disease.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Valeria M; Aarsvold, John N; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based medicine is medical research and care conducted with conscious consideration of the sex and gender differences of subjects and patients. This issue of Seminars is focused on diseases for which nuclear medicine is part of routine management and for which the diseases have sex- or gender-based differences that affect incidence or pathophysiology and that thus have differences that can potentially affect the results of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. In this first article, we discuss neurologic diseases, certain gastrointestinal conditions, and thyroid conditions. The discussion is in the context of those sex- or gender-based aspects of these diseases that should be considered in the performance, interpretation, and reporting of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. Cardiovascular diseases, gynecologic diseases, bone conditions such as osteoporosis, pediatric occurrences of some diseases, human immunodeficiency virus-related conditions, and the radiation dose considerations of nuclear medicine studies are discussed in the other articles in this issue. PMID:25362232

  2. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter. PMID:24243238

  3. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints. PMID:27262111

  4. Virotherapy: cancer gene therapy at last?

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Alan E.; Spiliopoulou, Pavlina; Evans, T. R. Jeffry

    2016-01-01

    For decades, effective cancer gene therapy has been a tantalising prospect; for a therapeutic modality potentially able to elicit highly effective and selective responses, definitive efficacy outcomes have often seemed out of reach. However, steady progress in vector development and accumulated experience from previous clinical studies has finally led the field to its first licensed therapy. Following a pivotal phase III trial, Imlygic (talimogene laherparepvec/T-Vec) received US approval as a treatment for cutaneous and subcutaneous melanoma in October 2015, followed several weeks later by its European authorisation. These represent the first approvals for an oncolytic virotherapy. Imlygic is an advanced-generation herpesvirus-based vector optimised for oncolytic and immunomodulatory activities. Many other oncolytic agents currently remain in development, providing hope that current success will be followed by other diverse vectors that may ultimately come to constitute a new class of clinical anti-cancer agents. In this review, we discuss some of the key oncolytic viral agents developed in the adenovirus and herpesvirus classes, and the prospects for further enhancing their efficacy by combining them with novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  5. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  6. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  7. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  8. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  9. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2....

  10. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  11. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed. PMID:18057169

  12. Internal radiation therapy: a neglected aspect of nuclear medicine in the molecular era

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yansong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With increasing evidence, internal radiation therapy, also known as brachytherapy, has become a neglected aspect of nuclear medicine in the molecular era. In this paper, recent developments regarding internal radiation therapy, including developments in radioiodine-131 (131I) and thyroid, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and radiopharmaceuticals for bone metastases. Relevant differences and status of their applications in China were mentioned as well. These molecular mediated internal radiation therapies are gaining increasing importance by providing palliative and curative treatments for an increasing number of diseases and becoming one of the important parts of molecular nuclear medicine. PMID:26445567

  13. Gene patents and personalized medicine - what lies ahead?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Gene patents have generally not impeded biomedical research, but some problems that arise in genetic diagnostics can be attributed to exclusively licensed gene patents. Gene patents for therapeutics have often been litigated but have received surprisingly little public outcry. In stark contrast, genetic diagnostics have been highly controversial but rarely litigated: no case has gone to trial and there is little case law to guide policy. Most recently the Secretary's Advisory Committee for Genetics Health and Society (SACGHS) released a draft report examining how patenting and licensing affect access to clinical genetic testing in the US. The SACGHS reported that patents neither greatly hindered nor facilitated patient access to genetic testing; both the harms and the benefits of patents on genetic diagnostics have been exaggerated. Problems do occur when patents are exclusively licensed to a single provider and no alternative is available. Courts have been changing the thresholds for what can be patented, and how strongly patents can be enforced. Technologies for sequencing, genotyping and gene expression profiling promise to guide clinical decisions in managing common chronic diseases and infectious diseases, and will likely be an integral part of personalized medicine. Developing such genomic tests may require mapping a complex intellectual property landscape and cutting through thickets of patented DNA sequences and related methods. Our preliminary studies have found patent claims that, if strictly enforced, might block the use of multi-gene tests or full-genome sequence data. Yet new technologies promise to reduce the costs of complete genomic sequencing to prices that are comparable to current genetic tests for a single condition. Courts, companies, and policy makers seem unlikely to allow intellectual property to obstruct such technological advance, but prudent policy will depend on careful analysis and foresight. The SACGHS report signals that the US

  14. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal–known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists’ perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists’ views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software. Results Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients. Discussion This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which

  15. Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy: Current State and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lukashev, A N; Zamyatnin, A A

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapy is the straightforward approach for the application of recent advances in molecular biology into clinical practice. One of the major obstacles in the development of gene therapy is the delivery of the effector to and into the target cell. Unfortunately, most methods commonly used in laboratory practice are poorly suited for clinical use. Viral vectors are one of the most promising methods for gene therapy delivery. Millions of years of evolution of viruses have resulted in the development of various molecular mechanisms for entry into cells, long-term survival within cells, and activation, inhibition, or modification of the host defense mechanisms at all levels. The relatively simple organization of viruses, small genome size, and evolutionary plasticity allow modifying them to create effective instruments for gene therapy approaches. This review summarizes the latest trends in the development of gene therapy, in particular, various aspects and prospects of the development of clinical products based on viral delivery systems. PMID:27449616

  16. A snapshot of gene therapy in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Linden, Rafael; Matte, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy attempts the insertion and expression of exogenous genetic material in cells for therapeutic purposes. Conceived in the 1960s, gene therapy reached its first clinical trial at the end of the 1980s and by December 2013 around 600 genuine open clinical trials of gene therapy were registered at NIH Clinical Trials Database. Here, we summarize the current efforts towards the development of gene therapy in Latin America. Our survey shows that the number of scientists involved in the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccines in Latin America is still very low. Higher levels of investment in this technology are necessary to boost the advancement of innovation and intellectual property in this field in a way that would ease both the social and financial burden of various medical conditions in Latin America. PMID:24764763

  17. A snapshot of gene therapy in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Rafael; Matte, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy attempts the insertion and expression of exogenous genetic material in cells for therapeutic purposes. Conceived in the 1960s, gene therapy reached its first clinical trial at the end of the 1980s and by December 2013 around 600 genuine open clinical trials of gene therapy were registered at NIH Clinical Trials Database. Here, we summarize the current efforts towards the development of gene therapy in Latin America. Our survey shows that the number of scientists involved in the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccines in Latin America is still very low. Higher levels of investment in this technology are necessary to boost the advancement of innovation and intellectual property in this field in a way that would ease both the social and financial burden of various medical conditions in Latin America. PMID:24764763

  18. [Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) in small animal medicine. Mechanisms of action, applications and indications].

    PubMed

    Nolff, M C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of open wounds is a daily challenge in veterinary medicine. During the past years, a special treatment option, the Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT), has been developed. Usage of this therapy significantly increases the healing rate of open wounds as well as free skin grafts in small animals. This review describes the mechanisms of action, indications as well as the known complications associated with this therapy. PMID:26830725

  19. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  20. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye.

    PubMed

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  1. Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fanghua; Li, Anyuan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jijun; Kokudo, Norihiro; Li, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that in cancer treatment Chinese herbal medicines in combination with chemo- or radio-therapy can be used to enhance the efficacy of and diminish the side effects and complications caused by chemo- and radio-therapy. Therefore, an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines is needed by physicians and other health care providers. This review provides evidence for use of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment during chemo- or radio-therapy. First, Chinese herbal medicines (e.g. Astragalus, Turmeric, Ginseng, TJ-41, PHY906, Huachansu injection, and Kanglaite injection) that are commonly used by cancer patients for treating the cancer and/or reducing the toxicity induced by chemo- or radio-therapy are discussed. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that these Chinese herbal medicines possess great advantages in terms of suppressing tumor progression, increasing the sensitivity of chemo- and radio-therapeutics, improving an organism's immune system function, and lessening the damage caused by chemo- and radio-therapeutics. Second, clinical trials of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant cancer treatment are reviewed. By reducing side effects and complications during chemo- and radio-therapy, these Chinese herbal medicines have a significant effect on reducing cancer-related fatigue and pain, improving respiratory tract infections and gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, protecting liver function, and even ameliorating the symptoms of cachexia. This review should contribute to an understanding of Chinese herbal medicines as adjuvant treatment for cancer and provide useful information for the development of more effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:21248427

  2. Nuclear medicine: proof of principle for targeted drugs in diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Leitha, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Delivering a drug to a specific target in the body is comparable to the "magic bullet principle" applied in Nuclear Medicine. If clinical medicine today found treatment options by targeting specific receptors, proteins or enzymes by "small-molecule drugs" it utilizes concepts that have been initially described by Nobel Laureate George von Hevesy as "tracer principle". This article is going to show that molecular imaging probes in Nuclear Medicine can be regarded as proof of principle of many of recent trends in diagnosis and therapy and offers exciting opportunities for further developments. Radioiodine therapy of benign and malignant thyroid disease has been established in Nuclear Medicine over six decades ago and is a fine example for using the same highly specific probe for diagnosis and treatment of a given disease. The use of radio labeled monoclonal antibodies against surface receptors of tumor cells (e.g. CEA) dominated diagnostic Nuclear Medicine in the eighties and sees a recent revival in lymphoma treatment radioimmunotherapy. Finally Nuclear Medicine has shown that it may advance drug development by visualizing its biodistribution and site of action. On the other hand some drugs like somatostatin analogues have been reinvented as diagnostic and therapeutic probes over a decade after their initial introduction as therapeutics. Molecular Imaging and targeted therapy are merging and potentiate their individual strength. Nuclear Medicine has ample experience in applying Molecular Imaging in clinical research and practice and has a bright future in this exciting field. PMID:19149611

  3. Equine-Assisted Therapies: Complementary Medicine or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Katherine T.; Sanekane, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Equine-assisted therapies are interventions that use the unique qualities of a horse to assist persons with disabilities to improve their gross motor, language, social, and self-help skills. Programs offering these services are varied and operate on all major continents across the world. The effectiveness of equine-assisted therapies is generally…

  4. Alternative Medicines as Emerging Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Udai P.; Singh, Narendra P.; Busbee, Brandon; Guan, H.; Singh, Balwan; Price, Robert L.; Taub, Dennis D.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be divided into two major categories, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease (CD). While the main cause(s) of IBD remain unknown, a number of interventional and preventive strategies have been proposed for use against CD and UC. Many reports have focused on the use of alternative natural medicines as potential therapeutic interventions in IBD patients with minimal side effects. While the use of alternative medicines may be effective in IBD patients that are refractory to corticosteroids or thiopurins, alternative treatment strategies are limited and require extensive clinical testing before being optimized for use in patients. PMID:22251008

  5. The Beginnings of Drug Therapy: Ancient Mesopotamian Medicine.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, John K.

    2002-04-01

    As civilizations developed and human and domesticated animal population density increased, protozoan, bacterial and viral disease-causing organisms had an expanded field for their propagation. This increase was particularly rapid and occurred at a very early date in Mesopotamia. Many closely related civilizations developed in Mesopotamia, including the Sumerians. Even in the early Sumerian civilization, medicine had developed considerably. Much of our knowledge of their medical practices comes from cuneiform clay tablets, many of which are prescriptions for medicine. (c) 2002 Prous Science. All rights reserved. PMID:12677263

  6. 75 FR 65640 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Tumor Vaccines and Biotechnology Branch, Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  7. Retroviral Integrations in Gene Therapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, Luca; Baricordi, Cristina; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    γ-Retroviral and lentiviral vectors allow the permanent integration of a therapeutic transgene in target cells and have provided in the last decade a delivery platform for several successful gene therapy (GT) clinical approaches. However, the occurrence of adverse events due to insertional mutagenesis in GT treated patients poses a strong challenge to the scientific community to identify the mechanisms at the basis of vector-driven genotoxicity. Along the last decade, the study of retroviral integration sites became a fundamental tool to monitor vector–host interaction in patients overtime. This review is aimed at critically revising the data derived from insertional profiling, with a particular focus on the evidences collected from GT clinical trials. We discuss the controversies and open issues associated to the interpretation of integration site analysis during patient's follow up, with an update on the latest results derived from the use of high-throughput technologies. Finally, we provide a perspective on the future technical development and on the application of these studies to address broader biological questions, from basic virology to human hematopoiesis. PMID:22252453

  8. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  9. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  10. Advancements in gene transfer-based therapy for hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Christopher B; Spencer, H Trent

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy has promised clinical benefit to those suffering with hemophilia A, but this benefit has not yet been realized. However, during the past two decades, basic and applied gene therapy research has progressed and the goal of gene therapy for hemophilia A is once again in our sights. The hemophilia A patient population suffers from a disease that requires invasive, lifelong management, is exorbitantly expensive to treat, has geographically limited treatment access and can become untreatable due to immune reactions to the treatment product. Subsequent to the cloning of the factor VIII gene and cDNA in the early 1980s, academic and commercial research laboratories began to pursue gene transfer-based therapies to supplement or supplant the available protein replacement therapy. However, to date, clinical trials for gene therapy of hemophilia A have been unsuccessful. Three trials have been conducted with each having tested a different gene-transfer strategy and each demonstrating that there is a considerable barrier to achieving sustained expression of therapeutic amounts of factor VIII. Recent progress has been made in gene-transfer technology and, relevant to hemophilia A, towards increasing the biosynthetic efficiency of factor VIII. These advances are now being combined to develop novel strategies to treat and possibly cure hemophilia A. PMID:20577574

  11. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric chambers in use].

    PubMed

    Henze, Clemens; Heß, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a scientifically justified and internationally established therapy, which is however not well-known thus rarely used in Germany. During a HBOT, the ambient pressure is raised while the patient breathes 100% O2, causing tissue partial oxygen pressure (ptO2) to increase distinctly. Through that, various pressure- and O2-associated processes are initiated. Herein 3 case studies are described that illustrate the mechanism of action and the range of applications of HBOT. PMID:26510110

  12. Sports medicine and platelet-rich plasma: nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2015-01-01

    A Cochrane Review was performed to assess the effects of platelet-rich therapies for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Selection criteria were randomized and quasirandomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared platelet-rich therapy with either placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy for people with acute or chronic musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Primary outcomes were functional status, pain, and adverse effects. The investigators found 19 studies that compared platelet-rich therapy with placebo, autologous whole blood, dry needling, or no platelet-rich therapy. Disorders included rotator cuff tears (arthroscopic repair; 6 trials); shoulder impingement syndrome surgery (1 trial); elbow epicondylitis (3 trials); anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (4 trials), ACL reconstruction (donor graft site application; 2 trials), patellar tendinopathy (1 trial), Achilles tendinopathy (1 trial), and acute Achilles rupture surgical repair (1 trial). They further subdivided the studies based on type of treatment, including tendinopathies in which platelet-rich therapy injections were the main treatment (5 trials), and surgical augmentation procedures in which platelet-rich therapy was applied during surgery (14 trials). The conclusion was that there is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of platelet-rich therapy for treating musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. Researchers contemplating RCTs should consider the coverage of currently ongoing trials when assessing the need for future RCTs on specific conditions. There is a need for standardization of PRP preparation methods. At this time, the use of PRP in foot and ankle surgery as an orthobiologic does not have an absolute indication. Many of the studies are lower evidence-based from surgical techniques. Several in vitro studies have shown that growth factors promote the regeneration of bone, cartilage, and tendons. More clinical studies are

  13. Mirror therapy for facial paralysis in traditional South Asian Islamic medicine.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy has stimulated a dynamic clinical and research agenda for the treatment of poststroke hemiparesis and phantom pain. The origins of mirror therapy are thought to lie with the end of the twentieth century. This article translates key sections on the use of mirror therapy for facial paralysis from Muhammad Akbar Arzānī, an influential practitioner of South Asian Islamic medicine. Given that his text appeared over a quarter millennium before Western accounts of mirror therapy, this article calls for an amendment to the historical record so that Arzānī is recognized. PMID:23323527

  14. Interactions between DNA and Gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene therapy using gemini surfactants is a unique approach to medicine that can be adapted toward the treatment of various diseases. Recently, gemini surfactants have been utilized as candidates for the formation of nonviral vectors. The chemical structure of the surfactant (variations in the alkyl tail length and spacer/head group) and the resulting physicochemical properties of the lipoplexes are critical parameters for efficient gene transfection. Moreover, studying the interaction of the surfactant with DNA can help in designing an efficient vector and understanding how transfection complexes overcome various cellular barriers. Part I of this review provides an overview of various types of gemini surfactants designed for gene therapy and their transfection efficiency; and Part II will focus on different novel methods utilized to understand the interactions between the gemini and DNA in a lipoplex. PMID:26785905

  15. Current progress in suicide gene therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Kazuyuki; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2002-07-01

    Standard chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation destroy dividing cells. Because tumor cells divide more rapidly than normal cells, there is a therapeutic index in which damage to the cancer cells is maximized while keeping the toxicity to the normal host cells acceptable. Suicide gene therapy strives to deliver genes to the cancer cells, which convert nontoxic prodrugs into active chemotherapeutic agents. With this strategy, the systemically administered prodrug is converted to the active chemotherapeutic agent only in cancer cells, thereby allowing a maximal therapeutic effect while limiting systemic toxicity. A literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE database from 1990 to 2001 to identify articles related to suicide gene therapy for cancer. A number of suicide gene systems have been identified, including the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, the cytosine deaminase gene, the varicella-zoster virus thymidine kinase gene, the nitroreductase gene, the Escherichia coli gpt gene, and the E. coli Deo gene. Various vectors, including liposomes, retroviruses, and adenoviruses, have been used to transfer these suicide genes to tumor cells. These strategies have been effective in cell culture experiments, laboratory animals, and some early clinical trials. Advances in tissue- and cell-specific delivery of suicide genes using specific promoters will improve the clinical utility of suicide gene therapy. PMID:11948367

  16. Gene Therapy and Cell-Based Therapies for Therapeutic Angiogenesis in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Hironori; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy and cell-based therapy have emerged as novel therapies to promote therapeutic angiogenesis in critical limb ischemia (CLI) caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD). Although researchers initially focused on gene therapy using proangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and hepatocyte growth factors (HGF), cell therapy using bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs), mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (M-PBMNCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have also been extensively studied. Based on the elaborate studies and favorable results of basic research, some clinical phase I/II trials have been performed, and the results demonstrate the safety of these approaches and their potential for symptomatic improvement in CLI. However, the phase 3 clinical trials have thus far been limited to gene therapy using the HGF gene. Further studies using well-designed larger placebo-controlled and long-term randomized control trials (RCTs) will clarify the effectiveness of gene therapy and cell-based therapy for the treatment of CLI. Furthermore, the development of efficient gene transfer systems and effective methods for keeping transplanted cells healthy will make these novel therapies more effective and ease the symptoms of CLI. PMID:24294599

  17. The interplay of post-translational modification and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Osamor, Victor Chukwudi; Chinedu, Shalom N; Azuh, Dominic E; Iweala, Emeka Joshua; Ogunlana, Olubanke Olujoke

    2016-01-01

    Several proteins interact either to activate or repress the expression of other genes during transcription. Based on the impact of these activities, the proteins can be classified into readers, modifier writers, and modifier erasers depending on whether histone marks are read, added, or removed, respectively, from a specific amino acid. Transcription is controlled by dynamic epigenetic marks with serious health implications in certain complex diseases, whose understanding may be useful in gene therapy. This work highlights traditional and current advances in post-translational modifications with relevance to gene therapy delivery. We report that enhanced understanding of epigenetic machinery provides clues to functional implication of certain genes/gene products and may facilitate transition toward revision of our clinical treatment procedure with effective fortification of gene therapy delivery. PMID:27013864

  18. The interplay of post-translational modification and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Osamor, Victor Chukwudi; Chinedu, Shalom N; Azuh, Dominic E; Iweala, Emeka Joshua; Ogunlana, Olubanke Olujoke

    2016-01-01

    Several proteins interact either to activate or repress the expression of other genes during transcription. Based on the impact of these activities, the proteins can be classified into readers, modifier writers, and modifier erasers depending on whether histone marks are read, added, or removed, respectively, from a specific amino acid. Transcription is controlled by dynamic epigenetic marks with serious health implications in certain complex diseases, whose understanding may be useful in gene therapy. This work highlights traditional and current advances in post-translational modifications with relevance to gene therapy delivery. We report that enhanced understanding of epigenetic machinery provides clues to functional implication of certain genes/gene products and may facilitate transition toward revision of our clinical treatment procedure with effective fortification of gene therapy delivery. PMID:27013864

  19. Synergistic nanomedicine by combined gene and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-03-01

    To date, various nanomaterials with the ability for gene delivery or photothermal effect have been developed in the field of biomedicine. The therapeutic potential of these nanomaterials has raised considerable interests in their use in potential next-generation strategies for effective anticancer therapy. In particular, the advancement of novel nanomedicines utilizing both therapeutic strategies of gene delivery and photothermal effect has generated much optimism regarding the imminent development of effective and successful cancer treatments. In this review, we discuss current research progress with regard to combined gene and photothermal therapy. This review focuses on synergistic therapeutic systems combining gene regulation and photothermal ablation as well as logically designed nano-carriers aimed at enhancing the delivery efficiency of therapeutic genes using the photothermal effect. The examples detailed in this review provide insight to further our understanding of combinatorial gene and photothermal therapy, thus paving the way for the design of promising nanomedicines. PMID:26748259

  20. Ibn-Sina's life and contributions to medicinal therapies of kidney calculi.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Pouya; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdoali

    2012-09-01

    Ibn-Sina (commonly known as Avicenna) is one of the most famous and influential scientists in the history of medicine. The Canon of Medicine, which is his most celebrated book in medicine, presents a summary of all the medical knowledge of his time. Ibn-Sina wrote a complete section about kidney calculi in his book. Totally, 65 herbal, 8 animal, and 4 mineral medicines are mentioned in the Canon of Medicine as beneficial drugs for dissolving, expelling, and preventing kidney calculi. Ibn-Sina introduced very advanced drug designing based on drug delivery, targeting the organ, deposition in the site of action, pain control, wound healing, clearance after action, and supporting the organ. Using Ibn-Sina's ideas help scientists to choose better drugs with a historical background to reduce the cost of therapies and research projects. PMID:22976258

  1. How knowledgeable are investigators studying therapies of traditional medicines?

    PubMed Central

    Narahari, Saravu R.; Aggithaya, Madhur G.; Thamban, Chendalam; Muralidharan, Kunnathody; Kanjarpane, Aniruddha B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research methodology in traditional Indian system of medicine. Aim: To determine the knowledge level of investigators conducting clinical trials in traditional medicines (TMs) including Ayurveda. Materials and Methods: This was a questionnaire survey conducted for selected researchers trained in any specialty and working in TM. 2087 researchers were selected based on selection criteria. A validated and pretested questionnaire containing the questions regarding regulatory issues, literature search, evidence-based medicine, clinical trial design, patient selection, and study reporting were sent either through E-mail or post. The answered questionnaires were analyzed. The parameters were analyzed based on median and interquartile range (IQR). Results: Forty two responses were received through E-mail and 21 researchers responded through post. Out of 63, six researchers sent incomplete responses. Among the remaining 57 respondents; 34 (59.6%) investigators had postdoctoral degree, 43 investigators (75.4%) did not receive any structured training on research methodology, 23 (40.4%) had two decades of research experience. Thirty three (74%) of investigators who received government funding didn’t have any training on research methodology. Ayurveda experts group had better knowledge compared to pharmaceutical sciences and basic science group although they had a dilemma about conducting clinical evaluation of TM within the specific framework of rigorous clinical pharmacological principles without ignoring the Ayurvedic concepts such as Dosha, Prakruti etc., Investigators below 30 years possessed higher knowledge of research methodology when analyzed based on the age. The respondents working in research organizations, government organizations, and academic institutions had lower knowledge compared to those who were in private organizations/practice. Conclusions: It is recommend that investigators, peer reviewers, and fund managers involved in traditional medicine

  2. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described. PMID:26193303

  3. Gene Therapy from the perspective of Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Annex, Brian H.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy research has expanded from its original concept of replacing absent or defective DNA with functional DNA for transcription. Genetic material may be delivered via multiple vectors, including naked plasmid DNA, viruses and even cells with the goal of increasing gene expression; and the targeting of specific tissues or cell types is aimed at decreasing risks of systemic or side effects. As with the development of any drug, there is an amount of empiricism in the choice of gene target, route of administration, dosing and in particular the scaling-up from pre-clinical models to clinical trials. Systems Biology, whose arsenal includes high-throughput experimental and computational studies that account for the complexities of host-disease-therapy interactions, holds significant promise in aiding the development and optimization of gene therapies, including personalized therapies and the identification of biomarkers for success of these strategies. In this review we describe some of the obstacles and successes in gene therapy, using the specific example of growth factor gene delivery to promote angiogenesis and blood vessel remodeling in ischemic diseases; we also make references to anti-angiogenic gene therapy in cancer. The opportunities for Systems Biology and in silico modeling to improve on current outcomes are highlighted. PMID:20886389

  4. Shared Decision Making in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Jansons, Lauren L.; Lynch, Rachel L.; LeBlanc, Annie; Tilburt, Jon C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper provides a structured approach for pediatricians responding to requests from patients and their families about the complementary medicine treatment options. Methods Using a case-based narrative review approach, the authors outline practical strategies for addressing conflict, uncertainty, and challenges in explaining alternative health paradigms in routine pediatric care. Reflections are drawn from the clinical experience of the authors, the literature, and recent high-profile cases in the United States. Results The discussion of common case-based scenarios illustrates a general guide for approaching conversations about complementary medicine in the care of the pediatric patient that is responsive to evidence and informed by patient and family values. Conclusions The principles of shared decision making can guide constructive conversations in this area in an effort to facilitate improved satisfaction for patient, family, and provider. Practice Implications Discussions of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics pose a specific challenge with regard to patient and/or family preferences and the duty of the provider to advocate for the safety of the child. The proposed structured approach is useful in navigating these important conversations. PMID:23205655

  5. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere

    PubMed Central

    Pytel, Kamila M.; Alton, Eric W.F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    PubMed

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here. PMID:25838137

  8. Cardiovascular gene therapy: current status and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, M M; Hynes, S O; Barry, F; O'Brien, T

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy is emerging as a potential treatment option in patients suffering from a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, vein graft failure and in-stent restenosis. Thus far preclinical studies have shown promise for a wide variety of genes, in particular the delivery of genes encoding growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to treat ischaemic vascular disease both peripherally and in coronary artery disease. VEGF as well as other genes such as TIMPs have been used to target the development of neointimal hyperplasia to successfully prevent vein graft failure and in-stent restenosis in animal models. Subsequent phase I trials to examine safety of these therapies have been successful with low levels of serious adverse effects, and albeit in the absence of a placebo group some suggestion of efficacy. Phase 2 studies, which have incorporated a placebo group, have not confirmed this early promise of efficacy. In the next generation of clinical gene therapy trials for cardiovascular disease, many parameters will need to be adjusted in the search for an effective therapy, including the identification of a suitable vector, appropriate gene or genes and an effective vector delivery system for a specific disease target. Here we review the current status of cardiovascular gene therapy and the potential for this approach to become a viable treatment option. PMID:17558439

  9. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS) Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV) alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases. PMID:27525222

  10. Cell and gene therapy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Martiniello-Wilks, R; Rasko, J E J

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of human cells to produce cell therapeutic products for the treatment of disease is, with few exceptions, an experimental therapy. Because cell therapies involve a biological product, often with some genetic or other modification, they require extensive pre-clinical research and development. Cell therapy production processes and premises require licensing by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. In this review, timed to coincide with the international meetings of the ISCT and ISSCR in Australia, we describe some promising cell therapies currently under development. PMID:17464751

  11. Prevailing public perceptions of the ethics of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Julie M; Roskams-Edris, Dylan; Kuzeljevic, Boris; Illes, Judy

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy research is advancing rapidly, and hopes of treating a large number of brain disorders exist alongside ethical concerns. Most surveys of public attitudes toward these ethical issues are already dated and the content of these surveys has been researcher-driven. To examine current public perceptions, we developed an online instrument that is responsive and relevant to the latest research about ethics, gene therapy, and the brain. The 16-question survey was launched with the platform Amazon Mechanical Turk and was made available to residents of Canada and the United States. The survey was divided into six themes: (1) demographic information, (2) general opinions about gene therapy, (3) medical applications of gene therapy, (4) identity and moral/belief systems, (5) enhancement, and (6) risks. We received and analyzed responses from a total of 467 participants. Our results show that a majority of respondents (>90%) accept gene therapy as a treatment for severe illnesses such as Alzheimer disease, but this receptivity decreases for conditions perceived as less severe such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (79%), and for nontherapeutic applications (47%). The greatest area of concern for the application of gene therapy to brain conditions is the fear of not receiving sufficient information before undergoing the treatment. The main ethical concerns with enhancement were the potential for disparities in resource allocation, access to the procedure, and discrimination. When comparing these data with those from the 1990s, our findings suggest that the acceptability of gene therapy is increasing and that this trend is occurring despite lingering concerns over ethical issues. Providing the public and patients with up-to-date information and opportunities to engage in the discourse about areas of research in gene therapy is a priority. PMID:24773182

  12. [The certification of advanced therapy medicinal products. A quality label for product development in small and medium-sized enterprises].

    PubMed

    Berger, A; Schüle, S; Flory, E

    2011-07-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are gene therapy, cell therapy, and tissue engineered products. To gain access to the market within the European Union, ATMPs must be authorized by the European Commission (EC). Especially for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the European centralized procedure of marketing authorization that is conducted by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) constitutes a major challenge, because SMEs often have little experience with regulatory procedures and many have limited financial possibilities. To tackle these challenges, a certification procedure exclusively for SMEs and their ATMP development was introduced by the EC. Independently from a marketing authorization application, development and/or production processes can be certified. An issued certificate demonstrates that the respective process meets the current regulatory and scientific requirements of the EMA, representing a valuable milestone for putative investors and licensees. This article highlights the background, the detailed procedure, the minimum requirements, as well as the costs of certification, while giving further noteworthy guidance for interested parties. PMID:21698534

  13. Precision medicine and personalized breast cancer: combination pertuzumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kerry; Sarangi, Sasmit; Bardia, Aditya; Dizon, Don S

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2), is the poster child for antibody-based targeted therapy in breast cancer. Pertuzumab, another humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to a different domain of HER2 and prevents the formation of HER2:HER3 dimers, which is the most potent heterodimer in the HER family. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab has synergistic activity, and is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy originally as first-line therapy for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in 2012, and more recently as neoadjuvant therapy for localized disease in 2013. Pertuzumab is the first neoadjuvant drug to receive accelerated approval by the FDA based on pathological complete response as the primary end point. In this article, we review the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and current role of pertuzumab in the management of breast cancer, as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions regarding the utility of pertuzumab as a personalized therapeutic option for HER2-positive breast cancer. In the coming years, we anticipate increased utilization of neoadjuvant trials for drug development, biomarker discovery, and validation, and envision conduct of personalized breast cancer clinics in which therapies will be routinely selected based on genetic alterations in the tumor. Regardless of the targeted therapy combinations employed based on tumor genomic profile, trastuzumab and pertuzumab will likely continue to form the backbone of the personalized regimen for HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:24715764

  14. Medicinal plants and dementia therapy: herbal hopes for brain aging?

    PubMed

    Perry, Elaine; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R

    2011-12-01

    An escalating "epidemic" of diseases like Alzheimer's has not yet been met by effective symptomatic treatments or preventative strategies. Among a few current prescription drugs are cholinesterase inhibitors including galantamine, originating from the snowdrop. Research into ethnobotanicals for memory or cognition has burgeoned in recent years. Based on a multi-faceted review of medicinal plants or phytochemicals, including traditional uses, relevant bioactivities, psychological and clinical evidence on efficacy and safety, this overview focuses on those for which there is promising clinical trial evidence in people with dementia, together with at least one other of these lines of supporting evidence. With respect to cognitive function, such plants reviewed include sage, Ginkgo biloba, and complex mixtures of other traditional remedies. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) challenge carers and lead to institutionalization. Symptoms can be alleviated by some plant species (e.g., lemon balm and lavender alleviate agitation in people with dementia; St John's wort treats depression in the normal population). The ultimate goal of disease prevention is considered from the perspective of limited epidemiological and clinical trial evidence to date. The potential value of numerous plant extracts or chemicals (e.g., curcumin) with neuroprotective but as yet no clinical data are reviewed. Given intense clinical need and carer concerns, which lead to exploration of such alternatives as herbal medicines, the following research priorities are indicated: investigating botanical agents which enhance cognition in populations with mild memory impairment or at earliest disease stages, and those for BPSD in people with dementia at more advanced stages; establishing an ongoing authoritative database on herbal medicine for dementia; and further epidemiological and follow up studies of promising phytopharmaceuticals or related nutraceuticals for disease prevention

  15. Leech Therapy- A Holistic Approach of Treatment in Unani (Greeko-Arab) Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Azad Hussain; Ahmad, Tanzeel; Anwar, Mohd; Habib, Shahida; Sofi, Gh; Imam, Hashmat

    2011-01-01

    The Unani System of Medicine also known as Greeko-Arab medicine, founded by Hippocrates is based on the concept of equilibrium and balance of natural body humours (blood, bile, black bile and phlegm). The imbalance in the quality and quantity of these humours leads to diseases whereas restoration of this balance maintains health of a person. The treatment methodology of diseases is based on four therapeutic modalities viz. Regimental therapy, Dieto-therapy, Pharmacotherapy and surgery. Irsale Alaq (Leech or Hirudo therapy) is one of the most important and widely practised methods of regimental therapy used for local evacuation of morbid humours. It is a procedure of treatment with the use of medicinal leeches. It has been suggested and successfully practised by Greeko-Arab physicians in the management of musculoskeletal diseases, gynaecological disorders, chronic skin diseases, thromboembolic diseases, varicose veins, ENT disorders etc since long. According to Unani doctrine, the efficacy of leech therapy is attributed to the analgesic and resolvent activities of leeches. However, from modern perspective, the saliva of leech contains about 100 pharmacologically active biological substances like Hirudin, hyaluronidase, vasodilators, anesthetics, antibacterial, fibrinases, collagenase etc. These substances are injected into human body while sucking of the blood and are responsible for the analgesic, anti inflammatory and anesthetic effects of leech therapy. PMID:22736888

  16. Perspectives on Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cheever, Thomas R.; Berkley, Dale; Braun, Serge; Brown, Robert H.; Byrne, Barry J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Cwik, Valerie; Duan, Dongsheng; Federoff, Howard J.; High, Katherine A.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Larkindale, Jane; Lincecum, John; Mavilio, Fulvio; McDonald, Cheryl L.; McLaughlin, James; Weiss McLeod, Bonnie; Mendell, Jerry R.; Nuckolls, Glen; Stedman, Hansell H.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Wang, Hao; Wernett, Pamela J.; Wilson, James M.; Porter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With recent successes in gene therapy trials for hemophilia and retinal diseases, the promise and prospects for gene therapy are once again garnering significant attention. To build on this momentum, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Muscular Dystrophy Association jointly hosted a workshop in April 2014 on “Best Practices for Gene Therapy Programs,” with a focus on neuromuscular disorders. Workshop participants included researchers from academia and industry as well as representatives from the regulatory, legal, and patient advocacy sectors to cover the gamut from preclinical optimization to intellectual property concerns and regulatory approval. The workshop focused on three key issues in the field: (1) establishing adequate scientific premise for clinical trials in gene therapy, (2) addressing regulatory process issues, and (3) intellectual property and commercialization issues as they relate to gene therapy. The outcomes from the discussions at this workshop are intended to provide guidance for researchers and funders in the gene therapy field. PMID:25654329

  17. Novel approaches and mechanisms in hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bigger, Brian W; Wynn, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy is one of the most exciting clinical tools to emerge from the gene therapy stable. This technology combines the expansion capability of hematopoietic stem cells, capable of replacing the entire blood and immune system of an individual, with the capacity for long-term replacement of one or more gene copies using integrating gene therapy vectors. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits significantly from the pre-existing experience of standard blood and marrow transplantation, whilst at the same time having the capacity to deliver a safer and more effective therapy to a wider range of diseases. In this review we summarize the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to expand the scope of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, including the evolution of vector delivery systems and the success and failures of current clinical experience with this treatment. In particular we deal with the incidence of vector mediated transformation in patients and the steps that have been taken to minimize this risk. Finally we discuss the innovations in preclinical development that are likely to drive the future of this field, including the expansion to many more genetic diseases, particularly those affecting the brain. PMID:24759625

  18. Bioethical conflicts of gene therapy: a brief critical review.

    PubMed

    Freire, José Ednésio da Cruz; Medeiros, Suelen Carneiro de; Lopes Neto, Antônio Viana; Monteiro Júnior, José Edvar; Sousa, Antônio Juscelino Sudário; Rocha, Antônio José; Menezes, Léa Maria Bezerra de

    2014-01-01

    Methods and techniques employed in gene therapy are reviewed in parallel with pertinent ethical conflicts. Clinical interventions based on gene therapy techniques preferentially use vectors for the transportation of therapeutic genes, however little is known about the potential risks and damages to the patient. Thus, attending carefully to the clinical complications arising as well as to security is essential. Despite the scientific and technological advances, there are still many uncertainties about the side effects of gene therapy. Moreover, there is a need, above all, to understand the principles of bioethics as both science and ethics, in accordance with its socioecological responsibility, in order to prioritize the health and welfare of man and nature, using properly natural resources and technology. Therefore, it is hard to determine objective results and to which extent the insertion of genes can affect the organism, as well as the ethical implication. PMID:25650850

  19. Progresses towards safe and efficient gene therapy vectors

    PubMed Central

    Chira, Sergiu; Jackson, Carlo S.; Oprea, Iulian; Ozturk, Ferhat; Pepper, Michael S.; Diaconu, Iulia; Braicu, Cornelia; Raduly, Lajos-Zsolt; Calin, George A.; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of genetic engineering at the beginning of the 1970′s opened the era of biomedical technologies, which aims to improve human health using genetic manipulation techniques in a clinical context. Gene therapy represents an innovating and appealing strategy for treatment of human diseases, which utilizes vehicles or vectors for delivering therapeutic genes into the patients' body. However, a few past unsuccessful events that negatively marked the beginning of gene therapy resulted in the need for further studies regarding the design and biology of gene therapy vectors, so that this innovating treatment approach can successfully move from bench to bedside. In this paper, we review the major gene delivery vectors and recent improvements made in their design meant to overcome the issues that commonly arise with the use of gene therapy vectors. At the end of the manuscript, we summarized the main advantages and disadvantages of common gene therapy vectors and we discuss possible future directions for potential therapeutic vectors. PMID:26362400

  20. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  1. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  3. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  4. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  5. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  6. Maggot debridement therapy in modern army medicine: perceptions and prevalence.

    PubMed

    Heitkamp, Rae A; Peck, George W; Kirkup, Benjamin C

    2012-11-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT), despite its long history and safety profile, finds limited use in the military health care system. Although new methods are continually being investigated to debride wounds more quickly and effectively, MDT remains largely a therapy of last resort. We evaluated the frequency of MDT in the Army sector of the MHS and the decision-making process surrounding its use. A 22 question survey of Army physicians was prepared and distributed through select Medical Corps Consultants in specialties likely to practice debridement. 83% of respondents were familiar with MDT, and of those familiar, 63% were aware of FDA approval for the product and 10% had used the product themselves. The three most frequently cited reasons for not using the therapy were no need (52%), no access (23%), and insufficient experience (19%). Informing the 37% of physicians who are not aware of FDA approval is an obvious target for program improvement. However, as many do not find a need for MDT, targeted improvements to MDT access and education for those physicians who encounter indications for MDT would permit them to apply MDT where there is an unmet need. PMID:23198524

  7. MicroRNAs and Chinese Medicinal Herbs: New Possibilities in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ming; Wang, Ning; Tan, Hor Yue; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades Chinese medicine has been used worldwide as a complementary and alternative medicine to treat cancer. Plenty of studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play fundamental roles in many pathological processes, including cancer, while the anti-cancer mechanisms of Chinese medicinal herbs targeting miRNAs also have been extensively explored. Our previous studies and those of others on Chinese medicinal herbs and miRNAs in various cancer models have provided a possibility of new cancer therapies, for example, up-regulating the expression of miR-23a may activate the positive regulatory network of p53 and miR-23a involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-tumor effect of berberine in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this review, we survey the role of Chinese medicinal herbal products in regulating miRNAs in cancer and the use of mediating miRNAs for cancer treatment. In addition, the controversial roles of herb-derived exogenous miRNAs in cancer treatment are also discussed. It is expected that targeting miRNAs would provide a novel therapeutic approach in cancer therapy by improving overall response and survival outcomes in cancer treatment, especially when combined with conventional therapeutics and Chinese medicinal herbal products. PMID:26305257

  8. MicroRNAs and Chinese Medicinal Herbs: New Possibilities in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Wang, Ning; Tan, Hor Yue; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades Chinese medicine has been used worldwide as a complementary and alternative medicine to treat cancer. Plenty of studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play fundamental roles in many pathological processes, including cancer, while the anti-cancer mechanisms of Chinese medicinal herbs targeting miRNAs also have been extensively explored. Our previous studies and those of others on Chinese medicinal herbs and miRNAs in various cancer models have provided a possibility of new cancer therapies, for example, up-regulating the expression of miR-23a may activate the positive regulatory network of p53 and miR-23a involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-tumor effect of berberine in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this review, we survey the role of Chinese medicinal herbal products in regulating miRNAs in cancer and the use of mediating miRNAs for cancer treatment. In addition, the controversial roles of herb-derived exogenous miRNAs in cancer treatment are also discussed. It is expected that targeting miRNAs would provide a novel therapeutic approach in cancer therapy by improving overall response and survival outcomes in cancer treatment, especially when combined with conventional therapeutics and Chinese medicinal herbal products. PMID:26305257

  9. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Xue; Wang, Ning-Li; Lu, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology. PMID:26086019

  10. A non-invasive tissue-specific molecular delivery method of cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoi, Atsuko; Vassaux, Georges; Mori, Shiro; Morikawa, Hidehiro; Koshiyama, Keni-Chiro; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo; Tomita, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    A Japanese word, monozukuri (literally translated "making things") is the philosophy of first having the idea and then the faith in the technical expertise and experience to accomplish the result. We believe that the concept of engineering is monozukuri. Through the process of monozukuri, engineered natural science based on mathematics and physics has been developed. Medicine is the field of study which has been developed for maintaining daily healthy life with diagnosis, treatment, examination, and protection. Biomedical engineering is the interdisciplinary study of engineering and medicine, and should be developed based on monozukuri. In this particular research, we have developed a physical molecular delivery method for cancer gene therapy using nano/microbubbles and ultrasound. First, the behavior of cavitation bubbles and subsequent shock wave phenomena involved in the mechanism of molecular delivery were analyzed, combining theory and computer simulation. In a second step, the methodology was optimized in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the therapeutic potential of the method in pre-clinical models was evaluated using transgenes relevant to cancer gene therapy instead of reporter genes, and whole body, non-invasive imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) was used to evaluate the selectivity of gene delivery in vivo. PMID:16966136

  11. Gene therapy for inhereted metabolic disorders in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Pinto, Carlos; Brown, Talmage; Chen, Y T

    2009-01-01

    Scientists first described inborn errors of metabolism, also termed inherited disorders of metabolism, early in the 20th century and since then have determined the biochemical and genetic bases of a great number of these disorders both in humans and in an increasing number of companion animals. The availability of metabolic screening tests has advanced the biochemical and genetic characterization in affected breeds of companion animals of inherited metabolic disorders involving amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, and metal metabolism. Advances in gene therapy have led to the development of new treatments for inherited disorders of metabolism, and animal models have played a critical role in this research. For example, glycogen storage disease type Ia in dogs was highly responsive to adeno-associated viral vectormediated gene therapy, which prolonged survival and for more than a year prevented hypoglycemia during fasting. Gene therapy for other glycogen storage diseases and metabolic disorders will also be feasible. The establishment of a breeding colony and the ability to sustain affected animals are critical steps toward evaluating the safety and efficacy of gene therapy with clinically relevant endpoints. The further development of gene therapy for inherited disorders of metabolism could lead to curative therapy for affected humans and animals alike. PMID:19293457

  12. Therapeutic Prospects of Gene Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Farraha, Melad; Chong, James J H; Kizana, Eddy

    2016-08-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common types of cardiac arrhythmias experienced in clinical practice, increasing the risk of stroke, dementia, myocardial infarction and death. Currently available options for the treatment of AF use either pharmacological agents or catheter-based ablation therapies to restore sinus rhythm or control the ventricular response rate. These current treatment options are suboptimal at best, motivating research into discovering more effective and innovative ways to treat AF. Gene therapy is being explored for its potential to treat various human conditions including cardiac arrhythmias. Gene transfer vectors with increasing transduction efficiency and biosafety have been developed and trialled for cardiovascular disease treatment. With an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms of AF, several gene therapy targets have been identified and evaluated in an attempt to rate or rhythm control the heart during AF. This review will discuss the gene therapy vectors in use today and methods for delivery of these vectors to the atrium. Further, it will evaluate several gene therapy strategies and approaches for sinus rhythm restoration and ventricular rate control that have the potential to emerge as a therapy for AF. PMID:27262391

  13. Obstacles and future of gene therapy for hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Valder R; Samelson-Jones, Ben J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The recent success of early-phase clinical trials for adeno-associated viral (AAV) liver-directed gene therapy for hemophilia B (HB) demonstrates the potential for gene therapy, in the future, to succeed protein-based prophylaxis therapy for HB. Significant obstacles, however, need to be overcome prior to widespread adoption. The largest obstacles include immune responses to the AAV capsid including preexisting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and a delayed cellular immune response. Emerging evidence suggests that the latter is vector-dose dependent. Furthermore, the development and eradication of inhibitors remains a significant safety concern. Similarly, biological differences between Factor VIII and Factor IX (FIX) impose challenges to direct adoption of the successes for HB to hemophilia A (HA). Areas covered The advantages and limitations of the current strategies addressing these obstacles for gene therapy for HB and HA are discussed, as well as vector manufacturing issues relevant to widespread adoption. Alternative strategies including both ex-vivo and in-vivo lentiviral-based methods are discussed, though we focus on AAV-based approaches because of their recent clinical success and potential. Expert opinion Our opinion is that these obstacles can be overcome with current approaches, and AAV-based gene therapy for HB will likely translate into future clinical care. Innovative approaches are, however, likely needed to solve the current problems obstructing HA gene therapy. PMID:26900534

  14. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside. PMID:27564673

  15. Development of Viral Vectors for Use in Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul D.; Ranjzad, Parisa; Kakar, Salik J.; Kingston, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents the most common cause of mortality in the developed world but, despite two decades of promising pre-clinical research and numerous clinical trials, cardiovascular gene transfer has so far failed to demonstrate convincing benefits in the clinical setting. In this review we discuss the various targets which may be suitable for cardiovascular gene therapy and the viral vectors which have to date shown the most potential for clinical use. We conclude with a summary of the current state of clinical cardiovascular gene therapy and the key trials which are ongoing. PMID:21994642

  16. Gene therapy for cancer: regulatory considerations for approval

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S R; Han, J; Au, P; Shannon, K; Puri, R K

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly changing field of gene therapy promises a number of innovative treatments for cancer patients. Advances in genetic modification of cancer and immune cells and the use of oncolytic viruses and bacteria have led to numerous clinical trials for cancer therapy, with several progressing to late-stage product development. At the time of this writing, no gene therapy product has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Some of the key scientific and regulatory issues include understanding of gene transfer vector biology, safety of vectors in vitro and in animal models, optimum gene transfer, long-term persistence or integration in the host, shedding of a virus and ability to maintain transgene expression in vivo for a desired period of time. Because of the biological complexity of these products, the FDA encourages a flexible, data-driven approach for preclinical safety testing programs. The clinical trial design should be based on the unique features of gene therapy products, and should ensure the safety of enrolled subjects. This article focuses on regulatory considerations for gene therapy product development and also discusses guidance documents that have been published by the FDA. PMID:26584531

  17. Clinical applications of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have represented a paradigmatic model for successes and pitfalls of hematopoietic stem cells gene therapy. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors (γ-RV) for adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), X-linked SCID (SCID-X1), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) showed that gene therapy is a valid therapeutic option in patients lacking an HLA-identical donor. No insertional mutagenesis events have been observed in more than 40 ADA-SCID patients treated so far in the context of different clinical trials worldwide, suggesting a favorable risk-benefit ratio for this disease. On the other hand, the occurrence of insertional oncogenesis in SCID-X1, WAS, and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) RV clinical trials prompted the development of safer vector construct based on self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral or lentiviral vectors (LVs). Here we present the recent results of LV-mediated gene therapy for WAS showing stable multilineage engraftment leading to hematological and immunological improvement, and discuss the differences with respect to the WAS RV trial. We also describe recent clinical results of SCID-X1 gene therapy with SIN γ-RV and the perspectives of targeted genome editing techniques, following early preclinical studies showing promising results in terms of specificity of gene correction. Finally, we provide an overview of the gene therapy approaches for other PIDs and discuss its prospects in relation to the evolving arena of allogeneic transplant. PMID:25860576

  18. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rastall, David PW; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme’s substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. PMID:26170711

  19. Gene Therapies for Cancer: Strategies, Challenges and Successes

    PubMed Central

    DAS, SWADESH K.; MENEZES, MITCHELL E.; BHATIA, SHILPA; WANG, XIANG-YANG; EMDAD, LUNI; SARKAR, DEVANAND; FISHER, PAUL B.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy, which involves replacement of a defective gene with a functional, healthy copy of that gene, is a potentially beneficial cancer treatment approach particularly over chemotherapy, which often lacks selectivity and can cause non-specific toxicity. Despite significant progress pre-clinically with respect to both enhanced targeting and expression in a tumor-selective manner several hurdles still prevent success in the clinic, including non-specific expression, low-efficiency delivery and biosafety. Various innovative genetic approaches are under development to reconstruct vectors/transgenes to make them safer and more effective. Utilizing cutting-edge delivery technologies, gene expression can now be targeted in a tissue- and organ-specific manner. With these advances, gene therapy is poised to become amenable for routine cancer therapy with potential to elevate this methodology as a first line therapy for neoplastic diseases. This review discusses recent advances in gene therapy and their impact on a pre-clinical and clinical level. PMID:25196387

  20. Gene therapy for hemophilia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    George, Lindsey A; Fogarty, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    After numerous preclinical studies demonstrated consistent success in large and small animal models, gene therapy has finally seen initial signs of clinically meaningful success. In a landmark study, Nathwani and colleagues reported sustained factor (F)IX expression in individuals with severe hemophilia B following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated in vivo FIX gene transfer. As the next possible treatment-changing paradigm in hemophilia care, gene therapy may provide patients with sufficient hemostatic improvement to achieve the World Federation of Hemophilia's aspirational goal of "integration of opportunities in all aspects of life… equivalent to someone without a bleeding disorder." Although promising momentum supports the potential of gene therapy to replace protein-based therapeutics for hemophilia, several obstacles remain. The largest challenges appear to be overcoming the cellular immune responses to the AAV capsid; preexisting AAV neutralizing antibodies, which immediately exclude approximately 50% of the target population; and the ability to scale-up vector manufacturing for widespread applicability. Additional obstacles specific to hemophilia A (HA) include designing a vector cassette to accommodate a larger cDNA; avoiding development of inhibitory antibodies; and, perhaps the greatest difficulty to overcome, ensuring adequate expression efficiency. This review discusses the relevance of gene therapy to the hemophilia disease state, previous research progress, the current landscape of clinical trials, and considerations for promoting the future availability of gene therapy for hemophilia. PMID:26805907

  1. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics. PMID:26561829

  2. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  3. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Loskog, Angelica

    2015-11-01

    Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics. PMID:26561829

  4. Omics and therapy - a basis for precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Garay, Joseph P; Gray, Joe W

    2012-04-01

    A founding premise of the human genome project was that knowledge of the spectrum of abnormalities that comprise cancers and other human diseases would lead to improved disease management by identifying molecular abnormalities that could guide disease detection and diagnosis, suggest new therapeutic strategies and be developed as markers to predict response to therapy. This project led to elucidation of a reference normal human genome sequence and normal polymorphisms therein against which sequences from diseased tissues can be compared to enable identification of causal abnormalities. It also stimulated development of an array of computational tools for genomic analysis and catalyzed public and private sector development of revolutionary tools for genome analysis that transformed analysis of whole genomes from an enterprise that required international teams and hundreds of millions of dollars to a process that can be carried out in core facilities for only a few thousand dollars per sample. Indeed, the $1000 genome is nearly upon us. Applications of these technologies to human cancers in international cancer genome projects are now revealing the spectra of abnormalities that comprise thousands of individual cancers. Analyses of these data are leading to the promised improvements in disease management. We review several aspects of cancer genomics with emphasis on aspects that are relevant to improving cancer therapy. PMID:22445068

  5. Chinese Medicines Induce Cell Death: The Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor Yue; Zhong, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Chinese medicines have long history in treating cancer. With the growing scientific evidence of biomedical researches and clinical trials in cancer therapy, they are increasingly accepted as a complementary and alternative treatment. One of the mechanisms is to induce cancer cell death. Aim. To comprehensively review the publications concerning cancer cell death induced by Chinese medicines in recent years and provide insights on anticancer drug discovery from Chinese medicines. Materials and Methods. Chinese medicines (including Chinese medicinal herbs, animal parts, and minerals) were used in the study. The key words including “cancer”, “cell death”, “apoptosis”, “autophagy,” “necrosis,” and “Chinese medicine” were used in retrieval of related information from PubMed and other databases. Results. The cell death induced by Chinese medicines is described as apoptotic, autophagic, or necrotic cell death and other types with an emphasis on their mechanisms of anticancer action. The relationship among different types of cell death induced by Chinese medicines is critically reviewed and discussed. Conclusions. This review summarizes that CMs treatment could induce multiple pathways leading to cancer cell death, in which apoptosis is the dominant type. To apply these preclinical researches to clinic application will be a key issue in the future. PMID:25379508

  6. The Combination of Light and Stem Cell Therapies: A Novel Approach in Regenerative Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Juanita; Moges, Helina; Wu, Xingjia; Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Longo, Leonardo

    2010-05-31

    Light therapy commonly referred to as low level laser therapy can alter cellular functions and clinical conditions. Some of the commonly reported in vitro and in vivo effects of light therapy include cellular proliferation, alterations in the inflammatory response to injury, and increases in mitochondrial respiration and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Based on the known effects of light on cells and tissues in general and on reports in the last 5 years on the interaction of light with stem cells, evidence is mounting indicating that light therapy could greatly benefit stem cell regenerative medicine. Experiments on a variety of harvested adult stem cells demonstrate that light therapy enhances differentiation and proliferation of the cells and alters the expression of growth factors in a number of different types of adult stem cells and progenitors in vitro. It also has the potential to attenuate cytotoxic effects of drugs used to purge harvested autologous stem cells and to increase survival of transplanted cells.

  7. Complementary Therapies for Significant Dysfunction from Tinnitus: Treatment Review and Potential for Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q.; Price, Rebecca; Hazelton, A. Garrett; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Bechard, Elizabeth M.; Shaffer, Janet K.; Tucci, Debara L.

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is a prevalent and costly chronic condition; no universally effective treatment exists. Only 20% of patients who report tinnitus actually seek treatment, and when treated, most patients commonly receive sound-based and educational (SBE) therapy. Additional treatment options are necessary, however, for nonauditory aspects of tinnitus (e.g., anxiety, depression, and significant interference with daily life) and when SBE therapy is inefficacious or inappropriate. This paper provides a comprehensive review of (1) conventional tinnitus treatments and (2) promising complementary therapies that have demonstrated some benefit for severe dysfunction from tinnitus. While there has been no systematic study of the benefits of an Integrative Medicine approach for severe tinnitus, the current paper reviews emerging evidence suggesting that synergistic combinations of complementary therapies provided within a whole-person framework may augment SBE therapy and empower patients to exert control over their tinnitus symptoms without the use of medications, expensive devices, or extended programs. PMID:26457113

  8. The Combination of Light and Stem Cell Therapies: A Novel Approach in Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Juanita; Moges, Helina; Wu, Xingjia; Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Longo, Leonardo

    2010-05-01

    Light therapy commonly referred to as low level laser therapy can alter cellular functions and clinical conditions. Some of the commonly reported in vitro and in vivo effects of light therapy include cellular proliferation, alterations in the inflammatory response to injury, and increases in mitochondrial respiration and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Based on the known effects of light on cells and tissues in general and on reports in the last 5 years on the interaction of light with stem cells, evidence is mounting indicating that light therapy could greatly benefit stem cell regenerative medicine. Experiments on a variety of harvested adult stem cells demonstrate that light therapy enhances differentiation and proliferation of the cells and alters the expression of growth factors in a number of different types of adult stem cells and progenitors in vitro. It also has the potential to attenuate cytotoxic effects of drugs used to purge harvested autologous stem cells and to increase survival of transplanted cells.

  9. Exploitation of Exosomes as Nanocarriers for Gene-, Chemo-, and Immune-Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Akhil; Babu, Anish; Filant, Justyna; Moxley, Katherine M; Ruskin, Rachel; Dhanasekaran, Danny; Sood, Anil K; McMeekin, Scott; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2016-06-01

    The bottleneck in current vector-based cancer therapy is the targeted and controlled release of therapeutics in tumors. Exosomes are submicron-sized vesicles that are secreted by all cell types and are involved in communication and transportation of materials between cells. Analogous in size and function to synthetic nanoparticles, exosomes offer many advantages, rendering them the most promising candidates for targeted drug or gene delivery vehicles. Patient-specific customized therapeutic strategies can be engineered using exosomes derived from the patient's own healthy cells. Therefore, exosome-based cancer therapy has the potential to become an important part of personalized medicine. Interest in exosomes as carrier organelles is relatively recent. Knowledge about exosomal biology and its applications remains limited. The present review is an attempt to describe the current status of the application of exosomes to cancer therapy and the potential challenges associated with their use. PMID:27319211

  10. [Non-viral gene therapy approach for regenerative recovery of skin wounds in mammals].

    PubMed

    Efremov, A M; Dukhovlinov, I V; Dizhe, E B; Burov, S V; Leko, M V; Akif'ev, B N; Mogilenko, D A; Ivanov, I A; Perevozchikov, A P; Orlov, S V

    2010-01-01

    The rate and character of skin tissue regeneration after wounds, burns and other traumas depend on the cell proliferation within damaged area. Acceleration of healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis is one of the most important tasks of modern medicine. There are gene therapy approaches to wound treatment consisting in the transfer of genes encoding mitogenic growth factors to wound area. The most important step in the development of gene therapy approaches is the design of gene delivery tools. In spite of high efficacy of viral vectors, the non-viral means have some preferences (low toxicity, low immunogenity, safety and the absence of backside effects). Among non-viral gene delivery tools, molecular conjugates are the most popular because of their efficacy, simplicity, and the capacity to the targeted gene transfer. In the present work we have developed two molecular conjugates--NLS-TSF7 and NLS-TSF12 consisting of the modified signal of nuclear localization of T-antigen of SV40 virus (cationic part) and the peptide ligands of mammalian transferrin receptor (ligand part). These conjugates bind to plasmid DNA with formation of polyelectrolytic complexes and are capable to deliver plasmid DNA into cells expressing transferrin receptors by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Transfer of the expression vector of luciferase gene in the complex with molecular conjugate NLS-TSF7 to murine surface tissues led to about 100 fold increasing of luciferase activity in comparison with the transfer of free expression vector. Treatment of slash wounds in mice with the complexes of expression vector of synthetic human gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1 with molecular conjugates NLS-TSF7 led to acceleration of healing in comparison with mice treated with free expression vector. The results obtained confirm the high efficiency of the developed regenerative gene therapy approach for the treatment of damaged skin tissues in mammals. PMID

  11. Recent trends in the gene therapy of β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Finotti, Alessia; Breda, Laura; Lederer, Carsten W; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Zuccato, Cristina; Kleanthous, Marina; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The β-thalassemias are a group of hereditary hematological diseases caused by over 300 mutations of the adult β-globin gene. Together with sickle cell anemia, thalassemia syndromes are among the most impactful diseases in developing countries, in which the lack of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis have contributed to the maintenance of a very high frequency of these genetic diseases in the population. Gene therapy for β-thalassemia has recently seen steadily accelerating progress and has reached a crossroads in its development. Presently, data from past and ongoing clinical trials guide the design of further clinical and preclinical studies based on gene augmentation, while fundamental insights into globin switching and new technology developments have inspired the investigation of novel gene-therapy approaches. Moreover, human erythropoietic stem cells from β-thalassemia patients have been the cellular targets of choice to date whereas future gene-therapy studies might increasingly draw on induced pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we summarize the most significant developments in β-thalassemia gene therapy over the last decade, with a strong emphasis on the most recent findings, for β-thalassemia model systems; for β-, γ-, and anti-sickling β-globin gene addition and combinatorial approaches including the latest results of clinical trials; and for novel approaches, such as transgene-mediated activation of γ-globin and genome editing using designer nucleases. PMID:25737641

  12. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Burney, Tabinda J; Davies, Jane C

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion) outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford) is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational research in CF gene therapy. PMID:23776378

  13. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  14. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  15. Novel epigenetic-based therapies useful in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Claudio; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Sommese, Linda; Infante, Teresa; Soricelli, Andrea

    2016-02-26

    Epigenetic modifications include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA. Gene alterations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases, and epigenetic mechanisms are continuously being studied to find new useful strategies for the clinical management of afflicted patients. Numerous cardiovascular disorders are characterized by the abnormal methylation of CpG islands and so specific drugs that could inhibit DNA methyltransferase directly or by reducing its gene expression (e.g., hydralazine and procainamide) are currently under investigation. The anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties of histone deacetylase inhibitors and their cardio-protective effects have been confirmed in preclinical studies. Furthermore, the regulation of the expression of microRNA targets through pharmacological tools is still under development. Indeed, large controlled trials are required to establish whether current possible candidate antisense microRNAs could offer better therapeutic benefits in clinical practice. Here, we updated therapeutic properties, side effects, and feasibility of emerging epigenetic-based strategies in cardiovascular diseases by highlighting specific problematic issues that still affect the development of large scale novel therapeutic protocols. PMID:26981216

  16. Novel epigenetic-based therapies useful in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Claudio; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Sommese, Linda; Infante, Teresa; Soricelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA. Gene alterations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases, and epigenetic mechanisms are continuously being studied to find new useful strategies for the clinical management of afflicted patients. Numerous cardiovascular disorders are characterized by the abnormal methylation of CpG islands and so specific drugs that could inhibit DNA methyltransferase directly or by reducing its gene expression (e.g., hydralazine and procainamide) are currently under investigation. The anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties of histone deacetylase inhibitors and their cardio-protective effects have been confirmed in preclinical studies. Furthermore, the regulation of the expression of microRNA targets through pharmacological tools is still under development. Indeed, large controlled trials are required to establish whether current possible candidate antisense microRNAs could offer better therapeutic benefits in clinical practice. Here, we updated therapeutic properties, side effects, and feasibility of emerging epigenetic-based strategies in cardiovascular diseases by highlighting specific problematic issues that still affect the development of large scale novel therapeutic protocols. PMID:26981216

  17. Gene therapy for the prevention of vein graft disease

    PubMed Central

    Southerland, Kevin W.; Frazier, Sarah B.; Bowles, Dawn E.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Kontos, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite advances in the medical management of atherosclerosis over the past several decades, many patients require arterial revascularization to reduce mortality and alleviate ischemic symptoms. Technological advancements have led to dramatic increases in the use of percutaneous and endovascular approaches, yet surgical revascularization (bypass surgery) with autologous vein grafts remains a mainstay of therapy for both coronary and peripheral artery disease. Although bypass surgery is highly efficacious in the short-term, long-term outcomes are limited by relatively high failure rates as a result of intimal hyperplasia, which is a common feature of vein graft disease. The supply of native veins is limited, and many individuals require multiple grafts and repeat procedures. The need to prevent vein graft failure has led to great interest in gene therapy approaches to this problem. Bypass grafting presents an ideal opportunity for gene therapy, as surgically harvested vein grafts can be treated with gene delivery vectors ex vivo, thereby maximizing gene delivery while minimizing the potential for systemic toxicity and targeting the pathogenesis of vein graft disease at its onset. Here we will review the pathogenesis of vein graft disease and discuss vector delivery strategies and potential molecular targets for its prevention. We will summarize the preclinical and clinical literature on gene therapy in vein grafting and discuss additional considerations for future therapies to prevent vein graft disease. PMID:23274305

  18. 77 FR 71194 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene... for Biologics Research and Evaluation (CBER), Office of Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies...

  19. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  20. 'Becoming accepted': The complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' response to the uptake and practice of traditional medicine therapies by the mainstream health sector.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Marlene; Oster, Candice

    2010-07-01

    This Australian study sought to understand how practitioners of the traditional systems of what is now termed complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are responding to the adoption of their traditional medicine therapies by the mainstream health care system, and the practice of these therapies by mainstream health care practitioners. A grounded theory approach was used for this study. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 participants who were non-mainstream practitioners from five traditional systems of medicine - Traditional Chinese Medicine,Ayurveda, Naturopathy, Homeopathy and Western Herbal Medicine. Four main conceptual categories were identified: Losing Control of the CAM Occupational Domain (the participants' main concern); Personal Positioning; Professional Positioning (the core category); and Legitimacy.These categories formed the elements of the substantive theory of 'becoming accepted' as a legitimate health care provider in the mainstream health system, which explained the basic social process that the study's participants were using to resolve their main concern. PMID:20603310

  1. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  2. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  3. Sequence Thyself: Personalized Medicine and Therapies for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ashley Erin

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 8th year, the Yale Healthcare Conference has arguably come upon its most exciting and dramatic time within the U.S. health care system. Dynamic speakers from all over the country came together in April 2012 at Yale University to question, debate, creatively think, and examine challenges within health care organizations and institutions. One of the most prominent issues concerned the aftermath of sequencing the human genome and the explosion of information concerning gene polymorphisms and biomarkers in health and disease. Clinicians, scientists, and pharmaceuticals are looking to innovative individually tailored treatments for patients. During the conference breakout session, speakers Thomas Lynch, MD, director of the Yale Cancer Center and physician-in-chief of the Smilow Cancer Hospital, and Zen Chu, MBA, co-founder of Accelerated Medical Ventures and entrepreneur-in-residence at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, provided enriching discussion on the delivery of science and genetic care of the individual. PMID:23012590

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy: A promising therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Mohammadian, Mozhdeh; Abasi, Elham; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal cells that exist in bone marrow, fat, and so many other tissues, and can differentiate into a variety of cell types including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, as well as myocytes and neurons. Moreover, they have great capacity for self-renewal while maintaining their multipotency. Their capacity for proliferation and differentiation, in addition to their immunomodulatory activity, makes them very promising candidates for cell-based regenerative medicine. Moreover, MSCs have the ability of mobilization to the site of damage; therefore, they can automatically migrate to the site of injury via their chemokine receptors following intravenous transplantation. In this respect, they can be applied for MSC-based gene therapy. In this new therapeutic method, genes of interest are introduced into MSCs via viral and non-viral-based methods that lead to transgene expression in them. Although stem cell-based gene therapy is a relatively new strategy, it lights a new hope for the treatment of a variety of genetic disorders. In the near future, MSCs can be of use in a vast number of clinical applications, because of their uncomplicated isolation, culture, and genetic manipulation. However, full consideration is still crucial before they are utilized for clinical trials, because the number of studies that signify the advantageous effects of MSC-based gene therapy are still limited. PMID:26148175

  5. Gene correction in patient-specific iPSCs for therapy development and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon-Young; Ye, Zhaohui

    2016-09-01

    The discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent and the development of engineered endonucleases for enhancing genome editing are two of the most exciting and impactful technology advances in modern medicine and science. Human pluripotent stem cells have the potential to establish new model systems for studying human developmental biology and disease mechanisms. Gene correction in patient-specific iPSCs can also provide a novel source for autologous cell therapy. Although historically challenging, precise genome editing in human iPSCs is becoming more feasible with the development of new genome-editing tools, including ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR. iPSCs derived from patients of a variety of diseases have been edited to correct disease-associated mutations and to generate isogenic cell lines. After directed differentiation, many of the corrected iPSCs showed restored functionality and demonstrated their potential in cell replacement therapy. Genome-wide analyses of gene-corrected iPSCs have collectively demonstrated a high fidelity of the engineered endonucleases. Remaining challenges in clinical translation of these technologies include maintaining genome integrity of the iPSC clones and the differentiated cells. Given the rapid advances in genome-editing technologies, gene correction is no longer the bottleneck in developing iPSC-based gene and cell therapies; generating functional and transplantable cell types from iPSCs remains the biggest challenge needing to be addressed by the research field. PMID:27256364

  6. Round table discussion 'gene therapy and society'--summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Hehlmann, R; Odenbach, E; Hofschneider, P H; Strorhman, R; Goldman, J; Hausheer, H; Takaku, F

    1995-10-01

    An international group consisting of scientists, physicians, and one lawyer reported on the problems of gene therapy with regard to society in their respective countries and discussed ethical, legal and scientific aspects of gene therapy. Ethical questions and fear in society were addressed by Dr Odenbach, former Secretary General of the German Medical Association, member of the German Parliamentary Enquiry Commission, 'Prospects and Risks of Gene Technology' and present adviser of the Ethical Committee of the World Medical Association, and by PH Hofschneider, Professor of Virology at the Max-Planck-Institut for Biochemistry, Munich, with a long-time strong interest in medical ethics; legal aspects were addressed by H Hausheer, Professor of Civil Law with many years experience in constitutional law and jurisdiction in Switzerland. Medical and scientific aspects were discussed by R Strohman, Emeritus Professor of Molecular Biology, Berkeley, USA, F Takaku, President of the International Medical Center of Japan and Chairman of the Central Evaluation Committee of the Japanese government for gene therapy, Tokyo and J Goldman, Professor of Leukemia Biology at Hammersmith Hospital, London, and known for this pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation. The discussion was moderated by R Hehlmann, Professor of Medicine at the University of Heidelberg and member of the World Committee of the International Association. PMID:7475318

  7. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle that gene expression occurs at the correct location and at a sufficient level. Gene-based imaging can advance cancer detection and diagnosis. By combining the cancer-targeted imaging and therapeutic strategies, the exciting prospect of a ‘one-two punch’ to find hidden, disseminated cancer cells and destroy them simultaneously can potentially be realized. PMID:14557054

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Lee, H J; Song, Y S

    2016-05-01

    Despite the overwhelming success of PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5I), the demand for novel pharmacotherapeutic and surgical options for ED continues to rise owing to the increased proportion of elderly individuals in the population, in addition to the growing percentage of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I. Surgical treatment of ED is associated with many complications, thus warranting the need for nonsurgical therapies. Moreover, none of the above-mentioned treatments essentially corrects, cures or prevents ED. Although gene therapy is a promising option, many challenges and obstacles such as local inflammatory response and random transgene expression, in addition to other safety issues, limit its use at the clinical level. The use of stem cell therapy alone also has many shortcomings. To overcome these inadequacies, many scientists and clinicians are investigating new gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:26888355

  9. [Is a gene therapy for diabetic syndromes foreseeable?].

    PubMed

    Assan, R; Clauser, E; Larger, E

    1994-01-01

    The concepts and methods of gene therapy are summarized in order to assess a possible implication in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Gene therapy requires identification of the critical genetic defect and then the preparation and introduction of the therapeutic transgene, with an appropriate targeting and a strong regulated expression. The bases of the different human diabetic syndromes are reviewed in their present state of knowledge: they are mostly clarified in the case of MODY, extreme insulin resistance syndromes, and some mitochondrial diabetic syndromes; but still obscure in the case of Type 2 and Type 1 diabetic syndromes. Substantial contributions to the understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetes have been brought by transgenic animal models. Gene therapy of human diabetic syndromes may become available, in an undetermined future, particularly under the forms of insulin secreting transgenic "organoïds". Such treatments should be proportionate to the intrinsic severity of the candidate diseases and carefully screened for safety. PMID:8001711

  10. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Martini, S V; Rocco, P R M; Morales, M M

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR) to the affected organ (lung). Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy. PMID:21952739

  11. Large Animal Models of Neurological Disorders for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Christine; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of therapeutic interventions for genetic disorders and diseases that affect the central nervous system (CNS) has proven challenging. There has been significant progress in the development of gene therapy strategies in murine models of human disease, but gene therapy outcomes in these models do not always translate to the human setting. Therefore, large animal models are crucial to the development of diagnostics, treatments, and eventual cures for debilitating neurological disorders. This review focuses on the description of large animal models of neurological diseases such as lysosomal storage diseases, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and neuroAIDS. The review also describes the contributions of these models to progress in gene therapy research. PMID:19293458

  12. Antisense Gene Silencing: Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Troels T.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how the technique is exploited in a pre-clinical and clinical perspective in relation to neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24705213

  13. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  14. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  15. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jun; Song, Yun Seob

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations. PMID:25121103

  16. Gene therapy, fundamental rights, and the mandates of public health.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John

    2004-01-01

    Recent and near-future developments in the field of molecular biology will make possible the treatment of genetic disease on an unprecedented scale. The potential applications of these developments implicate important public policy considerations. Among the questions that may arise is the constitutionality of a state-mandated program of gene therapy for the purpose of eradicating certain genetic diseases. Though controversial, precedents of public health jurisprudence suggest that such a program could survive constitutional scrutiny. This article provides an overview of gene therapy in the context of fundamental rights and the mandates of public health. PMID:15255004

  17. Pathogenic mechanisms and the prospect of gene therapy for choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulos, Ioannis S; Chan, Stephanie; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Choroideremia is a rare, X-linked disorder recognized by its specific ocular phenotype as a progressive degenerative retinopathy resulting in blindness. New therapeutic approaches, primarily based on genetic mechanisms, have emerged that aim to prevent the progressive vision loss. Areas covered This article will review the research that has progressed incrementally over the past two decades from mapping to gene discovery, uncovering the presumed mechanisms triggering the retinopathy to preclinical testing of potential therapies. Expert opinion While still in an evaluative phase, the introduction of gene replacement as a potential therapy has been greeted with great enthusiasm by patients, advocacy groups and the medical community. PMID:26251765

  18. Current gene therapy using viral vectors for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Guedon, Jean-Marc G; Wu, Shaogen; Zheng, Xuexing; Churchill, Caroline C; Glorioso, Joseph C; Liu, Ching-Hang; Liu, Shue; Vulchanova, Lucy; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Kinchington, Paul R; Goins, William F; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Hao, Shuanglin

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of chronic pain and the challenges of pharmacotherapy highlight the importance of development of new approaches to pain management. Gene therapy approaches may be complementary to pharmacotherapy for several advantages. Gene therapy strategies may target specific chronic pain mechanisms in a tissue-specific manner. The present collection of articles features distinct gene therapy approaches targeting specific mechanisms identified as important in the specific pain conditions. Dr. Fairbanks group describes commonly used gene therapeutics (herpes simplex viral vector (HSV) and adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)), and addresses biodistribution and potential neurotoxicity in pre-clinical models of vector delivery. Dr. Tao group addresses that downregulation of a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.2) contributes to the maintenance of neuropathic pain. Alleviation of chronic pain through restoring Kv1.2 expression in sensory neurons is presented in this review. Drs Goins and Kinchington group describes a strategy to use the replication defective HSV vector to deliver two different gene products (enkephalin and TNF soluble receptor) for the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia. Dr. Hao group addresses the observation that the pro-inflammatory cytokines are an important shared mechanism underlying both neuropathic pain and the development of opioid analgesic tolerance and withdrawal. The use of gene therapy strategies to enhance expression of the anti-pro-inflammatory cytokines is summarized. Development of multiple gene therapy strategies may have the benefit of targeting specific pathologies associated with distinct chronic pain conditions (by Guest Editors, Drs. C. Fairbanks and S. Hao). PMID:25962909

  19. Translating stem cell therapies: the role of companion animals in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Susan W.; Theoret, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians and veterinary medicine have been integral to the development of stem cell therapies. The contributions of large animal experimental models to the development and refinement of modern hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were noted nearly five decades ago. More recent advances in adult stem cell/regenerative cell therapies continue to expand knowledge of the basic biology and clinical applications of stem cells. A relatively liberal legal and ethical regulation of stem cell research in veterinary medicine has facilitated the development and in some instances clinical translation of a variety of cell-based therapies involving hematopoietic (HSC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as well as other adult regenerative cells and recently embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). In fact, many of the pioneering developments in these fields of stem cell research have been achieved through collaborations of veterinary and human scientists. This review aims to provide an overview of the contribution of large animal veterinary models in advancing stem cell therapies for both human and clinical veterinary applications. Moreover, in the context of the “One Health Initiative”, the role veterinary patients may play in the future evolution of stem cell therapies for both human and animal patients will be explored. PMID:23627495

  20. Clinical holistic medicine: avoiding the Freudian trap of sexual transference and countertransference in psychodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an "idealized father" figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem "Freud's Trap". Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient's internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy. PMID:18454245

  1. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  2. Changing paradigm of cancer therapy: precision medicine by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Wilcox, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine aims to identify the right drug, for the right patient, at the right dose, at the right time, which is particularly important in cancer therapy. Problems such as the variability of treatment response and resistance to medication have been long-standing challenges in oncology, especially for development of new medications. Solid tumors, unlike hematologic malignancies or brain tumors, are remarkably diverse in their cellular origins and developmental timing. The ability of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze the comprehensive landscape of genetic alterations brings promises to diseases that have a highly complex and heterogeneous genetic composition such as cancer. Here we provide an overview of how NGS is able to facilitate precision medicine and change the paradigm of cancer therapy, especially for solid tumors, through technical advancements, molecular diagnosis, response monitoring and clinical trials. PMID:27144059

  3. State of the art: gene therapy of haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H T; Riley, B E; Doering, C B

    2016-07-01

    Clinical gene therapy has been practiced for more than a quarter century and the first products are finally gaining regulatory/marketing approval. As of 2016, there have been 11 haemophilia gene therapy clinical trials of which six are currently open. Each of the ongoing phase 1/2 trials is testing a variation of a liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) . As summarized herein, the clinical results to date have been mixed with some perceived success and a clear recognition of the immune response to AAV as an obstacle to therapeutic success. We also attempt to highlight promising late-stage preclinical activities for AAV-FVIII where, due to inherent challenges with manufacture, delivery and transgene product biosynthesis, more technological development has been necessary to achieve results comparable to what has been observed previously for AAV-FIX. Finally, we describe the development of a stem cell-based lentiviral vector gene therapy product that has the potential to provide lifelong production of FVIII and provide a functional 'cure' for haemophilia A. Integral to this program has been the incorporation of a blood cell-specific gene expression element driving the production of a bioengineered FVIII designed for optimal efficiency. As clearly outlined herein, haemophilia remains at the forefront of the rapidly advancing clinical gene therapy field where there exists a shared expectation that transformational advances are on the horizon. PMID:27405679

  4. Megakaryocyte- and megakaryocyte precursor–related gene therapies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be safely collected from the body, genetically modified, and re-infused into a patient with the goal to express the transgene product for an individual’s lifetime. Hematologic defects that can be corrected with an allogeneic bone marrow transplant can theoretically also be treated with gene replacement therapy. Because some genetic disorders affect distinct cell lineages, researchers are utilizing HSC gene transfer techniques using lineage-specific endogenous gene promoters to confine transgene expression to individual cell types (eg, ITGA2B for inherited platelet defects). HSCs appear to be an ideal target for platelet gene therapy because they can differentiate into megakaryocytes which are capable of forming several thousand anucleate platelets that circulate within blood vessels to establish hemostasis by repairing vascular injury. Platelets play an essential role in other biological processes (immune response, angiogenesis) as well as diseased states (atherosclerosis, cancer, thrombosis). Thus, recent advances in genetic manipulation of megakaryocytes could lead to new and improved therapies for treating a variety of disorders. In summary, genetic manipulation of megakaryocytes has progressed to the point where clinically relevant strategies are being developed for human trials for genetic disorders affecting platelets. Nevertheless, challenges still need to be overcome to perfect this field; therefore, strategies to increase the safety and benefit of megakaryocyte gene therapy will be discussed. PMID:26787735

  5. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models. PMID:26307195

  6. Correlation between cold and hot pattern in traditional Chinese medicine and gene expression profiles in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Xiao, Cheng; Chen, Gao; Lu, Cheng; Zha, Qinglin; Yan, Xiaoping; Kong, Weiping; Xu, Shijie; Ju, Dahong; Xu, Pu; Zou, Youwen; Lu, Aiping

    2011-06-01

    Clinical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are diversified, and based on the manifestations, the patients with RA could be classified into different patterns under traditional Chinese medicine. These patterns decide the selection of herbal prescription, and thus they can help find a subset of rheumatoid arthritis patients for a type of therapy. In the present study, we combine genome-wide expression analysis with methods of systems biology to identify the functional gene networks for the sets of clinical symptoms that comprise the major information for pattern classification. Clinical manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis were clustered with factor analysis, and two factors (similar to cold and hot patterns in traditional Chinese medicine) were found. Microarray technology was used to reveal gene expression profiles in CD4(+) T cells from 21 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Protein-protein interaction information for these genes from databases and literature data was searched. The highly-connected regions were detected to infer significant complexes or pathways in this protein-protein interaction network. The significant pathways and function were extracted from these subnetworks using the Biological Network Gene Ontology tool. The genes significantly related to hot and cold patterns were identified by correlations analysis. MAPK signalling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, and insulin signaling pathway were found to be related to hot pattern. Purine metabolism was related to both hot and cold patterns. Alanine, aspartate, and tyrosine metabolism were related to cold pattern, and histindine metabolism and lysine degradation were related to hot pattern. The results suggest that cold and hot patterns in traditional Chinese medicine were related to different pathways, and the network analysis might be used for identifying the pattern classification in other diseases. PMID:21695629

  7. Credentialing guidelines for doctors of podiatric medicine supervising hyperbaric oxygen therapy a position paper.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lee C; DellaCorte, Michael P; Stavosky, James W; Millington, J Thomas; Capotorto, John V

    2015-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a useful tool for many conditions within the scope of practice of a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (DPM). More wound-care clinics are adding HBOT as a service line. The increasing prevalence of DPMs operating inside of these wound-care clinics has raised questions about the licensure and privileging of DPMs to supervise HBOT. This document reviews the safety of outpatient HBOT and provides guidelines for hospitals to credential DPMs to supervise treatments. PMID:25649892

  8. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - diving medicine - present state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Winkler, Bernd; Muth, Claus-Martin; Piepho, Tim

    2015-10-01

    The diving accident (decompression incident, DCI) occurs in the decompression phase of dives. The DCI can either be caused by an arterial gas embolism (AGE) subsequent to a pulmonary barotrauma or by the formation of inert gas bubbles subsequent to a reduction of ambient pressure during the ascent from depth. In contrast to the traditional assumption that decompression incidents only occur if decompression rules are neglected, recent data indicate that a vast amount of diving accidents occur even though divers adhered to the rules. Hence, there is a large inter- and intraindividual variability in the predisposition for diving accidents. Within the past few years, the molecular understanding of the pathophysiology of diving accidents has improved considerably. It is now well accepted that pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory mechanisms play a central role. Moreover, microparticles are increasingly discussed in the pathogenesis of diving accidents. These new molecular findings have not yet resulted in new therapeutic approaches. However, new approaches of preconditioning before the dive have been developed which are intended to reduce the risk of diving accidents. The symptoms of a diving accident show a large variability and range. They reach from pruritus over tension in the female breast, marbled skin and pain in the joints to severe neurological disability like paraplegia or hemiplegia. Furthermore, pulmonary symptoms can be a result of a pulmonary gas embolism and/or a tension pneumothorax. Extreme cases can also manifest as generalized, difficult-to-treat seizures, loss of consciousness or even death. The evidence-based therapy of diving accidents consists of an immediate application of 100% inspiratory O2. This can be performed via a demand valve, face mask with reservoir bag or ventilation bag connected to a reservoir bag. Fluid substitution is performed by i. v. infusion of 500-1000ml/h of cristalloids. If consciousness is not impaired, the diver is

  9. Systematic reviews of complementary therapies – an annotated bibliography. Part 2: Herbal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; ter Riet, Gerben; Hondras, Maria; Vickers, Andrew; Saller, Reinhard; Melchart, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Background Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with herbal medicine. Potentially relevant reviews were searched through the register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and bibliographies of articles and books. To be included articles had to review prospective clinical trials of herbal medicines; had to describe review methods explicitly; had to be published; and had to focus on treatment effects. Information on conditions, interventions, methods, results and conclusions was extracted using a pre-tested form and summarized descriptively. Results From a total of 79 potentially relevant reviews pre-selected in the screening process 58 met the inclusion criteria. Thirty of the reports reviewed ginkgo (for dementia, intermittent claudication, tinnitus, and macular degeneration), hypericum (for depression) or garlic preparations (for cardiovascular risk factors and lower limb atherosclerosis). The quality of primary studies was criticized in the majority of the reviews. Most reviews judged the available evidence as promising but definitive conclusions were rarely possible. Conclusions Systematic reviews are available on a broad range of herbal preparations prescribed for defined conditions. There is very little evidence on the effectiveness of herbalism as practised by specialist herbalists who combine herbs and use unconventional diagnosis. PMID:11518548

  10. Misunderstanding as therapy: doctors, patients and medicines in a rural clinic in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sachs, L

    1989-09-01

    In this paper I want to draw attention to the integration of Western medicine into therapeutic choices among patients in rural Sri Lanka. These patients' interpretation and use of Western pharmaceuticals is discussed in relation to the Ayurvedic theory of balance. The influence of this theory on people's ideas of health and illness is highlighted in encounters where laymen and professionals alike use Western medicines according to context and their respective perspectives. Such therapeutic encounters are used to describe how the meaning of therapy is negotiated and communicated. The modes of perception used by doctors and patients seem to be mutually exclusive but each has its own logic. Western medicines are used as a symbolic means which help the patients and the practitioners of Western clinical medicine in a rural health unit to communicate through - rather than despite - "misunderstandings" based on their differing cultural assumptions about the body, about disease and about therapy. This argument is raised in relation to recent theoretical discussions among medical anthropologists concerning doctor-patient relationships, asymmetric medical relations and the analysis of meaning systems. PMID:2776468

  11. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Gennery, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy using autologous haematopoietic stem cells offers a valuable treatment option for patients with primary immunodeficiencies who do not have access to an HLA-matched donor, although such treatments have not been without their problems. This review details gene therapy trials for X-linked and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). X-linked SCID was chosen for gene therapy because of previous 'natural' genetic correction through a reversion event in a single lymphoid precursor, demonstrating limited thymopoiesis and restricted T-lymphocyte receptor repertoire, showing selective advantage of progenitors possessing the wild-type gene. In early studies, patients were treated with long terminal repeats-intact gamma-retroviral vectors, without additional chemotherapy. Early results demonstrated gene-transduced cells, sustained thymopoiesis, and a diverse T-lymphocyte repertoire with normal function. Serious adverse effects were subsequently reported in 5 of 20 patients, with T-lymphocyte leukaemia developing, secondary to the viral vector integrating adjacent to a known oncogene. New trials using self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors are progressing. Trials for ADA-SCID using gamma-retroviral vectors have been successful, with no similar serious adverse effects reported; trials using lentiviral vectors are in progress. Patients with WAS and CGD treated with early gamma-retroviral vectors have developed similar lymphoproliferative adverse effects to those seen in X-SCID--current trials are using new-generation vectors. Targeted gene insertion using homologous recombination of corrected gene sequences by cellular DNA repair pathways following targeted DNA breakage will improve efficacy and safety of gene therapy. A number of new techniques are discussed. PMID:24848753

  12. Glaucoma: genes, phenotypes, and new directions for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bao Jian; Wiggs, Janey L.

    2010-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is characterized by progressive optic nerve damage, usually associated with intraocular pressure. Although the clinical progression of the disease is well defined, the molecular events responsible for glaucoma are currently poorly understood and current therapeutic strategies are not curative. This review summarizes the human genetics and genomic approaches that have shed light on the complex inheritance of glaucoma genes and the potential for gene-based and cellular therapies that this research makes possible. PMID:20811162

  13. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD. PMID:27003751

  14. A Case of Metastatic Bladder Cancer in Both Lungs Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  15. A case of metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs treated with korean medicine therapy alone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Seong, Shin; Woo, Chang-Ryoul; Han, Jae-Bok

    2014-05-01

    This case report is aimed to investigate the effects of Korean medicine therapy (KMT) including oral herbal medicine and herb nebulizer therapy in treating metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with metastatic bladder cancer in both lungs in August 2013. He refused any chemotherapy and was admitted to our hospital in a much progressed state on January 11, 2014. Since then, he was treated with KMT until May 17, 2014. The main oral herbal medicines were Hyunamdan made of heat-processed ginseng, Hangamdan S made of Cordyceps militaris, Panax ginseng radix, Commiphora myrrha, calculus bovis, margarita, Boswellia carteri, Panax notoginseng radix and Cremastra appendiculata tuber, and nebulizer therapy with Soram nebulizer solution made of wild ginseng and Cordyceps sinensis distillate. Their effect was evaluated considering the change of the main symptoms and using serial chest X-ray. The size and number of multiple metastatic nodules in both lungs were markedly decreased and the symptoms had disappeared. These results suggest that KMT can be an effective method to treat metastatic bladder cancer in the lungs. PMID:25232323

  16. [Rituximab (MabThera)--a new biological medicine in rheumatoid arthritis therapy].

    PubMed

    Nemec, P

    2007-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious, chronic, inflammatory disorder that damages the joints. The chronic destructive process causes pain to patients with RA and leads to the development of permanent disability. At present, great emphasis is placed on timely and effective therapy for RA, which is able to halt or slow the development of the disorder. At present we do not have any means of curing RA, the main objective for treatment is to induce remission of the disorder and prevent structural damage to the joints and the development of permanent disability. The relatively frequent failure of disease modifying medications (DMARDs) lead to efforts to find new resources for the treatment of RA. So called biological medicines were recently introduced into therapeutic use. These were mainly TNFalpha blockers. Experience has shown that approximately a third of patients with RA do not respond even to treatment with such medicines. Rituximab (MabThera), a monoclonal antibody against CD20 positive B-lymphocytes, is a new biological medicine approved for RA therapy. It represents a new hope for patients with active RA, for whom earlier therapy with TNFa blockers has failed. PMID:18277630

  17. Gene therapy ethics and haemophilia: an inevitable therapeutic future?

    PubMed

    Dimichele, D; Miller, F G; Fins, J J

    2003-03-01

    Haemophilia was recognized early on as an ideal candidate for a gene transfer approach to therapy. In the past decade, gene transfer experimentation in the haemophilias has indeed played an integral role in furthering the science in the global field of gene therapy. However, these expectations have placed haemophilia gene transfer researchers under pressure to succeed in a scientific domain in which successes are infrequent and progress is necessarily slow. These same expectations have also fueled the perception of gene therapy as the inevitable therapeutic goal for the youngest children with haemophilia. In this paper, we will discuss the ethical implications of this perception in light of anticipated benefits, acceptable risk, perceived consumer need and the unknown cost of this intervention. A framework for the future study and therapeutic implementation of gene transfer technology in this specific population is proposed. Public debate on this issue that includes the voices of the intended beneficiaries, especially the parents of the youngest children with haemophilia and the children themselves, is encouraged. PMID:12614364

  18. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  19. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  20. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    PubMed Central

    Sallenave, J. M.; Porteous, D. J.; Haslett, C.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for example, overexpressing anti-elastase genes may circumvent elastase mediated lung damage in emphysema. With the development of improved viral and liposome vectors and the evolution of effective adjuvant immunosuppression to obviate host immune responses-- for example, using selective cytokines and blockers of T cell surface activation--the potential exists to target therapeutic doses of transgene to deficient or dysregulated cells. Furthermore, increased understanding of tissue-specific promoter regions and of mechanisms controlling regulation of gene expression offer the potential for close control of therapeutic gene expression within the lung. Continuing refinements in these technologies will provide new therapeutic strategies in inflammatory lung disease. 


 PMID:9337837

  1. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C

    1997-08-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for example, overexpressing anti-elastase genes may circumvent elastase mediated lung damage in emphysema. With the development of improved viral and liposome vectors and the evolution of effective adjuvant immunosuppression to obviate host immune responses--for example, using selective cytokines and blockers of T cell surface activation--the potential exists to target therapeutic doses of transgene to deficient or dysregulated cells. Furthermore, increased understanding of tissue-specific promoter regions and of mechanisms controlling regulation of gene expression offer the potential for close control of therapeutic gene expression within the lung. Continuing refinements in these technologies will provide new therapeutic strategies in inflammatory lung disease. PMID:9337837

  2. The expanding role of aerosols in systemic drug delivery, gene therapy, and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Laube, Beth L

    2005-09-01

    Aerosolized medications have been used for centuries to treat respiratory diseases. Until recently, inhalation therapy focused primarily on the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the pressurized metered-dose inhaler was the delivery device of choice. However, the role of aerosol therapy is clearly expanding beyond that initial focus. This expansion has been driven by the Montreal protocol and the need to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from traditional metered-dose inhalers, by the need for delivery devices and formulations that can efficiently and reproducibly target the systemic circulation for the delivery of proteins and peptides, and by developments in medicine that have made it possible to consider curing lung diseases with aerosolized gene therapy and preventing epidemics of influenza and measles with aerosolized vaccines. Each of these drivers has contributed to a decade or more of unprecedented research and innovation that has altered how we think about aerosol delivery and has expanded the role of aerosol therapy into the fields of systemic drug delivery, gene therapy, and vaccination. During this decade of innovation, we have witnessed the coming of age of dry powder inhalers, the development of new soft mist inhalers, and improved pressurized metered-dose inhaler delivery as a result of the replacement of CFC propellants with hydrofluoroalkane. The continued expansion of the role of aerosol therapy will probably depend on demonstration of the safety of this route of administration for drugs that have their targets outside the lung and are administered long term (eg, insulin aerosol), on the development of new drugs and drug carriers that can efficiently target hard-to-reach cell populations within the lungs of patients with disease (eg, patients with cystic fibrosis or lung cancer), and on the development of devices that improve aerosol delivery to infants, so that early intervention in disease processes with aerosol

  3. [Scientific advice by the national and European approval authorities concerning advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Jost, Nils; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Ziegele, Bettina; Reinhardt, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The aim of scientific advice is to support pharmaceutical developers in regulatory and scientific questions, thus facilitating the development of safe and efficacious new medicinal products. Recent years have shown that the development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in particular needs a high degree of regulatory support. On one hand, this is related to the complexity and heterogeneity of this group of medicinal products and on the other hand due to the fact that mainly academic research institutions and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are developing ATMPs. These often have limited regulatory experience and resources. In 2009 the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) initiated the Innovation Office as a contact point for applicants developing ATMPs. The mandate of the Innovation Office is to provide support on regulatory questions and to coordinate national scientific advice meetings concerning ATMPs for every phase in drug development and especially with view to the preparation of clinical trial applications. On the European level, the Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP) of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicinal Agency (EMA) offers scientific advice. This article describes the concepts of national and EMA scientific advice concerning ATMPs and summarizes the experience of the last six years. PMID:26369763

  4. [Observation on 17 patients of radio-ulcer with combined traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine therapy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, B F

    1994-02-01

    34 radioulcer patients were divided randomly into two groups, the TCM-WM group (17 cases) and the WM group (17 cases). The TCM-WM group was treated mainly with oral administration and external treatment of TCM plus wet-compressing with antibiotics, gradual elimination of necrotic tissue and symptomatic treatment. The latter group was treated with Western medicine therapy only including pain-killer, antibiotics, debridement and dressing change. The results showed that the total effective rate of TCM-WM group was 94.1%, significantly higher than that (52.9%) of WM group (P < 0.01). Meanwhile the mean pain-ceasing time, wound-cleaning time and effective time of the TCM-WM group were 62.18, 80.16 and 107.55 days respectively, significantly shorter than those (97.29, 116.86 and 169.83 days) of WM group (P < 0.010-005). This study suggested that the TCM-WM therapy could reduce pain quickly, clean wound well, promote granulation growth and epithelium regeneration so as to accelerate ulcer healing. PMID:8044016

  5. Novel molecular approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tim W. R.; Matthews, David A.; Blair, G. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of a range of inherited diseases, such as cystic fibrosis. However, efficient delivery and expression of the therapeutic transgene at levels sufficient to result in phenotypic correction of cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease has proved elusive. There are many reasons for this lack of progress, both macroscopically in terms of airway defence mechanisms and at the molecular level with regard to effective cDNA delivery. This review of approaches to cystic fibrosis gene therapy covers these areas in detail and highlights recent progress in the field. For gene therapy to be effective in patients with cystic fibrosis, the cDNA encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein must be delivered effectively to the nucleus of the epithelial cells lining the bronchial tree within the lungs. Expression of the transgene must be maintained at adequate levels for the lifetime of the patient, either by repeat dosage of the vector or by targeting airway stem cells. Clinical trials of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have demonstrated proof of principle, but gene expression has been limited to 30 days at best. Results suggest that viral vectors such as adenovirus and adeno-associated virus are unsuited to repeat dosing, as the immune response reduces the effectiveness of each subsequent dose. Nonviral approaches, such as cationic liposomes, appear more suited to repeat dosing, but have been less effective. Current work regarding non-viral gene delivery is now focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in cell entry, endosomal escape and nuclear import of the transgene. There is now increasing evidence to suggest that additional ligands that facilitate endosomal escape or contain a nuclear localization signal may enhance liposome-mediated gene delivery. Much progress in this area has been informed by advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses deliver their genomes to the nuclei of host

  6. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  7. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Primary Immune Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Caroline Y; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The use of gene therapy in the treatment of primary immune deficiencies (PID) has advanced significantly in the last decade. Clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome have demonstrated that gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells and autologous transplant can result in clinical improvement and is curative for many patients. Unfortunately, early clinical trials were complicated by vector-related insertional mutagenic events for several diseases with the exception of ADA-deficiency SCID. These results prompted the current wave of clinical trials for primary immunodeficiency using alternative retro- or lenti-viral vector constructs that are self-inactivating, and they have shown clinical efficacy without leukemic events thus far. The field of gene therapy continues to progress, with improvements in viral vector profiles, stem cell culturing techniques, and site-specific genome editing platforms. The future of gene therapy is promising, and we are quickly moving towards a time when it will be a standard cellular therapy for many forms of PID. PMID:27056559

  8. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  9. Gene therapy for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tseng, Sheng-Hong; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Lee, Ni-Chung; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Snyder, Richard O; Byrne, Barry J; Tai, Chun-Hwei; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2012-05-16

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) is required for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Children with defects in the AADC gene show compromised development, particularly in motor function. Drug therapy has only marginal effects on some of the symptoms and does not change early childhood mortality. Here, we performed adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of the human AADC gene bilaterally into the putamen of four patients 4 to 6 years of age. All of the patients showed improvements in motor performance: One patient was able to stand 16 months after gene transfer, and the other three patients achieved supported sitting 6 to 15 months after gene transfer. Choreic dyskinesia was observed in all patients, but this resolved after several months. Positron emission tomography revealed increased uptake by the putamen of 6-[(18)F]fluorodopa, a tracer for AADC. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed increased dopamine and serotonin levels after gene transfer. Thus, gene therapy targeting primary AADC deficiency is well tolerated and leads to improved motor function. PMID:22593174

  10. Gene Therapy for Type I Glycogen Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Janice Y.; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The type I glycogen storage diseases (GSD-I) are a group of related diseases caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) system, a key enzyme complex that is essential for the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis between meals. The complex consists of a glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) that translocates glucose-6-phosphate from the cytoplasm into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, and a G6Pase-α catalytic unit that hydrolyses the glucose-6-phosphate into glucose and phosphate. A deficiency in G6Pase-α causes GSD type Ia (GSD-Ia) and a deficiency in G6PT causes GSD type Ib (GSD-Ib). Both GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients manifest a disturbed glucose homeostasis, while GSD-Ib patients also suffer symptoms of neutropenia and myeloid dysfunctions. G6Pase-α and G6PT are both hydrophobic endoplasmic reticulum-associated transmembrane proteins that can not expressed in soluble active forms. Therefore protein replacement therapy of GSD-I is not an option. Animal models of GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib that mimic the human disorders are available. Both adenovirus- and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapies have been evaluated for GSD-Ia in these model systems. While adenoviral therapy produces only short term corrections and only impacts liver expression of the gene, AAV-mediated therapy delivers the transgene to both the liver and kidney, achieving longer term correction of the GSD-Ia disorder, although there are substantial differences in efficacy depending on the AAV serotype used. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib in the animal model is still in its infancy, although an adenoviral construct has improved the metabolic profile and myeloid function. Taken together further refinements in gene therapy may hold long term benefits for the treatment of type I GSD disorders. PMID:17430128

  11. Recent progress in gene therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Ryuichi

    2002-12-01

    Gene therapy is emerging as a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as peripheral arterial disease, ischemic heart disease, restenosis after angioplasty, vascular bypass graft occlusion and transplant coronary vasculopathy, for which no known effective therapy exists. The first human trial in cardiovascular disease started in 1994 treating peripheral vascular disease with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and since then, many different potent angiogenic growth factors have been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. In addition, therapeutic angiogenesis using the VEGF gene has been used to treat ischemic heart disease since 1997. The results from these clinical trials have exceeded expectations; improvement in the clinical symptoms of peripheral arterial disease and ischemic heart disease has been reported. Another strategy for combating the disease processes, targeting the transcriptional process, has been tested in a human trial. IN particular, transfection of cis-element double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) (= decoy) is a powerful tool in a new class of anti-gene strategies. Transfection of ds-ODN corresponding to the cis sequence will attenuate the authentic cis-trans interaction, leading to removal of trans-factors from the endogenous cis-elements and subsequent modulation of gene expression. Genetically modified vein grafts transfected with a decoy against E2F, an essential transcription factor in cell cycle progression, appear to have long-term potency in human patients. There is great potential in gene therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:12499610

  12. Current Status of Gene Therapy for Inherited Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy as a treatment modality for pulmonary disorders has attracted significant interest over the past decade. Since the initiation of the first clinical trials for cystic fibrosis lung disease using recombinant adenovirus in the early 1990s, the field has encountered numerous obstacles including vector inflammation, inefficient delivery, and vector production. Despite these obstacles, enthusiasm for lung gene therapy remains high. In part, this enthusiasm is fueled through the diligence of numerous researchers whose studies continue to reveal great potential of new gene transfer vectors that demonstrate increased tropism for airway epithelia. Several newly identified serotypes of adeno-associated virus have demonstrated substantial promise in animal models and will likely surface soon in clinical trials. Furthermore, an increased understanding of vector biology has also led to the development of new technologies to enhance the efficiency and selectivity of gene delivery to the lung. Although the promise of gene therapy to the lung has yet to be realized, the recent concentrated efforts in the field that focus on the basic virology of vector development will undoubtedly reap great rewards over the next decade in treating lung diseases. PMID:12524461

  13. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  14. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  15. Perinatal stem-cell and gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Surbek, Daniel; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Wagner, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Most genetic diseases of the lymphohematopoietic system, including hemoglobinopathies, can now be diagnosed early in gestation. However, as yet, prenatal treatment is not available. Postnatal therapy by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation from bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood is possible for several of these diseases, in particular for the hemoglobinopathies, but is often limited by a lack of histocompatible donors, severe treatment-associated morbidity, and preexisting organ damage that developed before birth. In-utero transplantation of allogeneic HSC has been performed successfully in various animal models and recently in humans. However, the clinical success of this novel treatment is limited to diseases in which the fetus is affected by severe immunodeficiency. The lack of donor cell engraftment in nonimmunocompromised hosts is thought to be due to immunologic barriers, as well as to competitive fetal marrow population by host HSCs. Among the possible strategies to circumvent allogeneic HLA barriers, the use of gene therapy by genetically corrected autologous HSCs in the fetus is one of the most promising approaches. The recent development of strategies to overcome failure of efficient transduction of quiescent hematopoietic cells using new vector constructs and transduction protocols opens new perspectives for gene therapy in general, as well as for prenatal gene transfer in particular. The fetus might be especially susceptible for successful gene therapy approaches because of the developing, expanding hematopoietic system during gestation and the immunologic naiveté early in gestation, precluding immune reaction towards the transgene by inducing tolerance. Ethical issues, in particular regarding treatment safety, must be addressed more closely before clinical trials with fetal gene therapy in human pregnancies can be initiated. PMID:18420474

  16. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  17. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  18. Testing gene therapy vectors in human primary nasal epithelial cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huibi; Ouyang, Hong; Ip, Wan; Du, Kai; Duan, Wenming; Avolio, Julie; Wu, Jing; Duan, Cathleen; Yeger, Herman; Bear, Christine E; Gonska, Tanja; Hu, Jim; Moraes, Theo J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which codes for a chloride/bicarbonate channel in the apical epithelial membranes. CFTR dysfunction results in a multisystem disease including the development of life limiting lung disease. The possibility of a cure for CF by replacing defective CFTR has led to different approaches for CF gene therapy; all of which ultimately have to be tested in preclinical model systems. Primary human nasal epithelial cultures (HNECs) derived from nasal turbinate brushing were used to test the efficiency of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector expressing CFTR. HD-Ad-CFTR transduction resulted in functional expression of CFTR at the apical membrane in nasal epithelial cells obtained from CF patients. These results suggest that HNECs can be used for preclinical testing of gene therapy vectors in CF. PMID:26730394

  19. The Promise of Gene Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassaux, Georges; Angelova, Assia; Baril, Patrick; Midoux, Patrick; Rommelaere, Jean; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Unlike for other digestive cancer entities, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and targeted therapies have, so far, largely failed to improve patient survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Europe and the United States. In this context, gene therapy may offer a new avenue for patients with PDAC. In this review, we explore the research currently ongoing in French laboratories aimed at defeating PDAC using nonviral therapeutic gene delivery, targeted transgene expression, or oncolytic virotherapy that recently or will soon bridge the gap between experimental models of cancer and clinical trials. These studies are likely to change clinical practice or thinking about PDAC management, as they represent a major advance not only for PDAC but may also significantly influence the field of gene-based molecular treatment of cancer. PMID:26603492

  20. Testing gene therapy vectors in human primary nasal epithelial cultures.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huibi; Ouyang, Hong; Ip, Wan; Du, Kai; Duan, Wenming; Avolio, Julie; Wu, Jing; Duan, Cathleen; Yeger, Herman; Bear, Christine E; Gonska, Tanja; Hu, Jim; Moraes, Theo J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which codes for a chloride/bicarbonate channel in the apical epithelial membranes. CFTR dysfunction results in a multisystem disease including the development of life limiting lung disease. The possibility of a cure for CF by replacing defective CFTR has led to different approaches for CF gene therapy; all of which ultimately have to be tested in preclinical model systems. Primary human nasal epithelial cultures (HNECs) derived from nasal turbinate brushing were used to test the efficiency of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector expressing CFTR. HD-Ad-CFTR transduction resulted in functional expression of CFTR at the apical membrane in nasal epithelial cells obtained from CF patients. These results suggest that HNECs can be used for preclinical testing of gene therapy vectors in CF. PMID:26730394

  1. Pharmacologic and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maneerattaporn, Monthira; Saad, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain or discomfort in association with altered bowel habits (diarrhea and/or constipation). Other gastrointestinal symptoms, such as bloating and flatulence, are also common. A variety of factors are believed to play a role in the development of IBS symptoms, including altered bowel motility, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial stressors, altered brain-gut interactions, immune activation/low grade inflammation, alterations in the gut microbiome, and genetic factors. In the absence of biomarkers that can distinguish between IBS subgroups on the basis of pathophysiology, treatment of this condition is predicated upon a patient's most bothersome symptoms. In clinical trials, effective therapies have only offered a therapeutic gain over placebos of 7-15%. Evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) include lubiprostone and tegaserod; evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of diarrhea predominant IBS (IBS-D) include the probiotic Bifidobacter infantis, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin, and alosetron. Additionally, there is persuasive evidence to suggest that selected antispasmodics and antidepressants are of benefit for the treatment of abdominal pain in IBS patients. Finally, several emerging therapies with novel mechanisms of action are in development. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies including probiotics, herbal therapies and acupuncture are gaining popularity among IBS sufferers, although concerns regarding manufacturing standards and the paucity of high quality efficacy and safety data remain. PMID:21927652

  2. Gene marking and gene therapy directed at primary hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, C E; Young, N S

    1996-11-01

    The past year has been a very active one in the field of gene transfer to hematopoietic targets, specifically stem cells and T cells. A number of clinical trials were published that both demonstrated progress as well as identified problems that investigators will face in trying to make the technology therapeutically applicable. Important laboratory and animal experiments focused on predictive models for human stem cell behavior, methods for culturing and expanding primitive cells ex vivo, immune responses against transgenes, in vitro and in vivo selection of transduced cells, and alternatives to standard retroviral vectors. PMID:9372114

  3. Gene therapy: Biological pacemaker created by gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miake, Junichiro; Marbán, Eduardo; Nuss, H. Bradley

    2002-09-01

    The pacemaker cells of the heart initiate the heartbeat, sustain the circulation, and dictate the rate and rhythm of cardiac contraction. Circulatory collapse ensues when these specialized cells are damaged by disease, a situation that currently necessitates the implantation of an electronic pacemaker. Here we report the use of viral gene transfer to convert quiescent heart-muscle cells into pacemaker cells, and the successful generation of spontaneous, rhythmic electrical activity in the ventricle in vivo. Our results indicate that genetically engineered pacemakers could be developed as a possible alternative to implantable electronic devices.

  4. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  5. Molecular Medicine and Molecular Pathology for Haematologists: I. Gene Speak made Easy: An Overview of Genes and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Lawler, MARK

    1999-01-01

    Molecular Medicine and Molecular Pathology are integral parts of Haematology as we enter the new millennium. Their origins can be linked to fundamental developments in the basic sciences, particularly genetics, chemistry and biochemistry. The structure of DNA and the genetic code that it encrypts are the critical starting points to our understanding of these new disciplines. The genetic alphabet is a simple one, consisting of just 4 letters, buts its influence is crucial to human development and differentiation. The concept of a gene is not a new one but the Human Genome Project (a joint world-wide effort to characterise our entire genetic make-up) is providing an invaluable understanding of how genes function in normal cellular processes and pinpointing how disruption of these processes can lead to disease. Transcription and translation are the key events by which our genotype is converted to our phenotype (via a messenger RNA intermediate), producing the myriad proteins and enzymes which populate the cellular factory of our body. Unlike the bacterial or prokaryotic genome, the human genome contains a large amount of non coding DNA (less than 1% of our genome codes for proteins), and our genes are interrupted, with the coding regions or exons separated by non coding introns. Precise removal of the intronic material after transcription (though a process called splicing) is critical for efficient translation to occur. Incorrect splicing can lead to the generation of mutant proteins, which can have a dilaterious effect on the phenotype of the individual. Thus the 100,000-200,000 genes which are present in each cell in our body have a defined control mechanism permitting efficient and appropriate expression of proteins and enzymes and yet a single base change in just one of those genes can lead to diseases such as haemophilia or fanconis anaemia. PMID:11399553

  6. [Study of clinical character and medicinal therapy of viral hepatitis in hospital based on real world].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-ru; Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Yang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo-yue; Yi, Dan-hui; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Viral hepatitis was the most common infectious disease in china. But the diagnosis and treatment were varied because the viral hepatitis patients were hospitalized in different kinds of hospital such as infectious disease hospital, general hospital and Chinese medical hospital. It was necessary to know clinical characters and information of viral hepatitis patients in different hospitals. The general information, subtype distribution, prognosis, complication, medication and relations of onset with solar term from 41 180 viral hepatitis patients based on HIS data were analyzed. It was found that the age of patients between 18 to 59 years old was most; most patients were males. The national basic medical insurance was the most type of payment. The outcome of viral hepatitis in the youth and female were better than that in the old and male. Acute hepatitis was easer to restore than chronic hepatitis. Liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were the two most complications. The peak of onset was during summer solstice, slight heat and great heat. The most common Chinese medicine was Diammonium glycyrrhizinate and the most common western medicine was reduced glutathione. The combination of D. glycyrrhizinate with reduced glutathione, polyene phosphatidylcholine and thymosin was the main pattern. But It was not knew if the combination of western and Chinese medicine was the most effective therapy to protect liver function. It was necessary to take deeply research of the relationship between the combination therapy and their effectiveness. PMID:25532376

  7. Gene therapy for trigeminal pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzabazis, Alexander Z.; Klukinov, Michael; Feliciano, David P.; Wilson, Steven P.; Yeomans, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a single direct injection of viral vector encoding for encephalin to induce a widespread expression of the transgene and potential analgesic effect in trigeminal behavioral pain models in mice. After direct injection of HSV-1 based vectors encoding for human preproenkephalin (SHPE) or the lacZ reporter gene (SHZ.1, control virus) into the trigeminal ganglia in mice, we performed an orofacial formalin test and assessed the cumulative nociceptive behavior at different time points after injection of the viral vectors. We observed an analgesic effect on nociceptive behavior that lasted up to 8 weeks after a single injection of SHPE into the trigeminal ganglia. Control virus injected animals showed nociceptive behavior similar to naïve mice. The analgesic effect of SHPE injection was reversed/attenuated by subcutaneous naloxone injections, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. SHPE injected mice also showed normalization in withdrawal latencies upon thermal noxious stimulation of inflamed ears after subdermal complete Freund’s adjuvans injection indicating widespread expression of the transgene. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of trigeminal ganglia showed expression of human preproenkephalin after SHPE injection. Direct injection of viral vectors proved to be useful for exploring the distinct pathophysiology of the trigeminal system and could also be an interesting addition to the pain therapists’ armamentarium. PMID:24572785

  8. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  9. 77 FR 73472 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  10. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology. PMID:25012686

  11. Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture for Breast Cancer Palliative Care and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guo-Shiou; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a life-threatening disease among women worldwide with annual rates of reported incidence and death increasing alarmingly. Chemotherapy is a recommended and effective treatment option for breast cancer; however, the narrow therapeutic indices and varied side effects of currently approved drugs present major hurdles in increasing its effectiveness. An increasing number of literature evidence indicate that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used in treatment-related symptom control and alleviation of side effects plays an important role in increasing survival rate and quality of life in breast cancer patients. This review focuses on the use of herbal medicines and acupuncture in palliative care and as adjuvants in the treatment of breast cancer. Herbal medicinal treatments, the correlation of clinical use with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of action, and the use of certain acupoints in acupuncture are summarized. The aim of this review is to facilitate an understanding of the current practice and usefulness of herbal medicine and acupuncture as adjuvants in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23840256

  12. Gene mutations and molecularly targeted therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Georgiou, Georgios; Benetatos, Leonidas; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can progress quickly and without treatment can become fatal in a short period of time. However, over the last 30 years fine-tuning of therapeutics have increased the rates of remission and cure. Cytogenetics and mutational gene profiling, combined with the option of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offered in selected patients have further optimized AML treatment on a risk stratification basis in younger adults. However there is still an unmet medical need for effective therapies in AML since disease relapses in almost half of adult patients becoming refractory to salvage therapy. Improvements in the understanding of molecular biology of cancer and identification of recurrent mutations in AML provide opportunities to develop targeted therapies and improve the clinical outcome. In the spectrum of identified gene mutations, primarily targetable lesions are gain of function mutations of tyrosine kinases FLT3, JAK2 and cKIT for which specific, dual and multi-targeted small molecule inhibitors have been developed. A number of targeted compounds such as sorafenib, quizartinib, lestaurtinib, midostaurin, pacritinib, PLX3397 and CCT137690 are in clinical development. For loss-of-function gene mutations, which are mostly biomarkers of favorable prognosis, combined therapeutic approaches can maximize the therapeutic efficacy of conventional therapy. Apart from mutated gene products, proteins aberrantly overexpressed in AML appear to be clinically significant therapeutic targets. Such a molecule for which targeted inhibitors are currently in clinical development is PLK1. We review characteristic gene mutations, discuss their biological functions and clinical significance and present small molecule compounds in clinical development, which are expected to have a role in treating AML subtypes with characteristic molecular alterations. PMID:23358589

  13. Stereotactic radiation therapy in the era of precision medicine for cancer.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yang; Wu, Shi-kai

    2015-11-01

    Unlike conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) is an emerging tumor-ablative radiation technology with a high-dose delivery to targets while dramatically sparing adjacent normal tissues. The strengths of SRT involve noninvasive and short-course treatment, high rates of tumor local control with a low risk of side effects. Although the scientific concepts of radiobiology fail to be totally understood currently, SRT has shown its potential and advantages against various tumors, especially for those adjacent to less tolerable normal organs (spinal cord, optic nerve, bowels, etc.). Nowadays, the clinical efficacy of SRT has been widely confirmed in certain patients, especially for those medically inoperable, unwilling to undergo surgery, medicine ineffective with tumor progression. Moreover, SRT could be properly used as palliative treatment aiming at relieving local symptoms and pain, and eventually achieving a potential survival benefit of several months. However, the weaknesses of SRT relate to inevitable radiation-induced toxicities as well as the inaccessibility of prophylactic irradiation. In general, one flaw cannot obscure the splendor of the jade. The emergence and development of SRT has opened the new era of precision radiation therapy, and SRT will probably step gloriously onto the remarkable stage for precision medicine. PMID:27215015

  14. Multi-Target Strategy and Experimental Studies of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Lan; Yang, Cui-cui

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial complex disease. The pathogenesis of AD is very complicated, and involves the β-amyloid (Aβ) cascade, tau hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced levels of neurotrophic factors, and damage and loss of synapses as well as cholinergic neurons. The multi-target characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be advantageous over single-target drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. These drugs have therefore attracted more attention in the research and development of AD therapies. This review describes advances made in experimental studies of TCM for AD treatment. It discusses research, from our group and other laboratories, on TCM compound drugs (Shenwu capsule) and approximately 10 Chinese medicinal herb extracts (tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, epimedium flavonoid, icariin, cornel iridoid glycoside, ginsenoside, puerarin, clausenamide, huperzine A, and timosaponins). PMID:26268330

  15. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  16. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... you get better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring ... can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with food or other medicines you may be taking. They ...

  17. Welcoming a new age for gene therapy in hematology.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Mitchell J; Mullighan, Charles G

    2016-05-26

    Our capacities to understand and manipulate mammalian genomes are accelerating at an astounding pace. In 2007, Capecchi, Evans, and Smithies were awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for their work on gene targeting, which showed that embryonic stem cells could be modified by homologous recombination (HR) with engineered template DNA to alter virtually any gene and create mutant mice. This work revolutionized biology by allowing investigators to study the in vivo consequences of selected gene alteration. However, the efficiency of HR in embryonic stem cells is unpredictable, depending on the target gene and HR template. More importantly, spontaneous HR occurs at very low rates in most somatic cells, restricting the use of standard gene targeting for most laboratory and clinical applications. This limitation is being overcome by genome-editing technologies, which markedly enhance the capacity to alter cellular genes with laser-like precision. Four review articles in this edition of Blood summarize the field of genome editing, focusing on its potential for treating hematological disorders. PMID:27053534

  18. 76 FR 81513 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to make...

  19. 78 FR 79699 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), FDA. On February...

  20. 75 FR 66381 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... Lentiviral Vector Based Gene Therapy Products. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  1. 78 FR 44133 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... on guidance documents issued from the Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  2. 76 FR 22405 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... gene therapy products for the treatment of retinal disorders. Topics to be considered include...

  3. Progress on gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological strategies toward the treatment of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Harish, Pradeep; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Bachtarzi, Houria

    2015-05-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle-specific, late-onset degenerative disorder whereby muscles of the eyes (causing ptosis), throat (leading to dysphagia), and limbs (causing proximal limb weakness) are mostly affected. The disease is characterized by a mutation in the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, resulting in a short GCG expansion in the polyalanine tract of PABPN1 protein. Accumulation of filamentous intranuclear inclusions in affected skeletal muscle cells constitutes the pathological hallmark of OPMD. This review highlights the current translational research advances in the treatment of OPMD. In vitro and in vivo disease models are described. Conventional and experimental therapeutic approaches are discussed with emphasis on novel molecular therapies including the use of intrabodies, gene therapy, and myoblast transfer therapy. PMID:25860803

  4. From discovery to approval of an advanced therapy medicinal product-containing stem cells, in the EU.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Graziella; Lambiase, Alessandro; Macaluso, Claudio; Pocobelli, Augusto; Deng, Sophie; Cavallini, Gian Maria; Esteki, Roza; Rama, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In 1997, the human corneal epithelium was reconstructed in vitro and transplanted on patients. Later, it became a routine treatment, before regulations considered advanced therapy medicinal products and drugs on the same lines. Manufacturing, before and after good manufacturing practice setting, was established in different facilities and the clinical application in several hospitals. Advanced therapy medicinal products, including stem cells, are unique products with different challenges than other drugs: some uncertainties, in addition to benefit, cannot be avoided. This review will focus on all recent developments in the stem cell-based corneal therapy. PMID:27091398

  5. Innovative Strategy in Treating Angina Pectoris with Chinese Patent Medicines by Promoting Blood Circulation and Removing Blood Stasis: Experience from Combination Therapy in Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xing-Jiang; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Moreover, angina pectoris is one of the most important types of CHD. Therefore, prevention and effective treatment of angina pectoris is of utmost importance in both China and western countries. However, undesirable effects of antianginal therapy do influence treatment adherence to a certain extent. Therefore, it's not surprising that, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including Chinese medicine (CM), are widely welcomed among patients with CHD, hoping that it might complement western medicine. In our previous studies, blood stasis syndrome (BSS) (Xueyu Zheng) was the main syndrome (Zheng-hou) of angina pectoris. Currently, China Food and Drug Administration authoritatively recommended more than 200 Chinese patent medicines (CPMs) as complementary or adjunctive therapies for symptom management and enhancing quality of life along with mainstream care on angina pectoris management in mainland China. This paper reviewed 4 kinds of most frequently-used CPMs by promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis in the treatment of angina pectoris. It aims to evaluate the current evidence of CPMs in combination therapy for angina pectoris. This review indicated that CPMs as adjunctive treatment to routine antianginal therapy play an active role in reducing the incidence of primary endpoint events, decreasing anginal attack rate, and improving electrocardiogram. Additionally, CPMs have been proven relatively safe. Further rigorously designed clinical trials should be conducted to confirm the results. PMID:25360837

  6. Application of electroporation gene therapy: past, current, and future.

    PubMed

    Mir, Lluis M

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-five years after the publication of the first report on gene transfer in vitro in cultured cells by the means of electric pulse delivery, reversible cell electroporation for gene transfer and gene therapy (DNA electrotransfer) is at a crossroad in its development. Present knowledge on the effects of cell exposure to appropriate electric field pulses, particularly at the level of the cell membrane, is reported here as an introduction to the large range of applications described in this book. The importance of the models of electric field distribution in tissues and of the correct choice of electrodes and applied voltages is highlighted. The mechanisms involved in DNA electrotransfer, which include cell electropermeabilization and DNA electrophoresis, are also surveyed. The feasibility of electric pulse for gene transfer in humans is discussed taking into account that electric pulse delivery is already regularly used for localized drug delivery in the treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous solid tumors by electrochemotherapy. Because recent technological developments have made DNA electrotransfer more efficient and safer, this nonviral gene therapy approach is now ready to reach the clinical stage. A good understanding of DNA electrotransfer principles and a respect for safe procedures will be key elements for the successful future transition of DNA electrotransfer to the clinics. PMID:18370187

  7. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jacob L.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  8. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jacob L; O'Connor, Deirdre M; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  9. Viral vectors and delivery strategies for CNS gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Woodard, Kenton T; Samulski, R Jude

    2015-01-01

    This review aims to provide a broad overview of the targets, challenges and potential for gene therapy in the CNS, citing specific examples. There are a broad range of therapeutic targets, with very different requirements for a suitable viral vector. By utilizing different vector tropisms, novel routes of administration and engineered promoter control, transgenes can be targeted to specific therapeutic applications. Viral vectors have proven efficacious in preclinical models for several disease applications, spurring several clinical trials. While the field has pushed the limits of existing adeno-associated virus-based vectors, a next generation of vectors based on rational engineering of viral capsids should expand the application of gene therapy to be more effective in specific therapeutic applications. PMID:22833965

  10. [Gene therapy for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism].

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Jordi

    2014-06-16

    Due to the enzymatic defect in inborn errors of metabolism, there is a blockage in the metabolic pathways and an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Currently available therapies include dietary restriction, empowering of alternative metabolic pathways, and the replacement of the deficient enzyme by cell transplantation, liver transplantation or administration of the purified enzyme. Gene therapy, using the transfer in the body of the correct copy of the altered gene by a vector, is emerging as a promising treatment. However, the difficulty of vectors currently used to cross the blood brain barrier, the immune response, the cellular toxicity and potential oncogenesis are some limitations that could greatly limit its potential clinical application in human beings. PMID:23932565

  11. Contemporary Animal Models For Human Gene Therapy Applications.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Chitra; Nathar, Trupti Job; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Hickstein, Dennis Durand; Remington Nelson, Everette Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, gene therapy has been making considerable progress as an alternative strategy in the treatment of many diseases. Since 2009, several studies have been reported in humans on the successful treatment of various diseases. Animal models mimicking human disease conditions are very essential at the preclinical stage before embarking on a clinical trial. In gene therapy, for instance, they are useful in the assessment of variables related to the use of viral vectors such as safety, efficacy, dosage and localization of transgene expression. However, choosing a suitable disease-specific model is of paramount importance for successful clinical translation. This review focuses on the animal models that are most commonly used in gene therapy studies, such as murine, canine, non-human primates, rabbits, porcine, and a more recently developed humanized mice. Though small and large animals both have their own pros and cons as disease-specific models, the choice is made largely based on the type and length of study performed. While small animals with a shorter life span could be well-suited for degenerative/aging studies, large animals with longer life span could suit longitudinal studies and also help with dosage adjustments to maximize therapeutic benefit. Recently, humanized mice or mouse-human chimaeras have gained interest in the study of human tissues or cells, thereby providing a more reliable understanding of therapeutic interventions. Thus, animal models are of great importance with regard to testing new vector technologies in vivo for assessing safety and efficacy prior to a gene therapy clinical trial. PMID:26415576

  12. Recent progress in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: an emerging cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Both, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    The principle of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) has existed for many years but, while simple in concept, the effective practical application of this therapy has proven to be challenging. Improvements in the efficacy of GDEPT have been achieved principally through the choice and development of more effective vectors, by optimizing and controlling gene expression and by increasing the activity of the delivered enzyme through mutation. While innovation continues in this field, the pioneering GDEPT systems designed to treat glioma and prostate cancer have completed or are now entering late-stage clinical trials, respectively. As the pace of innovation in GDEPT technology far exceeds its clinical application, these initial products are anticipated to be replaced by next-generation biologicals. This review highlights recent progress in the strategies and development of GDEPT and summarizes the status of current clinical trials. With the first GDEPT product for treatment of resected gliomas poised to gain marketing approval, a new era in cancer gene medicine is emerging. PMID:19649987

  13. The Challenge for Gene Therapy: Innate Immune Response to Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Thaci, Bart; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses are the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy. Despite the promising safety profile demonstrated in clinical trials, the efficacy of using adenoviruses for gene therapy is poor. A major hurdle to adenoviral-mediated gene therapy is the innate immune system. Cell-mediated recognition of viruses via capsid components or nucleic acids has received significant attention, principally thought to be regulated by the toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antiviral innate immune responses are initiated by the infected cell, which activates the interferon (IFN) response to block viral replication, while simultaneously releasing chemokines to attract neutrophils, mononuclear- and natural killer-cells. While the IFN and cellular recruitment pathways are activated and regulated independently of each other, both are required to overcome immune escape mechanisms by adenoviruses. Recent work has shown that the generation of adenoviral vectors lacking specific transcriptionally-active regions decreases immune system activation and increases the chance for immune escape. In this review, we elucidate how adenoviral vector modifications alter the IFN and innate inflammatory pathway response and propose future targets with clinically-translational relevance. PMID:21399236

  14. Development of HIV vectors for anti-HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Poeschla, E; Corbeau, P; Wong-Staal, F

    1996-01-01

    Current gene therapy protocols for HIV infection use transfection or murine retrovirus mediated transfer of antiviral genes into CD4+ T cells or CD34+ progenitor cells ex vivo, followed by infusion of the gene altered cells into autologous or syngeneic/allogeneic recipients. While these studies are essential for safety and feasibility testing, several limitations remain: long-term reconstitution of the immune system is not effected for lack of access to the macrophage reservoir or the pluripotent stem cell population, which is usually quiescent, and ex vivo manipulation of the target cells will be too expensive and impractical for global application. In these regards, the lentivirus-specific biologic properties of the HIVs, which underlie their pathogenetic mechanisms, are also advantageous as vectors for gene therapy. The ability of HIV to specifically target CD4+ cells, as well as non-cycling cells, makes it a promising candidate for in vivo gene transfer vector on one hand, and for transduction of non-cycling stem cells on the other. Here we report the use of replication-defective vectors and stable vector packaging cell lines derived from both HIV-1 and HIV-2. Both HIV envelopes and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G were effective in mediating high-titer gene transfer, and an HIV-2 vector could be cross-packaged by HIV-1. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 vectors were able to transduce primary human macrophages, a property not shared by murine retroviruses. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G-pseudotyped HIV vectors have the potential to mediate gene transfer into non-cycling hematopoietic stem cells. If so, HIV or other lentivirus-based vectors will have applications beyond HIV infection. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8876146

  15. Gene therapy enhances chemotherapy tolerance and efficacy in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Jennifer E.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Beard, Brian C.; Guyman, Laura A.; Baldock, Anne L.; Bridge, Carly A.; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Gori, Jennifer L.; Born, Donald E.; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rockne, Russell C.; Storer, Barry E.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Swanson, Kristin R.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Temozolomide (TMZ) is one of the most potent chemotherapy agents for the treatment of glioblastoma. Unfortunately, almost half of glioblastoma tumors are TMZ resistant due to overexpression of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMThi). Coadministration of O6-benzylguanine (O6BG) can restore TMZ sensitivity, but causes off-target myelosuppression. Here, we conducted a prospective clinical trial to test whether gene therapy to confer O6BG resistance in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) improves chemotherapy tolerance and outcome. METHODS. We enrolled 7 newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients with MGMThi tumors. Patients received autologous gene-modified HSCs following single-agent carmustine administration. After hematopoietic recovery, patients underwent O6BG/TMZ chemotherapy in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples and tumor images were collected throughout the study. Chemotherapy tolerance was determined by the observed myelosuppression and recovery following each cycle. Patient-specific biomathematical modeling of tumor growth was performed. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were also evaluated. RESULTS. Gene therapy permitted a significant increase in the mean number of tolerated O6BG/TMZ cycles (4.4 cycles per patient, P < 0.05) compared with historical controls without gene therapy (n = 7 patients, 1.7 cycles per patient). One patient tolerated an unprecedented 9 cycles and demonstrated long-term PFS without additional therapy. Overall, we observed a median PFS of 9 (range 3.5–57+) months and OS of 20 (range 13–57+) months. Furthermore, biomathematical modeling revealed markedly delayed tumor growth at lower cumulative TMZ doses in study patients compared with patients that received standard TMZ regimens without O6BG. CONCLUSION. These data support further development of chemoprotective gene therapy in combination with O6BG and TMZ for the treatment of glioblastoma and potentially other tumors with overexpression of MGMT. TRIAL

  16. Cytochrome P450-based cancer gene therapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Kan, On; Kingsman, Susan; Naylor, Stuart

    2002-12-01

    Results from a number of preclinical studies have demonstrated that a P450-based gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategy for the treatment of cancer is both safe and efficacious. This strategy has now moved forward into the clinic. At least two different approaches using different delivery methods (retroviral vector MetXia [Oxford BioMedica] and encapsulated P450 expressing cells), different cytochrome P450 isoforms (human CYP2B6 versus rat CYP2B1) and different prodrugs (cyclophosphamide [CPA] versus ifosfamide [IFA]) have concluded Phase I/II clinical trial with encouraging results. In the future, P450-based GDEPT can potentially be further enhanced by improved vectors for P450 gene delivery and disease-targeted promoters for focused gene expression at the target site. In addition, there is scope for developing synthetic P450s and their respective prodrugs to improve both enzyme kinetics and the profile of the active moiety. PMID:12517265

  17. PTTG: an important target gene for ovarian cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Panguluri, Siva Kumar; Yeakel, Casey; Kakar, Sham S

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), also known as securin is an important gene involved in many biological functions including inhibition of sister chromatid separation, DNA repair, organ development, and expression and secretion of angiogenic and metastatic factors. Proliferating cancer cells and most tumors express high levels of PTTG. Overexpression of PTTG in vitro induces cellular transformation and development of tumors in nude mice. The PTTG expression levels have been correlated with tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Recent studies show that down regulation of PTTG in tumor cell lines and tumors in vivo results in suppression of tumor growth, suggesting its important role in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on PTTG structure, sub-cellular distribution, cellular functions, and role in tumor progression with suggestions on possible exploration of this gene for cancer therapy. PMID:19014669

  18. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene therapy for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B R

    1999-08-01

    Rheumtatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling, autoimmune disease, and is characterized by inflammation and destruction of joint tissue. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been identified as a key pro-inflammatory cytokine responsible for inflammation. One of the mechanisms of regulation of activity of IL-1 is IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra)-mediated: IL-1RA competes with IL-1 for binding to the IL-1 receptor. Significant progress has been made in the potential application of IL-1ra gene therapyfor the treatment of arthritis. Various vectors have been tested for the delivery of the IL-1ra gene to the intra-articular region. Recent studies in humans have provided encouraging prospects for IL-1ra-mediated arthritis gene therapy. PMID:11713759

  19. Nonoperative Korean Medicine Combination Therapy for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Case-Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiok; Jeong, Yongjae; Youn, Yousuk; Choi, Jeongcheol; Kim, Jaehong; Chung, Wonseok; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective case series exploring the therapeutic benefits and harm of nonoperative Korean medicine combination therapy for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The medical records of a total of 33 LSS patients, who were treated as inpatients at Mokhuri Neck and Back Hospital, Republic of Korea, from November 2010 to January 2012, were reviewed first and telephone survey on these patients was conducted after one year. Body acupuncture, pharmacoacupuncture, Chuna, and oral administration of herbal medicines were offered to all patients. A Visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain and the walking duration without pain were used to assess the patients during the approximately 1-month treatment period. The average VAS score of pain and the walking duration improved significantly; the VAS score decreased from 9 (SD, 1.15) to 2.75 (2.22) (p < 0.01), and the walking duration increased from 5.5 (6.66) to 16.75 (13.00) minutes (p < 0.01). No adverse event was reported during the treatment. In addition, the decreased pain level and improved function continued for over one year. Although we did not find definitive evidence, the study results suggest that KM combination therapy may be beneficial for decreasing pain and improving function in LSS patients and may produce comparatively few adverse events. PMID:26543486

  20. Minimizing nuclear medicine technologist radiation exposure during 131I-MIBG therapy.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Brian K; Morris, Victoria R; Lemen, Lisa; Weiss, Brian D; Gelfand, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine is a norepinephrine analog that concentrates in adrenergic tissue and has been shown to be an effective radiotherapeutic agent used to treat tumors of neural crest origin, particularly neuroblastoma, a sympathetic nervous system malignancy of children. The purpose of this study was to determine the radiation dose received by nuclear medicine technologists while preparing and administering 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy dosages, and if any changes could be implemented that would reduce a technologist's dose. The study involves the collection of total whole body doses received by technologists during the treatment of six patients. Patient dosages ranged from 9.25 to 31.1 GBq, with radiation exposures to the nuclear medicine technologists averaging 0.024 μSv per MBq administered to the patient. Subsequently, the doses received by the technologists were analyzed with respect to specific process steps performed during 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy including package receipt, dosage preparation, and dosage administration. Results show that the largest contribution to the technologist's whole body radiation dose (>83%) is received during the dosage administration process step. After additional shielding was installed for use during the dosage administration process step, technologists' doses decreased 80%. PMID:23287519

  1. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  2. Baculovirus vectors for antiangiogenesis-based cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, W-Y; Shih, Y-S; Lo, W-H; Chen, H-R; Wang, S-C; Wang, C-H; Chien, C-H; Chiang, C-S; Chuang, Y-J; Hu, Y-C

    2011-09-01

    Baculovirus is an insect virus that is non-pathogenic to humans and has emerged as a promising gene therapy vector. Since solid tumor growth/metastasis critically relies on angiogenesis and hEA, a fusion protein comprising human endostatin and angiostatin, exhibits potent antiangiogenic and antitumor efficacy in mouse models; this study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of baculovirus for hEA expression and antiangiogenesis-based cancer gene therapy. Toward this end, we constructed Bac-hEA that mediated transient hEA expression and Bac-ITR-hEA that exploited the adeno-associated virus inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) for prolonged hEA expression. Western blot and ELISA analyses showed that both Bac-hEA and Bac-ITR-hEA expressed hEA in transduced mammalian cells, yet Bac-ITR-hEA only marginally prolonged the hEA expression. In comparison with Bac-hEA, nonetheless, Bac-ITR-hEA significantly enhanced the hEA expression level that concurred with augmented antiangiogenic properties, as demonstrated by cell proliferation, migration and tubule network formation assays. Importantly, intratumoral injection of Bac-ITR-hEA into prostate cancer mouse models, when compared with Bac-hEA, exerted stronger antiangiogenic effects in vivo, more potently inhibited tumor growth and significantly prolonged mouse survival. This study collectively supported the notion that hEA is an effective antiangiogenic protein and proved the potential of baculovirus as a vector for antiangiogenesis-based cancer therapy, which may be combined with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or gene therapies using other vectors. PMID:21701531

  3. Local and Systemic Therapies for Breast Cancer Patients: Reducing Short-term Symptoms with the Methods of Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hack, C. C.; Voiß, P.; Lange, S.; Paul, A. E.; Conrad, S.; Dobos, G. J.; Beckmann, M. W.; Kümmel, S.

    2015-01-01

    With improved prognosis due to advances in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer, physicians and therapists now focus on aspects such as quality of life and the management of side effects from breast cancer treatment. Therapy- and disease-related side effects often reduce the patientʼs quality of life and can place a further burden on patients, with non-compliance or discontinuation of therapy a potential consequence. Study data have shown that therapy- and disease-related side effects can be reduced using the methods of integrative medicine. Reported benefits include improving patientsʼ wellbeing and quality of life, reducing stress, and improving patientsʼ mood, sleeping patterns and capacity to cope with disease. Examining the impact of integrative medicine on the side effects of cancer treatment would be beyond the scope of this review. This article therefore looks at short-term side effects of cancer treatment which are usually temporary and occur during or after local and systemic therapy. The focus is on mind-body medicine, acupuncture and classic naturopathic treatments developed by Sebastian Kneipp as complementary therapies. The latter includes hydrotherapy, phytotherapy, nutritional therapy, exercise therapy and a balanced lifestyle. PMID:26257404

  4. MSC-based VEGF gene therapy in rat myocardial infarction model using facial amphipathic bile acid-conjugated polyethyleneimine.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-Ho; Joo, Min Kyung; Mok, Hyejung; Lee, Minhyung; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Kim, Sung Wan; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Choi, Donghoon; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted much attention in regenerative medicine owing to their apparent usefulness as multi-potent replacement cells. The potential of MSC therapy can be further improved by transforming MSCs with therapeutic genes that maximize the efficacy of gene therapy and their own therapeutic ability. Since most conventional transfection methodologies have shown marginal success in delivering exogenous genes into primary cultured cells, efficient gene transfer into primary MSCs is a prerequisite for the development of MSC-based gene therapy strategies to achieve repair and regeneration of damaged tissues. Herein, facially amphipathic bile acid-modified polyethyleneimine (BA-PEI) conjugates were synthesized and used to transfer hypoxia-inducible vascular endothelial growth factor gene (pHI-VEGF) in MSCs for the treatment of rat myocardial infarction. Under the optimized transfection conditions, the BA-PEI conjugates significantly increased the VEGF protein expression levels in rat MSCs, compared with traditional transfection methods such as Lipofectamine™ and branched-PEI (25 kDa). Furthermore, the prepared pHI-VEGF-engineered MSCs (VEGF-MSCs) resulted in improved cell viability, particularly during severe hypoxic exposure in vitro. The transplantation of MSCs genetically modified to overexpress VEGF by BA-PEI enhanced the capillary formation in the infarction region and eventually attenuated left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rats. This study demonstrates the applicability of the BA-PEI conjugates for the efficient transfection of therapeutic genes into MSCs and the feasibility of using the genetically engineered MSCs in regenerative medicine for myocardial infarction. PMID:24280192

  5. The quest for genes causing complex traits in ocular medicine: successes, interpretations, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-01-01

    Gene mapping and positional cloning have gained acceptance as state-of-the-art methods to identify molecules that cause common complex diseases. However, the use of specialized technology, varying study designs, and misconceptions about the role of novel findings in genetics has led to confusion among basic scientists and health care professionals alike regarding the importance of these findings in molecular diagnostics and individualized medicine. To alleviate this confusion, the successes achieved in the past few years in mapping of genes for complex traits such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma are interpreted in the context of the appropriate population biology framework. The current article veers away from propagating the overly simplistic belief of a linear relationship between a specific gene and age-related macular degeneration, particularly one that equates possession of a specific risk allele as the only precursor to end-stage disease. Ascribing predictive properties to a single gene without consideration of its network partners, timing of action, or environmental correlates argues for a static view of gene action. Modern viewpoints of the mechanisms of action of a gene are contextual and encompass more cohesive frameworks, ranging from the developmental timing of action, to the genomic and environmental milieu. In this regard, gene mapping studies that have been so immensely successful in the gene detection phase of a study provide biased perspectives on the importance of these genes and the corresponding risk alleles in the general population because of their limited sample size and constrained design. To move the field of gene-based diagnosis forward, it will be necessary to conduct additional cohort and longitudinal studies using the original gene finding studies as a knowledge base to develop predictive models. In summary, while we have achieved great successes in finding genes for complex traits, the application of these findings to

  6. Cellular unfolded protein response against viruses used in gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are excellent vehicles for gene therapy due to their natural ability to infect and deliver the cargo to specific tissues with high efficiency. Although such vectors are usually “gutted” and are replication defective, they are subjected to clearance by the host cells by immune recognition and destruction. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a naturally evolved cyto-protective signaling pathway which is triggered due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in its lumen. The UPR signaling consists of three signaling pathways, namely PKR-like ER kinase, activating transcription factor 6, and inositol-requiring protein-1. Once activated, UPR triggers the production of ER molecular chaperones and stress response proteins to help reduce the protein load within the ER. This occurs by degradation of the misfolded proteins and ensues in the arrest of protein translation machinery. If the burden of protein load in ER is beyond its processing capacity, UPR can activate pro-apoptotic pathways or autophagy leading to cell death. Viruses are naturally evolved in hijacking the host cellular translation machinery to generate a large amount of proteins. This phenomenon disrupts ER homeostasis and leads to ER stress. Alternatively, in the case of gutted vectors used in gene therapy, the excess load of recombinant vectors administered and encountered by the cell can trigger UPR. Thus, in the context of gene therapy, UPR becomes a major roadblock that can potentially trigger inflammatory responses against the vectors and reduce the efficiency of gene transfer. PMID:24904562

  7. Regulatable Gene Expression Systems for Gene Therapy Applications: Progress and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Goverdhana, S.; Puntel, M.; Xiong, W.; Zirger, J. M.; Barcia, C.; Curtin, J. F.; Soffer, E. B.; Mondkar, S.; King, G. D.; Hu, J.; Sciascia, S. A.; Candolfi, M.; Greengold, D. S.; Lowenstein, P. R.; Castro, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy aims to revert diseased phenotypes by the use of both viral and nonviral gene delivery systems. Substantial progress has been made in making gene transfer vehicles more efficient, less toxic, and nonimmunogenic and in allowing long-term transgene expression. One of the key issues in successfully implementing gene therapies in the clinical setting is to be able to regulate gene expression very tightly and consistently as and when it is needed. The regulation ought to be achievable using a compound that should be nontoxic, be able to penetrate into the desired target tissue or organ, and have a half-life of a few hours (as opposed to minutes or days) so that when withdrawn or added (depending on the regulatable system used) gene expression can be turned “on” or “off” quickly and effectively. Also, the genetic switches employed should ideally be nonimmunogenic in the host. The ability to switch transgenes on and off would be of paramount importance not only when the therapy is no longer needed, but also in the case of the development of adverse side effects to the therapy. Many regulatable systems are currently under development and some, i.e., the tetracycline-dependent transcriptional switch, have been used successfully for in vivo preclinical applications. Despite this, there are no examples of switches that have been employed in a human clinical trial. In this review, we aim to highlight the main regulatable systems currently under development, the gene transfer systems employed for their expression, and also the preclinical models in which they have been used successfully. We also discuss the substantial challenges that still remain before these regulatable switches can be employed in the clinical setting. PMID:15946903

  8. An overview of the history, applications, advantages, disadvantages and prospects of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jafarlou, M; Baradaran, B; Saedi, T A; Jafarlou, V; Shanehbandi, D; Maralani, M; Othman, F

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has become a significant issue in science-related news. The principal concept of gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease. Although gene therapy was originally conceived as a way to treat life-threatening disorders (inborn defects, cancers) refractory to conventional treatment, it is now considered for many non–life-threatening conditions, such as those adversely impacting a patient’s quality of life. An extensive range of efficacious vectors, delivery techniques, and approaches for developing gene-based interventions for diseases have evolved in the last decade. The lack of suitable treatment has become a rational basis for extending the scope of gene therapy. The aim of this review is to investigate the general methods by which genes are transferred and to give an overview to clinical applications. Maximizing the potential benefits of gene therapy requires efficient and sustained therapeutic gene expression in target cells, low toxicity, and a high safety profile. Gene therapy has made substantial progress albeit much slower than was initially predicted. This review also describes the basic science associated with many gene therapy vectors and the present progress of gene therapy carried out for various surface disorders and diseases. The conclusion is that, with increased pathobiological understanding and biotechnological improvements, gene therapy will become a standard part of clinical practice. PMID:27358116

  9. Gene delivery systems for gene therapy in tissue engineering and central nervous system applications.

    PubMed

    Giordano, C; Causa, F; Bianco, F; Perale, G; Netti, P A; Ambrosio, L; Cigada, A

    2008-12-01

    The present review aims to describe the potential applications of gene delivery systems to tissue engineering and central nervous system diseases. Some key experimental work has been done with interesting results, but the subject is far from being fully explored. The combined approach of gene therapy and material science has a huge potential to improve the therapeutic approaches now available for a wide range of medical applications. Focus is given to this multidisciplinary strategy in neurodegenerative pathologies, where the use of polymeric matrices as gene carriers might make a crucial difference. PMID:19115193

  10. Interactions of Papua New Guinea medicinal plant extracts with antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Erica C.; Hathaway, Laura B.; Lamb, John G.; Pond, Chris D.; Rai, Prem P.; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R.; Franklin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance A substantial proportion of the population in Papua New Guinea (PNG) lives with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment requires lifelong use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The majority of people in PNG use traditional medicines (TM) derived from plants for all types of health promotions. Consequently, there is a concern that herb-drug interactions may impact the efficacy of ART. Herb-drug, or drug-drug, interactions occur at the level of metabolism through two major mechanisms: enzyme induction or enzyme inhibition. In this study, extracts of commonly-used medicinal plants from PNG were screened for herb-drug interactions related to cytochrome P450s (CYPs). Materials and Methods Sixty nine methanol extracts of TM plants were screened for their ability to induce CYPs by human aryl hydrocarbon receptor- (hAhR-) and human pregnane X receptor- (hPXR-) dependent mechanisms, utilizing a commercially available cell-based luciferase reporter system. Inhibition of three major CYPs, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and CYP2D6, was determined using human liver microsomes and enzyme-selective model substrates. Results Almost one third of the TM plant extracts induced the hAhR-dependent expression of CYP1A2, the hPXR-dependent expression of CYP3A4, or both. Almost two thirds inhibited CYP1A2, CYP3A4, or CYP2D6, or combinations thereof. Many plant extracts exhibited both induction and inhibition properties. Conclusions We demonstrated that the potent and selective ability of extracts from PNG medicinal plants to affect drug metabolizing enzymes through induction and/or inhibition is a common phenomenon. Use of traditional medicines concomitantly with ART could dramatically alter the concentrations of antiretroviral drugs in the body; and their efficacy. PNG healthcare providers should counsel HIV patients because of this consequence. PMID:25138353

  11. Gene therapy approaches against cancer using in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer of interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben; Poutou, Joanna; Ballesteros-Briones, María Cristina; Smerdou, Cristian

    2016-02-01

    IL-12 is an immunostimulatory cytokine with strong antitumor properties. Systemic administration of IL-12 in cancer patients led to severe toxic effects, prompting the development of gene therapy vectors able to express this cytokine locally in tumors. Both nonviral and viral vectors have demonstrated a high antitumor efficacy in preclinical tumor models. Some of these vectors, including DNA electroporation, adenovirus and ex vivo transduced dendritic cells, were tested in patients, showing low toxicity and moderate antitumor efficacy. IL-12 activity can be potentiated by molecules with immunostimulatory, antiangiogenic or cytotoxic activity. These combination therapies are of clinical interest because they could lower the threshold for IL-12 efficacy, increasing the therapeutic potential of gene therapy and preventing the toxicity mediated by this cytokine. PMID:26786809

  12. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder and alternative medicine therapies among dentists of North India: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Mathur, Amit; Patil, Gaurav I.; Tippanawar, Harshad K.; Jain, Ankita; Jaggi, Namita; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar; Garg, Purnima

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Health professionals especially the dental professional are the frequent targets of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can be of some help in managing these MSD especially in. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of CAM therapies as a treatment modality for MSD management among dental professionals of north India. Materials and Methods: Registered dentist of North Indian origin, India (n = 3598) were included in the study. The questionnaire was sent to all the dentists which consisted of the demographic profile, MSD in the past year, CAM therapies utilization and opinion about CAM therapies. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21 and data were presented in tabular and graphic form. Test of significance was done using chi-square statistics with P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: A response rate of 80% (n = 2879) was obtained, and all complained of MDS in some or the other part of their life. The use of CAM was reported among 70% (n = 2015) of the dentist who suffered from MSD. Other dentists either used conventional treatment or did not use anything. Conclusion: As the name implies, alternative medical systems is a category that extends beyond a single modality and refers to an entire system of theory and practice that developed separately from conventional medicine. CAM should be subject to rigorous scientific inquiry so that interventions that work are systematically distinguished from those that do not. In addition, the use of CAM treatments should be based on evidence of effectiveness and safety as demonstrated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:26692749

  13. Benefits of Neuronal Preferential Systemic Gene Therapy for Neurotransmitter Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Liu, Wen-Shin; Wang, Wei-Hua; Cheng, Chia-Hao; Hu, Meng-Kai; Chen, Pin-Wen; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Byrne, Barry J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease that impairs synthesis of dopamine and serotonin. Children with AADC deficiency exhibit severe motor, behavioral, and autonomic dysfunctions. We previously generated an IVS6+4A>T knock-in mouse model of AADC deficiency (Ddc(KI) mice) and showed that gene therapy at the neonatal stage can rescue this phenotype. In the present study, we extended this treatment to systemic therapy on young mice. After intraperitoneal injection of AADC viral vectors into 7-day-old Ddc(KI) mice, the treated mice exhibited improvements in weight gain, survival, motor function, autonomic function, and behavior. The yfAAV9/3-Syn-I-mAADC-treated mice showed greater neuronal transduction and higher brain dopamine levels than AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice, whereas AAV9-CMV-hAADC-treated mice exhibited hyperactivity. Therefore, neurotransmitter-deficient animals can be rescued at a young age using systemic gene therapy, although a vector for preferential neuronal expression may be necessary to avoid hyperactivity caused by this treatment. PMID:26137853

  14. Undermining tumor angiogenesis by gene therapy: an emerging field.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, S

    2004-09-01

    The recent discovery of several molecules that negatively modulate the migration and growth of endothelial cells, collectively referred to as inhibitors of angiogenesis, has made it possible to test the hypothesis that control of angiogenesis might be an effective strategy in controlling tumor growth, as well as ameliorating the course of other life-threatening diseases. Angiogenesis inhibitors are heterogeneous in origin and potency, and their growing list includes products of the proteolysis of larger molecules with a different function, such as angiostatin and endostatin, natural modulators of vascular endothelial growth factor activity, such as sFLT-1, and some cytokines with a marked anti-endothelial activity, such as IL-12 and interferon-alpha. Pre-clinical studies have clearly indicated that most of these factors exert cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects, thus implying the need for long-term administration in order to obtain a prolonged therapeutic effect. This feature of angiostatic therapy and the difficulty in synthesizing large amounts of recombinant functional proteins have prompted several studies, which have investigated their delivery by a gene therapy approach. This review addresses the several experimental approaches attempted to date, points out the constraints that have delayed clinical application, and envisions possible areas of integration between antiangiogenic gene therapy and other established therapeutic options against cancer. PMID:15384943

  15. Progress toward gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    1999-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is available. The lethal consequences of DMD are caused by absence of a structural protein, called dystrophin, from skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. The usefulness of gene replacement as therapy for this disease has been established in transgenic mouse models. Unfortunately, progress toward therapy for human patients has been limited by the characteristics of currently available viral vectors and by lack of a suitable technique for delivery of such vectors to a large mass of muscle cells. Successful gene therapy of DMD will require a vector that can carry most of the dystrophin coding sequence, that can be cheaply produce in large quantities, that can be delivered to a large mass of muscle cells, and that provides stable expression of dystrophin after delivery. We and others have worked to develop such a vector through modification of adenoviruses (Ad). Here we review the characteristics of conventional Ad vectors and new helper-dependent, or gutted, Ad vectors. Gutted Ad vectors contain cis-acting DNA sequences necessary for viral replication and packaging, but are deleted, or gutted, for all viral coding sequences. We found that gutted vectors efficiently delivered full-length dystrophin to the skeletal muscles of dystrophic (mdx) mice. Dystrophic muscles injected with these vectors expressed dystrophin for at least four months post-injection, which was the longest time point tested. These data suggest that gutted vectors will allow delivery and long-term expression of dystrophin. PMID:12194388

  16. Treating hearing disorders with cell and gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Lisa N.; Richardson, Rachael T.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Wise, Andrew K.

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is an increasing problem for a substantial number of people and, with an aging population, the incidence and severity of hearing loss will become more significant over time. There are very few therapies currently available to treat hearing loss, and so the development of new therapeutic strategies for hearing impaired individuals is of paramount importance to address this unmet clinical need. Most forms of hearing loss are progressive in nature and therefore an opportunity exists to develop novel therapeutic approaches to slow or halt hearing loss progression, or even repair or replace lost hearing function. Numerous emerging technologies have potential as therapeutic options. This paper details the potential of cell- and gene-based therapies to provide therapeutic agents to protect sensory and neural cells from various insults known to cause hearing loss; explores the potential of replacing lost sensory and nerve cells using gene and stem cell therapy; and describes the considerations for clinical translation and the challenges that need to be overcome.

  17. Identification and Evaluation of Reliable Reference Genes in the Medicinal Fungus Shiraia bambusicola.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Li, Tong; Fan, Li; Shen, Xiao-Ye; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The stability of reference genes plays a vital role in real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, which is generally regarded as a convenient and sensitive tool for the analysis of gene expression. A well-known medicinal fungus, Shiraia bambusicola, has great potential in the pharmaceutical, agricultural and food industries, but its suitable reference genes have not yet been determined. In the present study, 11 candidate reference genes in S. bambusicola were first evaluated and validated comprehensively. To identify the suitable reference genes for qRT-PCR analysis, three software-based algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder and Best Keeper, were applied to rank the tested genes. RNA samples were collected from seven fermentation stages using different media (potato dextrose or Czapek medium) and under different light conditions (12-h light/12-h dark and all-dark). The three most appropriate reference genes, ubi, tfc and ags, were able to normalize the qRT-PCR results under the culturing conditions of 12-h light/12-h dark, whereas the other three genes, vac, gke and acyl, performed better in the culturing conditions of all-dark growth. Therefore, under different light conditions, at least two reference genes (ubi and vac) could be employed to assure the reliability of qRT-PCR results. For both the natural culture medium (the most appropriate genes of this group: ubi, tfc and ags) and the chemically defined synthetic medium (the most stable genes of this group: tfc, vac and ef), the tfc gene remained the best gene used for normalizing the gene expression found with qRT-PCR. It is anticipated that these results would improve the selection of suitable reference genes for qRT-PCR assays and lay the foundation for an accurate analysis of gene expression in S. bambusicola. PMID:26721832

  18. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Susana; Calado, Sofia; Bitoque, Diogo; Oliveira, Ana Vanessa; Øpstad, Christer L.; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Pungente, Michael D.; Silva, Gabriela A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol). Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy. PMID:25147812

  19. Toward a stem cell gene therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, ZongYi; Liu, Ying; Tuve, Sebastian; Xun, Ye; Fan, Xiaolong; Min, Liang; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Disis, Mary Leonora

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches for treatment of late-stage breast cancer rarely result in a long-term cure. In part this is due to tumor stroma that prevents access of systemically or intratumorally applied therapeutics. We propose a stem cell gene therapy approach for controlled tumor stroma degradation that uses the pathophysiologic process of recruitment of inflammatory cells into the tumor. This approach involves genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their subsequent transplantation into tumor-bearing mice. We show that inducible, intratumoral expression of relaxin (Rlx) either by transplanting tumor cells that contained the Rlx gene or by transplantation of mouse HSCs transduced with an Rlx-expressing lentivirus vector delays tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer. The antitumor effect of Rlx was mediated through degradation of tumor stroma, which provided increased access of infiltrating antitumor immune cells to their target tumor cells. Furthermore, we have shown in a human/mouse chimeric model that genetically modified HSCs expressing a transgene can access the tumor site. Our findings are relevant for cancer gene therapy and immunotherapy. PMID:19329780

  20. Progress and Prospects of Anti-HBV Gene Therapy Development

    PubMed Central

    Maepa, Mohube B.; Roelofse, Ilke; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV), chronic infection with the virus remains a major global health concern. Current drugs against HBV infection are limited by emergence of resistance and rarely achieve complete viral clearance. This has prompted vigorous research on developing better drugs against chronic HBV infection. Advances in understanding the life cycle of HBV and improvements in gene-disabling technologies have been impressive. This has led to development of better HBV infection models and discovery of new drug candidates. Ideally, a regimen against chronic HBV infection should completely eliminate all viral replicative intermediates, especially covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). For the past few decades, nucleic acid-based therapy has emerged as an attractive alternative that may result in complete clearance of HBV in infected patients. Several genetic anti-HBV strategies have been developed. The most studied approaches include the use of antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, RNA interference effectors and gene editing tools. This review will summarize recent developments and progress made in the use of gene therapy against HBV. PMID:26263978

  1. Achromatopsia as a Potential Candidate for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy. PMID:20238068

  2. Simian virus-40 as a gene therapy vector.

    PubMed

    Vera, Maria; Fortes, Puri

    2004-05-01

    Simian virus-40 (SV40), an icosahedral papovavirus, has recently been modified to serve as a gene delivery vector. Recombinant SV40 vectors (rSV40) are good candidates for gene transfer, as they display some unique features: SV40 is a well-known virus, nonreplicative vectors are easy-to-make, and can be produced in titers of 10(12) IU/ml. They also efficiently transduce both resting and dividing cells, deliver persistent transgene expression to a wide range of cell types, and are nonimmunogenic. Present disadvantages of rSV40 vectors for gene therapy are a small cloning capacity and the possible risks related to random integration of the viral genome into the host genome. Considerable efforts have been devoted to modifing this virus and setting up protocols for viral production. Preliminary therapeutic results obtained both in tissue culture cells and in animal models for heritable and acquired diseases indicate that rSV40 vectors are promising gene transfer vehicles. This article reviews the work performed with SV40 viruses as recombinant vectors for gene transfer. A summary of the structure, genomic organization, and life cycle of wild-type SV40 viruses is presented. Furthermore, the strategies utilized for the development, production, and titering of rSV40 vectors are discussed. Last, the therapeutic applications developed to date are highlighted. PMID:15169607

  3. Self-deleting retrovirus vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Russ, A P; Friedel, C; Grez, M; von Melchner, H

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of retrovirus vectors for gene therapy has been developed. The vectors have the ability to excise themselves after inserting a gene into the genome, thereby avoiding problems encountered with conventional retrovirus vectors, such as recombination with helper viruses or transcriptional repression of transduced genes. The strategy exploited (i) the natural life cycle of retroviruses, involving duplication of terminal control regions U5 and U3 to generate long terminal repeats (LTRs) and (ii) the ability of the P1 phage site-specific recombinase (Cre) to excise any sequences positioned between two loxP target sequences from the mammalian genome. Thus, an independently expressed selectable marker gene flanked by a loxP target sequence was cloned into the U3 region of a Moloney murine leukemia virus vector. A separate cassette expressing the Cre recombinase was inserted between the LTRs into the body of the virus. LTR-mediated duplication placed vector sequences, including Cre, between loxP sites in the integrated provirus. This enabled Cre to excise from the provirus most of the viral and nonviral sequences unrelated to transcription of the U3 gene. PMID:8763996

  4. CellCAN: a unique enabler of regenerative medicine and cell therapy in Canada.

    PubMed

    Roy, Denis-Claude; Alarco, Anne-Marie; Isasi, Rosario

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapy (RMCT) is paving the way for the most innovative and promising medical breakthroughs of the 21st century. Indeed, its curative potential is immense and builds on the already proven benefits of stem cell transplantation. Successful and broad clinical implementation of RMCT, as well as reaping of its full social and economic benefits, is contingent on the resolution of a range of issues. The CellCAN network, a not-for-profit corporation, was created to tackle these challenges, gathering the key forces of the numerous Canadian organizations involved in basic research, assay development, manufacturing, clinical research, clinical trials, legal and ethical regulations, and policies, all working to move RMCT forward. CellCAN creates a national enterprise by bringing together a community of renowned researchers, industries, clinicians, funders and regulators, and aligning it with cell-handling facilities involved in processing cell products and other products for cell therapy clinical trials to ensure capacity and know-how for stem cell research and efficient execution of cell therapy clinical trials. CellCAN is uniquely positioned to accelerate the implementation of RMCT in Canada and disseminate novel developments and findings, thus significantly contributing to the world's knowledge in cellular therapeutics. As such, the CellCAN model could also serve as a useful benchmark to accelerate RMCT implementation in other countries. PMID:25457957

  5. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  6. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  7. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Moving the Field Forward

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. While corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of ambulation, respiratory failure and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes based on disease pathomechanism and phenotype. In this review, we highlight therapeutic progress with emphasis on evolving pre-clinical data and our own experience in completed clinical trials, and others currently underway. We also discuss the lessons we have learned along the way and the strategies developed to overcome limitations and obstacles in this field. PMID:25439576

  8. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies. PMID:26431849

  9. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking. PMID:26374212

  10. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-05-20

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3' UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  11. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3’ UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  12. Promising and delivering gene therapies for vision loss

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Livia S.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.

    2014-01-01

    The maturity in our understanding of the genetics and the pathogenesis of disease in degenerative retinal disorders has intersected in past years with a novel treatment paradigm in which a genetic intervention may lead to sustained therapeutic benefit, and in some cases even restoration of vision. Here, we review this prospect of retinal gene therapy, discuss the enabling technologies that have led to first-in-human demonstrations of efficacy and safety, and the road that led to this exciting point in time. PMID:25094052

  13. Cell and gene therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E

    1994-02-01

    Experiments in mice have supported the idea of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by implanting normal muscle precursor cells into dystrophin-deficient muscles. However, similar experiments on DMD patients have had little success. Gene therapy for DMD, by introducing dystrophin constructs via retroviral or adenoviral vectors, has been shown to be possible in the mouse, but the efficiency and safety aspects of this technique will have to be carefully examined before similar experiments can be attempted in man. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA constructs into mdx muscles has given rise to very low levels of dystrophin and this may be a possibility for the treatment of heart muscle. PMID:7514447

  14. Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Organoids for Reversible Gene Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; DelTatto, Michael; Shansky, Janet; Lemaire, Julie; Chang, Albert; Payumo, Francis; Lee, Peter; Goodyear, Amy; Raven, Latasha

    1996-01-01

    Genetically modified murine skeletal myoblasts were tissue engineered in vitro into organ-like structures (organoids) containing only postmitotic myoribers secreting pharmacological levels of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Subcutaneous organoid implantation under tension led to the rapid and stable appearance of physiological sera levels of rhGH for up to 12 weeks, whereas surgical removal led to its rapid disappearance. Reversible delivery of bioactive compounds from postmitotic cells in tissue engineered organs has several advantages over other forms of muscle gene therapy.

  15. Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Organoids for Reversible Gene Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; DelTatto, Michael; Shansky, Janet; Lemaire, Julie; Chang, Albert; Payumo, Francis; Lee, Peter; Goodyear, Amy; Raven, Latasha

    1996-01-01

    Genetically modified murine skeletal myoblasts were tissue engineered in vitro into organ-like structures (organoids) containing only postmitotic myofibers secreting pharmacological levels of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Subcutaneous organoid Implantation under tension led to the rapid and stable appearance of physiological sera levels of rhGH for up to 12 weeks, whereas surgical removal led to its rapid disappearance. Reversible delivery of bioactive compounds from postimtotic cells in tissue engineered organs has several advantages over other forms of muscle gene therapy.

  16. Towards liver-directed gene therapy: retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Raper, S E; Wilson, J M

    1991-11-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being considered in the treatment of inherited metabolic diseases. One approach we are considering is the transplantation of autologous hepatocytes that have been genetically modified with recombinant retroviruses ex vivo. We describe, in this report, techniques for isolating human hepatocytes and efficiently transducing recombinant genes into primary cultures. Hepatocytes were isolated from tissue of four different donors, plated in primary culture, and exposed to recombinant retroviruses expressing either the LacZ reporter gene or the cDNA for rabbit LDL receptor. The efficiency of gene transfer under optimal conditions, as determined by Southern blot analysis, varied from a maximum of one proviral copy per cell to a minimum of 0.1 proviral copy per cell. Cytochemical assays were used to detect expression of the recombinant derived proteins, E. coli beta-galactosidase and rabbit LDL receptor. Hepatocytes transduced with the LDL receptor gene expressed levels of receptor protein that exceeded the normal endogenous levels. The ability to isolate and genetically modify human hepatocytes, as described in this report, is an important step towards the development of liver-directed gene therapies in humans. PMID:1767337

  17. COMPUTING THERAPY FOR PRECISION MEDICINE: COLLABORATIVE FILTERING INTEGRATES AND PREDICTS MULTI-ENTITY INTERACTIONS.

    PubMed

    Regenbogen, Sam; Wilkins, Angela D; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Biomedicine produces copious information it cannot fully exploit. Specifically, there is considerable need to integrate knowledge from disparate studies to discover connections across domains. Here, we used a Collaborative Filtering approach, inspired by online recommendation algorithms, in which non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) predicts interactions among chemicals, genes, and diseases only from pairwise information about their interactions. Our approach, applied to matrices derived from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, successfully recovered Chemical-Disease, Chemical-Gene, and Disease-Gene networks in 10-fold cross-validation experiments. Additionally, we could predict each of these interaction matrices from the other two. Integrating all three CTD interaction matrices with NMF led to good predictions of STRING, an independent, external network of protein-protein interactions. Finally, this approach could integrate the CTD and STRING interaction data to improve Chemical-Gene cross-validation performance significantly, and, in a time-stamped study, it predicted information added to CTD after a given date, using only data prior to that date. We conclude that collaborative filtering can integrate information across multiple types of biological entities, and that as a first step towards precision medicine it can compute drug repurposing hypotheses. PMID:26776170

  18. COMPUTING THERAPY FOR PRECISION MEDICINE: COLLABORATIVE FILTERING INTEGRATES AND PREDICTS MULTI-ENTITY INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    REGENBOGEN, SAM; WILKINS, ANGELA D.; LICHTARGE, OLIVIER

    2015-01-01

    Biomedicine produces copious information it cannot fully exploit. Specifically, there is considerable need to integrate knowledge from disparate studies to discover connections across domains. Here, we used a Collaborative Filtering approach, inspired by online recommendation algorithms, in which non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) predicts interactions among chemicals, genes, and diseases only from pairwise information about their interactions. Our approach, applied to matrices derived from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, successfully recovered Chemical-Disease, Chemical-Gene, and Disease-Gene networks in 10-fold cross-validation experiments. Additionally, we could predict each of these interaction matrices from the other two. Integrating all three CTD interaction matrices with NMF led to good predictions of STRING, an independent, external network of protein-protein interactions. Finally, this approach could integrate the CTD and STRING interaction data to improve Chemical-Gene cross-validation performance significantly, and, in a time-stamped study, it predicted information added to CTD after a given date, using only data prior to that date. We conclude that collaborative filtering can integrate information across multiple types of biological entities, and that as a first step towards precision medicine it can compute drug repurposing hypotheses. PMID:26776170

  19. Animal models for prenatal gene therapy: rodent models for prenatal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Roybal, Jessica L; Endo, Masayuki; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Herbert, Bronwen R; Waddington, Simon N; Flake, Alan W

    2012-01-01

    Fetal gene transfer has been studied in various animal models, including rabbits, guinea pigs, cats, dogs, and nonhuman primate; however, the most common model is the rodent, particularly the mouse. There are numerous advantages to mouse models, including a short gestation time of around 20 days, large litter size usually of more than six pups, ease of colony maintenance due to the small physical size, and the relatively low expense of doing so. Moreover, the mouse genome is well defined, there are many transgenic models particularly of human monogenetic disorders, and mouse-specific biological reagents are readily available. One criticism has been that it is difficult to perform procedures on the fetal mouse with suitable accuracy. Over the past decade, accumulation of technical expertise and development of technology such as high-frequency ultrasound have permitted accurate vector delivery to organs and tissues. Here, we describe our experiences of gene transfer to the fetal mouse with and without ultrasound guidance from mid to late gestation. Depending upon the vector type, the route of delivery and the age of the fetus, specific or widespread gene transfer can be achieved, making fetal mice excellent models for exploratory biodistribution studies. PMID:22648774

  20. Influential Factors and Synergies for Radiation-Gene Therapy on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Shi, Yujuan; Xiao, Yanhong; Guo, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-gene therapy, a dual anticancer strategy of radiation therapy and gene therapy through connecting radiation-inducible regulatory sequence to therapeutic gene, leading to the gene being induced to express by radiation while radiotherapy is performed and finally resulting in a double synergistic antitumor effect of radiation and gene, has become one of hotspots in the field of cancer treatment in recent years. But under routine dose of radiation, especially in the hypoxia environment of solid tumor, it is difficult for this therapy to achieve desired effect because of low activity of radiation-inducible regulatory elements, low level and transient expression of target gene induced by radiation, inferior target specificity and poor biosecurity, and so on. Based on the problems existing in radiation-gene therapy, many efforts have been devoted to the curative effect improvement of radiation-gene therapy by various means to increase radiation sensitivity or enhance target gene expression and the expression's controllability. Among these synergistic techniques, gene circuit, hypoxic sensitization, and optimization of radiation-induced sequence exhibit a good application potential. This review provides the main influential factors to radiation-gene therapy on cancer and the synergistic techniques to improve the anticancer effect of radiation-gene therapy. PMID:26783511

  1. 77 FR 63840 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... in open session to hear updates of research programs in the Gene Transfer and Immunogenicity...

  2. Canine models of inherited bleeding disorders in the development of coagulation assays, novel protein replacement and gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T C; Hough, C; Agersø, H; Ezban, M; Lillicrap, D

    2016-05-01

    Animal models of inherited bleeding disorders are important for understanding disease pathophysiology and are required for preclinical assessment of safety prior to testing of novel therapeutics in human and veterinary medicine. Experiments in these animals represent important translational research aimed at developing safer and better treatments, such as plasma-derived and recombinant protein replacement therapies, gene therapies and immune tolerance protocols for antidrug inhibitory antibodies. Ideally, testing is done in animals with the analogous human disease to provide essential safety information, estimates of the correct starting dose and dose response (pharmacokinetics) and measures of efficacy (pharmacodynamics) that guide the design of human trials. For nearly seven decades, canine models of hemophilia, von Willebrand disease and other inherited bleeding disorders have not only informed our understanding of the natural history and pathophysiology of these disorders but also guided the development of novel therapeutics for use in humans and dogs. This has been especially important for the development of gene therapy, in which unique toxicities such as insertional mutagenesis, germ line gene transfer and viral toxicities must be assessed. There are several issues regarding comparative medicine in these species that have a bearing on these studies, including immune reactions to xenoproteins, varied metabolism or clearance of wild-type and modified proteins, and unique tissue tropism of viral vectors. This review focuses on the results of studies that have been performed in dogs with inherited bleeding disorders that closely mirror the human condition to develop safe and effective protein and gene-based therapies that benefit both species. PMID:26924758

  3. Towards gene therapy based on femtosecond optical transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, M.; Torres-Mapa, M. L.; McGinty, J.; Chahine, M.; Bugeon, L.; Rose, A.; Finn, A.; Moleirinho, S.; Okuse, K.; Dallman, M.; French, P.; Harding, S. E.; Reynolds, P.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

    2012-06-01

    Gene therapy poses a great promise in treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases. However, crucial to studying and the development of this therapeutic approach is a reliable and efficient technique of gene and drug delivery into primary cell types. These cells, freshly derived from an organ or tissue, mimic more closely the in vivo state and present more physiologically relevant information compared to cultured cell lines. However, primary cells are known to be difficult to transfect and are typically transfected using viral methods, which are not only questionable in the context of an in vivo application but rely on time consuming vector construction and may also result in cell de-differentiation and loss of functionality. At the same time, well established non-viral methods do not guarantee satisfactory efficiency and viability. Recently, optical laser mediated poration of cell membrane has received interest as a viable gene and drug delivery technique. It has been shown to deliver a variety of biomolecules and genes into cultured mammalian cells; however, its applicability to primary cells remains to be proven. We demonstrate how optical transfection can be an enabling technique in research areas, such as neuropathic pain, neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure and immune or inflammatory-related diseases. Several primary cell types are used in this study, namely cardiomyocytes, dendritic cells, and neurons. We present our recent progress in optimizing this technique's efficiency and post-treatment cell viability for these types of cells and discuss future directions towards in vivo applications.

  4. Nanoparticle-based Technologies for Retinal Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adijanto, Jeffrey; Naash, Muna I

    2015-01-01

    For patients with hereditary retinal diseases, retinal gene therapy offers significant promise for the prevention of retinal degeneration. While adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based systems remain the most popular gene delivery method due to their high efficiency and successful clinical results, other delivery systems, such as non-viral nanoparticles (NPs) are being developed as additional therapeutic options. NP technologies come in several categories (e.g., polymer, liposomes, peptide compacted DNA), several of which have been tested in mouse models of retinal disease. Here, we discuss the key biochemical features of the different NPs that influence how they are internalized into cells, escape from endosomes, and are delivered into the nucleus. We review the primary mechanism of NP uptake by retinal cells and highlight various NPs that have been successfully used for in vivo gene delivery to the retina and RPE. Finally, we consider the various strategies that can be implemented in the plasmid DNA to generate persistent, high levels of gene expression. PMID:25592325

  5. Controversial issues in hyperbaric oxygen therapy: a European Committee for Hyperbaric Medicine Workshop.

    PubMed

    Kot, Jacek; Mathieu, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Every few years, the European Committee for Hyperbaric Medicine (ECHM) publishes its recommendations concerning the clinical indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The last recommendations were issued during the 7th European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine in 2004. Since then, several publications have reported on the use of HBOT in some indications in which it has not yet been recommended routinely, namely aseptic bone necrosis, global brain ischaemia and autism. Patients or their families push physicians and staff of hyperbaric facilities to use hyperbaric treatment regardless of the quality of the scientific evidence. Therefore, the ECHM Workshop "Controversial issues in hyperbaric oxygen therapy" was convened as a satellite meeting of the 2010 European Underwater and Baromedical Society Annual Scientific Meeting in Istanbul, Turkey in 2010. For each topic, a set procedure was used: first came a general report by specialists in the topic, incorporating a review of current pathophysiological, experimental and clinical evidence. Then, there were reports from hyperbaric facilities that had gained clinical experience in that condition, followed by a general discussion with specialists present in the audience. Finally, statements regarding each topic were proposed and voted on by the audience and these were presented to the ECHM Executive Board for consideration and possible approval. In conclusion, the use of HBOT in femoral head necrosis will be proposed during the next ECHM Consensus Conference to become an 'accepted' indication; whilst the use of HBOT in global brain ischaemia and autism should retain its current ECHM recommendations, that it should be 'optional' and 'non-accepted' respectively. PMID:21848114

  6. Genome network medicine: innovation to overcome huge challenges in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2014-01-01

    The post-ENCODE era shapes now a new biomedical research direction for understanding transcriptional and signaling networks driving gene expression and core cellular processes such as cell fate, survival, and apoptosis. Over the past half century, the Francis Crick 'central dogma' of single n gene/protein-phenotype (trait/disease) has defined biology, human physiology, disease, diagnostics, and drugs discovery. However, the ENCODE project and several other genomic studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, computational strategies, and imaging techniques to visualize regulatory networks, provide evidence that transcriptional process and gene expression are regulated by highly complex dynamic molecular and signaling networks. This Focus article describes the linear experimentation-based limitations of diagnostics and therapeutics to cure advanced cancer and the need to move on from reductionist to network-based approaches. With evident a wide genomic heterogeneity, the power and challenges of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify a patient's personal mutational landscape for tailoring the best target drugs in the individual patient are discussed. However, the available drugs are not capable of targeting aberrant signaling networks and research on functional transcriptional heterogeneity and functional genome organization is poorly understood. Therefore, the future clinical genome network medicine aiming at overcoming multiple problems in the new fields of regulatory DNA mapping, noncoding RNA, enhancer RNAs, and dynamic complexity of transcriptional circuitry are also discussed expecting in new innovation technology and strong appreciation of clinical data and evidence-based medicine. The problematic and potential solutions in the discovery of next-generation, molecular, and signaling circuitry-based biomarkers and drugs are explored. PMID:24318985

  7. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry.

    PubMed

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purposing of existing, licenced medicines that may limit the morbidity and mortality rates of EBOV and could be used immediately. Here we test three such medicines and measure their ability to inhibit pseudotype viruses (PVs) of two EBOV species, Marburg virus (MARV) and avian influenza H5 (FLU-H5). We confirm the ability of chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit viral entry in a pH specific manner. The commonly used proton pump inhibitors, Omeprazole and Esomeprazole were also able to inhibit entry of all PVs tested but at higher drug concentrations than may be achieved in vivo. We propose CQ as a priority candidate to consider for treatment of EBOV. PMID:26069727

  8. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purposing of existing, licenced medicines that may limit the morbidity and mortality rates of EBOV and could be used immediately. Here we test three such medicines and measure their ability to inhibit pseudotype viruses (PVs) of two EBOV species, Marburg virus (MARV) and avian influenza H5 (FLU-H5). We confirm the ability of chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit viral entry in a pH specific manner. The commonly used proton pump inhibitors, Omeprazole and Esomeprazole were also able to inhibit entry of all PVs tested but at higher drug concentrations than may be achieved in vivo. We propose CQ as a priority candidate to consider for treatment of EBOV. PMID:26069727

  9. Physiologic and metabolic safety of butyrylcholinesterase gene therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; White, Thomas A; Parks, Robin J; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2014-07-16

    In continuing efforts to develop gene transfer of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as therapy for cocaine addiction, we conducted wide-ranging studies of physiological and metabolic safety. For that purpose, mice were given injections of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector or helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector encoding human or mouse BChE mutated for optimal cocaine hydrolysis. Age-matched controls received saline or AAV-luciferase control vector. At times when transduced BChE was abundant, physiologic and metabolic parameters in conscious animals were evaluated by non-invasive Echo-MRI and an automated "Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Monitoring System" (CLAMS). Despite high vector doses (up to 10(13) particles per mouse) and high levels of transgene protein in the plasma (∼1500-fold above baseline), the CLAMS apparatus revealed no adverse physiologic or metabolic effects. Likewise, body composition determined by Echo-MRI, and glucose tolerance remained normal. A CLAMS study of vector-treated mice given 40 mg/kg cocaine showed none of the physiologic and metabolic fluctuations exhibited in controls. We conclude that neither the tested vectors nor great excesses of circulating BChE affect general physiology directly, while they protect mice from disturbance by cocaine. Hence, viral gene transfer of BChE appears benign and worth exploring as a therapy for cocaine abuse and possibly other disorders as well. PMID:24892251

  10. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. PMID:27106799

  11. Harnessing autophagy for cell fate control gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Felizardo, Tania C; Foley, Jason; Steed, Kevin; Dropulic, Boro; Amarnath, Shoba; Medin, Jeffrey A; Fowler, Daniel H

    2013-07-01

    We hypothesized that rapamycin, through induction of autophagy and promotion of an antiapoptotic phenotype, would permit lentiviral (LV)-based transgene delivery to human T-Rapa cells, which are being tested in phase II clinical trials in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Manufactured T-Rapa cells were exposed to supernatant enriched for a LV vector encoding a fusion protein consisting of truncated CD19 (for cell surface marking) and DTYMK/TMPKΔ, which provides "cell-fate control" due to its ability to phosphorylate (activate) AZT prodrug. LV-transduction in rapamycin-treated T-Rapa cells: (1) resulted in mitochondrial autophagy and a resultant antiapoptotic phenotype, which was reversed by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA; (2) yielded changes in MAP1LC3B and SQSTM1 expression, which were reversed by 3-MA; and (3) increased T-Rapa cell expression of the CD19-DTYMKΔ fusion protein, despite their reduced proliferative status. Importantly, although the transgene-expressing T-Rapa cells expressed an antiapoptotic phenotype, they were highly susceptible to cell death via AZT exposure both in vitro and in vivo (in a human-into-mouse xenogeneic transplantation model). Therefore, rapamycin induction of T cell autophagy can be used for gene therapy applications, including the CD19-DTYMKΔ cell-fate control axis to improve the safety of T cell immuno-gene therapy. PMID:23633667

  12. Gene and protein therapies utilizing VEGF for ALS

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, Orion P.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is usually fatal within 2–5 years. Unfortunately, the only treatment currently available is riluzole, which has a limited efficacy. As a redress, there is an expanding literature focusing on other potential treatments. One such potential treatment option utilizes the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family, which includes factors that are primarily associated with angiogenesis but are now increasingly recognized to have neurotrophic effects. Reduced expression of a member of this family, VEGF-A, in mice results in neurodegeneration similar to that of ALS, while treatment of animal models of ALS with either VEGF-A gene therapy or VEGF-A protein has yielded positive therapeutic outcomes. These basic research findings raise the potential for a VEGF therapy to be translated to the clinic for the treatment of ALS. This review covers the VEGF family, its receptors and neurotrophic effects as well as VEGF therapy in animal models of ALS and advances towards clinical trials. PMID:24177067

  13. Optimizing T-cell receptor gene therapy for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Morris, Emma C; Stauss, Hans J

    2016-06-30

    Recent advances in genetic engineering have enabled the delivery of clinical trials using patient T cells redirected to recognize tumor-associated antigens. The most dramatic results have been seen with T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19, a differentiation antigen expressed in B cells and B lineage malignancies. We propose that antigen expression in nonmalignant cells may contribute to the efficacy of T-cell therapy by maintaining effector function and promoting memory. Although CAR recognition is limited to cell surface structures, T-cell receptors (TCRs) can recognize intracellular proteins. This not only expands the range of tumor-associated self-antigens that are amenable for T-cell therapy, but also allows TCR targeting of the cancer mutagenome. We will highlight biological bottlenecks that potentially limit mutation-specific T-cell therapy and may require high-avidity TCRs that are capable of activating effector function when the concentrations of mutant peptides are low. Unexpectedly, modified TCRs with artificially high affinities function poorly in response to low concentration of cognate peptide but pose an increased safety risk as they may respond optimally to cross-reactive peptides. Recent gene-editing tools, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, provide a platform to delete endogenous TCR and HLA genes, which removes alloreactivity and decreases immunogenicity of third-party T cells. This represents an important step toward generic off-the-shelf T-cell products that may be used in the future for the treatment of large numbers of patients. PMID:27207802

  14. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai influences clock gene expression in the liver of mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan; Li, Wen-Kai; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Wei, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The circadian clock is involved in drug metabolism, efficacy and toxicity. Drugs could in turn affect the biological clock as a mechanism of their actions. Zuotai is an essential component of many popular Tibetan medicines for sedation, tranquil and “detoxification,” and is mainly composed of metacinnabar (β-HgS). The pharmacological and/or toxicological basis of its action is unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of Zuotai on biological clock gene expression in the liver of mice. Materials and methods. Mice were orally given Zuotai (10 mg/kg, 1.5-fold of clinical dose) daily for 7 days, and livers were collected every 4 h during the 24 h period. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis of circadian clock gene expression. Results. Zuotai decreased the oscillation amplitude of the clock core gene Clock, neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2), Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1) at 10:00. For the clock feedback negative control genes, Zuotai had no effect on the oscillation of the clock gene Cryptochrome (Cry1) and Period genes (Per1–3). For the clock-driven target genes, Zuotai increased the oscillation amplitude of the PAR-bZip family member D-box-binding protein (Dbp), decreased nuclear factor interleukin 3 (Nfil3) at 10:00, but had no effect on thyrotroph embryonic factor (Tef); Zuotai increased the expression of nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1) at 18:00, but had little influence on the nuclear receptor Rev-Erbβ (Nr1d2) and RORα. Conclusion. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai could influence the expression of clock genes, which could contribute to pharmacological and/or toxicological effects of Zuotai. PMID:26855871

  15. Biologic therapy and gene therapy in the multimodality treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Viti, Andrea; Bertolaccini, Luca; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    The last years have witnessed an abrupt paradigm shift in cancer treatment owing to the discoveries concerning the relationships between the immune system and neoplastic cells. In the field of malignant mesothelioma, which, despite painstaking efforts, remains an incurable form of cancer, the researchers' attention has been seized by a variety of new biologic approaches, including both viral gene therapy and active immunotherapy. The former is meant to induce programmed cell death by introducing a specific gene in the target cell, this gene encoding a specific protein with anticancer activity. Active immunotherapy, on the other hand, tires to induce an active response of the immune system, whose surveillance may be easily dodged by cancer cells. In fact, this mechanism seems to play an important role in the development, growth and diffusion of malignant mesothelioma which easily manages to hinder the immune response. A thorough understanding of the relationships existing between mesothelioma and immune system is the basis for the success of those immune therapies, which are showing promising results in the preclinical setting, especially when combined with other approaches, such as cytoreductive surgery. PMID:26605294

  16. Gene therapy for ocular diseases meditated by ultrasound and microbubbles (Review)

    PubMed Central

    WAN, CAIFENG; LI, FENGHUA; LI, HONGLI

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an ideal target organ for gene therapy as it is easily accessible and immune-privileged. With the increasing insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ocular diseases, gene therapy has been proposed as an effective approach. Successful gene therapy depends on efficient gene transfer to targeted cells to prove stable and prolonged gene expression with minimal toxicity. At present, the main hindrance regarding the clinical application of gene therapy is not the lack of an ideal gene, but rather the lack of a safe and efficient method to selectively deliver genes to target cells and tissues. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), with the advantages of high safety, repetitive applicability and tissue targeting, has become a potential strategy for gene- and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubbles are injected, UTMD is able to enhance the transport of the gene to the targeted cells. High-amplitude oscillations of microbubbles act as cavitation nuclei which can effectively focus ultrasound energy, produce oscillations and disruptions that increase the permeability of the cell membrane and create transient pores in the cell membrane. Thereby, the efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. The UTMD-mediated gene delivery system has been widely used in pre-clinical studies to enhance gene expression in a site-specific manner in a variety of organs. With reasonable application, the effects of sonoporation can be spatially and temporally controlled to improve localized tissue deposition of gene complexes for ocular gene therapy applications. In addition, appropriately powered, focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles can induce a reversible disruption of the blood-retinal barrier with no significant side effects. The present review discusses the current status of gene therapy of ocular diseases as well as studies on gene therapy of ocular diseases meditated by UTMD. PMID:26151686

  17. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: How to Bring Cell-Based Medicinal Products Successfully to the Market – Report from the CAT-DGTI-GSCN Workshop at the DGTI Annual Meeting 2014

    PubMed Central

    Celis, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Hystad, Marit; Schüßler-Lenz, Martina; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Flory, Egbert; Beuneu, Claire; Reischl, Ilona; Salmikangas, Paula

    2015-01-01

    On September 11, 2014, a workshop entitled ‘Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: How to Bring Cell-Based Medicinal Product Successfully to the Market’ was held at the 47th annual meeting of the German Society for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology (DGTI), co-organised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the DGTI in collaboration with the German Stem Cell Network (GSCN). The workshop brought together over 160 participants from academia, hospitals, small- or medium-sized enterprise developers and regulators. At the workshop, speakers from EMA, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), industry and academia addressed the regulatory aspects of development and authorisation of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), classification of ATMPs and considerations on cell-based therapies for cardiac repair. The open forum discussion session allowed for a direct interaction between ATMP developers and the speakers from EMA and CAT. PMID:26195933

  18. A Case of Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-hyun; Seong, Shin; Kim, Sung-su; Han, Jae-bok

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case that shows a significant anticancer effect of Korean medicine therapy (KMT). A 79-year-old man, who was diagnosed as stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in December 2012, was treated with KMT including intravenous pharmacopunctures and oral herbal medicine from February 22, 2013, until September 2013 without any surgical intervention, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The intravenous pharmacopunctures were the wild ginseng pharmacopuncture, Cordyceps sinensis pharmacopuncture and Trichosanthes kirilowii pharmacopuncture. The oral herbal medicine used was soramdan, made of cultivated wild ginseng. The effectiveness of this therapy was evaluated with computed tomography and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scale. The size of the tumor mass was markedly decreased and the ECOG performance scale was also improved. These results suggest that KMT alone can be an effective method to treat NSCLC. PMID:24348396

  19. Regenerative Medicine for the Heart: Perspectives on Stem-Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Gun-Sik; Fernandez, Laviel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite decades of progress in cardiovascular biology and medicine, heart disease remains the leading cause of death, and there is no cure for the failing heart. Since heart failure is mostly caused by loss or dysfunction of cardiomyocytes (CMs), replacing dead or damaged CMs with new CMs might be an ideal way to reverse the disease. However, the adult heart is composed mainly of terminally differentiated CMs that have no significant self-regeneration capacity. Recent Advances: Stem cells have tremendous regenerative potential and, thus, current cardiac regenerative research has focused on developing stem cell sources to repair damaged myocardium. Critical Issues: In this review, we examine the potential sources of cells that could be used for heart therapies, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as alternative methods for activating the endogenous regenerative mechanisms of the heart via transdifferentiation and cell reprogramming. We also discuss the current state of knowledge of cell purification, delivery, and retention. Future Directions: Efforts are underway to improve the current stem cell strategies and methodologies, which will accelerate the development of innovative stem-cell therapies for heart regeneration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2018–2031. PMID:25133793

  20. Dawn of Advanced Molecular Medicine: Nanotechnological Advancements in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Shaffer, Travis M.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:25271430

  1. Advances in combining gene therapy with cell and tissue engineering-based approaches to enhance healing of the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, M; McNulty, A L; Mauck, R L; Setton, L A; Guilak, F; Madry, H

    2016-08-01

    Meniscal lesions are common problems in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, and injury or loss of the meniscus accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite a variety of therapeutic options in the clinics, there is a critical need for improved treatments to enhance meniscal repair. In this regard, combining gene-, cell-, and tissue engineering-based approaches is an attractive strategy to generate novel, effective therapies to treat meniscal lesions. In the present work, we provide an overview of the tools currently available to improve meniscal repair and discuss the progress and remaining challenges for potential future translation in patients. PMID:27063441

  2. Gene and Cell Therapies for the Failing Heart to Prevent Sudden Arrhythmic Death

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2013-01-01

    Current therapies for treatment and prevention of sudden cardiac death have certain limitations, and a search for new therapeutic approaches is desirable to reduce the burden of sudden arrhythmic death. Gene therapy and stem cell therapy have been investigated as new, valuable tools in treating cardiac diseases such as arrhythmias. In this review, the basics of each modality, important related experimental and clinical studies, and potential advantages and limitations of these treatments will be discussed. The future success of gene and cell therapy to become practical clinical tools greatly depends on our understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmia and the mechanisms of action of gene and cell therapy. PMID:22858914

  3. Profiling gene mutations, translocations, and multidrug resistance in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a step forward to personalizing medicine.

    PubMed

    Rose-James, Alphy; Shiji, R; Kusumakumary, P; Nair, Manjusha; George, Suraj K; Sreelekha, T T

    2016-09-01

    Precise risk stratification and tailored therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can lead to enhanced survival rates among children. Translocations and mutations along with multidrug resistance markers are important factors that determine therapeutic efficacy. Gene mutation profiling of patients at the time of diagnosis can offer accurate clinical decision-making. Multiplex PCR was used to screen for various translocations, mutations, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) status in pediatric ALL samples. The roles of P-gp were analyzed at the transcriptional and translational levels by using real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. ALL specific cell line Jurkat was used to validate the functional role of P-gp in imparting drug resistance by siRNA knockdown studies. Co-occurrence of translocations and mutations contributes to cellular drug resistance. Presence of any translocation in addition to FLT3/ITD hints for overactive P-gp. Co-occurrence of E2A/PBX and TEL/AML has also been positively correlated with P-gp status. Multiplex PCR provides a rapid and cost effective technique for profiling translocations, mutations, and multidrug resistance status that determines what therapy patients could be administered. Mutation profiling in patients for analyzing genetic lesions along with drug resistance profiling will help improve risk stratification and personalized medicine, thereby increasing the treatment success rates among pediatric patients with leukemia. PMID:27449773

  4. Intrathecal gene therapy rescues a model of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Sargiannidou, Irene; Theophilidis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Richter, Jan; Bashiardes, Stavros; Schiza, Natasa; Nearchou, Marianna; Christodoulou, Christina; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-04-26

    Inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies are progressive incurable diseases without effective treatment. To develop a gene therapy approach targeting myelinating Schwann cells that can be translatable, we delivered a lentiviral vector using a single lumbar intrathecal injection and a myelin-specific promoter. The human gene of interest, GJB1, which is mutated in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1X), was delivered intrathecally into adult Gjb1-null mice, a genetically authentic model of CMT1X that develops a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. We obtained widespread, stable, and cell-specific expression of connexin32 in up to 50% of Schwann cells in multiple lumbar spinal roots and peripheral nerves. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis revealed significantly improved motor performance, quadriceps muscle contractility, and sciatic nerve conduction velocities. Furthermore, treated mice exhibited reduced numbers of demyelinated and remyelinated fibers and fewer inflammatory cells in lumbar motor roots, as well as in the femoral motor and sciatic nerves. This study demonstrates that a single intrathecal lentiviral gene delivery can lead to Schwann cell-specific expression in spinal roots extending to multiple peripheral nerves. This clinically relevant approach improves the phenotype of an inherited neuropathy mouse model and provides proof of principle for treating inherited demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:27035961

  5. Large Animal Models for Foamy Virus Vector Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Trobridge, Grant D.; Horn, Peter A.; Beard, Brian C.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vectors have shown great promise for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy. Their ability to efficiently deliver transgenes to multi-lineage long-term repopulating cells in large animal models suggests they will be effective for several human hematopoietic diseases. Here, we review FV vector studies in large animal models, including the use of FV vectors with the mutant O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMTP140K to increase the number of genetically modified cells after transplantation. In these studies, FV vectors have mediated efficient gene transfer to polyclonal repopulating cells using short ex vivo transduction protocols designed to minimize the negative effects of ex vivo culture on stem cell engraftment. In this regard, FV vectors appear superior to gammaretroviral vectors, which require longer ex vivo culture to effect efficient transduction. FV vectors have also compared favorably with lentiviral vectors when directly compared in the dog model. FV vectors have corrected leukocyte adhesion deficiency and pyruvate kinase deficiency in the dog large animal model. FV vectors also appear safer than gammaretroviral vectors based on a reduced frequency of integrants near promoters and also near proto-oncogenes in canine repopulating cells. Together, these studies suggest that FV vectors should be highly effective for several human hematopoietic diseases, including those that will require relatively high percentages of gene-modified cells to achieve clinical benefit. PMID:23223198

  6. ORMOPLEXEs for gene therapy: In vitro and in vivo assays.

    PubMed

    Matos, J C; Soares, A R; Domingues, I; Monteiro, G A; Gonçalves, M C

    2016-06-01

    Gene therapy stays on the cutting edge of biomedical research, being the design of the optimal gene delivery vector one of the key requests. Silica-based nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as promising non-viral gene delivery vector, due to their high biocompatibility, nontoxicity, non-immunogenicity, biodegradability and enormous bioconjugation versatility. In this work a sol-gel methodology for the synthesis of amino-functionalized silica NPs (NH2-ORMOSIL NPs) was optimized, and NPs were characterized by TEM and FTIR. In a first step NH2-ORMOSIL NPs were bioconjugated with a plasmid DNA, pVAX1-GFP, assembling an ORMOPLEXE, confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. In a second step, in vitro studies have been performed with cultured CHO cells, where ORMOPLEXEs transfection was proved by CLSM. In vivo transfection efficiency and bio-distribution were performed in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, assessed by FM. Finally, NPs ecotoxicity was studied in zebrafish embryos by following the mortality and developmental endpoints. PMID:27040249

  7. Tmc gene therapy restores auditory function in deaf mice.

    PubMed

    Askew, Charles; Rochat, Cylia; Pan, Bifeng; Asai, Yukako; Ahmed, Hena; Child, Erin; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    Genetic hearing loss accounts for up to 50% of prelingual deafness worldwide, yet there are no biologic treatments currently available. To investigate gene therapy as a potential biologic strategy for restoration of auditory function in patients with genetic hearing loss, we tested a gene augmentation approach in mouse models of genetic deafness. We focused on DFNB7/11 and DFNA36, which are autosomal recessive and dominant deafnesses, respectively, caused by mutations in transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1). Mice that carry targeted deletion of Tmc1 or a dominant Tmc1 point mutation, known as Beethoven, are good models for human DFNB7/11 and DFNA36. We screened several adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotypes and promoters and identified AAV2/1 and the chicken β-actin (Cba) promoter as an efficient combination for driving the expression of exogenous Tmc1 in inner hair cells in vivo. Exogenous Tmc1 or its closely related ortholog, Tmc2, were capable of restoring sensory transduction, auditory brainstem responses, and acoustic startle reflexes in otherwise deaf mice, suggesting that gene augmentation with Tmc1 or Tmc2 is well suited for further development as a strategy for restoration of auditory function in deaf patients who carry TMC1 mutations. PMID:26157030

  8. Emerging gene-based prognostic tools in early breast cancer: First steps to personalised medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wazir, Umar; Mokbel, Kefah

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a major cause of neoplastic disease in much of the developed world. The majority of cases are diagnosed with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative invasive ductal carcinoma and are treated predominantly by surgery which includes sentinel node biopsy and adjuvant endocrine therapy ± adjuvant radiotherapy. It is believed that an indeterminate subset of the patient population is needlessly incurring chemotherapy related morbidity without attaining any increase in survival due to therapy. Furthermore in the era of extended adjuvant endocrine therapy it is important to identify those patients who can be safely treated with 5 years rather than 10 years of endocrine therapy thus optimising the benefit-risk balance. This perception has propelled the development of more personalised prognostic tools for newly diagnosed cases of ER-positive breast cancer. In this article, we shall review the evidence regarding the currently available gene assays for human breast cancer. PMID:25493218

  9. Current and future regenerative medicine — Principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Thomas G.; Berg, Lise C.; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird’s-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine. The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds, and their potential therapeutic use in horses are rudimentary at present. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation has been proclaimed from several equine tissues in the past few years. Based on the criteria of the International Society for Cellular Therapy, most of these cells are more correctly referred to as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering — cells, biological factors, and biomaterials — are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources. The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently in controlled clinical trials in equine patients to be regarded as evidence-based medicine. In the meantime, the medical mantra “do no harm” should prevail, and the application of stem cell-based therapies in the horse should be done critically and cautiously, and treatment outcomes (good and bad) should be recorded and reported. Stem cell and tissue engineering research in the horse has exciting comparative and equine specific perspectives that most likely will benefit the health of horses and humans. Controlled, well-designed studies are needed to move this new equine research field forward. PMID:19412395

  10. Simultaneous gene silencing of KRAS and anti-apoptotic genes as a multitarget therapy

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Kristin; Lademann, Franziska; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Jahnke, Beatrix; Aust, Daniela E.; Kahlert, Christoph; Weber, Georg; Weitz, Jürgen; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumor types worldwide and an effective therapy is still elusive. Targeted therapy focused against a specific alteration is by definition unable to attack broad pathway signaling modification. Tumor heterogeneity will render targeted therapies ineffective based on the regrowth of cancer cell sub-clones. Therefore multimodal therapy strategies, targeting signaling pathways simultaneously should improve treatment. SiRNAs against KRAS and the apoptosis associated genes BCLXL, FLIP, MCL1L, SURVIVIN and XIAP were transfected into human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis was measured by Caspase 3/7 activation, subG1 FACS analysis and PARP cleavage. The therapeutic approach was tested in a subcutaneous allograft model with a murine cancer cell line. By using siRNAs as a systematic approach to remodel signal transduction in pancreatic cancer the results showed increasing inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis induction in vitro and in vivo. Thus, siRNAs are suitable to model multimodal therapy against signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer. Improvements in in vivo delivery of siRNAs against a multitude of targets might therefore be a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26716649

  11. A circadian gene expression atlas in mammals: Implications for biology and medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ray; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Ballance, Heather I.; Hughes, Michael E.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the role of the circadian clock in mouse physiology and behavior, we used RNA-seq and DNA arrays to quantify the transcriptomes of 12 mouse organs over time. We found 43% of all protein coding genes showed circadian rhythms in transcription somewhere in the body, largely in an organ-specific manner. In most organs, we noticed the expression of many oscillating genes peaked during transcriptional “rush hours” preceding dawn and dusk. Looking at the genomic landscape of rhythmic genes, we saw that they clustered together, were longer, and had more spliceforms than nonoscillating genes. Systems-level analysis revealed intricate rhythmic orchestration of gene pathways throughout the body. We also found oscillations in the expression of more than 1,000 known and novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Supporting their potential role in mediating clock function, ncRNAs conserved between mouse and human showed rhythmic expression in similar proportions as protein coding genes. Importantly, we also found that the majority of best-selling drugs and World Health Organization essential medicines directly target the products of rhythmic genes. Many of these drugs have short half-lives and may benefit from timed dosage. In sum, this study highlights critical, systemic, and surprising roles of the mammalian circadian clock and provides a blueprint for advancement in chronotherapy. PMID:25349387

  12. A circadian gene expression atlas in mammals: implications for biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ray; Lahens, Nicholas F; Ballance, Heather I; Hughes, Michael E; Hogenesch, John B

    2014-11-11

    To characterize the role of the circadian clock in mouse physiology and behavior, we used RNA-seq and DNA arrays to quantify the transcriptomes of 12 mouse organs over time. We found 43% of all protein coding genes showed circadian rhythms in transcription somewhere in the body, largely in an organ-specific manner. In most organs, we noticed the expression of many oscillating genes peaked during transcriptional "rush hours" preceding dawn and dusk. Looking at the genomic landscape of rhythmic genes, we saw that they clustered together, were longer, and had more spliceforms than nonoscillating genes. Systems-level analysis revealed intricate rhythmic orchestration of gene pathways throughout the body. We also found oscillations in the expression of more than 1,000 known and novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Supporting their potential role in mediating clock function, ncRNAs conserved between mouse and human showed rhythmic expression in similar proportions as protein coding genes. Importantly, we also found that the majority of best-selling drugs and World Health Organization essential medicines directly target the products of rhythmic genes. Many of these drugs have short half-lives and may benefit from timed dosage. In sum, this study highlights critical, systemic, and surprising roles of the mammalian circadian clock and provides a blueprint for advancement in chronotherapy. PMID:25349387

  13. Facilitating Redundancy-Oriented Management with Gene-Therapy-Oriented Management Against Disaster.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoo-Man

    2016-06-01

    This article tests the hypothesis that "if redundancy-oriented management has negative aspects, then it could be facilitated by gene-therapy-oriented management." Negative aspects include disadvantages, misjudgments, or miscalculations. The article provides a newly revised principle of disaster management by studying gene-therapy-oriented management. Based on qualitative analysis, redundancy-oriented and gene-therapy-oriented management are analyzed via five variables: governments, business, volunteers, households, and the international community. The article is valuable because an analytical frame on gene-therapy-oriented management is systematically reconceptualized for the field of disaster management via three elements: unhealthy proteins (problems or failed measures), a vector (new or modified solutions), and target cells (positive outcomes). In accepting the hypothesis, the key tenet is that stakeholders have to assist the progress of redundancy-oriented management with gene-therapy-oriented management by paying attention to the genes of each disaster. PMID:26720173

  14. Gene therapy for the treatment of mitochondrial DNA disorders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert W

    2005-02-01

    Despite recent epidemiological studies confirming that mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders due to mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome are amongst the most common inherited human diseases, realistic therapeutic strategies for these patients remain limited. The disappointing response to various vitamins, cofactors and electron acceptors that have been administered to patients in an attempt to bypass the underlying respiratory chain defect, coupled with the complexities of human mitochondrial genetics, means that novel and innovative means are required to offer realistic treatments. Several 'gene therapy' strategies have therefore been proposed to treat patients with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, and although these are not without their own inherent problems, several exciting approaches promise much in the near future. This review will provide a basic background to mitochondrial genetics and mitochondrial DNA disorders before introducing the various strategies being tested in vitro at present, in cell culture and animal models, and, in the example of therapeutic exercise, in patients themselves. PMID:15757380

  15. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders: a good start.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases with a collective frequency of ∼1 in 7000 births, resulting from the deficiency in one or more enzymes or transporters that normally reside within the lysosomes. Pathology results from the progressive accumulation of uncleaved lipids, glycoproteins and/or glycosaminoglycans in the lysosomes and secondary damages that affect the brain, viscera, bones and connective tissues. Most treatment modalities developed for LSD, including gene therapy (GT), are based on the lysosome-specific cross-correction mechanism, by which close proximity of normal cells leads to the correction of the biochemical consequences of enzymatic deficiency within the neighboring cells. Here, GT efforts addressing these disorders are reviewed with an up-to-date discussion of their impact on the LSD disease phenotype in animal models and patients. PMID:26604151

  16. Gene Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pechan, Peter; Wadsworth, Samuel; Scaria, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    Pathological neovascularization is a key component of the neovascular form (also known as the wet form) of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Several preclinical studies have shown that antiangiogenesis strategies are effective for treating neovascular AMD in animal models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the main inducers of ocular neovascularization, and several clinical trials have shown the benefits of neutralizing VEGF in patients with neovascular AMD or diabetic macular edema. In this review, we summarize several preclinical and early-stage clinical trials with intraocular gene therapies, which have the potential to reduce or eliminate the repeated intravitreal injections that are currently required for the treatment of neovascular AMD. PMID:25524721

  17. GeneNews Limited: bringing the blood transcriptome to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Novak, David J; Liew, Gailina J; Liew, Choong-Chin

    2012-03-01

    GeneNews Limited (TSX:GEN) is a molecular diagnostics company, uniquely positioned to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. GeneNews has developed and patented the Sentinel Principle(®), an innovative approach to identify clinically actionable disease biomarkers from the blood transcriptome. Novel biomarker panels have been identified to address unmet clinical needs in a broad spectrum of malignancy, including those for oncology, cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological related disorders. Currently available products and services from GeneNews are: ColonSentry™, the world's first blood-based molecular test for colorectal cancer, and; the SentinelGX™ Pharmacogenomic and Companion Diagnostic BloodRNA™ services, established to effectively support pharmaceutical partners in their companion diagnostic, development efforts. PMID:22379995

  18. Stem cell therapy: from evidence-based medicine to emotion-based medicine? The long Italian way for a scientific regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    On 23 May 2013, the Italian health minister decided to endorse a law regarding controversial stem cell-based therapies in 32 young terminally ill patients, shocking many scientists. According to the international scientific community, these therapies could be dangerous because they were not rigorously tested in humans. This decision was made after many days of media and judiciary pressure. Several lawsuits regarding stem cell-based therapies were brought before the judiciary districts of different Italian regions. We analyzed the Italian legal context regarding the field of pharmaceutical and medical devices, including the European Union trend. A national database - commonly used to manage legal materials for professional or educational purposes or both - was used to find relevant legal cases involving stem cell-based therapies. Stem cell-based therapies endorsed by the new Italian law have been the subject of an important discussion not only in the scientific community but also in various courts. We found several legal actions filed by parents in order to make stem cells available to their young children, who had serious neurodegenerative diseases. The majority of the analyzed legal disputes were settled in favor of the applicants, whereas only two decisions (Courts of Justice of Rome and Florence) rejected the complaint because of the absence of sufficient scientific data regarding stem cell-based therapies. The present Italian situation is influencing the destiny of future young patients and strongly impacting public and institutional opinion. It is a practical example of the complexity of the decision of not providing unapproved scientific stem cell-based therapies when medicine does not have any other alternative therapies. PMID:24456690

  19. Stem cell therapy: from evidence-based medicine to emotion-based medicine? The long Italian way for a scientific regulation.

    PubMed

    Frati, Paola; Frati, Giacomo; Gulino, Matteo; Montanari Vergallo, Gianluca; Di Luca, Alessandro; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    On 23 May 2013, the Italian health minister decided to endorse a law regarding controversial stem cell-based therapies in 32 young terminally ill patients, shocking many scientists. According to the international scientific community, these therapies could be dangerous because they were not rigorously tested in humans. This decision was made after many days of media and judiciary pressure. Several lawsuits regarding stem cell-based therapies were brought before the judiciary districts of different Italian regions. We analyzed the Italian legal context regarding the field of pharmaceutical and medical devices, including the European Union trend. A national database - commonly used to manage legal materials for professional or educational purposes or both - was used to find relevant legal cases involving stem cell-based therapies. Stem cell-based therapies endorsed by the new Italian law have been the subject of an important discussion not only in the scientific community but also in various courts. We found several legal actions filed by parents in order to make stem cells available to their young children, who had serious neurodegenerative diseases. The majority of the analyzed legal disputes were settled in favor of the applicants, whereas only two decisions (Courts of Justice of Rome and Florence) rejected the complaint because of the absence of sufficient scientific data regarding stem cell-based therapies. The present Italian situation is influencing the destiny of future young patients and strongly impacting public and institutional opinion. It is a practical example of the complexity of the decision of not providing unapproved scientific stem cell-based therapies when medicine does not have any other alternative therapies. PMID:24456690

  20. Managing Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Special Focus in MicroRNA Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passadouro, Marta; Faneca, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease and the fourth most lethal cancer in developed countries. Despite all progress in medicine and in understanding the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, pancreatic cancer still has a poor prognosis, the median survival after diagnosis being around 3 to 6 months and the survival rate of 5 years being less than 4%. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which represents more than 90% of new pancreatic cancer cases, the prognosis is worse than for the other cancers with a patient mortality of approximately 99%. Therefore, there is a pressing need for developing new and efficient therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. In this regard, microRNAs not only have been seen as potential diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers but also as promising therapeutic agents. In this context, this review provides an examination of the most frequently deregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) in PDAC and their putative molecular targets involved in the signaling pathways of pancreatic
carcinogenesis. Additionally, it is presented a summary of gene therapy clinical trials involving miRNAs and it is illustrated the therapeutic potential associated to these small non-coding RNAs, for PDAC treatment. The facts presented here constitute a strong evidence of the remarkable opportunity associated to the application of microRNA-based therapeutic strategies as a novel approach for cancer therapy. PMID:27187371