Science.gov

Sample records for medicine london uk

  1. Biosimilar Medicines Group - 14th Annual Medicines for Europe Conference (April 28-29, 2016 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, L

    2016-05-01

    Biotechnology has enabled the development of treatments for many diseases benefiting millions of people. Similar biologics or 'biosimilar' versions of originator biologic medicines are a relatively new category of biologics, usually developed when the originator is protected by patent exclusivity and introduced to healthcare systems as a cheaper option to treat disease. Biosimilars provide value and thus access for new groups of patients because they bring cost savings to the healthcare ecosystem. Generics achieved cost savings of EUR 100 billion in 2014, which allows the system to finance more innovative methods of bringing medicines to patients. The Medicines for Europe Biosimilars Medicines Group Conference in London is the main annual biosimilars gathering and attracts the world's experts. A recurring theme throughout this year's conference was the promotion of a multi-stakeholder approach; if stakeholders work together they will collectively give patients more opportunity to benefit from biologic medicines. In discussion were the latest developments in the biosimilars market, including the ongoing challenges against adoption of biosimilars. PMID:27376164

  2. The 2015 Pregnancy Summit, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cherynne

    2016-03-01

    Pregnancy Summit, Cineworld, The O2, London, UK, 29 September to 1 October 2015 The 2015 Pregnancy Summit was held over 3 days from 29 September to 1 October at Cineworld, The O2, London, UK. The event brings together a multidisciplinary faculty of international researchers and clinicians to discuss both scientific and clinical aspects of pregnancy-related issues in an informal setting. The goal of the meeting was to provide delegates with an update of recent advances in management of pregnancy-related conditions, to present research data and to discuss the current attitudes and practices in relevant topics. An extensive range of topics were discussed, from preeclampsia and treatment of hypertension, to the psychological impact of termination of pregnancy and feticide. This report will summarize a selection of the lectures presented. PMID:26900652

  3. Pharmacovigilance Discussion Forum--The European Generic Medicines Association's 8th Annual Meeting (January 21, 2015--London, UK).

    PubMed

    Lam, S

    2015-01-01

    The practice and science of pharmacovigilance first emerged following the disaster caused by thalidomide in 1961, which led to the initiation of systemic international efforts to address drug safety issues spearheaded by the WHO. Systems were developed in member states of the WHO to analyze cases of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and collate these data into a central database to aid national drug regulatory authorities in improving safety profiles of medicines. Pharmacovigilance is a key public health function for monitoring all medicinal products to assess their quality, efficacy and safety before and following authorization. These medicines are continually assessed to detect any aspect that could compromise their safety, and ensure that the necessary measures are taken. In July 2012, new legislation for pharmacovigilance in the E.U. came into effect as a result of the changes set out in the Directive 2010/84/EU and the European Commission (EC) implementing Regulation (EU) No 520/2012 to reduce the increasing number of ADRs. The latest developments in pharmacovigilance in Europe, including news on E.U. pharmacovigilance legislation, were discussed at the 8th European Generic Medicines Association (EGA) Pharmacovigilance Discussion Forum. The meeting facilitated constructive dialogue between regulators and industry on a range of topics including how to simplify pharmacovigilance activities and improve the processes of risk management plans, periodic safety update reports, signal detection, joint studies and inspections. PMID:25685861

  4. Acheiving speech intelligibility at Paddington Station, London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Helen M.

    2002-11-01

    Paddington Station in London, UK is a large rail terminus for long distance electric and diesel powered trains. This magnificent train shed has four arched spans and is one of the remaining structural testaments to the architect Brunel. Given the current British and European legislative requirements for intelligible speech in public buildings AMS Acoustics were engaged to design an electroacoustic solution. In this paper we will outline how the significant problems of lively natural acoustics, the high operational noise levels and the strict aesthetic constraints were addressed. The resultant design is radical, using the most recent dsp controlled line array loudspeakers. In the paper we detail the acoustic modeling undertaken to predict both even direct sound pressure level coverage and STI. Further it presents the speech intelligibility measured upon handover of the new system. The design has proved to be successful and given the nature of the space, outstanding speech intelligibility is achieved.

  5. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  6. Novel methylotrophic bacteria isolated from the River Thames (London, UK).

    PubMed

    Boden, Rich; Thomas, Elizabeth; Savani, Parita; Kelly, Donovan P; Wood, Ann P

    2008-12-01

    Enrichment and elective culture for methylotrophs from sediment of the River Thames in central London yielded a diversity of pure cultures representing several genera of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, which were mainly of organisms not generally regarded as typically methylotrophic. Substrates leading to successful isolations included methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, methanesulfonate and dimethylsulfone. Several isolates were studied in detail and shown by their biochemical and morphological properties and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to be Sphingomonas melonis strain ET35, Mycobacterium fluoranthenivorans strain DSQ3, Rhodococcus erythropolis strain DSQ4, Brevibacterium casei strain MSQ5, Klebsiella oxytoca strains MMA/F and MMA/1, Pseudomonas mendocina strain TSQ4, and Flavobacterium sp. strains MSA/1 and MMA/2. The results show that facultative methylotrophy is present across a wide range of Bacteria, suggesting that turnover of diverse C(1)-compounds is of much greater microbiological and environmental significance than is generally thought. The origins of the genes encoding the enzymes of methylotrophy in diverse heterotrophs need further study, and could further our understanding of the phylogeny and antiquity of methylotrophic systems. PMID:18681896

  7. Medical nanotechnology in the UK: a perspective from the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Horton, Michael A; Khan, Abid

    2006-03-01

    Nanotechnology research is booming worldwide, and the general belief is that medical and biological applications will form the greatest sector of expansion over the next decade, driven by an attempt to bring radical solutions to areas of unmet medical need. What is true in the United States is also being fulfilled in Europe. This, though, is generally at a significantly lower investment level, even if for "large" capital infrastructure and interdisciplinary centers. Against this, the United Kingdom and its European partners are following the maxim "small is beautiful" and are attempting to identify and develop academic research and commercial businesses in areas that traditional nanotechnology developments involving engineering or physics find challenging. Thus in London-University College London (UCL) in a major joint project with Imperial College and linked to other UK and European centers of excellence-we are building upon our internationally competitive medical research (the two universities together form one of the largest centers of biomedical research outside the United States) to focus on and develop medical nanotechnology as a major sector of our research activity. A novel approach to commercialization has been the establishment with government and private equity funds of a "BioNanotechnology Centre" that will act as a portal for UK industry to access specialist skills to solve issues relating to developing nanotechnology-based medical applications, for example, for environmental screening, diagnostics, and therapy. This article reviews our academic and business strategy with examples from our current biomedical research portfolio. PMID:17292115

  8. Bullying, "Cussing" and "Mucking About": Complexities in Tackling Homophobia in Three Secondary Schools in South London, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Ian; Aggleton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In countries such as the UK, schools have a responsibility to prevent all forms of bullying, including those related to sexual orientation. However, relatively little is known about how schools go about this work successfully. This study aimed to identify how three secondary schools in south London, England, were addressing homophobia. Three…

  9. Monitoring CO2 and CH4 concentrations along an urban-rural transect in London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Alex; Broquet, Gregoire; Clifford, Debbie; Chevallier, Frederic; Butterfield, David

    2013-04-01

    Cities are important sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Anthropogenic CO2 is released in the combustion of fossil fuels for heating, electricity and transport. The major sources of CH4 in city environments are natural gas leakage, landfill sites and transport emissions. Monitoring of urban greenhouse gas concentrations is crucial for cities aiming to reduce emissions through measures such as changes to the transport infrastructure and green planning. We present measurements of CO2 and CH4 concentrations using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) at four sites located in and around London, UK. Two sites were located in the inner city, one in the suburban fringe and the fourth in a rural location close to the city. This study was funded by Astrium Services Ltd as part of a pilot scheme to monitor city-scale GHG emissions and presented a unique opportunity to study changes in greenhouse gas concentrations across an urban to rural 'transect'. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is used to estimate CO2 and CH4 concentrations throughout the four month measurement period during the summer of 2012. Comparisons are made between the measured and modelled CO2 and CH4 concentrations and the representativity of the study sites for future urban greenhouse gas monitoring is considered. This study also examines the ability of a variety of measurement and modelling techniques to partition anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 sources.

  10. Assessing the representativeness of monitoring data from an urban intersection site in central London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaperdas, A.; Colvile, R. N.

    The wind flow field around urban street-building configurations has an important influence on the microscale pollutant dispersion from road traffic, affecting overall dilution and creating localised spatial variations of pollutant concentration. As a result, the "representativeness" of air quality measurements made at different urban monitoring sites can be strongly dependent on the interaction of the local wind flow field with the street-building geometry surrounding the monitor. The present study is an initial attempt to develop a method for appraising the significance of air quality measurements from urban monitoring sites, using a general application computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate small-scale flow and dispersion patterns around real urban building configurations. The main focus of the work was to evaluate routine CO monitoring data collected by Westminster City Council at an intersection of street canyons at Marylebone Road, Central London. Many monitors in the UK are purposely situated at urban canyon intersections, which are thought to be local "hot spots" of pollutant emissions, however very limited information exists in the literature on the flow and dispersion patterns associated with them. With the use of simple CFD simulations and the analysis of available monitoring data, it was possible to gain insights into the effect of wind direction on the small-scale dispersion patterns at the chosen intersection, and how that can influence the data captured by a monitor. It was found that a change in wind direction could result in an increase or decrease of monitored CO concentration of up to 80%, for a given level of traffic emissions and meteorological conditions. Understanding and de-coupling the local effect of wind direction from monitoring data using the methods presented in this work could prove a useful new tool for urban monitoring data interpretation.

  11. [Identification of ancient Chinese medicinal specimens preserved at Natural History Museum in London].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong-zhen; Zhao, Kai-cun; Brand, Eric

    2015-12-01

    On-site field investigation was conducted to authenticate a batch of ancient Chinese medicinal decoction pieces that have been preserved in a rare collection at the Natural History Museum in London. These treasured artifacts comprise a portion of the Sloane Collection, and the nearly one hundred Chinese medicinal specimens examined within provide an objective record of the real situation regarding the Chinese medicinal materials in commercial circulation three hundred years ago. The precious data from this collection pro-vides an extremely valuable reference for the research into the history of medicinal exchange between China and the West during the Age of Exploration, shedding light on the evolution and historical changes in the species used in Chinese medicine, as well as the history of medicinal processing and decoction pieces. PMID:27245044

  12. Sources of greenhouse gases and carbon monoxide in central London (UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja; Zazzeri, Giulia; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been on the scientific agenda for several decades and new technology now also allows for high-precision, continuous monitoring of fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Compared to the natural environment, flux measurements in the urban environment, which is home to over 50% of the population globally, are still rare despite high densities of anthropogenic sources of pollutants. We report on over three years of measurements atop a 192 m tower in central London (UK), Europe's largest city, which started in October 2011. Fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide are measured by eddy-covariance (EC) at the British Telecom tower (51° 31' 17.4' N 0° 8' 20.04' W). In addition to the long-term measurements, EC fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured in February 2014. All four trace gases exhibit diurnal trends consistent with anthropogenic activities with minimum emissions at night and early afternoon maxima. Segregating emissions by wind direction reveals heterogeneous source distributions with temporal patterns and source strengths that differ between compounds. The lowest emissions for CO, CO2 and CH4 were recorded for NW winds. The highest emissions of methane were in the SE sector, in the NE for CO2 and in the W for CO. Fluxes of all 3 gases exhibited marked seasonal trends characterised by a decrease in emissions in summer (63% reduction for CO, 36% for CO2 and 22% for CH4). Monthly fluxes of CO and CO2 were linearly correlated to air temperature (R2 = 0.7 and 0.59 respectively); a weaker dependence upon temperature was also observed for CH4 (R2 = 0.31). Diurnal and seasonal emissions of CO and CO2 are mainly controlled by local fossil fuel combustion and vehicle cold starts are thought to account for 20-30% of additional emissions of CO during the winter. Fugitive emissions of CH4 from the natural gas distribution network are thought to be substantial, which is consistent

  13. Regional methods for mapping major faults in areas of uniform low relief, as used in the London Basin, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, Richard; Aldiss, Donald

    2013-04-01

    Most of the London Basin, south-eastern UK, is underlain by the Palaeogene London Clay Formation, comprising a succession of rather uniform marine clay deposits up to 150 m thick, with widespread cover of Quaternary deposits and urban development. Therefore, in this area faults are difficult to delineate (or to detect) by conventional geological surveying methods in the field, and few are shown on the geological maps of the area. However, boreholes and excavations, especially those for civil engineering works, indicate that faults are probably widespread and numerous in the London area. A representative map of fault distribution and patterns of displacement is a pre-requisite for understanding the tectonic development of a region. Moreover, faulting is an important influence on the design and execution of civil engineering works, and on the hydrogeological characteristics of the ground. This paper reviews methods currently being used to map faults in the London Basin area. These are: the interpretation of persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) data from time-series satellite-borne radar measurements; the interpretation of regional geophysical fields (Bouguer gravity anomaly and aeromagnetic), especially in combination with a digital elevation model; and the construction and interpretation of 3D geological models. Although these methods are generally not as accurate as large-scale geological field surveys, due to the availability of appropriate data in the London Basin they provide the means to recognise and delineate more faults, and with more confidence, than was possible using traditional geological mapping techniques. Together they reveal regional structures arising during Palaeogene crustal extension and subsidence in the North Sea, followed by inversion of a Mesozoic sedimentary basin in the south of the region, probably modified by strike-slip fault motion associated with the relative northward movement of the African Plate and the Alpine orogeny. This

  14. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) - 17th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (June 8-11, 2016 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Walker, G; Croasdell, G

    2016-06-01

    The 2016 Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, an annual conference organized by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), took place in London, U.K. Over 4,000 abstracts were submitted this year with over 199 sessions and poster tours on offer. The congress has become a major event in the field of rheumatology with participants attending from around the world. The oral sessions, poster displays and lectures cover a broad spectrum of topics, including the latest understanding of disease processes, as well as recent advances in diagnosis and patient care. PMID:27458612

  15. Conference Report: Online Information Meeting 2005, Olympia, London (UK), 29 November-1 December 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education for Information, 2006

    2006-01-01

    For many years now the Holiday season has been associated with the gathering of information professionals in west London for the annual Online Information Meeting. The Meeting currently is organized by VNU Exhibitions Europe (formerly Imark Communication), though for old-timers it will forever be associated with Learned Information, the…

  16. The Society for Acute Medicine (UK) Acute Medicine Training Survey 2007.

    PubMed

    Skene, Hannah; Ward, David K

    2008-01-01

    An online survey of training in Acute Medicine was conducted to assemble a true picture of the current situation in the UK. The specialty is flourishing, with over 60 trainees having predicted CCT dates in Acute Medicine in 2010 and 2011 alone. 128 respondents highlighted a multitude of issues, including the need for improvements in management and special skills training and part time opportunities. We have used the results of this survey to suggest action points for Deaneries, Training Programme Directors, the Society for Acute Medicine (UK) and those involved in workforce planning. PMID:21607233

  17. The medicines for children agenda in the UK.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Terence

    2006-06-01

    Children can expect the medicines prescribed for them to have at least as good an evidence base as in adult practice. Current licensing arrangements in the UK ensure a rigorous assessment of most drugs used for adults, whereas prescribing outside the licence is relatively common for children. Until the evidence base is increased, consensus guidelines or formularies, such as the new British National Formulary for Children, provide some protection for children and prescribers. For the future, there is optimism that the dearth of research on which to base children's prescribing will be addressed by new initiatives, such as the UK Medicines for Children Research Network and draft EU legislation providing incentives to industry. PMID:16722834

  18. Working with Secondary School Leadership in a Large-Scale Reform in London, UK: Consultants' Perspectives of Their Role as Agents of School Change and Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, David Hagen

    2010-01-01

    This article uses a cultural and political theoretical framework to examine the relationship between consultants and secondary school leaders within a large-scale consultancy-based reform, the Secondary National Strategy (SNS), in London UK. The SNS follows a cascade model of implementation, in which nationally created initiatives are introduced…

  19. Complaints about dog faeces as a symbolic representation of incivility in London, UK: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Derges, Jane; Lynch, Rebecca; Clow, Angela; Petticrew, Mark; Draper, Alizon

    2012-12-01

    During a 'Well London' study, residents were asked about their neighbourhood and its environment. Above all other complaints, 'dog poo' was mentioned as a key concern. Despite low rates of infection and disease among the human population resulting from contact with canine faecal matter, the concerns of the public continue to rate it as a serious public health issue. Most public health studies, therefore, seek to identify processes of transmission and disease pathology as a method of addressing the problem. This study approaches the issue through a contextualised analysis of residents' complaints, using anthropological theory to examine the symbolic representation of 'dog poo'. Analysis of the interviews shows that these specific complaints were located among less easily defined or articulated experiences of social and environmental neglect, where neighbours were estranged from one another and local authorities seen as negligent. This approach has important implications for public health, as it provides not only a strong indicator of the level of dissatisfaction within some of London's more disadvantaged neighbourhoods, but also identifies a need for policies that are grounded in cross-disciplinary research into the relationship between health, 'wellbeing' and experiences of marginalisation among urban populations. PMID:23335839

  20. Review of the British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting 2015, 2-4 December, London, UK.

    PubMed

    José, Ricardo J; Chalmers, James D; Greening, Neil J; Janes, Sam M

    2016-06-01

    The British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting 2015 is reviewed in this article. Over 3 days in December, this annual scientific meeting attracted over 2300 delegates and up-to-date respiratory research was presented by leading UK and international speakers. This article reviews a number of symposia and selected abstract presentations from the meeting. PMID:27015800

  1. Highlights from Faraday Discussion: Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts, London, UK, April 2016.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nico; Manyar, Haresh G; Roldan, Alberto

    2016-06-28

    The Faraday Discussion on the design of new heterogeneous catalysts took place from 4-6 April 2016 in London, United Kingdom. It brought together world leading scientists actively involved in the synthesis, characterisation, modelling and testing of solid catalysts, attracting more than one hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - academic and industrial researchers, experimentalists and theoreticians, and students. The meeting was a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to control and design catalysts with specific properties for particular processes can potentially have on the chemical industry, environment, economy and society as a whole. In the following, we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation. PMID:27307017

  2. Medicine, metals and empire: the survival of a chymical projector in early eighteenth-century London.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koji

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that Newtonian philosophers such as Johan T. Desaguliers defined their authority in contradistinction to the 'projector', a promoter of allegedly impractical and fraudulent schemes. Partly due to the lack of evidence, however, we know relatively little about these eighteenth-century projectors, especially those operating outside learned networks without claims to gentility, disinterest or theoretical sophistication. This paper begins to remedy this lacuna through the case of a 'chymical' projector, Moses Stringer (fl. 1693-1714). Instead of aspiring to respectability, this London chymist survived by vigorously promoting new projects, thereby accelerating, rather than attenuating, the course of action that rendered him dubious in the first place. The article follows his (often abortive) exploitation of medicine, metals and empire, and thereby illuminates the shady end of the enlightened world of public science. PMID:26336059

  3. Discovery of previously unrecognised local faults in London, UK, using detailed 3D geological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiss, Don; Haslam, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In parts of London, faulting introduces lateral heterogeneity to the local ground conditions, especially where construction works intercept the Palaeogene Lambeth Group. This brings difficulties to the compilation of a ground model that is fully consistent with the ground investigation data, and so to the design and construction of engineering works. However, because bedrock in the London area is rather uniform at outcrop, and is widely covered by Quaternary deposits, few faults are shown on the geological maps of the area. This paper discusses a successful resolution of this problem at a site in east central London, where tunnels for a new underground railway station are planned. A 3D geological model was used to provide an understanding of the local geological structure, in faulted Lambeth Group strata, that had not been possible by other commonly-used methods. This model includes seven previously unrecognised faults, with downthrows ranging from about 1 m to about 12 m. The model was constructed in the GSI3D geological modelling software using about 145 borehole records, including many legacy records, in an area of 850 m by 500 m. The basis of a GSI3D 3D geological model is a network of 2D cross-sections drawn by a geologist, generally connecting borehole positions (where the borehole records define the level of the geological units that are present), and outcrop and subcrop lines for those units (where shown by a geological map). When the lines tracing the base of each geological unit within the intersecting cross-sections are complete and mutually consistent, the software is used to generate TIN surfaces between those lines, so creating a 3D geological model. Even where a geological model is constructed as if no faults were present, changes in apparent dip between two data points within a single cross-section can indicate that a fault is present in that segment of the cross-section. If displacements of similar size with the same polarity are found in a series

  4. Short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and daily mortality in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Richard W; Analitis, Antonis; Samoli, Evangelia; Fuller, Gary W; Green, David C; Mudway, Ian S; Anderson, Hugh R; Kelly, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked daily concentrations of urban air pollution to mortality, but few have investigated specific traffic sources that can inform abatement policies. We assembled a database of >100 daily, measured and modelled pollutant concentrations characterizing air pollution in London between 2011 and 2012. Based on the analyses of temporal patterns and correlations between the metrics, knowledge of local emission sources and reference to the existing literature, we selected, a priori, markers of traffic pollution: oxides of nitrogen (general traffic); elemental and black carbon (EC/BC) (diesel exhaust); carbon monoxide (petrol exhaust); copper (tyre), zinc (brake) and aluminium (mineral dust). Poisson regression accounting for seasonality and meteorology was used to estimate the percentage change in risk of death associated with an interquartile increment of each pollutant. Associations were generally small with confidence intervals that spanned 0% and tended to be negative for cardiovascular mortality and positive for respiratory mortality. The strongest positive associations were for EC and BC adjusted for particle mass and respiratory mortality, 2.66% (95% confidence interval: 0.11, 5.28) and 2.72% (0.09, 5.42) per 0.8 and 1.0 μg/m3, respectively. These associations were robust to adjustment for other traffic metrics and regional pollutants, suggesting a degree of specificity with respiratory mortality and diesel exhaust containing EC/BC. PMID:26464095

  5. Short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and daily mortality in London, UK.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Richard W; Analitis, Antonis; Samoli, Evangelia; Fuller, Gary W; Green, David C; Mudway, Ian S; Anderson, Hugh R; Kelly, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked daily concentrations of urban air pollution to mortality, but few have investigated specific traffic sources that can inform abatement policies. We assembled a database of >100 daily, measured and modelled pollutant concentrations characterizing air pollution in London between 2011 and 2012. Based on the analyses of temporal patterns and correlations between the metrics, knowledge of local emission sources and reference to the existing literature, we selected, a priori, markers of traffic pollution: oxides of nitrogen (general traffic); elemental and black carbon (EC/BC) (diesel exhaust); carbon monoxide (petrol exhaust); copper (tyre), zinc (brake) and aluminium (mineral dust). Poisson regression accounting for seasonality and meteorology was used to estimate the percentage change in risk of death associated with an interquartile increment of each pollutant. Associations were generally small with confidence intervals that spanned 0% and tended to be negative for cardiovascular mortality and positive for respiratory mortality. The strongest positive associations were for EC and BC adjusted for particle mass and respiratory mortality, 2.66% (95% confidence interval: 0.11, 5.28) and 2.72% (0.09, 5.42) per 0.8 and 1.0 μg/m(3), respectively. These associations were robust to adjustment for other traffic metrics and regional pollutants, suggesting a degree of specificity with respiratory mortality and diesel exhaust containing EC/BC. PMID:26464095

  6. How and Why Do Smokers Start Using E-Cigarettes? Qualitative Study of Vapers in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Elle; Neale, Joanne; McNeill, Ann; Hitchman, Sara C.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the study were to (1) describe how and why smokers start to vape and what products they use; (2) relate findings to the COM-B theory of behaviour change (three conditions are necessary for behaviour change (B): capability (C), opportunity (O), and motivation (M)); and (3) to consider implications for e-cigarette policy research. Semi-structured interviews (n = 30) were conducted in London, UK, with smokers or ex-smokers who were currently using or had used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette initiation (behaviour) was facilitated by: capability (physical capability to use an e-cigarette and psychological capability to understand that using e-cigarettes was less harmful than smoking); opportunity (physical opportunity to access e-cigarettes in shops, at a lower cost than cigarettes, and to vape in “smoke-free” environments, as well as social opportunity to vape with friends and family); and motivation (automatic motivation including curiosity, and reflective motivation, including self-conscious decision-making processes related to perceived health benefits). The application of the COM-B model identified multiple factors that may lead to e-cigarette initiation, including those that could be influenced by policy, such as price relative to cigarettes and use in smoke-free environments. The effects of these policies on initiation should be further investigated along with the possible moderating/mediating effects of social support. PMID:27376312

  7. How and Why Do Smokers Start Using E-Cigarettes? Qualitative Study of Vapers in London, UK.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Elle; Neale, Joanne; McNeill, Ann; Hitchman, Sara C

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the study were to (1) describe how and why smokers start to vape and what products they use; (2) relate findings to the COM-B theory of behaviour change (three conditions are necessary for behaviour change (B): capability (C), opportunity (O), and motivation (M)); and (3) to consider implications for e-cigarette policy research. Semi-structured interviews (n = 30) were conducted in London, UK, with smokers or ex-smokers who were currently using or had used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette initiation (behaviour) was facilitated by: capability (physical capability to use an e-cigarette and psychological capability to understand that using e-cigarettes was less harmful than smoking); opportunity (physical opportunity to access e-cigarettes in shops, at a lower cost than cigarettes, and to vape in "smoke-free" environments, as well as social opportunity to vape with friends and family); and motivation (automatic motivation including curiosity, and reflective motivation, including self-conscious decision-making processes related to perceived health benefits). The application of the COM-B model identified multiple factors that may lead to e-cigarette initiation, including those that could be influenced by policy, such as price relative to cigarettes and use in smoke-free environments. The effects of these policies on initiation should be further investigated along with the possible moderating/mediating effects of social support. PMID:27376312

  8. Marvelous medicines and dangerous drugs: the representation of prescription medicine in the UK newsprint media.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Using discourse analysis, this study examines the representation of prescription medicines in the UK newsprint media and, specifically, how the meaning and function of medicines are constructed. At the same time, it examines the extent to which the newsprint media represents a resource for health information, and considers how it may encourage or challenge faith in modern medicine and medical authority. As such, it extends analysis around concepts such as the informed patient and examines the representation of patients and doctors and the extent to which patient-doctor identities promoted in the newsprint media reflect a shift away from paternalism to negotiated encounters. Findings show the media constructs a discrete, contradictory, and frequently oversimplified set of characterizations about medicine. Moreover, it discursively constructs realities that justify and sustain medial dominance. Ideological paradigms in discourse assign patients as passive and disempowered while simultaneously privileging "expert" knowledge. This constructs a reality that marginalizes patients' participation in decision-making. PMID:20533792

  9. Methanotrophy in London, UK, Landfill Topsoil: Microbiology, Stable Carbon Isotopes, Seasonal Variation and Laboratory Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriskantharajah, S.; Fisher, R.; Lowry, D.; Grassineau, N.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2004-12-01

    Landfill is a major source of methane emissions into the atmosphere. Aerobic soil is also a good sink of methane, as it is inhabited by methane consuming bacteria, methanotrophs. Methanotrophic bacteria were cultured from landfill soil samples. Three genera of methanotrophs were cultured: Methylocaldum, Methylosinus and Methylomonas. Interestingly, the only established members of the Methylocaldum genus are all thermophilic, whilst those isolated in this study are mesophilic. This suggests that those Methylocaldum methanotrophs found in landfills may have migrated from hot spring natural settings. Representatives of each genera were inoculated into a simple topsoil model and subjected to variations in temperature, methane concentration and incubation periods. As expected, temperature greatly affected methane oxidation, but methane concentration affected the rate of oxidation far more than expected. The model study implies that the complete combustion of methane to carbon dioxide is greatly affected by temperature and methane availability, whilst the effect on the uptake of methane is not as great. Seasonal variations in methane concentrations within the topsoil were monitored over a one year period from November 2002 to October 2003 and show that methane flow through the topsoil, and consequently methanotrophy, is strongly controlled by meteorology, mainly air temperature and pressure. Generally, methanotrophy was low during colder months and higher at during warmer months, but changes in air pressure complicate this by controlling the rate of flow of methane through the topsoil. δ 13C analyses of methane and carbon dioxide emitted from landfill topsoil showed that there was a great deal of methanotrophic activity during the warmer months of 2003, with most fractionation of residual methane occurring during August. During the heat wave experienced in the UK in August 2003, the δ 13C from borehole samples of methane in the anaerobic zone shifted from -57‰ to -16

  10. Organizational profile: UK regenerative medicine platform immunomodulation hub.

    PubMed

    Asante, Curtis O

    2015-01-01

    The UK Regenerative Medicine Platform was launched in 2013 as a jointly funded venture by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Medical Research Council (MRC) to address the technical and scientific challenges associated with translating promising scientific discoveries into the clinical setting. The first stage of the Platform involved the establishment of five interdisciplinary and cross-institutional research Hubs and the final Hub, the Immunomodulation Hub, was formed in 2014. The Immunomodulation Hub comprises scientists from diverse clinical and nonclinical research backgrounds. Collectively, they provide expertise in tissues for which there is an unmet clinical need for regenerative treatments, in innate and adaptive immunity and in whole organ transplantation. Their vision is that by working together to determine how regenerative medicine cell therapies in a laboratory setting are affected by the immune system, they will make a substantial contribution to long-term clinical deliverables that include improved efficacy of photoreceptor cell therapy to treat blindness; improved repair of damaged heart tissue; and improved survival and functionality of transplanted hepatocytes as an alternative to liver transplantation. PMID:25933235

  11. Antibiotic resistance and mecA characterization of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from three hotels in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Mkrtchyan, Hermine V.; Cutler, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from non-healthcare environments, is a potential problem to public health. In our survey a total of 71 coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) belonging to 11 different species were isolated from three large hotels in London, UK. The most prevalent species was Staphylococcus haemolyticus, with S. hominis, S. warneri, S. cohnii, and Staphylococcus epidermidis commonly detected. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and carriage of the mecA gene were determined for all of these isolates. Most (85.9%) staphylococci were resistant to multiple antibiotics with all displaying increased susceptibility toward penicillin, fusidic acid, erythromycin, and cefepime. Twenty-one (29.5%) of the isolates were mecA positive, however MIC values to oxacillin, normally associated with the carriage of mecA, varied widely in this group (from 0.06 to 256 mg/L). Fifteen of the twenty-one mecA positive isolates carried SCCmec of these seven were type V, one type I, one type II, and one type IV. Additionally, five of these 15 isolates carried a previously unreported type, 1A, which involves an association between class A mec complex and ccr type 1. The remaining six of the 21 isolates were non-typeable and carried a combination of class A mec complex and ccrC. In addition to this, we also report on new MLST types which were assigned for five S. epidermidis isolates. Four out of these five isolates had MICs between 0.06 and 256 mg/L to oxacillin and would be regarded as clinically susceptible but one isolate had a high oxacillin MIC of 256 mg/L. We demonstrated widespread multiple drug resistance among different staphylococcal species isolated from non-healthcare environments highlighting the potential for these species to act as a reservoir for methicillin and other forms of drug resistance. PMID:26441881

  12. Antibiotic resistance and mecA characterization of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from three hotels in London, UK.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Mkrtchyan, Hermine V; Cutler, Ronald R

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from non-healthcare environments, is a potential problem to public health. In our survey a total of 71 coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) belonging to 11 different species were isolated from three large hotels in London, UK. The most prevalent species was Staphylococcus haemolyticus, with S. hominis, S. warneri, S. cohnii, and Staphylococcus epidermidis commonly detected. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and carriage of the mecA gene were determined for all of these isolates. Most (85.9%) staphylococci were resistant to multiple antibiotics with all displaying increased susceptibility toward penicillin, fusidic acid, erythromycin, and cefepime. Twenty-one (29.5%) of the isolates were mecA positive, however MIC values to oxacillin, normally associated with the carriage of mecA, varied widely in this group (from 0.06 to 256 mg/L). Fifteen of the twenty-one mecA positive isolates carried SCCmec of these seven were type V, one type I, one type II, and one type IV. Additionally, five of these 15 isolates carried a previously unreported type, 1A, which involves an association between class A mec complex and ccr type 1. The remaining six of the 21 isolates were non-typeable and carried a combination of class A mec complex and ccrC. In addition to this, we also report on new MLST types which were assigned for five S. epidermidis isolates. Four out of these five isolates had MICs between 0.06 and 256 mg/L to oxacillin and would be regarded as clinically susceptible but one isolate had a high oxacillin MIC of 256 mg/L. We demonstrated widespread multiple drug resistance among different staphylococcal species isolated from non-healthcare environments highlighting the potential for these species to act as a reservoir for methicillin and other forms of drug resistance. PMID:26441881

  13. Are fuel poverty reduction schemes associated with decreased excess winter mortality in elders? A case study from London, U.K.

    PubMed

    El Ansari, Walid; El-Silimy, Sally

    2008-12-01

    The London Borough of Newham, London piloted the Warm Zone, a government-led fuel poverty reduction scheme. Fuel poverty is often cited as a factor in excess winter mortality (EWM) in the U.K. This study reported in this paper assessed whether EWM decreased for people aged > or =65 years in Newham as compared to all London, employing data from before and throughout the duration of the Warm Zone project. The paper also discusses the difficulties surrounding the measurement and interpretation of health impact relating to fuel poverty. We calculated and compared the yearly EWM indices for people aged > or =65 years for all of London, and for Newham over 12 years (1993-2005). The yearly EWM ratio for Newham in relation to all London was then calculated and compared. No definitive evidence to support the effect of the War Zone on EMW were noted. Relationships between EWM and fewer poverty reduction schemes are difficult to interpret, as many factors are entangled. These include cold strain and biological, genetic, gender, physiological, thermoregulation, environmental, meteorological, socio-economic, healthcare provision/expenditure, lifestyle and co-morbidity aspects, besides the challenges of sample sizes and whether other fuel poverty reduction schemes were simultaneously in operation. Those in privately owned housing might be ;masked' (underestimated) in their vulnerability to fuel poverty. Redefining the specific criteria for eligibility for fuel poverty grants and tackling heat inefficiency in privately owned homes not eligible for home heating improvement despite fulfilling other criteria for vulnerability requires attention. The implications are discussed. PMID:19091937

  14. Who applies and who gets admitted to UK graduate entry medicine? - an analysis of UK admission statistics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Graduate-entry medicine is a recent development in the UK, intended to expand and broaden access to medical training. After eight years, it is time to evaluate its success in recruitment. Objectives This study aimed to compare the applications and admissions profiles of graduate-entry programmes in the UK to traditional 5 and 6-year courses. Methods Aggregate data on applications and admissions were obtained from the Universities and Colleges Admission Service covering 2003 to 2009. Data were extracted, grouped as appropriate and analysed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Results Graduate-entry attracts 10,000 applications a year. Women form the majority of applicants and admissions to graduate-entry and traditional medicine programmes. Graduate-entry age profile is older, typically 20's or 30's compared to 18 or 19 years in traditional programmes. Graduate-entry applications and admissions were higher from white and black UK ethnic communities than traditional programmes, and lower from southern and Chinese Asian groups. Graduate-entry has few applications or admissions from Scotland or Northern Ireland. Secondary educational achievement is poorer amongst graduate-entry applicants and admissions than traditional programmes. Conclusions Graduate-entry has succeeded in recruiting substantial additional numbers of older applicants to medicine, in which white and black groups are better represented and Asian groups more poorly represented than in traditional undergraduate programmes. PMID:21943332

  15. Lessons for Control of Heroin-Associated Anthrax in Europe from 2009–2010 Outbreak Case Studies, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Abbara, Aula; Brooks, Tim; Taylor, Graham P.; Nolan, Marianne; Donaldson, Hugo; Manikon, Maribel

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of serious infections associated with heroin use in persons who inject drugs (PWIDs) occur intermittently and require vigilance and rapid reporting of individual cases. Here, we give a firsthand account of the cases in London during an outbreak of heroin-associated anthrax during 2009–2010 in the United Kingdom. This new manifestation of anthrax has resulted in a clinical manifestation distinct from already recognized forms. During 2012–13, additional cases of heroin-associated anthrax among PWIDs in England and other European countries were reported, suggesting that anthrax-contaminated heroin remains in circulation. Antibacterial drugs used for serious soft tissue infection are effective against anthrax, which may lead to substantial underrecognition of this novel illness. The outbreak in London provides a strong case for ongoing vigilance and the use of serologic testing in diagnosis and serologic surveillance schemes to determine and monitor the prevalence of anthrax exposure in the PWID community. PMID:24959910

  16. UK postgraduate medicine examinations: opportunities for international candidates.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Lawrence; Selamaj, Elona; Shannon, Colleen; Chis, Liliana; Dacre, Jane; Elder, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    The medical profession is global, and ambitious trainee physicians around the world are eager to attain internationally recognised postgraduate medical qualifications. The MRCP(UK) and specialty certificate examinations of the Federation of Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom provide such qualifications, and between 2002 and 2013, the number of international candidates attempting these examinations grew substantially. Delivering these proven and reliable UK-based examinations in other countries has many local benefits: it enhances careers, strengthens medical training and improves standards of patient care. In collaboration with international colleagues, the Federation is committed to continued growth that extends these benefits to all physicians, wherever they work and live. PMID:25301910

  17. ‘Complex’ but coping: experience of symptoms of tuberculosis and health care seeking behaviours - a qualitative interview study of urban risk groups, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis awareness, grounded in social cognition models of health care seeking behaviour, relies on the ability of individuals to recognise symptoms, assess their risk and access health care (passive case finding). There is scant published research into the health actions of ‘hard-to-reach’ groups with tuberculosis, who represent approximately 17% of the London TB caseload. This study aimed to analyse patients’ knowledge of tuberculosis, their experiences of symptoms and their health care seeking behaviours. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 participants, predominantly homeless and attending a major tuberculosis centre in London, UK. Most had complex medical and social needs including drug and alcohol use or immigration problems affecting entitlement to social welfare. Analytical frameworks aimed to reflect the role of broader social structures in shaping individual health actions. Results Although participants demonstrated some knowledge of tuberculosis their awareness of personal risk was low. Symptoms commonly associated with tuberculosis were either not recognised or were attributed to other causes for which participants would not ordinarily seek health care. Many accessed health care by chance and, for some, for health concerns other than tuberculosis. Conclusions Health education, based on increasing awareness of symptoms, may play a limited role in tuberculosis care for populations with complex health and social needs. The findings support the intensification of outreach initiatives to identify groups at risk of tuberculosis and the development of structured care pathways which support people into prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24943308

  18. Estimating the influence of different urban canopy cover types on atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) pollution abatement in London UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallis, Matthew; Freer-Smith, Peter; Sinnett, Danielle; Aylott, Matthew; Taylor, Gail

    2010-05-01

    In the urban environment atmospheric pollution by PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 x 10-6 m) is a problem that can have adverse effects on human health, particularly increasing rates of respiratory disease. The main contributors to atmospheric PM10 in the urban environment are road traffic, industry and power production. The urban tree canopy is a receptor for removing PM10s from the atmosphere due to the large surface areas generated by leaves and air turbulence created by the structure of the urban forest. In this context urban greening has long been known as a mechanism to contribute towards PM10 removal from the air, furthermore, tree canopy cover has a role in contributing towards a more sustainable urban environment. The work reported here has been carried out within the BRIDGE project (SustainaBle uRban plannIng Decision support accountinG for urban mEtabolism). The aim of this project is to assess the fluxes of energy, water, carbon dioxide and particulates within the urban environment and develope a DSS (Decision Support System) to aid urban planners in sustainable development. A combination of published urban canopy cover data from ground, airborne and satellite based surveys was used. For each of the 33 London boroughs the urban canopy was classified to three groups, urban woodland, street trees and garden trees and each group quantified in terms of ground cover. The total [PM10] for each borough was taken from the LAEI (London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory 2006) and the contribution to reducing [PM10] was assessed for each canopy type. Deposition to the urban canopy was assessed using the UFORE (Urban Forest Effects Model) approach. Deposition to the canopy, boundary layer height and percentage reduction of the [PM10] in the atmosphere was assessed using both hourly meterological data and [PM10] and seasonal data derived from annual models. Results from hourly and annual data were compared with measured values. The model was then

  19. Protease Inhibition: Design, Technology & Opportunities--First RSC/SCI Symposium on Protease Inhibition.18-19 May 1998, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Buckle, D R

    1998-06-01

    This symposium, organized jointly by the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Society of Chemical Industry, aimed to distil current knowledge on the classification, structure and mechanism of proteolytic enzymes whilst focusing on the approaches and methodology being used to identify potent and selective inhibitors. A wide range of therapeutic targets covering all proteinase classes was presented to a largely medicinal chemical audience of around 130 participants from the UK and mainland Europe. There were no poster sessions. PMID:18465527

  20. Sports medicine across Missouri: interviews with Dr. Paul Meyer and Dr. Stanley London. Interview by Thomas D. Eppright, Shane Bradley, Maureen Alwood.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; London, S

    1998-12-01

    Paul Meyer and Stanley London are two Missourians who have led the way for many in the field of Sports Medicine. The careers of many professional athletes have been extended due to the clinical expertise of these exemplary physicians who both began their medical careers in the 1940s. Through this interview, they offer a historical perspective of Sports Medicine and baseball. They also share their life experiences, as well as their formulas for successful careers and long-lasting marriages. PMID:9863341

  1. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  2. The UK relative to other single payer-dominated healthcare markets for regenerative medicine therapies.

    PubMed

    Rose, James B; Williams, David J

    2012-05-01

    The UK has for many years been considered by businesses, including those based in the UK, as at best a second market for the launch of innovative medical technology products. Historically, this has been attributed to the slow pace of adoption in its National Health Service (NHS). The NHS is perceived to be subject to cost containment, high levels of fragmentation and a lack of strategic incentives to resolve its key failings as a market. Canada and Sweden offer examples of different operating models of healthcare delivery in a single payer-dominated market, and as a consequence, have evolved with different market characteristics. Together, these economies represent an important subsection of healthcare markets that are predominantly publically funded. This report examines the barriers to market entry for regenerative medicine products in these economies and attempts to evaluate the upcoming UK healthcare reforms in terms of impact on the regenerative medicine industry sector. PMID:22594333

  3. Evaluation of the source area of rooftop scalar measurements in London, UK using wind tunnel and modelling approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklehurst, Aidan; Boon, Alex; Barlow, Janet; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan

    2014-05-01

    The source area of an instrument is an estimate of the area of ground over which the measurement is generated. Quantification of the source area of a measurement site provides crucial context for analysis and interpretation of the data. A range of computational models exists to calculate the source area of an instrument, but these are usually based on assumptions which do not hold for instruments positioned very close to the surface, particularly those surrounded by heterogeneous terrain i.e. urban areas. Although positioning instrumentation at higher elevation (i.e. on masts) is ideal in urban areas, this can be costly in terms of installation and maintenance costs and logistically difficult to position instruments in the ideal geographical location. Therefore, in many studies, experimentalists turn to rooftops to position instrumentation. Experimental validations of source area models for these situations are very limited. In this study, a controlled tracer gas experiment was conducted in a wind tunnel based on a 1:200 scale model of a measurement site used in previous experimental work in central London. The detector was set at the location of the rooftop site as the tracer was released at a range of locations within the surrounding streets and rooftops. Concentration measurements are presented for a range of wind angles, with the spread of concentration measurements indicative of the source area distribution. Clear evidence of wind channeling by streets is seen with the shape of the source area strongly influenced by buildings upwind of the measurement point. The results of the wind tunnel study are compared to scalar concentration source areas generated by modelling approaches based on meteorological data from the central London experimental site and used in the interpretation of continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data. Initial conclusions will be drawn as to how to apply scalar concentration source area models to rooftop measurement sites and

  4. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations.

    PubMed

    Harding, L K

    1987-09-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine requires integration of radiation safety with patient care and radiopharmaceutical standards. Nationally there was useful discussion in the UK before the Ionising Radiations Regulations and Approved Code of Practice were published, although such consultation had been lacking when the Medicines Act was implemented. Most of the new considerations relating to nuclear medicine stem from Schedule 6 of the Regulations. Generally, the presence of a single patient does not require a controlled area. However, when several patients are present, or radiopharmaceuticals are being prepared prior to injection, a controlled area is required. Classification of workers is not likely to be required in a typical nuclear medicine department in the UK, although most parts of the nuclear medicine department will need to be controlled areas. These include the radiopharmacy, radionuclide dispensary, injection room, and imaging rooms if patients are injected in them. The importance of finger dose measurements is emphasised. Patient wards, however, need not be controlled areas. A particular concern in nuclear medicine was that patients should not need to be admitted to hospital merely to comply with legislation. This is possibly the case and clarification will probably be available when the Notes for Guidance are published. Most procedures in nuclear medicine departments will remain unchanged. Further information is required, however, on patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy, and breast feeding. Within the hospital, detailed and multidisciplinary discussion will need to take place within the forum of the radiation safety committee. PMID:3664186

  5. Qualitative investigation of patients’ experience of a glaucoma virtual clinic in a specialist ophthalmic hospital in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Aachal; Bonstein, Karen; Cable, Richard; Cammack, Jocelyn; Clipston, Jane; Foster, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore how patients felt about delivery of care in a novel technician-delivered virtual clinic compared with delivery of care in a doctor-delivered model. Design A qualitative investigation using one-to-one interviews before and after patients’ appointments at either the standard outpatient glaucoma clinic or the new technician-delivered virtual glaucoma clinic (Glaucoma Screening and Stable Monitoring Service, GSMS). Setting A glaucoma clinic based in a tertiary ophthalmic specialist hospital in London. Participants 43 patients (38 Caucasian, 5 African/Afro-Caribbean) were interviewed prior to their glaucoma appointment; 38 patients were interviewed between 4 and 6 weeks after their appointment. Consecutive patients were identified from patient reception lists and telephoned prior to their appointment inviting them to participate. Results Trust in the patient–provider relationship emerged as a key theme in patients’ acceptance of not being seen in a traditional doctor-delivered service. Patients who were well informed regarding their glaucoma status and low risk of progression to sight loss were more accepting of the GSMS. Patients valued the reassurance received through effective communication with their healthcare practitioner at the time of their appointment. Conclusions This study suggests that patients are accepting of moving to a model of service delivery whereby the doctor is removed from the consultation as long as they are informed about the status of their condition and reassured by the interaction with staff they meet. This study highlights the importance of patient engagement when introducing new models of service delivery. PMID:26671959

  6. Quality of Life and Unmet Need in People with Psychosis in the London Borough of Haringey, UK

    PubMed Central

    Lambri, Maria; Chakraborty, Apu; Leavey, Gerard; King, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Deinstitutionalization of long-term psychiatric patients produced various community-based residential care facilities. However, inner-city areas have many patients with severe mental illness (SMI) as well as deprivation, unemployment, and crime. This makes meeting their community needs complex. We undertook a needs assessment of service provision and consonance between service users' evaluation of need and by care workers. Design. Cross-sectional study with random sample of SMI service users in four housing settings: rehabilitation units; high-supported; medium-supported; low-supported housing. Setting. London Borough of Haringey. Outcome Measures. 110 SMI service users and 110 keyworkers were interviewed, using Camberwell Assessment of Need; SF-36; Lancashire Quality-of-Life profile; demographic and clinical information. Results. People in “low-support” and “high-support” housing had similar symptom scores, though low support had significantly lower quality of life. Quality of life was positively predicted by self-reported mental-health score and negatively predicted by unmet-need score in whole sample and in medium-support residents. Residents' and care-workers' assessments of need differed considerably. Conclusions. Although patients' housing needs were broadly met, those in low-supported housing fared least well. Attendance to self-reported mental health and unmet social needs to quality of life underpins planning of residential services for those with SMI. Social and personal needs of people in supported housing may be underestimated and overlooked; service providers need to prioritise these if concept of “recovery” is to advance. PMID:23213300

  7. Residents' perceptions of water quality improvements following remediation work in the Pymme's Brook catchment, north London, UK.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, H; Green, A; Pellaumail, K; Weaver, T

    2001-07-01

    Residents' perceptions of water quality change following remediation work in the upper Pymme's Brook catchment (north London) were elicited by questionnaire and compared with monitored changes in Escherichia coli count and BMWP (The Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP)) score. The wider usefulness of consumer perception surveys was then discussed. Monthly data collected between 1990 and 1996 shows that both E. coli count and BMWP score improved following flushing of the foul sewerage system in 1992, but that only E. coli count improved following the subsequent completion of large-scale remedial engineering works. Local residents were surveyed regarding their awareness of the scheme, and the causes of pollution, together with their perceptions as to the effects of the engineering works and of the resulting water quality improvements. Most respondents selected and ranked indicators in a way that suggested they had an awareness of the significance of various indicators of pollution severity. Following completion of the remediation scheme, residents perceived the watercourse to contain less rubbish and sewage fungus, and to have an improved colour and smell, which corresponds favourably to the monitored improvements. However, respondents' perceptions were found to vary when the study population was sub-divided using a range of parameters. For instance, frequent observers of the brook were most likely to correctly identify sewage as the main form of pollution. These divergent perceptions suggest that there may be considerable difficulties when perception surveys are used to quantify 'benefits' following environmental improvement programmes. Nevertheless, the survey was clearly beneficial in enhancing residents' awareness of their environment and the role of their voice in its management. PMID:11475083

  8. Understanding the interplay of time, gender and professionalism in hospital medicine in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ozbilgin, Mustafa F; Tsouroufli, Maria; Smith, Merryn

    2011-05-01

    Regulation of time, management of gender equality and discourses of professionalism are often studied in isolation from one another in the context of hospital medicine. Drawing on qualitative analysis of 20 interviews with senior National Health Service (NHS) hospital doctors in Wales, UK, we demonstrate the complex interplay between professionalism and regulation of time and gender in hospital medicine. We examine the connectivity of gender and time in norms about professional behaviour in hospital medicine and demonstrate how a certain discourse of professionalism is used in turn to retain and reproduce a temporally regulated gender order at work. Based on our findings, and congruent with the spirit of modernisation of management of human resources in healthcare, we offer new directions for gender equality, regulation of time and development of professionalism in hospital medicine. PMID:21550153

  9. Energy exchanges in a Central Business District - Interpretation of Eddy Covariance and radiation flux measurements (London UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

    2013-12-01

    Global urbanisation brings increasingly dense and complex urban structures. To manage cities sustainably and smartly, currently and into the future under changing climates, urban climate research needs to advance in areas such as Central Business Districts (CBD) where human interactions with the environment are particularly concentrated. Measurement and modelling approaches may be pushed to their limits in dense urban settings, but if urban climate research is to contribute to the challenges of real cities those limits have to be addressed. The climate of cities is strongly governed by surface-atmosphere exchanges of energy, moisture and momentum. Observations of the relevant fluxes provide important information for improvement and evaluation of modelling approaches. Due to the CBD's heterogeneity, a very careful analysis of observations is required to understand the relevant processes. Current approaches used to interpret observations and set them in a wider context may need to be adapted for use in these more complex areas. Here, we present long-term observations of the radiation balance components and turbulent fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat and momentum in the city centre of London. This is one of the first measurement studies in a CBD covering multiple years with analysis at temporal scales from days to seasons. Data gathered at two sites in close vicinity, but with different measurement heights, are analysed to investigate the influence of source area characteristics on long-term radiation and turbulent fluxes. Challenges of source area modelling and the critical aspect of siting in such a complex environment are considered. Outgoing long- and short-wave radiation are impacted by the anisotropic nature of the urban surface and the high reflectance materials increasingly being used as building materials. Results highlight the need to consider the source area of radiometers in terms of diffuse and direct irradiance. Sensible heat fluxes (QH) are positive

  10. Population Genomics of Cardiometabolic Traits: Design of the University College London-London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom; Holmes, Michael V.; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Sofat, Reecha; Caulfield, Mark; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N.; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W. J.; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Dudbridge, Frank; Whittaker, John C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hingorani, Aroon D.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in identifying common genetic variants influencing cardiometabolic traits and disease outcomes through genome wide association studies. Nevertheless, gaps in knowledge remain and new questions have arisen regarding the population relevance, mechanisms, and applications for healthcare. Using a new high-resolution custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Metabochip) incorporating dense coverage of genomic regions linked to cardiometabolic disease, the University College-London School-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) consortium of highly-phenotyped population-based prospective studies, aims to: (1) fine map functionally relevant SNPs; (2) precisely estimate individual absolute and population attributable risks based on individual SNPs and their combination; (3) investigate mechanisms leading to altered risk factor profiles and CVD events; and (4) use Mendelian randomisation to undertake studies of the causal role in CVD of a range of cardiovascular biomarkers to inform public health policy and help develop new preventative therapies. PMID:23977022

  11. Population genomics of cardiometabolic traits: design of the University College London-London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; White, Jon; Giambartolomei, Claudia; McLachlan, Stela; Zabaneh, Delilah; Cavadino, Alana; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom; Holmes, Michael V; Warren, Helen; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Sofat, Reecha; Caulfield, Mark; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Dudbridge, Frank; Whittaker, John C; Casas, Juan P; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2013-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in identifying common genetic variants influencing cardiometabolic traits and disease outcomes through genome wide association studies. Nevertheless, gaps in knowledge remain and new questions have arisen regarding the population relevance, mechanisms, and applications for healthcare. Using a new high-resolution custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Metabochip) incorporating dense coverage of genomic regions linked to cardiometabolic disease, the University College-London School-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) consortium of highly-phenotyped population-based prospective studies, aims to: (1) fine map functionally relevant SNPs; (2) precisely estimate individual absolute and population attributable risks based on individual SNPs and their combination; (3) investigate mechanisms leading to altered risk factor profiles and CVD events; and (4) use Mendelian randomisation to undertake studies of the causal role in CVD of a range of cardiovascular biomarkers to inform public health policy and help develop new preventative therapies. PMID:23977022

  12. European Pharmaceutical Pricing and Reimbursement--SMi's 21st Annual Meeting (October 5-6, 2015--London, UK).

    PubMed

    Kibble, A; D'Souza, P

    2015-10-01

    Translating perceived market value for pharmaceutical products into a willingness to pay remains the key factor in ensuring market access and return on investment. How price is managed in the context of new market entrants or new approval settings can create complex challenges, and further complexity is added through diverse global reimbursement structures and the myriad of stakeholders involved at every step of value identification. SMi's 21st Annual Meeting on European Pricing and Reimbursement presented a program focused on the measures being taken by European healthcare systems as they seek to facilitate access to the latest treatments while delivering value for payers and patients. Supporting patient access to life-changing medicines is a challenge, and funders are responding in many different ways; however, while the pharma industry continues to focus its efforts on high cost drugs that treat diseases of the few, the disconnect will be not be resolved. The speakers and delegates at the annual meeting believe success is possible by focusing on value for patients, driven by provider experience, scale and learning. Instead of simply lowering costs, companies, providers and payers can more adequately contribute to the goals of funders as well as the treatment needs of patients. PMID:26583303

  13. Improving the evidence base for transfusion medicine: the work of the UK systematic review initiative.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, S J; Hyde, C J; Stanworth, S J; Dorée, C J; Roberts, D J; Murphy, M F

    2009-04-01

    Clarifying the existing evidence base is crucial to improve the effectiveness of transfusion practice. The UK Systematic Review Initiative has been pursuing this objective primarily through writing systematic reviews on important topics in transfusion medicine. Here, we describe our progress for the past 5 years. We are the only research group that identifies transfusion medicine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and to date, we have contributed 3002 RCT citations. The article considers future challenges including the need for wider involvement from the transfusion medicine community in the process of maintaining and updating systematic reviews and the identification and prioritization of topics for further clinical research including clinical trials. Collaboration between international and local research groups is important if these challenges are to be met. PMID:19320853

  14. Associations of short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution with cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Samoli, Evangelia; Atkinson, Richard W; Analitis, Antonis; Fuller, Gary W; Green, David C; Mudway, Ian; Anderson, H Ross; Kelly, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is evidence of adverse associations between short-term exposure to traffic-related pollution and health, but little is known about the relative contribution of the various sources and particulate constituents. Methods For each day for 2011–2012 in London, UK over 100 air pollutant metrics were assembled using monitors, modelling and chemical analyses. We selected a priori metrics indicative of traffic sources: general traffic, petrol exhaust, diesel exhaust and non-exhaust (mineral dust, brake and tyre wear). Using Poisson regression models, controlling for time-varying confounders, we derived effect estimates for cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions at prespecified lags and evaluated the sensitivity of estimates to multipollutant modelling and effect modification by season. Results For single day exposure, we found consistent associations between adult (15–64 years) cardiovascular and paediatric (0–14 years) respiratory admissions with elemental and black carbon (EC/BC), ranging from 0.56% to 1.65% increase per IQR change, and to a lesser degree with carbon monoxide (CO) and aluminium (Al). The average of past 7 days EC/BC exposure was associated with elderly (65+ years) cardiovascular admissions. Indicated associations were higher during the warm period of the year. Although effect estimates were sensitive to the adjustment for other pollutants they remained consistent in direction, indicating independence of associations from different sources, especially between diesel and petrol engines, as well as mineral dust. Conclusions Our results suggest that exhaust related pollutants are associated with increased numbers of adult cardiovascular and paediatric respiratory hospitalisations. More extensive monitoring in urban centres is required to further elucidate the associations. PMID:26884048

  15. Factors associated with travel to non-local genitourinary medicine clinics for gonorrhoea: an analysis of patients diagnosed in London, 2009-10.

    PubMed

    Le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Hughes, Gwenda; Maguire, Helen; Crook, Paul D

    2014-03-01

    We analysed factors associated with travelling to non-local genitourinary medicine clinics for gonorrhoea care in London. We used surveillance data on London residents attending genitourinary medicine clinics in 2009-10 and calculated distances between patients' areas of residence and both the nearest genitourinary medicine clinic and the clinic attended. Non-local clinics were attended by 5408 (46.7%) patients. Men having sex with men attended non-local services more than heterosexuals (OR 3.83, p < 0.001). Among heterosexual men, black Africans and black Caribbeans were more likely, and South Asians less likely, to attend non-local services compared to whites (OR [95%CI] 1.33 [1.04-1.72], 1.36 [1.11-1.67] and 0.46 [0.31-0.70] respectively). Similar associations, although not statistically significant, were found in women. People were more likely to attend local services if their local clinic provided walk-in and young people's services, weekend consultations and long opening hours. These findings could help design services meeting local population needs and facilitate prompt and equitable access to care. PMID:23970635

  16. Opening the gateways to market and adoption of regenerative medicine? The UK case in context.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Regenerative medicine is a site for opposing forces of gatekeeping and innovation. This applies both to regulation of market entry and to clinical adoption. Key gateways include the EU's Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products Regulation, technology assessment body NICE and commissioning/service contractor National Health Service England. The paper maps recent gatekeeping flexibilities, describing the range of gateways to market and healthcare adoption seen as alternatives to mainstream routes. The initiatives range from exemptions in pharmaceutical and ATMP regulations, through 'adaptive pathways' and 'risk-based' approaches, to special designation for promising innovation, value-based assessment and commissioner developments. Future developments are considered in the UK's 'accelerated access review'. Caution is urged in assessing the impact of these gateway flexibilities and their market and public health implications. PMID:27035398

  17. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    PubMed

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development. PMID:21771557

  18. Reducing follow-ups: an opportunity to increase the capacity of genitourinary medicine services across the UK.

    PubMed

    Ahmed-Jushuf, I; Griffiths, V

    2007-05-01

    Significant increases in genitourinary (GU) medicine clinic workloads throughout the UK have resulted in an unmet demand for appointments, and increased waiting times. In order to meet the government target of a 48-hour maximum waiting time for all patients, many clinics are modernising current practices to increase capacity and improve access to services. The 'Six Sigma' study group of 12 GU medicine clinics which was formed in 2003 to investigate means of enhancing capacity of GU medicine services, has demonstrated that there is a significant amount of unreleased capacity within UK clinics. In this article, the Six Sigma group present potential actions which other GU medicine clinics in the UK may be able to apply and thereby release additional capacity. Example case studies from the Six Sigma study are also presented, illustrating the applicability of this model throughout the UK. The findings of the Six Sigma project offer GU medicine clinics across the UK the opportunity to increase capacity, without adversely affecting quality of care. PMID:17524188

  19. Personal exposure of street canyon intersection users to PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts and carbon monoxide in Central London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.; Colvile, R.

    Short-term human exposure to PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts (particle range: 0.02-1 μm) and carbon monoxide (CO) was investigated at and around a street canyon intersection in Central London, UK. During a four-week field campaign, groups of four volunteers collected samples at three timings (morning, lunch and afternoon), along two different routes (a heavily trafficked route and a backstreet route) via five modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi). PM 2.5 was sampled using high-flow gravimetric personal samplers, ultrafine particle counts were measured using TSI P-TRAKs and Langans were used to measure CO exposure. Three hundred and ninety-four samples were collected—197 PM 2.5, 86 ultrafine particle count and 111 CO. Arithmetic means of PM 2.5 personal exposure were 27.5, 33.5, 34.5, 38.0 and 41.5 μg m -3, ultrafine particle counts were 67 773, 93 968, 101 364, 99 736 and 87 545 pt cm -3 and CO levels were 0.9, 1.1, 0.8, 1.3 and 1.1 ppm for walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi respectively. On the heavily trafficked route, personal exposure was 35.3 μg m -3, 101142 pt cm -3 and 1.3 ppm, and on the backstreet route it was 31.8 μg m -3, 71628 pt cm -3 and 0.6 ppm for PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts and CO, respectively. Personal exposure levels were high during the morning measurements for all three pollutants (34.6 μg m -3, 106 270 pt cm -3 and 1.5 ppm for PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts and CO, respectively).There was a moderately strong correlation between personal exposure of ultrafine particle counts and CO ( r=0.7, N=67) but a weaker correlation between PM 2.5 and ultrafine particle counts ( r=0.5, N=83) and a low correlation between PM 2.5 and CO exposure ( r=0.2, N=105). The exposure assessment also revealed that the background and kerbside monitoring stations were not representative of the personal exposure of individuals to PM 2.5 and CO at and around a street canyon intersection.

  20. Assessment of the impact of the London Olympics 2012 on selected non-genitourinary medicine clinic sexual health services.

    PubMed

    Hartley, A; Foster, R; Brook, M G; Cassell, J A; Mercer, C H; Coyne, K; Hughes, G; Crook, P

    2015-04-01

    With minimal information on sexual health provision during mass-gathering events, our aim was to describe the use of sexual health, contraceptive, sex worker and sexual assault services during the London 2012 Olympics. We analysed data from five sources. One contraceptive service provider reported a 10% increase in attendance during the main Games, while emergency contraception prescriptions rose during the main Olympics, compared to the week before, but were similar or lower than at the beginning and end of the summer period. A health telephone advice line reported a 16% fall in sexual health-related calls during the main Olympics, but a 33% increase subsequently. London sexual assault referral centres reported that 1.8% of sexual assaults were Olympics-linked. A service for sex workers reported that 16% started working in the sex industry and 7% moved to London to work during the Olympics. Fifty-eight per cent and 45% of sex workers reported fewer clients and an increase in police crack-downs, respectively. Our results show a change in activity across these services during the 2012 summer, which may be associated with the Olympics. Our data are a guide to other services when anticipating changes in service activity and planning staffing for mass-gathering events. PMID:24894726

  1. Nutrition Labeling and Portion Size Information on Children's Menus in Fast-Food and Table-Service Chain Restaurants in London, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Sue; Wake, Yvonne; Zick, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate meals, price, nutritional content, and nutrition and portion size information available on children's menus in fast-food and table-service chain restaurants in London, since the United Kingdom does not currently require such information but may be initiating a voluntary guideline. Methods: Children's menus were assessed…

  2. Comparing TCM textbook descriptions of menopausal syndrome with the lived experience of London women at midlife and the implications for Chinese medicine research.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Volker; Ward, Trina; Tuffrey, Veronica

    2010-08-01

    Almost without exception clinical research seeking to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese medicine relies on TCM textbook knowledge - accessed directly or via practitioners' clinical usage - in order to frame its hypotheses. Recent historical research shows that these textbooks, products of a politically directed process of modernisation, constitute complex hybrids of western and Chinese knowledge that are designed to facilitate the integration of Chinese medicine into biomedically dominated contexts of practice. As such they produce a number of unresolved and generally unacknowledged tensions, such as between the emphasis on local illness experience in the Chinese medical tradition and the universality aspired to by biomedical knowledge. To examine the effect of these tensions we have carried out a study that compares local symptom patterns experienced by post-menopausal women in London with the universal patterns described in TCM textbooks. The results of this study confirm our proposition, namely that the TCM textbook descriptions of disease are not always grounded in clinical experience even if that is what textbooks claim. This raises questions about the relation of textbooks to clinical practice, and about the validity of clinical research based on textbooks and textbook derived normative practice. We argue that only a multidisciplinary approach that includes an understanding of the historical construction of contemporary Chinese medical knowledge and its relation to clinical practice can overcome these problems and enable a meaningful evaluation and utilisation of Chinese medicine in the context of 21st century evidence-based healthcare. PMID:20444560

  3. Airborne determination of the temporo-spatial distribution of benzene, toluene, nitrogen oxides and ozone in the boundary layer across Greater London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Lee, J. D.; Davison, B.; Vaughan, A.; Purvis, R. M.; Harvey, A.; Lewis, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2015-05-01

    Highly spatially resolved mixing ratios of benzene and toluene, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) were measured in the atmospheric boundary layer above Greater London during the period 24 June to 9 July 2013 using a Dornier 228 aircraft. Toluene and benzene were determined in situ using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), NOx by dual-channel NOx chemiluminescence and O3 mixing ratios by UV absorption. Average mixing ratios observed over inner London at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. were 0.20 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.07, 13.2 ± 8.6, 21.0 ± 7.3 and 34.3 ± 15.2 ppbv for benzene, toluene, NO, NO2 and NOx respectively. Linear regression analysis between NO2, benzene and toluene mixing ratios yields a strong covariance, indicating that these compounds predominantly share the same or co-located sources within the city. Average mixing ratios measured at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l. over outer London were always lower than over inner London. Where traffic densities were highest, the toluene / benzene (T / B) concentration ratios were highest (average of 1.8 ± 0.5 ppbv ppbv-1), indicative of strong local sources. Daytime maxima in NOx, benzene and toluene mixing ratios were observed in the morning (~ 40 ppbv NOx, ~ 350 pptv toluene and ~ 200 pptv benzene) and in the mid-afternoon for ozone (~ 40 ppbv O3), all at 360 ± 10 m a.g.l.

  4. Fritz London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavroglu, Kostas

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. From Philosophy to Physics: The years that left nothing unaffected; 1. The appeal of ideas; 2. Goëthe as a scientist; 3. How absolute is our knowledge?; 4. How do we come to know things?; 5. London's teachers in philosophy; 6. Husserl's teachings; 7. Expectations of things to come; 8. The thesis in philosophy; 9. Tolman's principle of similitude; 10. The necessary clarifications; 11. Work on quantum theory; 12. Transformation theory; 13. Unsuccessful attempts at unification; Part II. The Years in Berlin and the Beginnings of Quantum Chemistry: The mysterious bond; 14. London in Zürich; 15. Binding forces; 16. The Pauli principle; 17. Reactions to the Heitler-London paper; 18. Polyelectronic molecules and the application of group theory to problems of chemical valence; 19. Chemists as physicists?; 20. London's first contacts in Berlin; 21. Marriage; 22. Job offers; 23. Intermolecular forces; 24. The book which could not be written; 25. Leningrad and Rome; 26. Difficulties with group theory; 27. Linus Pauling's resonance structures; 28. Robert Mulliken's molecular orbitals; Part III. Oxford and Superconductivity: The rise of the Nazis; 29. Going to Oxford; 30. Lindemann, Simon and Heinz London; 31. Electricity in the very cold; 32. The end of old certainties; 33. The thermodynamic treatment; 34. The theory of Fritz and Heinz London; 35. Initial reactions by von Laue; 36. The discussion at the Royal Society; 37. Termination of the ICI fellowship; Part IV. Paris and Superfluidity: The Front Populaire; 38. The article in Nature 1937 and 'Nouvelle Conception'; 39. Laue again; 40. The structure of solid helium; 41. The peculiar properties of helium; 42. Bose-Einstein condensation; 43. The note in Nature; 44. The two-fluid model; 45. The trip to Jerusalem; 46. Leaving again; 47. The observer in quantum mechanics; Part V. United States and the Typing up of Loose Ends: Duke University, North Carolina; 48. The Soviet Union, Kapitza and

  5. The Primary Care Respiratory Society-UK Quality Award: development and piloting of quality standards for primary care respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin; Small, Iain; Fletcher, Monica; Bryant, Tricia

    2013-09-01

    In an attempt to improve the standards of primary respiratory care in the UK, the Primary Care Respiratory Society-UK (PCRS-UK), in conjunction with other leading respiratory-interested health professional and patient groups, has devised a General Practice Quality Award for Respiratory Medicine. The Award is divided into three modules separated into a total of seven clinical standards (in parentheses): 'Clinical' (prevention, early and accurate diagnosis, acute care, chronic care); 'Organisational' (equipment); and 'The Practice Team' (practice learning needs, educational strategy). Assessment is by submission of a written portfolio of 37 pieces of evidence including audit, reflective learning, patient feedback, and significant event analyses. The Award was piloted in five respiratory-interested practices across the UK. The practices reported improvements in practice organisation, practice teamwork, improved process measures such as improvement in quality of spirometry, and improved patient access to patient services. All practices in the UK are being invited to apply for the Award in 2013. It is hoped that it will provide a framework and stimulus for provision of high-quality primary respiratory care, not only in the UK, but also some aspects of the Award may be applicable on a wider international scale. PMID:23974675

  6. Experiential Approaches to the Global City: London as Social Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gristwood, Anthony; Woolf, Michael

    2011-01-01

    London is the paramount example of a city that is not bounded by its geography and cannot be grasped in isolation. The U.K.'s national capital and the prime focus for business, finance and creative industries, London also transcends the U.K.'s borders as a hub of the world economy. This paper argues that London, a city riddled by the socioeconomic…

  7. A review of the cultivation and processing of cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) for production of prescription medicines in the UK.

    PubMed

    Potter, David J

    2014-01-01

    The quality demands of the pharmaceutical industry require prescription medicines to be consistent in their active ingredient content. Achieving this, using raw cannabis as a feedstock, is especially challenging. The plant material is extremely inhomogeneous, and the ratios of active ingredients are affected by a range of factors. These include the genetics of the plant, the growing and storage conditions, the state of maturity at harvest, and the methods used to process and formulate the material. The reasons for this variability are described, with particular emphasis on the botanical considerations. To produce the complex botanical medicine Sativex®, which contains the cannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and a range of other ingredients, GW Pharmaceuticals had to manage these variables. This medicine, for the treatment of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis, is the first cannabis-based medicine to be approved in the UK. The company's methodology for producing this and other chemotypes is described. PMID:24115748

  8. Analysis of the potential of near ground measurements of CO2 and CH4 in London, UK for the monitoring of city-scale emissions using an atmospheric transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, A.; Broquet, G.; Clifford, D. J.; Chevallier, F.; Butterfield, D. M.; Pison, I.; Ramonet, M.; Paris, J. D.; Ciais, P.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) mole fractions were measured at four near ground sites located in and around London during the summer of 2012 in view to investigate the potential of assimilating such measurements in an atmospheric inversion system for the monitoring of the CO2 and CH4 emissions in the London area. These data were analysed and compared with simulations using a modelling framework suited to building an inversion system: a 2 km horizontal resolution South of England configuration of the transport model CHIMERE driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) meteorological forcing, coupled to a 1 km horizontal resolution emission inventory (the UK National Atmospheric Emission Inventory). First comparisons reveal that local sources have a large impact on measurements and these local sources cannot be represented in the model at 2 km resolution. We evaluate methods to minimise some of the other critical sources of misfits between the observation data and the model simulation that overlap the signature of the errors in the emission inventory. These methods should make it easier to identify the corrections that should be applied to the inventory. Analysis is supported by observations from meteorological sites around the city and a three-week period of atmospheric mixing layer height estimations from lidar measurements. The difficulties of modelling the mixing layer depth and thus CO2 and CH4 concentrations during the night, morning and late afternoon led us to focus on the afternoon period for all further analyses. The misfits between observations and model simulations are high for both CO2 and CH4 (i.e., their root mean square (RMS) is between 8 and 12 parts per million (ppm) for CO2 and between 30 and 55 parts per billion (ppb) for CH4 at a given site). By analysing the gradients between the urban sites and a suburban or rural reference site, we are able to decrease the impact of uncertainties in the fluxes and transport

  9. International Health and Tropical Medicine 08: Proceedings of a Residential Meeting of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 17-19 September 2008, Brighton, UK.

    PubMed

    Newport, Melanie J; Lang, Trudie

    2009-11-01

    The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene held a residential meeting from 17-19 September 2008. Over 250 delegates from a diverse range of backgrounds and experience convened in Brighton, UK for three days of talks and discussions on a wide variety of themes. Topics ranged from tropical and neglected infectious diseases through to other disorders that whilst not traditionally associated with low income countries pose an increasing challenge; chronic diseases, mental health disorders and problems arising from conflict and poverty combined. The meeting represented the change in focus at RSTMH from tropical infectious diseases towards global health in its broadest sense. PMID:19647845

  10. Ethnopharmacy of Turkish-speaking Cypriots in Greater London.

    PubMed

    Yöney, Ahmet; Prieto, José M; Lardos, Andreas; Heinrich, Michael

    2010-05-01

    For centuries, in the Eastern Mediterranean region, medicinal plant use has been widely accepted as a treatment method for both minor and major diseases. Although some knowledge exists on the use of such medicinal plants within the Greek Cypriot culture and considerable information is available on various regions in Turkey, no detailed ethnopharmaceutical or ethnobotanical studies exist on Turkish-speaking Cypriots (TSC) both in Cyprus and within one of the largest TSC migrant communities in London, UK. Semi-structured interviews with members of the TSC community in London were conducted by using a questionnaire consisting both of open and closed questions. Open questions were aimed at identifying herbs, spices, medicinal plants and their uses. Also, graded questions were used to define informants' opinions as a quantitative parameter, constructing a statistical basis. A wide range of therapeutic claims were recorded, including 13 chronic illnesses within 85 different plant species, of which 18 were cited more than 10 times. The most frequently mentioned species were Mentha spicata, Salvia fruticosa and Pimpinella anisum. The plants recorded are frequently based on knowledge derived from Turkish-Cypriot traditions, but many examples of medicinal plants with a use based on UK or general western herbal medical traditions were also recorded. Informants highlighted the risk of knowledge loss in younger generations and thus this study serves as a repository of knowledge for use in the future. Due to a lack of knowledge about such usages in the healthcare professions, our study also highlights the need to develop information sources for use by healthcare practitioners in order to raise awareness about benefits and risks of such medical and health food products. PMID:19827023

  11. London, England

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For almost 2,000 years, the River Thames has served as the life force of London, capital of the United Kingdom and one of the world's most famous cities. In AD 43 the Romans established the trading settlement of Londinium at a favorable crossing point on the river. The Romans remained until the 5th century, when the city came under Saxon control. The early 17th century saw enormous growth, but the deadly plague of 1664 and 1665 ravaged the population, and in the following year the Great Fire, which burned for four days, destroyed most of the city. A public transportation system and other city services in the early 19th century eased many of the increasing urban problems of the burgeoning capital of the wealthy British Empire. After coping with the devastating effects of bombing during World War II and the gradual dismantling of the empire, London today thrives as a vital modern metropolis. London is one of 100 cities being studied using ASTER data to map and monitor urban use patterns and growth.

    This image was acquired on October 12, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  12. Special issue of selected papers from the second UK-Japan bilateral Workshop and First ERCOFTAC Workshop on Turbulent Flows Generated/Designed in Multiscale/Fractal Ways, London, March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laizet, Sylvain; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Christos Vassilicos, J.

    2013-12-01

    This special issue of Fluid Dynamics Research includes nine papers which are based on nine of the presentations at the Second UK-Japan bilateral Workshop and First ERCOFTAC Workshop on 'Turbulent flows generated/designed in multiscale/fractal ways: fundamentals and applications' held from 26 to 27 March 2012 at Imperial College London, UK. The research area of fractal-generated turbulent flows started with a chapter published in 2001 in one of the conference proceedings which came out of the 1999 Isaac Newton Institute 6 month Programme on Turbulence in Cambridge (UK). However, the first results which formed the basis of much of the work reported in this special issue started appearing from 2007 onwards and progress since then could perhaps be described as not insignificant. Research in this area has resulted in the following six notable advances: (a) the definition of two new length-scales characterizing grid-generated turbulence; (b) enhanced and energy-efficient stirring and scalar transfer by fractal grid and fractal openings/flanges with applications, in particular, to improved turbulence generation for combustion; (c) the non-equilibrium turbulent dissipation law; (d) non-equilibrium axisymmetric wake laws; (e) insights into the dependence of drag forces and vortex shedding on the fractal geometry of fractal objects and simulation methods for the calculation of drag of fractal trees; and (f) the invention and successful proof of concept of fractal spoilers and fractal fences. The present special issue contains papers directly related to these advances and can be seen as a reflection of the current research in the field of fractal-generated turbulent flows and their differences and commonalities with other turbulent flows. The financial support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science has been decisive for the organization and success of this workshop. We are also grateful to ERCOFTAC who put in place the EU-wide Special Interest Group on multiscale

  13. Monitoring CO2 and CH4 concentrations in London, UK using a rooftop atmospheric measurement network and an atmospheric chemistry-transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Alex; Broquet, Gregoire; Clifford, Debbie; Chevallier, Frederic; Butterfield, David; Pison, Isabelle; Ciais, Phillipe

    2014-05-01

    A rapidly developing research field is the development of monitoring networks and data assimilation systems to provide an optimal estimate of urban greenhouse gases based on both observations and the output of a chemistry-transport model driven by current emissions inventories. A key first step in development of this methodology is to evaluate the ability of the chemistry-transport model to simulate observations at the chosen measurement sites. In this study, funded by Astrium Services SAS, a network comprising four state-of-the-art atmospheric sensors was placed on rooftop sites in and around London during the summer of 2012. Two sites were located in the inner city and two 'background' sites (one suburban and one rural) were positioned to enable examination of the urban increment of GHG concentrations. The chemistry-transport model, CHIMERE, was run at 2 km resolution using temporally and spatially derived emissions inventories from the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI), driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) meteorology. Here, we focus on the analysis of the urban increments of total CO2, total CH4 and fossil fuel CO2 during the afternoon hours 12:00 to 17:00, aiming to identify the key sources of misfits between the model and the observations. Results showed there was improved agreement between the observed and modelled urban increments compared with total modelled and observed values for individual sites. This suggests that some of the misfits arose from the selection of appropriate boundary conditions for the model. However, there remained underestimation of the observed values and an inability of the model to simulate observed variability. The observations at the two inner city sites showed evidence of different contributions from local (<2 km-scale) sources, despite their proximity. A simple CO-based method was used to attribute fossil fuel CO2 from observations and showed that there were localised traffic based

  14. Analysis of the potential of near-ground measurements of CO2 and CH4 in London, UK, for the monitoring of city-scale emissions using an atmospheric transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Alex; Broquet, Grégoire; Clifford, Deborah J.; Chevallier, Frédéric; Butterfield, David M.; Pison, Isabelle; Ramonet, Michel; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Ciais, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) mole fractions were measured at four near-ground sites located in and around London during the summer of 2012 with a view to investigating the potential of assimilating such measurements in an atmospheric inversion system for the monitoring of the CO2 and CH4 emissions in the London area. These data were analysed and compared with simulations using a modelling framework suited to building an inversion system: a 2 km horizontal resolution south of England configuration of the transport model CHIMERE driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) meteorological forcing, coupled to a 1 km horizontal resolution emission inventory (the UK National Atmospheric Emission Inventory). First comparisons reveal that local sources, which cannot be represented in the model at a 2 km resolution, have a large impact on measurements. We evaluate methods to filter out the impact of some of the other critical sources of discrepancies between the measurements and the model simulation except that of the errors in the emission inventory, which we attempt to isolate. Such a separation of the impact of errors in the emission inventory should make it easier to identify the corrections that should be applied to the inventory. Analysis is supported by observations from meteorological sites around the city and a 3-week period of atmospheric mixing layer height estimations from lidar measurements. The difficulties of modelling the mixing layer depth and thus CO2 and CH4 concentrations during the night, morning and late afternoon lead to focusing on the afternoon period for all further analyses. The discrepancies between observations and model simulations are high for both CO2 and CH4 (i.e. their root mean square (RMS) is between 8 and 12 parts per million (ppm) for CO2 and between 30 and 55 parts per billion (ppb) for CH4 at a given site). By analysing the gradients between the urban sites and a suburban or rural reference site, we

  15. Analysis of the potential of near-ground measurements of CO2 and CH4 in London, UK, for the monitoring of city-scale emissions using an atmospheric transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Alex; Broquet, Grégoire; Clifford, Deborah J.; Chevallier, Frédéric; Butterfield, David M.; Pison, Isabelle; Ramonet, Michel; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Ciais, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) mole fractions were measured at four near-ground sites located in and around London during the summer of 2012 with a view to investigating the potential of assimilating such measurements in an atmospheric inversion system for the monitoring of the CO2 and CH4 emissions in the London area. These data were analysed and compared with simulations using a modelling framework suited to building an inversion system: a 2 km horizontal resolution south of England configuration of the transport model CHIMERE driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) meteorological forcing, coupled to a 1 km horizontal resolution emission inventory (the UK National Atmospheric Emission Inventory). First comparisons reveal that local sources, which cannot be represented in the model at a 2 km resolution, have a large impact on measurements. We evaluate methods to filter out the impact of some of the other critical sources of discrepancies between the measurements and the model simulation except that of the errors in the emission inventory, which we attempt to isolate. Such a separation of the impact of errors in the emission inventory should make it easier to identify the corrections that should be applied to the inventory. Analysis is supported by observations from meteorological sites around the city and a 3-week period of atmospheric mixing layer height estimations from lidar measurements. The difficulties of modelling the mixing layer depth and thus CO2 and CH4 concentrations during the night, morning and late afternoon lead to focusing on the afternoon period for all further analyses. The discrepancies between observations and model simulations are high for both CO2 and CH4 (i.e. their root mean square (RMS) is between 8 and 12 parts per million (ppm) for CO2 and between 30 and 55 parts per billion (ppb) for CH4 at a given site). By analysing the gradients between the urban sites and a suburban or rural reference site, we

  16. Overall satisfaction, sexual function, and the durability of neophallus dimensions following staged female to male genital gender confirming surgery: the Institute of Urology, London U.K. experience

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Nim A.; De Luca, Francesco; Spilotros, Marco; Ralph, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose What factors influence transgender men’s decisions to undergo (and to not undergo) specific genital gender confirming surgeries (GCS) has not been described in the literature. Sexual function outcomes related to clitoral transposition and penile prosthesis placement is also not well described. Durability of neophallus dimensions after phalloplasty has not been described. A better understanding of these factors is necessary for pre-op counseling. We sought to assess patient genital-GCS related satisfaction, regret, pre/post-op sexual function, genital preferences, and genital measurements post-op. Materials and methods We evaluated ten female to male transgender patients who had previously undergone suprapubic pedicle-flap phalloplasty [suprapubic phalloplasty (SP); N=10] and 15 who had undergone radial artery forearm-flap phalloplasty [(RAP); N=15; 5/15 without and 10/15 with cutaneous nerve to clitoral nerve anastomosis] at our center (UK). We queried patients’ surgery related preferences and concerns, satisfaction, and sexual function pre/post-surgery, and accounted for whether patients had undergone clitoral transposition and/or cutaneous-to-clitoral nerve anastomosis. We measured flaccid and (where applicable) erect length and girth using a smart-phone app we designed. Results Mean age at surgery and follow-up for those that underwent SP was 35.1 and 2.23 years, and 34 and 6.8 for those that underwent RAP. Mean satisfaction scores were 9.1/10 and 9/10 for those that underwent SP and RAP, respectively. No patient (0%) regretted starting genital-GCS surgery. All (100%) patients that could achieve orgasm before GCS with clitoral transposition could achieve orgasm after surgery, and the vast majority reported preserved quality of erogenous sensation by our transposition technique. All (100%) RAP and 9/10 SP patients reported masturbation with their phallus. Inflatable penile prosthesis placement was not associated with decreased erogenous

  17. Survey of the use of homeopathic medicine in the UK health system.

    PubMed Central

    Swayne, J M

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of 7218 consultations showed that homeopathic medicines are being used to treat a wide range of morbidity in the United Kingdom. The data were derived from all consecutive consultations during one week by 73 doctors who used homeopathic medicine. Of these consultations 88% were conducted as part of the National Health Service (the majority in general practice). Thirty five per cent overall and 25% of general practice consultations were managed using homeopathic medicines, and these were combined with conventional drugs in 8.5% of the prescriptions. PMID:2558206

  18. System-level and patient-level explanations for non-attendance at diabetic retinopathy screening in Sutton and Merton (London, UK): a qualitative analysis of a service evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Strutton, R; Du Chemin, A; Stratton, I M; Forster, A S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Non-attendance at diabetic retinopathy screening has financial implications for screening programmes and potential clinical costs to patients. We sought to identify explanations for why patients had never attended a screening appointment (never attendance) in one programme. Design Qualitative analysis of a service evaluation. Setting One South London (UK) diabetic eye screening programme. Participants and procedure Patients who had been registered with one screening programme for at least 18 months and who had never attended screening within the programme were contacted by telephone to ascertain why this was the case. Patients’ general practices were also contacted for information about why each patient may not have attended. Framework analysis was used to interpret responses. Results Of the 296 patients, 38 were not eligible for screening and of the 258 eligible patients, 159 were not contactable (31 of these had phone numbers that were not in use). We obtained reasons from patients/general practices/clinical notes for non-attendance for 146 (57%) patients. A number of patient-level and system-level factors were given to explain non-attendance. Patient-level factors included having other commitments, being anxious about screening, not engaging with any diabetes care and being misinformed about screening. System-level factors included miscommunication about where the patient lives, their clinical situation and practical problems that could have been overcome had their existence been shared between programmes. Conclusions This service evaluation provides unique insight into the patient-level and system-level reasons for never attendance at diabetic retinopathy screening. Improved sharing of relevant information between providers has the potential to facilitate increased uptake of screening. Greater awareness of patient-level barriers may help providers offer a more accessible service. PMID:27194319

  19. Cancer Research UK Centre for Drug Development: translating 21st-century science into the cancer medicines of tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, James W A; Williams, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    The Cancer Research UK Centre (CRUK) for Drug Development (CDD) can trace its origins back to the Cancer Research Campaign Phase I/II Committee (created in 1980) and to date has tested over 120 potential cancer medicines in early-phase clinical trials. Five drugs are now registered, providing benefit to thousands of patients with cancer as part of their routine standard of care. In recent years, the CDD has established several different business and operating models that provide it with access to the pipelines of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This has enabled potential new treatments to be taken into clinical development that might have otherwise languished on companies' shelves and has increased the number of drug combinations being explored in early-phase clinical trials. PMID:25794601

  20. Cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus, London, UK

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anisur

    2003-01-01

    The meeting consisted of 11 talks that illustrated the complexity of the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying systemic lupus erythematosus and aimed to identify ways in which cytokine modulation might affect those mechanisms. The evidence relating to the involvement of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10 and BLyS in this disease was discussed in particular detail. A final discussion explored the possible ways in which cytokine modulation might lead to new methods of treating systemic lupus erythematosus in the future. PMID:12823845

  1. General practitioners with a special interest in respiratory medicine: national survey of UK primary care organisations

    PubMed Central

    Pinnock, Hilary; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Price, David; Sheikh, Aziz

    2005-01-01

    Background To meet the universally recognised challenge of caring for people with long-term diseases many healthcare cultures are encouraging family physicians to develop specialist skills. We aimed to determine the major factors influencing the appointment of respiratory General Practitioners with a Special Interest (GPwSI) in the UK, and to determine the priority attached to the potential roles, perceived barriers to implementation, and monitoring planned. Methods We sent a piloted semi-structured questionnaire to a random sample of 50% of English and Welsh primary care organisations (PCOs) (n = 161) during winter 2003. In addition to descriptive statistics, we used hierarchical cluster analysis to classify service priorities. Free-text responses to open-ended questions were analysed qualitatively by a multidisciplinary group to identify emerging themes. Results Of the 111 (69%) PCOs who responded, 7 (6%) already have, and a further 35 (32%) are planning, a respiratory GPwSI service. This proportion is considerably lower than in specialities linked to National Health Service clinical priorities. Local needs and pressure on hospital beds were the main described motives for developing a service. Stated service priorities were to relieve pressure on secondary care and to improve quality of care, including the strategic planning of respiratory services within PCOs. Conclusion The relatively few respiratory GPwSIs currently in post reflects the lack of government prioritisation of respiratory care. However, respiratory GPwSI services are increasingly being considered as a local strategy for reducing pressure on secondary care respiratory services and raising standards of chronic disease management in primary care. PMID:15921509

  2. The doctor's medicine and the ambiguity of amulets: life and suffering among Bangladeshi psychiatric patients and their families in London – an interview study – 1

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An interview study of 44 Bangladeshi patients and relatives in London demonstrated simultaneous trust in psychiatrists as well as in the widespread use of healing amulets. At the same time, local Islamic clerics and traditional healers were seen by many with some degree of suspicion. The authors offer an interpretation in which local healers and their methods are regarded ambivalently: the more distant biomedical framework fits with the newer modernising ‘High’ Islam (literate, scripturalist, puritanical, unitarian, urban, clerical, perhaps masculinist), as opposed to Hindu-inflected traditional Sufi Islam in Bangladesh (peasant, popular, syncretic, saintly, magical, ecstatic and possibly more sympathetic to women's experience). PMID:23998259

  3. The doctor's medicine and the ambiguity of amulets: life and suffering among Bangladeshi psychiatric patients and their families in London--an interview study--1.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An interview study of 44 Bangladeshi patients and relatives in London demonstrated simultaneous trust in psychiatrists as well as in the widespread use of healing amulets. At the same time, local Islamic clerics and traditional healers were seen by many with some degree of suspicion. The authors offer an interpretation in which local healers and their methods are regarded ambivalently: the more distant biomedical framework fits with the newer modernising 'High' Islam (literate, scripturalist, puritanical, unitarian, urban, clerical, perhaps masculinist), as opposed to Hindu-inflected traditional Sufi Islam in Bangladesh (peasant, popular, syncretic, saintly, magical, ecstatic and possibly more sympathetic to women's experience). PMID:23998259

  4. The prevalence of comorbidities among people living with HIV in Brent: a diverse London Borough.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Ava; Ananthavarathan, Piriyankan; Lorigan, James; Jowata, Mohamade; Brook, Gary; Banarsee, Ricky

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV has changed from a rapidly deteriorating illness to a complex chronic disease, with increasing incidences of comorbidity, including cancer, and liver, lung and cardiovascular diseases. North West London has 6719 individuals living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 873 of whom reside in the London Borough of Brent. Traditionally, commissioning services have focused on HIV therapy alone without considering how comorbidity affects treatment outcome and total service costs. Setting The setting for the study was NHS Brent Primary Care Trust, London UK. Question What associated comorbidities are present in people in Brent (London, UK) living with HIV, and how common are they? Methods A point-prevalence audit of retrospective data was conducted on all HIV-positive patients in Brent (financial year 2011/12). Data were collected from genito-urinary medicine (GUM) services, community services and general practitioners (GPs) on HIV diagnosis, patient demographics and past/current comorbidities: hepatitis B and C, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and mental health disorders. Results This study identified that 29% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Brent have at least one comorbidity. The most common was hepatitis, followed by mental health disorders and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Comorbidity was more likely in older male patients (in particular CVD and diabetes) and White patients (except for diabetes which was more common in Asian groups). Discussion/Conclusion Many PLWHA in Brent suffer from a number of other conditions, which appear largely independent of HIV. Findings confirm the need to treat HIV as a long-term condition, including patient education, empowerment and encouraging self-management. The multi-morbidity of many PLWHA suggests a role for both primary care and collaborative, holistic, patient-centred and individualised healthcare. Service providers and commissioners need to consider comorbidities in their treatment of and

  5. The prevalence of comorbidities among people living with HIV in Brent: a diverse London Borough

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Ava; Lorigan, James; Jowata, Mohamade; Brook, Gary; Banarsee, Ricky

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV has changed from a rapidly deteriorating illness to a complex chronic disease, with increasing incidences of comorbidity, including cancer, and liver, lung and cardiovascular diseases. North West London has 6719 individuals living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 873 of whom reside in the London Borough of Brent. Traditionally, commissioning services have focused on HIV therapy alone without considering how comorbidity affects treatment outcome and total service costs. Setting The setting for the study was NHS Brent Primary Care Trust, London UK. Question What associated comorbidities are present in people in Brent (London, UK) living with HIV, and how common are they? Methods A point-prevalence audit of retrospective data was conducted on all HIV-positive patients in Brent (financial year 2011/12). Data were collected from genito-urinary medicine (GUM) services, community services and general practitioners (GPs) on HIV diagnosis, patient demographics and past/current comorbidities: hepatitis B and C, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and mental health disorders. Results This study identified that 29% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Brent have at least one comorbidity. The most common was hepatitis, followed by mental health disorders and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Comorbidity was more likely in older male patients (in particular CVD and diabetes) and White patients (except for diabetes which was more common in Asian groups). Discussion/Conclusion Many PLWHA in Brent suffer from a number of other conditions, which appear largely independent of HIV. Findings confirm the need to treat HIV as a long-term condition, including patient education, empowerment and encouraging self-management. The multi-morbidity of many PLWHA suggests a role for both primary care and collaborative, holistic, patient-centred and individualised healthcare. Service providers and commissioners need to consider comorbidities in their treatment of and

  6. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  7. Assessing the sources and bioaccessibility of Lead in Soils from London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Mark R.; Wragg, Joanna; Chenery, Simon

    2013-04-01

    The lead content of soil is important since it is toxic to humans and particularly because children tend to more readily absorb lead than do adults: children absorb up to 40% into the bloodstream from ingested or inhaled lead, versus 5-15% in adults. Studies have shown that relatively low concentrations of lead in blood can lead to significant decrease in IQ of children (e.g. Jakubowski, 2011) leading to neuropathy and hypertension in adults. The British Geological Survey has recently completed a systematic high-density geochemical soil survey of the Greater London Area (GLA) in which over 6000 surface soil samples were collected and analysed for 50 elements. The Pb content of the soils range from 11 mg/kg to greater than 10000 mg/kg with mean and median values of 301 and 185 mg/kg, respectively. The ingestion bioaccessible fraction of Pb was measured using an in-vitro bioaccessibility test showing that 68% of the total Pb in London soils is bioaccessible. Measurement of Pb isotopic ratios in selected soils matched with those found in London air particulates and, to a lesser extent, with petrol lead. Self modelling mixture resolution of the 50 element geochemical data set was used to identify geochemically distinct components in the data with Pb being associated with 11 of the components which were of both natural and anthropogenic origin. Relationships between the soil components, the bioaccessible fraction and the Pb isotope ratios provided an indication of the sources of mobile lead in the London soils. References JAKUBOWSKI, M. 2011. Low-level environmental lead exposure and intellectual impairment in children - the current concepts of risk assessment. International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, Vol. 24, 1-7. APPLETON, J D, CAVE, M R, and WRAGG, J. 2012. Modelling lead bioaccessibility in urban topsoils based on data from Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea, UK. Environmental Pollution, Vol. 171, 265-272.

  8. Naturalness as an ethical stance: idea(l)s and practices of care in western herbal medicine in the UK.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    An association of non-biomedical healthcare with appeals to nature and naturalness, and an invocation of a rhetoric of gentleness, goodness, purity and moral power has been noted previously, and some scholars argue that nature has taken on a meaning broadly opposed to the rational scientific order of modernity. Drawing on an ethnographic study of women's practice and use of western herbal medicine (WHM) in the UK, the intertwining of the perceived naturalness of WHM with distinct care practices points to a further avenue for exploration. To examine patients' and herbalists' discourses of the naturalness of WHM and associated idea(l)s and practices of care, understandings of nature and a feminist ethics of care are utilized as analytical frameworks. The analysis presented suggests that, through WHM, patients and herbalists become embedded in a complex spatio-temporal wholeness and web of care that intertwines past, present and future, self and others, and local and global concerns. In the emerging 'ordinary ethics of care', naturalness constitutes a sign of goodness and of a shared humanity within the organic world, while care, underpinned by idea(l)s of natural and holistic care practices, links human and non-human others. Thus, the naturalness of WHM, as perceived by some patients and herbalists, engages and blends with a continually unfolding field of relationships in the lifeworld(s), where care practices, caring relations and collective wellbeing may constitute an ethical stance that raises deeper questions about the significance of relationality, the values of care/caring and the mutual involvement of nature and human being(s). PMID:26001272

  9. Are Londoners Prepared for an Emergency? A Longitudinal Study Following the London Bombings

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, James; Amlôt, Richard; Simpson, John; Wessely, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The UK government sees increasing individual preparedness as a priority, but the level of preparedness of people in the UK for a large-scale emergency is not known. The London bombings of July 7, 2005, affected many Londoners and may have altered their sense of vulnerability to a future terrorist attack. We used a longitudinal study design to assess individual preparedness within the same sample of Londoners at 2 points in time: immediately after the bombings (T1) and 7 to 8 months later (T2). A demographically representative sample of 1,010 Londoners participated in a phone interview at T1. Subsequently, at T2, 574 of the same people participated in a follow-up phone interview. At T1 51% of Londoners had made 4 or more relevant emergency plans; 48% had gathered 4 or more relevant supplies in case of emergency. There was evidence of increased preparedness at T2, by which time 90% had made 4 or more emergency plans. Ethnicity, low social status, and having felt a sense of threat during the bombings predicted increased preparedness between T1 and T2. Women in general, and women of low social status in particular, perceived themselves to be unprepared in the event of a future terrorist attack. In summary, Londoners show moderate levels of emergency preparedness, which increased following the London bombings. Although we cannot know whether this association is causal, the prospective nature of the study increases the likelihood that it is. However, preparedness is still patchy, and there are important demographic associations with levels of preparedness and perception of vulnerability. These findings have implications for future development of individual and community emergency preparedness policy. PMID:19117430

  10. UK Parkinson's Excellence Network: empowering service improvement across the UK.

    PubMed

    Burn, David

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's UK, together with leading Parkinson's professionals, has set up the UK Parkinson's Excellence Network to bring together the passion and expertise of leading clinicians with the strategic leadership and resources of Parkinson's UK underpinned by the voice of people affected by Parkinson's. Launched in London in February 2015, the Excellence Network aims to drive sustainable improvements in health and social care services. It will provide a more strategic approach to clinical development so that Parkinson's services across health and social care can be transformed to provide the best quality care across the UK. PMID:26107314

  11. Materials modelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciudad, David

    2016-04-01

    Angelos Michaelides, Professor in Theoretical Chemistry at University College London (UCL) and co-director of the Thomas Young Centre (TYC), explains to Nature Materials the challenges in materials modelling and the objectives of the TYC.

  12. Variation in assessment and standard setting practices across UK undergraduate medicine and the need for a benchmark

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The principal aim of this study is to provide an account of variation in UK undergraduate medical assessment styles and corresponding standard setting approaches with a view to highlighting the importance of a UK national licensing exam in recognizing a common standard. Methods Using a secure online survey system, response data were collected during the period 13 - 30 January 2014 from selected specialists in medical education assessment, who served as representatives for their respective medical schools. Results Assessment styles and corresponding choices of standard setting methods vary markedly across UK medical schools. While there is considerable consensus on the application of compensatory approaches, individual schools display their own nuances through use of hybrid assessment and standard setting styles, uptake of less popular standard setting techniques and divided views on norm referencing. Conclusions The extent of variation in assessment and standard setting practices across UK medical schools validates the concern that there is a lack of evidence that UK medical students achieve a common standard on graduation. A national licensing exam is therefore a viable option for benchmarking the performance of all UK undergraduate medical students. PMID:26520472

  13. East London Experience with Enteric Fever 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jayshree; Millar, Michael; Maxeiner, Horst; Freedman, Joanne; Meade, Rachel; Rosmarin, Caryn; Jordan, Matthew; Andrews, Nick; Holliman, Richard; Sefton, Armine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical presentation and epidemiology for patients with enteric fever at two hospitals in East London during 2007–2012 is described with the aim to identify preventive opportunities and to reduce the cost of treatment. Methods A retrospective analysis of case notes from patients admitted with enteric fever during 2007 to 2012 with a microbiologically confirmed diagnosis was undertaken. Details on clinical presentation, travel history, demographic data, laboratory parameters, treatment, patient outcome and vaccination status were collected. Results Clinical case notes were available for 98/129 (76%) patients including 69 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) and 29 Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi (S. Paratyphi). Thirty-four patients (35%) were discharged from emergency medicine without a diagnosis of enteric fever and then readmitted after positive blood cultures. Seventy-one of the 98 patients (72%) were UK residents who had travelled abroad, 23 (23%) were foreign visitors/new entrants to the UK and four (4%) had not travelled abroad. Enteric fever was not considered in the initial differential diagnosis for 48/98 (49%) cases. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days (range 0–57 days). The total cost of bed days for managing enteric fever was £454,000 in the two hospitals (mean £75,666/year). Median time to clinical resolution was five days (range 1–20). Seven of 98 (7%) patients were readmitted with relapsed or continued infection. Six of the 71 (8%) patients had received typhoid vaccination, 34 (48%) patients had not received vaccination, and for 31 cases (44%) vaccination status was unknown. Conclusions Further interventions regarding education and vaccination of travellers and recognition of the condition by emergency medicine clinicians in travellers to South Asia is required. PMID:25790017

  14. Overseas Chinese students in the UK: patterns and correlates of their use of Western and traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Felicity L; Lim, Chiw Yeh; Leydon, Geraldine M; Lewith, George T

    2009-02-01

    We explored the correlates of use of TCM and WM by ethnic Chinese students in the UK. A questionnaire assessed key theoretical determinants of health services use. One hundred and seventy ethnic Chinese participants (international students at one university in the South of England) completed this questionnaire (presented in English and Chinese) assessing their demographic characteristics, health status, attitudes towards and use of TCM and WM. Participants were more likely to use WM than TCM when they were in the UK. Different variables predicted use of WM and TCM. The statistical predictors (demographic characteristics, health status, past behaviour, attitudes) explained modest but important proportions of the variance in use of WM (37%) and TCM (29%). In conclusion, this small exploratory study suggests a need for further research on the health care utilisation of this growing body of international students. Improved language support is needed for international students in UK health care settings. PMID:19161948

  15. Conference Scene: Induced pluripotent cells: a new path for regenerative medicine. 7 October 2010, BioPark, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Hélène S G

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are embryonic stem-like cells derived from adult tissues, have the broadest differentiation potential. These cells are unique in their ability to self-renew, to be maintained in an undifferentiated state for long periods of culturing and to give rise to many different cell lineages including germ-line cells. They therefore represent an invaluable tool for facilitating research towards the realization of regenerative medicine. The recent developments in embryonic stem cell and iPS cell technology have allowed human cell models to be developed that will hopefully provide novel platforms for disease analysis not only at the basic science level, but also for drug discovery and screening, and other clinical applications. This 1-day conference, chaired by Professor Peter Andrews from the University of Sheffield, UK, and Dr Chris Denning from the University of Nottingham, UK, focused on generation of iPS cells, their differentiation into specific fates and applications to disease modeling. It consisted of 11 talks by UK-based and international researchers, and three posters; Ms Azra Fatima from Cologne University, Germany, won the competition for her poster on the derivation of iPS cells from a patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. PMID:21175284

  16. 119. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 118. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 120. Thames River Bridge draw span. New London, New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. Thames River Bridge draw span. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 117. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. 116. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  1. 111. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 122.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  2. Language Shift and Vitality Perceptions amongst London's Second-Generation Bangladeshis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinger, Sebastian M.

    2013-01-01

    With more than 64,500 members, the Bangladeshi community in London is one of the largest in the UK. Originating from a wave of immigration during the 1970s, a considerable part of the community now consists of a second, UK-born generation. This explorative study seeks to address, first, the extent of the intergenerational language shift from…

  3. The use of biomedicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and ethnomedicine for the treatment of epilepsy among people of South Asian origin in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Penny J; Small, Neil; Ismail, Hanif; Wright, John P

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that a significant proportion of people with epilepsy use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM use is known to vary between different ethnic groups and cultural contexts; however, little attention has been devoted to inter-ethnic differences within the UK population. We studied the use of biomedicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and ethnomedicine in a sample of people with epilepsy of South Asian origin living in the north of England. Methods Interviews were conducted with 30 people of South Asian origin and 16 carers drawn from a sampling frame of patients over 18 years old with epilepsy, compiled from epilepsy registers and hospital databases. All interviews were tape-recorded, translated if required and transcribed. A framework approach was adopted to analyse the data. Results All those interviewed were taking conventional anti-epileptic drugs. Most had also sought help from traditional South Asian practitioners, but only two people had tried conventional CAM. Decisions to consult a traditional healer were taken by families rather than by individuals with epilepsy. Those who made the decision to consult a traditional healer were usually older family members and their motivations and perceptions of safety and efficacy often differed from those of the recipients of the treatment. No-one had discussed the use of traditional therapies with their doctor. The patterns observed in the UK mirrored those reported among people with epilepsy in India and Pakistan. Conclusion The health care-seeking behaviour of study participants, although mainly confined within the ethnomedicine sector, shared much in common with that of people who use global CAM. The appeal of traditional therapies lay in their religious and moral legitimacy within the South Asian community, especially to the older generation who were disproportionately influential in the determination of treatment choices. As a second generation made up of people of

  4. Nitrate concentrations and fluxes in the River Thames, London UK 1868 to 2008: catchment-scale modelling of diffuse agricultural sources and groundwater response using the world's longest water quality time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howden, N. J.; Burt, T. P.; Worrall, F.; Mathias, S.; Whelan, M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents analyses of the world's longest water quality record: 140 years of monthly-average nitrate concentrations (1868 to 2008) and fluxes (1883 to 2008) for the River Thames north of London. We show how short- and long- term patterns in these time series are influenced by both climatic and anthropogenic pressures, in the case of the latter, particularly land use and land management practices. Climate change does not play a significant role in controlling annual average concentrations or fluxes, rather large-scale land conversions from permanent grassland to arable farming have created sustained diffuse sources of nitrate that have caused (almost four-fold) increases in concentrations and fluxes that persist for many decades after the initial changes. Our analyses of this unique time series highlight four areas of particular interest: (1) Despite several layers of regulation and source control, fluvial concentrations and fluxes remain in- tractably high - no decrease has been observed since the early 1970s; (2) Catchment response to changing nitrogen inputs from land use and land management is subject to considerable lag: present conditions in the river reflect land practices from some years ago; (3) Following (2), we suggest that current changes to land use and land management practices will not be reflected in river water quality for some time to come; (4) Overall, the long-term view afforded by this record questions the derivation of "baseline conditions" that are formulated from records that do not reflect the massive changes in land use and land management in the mid-20th century. Overall, a better understanding of the links, and time delays, between cause (i.e. changing land use / land management) and fluvial response (i.e. concentration increase/decrease) will improve our ability both to predict changes in the coming decades, and inform management decision making now, to ensure the appropriate balance between agricultural development and

  5. Drug assessment: UK style.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Before medicines can be marketed in the UK, they are subject to a system of licensing and the granting of a marketing authorisation that describes the conditions and patient groups for which the medicinal product can be used within the terms of its licence.(1) The licensing process involves an assessment of data relating to the efficacy, safety and quality of the product. However, the marketing authorisation does not determine whether, or how, it will be used in clinical practice. In the UK, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) and the All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) publish recommendations on the use of medicines for health services in the United Kingdom. In this article we review their remit, work processes and the status of guidance published in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. PMID:24336496

  6. The first UK measurements of nitryl chloride using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer in central London in the summer of 2012, and an investigation of the role of Cl atom oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas J.; Booth, A. Murray; Bacak, Asan; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Leather, Kimberley E.; Le Breton, Michael; Jones, Benjamin; Young, Dominique; Coe, Hugh; Allan, James; Visser, Suzanne; Slowik, Jay G.; Furger, Markus; Prévôt, André S. H.; Lee, James; Dunmore, Rachel E.; Hopkins, James R.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Sharp, Thomas; Stone, Daniel; Heard, Dwayne E.; Fleming, Zoë L.; Leigh, Roland; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Percival, Carl J.

    2015-06-01

    The first nitryl chloride (ClNO2) measurements in the UK were made during the summer 2012 ClearfLo campaign with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, utilizing an I- ionization scheme. Concentrations of ClNO2 exceeded detectable limits (11 ppt) every night with a maximum concentration of 724 ppt. A diurnal profile of ClNO2 peaking between 4 and 5 A.M., decreasing directly after sunrise, was observed. Concentrations of ClNO2 above the detection limit are generally observed between 8 P.M. and 11 A.M. Different ratios of the production of ClNO2:N2O5 were observed throughout with both positive and negative correlations between the two species being reported. The photolysis of ClNO2 and a box model utilizing the Master Chemical Mechanism modified to include chlorine chemistry was used to calculate Cl atom concentrations. Simultaneous measurements of hydroxyl radicals (OH) using low pressure laser-induced fluorescence and ozone enabled the relative importance of the oxidation of three groups of measured VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes) by OH radicals, Cl atoms, and O3 to be compared. For the day with the maximum calculated Cl atom concentration, Cl atoms in the early morning were the dominant oxidant for alkanes and, over the entire day, contributed 15%, 3%, and 26% toward the oxidation of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, respectively.

  7. 'Personal Care' and General Practice Medicine in the UK: A qualitative interview study with patients and General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent policy and organisational changes within UK primary care have emphasised graduated access to care, speed of access to the first available general practitioner (GP) and care being provided by a range of healthcare professionals. These trends have been strengthened by the current GP contract and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Concern has been expressed that the potential for personal care is being diminished as a result and that this will reduce quality standards. This paper presents data from a study that explored with patients and GPs what personal care means and whether it has continuing importance to them. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview participants and Framework Analysis supported analysis of emerging themes. Twenty-nine patients, mainly women with young children, and twenty-three GPs were interviewed from seven practices in Lothian, Scotland, ranged by practice size and relative deprivation score. Results and Discussion Personal care was defined mainly, though not exclusively, as care given within the context of a continuing relationship in which there is an interpersonal connection and the doctor adopts a particular consultation style. Defined in this way, it was reported to have benefits for both health outcomes and patients' experience of care. In particular, such care was thought to be beneficial in attending to the emotions that can be elicited when seeking and receiving health care and in enabling patients to be known by doctors as legitimate seekers of care from the health service. Its importance was described as being dependent upon the nature of the health problem and patients' wider familial and social circumstances. In particular, it was found to provide support to patients in their parenting and other familial caring roles. Conclusion Personal care has continuing salience to patients and GPs in modern primary care in the UK. Patients equate the experience of care, not just outcomes, with high

  8. The worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London.

    PubMed

    Hunting, P

    2004-01-01

    The Society of Apothecaries is both a City livery company and an examining authority for the medical profession. Founded in 1617 by the royal apothecary Gideon de Laune leading a breakaway group from the Grocers' Company, the Society was instrumental in raising the status of apothecaries as general practitioners. Under the Apothecaries' Act (1815) the Society examined for the LSA and it now awards the LMSSA (Licence in Medicine and Surgery of the Society of Apothecaries) and postgraduate diplomas, while maintaining the civic, charitable, and ceremonial traditions of a livery company of the City of London. PMID:14760181

  9. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  10. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... you get better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring ... can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with food or other medicines you may be taking. They ...

  11. Ebola virus disease: the UK critical care perspective.

    PubMed

    Martin, D; Howard, J; Agarwal, B; Rajalingam, Y; Athan, B; Bhagani, S; Cropley, I; Hopkins, S; Mepham, S; Rodger, A; Warren, S; Jacobs, M

    2016-05-01

    The recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) has required the treatment of affected patients in the NHS system within the UK. Managing patients with a confirmed viral haemorrhagic fever requires a thorough understanding of treatment options within the confines of an effective biocontainment setting. The Royal Free Hospital High Level Isolation Unit (HLIU) in London, is a purpose built facility that allows healthcare workers to safely treat patients with highly contagious diseases. This HLIU uses Trexler isolator tents to prevent the spread of infection from patients to healthcare workers. Provision of invasive organ support can be provided in this environment, if considered appropriate, and is achievable without posing additional risk to staff. We report our recent experiences of managing patients with EVD, with particular focus on those aspects of care pertinent to anaesthesia and critical care medicine. PMID:27106962

  12. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  13. London International Youth Science Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

  14. Safer Schools in the UK--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Carol; Holt, Amanda; Martin, Denise; Nee, Claire

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a research that is based on a European Safer Schools Partnership that included ten countries and specifically the UK case study which was located in London. The initiators of this partnership had been involved in early SSPs in the UK and the educationalists were very much focussed on work that would address problematic…

  15. Looking into 'London'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic image from the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock abrasion tool target, 'London.' The image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on its 149th sol on Mars (June 24, 2004). Scientists 'read' the geology of the image from bottom to top, with the youngest material pictured at the bottom of the image and the oldest material in the layers pictured at the top. Millimeter-scale layers run horizontally across the exposed surface, with two sliced sphere-like objects, or 'blueberries' on the upper left and upper right sides of the impression. This material is similar to the evaporative material found in 'Eagle Crater.' However, the intense review of these layers in Endurance Crater is, in essence, deepening the water story authored by ancient Mars.

    In Eagle Crater, the effects of water were traced down a matter of centimeters. Endurance Crater's depth has allowed the tracing of water's telltale marks up to meters. Another process that significantly affects martian terrain is muddying the water story a bit. Although it is clear that the layers in Endurance were affected by water, it is also evident that Aeolian, or wind, processes have contributed to the makeup of the crater.

  16. Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654): London's first general practitioner?

    PubMed

    Farthing, Michael J G

    2015-08-01

    Nicholas Culpeper is often regarded as an ill-disciplined, maverick, mid-17th century herbalist and the father of contemporary alternative medicine. There are elements of this statement that have some truth but to dismiss his contribution to the development of health provision in London at the time would be a great injustice. Culpeper did not complete his apprenticeship as an apothecary and was not a formally trained physician, but he developed a clinical practice for the poor of London, indistinguishable from the role of the present day general practitioner. Observers at the time recognised his concern and compassion and his commitment to treat the whole patient and not just the disease. His enduring contribution was his translation from Latin of the physicians' Pharmacopoeia Londinensis which could be regarded as the first major step towards the demystification of medicine. Culpeper's London Dispensatory and the many other medical treatises that followed were affordable and widely available to the common man. Culpeper antagonised both apothecaries and physicians because he breached the regulations of the day by accepting patients directly. So perhaps Culpeper was, de facto, London's first general practitioner, at least 150 years before the role was formally recognised in the Apothecaries Act 1815. PMID:24585603

  17. The Training Situation of the Non-Native EFL Teacher in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, M. H. Combe

    1975-01-01

    Describes problems faced by non-native teacher trainees in London and emphasizes necessity of EFL teachers to be aware of these problems. RSA courses in EFL have successfully prepared non-native trainees from many countries. Six centers outside the UK are training mostly non-native teachers for the RSA certificate. (CJ)

  18. Analyzing the Roles, Activities, and Skills of Learning Technologists: A Case Study from City University London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Olivia; Sumner, Neal

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a case study carried out at City University London into the role of learning technologists. The article examines how the role developed by providing points of comparison with a report on the career development of learning technology staff in UK universities in 2001. This case study identified that learning technologists…

  19. London Tideway Tunnels: tackling London's Victorian legacy of combined sewer overflows.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G B; Crawford, D

    2011-01-01

    It takes a few millimetres of rainfall to cause the 34 most polluting combined sewer overflows (CSOs) to discharge into the River Thames. Currently, in a typical year, spillages to the tidal reaches of the River Thames occur about 60 times, with an estimated spill volume of 39 million cubic metres. Both the UK Government and the European Union have determined that the CSO discharges have an adverse environmental impact on fish species, introduce unacceptable aesthetics and elevate the health risks for recreational users of the Thames, with a frequency of discharge which is in breach of the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive. Studies have established that the environmental objectives can be fully met on the most cost-effective basis by completing both quality improvements to treatment works and by the provision of a storage and transfer tunnel to intercept unsatisfactory CSOs. Extensive modelling has been undertaken to develop an optimised solution. In parallel with the design development a rigorous and comprehensive site selection methodology has been established to select sites and consult stakeholders and the public on the preferred sites and scheme, with the first stage of public consultation planned for later in 2010. The London Tideway Tunnels are an essential part of the delivery of improvements to the water quality of the tidal River Thames, and this ambitious, historic scheme represents a vital strategic investment in London's infrastructure. PMID:21245557

  20. Deaths of cyclists in london: trends from 1992 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cycling is an increasingly important mode of transport for environmental and health reasons. Cycling fatalities in London were previously investigated in 1994 using routinely collected data. Since then, there have been shifts in the modes of transport used, and in transport policies. We sought to replicate the previous work using data on cyclist deaths in London between 1992 and 2006, specifically investigating whether heavy goods vehicles continued to pose a threat. Methods Observational study based on analysis of time series of police road casualties data, 1992 to 2006, in London, UK. The main outcome measures were cyclists killed in road traffic collisions. Poisson regression and chi-squared test for homogeneity were used to assess time effects. Travel flow data was then used to estimate annual fatality rates per 100,000 cyclists per kilometre. Results From 1992 to 2006 there was a mean of 16 cycling fatalities per year (range 8-21). 146 deaths (60%) were in inner London and 96 in outer London. There was no evidence for a decline over time (p = 0.7) other than a pronounced dip in 2004 when there were 8 fatalities. Freight vehicles were involved in 103 of 242 (43%) of all incidents and the vehicle was making a left turn in over half of these (53%). The fatality rate ranged from 20.5 deaths in 1992 to 11.1 deaths in 2006 per 100,000 estimated cyclists per kilometre (rate ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 1.03). Conclusions There is little evidence fatality rates have fallen. Freight vehicles over 3.5 tonnes continue to present a disproportionate threat; they should be removed from urban roads and more appropriate means of delivery of essential goods found. PMID:21078190

  1. Sport and exercise medicine and the Olympic health legacy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    London 2012 is the first Olympic and Paralympic Games to explicitly try and develop socioeconomic legacies for which success indicators are specified - the highest profile of which was to deliver a health legacy by getting two million more people more active by 2012. This editorial highlights how specialists in Sport and Exercise Medicine can contribute towards increasing physical activity participation in the UK, as well as how the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine might be a useful vehicle for delivering an Olympic health legacy. Key challenges are also discussed such as acquisition of funding to support new physical activity initiatives, appropriate allocation of resources, and how to assess the impact of legacy initiatives. PMID:22813079

  2. Space in Pentecostal healing practices among Ghanaian migrants in London.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    In this article I analyze different spatial practices related to Pentecostal healing, drawing on fieldwork with Pentecostal believers who have migrated from Ghana to London, UK. I explore the relationship between space and the manifestation of the Holy Spirit by looking at how points of contact with the divine are created in the personal life of people and at the sites where the casting out of demons takes place. Unlike in other spirit-centered healing traditions, the Christian Holy Spirit is not conceived of as embodied in specific places, but rather is spatially unbound. To manifest, however, the Holy Spirit requires specific spatial qualities and esthetics. PMID:24383751

  3. Frontiers in cardiovascular biology: London 2012 - a scientific 'olympiad'.

    PubMed

    Harding, Sian E

    2012-09-01

    Imperial College London (UK) was the showcase for the second in the 'Frontiers in Cardiovascular Biology' series, a biennial meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Council on basic cardiovascular sciences, held from 30 March to 1 April 2012. The aim of this series is to bring researchers together to learn the very latest findings in cardiac and vascular sciences, and to see state-of-the-art and developing technologies that could impact cardiovascular research. Five keynote lectures, 25 scientific symposia and two translational lunchtime symposia were grouped around the central themes of bioimaging, degeneration and regeneration, and inflammation. PMID:23013121

  4. Eye casualty services in London

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  5. Lessons from London Schools: Investigating the Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baars, Sam; Bernardes, Eleanor; Elwick, Alex; Malortie, Abigail; McAleavy, Tony; McInerney, Laura; Menzies, Loic; Riggall, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This research seeks to investigate the claim that London schools have improved dramatically since 2000. The authors have reviewed the evidence of transformational change and explored possible reasons for the development in London's schools. The project was guided by three questions: (1) Is the success of London's schools as real as has…

  6. UK-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcroberts, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    The launch of the UK-4 satellite (United Kingdom) and its expected operations in the upper ionosphere are discussed. The satellite is designed to study radio noise, low frequency radio waves, electron temperature, and count low energy charged particles.

  7. Jean Decima Jacomb (1894-1988), matron of The London Clinic, 20 Devonshire Place, London W1 from 1938 to 1949.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Miss Jean Jacomb born into a wealthy family, was at the age of 22 a student nurse at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London in 1917 where she nursed convalescent soldiers from World War I. Her midwifery training was in the slums around Whitechapel where a nurses uniform and medical bag provided a safe passage in the East End of London. For a while she worked in South Africa and India and returning to UK in 1923 she progressed to appointment as matron at the now re-named Royal Marsden Hospital in Chelsea. In 1938 she was appointed matron to The London Clinic during the years of World War II following which in 1949 she retired at the age of 55. She then travelled the world extensively by ship, always first class. She died in 1988. PMID:24944046

  8. Commentary: Clinical skills teaching in UK medical education as exemplified by the BM5 curriculum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton.

    PubMed

    Timm, Anja; Polack, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This commentary seeks to enable comparisons about clinical skills teaching in Germany and the UK. It outlines the British regulatory environment and its impact on programme design. Through the example of the University of Southampton we show how clinical skills teaching is integrated both vertically and horizontally. PMID:27579351

  9. Commentary: Clinical skills teaching in UK medical education as exemplified by the BM5 curriculum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Anja; Polack, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This commentary seeks to enable comparisons about clinical skills teaching in Germany and the UK. It outlines the British regulatory environment and its impact on programme design. Through the example of the University of Southampton we show how clinical skills teaching is integrated both vertically and horizontally. PMID:27579351

  10. Modelling of hydrogen infrastructure for vehicle refuelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, D.; Hart, D.; Bauen, A.

    One of the principal barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen as a road transport fuel is the need for a refuelling infrastructure to be established. The lack of an adequate refuelling infrastructure would severely inhibit an uptake of hydrogen vehicles. On the other hand, without significant penetration of these vehicles, the demand for hydrogen would be insufficient to make a widespread conventional refuelling infrastructure economic. The infrastructure is likely to develop initially in cities, due to the high concentration of vehicles and the anticipated air quality benefits of a switch to hydrogen as a road transport fuel. While trial schemes such as the Clean Urban Transport for Europe (CUTE) bus project will establish initial hydrogen refuelling sites, it is not clear how a transition to a widespread refuelling infrastructure will occur. Indeed, the number of possible different ways and scales of producing and distributing hydrogen means that the possible configurations for such an infrastructure are almost endless. Imperial College London is examining transition strategies for a hydrogen infrastructure for vehicle refuelling in London under a project funded by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Imperial has five project partners from industry and local government to assist in this study: the Greater London Authority (GLA), BP, BOC, BMW and Air Products. This paper presents initial results from technical modelling of hydrogen infrastructure technologies and how they could be deployed to provide an initial facility for the refuelling of hydrogen fuel-cell buses in London. The results suggest that the choice of H 2 production technology can have significant effects on when the infrastructure would be installed, and the timing of hydrogen production, and bus refuelling.

  11. Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a London sexually transmitted infection clinic not fully sensitive to quinolones: are isolates imported and how effective is ciprofloxacin as a first-line therapy?

    PubMed

    Ivens, D; Martin, I; Ison, C

    2000-12-01

    Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae not fully sensitive to ciprofloxacin from a sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic in London and where the isolates were acquired from. Data of antibiotic sensitivities of N. gonorrhoeae from 292 patients were reviewed over a 6-month period at St Mary's Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) Clinic, London. Isolates which exhibited reduced susceptibility (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 0.03-0.12 mg/l) and high level resistance (MIC>0.12 mg/l) to ciprofloxacin represented 10% and 1.3% of the total respectively. All patients infected with a high level resistant isolate to ciprofloxacin had had a recent sexual partner from abroad but 18 of the 28 patients infected with a reduced susceptibility isolate denied recent travel. None of the 20 patients with a non-sensitive isolate who re-attended for post treatment cultures had persistant gonococcal infection. From this study we concluded that although N. gonorrhoeae resistant to ciprofloxacin was rare and probably always acquired abroad, isolates exhibiting reduced susceptibility were more common and were mainly as a result of infection from the UK. A stat dose of ciprofloxacin 500 mg and doxycycline 100 mg twice a day for one week was effective treatment. PMID:11138910

  12. Knowledge Construction and Personal Relationship: Insights about a UK University Mentoring and Coaching Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Eleanore

    2010-01-01

    This article examines interview data from 12 mentors/coaches and eight of their clients in order to explore a mentoring and coaching service among UK university staff. Both mentors/coaches and clients were administrative or academic employees of the Institute of Education or affiliated colleges at London University, UK. Their roles related to the…

  13. The UK pharmaceutical market. An overview.

    PubMed

    Towse, A

    1996-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) accounts for more than 98% of the UK prescription medicines market, which is the sixth largest pharmaceutical market in the world. Most of this market is driven by the UK's approximately 35,000 general practitioners (GPs). It is an open market, with most leading foreign pharmaceutical companies having a strong presence. While the growth rate of this market has been decelerating, it remains one of the fastest growing components of NHS expenditure. The NHS does not operate any kind of national reimbursement list, but the UK government has adopted several means to keep medicines expenditure under control. These include cash incentives and constraints for GPs relating to expenditure on medicines, individual quarterly updates on GP prescribing, the publication of a list of medicines that cannot be prescribed by GPs, the switching of some prescription-only medicines to over-the-counter medicines, and a co-payment system. The main form of economic regulation in the UK, however, remains the Pharmaceutical Price Regulation Scheme (PPRS). This limits the rate-of-return on capital attributable to medicines sales to the NHS, with the intended rate-of-return being equal to that of UK industry overall. The pharmaceutical industry has generally performed relatively well in the UK market, managing to preserve incentives to innovation. This reflects the fact that UK GPs have been able to maintain their clinical freedom, as well as government recognition of the economic contribution made by the pharmaceutical industry. Current issues of interest in the UK pharmaceutical market context include the future of the PPRS, the debates over the imposition of a national formulary and generic substitution, and over parallel trade, the potential impact of managed-care protocols and computer-based prescribing on pharmaceutical expenditures, and possible political changes. PMID:10163432

  14. Low on the London Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2013-09-01

    Until relatively recently, many authors have assumed that if extraterrestrial life is discovered it will be via the discovery of extraterrestrial intelligence: we can best try to detect life by adopting the SETI approach of trying to detect beacons or artefacts. The Rio Scale, proposed by Almár and Tarter in 2000, is a tool for quantifying the potential significance for society of any such reported detection. However, improvements in technology and advances in astrobiology raise the possibility that the discovery of extraterrestrial life will instead be via the detection of atmospheric biosignatures. The London Scale, proposed by Almár in 2010, attempts to quantify the potential significance of the discovery of extraterrestrial life rather than extraterrestrial intelligence. What might be the consequences of the announcement of a discovery that ranks low on the London Scale? In other words, what might be society's reaction if 'first contact' is via the remote sensing of the byproducts of unicellular organisms rather than with the products of high intelligence? Here, I examine some possible reactions to that question; in particular, I discuss how such an announcement might affect our views of life here on Earth and of humanity's place in the universe.

  15. Teachers' Experiences of Autonomy in Continuing Professional Development: Teacher Learning Communities in London and Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Eleanore; Berry, Rita; Lai, Y. C.; Leung, Pamela; Scott, David; Stobart, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines teachers' experiences of autonomy as they undertook Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the form of Teacher Learning Communities (TLCs) to develop Assessment for Learning (AfL). Participant teacher interview data were used from two parallel TLC projects, one in Hong Kong and one in London, UK. Autonomy was defined…

  16. London's Jewish Communities and State Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The Inner London education authority was a notable example of a radical and powerful local government body from which the fight for the comprehensive principle in English secondary education emerged. Building on previous work of women's contribution to state education in London, this articles focuses on Anglo-Jewish educator activists who helped…

  17. School Improvement in London: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavy, Tony; Elwick, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This report considers how successful London's schools have been over the past decade and identifies potentially transferable components of the success story. There is much to be learned from the transformation undergone in London that is relevant to policymakers and educationalists worldwide, working in both high-income and low-income countries.…

  18. Jack London: The Paradox of Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Because of their interest in naturalism and socialism, critics often overlook the major intellectual conflict in Jack London's work: the paradox of individualism. London regards society as affecting the individual in two ways: it either promotes individuality or it demands a conformity that undermines individualism. When society fails Buck in "The…

  19. Why is U.K. medicine no longer a self-regulating profession? The role of scandals involving "bad apple" doctors.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Woods, Mary; Yeung, Karen; Bosk, Charles L

    2011-11-01

    This article identifies the role played by a series of medical scandals in the U.K., occurring from the mid-1990s onwards, in ending a collegial model of self-regulation of the medical profession that had endured for 150 years. The state's original motive in endorsing professional self-regulation was to resolve the principal-agent problem inherent in the doctor-patient relationship. The profession, in return for its self-regulating privileges, undertook to act as a reliable guarantor for the competence and conduct of each of its members. Though sufficient to ensure that most doctors were "good", the collegial model adopted by the profession left it fatally vulnerable to the problem of "bad apples": those unwilling, incapable or indifferent to delivering on their professional commitments and who betrayed the trust of both patients and peers. Weak administrative systems in the NHS failed to compensate for the defects of the collegium in controlling these individuals. The scandals both provoked and legitimised erosion of the profession's self-regulatory power. Though its vulnerability to bad apples had been present since the founding of the 19th century profession, it was the convergence of social and political conditions at a particular historical moment that transformed the scandals into an unstoppable imperative for reform. Huge public anger, the voice permitted to a coalition of critics, shifts in social attitudes, the opportunity presented for imposing standards for accountability, and the increasing ascendancy of pro-interventionist managerialist and political agendas from the early 1990s onwards were all implicated in the response made to scandals and the shape the reforms took. Scandals need to be understood not as simple determinants of change, but as one performative element in a constellation of socially contingent forces and contexts. The new rebalancing of the "countervailing powers" has dislodged the profession as the senior partner in the regulation of

  20. Comparability: manufacturing, characterization and controls, report of a UK Regenerative Medicine Platform Pluripotent Stem Cell Platform Workshop, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, 14-15 September 2015.

    PubMed

    Williams, David J; Archer, Richard; Archibald, Peter; Bantounas, Ioannis; Baptista, Ricardo; Barker, Roger; Barry, Jacqueline; Bietrix, Florence; Blair, Nicholas; Braybrook, Julian; Campbell, Jonathan; Canham, Maurice; Chandra, Amit; Foldes, Gabor; Gilmanshin, Rudy; Girard, Mathilde; Gorjup, Erwin; Hewitt, Zöe; Hourd, Paul; Hyllner, Johan; Jesson, Helen; Kee, Jasmin; Kerby, Julie; Kotsopoulou, Nina; Kowalski, Stanley; Leidel, Chris; Marshall, Damian; Masi, Louis; McCall, Mark; McCann, Conor; Medcalf, Nicholas; Moore, Harry; Ozawa, Hiroki; Pan, David; Parmar, Malin; Plant, Anne L; Reinwald, Yvonne; Sebastian, Sujith; Stacey, Glyn; Thomas, Robert J; Thomas, Dave; Thurman-Newell, Jamie; Turner, Marc; Vitillio, Loriana; Wall, Ivan; Wilson, Alison; Wolfrum, Jacqueline; Yang, Ying; Zimmerman, Heiko

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a workshop held at Trinity Hall, Cambridge to discuss comparability and includes additional information and references to related information added subsequently to the workshop. Comparability is the need to demonstrate equivalence of product after a process change; a recent publication states that this 'may be difficult for cell-based medicinal products'. Therefore a well-managed change process is required which needs access to good science and regulatory advice and developers are encouraged to seek help early. The workshop shared current thinking and best practice and allowed the definition of key research questions. The intent of this report is to summarize the key issues and the consensus reached on each of these by the expert delegates. PMID:27404768

  1. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:26940413

  2. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:26851100

  3. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27365238

  4. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-06-11

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27288166

  5. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-09-10

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27609956

  6. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27493045

  7. 12. Photo copy of drawing, May 21, 1963. NEW LONDON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photo copy of drawing, May 21, 1963. NEW LONDON LEDGE LIGHT STATION LIGHTING. Drawing no. 03-2730, U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit, Warwick, Rhode Island. - New London Ledge Lighthouse, Long Island Sound, East of main harbor channel, New London, New London County, CT

  8. A comparison of the management of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions by oral medicine practitioners and oral & maxillofacial surgeons in the UK.

    PubMed

    Marley, J J; Linden, G J; Cowan, C G; Lamey, P J; Johnson, N W; Warnakulasuriya, K A; Scully, C

    1998-11-01

    This study describes the results of a survey undertaken to assess the management of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions by oral medicine practitioners and compares their approach with that of oral & maxillofacial surgeons that we have previously described. Significant differences were noted between the two groups in the use of photography to document the lesions and in the use of certain special investigations, which included measurement of serum iron, serum ferritin, serum Vit B12, red cell folate and candidal isolation. The groups also varied in the perceived importance of the age of the patient and anatomical site of the lesion when deciding on the need for further biopsy. There was also significant variation in the use of certain treatment modalities, including excising non-dysplastic and severely dysplastic/carcinoma in-situ lesions and eliminating trauma when treating mild/moderately dysplastic and severely dysplastic/carcinoma in-situ lesions. Significant differences in the frequency and duration of follow-up were noted for non-dysplastic lesions. Finally, the two groups differed significantly when asked to rank the perceived importance of certain factors (the histopathology of the most recent biopsy and the anatomical site of the lesion) when deciding the need to follow-up. Possible reasons for the variation are discussed. PMID:9831962

  9. An RAS Specialist Meeting, London, 14 October 2005: "Science from La Palma - Looking Beyond 2009"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, D.; Evans, C.; Drew, J.

    2005-12-01

    In 2009 the international agreement setting up the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma will have been in existence for a period of 30 years. In 2007 the United Kingdom will have to make a decision on whether or not to withdraw from that agreement and PPARC, through its ownership of the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, has the responsibility of deciding on the UK's involvement in the observatory beyond 2009. As part of the decision making process, and in support of the UK's overall strategic re-evaluation in astronomy, the ING was reviewed during 2005. It was therefore thought timely to assess recent scientific achievements from the Roque de los Muchachos, and to consider what role the observatory might have beyond 2009. Under the auspices of the Royal Astronomical Society a Specialist Meeting was held in Burlington House, Piccadilly, London on October 14th 2005 and was attended by approximately 100 astronomers from around the UK.

  10. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Carslaw, David C; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D; Karl, Thomas G

    2016-07-18

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over London. The highest fluxes were observed over central London, with lower fluxes measured in suburban areas. A footprint model was used to estimate the spatial area from which the measured emissions occurred. This allowed comparison of the flux measurements to the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for NOx, with scaling factors used to account for the actual time of day, day of week and month of year of the measurement. The comparison suggests significant underestimation of NOx emissions in London by the NAEI, mainly due to its under-representation of real world road traffic emissions. A comparison was also carried out with an enhanced version of the inventory using real world driving emission factors and road measurement data taken from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI). The measurement to inventory agreement was substantially improved using the enhanced version, showing the importance of fully accounting for road traffic, which is the dominant NOx emission source in London. In central London there was still an underestimation by the inventory of 30-40% compared with flux measurements, suggesting significant improvements are still required in the NOx emissions inventory. PMID:27098421

  11. Malaria in Birmingham and a London teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J; Eykyn, S J; Watkins, P; Bell, M; Geddes, A M

    1979-01-01

    During the past five years the incidence of imported malaria increased among patients seen in East Birmingham Hospital and in St Thomas's Hospital, London. Plasmodium vivax was the predominant species in Birmingham, and was almost always acquired by Asian immigrants visiting the Indian subcontinent. In St Thomas's P falciparum was most commonly imported, usually by African immigrants visiting Nigeria and Ghana. Two patients (one Irish, one Japanese) died of falciparum malaria after visiting tropical Africa. In both hospitals the immigrant patients had seldom taken prophylactic drugs, and the few who had, ceased to do so on arrival in the UK and sometimes before leaving the malarious country. Apparently immigrants who visit their homeland do not consult their general practitioners before travelling, are given inappropriate advice, or do not take appropriate advice when given. Since the incidence of imported falciparum malaria in the UK is rising, the following points should be considered: the infection may be lethal, particularly in patients lacking immunity; it can mimic other diseases, which may lead to delayed diagnosis; severe disease may be associated with few parasites on a blood film, and even if the result is negative further tests should be performed; clinicians and hospital pharmacists should be aware of the need to keep permanent stocks of parenteral chloroquine and quinine preparations. PMID:367507

  12. Geological Society of London Issues Statement on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerhayes, Colin

    2011-02-01

    On 1 November the Geological Society of London (GSL) published a statement (http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/gsl/site//GSL//lang/en/climatechange) about the geological evidence relating to past climates, atmospheric carbon levels, and their interrelationships. The online version also carries a list of recommendations for further reading. The GSL's Geoscientist magazine (http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/gsl/site/GSL/lang/en/page8578.html) reported Bryan Lovell, GSL president, as saying, “Climate change is a defining issue of our time, whose full understanding needs geology's long perspective. Earth scientists can read…the geological record of changes in climate that occurred long before we were around to light so much as a camp fire, let alone burn coal, gas and oil. A dramatic global warming event 55 million years ago gives us a particularly clear indication of what happens when there is a sudden release of 1500 billion tonnes of carbon into Earth's atmosphere. It gets hot, the seas become more acid, and there is widespread extinction of life. We are a third of the way to repeating that ancient natural input of carbon through our own agency. The message from the rocks is that it would be a good idea to stop pulling that carbon trigger.”

  13. Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM) (7th, London, United Kingdom, July 4-7, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamper, John, Ed.; Pardos, Zachary, Ed.; Mavrikis, Manolis, Ed.; McLaren, Bruce M., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The 7th International Conference on Education Data Mining held on July 4th-7th, 2014, at the Institute of Education, London, UK is the leading international forum for high-quality research that mines large data sets in order to answer educational research questions that shed light on the learning process. These data sets may come from the traces…

  14. Fritz London's Legacy at Duke University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Horst

    2006-03-01

    When 3He became available in small quantities after WWII Fritz London, Professor at Duke University since 1939, became very interested in its properties in the liquid and solid phases, as contrasted with those of 4He. His influence and that of his colleague Walter Gordy led to the appointment of William Fairbank in 1952, who was able to verify experimentally the prediction on the Fermi degeneracy of liquid 3He below 1K, a few weeks before London's death in 1954. With his students and associates, Fairbank carried out a number of important experiments which became classics, several of which will be described. At Duke he also started planning other experiments inspired by London's predictions. After W. Fairbank's departure for Stanford in 1959, further research on liquid and solid 3He and 3He-4He mixtures was carried out by his successors at Duke University and some of the results in the sixties will be briefly described.

  15. Experiences of non-UK-qualified doctors working within the UK regulatory framework: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Slowther, A; Lewando Hundt, GA; Purkis, J; Taylor, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the experience of non-UK-qualified doctors in working within the regulatory framework of the General Medical Council (GMC) document Good Medical Practice. Design Individual interviews and focus groups. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Non-UK-qualified doctors who had registered with the GMC between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2008, doctors attending training/induction programmes for non-UK-qualified doctors, and key informants involved in training and support for non-UK-qualified doctors. Main outcome measures Themes identified from analysis of interview and focus group transcripts. Results Information and support for non-UK qualified doctors who apply to register to work in the UK has little reference to the ethical and professional standards required of doctors working in the UK. Recognition of the ethical, legal and cultural context of UK healthcare occurs once doctors are working in practice. Non-UK qualified doctors reported clear differences in the ethical and legal framework for practising medicine between the UK and their country of qualification, particularly in the model of the doctor–patient relationship. The degree of support for non-UK-qualified doctors in dealing with ethical concerns is related to the type of post they work in. European doctors describe similar difficulties with working in an unfamiliar regulatory framework to their non-European colleagues. Conclusions Non-UK-qualified doctors experience a number of difficulties related to practising within a different ethical and professional regulatory framework. Provision of information and educational resources before registration, together with in-practice support would help to develop a more effective understanding of GMP and its implications for practice in the UK. PMID:22408082

  16. Environmental health impacts: occurrence, exposure and significance, Lancaster University, UK, 9-10 September 2003.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francis L; Semple, Kirk T

    2004-09-01

    Speakers: John Ashby (Syngenta CTL, UK), Peter A. Behnisch (Eurofins GfA, Germany), Paul L. Carmichael (Unilever Colworth, UK), Curtis C.Harris (National Cancer Institute, USA), Kevin C. Jones (Lancaster University, UK), Andreas Kortenkamp (School of Pharmacy, London, UK), Caroline J. Langdon (Reading University, UK), Anthony M. Lynch (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), Francis L. Martin (Lancaster University, UK), Trevor J. McMillan (Lancaster University, UK), David H. Phillips (Institute of Cancer Research, UK), Huw J. Ricketts (University of Cardiff, UK), Michael N. Routledge (University of Leeds, UK), J. Thomas Sanderson (Utrecht University, The Netherlands) and Kirk T. Semple (Lancaster University, UK) The effects of many environmental exposures to either single contaminants or to mixtures still remain to be properly assessed in ecotoxicological and human toxicological settings. Such assessments need to be carried out using relevant biological assays. On a mechanistic basis, future studies need to be able to extrapolate exposure to disease risk. It is envisaged that such an approach would lead to the development of appropriate strategies to either reduce exposures or to initiate preventative measures in susceptible individuals or populations. To mark the opening of a new Institute, the Lancaster Environmental Centre, an environmental health workshop was held over 2 days (9-10 September 2003) at Lancaster University, UK. The fate, behaviour and movement of chemicals in the environment, together with environmental exposures and human health, biomarkers of such exposures, hormone-like compounds and appropriate genetic toxicology methodologies, were discussed. PMID:15388817

  17. Heavens Open Up for UK Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-07-01

    A significant milestone for British and European science occurred today (July 8, 2002) when the Council of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) met in London. At this historical meeting, the United Kingdom was formally welcomed into ESO by the nine other member states. The UK, one of the leading nations in astronomical research, now joins one of the world's major astronomical organisations. UK astronomers will now be able to use the four 8.2-metre and several 1.8-metre telescopes that comprise the Very Large Telescope (VLT) facility located at the Paranal Observatory in the northern part of the Atacama desert in Chile, as well as two 4-m class telescopes and several smaller ones at the ESO La Silla Observatory further south. The UK will also benefit from increased involvement in the design and construction of the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA), a network of 64 twelve-metre telescopes also sited in Chile, and play a defining role in ESO's 100-metre Overwhelmingly Large Telescope (OWL). Sir Martin Rees , The Astronomer Royal, said, "Joining ESO is good for UK science, and I think good for Europe as well. It offers us access to the VLT's 8-m class telescopes and restores the UK's full competitiveness in optical astronomy. We're now guaranteed full involvement in ALMA and in the next generation of giant optical instruments - projects that will be at the forefront of the research in the next decade and beyond. Moreover, our commitment to ESO should enhance its chances of forging ahead of the US in these technically challenging and high profile scientific projects. UK membership of ESO is a significant and welcome outcome of this government's increasing investment in science". Prof. Ian Halliday , Chief Executive of the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), the UK's strategic science investment agency said, "The United Kingdom already participates in Europe's flagship particle physics research and the space science research programmes through

  18. Suicide on the London Underground System.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R; O'Donnell, I; Tranah, T

    1991-09-01

    Over the past 50 years there has been an increase in the numbers of people jumping/falling in front of trains on the London Underground system. Case-fatality rates have fallen from 70% in the 1950s to 55% today. The proportion certified as suicide has fallen while the proportions certified as accidents or open verdicts have risen. There is unusual clustering of events at some stations which are adjacent to psychiatric units. The hypothesis that ease of access to London Underground stations may sometimes be a determinant of suicide is investigated. PMID:1955255

  19. Two Years on: Koha 3.0 in Use at the CAMLIS Library, Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissels, Gerhard; Chandler, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the further development of the Koha 3.0 library management system (LMS) and the involvement of external software consultants at the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Library and Information Service (CAMLIS), Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes the…

  20. Implementation of an Open Source Library Management System: Experiences with Koha 3.0 at the Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissels, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the selection process and criteria that led to the implementation of the Koha 3.0 library management system (LMS) at the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Library and Information Service (CAMLIS), Royal London Homoeopathic Hospital. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a report based on…

  1. How To: Preparing to Find a Job as a Spanish Teacher in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talero, Gemma Carmen Belmonte

    2016-01-01

    This case study is about the design of the one-day course "How to find a job as a Spanish teacher in the UK," which is taught at the Instituto Cervantes in London. The course came to exist due to a large number of requests from Spaniards who have come to the UK in recent years--many of them wanting to find a job as a Spanish teacher--and…

  2. Knives and Other Weapons in London Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, S. R. St. J.

    2005-01-01

    London schools operate in an area where crime rates, including violent crime, is statistically more frequent than the average for the whole of England and Wales (Moore and Yeo 2004). Violent crime in the capital increased (though not to a statistically significant extent) between 2002/3 and 2003/4 (Moore and Yeo 2004b). This has led to a…

  3. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  4. Stage Voice Training in the London Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lucille S.

    This report is the result of a six-week study in which the voice training offerings at four schools of drama in London were examined using interviews of teachers and directors, observation of voice classes, and attendance at studio presentations and public performances. The report covers such topics as: textbooks and references being used; courses…

  5. The Compact Route from Boston to London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Brian

    1988-01-01

    The author describes the development and implementation of a business/secondary school compact in East London, based on the original Boston Compact. This cooperative relationship helps disadvantaged students attain employability skills and work experience, while employers gain a trained labor force for their entry-level jobs. (CH)

  6. Jack London and the San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    After it was over, it seemed to many, and especially to eyewitnesses like Jack London, that the earthquake and fire had devastated San Francisco. However people were confident that, like the phoeniz, San Francisco would rise from the ashes and regain her palce as the "Imperial City of the West." 

  7. Preventing suicide on the London Underground.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R V; Poyner, B

    1994-02-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the possibility of preventing suicide on the London Underground. Four groups of potentially valuable measures were identified with the objectives of: (i) reducing public access to the tracks; (ii) improving surveillance by station staff; (iii) facilitating emergency stops; and (iv) reducing injury. These strategies are discussed. PMID:8153749

  8. Ensuring equine biosecurity at London 2012.

    PubMed

    Slater, Josh

    2013-02-01

    The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Equestrian Games were the highest profile event in the 2012 equestrian calendar and were the culmination of four years of detailed and meticulous biosecurity planning to ensure that all horses arrived, competed and returned home safely and in good health. Josh Slater, Anthony Greenleaves and Andy Paterson describe how this was achieved. PMID:23378308

  9. Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conferences

    SciTech Connect

    Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2013-11-25

    The 6th Pathways, Networks and Systems Medicine Conference was held at the Minoa Palace Conference Center, Chania, Crete, Greece (16-21 June 2008). The Organizing Committee was composed of Joe Nadeau (CWRU, Cleveland), Rudi Balling (German Research Centre, Brauschweig), David Galas (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Lee Hood (Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle), Diane Isonaka (Seattle), Fotis Kafatos (Imperial College, London), John Lambris (Univ. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia),Harris Lewin (Univ. of Indiana, Urbana-Champaign), Edison Liu (Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore), and Shankar Subramaniam (Univ. California, San Diego). A total of 101 individuals from 21 countries participated in the conference: USA (48), Canada (5), France (5), Austria (4), Germany (3), Italy (3), UK (3), Greece (2), New Zealand (2), Singapore (2), Argentina (1), Australia (1), Cuba (1), Denmark (1), Japan (1), Mexico (1), Netherlands (1), Spain (1), Sweden (1), Switzerland (1). With respect to speakers, 29 were established faculty members and 13 were graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. With respect to gender representation, among speakers, 13 were female and 28 were male, and among all participants 43 were female and 58 were male. Program these included the following topics: Cancer Pathways and Networks (Day 1), Metabolic Disease Networks (Day 2), Day 3 ? Organs, Pathways and Stem Cells (Day 3), and Day 4 ? Inflammation, Immunity, Microbes and the Environment (Day 4). Proceedings of the Conference were not published.

  10. 114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. 33 CFR 110.52 - Thames River, New London, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thames River, New London, Conn... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.52 Thames River, New London, Conn. (a) Area No... Academy, New London, Connecticut....

  14. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  15. Recognising and Developing Urban Teachers: Chartered London Teacher Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubb, Sara; Porritt, Vivienne

    2008-01-01

    Chartered London Teacher (CLT) status is a unique scheme designed by London Challenge to recognise and reward teachers' achievements and provide a framework for professional development. As well as having the prestige of being a Chartered London Teacher for life, educators receive a one-time payment of 1,000 British pounds from the school budget…

  16. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  17. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  18. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  19. 33 CFR 110.52 - Thames River, New London, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thames River, New London, Conn... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.52 Thames River, New London, Conn. (a) Area No... Academy, New London, Connecticut....

  20. 33 CFR 110.52 - Thames River, New London, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thames River, New London, Conn... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.52 Thames River, New London, Conn. (a) Area No... Academy, New London, Connecticut....

  1. 32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. OCTOBER 3, 1932. COMPLETION OF ERECTION OF STEELWORK FOR ELEVATOR. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  2. 30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 2 JUNE 1930. SUBMARINE TRAINING TANK - STEELWORK 98% COMPLETE; BRICKWORK 95% COMPLETE, PIPING 10% IN PLACE. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  3. A Review of Recent Developments in the Role of the SENCo in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    In this discussion paper, Suzanne Mackenzie, senior lecturer with responsibility for the special educational needs BA and MA programmes at the University of East London, reviews previous research in order to identify changes in the role of the special educational needs co-ordinator (SENCo) in schools in the UK. She provides an overview of the…

  4. Supporting a UK Success Story: The Impact of University Research and Sport Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2012

    2012-01-01

    As part of an Olympic and Paralympic themed Universities Week this new report highlights just some of the many ways in which research will help Team Great Britain achieve exceptional results. While most attention will be on the results achieved in London this summer, it is inspiring to look at the research taking place in UK universities that will…

  5. Sir James Edward Smith (1759-1828) MD FRS, botanist, co-founder of the Linnean Society of London.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2009-05-01

    James Edward Smith's interest in botany led him to enter medicine at Edinburgh in 1781. Smith was continuing his medical studies in London when Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820) suggested to him that he should purchase the collection of the famous Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus that had just been offered to Banks. Smith bought the Linnean Collection and Library in 1784. In 1786 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Leiden. In 1788 Smith, with two associates, founded the Linnean Society of London and became President for life. Smith turned from medicine to natural history as a lecturer and writer. During his lifetime he produced numerous botanical works of high value, including The English Flora (1824-28), and he did much to popularize botany. PMID:19401517

  6. The role of one large greenspace in mitigating London's nocturnal urban heat island.

    PubMed

    Doick, Kieron J; Peace, Andrew; Hutchings, Tony R

    2014-09-15

    The term urban heat island (UHI) describes a phenomenon where cities are on average warmer than the surrounding rural area. Trees and greenspaces are recognised for their strong potential to regulate urban air temperatures and combat the UHI. Empirical data is required in the UK to inform predictions on cooling by urban greenspaces and guide planning to maximise cooling of urban populations. We describe a 5-month study to measure the temperature profile of one of central London's large greenspaces and also in an adjacent street to determine the extent to which the greenspace reduced night-time UHI intensity. Statistical modelling displayed an exponential decay in the extent of cooling with increased distance from the greenspace. The extent of cooling ranged from an estimated 20 m on some nights to 440 m on other nights. The mean temperature reduction over these distances was 1.1 °C in the summer months, with a maximum of 4 °C cooling observed on some nights. Results suggest that calculation of London's UHI using Met Stations close to urban greenspace can underestimate 'urban' heat island intensity due to the cooling effect of the greenspace and values could be in the region of 45% higher. Our results lend support to claims that urban greenspace is an important component of UHI mitigation strategies. Lack of certainty over the variables that govern the extent of the greenspace cooling influence indicates that the multifaceted roles of trees and greenspaces in the UK's urban environment merit further consideration. PMID:24995636

  7. An outbreak of illness among schoolchildren in London: toxic poisoning not mass hysteria.

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, J C; Ellam, G A; Murray, V; Pike, G

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To determine the cause of an outbreak of acute gastrointestinal illness that occurred shortly after lunch in children attending a school in London, UK. DESIGN--A questionnaire survey of children at the affected school was carried out on the day after the incident. Microbiological, environmental, and toxicological investigations were also undertaken. SETTING--A school in London, UK. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 374/468 (80%) of the children who had eaten lunch at the school on the day of the incident completed a questionnaire. MAIN RESULTS--There was a significant association between illness and the consumption of raw cucumber (relative risk = 6.1; 95% confidence interval 2.2, 16). Microbiological investigation of the foods served at lunch did not show any pathogens and toxicological investigations suggested that the cucumbers were contaminated by a pesticide. CONCLUSIONS--Although the outbreak displayed several typical features of mass psychogenic illness, the most probable cause was a toxic chemical present in cucumber served at lunch. Those responsible for investigating outbreaks of illness should be aware of the possible toxicological causes and the appropriate modes of investigation. They should be wary of too readily attributing a psychogenic cause to unusual outbreaks of acute illness in schoolchildren. PMID:8138768

  8. Physical Activity in Deprived Communities in London: Examining Individual and Neighbourhood-Level Factors

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Paul; Phillips, Gemma; Petticrew, Mark; Hayes, Richard; Bottomley, Christian; Yu, Ge; Schmidt, Elena; Tobi, Patrick; Moore, Derek; Frostick, Caroline; Lock, Karen; Renton, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The objectives of this study were to examine relationships between neighbourhood-level and individual-level characteristics and physical activity in deprived London neighbourhoods. Methods In 40 of the most deprived neighbourhoods in London (ranked in top 11% in London by Index of Multiple Deprivation) a cross-sectional survey (n = 4107 adults aged > = 16 years), neighbourhood audit tool, GIS measures and routine data measured neighbourhood and individual-level characteristics. The binary outcome was meeting the minimum recommended (CMO, UK) 5×30 mins moderate physical activity per week. Multilevel modelling was used to examine associations between physical activity and individual and neighbourhood-level characteristics. Results Respondents living more than 300 m away from accessible greenspace had lower odds of achieving recommended physical activity levels than those who lived within 300 m; from 301–600 m (OR = 0.7; 95% CI 0.5–0.9) and from 601–900 m (OR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4–0.8). There was substantial residual between-neighbourhood variance in physical activity (median odds ratio = 1.7). Other objectively measured neighbourhood-level characteristics were not associated with physical activity levels. Conclusions Distance to nearest greenspace is associated with meeting recommended physical activity levels in deprived London neighbourhoods. Despite residual variance in physical activity levels between neighbourhoods, we found little evidence for the influence of other measured neighbourhood-level characteristics. PMID:23922717

  9. Listening to those on the frontline: service users’ experiences of London tuberculosis services

    PubMed Central

    Boudioni, Markella; McLaren, Susan; Belling, Ruth; Woods, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To explore tuberculosis (TB) service users’ experiences and satisfaction with care provision. Background: Thirty-nine percent of all new UK TB cases occur in London. Prevalence varies considerably between and within boroughs. Overall, research suggests inadequate control of London’s TB transmission; TB has become a health care priority for all London Primary Care Trusts. Service users’ experiences and satisfaction with care provision have not been explored adequately previously. Methods: A qualitative research design, using semi-structured face-to-face interviews was used. Ten service users, purposively selected in key risk groups across London, were interviewed. All interviews were digitally recorded with users’ permission, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Results: Participants were treated in local hospitals for 6–12 months. Treatment was administered by TB nurses to inpatients and outpatients receiving directly observed therapy in consultation with medical staff and home visits for complex cases. Two participants did not realize the importance of compliance. Overall, they were satisfied with many TB services’ aspects, communication, and service organization. Early access, low suspicion index amongst some GPs, and restricted referral routes were identified as service barriers. Other improvement areas were information provision on drug side effects, diet, nutritional status, and a few health professionals’ attitudes. The effects on people varied enormously from minimal impact to psychological shock; TB also affected social and personal aspects of their life. With regard to further support facilities, some positive views on managed accommodation by TB-aware professionals for those with accommodation problems were identified. Conclusion: This first in-depth study of TB service users’ experiences across London offers valuable insights into service users’ experiences, providing information and recommendations for a strategic

  10. Gonorrhoea in inner London: results of a cross sectional study.

    PubMed Central

    Low, N.; Daker-White, G.; Barlow, D.; Pozniak, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate population based incidence rates of gonorrhoea in an inner London area and examine relations with age, ethnic group, and socioeconomic deprivation. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. SETTING: 11 departments of genitourinary medicine in south and central London. SUBJECTS: 1978 first episodes of gonorrhoea diagnosed in 1994 and 1995 in residents of 73 electoral wards in the boroughs of Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham who attended any of the departments of genitourinary medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Yearly age, sex, and ethnic group specific rates of gonorrhoea per 100,000 population aged 15-59 years; rate ratios for the effects of age and ethnic group on gonorrhoea rates in women and men before and after adjustment for confounding factors. RESULTS: Overall incidence rates of gonorrhoea in residents of Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham were 138.3 cases yearly per 100,000 women and 291.9 cases yearly per 100,000 men aged 15-59 years. At all ages gonorrhoea rates were higher in non-white minority ethnic groups. Rate ratios for the effect of age adjusted for ethnic group and underprivilege were 15.2 (95% confidence interval 11.6 to 19.7) for women and 2.0 (1.7 to 2.5) for men aged 15-19 years compared with those over 30. After deprivation score and age were taken into account, women from black minority groups were 10.5 (8.6 to 12.8) times as likely and men 11.0 (9.7 to 12.6) times as likely as white people to experience gonorrhoea. CONCLUSIONS: Gonorrhoea rates in Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham in 1994-5 were six to seven times higher than for England and Wales one year earlier. The presentation of national trends thus hides the disproportionate contribution of ongoing endemic transmission in the study area. Teenage women and young adult men, particularly those from black minority ethnic groups, are the most heavily affected, even when socioeconomic underprivilege is taken into account. There is urgent need for resources for culturally

  11. Presence of Legionella in London's water supplies.

    PubMed

    Colbourne, J S; Trew, R M

    1986-09-01

    Legionella occurs frequently (52 to 54%) in domestic water and cooling water inside commercial, industrial and health care buildings, and these types of water systems are now regarded as a normal habitat for Legionella. The factors that predispose a particular water system to colonization by these organisms are ill-defined, although it is fairly certain that biological and physicochemical environmental factors play an important role in allowing Legionella to multiply in the circulating water. It has been postulated that the organism may gain access to water systems inside buildings by one of three routes: contact with air through open points such as uncovered storage tanks or vents, ingress of soil or surface water during construction or repair, or intermittent seeding with organisms present in low numbers in the public water supply. Three studies in the USA have found Legionella in 0.4 to 8.8% of drinking-water samples, but these were not representative of the public supply network as a whole. The aim of this study was to determine, over a period of 1 year, the frequency of Legionella in London's drinking water--from the treatment plant through to the consumer's tap. To date, Legionella has not been isolated from raw river water entering London's treatment works or from treated water entering the distribution network. Sixty-two monitoring taps in buildings located in 21 supply areas have been sampled twice for Legionella; only 2 (2.4%) have proved positive during the autumn and winter of 1985/86. The strain found was L. pneumophila serotype 1, subgroup Olda, and the numbers ranged from 10(2) to 10(4)/l. Although the survey is incomplete, it is already clear that the public water supplies in London are not a source of strains of Legionella associated with disease. PMID:3793445

  12. UK malaria treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Chiodini, Peter L; Whitty, Christopher J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Hill, David R; Warrell, David A; Bannister, Barbara A

    2007-02-01

    ); quinine is highly effective but poorly tolerated in prolonged dosage and is always supplemented by additional treatment, usually with oral doxycycline. ALL patients treated for P. falciparum malaria should be admitted to hospital for at least 24 h, since patients can deteriorate suddenly, especially early in the course of treatment. Severe falciparum malaria, or infections complicated by a relatively high parasite count (more than 2% of red blood cells parasitized), should be treated with intravenous therapy until the patient is well enough to continue with oral treatment. In the UK, the treatment of choice for severe or complicated malaria is currently an infusion of intravenous quinine. This may exacerbate hypoglycaemia that can occur in malaria; patients treated with intravenous quinine therefore require careful monitoring. Intravenous artesunate reduces high parasite loads more rapidly than quinine and is more effective in treating severe malaria in selected situations. It can also be used in patients with contra-indications to quinine. Intravenous artesunate is unlicensed in the EU. Assistance in obtaining artesunate may be sought from specialist tropical medicine centres, on consultation, for named patients. Patients with severe or complicated malaria should be managed in a high dependency or intensive care environment. They may require haemodynamic support and management of acute respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal impairment/failure, seizures, and severe intercurrent infections including gram-negative bacteraemia/septicaemia. Falciparum malaria in pregnancy is more likely to be severe and complicated: the placenta contains high levels of parasites. Stillbirth or early delivery may occur and diagnosis can be difficult if parasites are concentrated in the placenta and scanty in the blood. The treatment of choice for falciparum malaria in pregnancy is quinine; doxycycline is contraindicated in pregnancy but clindamycin can be

  13. Healthcare Planning for the Olympics in London: A Qualitative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Black, Georgia; Kononovas, Kostas; Taylor, Jayne; Raine, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass gatherings, such as the Olympic and Paralympic Games, represent an enormous logistical challenge for the host city. Health service planners must deliver routine and emergency services and, in recent Games, health legacy initiatives, for the local and visiting population. However there is little evidence to support their planning decisions. We therefore evaluated the strategic health planning programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games to identify generalisable information for future Games. Methods We thematically analysed data from stakeholder interviews and documents. The data were prospectively collected in three phases, before, during and after the Games. Findings We identified five key themes: (1) Systemic Improvement for example in communications, (2) Effective relationships led to efficiencies and permanent gains, such as new relationships with the private sector (3) Difficult relationships led to inefficiencies, for instance, duplication in testing and exercising emergency scenarios, (4) Tendency to over-estimate demand for care, particularly emergency medicine, and (5) Difficulties establishing a health legacy due to its deprioritisation and lack of vision by the programme team. Interpretation Enduring improvements which are sustained after the Games are possible, such as the establishment of new and productive partnerships. Relationships must be established early on to avoid duplication, delay and unnecessary expense. There should be greater critical evaluation of the likely demand for health services to reduce the wasting of resources. Finally, if a health legacy is planned, then clear definitions and commitment to its measurement is essential. PMID:24647613

  14. UK Secondary Schools under Surveillance: What Are the Implications for Race? A Critical Race and Butlerian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadderton, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Since September 11th 2001, and the London bombings of July 2005, the "war on terror" has led to the subjection of populations to new regimes of control and reinforced state sovereignty. This involves, in countries such as the UK and the US, the limiting of personal freedoms, increased regulation of immigration and constant surveillance, as a…

  15. Is preparedness for CBRN incidents important to general practitioners in East London?

    PubMed

    Dabrera, Gavin; Anyaegbu, Emmanuel; Addiman, Sarah; Keeling, David; Ashton, Charlotte; Whala, Shakeel; Dunne, Adrienne; Figueroa, Jose; Lovitt, Chris; Basnett, Ian; Balasegaram, Sooria

    2012-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) have an important role in public health response to CBRN incidents, including disseminating information to worried patients and undertaking risk assessments of patients. The authors undertook the first known UK survey of GPs' CBRN preparedness to assess knowledge and attitudes towards CBRN preparedness among GPs in East London, in the area of the Olympic Park. A questionnaire was developed, focusing on GPs' self-preparedness for, and perceived roles in CBRN incidents, and GPs' access to resources and policies for dealing with such incidents. Of 157 GPs, 56 responded, although some responded collectively for their practice. The majority of respondents recognised roles for themselves in CBRN incidents, including recognition of illness, supporting decontamination, and appropriate reporting. However, 79 per cent of GPs also felt unprepared for such incidents. The most popular topic for training to address this was clinical presentation of CBRN exposures. Most practices had no policy for dealing with suspect packages and white powder incidents. Since this survey, guidance and training has been made available to local GPs. As the UK will host more events like the 2012 Olympics, preparedness for GPs will continue to be an important consideration in the UK. PMID:22948105

  16. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE NEW LONDON HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around navy harbor facilities located on the Thames River near New London, Connecticut. These facilities include the New London Submarine Base at Groton, the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Sound ...

  17. Alternative Spaces of Learning in East London: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneddon, Raymonde; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article emerges from an ongoing exploration into how British minority ethnic communities in the London area create spaces in community-based programs to maintain or develop their languages and literacies. In London, more than one-third of the 850,000 school children speak a language other than English at home (Baker & Eversley, 2000). This…

  18. Education in a Global City: Essays from London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brighouse, Tim, Ed.; Fullick, Leisha, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This collection of essays by academic and policy experts brings together a wide range of data to offer a clear picture of London's changing education scene. Its mapping of new and developing strategies for successful urban education will be useful to educators and policymakers not only in London but also in other cities operating in similar…

  19. Changing the Subject: English in London, 1945-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yandell, John

    2014-01-01

    Two recent books, "English Teachers in a Postwar Democracy: Emerging Choice in London Schools, 1945-1965" and "The London Association for the Teaching of English, 1947-67: A History," explore an important period in the development of English as a school subject and in the remaking of the professional identity of English…

  20. Practicing Reflexivity in the Study of Italian Migrants in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seganti, Francesca Romana

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the centrality of reflexivity in qualitative research through examples from my study on the role new media play in the lives of Italians in London. My hypothesis was that Italians were "in transit" in London and they were using new media to build "temporary" communities. I conducted in-depth interviews with members of the…

  1. London in Space and Time: Peter Ackroyd and Will Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the treatment of London by two authors who are profoundly influenced by the concept of the power of place and the nature of urban space. The works of Peter Ackroyd, whose writings embody, according to Onega (1997, p. 208) "[a] yearning for mythical closure" where London is "a mystic centre of…

  2. Spatial and temporal associations of road traffic noise and air pollution in London: Implications for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Fecht, Daniela; Hansell, Anna L; Morley, David; Dajnak, David; Vienneau, Danielle; Beevers, Sean; Toledano, Mireille B; Kelly, Frank J; Anderson, H Ross; Gulliver, John

    2016-03-01

    Road traffic gives rise to noise and air pollution exposures, both of which are associated with adverse health effects especially for cardiovascular disease, but mechanisms may differ. Understanding the variability in correlations between these pollutants is essential to understand better their separate and joint effects on human health. We explored associations between modelled noise and air pollutants using different spatial units and area characteristics in London in 2003-2010. We modelled annual average exposures to road traffic noise (LAeq,24h, Lden, LAeq,16h, Lnight) for ~190,000 postcode centroids in London using the UK Calculation of Road Traffic Noise (CRTN) method. We used a dispersion model (KCLurban) to model nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, ozone, total and the traffic-only component of particulate matter ≤2.5μm and ≤10μm. We analysed noise and air pollution correlations at the postcode level (~50 people), postcodes stratified by London Boroughs (~240,000 people), neighbourhoods (Lower layer Super Output Areas) (~1600 people), 1km grid squares, air pollution tertiles, 50m, 100m and 200m in distance from major roads and by deprivation tertiles. Across all London postcodes, we observed overall moderate correlations between modelled noise and air pollution that were stable over time (Spearman's rho range: |0.34-0.55|). Correlations, however, varied considerably depending on the spatial unit: largest ranges were seen in neighbourhoods and 1km grid squares (both Spearman's rho range: |0.01-0.87|) and was less for Boroughs (Spearman's rho range: |0.21-0.78|). There was little difference in correlations between exposure tertiles, distance from road or deprivation tertiles. Associations between noise and air pollution at the relevant geographical unit of analysis need to be carefully considered in any epidemiological analysis, in particular in complex urban areas. Low correlations near roads, however, suggest that independent effects of road noise and

  3. Advances in sports nutrition, exercise and medicine: Olympic issues, the legacy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the run up to the London 2012 Olympics, this editorial introduces the cross-journal article collection Advances in Sports Nutrition, Exercise and Medicine http://www.biomedcentral.com/series/asnem PMID:22812481

  4. Butyltin compounds in a sediment core from the old Tilbury basin, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, M D; Wahlen, R; Catterick, T; Lester, J N

    2005-12-01

    Sections from a sediment core taken from the River Thames were analysed for butyltin species using gas chromatography with species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that in most samples tributyltin concentrations of 20-60 ng/g accounted for <10% of the total butyltin species present, which is in agreement with data from other sediment samples which were historically contaminated with tributyltin. Vertical distribution of the organotin residues with depth throughout the core, with data on organochlorine compounds and heavy metals allowed for the construction of a consistent hypothesis on historical deposition of contaminated sediments. From this it was possible to infer that the concentrations of tributyltin in sediments deposited during the early 1960s were in the order of 400-600 microg/g by using degradation rate constants derived by other workers. Such values fall well within the range quoted for harbour sediments in the literature. PMID:16040058

  5. Evidence 2016--A Health Network Communications Conference (February 24-25, 2016--London, UK).

    PubMed

    Kibble, A

    2016-03-01

    Defining, standardizing and interpreting are the keys to evidence use throughout healthcare and at each point in the care decision process. The generation of evidence at each step is also critical to define and constitute value from the information gathered, and not gathered, for each stakeholder in the care pathway. Health Network Communications' Evidence 2016 conference provided the opportunity for attendees to consider diverse evidence methodologies globally and their wide-ranging use, from economic modeling initiatives, to framing value assessments in health technology assessments, to leveraging real-world data to support market access. PMID:27186596

  6. A dynamic approach to urban road deposited sediment pollution monitoring (Marylebone Road, London, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, C. J.; Fullen, M. A.; Booth, C. A.; Searle, D. E.

    2014-06-01

    The use of mineral magnetic measurements (χLF, χARM and SIRM) as a potential pollution proxy using road deposited sediment (RDS) is explored as an alternative means of monitoring pollution on a busy city road. Comparison of sediment-related analytical data by correlation analysis between mineral magnetic, particle size and geochemical properties is reported. Mineral magnetic concentration parameters (χLF, χARM and SIRM) reveal significant (p < 0.001; n = 61) associations with PM1.0, PM2.5 and PM10. Significant associations were also found with mineral magnetic concentrations (χLF and SIRM) and specific concentrations of the elements Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn (p < 0.001; n = 61). Inter-geochemical correlation analysis found strong associations (p < 0.001; n = 61) between Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn and suggest anthropogenic enrichment influences. Low χFD% measurements imply an influence of multi-domain mineralogy, indicative of anthropogenic combustion processes. SEM micrographs also support this, as all samples contain Fe spherules indicative of vehicular combustion processes. This study advocates rapid and simple initial assessment of urban pollution episodes using mineral magnetic measurements as a dynamic explorative technology.

  7. Cancer Vaccines - SMi's Fourth Annual Conference (September 16-17, 2015 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Searle, B

    2015-09-01

    Recent years have seen the academic, medical and pharmaceutical communities gain a new understanding of the central role of the immune system in fighting cancer. With the approval of the first cancer vaccine by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the success of immuno-oncology, new avenues are opening for the successful development of therapeutic cancer vaccines. Opportunity for combination therapies exploiting immune checkpoint inhibitors is being realized and delivery mechanisms and adjuvants are likewise being optimized. The incorporation of monoclonal antibodies alongside genetically engineered viral vectors is also being pursued. This year's conference focused on the development of personalized therapies and their commercial viability, with in-depth discussions of novel T-cell therapies, oncolytic viruses, gene therapies and adoptive T-cell transfer. The meeting brought together key academic and medical experts with leading industry figures to debate future directions and the next generations of tools in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26488036

  8. Geostrategies of Interlingualism: Language Policy and Practice in the International Maritime Organisation, London, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntee-Atalianis, Lisa J.

    2006-01-01

    Fettes (2004) asserts that "politico-strategies" of languages are no longer viable frameworks for "national and community policy". Rather, he proposes the development of "geostrategies of interlingualism", i.e. linguistic strategies which promote international communication equitably and efficiently, whilst respecting and ensuring language…

  9. Is there a best strategy for drug discovery?--SMR Meeting. 13 March 2003, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Lunec, Anna

    2003-05-01

    This gathering of members from academia and industry allowed the sharing of ideas and techniques or the acceleration of drug discovery, and it was clear that there is a need for a more streamlined approach to discovery and development. Clearly, new technologies will aid in the discovery process, but the abilities of the human brain to analyze and interpret data should not be overlooked, as many discoveries have been made by chance or as the result of a hunch, and it would be a shame if the advent of artificial intelligence quashed that inquisitive aspect of drug discovery. PMID:12841215

  10. Review of the British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting 2014, 3-5 December, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Greening, Neil J; José, Ricardo J; Chalmers, James D; Janes, Samuel M

    2015-03-01

    The British Thoracic Society Winter Meeting 2014 is reviewed in this article. This annual scientific meeting attracted its largest number of delegates ever and over 3 days in December up-to-date respiratory research was presented and current thinking in respiratory science and clinical academia was discussed. This article reviews a number of symposia and selected abstract presentations from the meeting. PMID:25688162

  11. The London low emission zone baseline study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank; Armstrong, Ben; Atkinson, Richard; Anderson, H Ross; Barratt, Ben; Beevers, Sean; Cook, Derek; Green, Dave; Derwent, Dick; Mudway, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul

    2011-11-01

    On February 4, 2008, the world's largest low emission zone (LEZ) was established. At 2644 km2, the zone encompasses most of Greater London. It restricts the entry of the oldest and most polluting diesel vehicles, including heavy-goods vehicles (haulage trucks), buses and coaches, larger vans, and minibuses. It does not apply to cars or motorcycles. The LEZ scheme will introduce increasingly stringent Euro emissions standards over time. The creation of this zone presented a unique opportunity to estimate the effects of a stepwise reduction in vehicle emissions on air quality and health. Before undertaking such an investigation, robust baseline data were gathered on air quality and the oxidative activity and metal content of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution monitors located in Greater London. In addition, methods were developed for using databases of electronic primary-care records in order to evaluate the zone's health effects. Our study began in 2007, using information about the planned restrictions in an agreed-upon LEZ scenario and year-on-year changes in the vehicle fleet in models to predict air pollution concentrations in London for the years 2005, 2008, and 2010. Based on this detailed emissions and air pollution modeling, the areas in London were then identified that were expected to show the greatest changes in air pollution concentrations and population exposures after the implementation of the LEZ. Using these predictions, the best placement of a pollution monitoring network was determined and the feasibility of evaluating the health effects using electronic primary-care records was assessed. To measure baseline pollutant concentrations before the implementation of the LEZ, a comprehensive monitoring network was established close to major roadways and intersections. Output-difference plots from statistical modeling for 2010 indicated seven key areas likely to experience the greatest change in concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (at least 3

  12. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  13. Congressional Science Fellow tackles science policy for U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julie J.

    After an AGU Congressional Science Fellowship in 1997-1998,I decided to pursue science policy further. I spied an ad in the Sunday Washington Post advertising for someone with a science degree, who also had knowledge of the United Kingdom, and science policy experience on Capitol Hill. In addition to my Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles and the Congressional Science Fellowship, I had spent two years in the U.K. as a post-doc at Queen Mary and Westfield College in London.I applied for the job, which was at the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., and was hired. The UK Foreign Office has a tradition of hiring many of its embassy staff locally; they consider knowledge of local politics and issues very use ful for their interests. Now I cover hard science issues, including space and the Internet for Her Majesty's Government.

  14. Promoting SETI in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Alan

    2013-10-01

    MEETING REPORT What does the UK presently do in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence and what are the plans for the future? Alan Penny reports on a meeting of UK academics active in SETI, held as sessions in the recent National Astronomy Meeting in Scotland - and the formation of the UK SETI Research Network to promote UK academic work.

  15. The Dependence on Smokeless Tobacco in the South Asian Communities in East London

    PubMed Central

    Khaja, Amjad Hussain; Zwiad, Abdulsalam Ali; Tarakji, Bassel; Gazal, Giath; Albaba, Feras; KalajI, Nader; Petro, Waleed

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective: The purpose of the study was to understand the dependency on smokeless tobacco. Methods: The major aspect of the interview was to study the type of chewing tobacco used, frequency of purchase of chewing tobacco, change in attitude and behavior after the use of chewing tobacco. This study was done in 2005 in London. Of the 110 respondents interviewed 88 were used for the data analysis. Study Design: An exploratory study was conducted in East London, United Kingdom. The selected sample was interviewed through a questionnaire, based on the Severson Smokeless Tobacco Dependence Scale. Results: Cross tabulations report that in a sample of 88 South Asian UK resident men 46.6% used leaf (paan), 43.2% used processed form of chewing tobacco and 10.2% used gutka. Older age (67%) respondents were more likely than the younger age (30%) respondents to chew tobacco. The frequency of purchase of chewing tobacco is reported high (67.2%) in the older age group than the younger age group (50%). Conclusion: This current study used an amended form of the Severson Smokeless Tobacco Scale questionnaire to study the dependency on smokeless tobacco. The study could be developed in the selection of the sample, which would include both males and females to study the dependency on smokeless tobacco. PMID:26234985

  16. The changing oxidizing environment in London - trends in ozone precursors and their contribution to ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, E.; Vieno, M.; Monks, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-level ozone is recognized to be a threat to human health (WHO, 2003), have a deleterious impact on vegetation (Fowler et al., 2009), is also an important greenhouse gas (IPCC, 2007) and key to the oxidative ability of the atmosphere (Monks et al., 2009). Owing to its harmful effect on health, much policy and mitigation effort has been put into reducing its precursors - the nitrogen oxides (NOx) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs). The non-linear chemistry of tropospheric ozone formation, dependent mainly on NOx and NMVOC concentrations in the atmosphere, makes controlling tropospheric ozone complex. Furthermore, the concentration of ozone at any given point is a complex superimposition of in-situ produced or destroyed ozone and transported ozone on the regional and hemispheric-scale. In order to effectively address ozone, a more detailed understanding of its origins is needed. Here we show that roughly half (5 μg m-3) of the observed increase in urban (London) ozone (10 μg m-3) in the UK from 1998 to 2008 is owing to factors of local origin, in particular, the change in NO : NO2 ratio, NMVOC : NOx balance, NMVOC speciation, and emission reductions (including NOx titration). In areas with previously higher large concentrations of nitrogen oxides, ozone that was previously suppressed by high concentrations of NO has now been "unmasked", as in London and other urban areas of the UK. The remaining half (approximately 5 μg m-3) of the observed ozone increase is attributed to non-local factors such as long-term transport of ozone, changes in background ozone, and meteorological variability. These results show that a two-pronged approach, local action and regional-to-hemispheric cooperation, is needed to reduce ozone and thereby population exposure, which is especially important for urban ozone.

  17. The Centre for History in Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London (LSHTM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the origin of the Centre for History in Public Health and the significance of its location in a leading school of public health. It is in three parts: (1) A brief history of how the AIDS programme became the History Centre; (2) The distinctive approach of the Centre's staff as historians: their contribution and its…

  18. Current Capabilities, Requirements and a Proposed Strategy for Interdependency Analysis in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Robin; Chozos, Nick; Salako, Kizito

    The UK government recently commissioned a research study to identify the state-of-the-art in Critical Infrastructure modelling and analysis, and the government/industry requirements for such tools and services. This study (Cetifs) concluded with a strategy aiming to bridge the gaps between the capabilities and requirements, which would establish interdependency analysis as a commercially viable service in the near future. This paper presents the findings of this study that was carried out by CSR, City University London, Adelard LLP, a safety/security consultancy and Cranfield University, defense academy of the UK.

  19. Teaching the History of Astronomy On Site in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    In the autumn of 2014, the author had the opportunity to teach a class on the history of astronomy in England as part of a study abroad experience for students at Illinois Wesleyan University. The philosophy of the program is to use the rich cultural environment of London as a setting for active learning. In the classroom, students read and discussed selected works by Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Herschel. We visited Stonehenge, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the London Science Museum, the London Monument, and the library of the Royal Astronomical Society. Lessons learned from the experience will be shared.

  20. Lidar Observations of Pollution Transport From London to Rural Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Hugo; Vaughan, Geraint; Wareing, David

    2016-06-01

    The Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) Project took place in and around London, United Kingdom. The aim of the project was to learn how both atmospheric dynamics and chemistry affect air pollution in the south east of England. During the winter and summer of 2012 many different types of instrument including lidars were deployed throughout London city centre, suburbs and into rural areas. Amongst these instruments was the Boundary Layer Aerosol/Ozone Lidar owned by the National Centre for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) in the United Kingdom. Ozone and aerosol data are presented from data collected during July and August 2012 and compared to back trajectories to identify their origins.

  1. Prostitution and risk of HIV: female prostitutes in London.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, H; Day, S; Mezzone, J; Dunlop, L; Donegan, C; Farrar, S; Whitaker, L; Harris, J R; Miller, D L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To measure the prevalence of HIV and to describe established risk factors in female prostitutes. DESIGN--A cross sectional survey. SETTING--A genitourinary medicine clinic, streets, and magistrates' courts in London. SUBJECTS--280 female prostitutes recruited between April 1989 and August 1991. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Infection with HIV-1, reported risk behaviours, and prevalence of sexually transmitted infections. RESULTS--228 of the women had HIV tests, and two (0.9% (95% confidence interval 0% to 2.1%)) were infected with HIV-1. Reported use of condoms was high for commercial clients and low for non-paying partners: 98% (251/255) of women used condoms with all clients and 12% (25/207) with non-paying partners for vaginal intercourse. Twenty two women were current or past injecting drug users. Of the 193 women examined for sexually transmitted infections, 27 had an acute infection (gonorrhoea, chlamydia, trichomonas, or primary genital herpes) at the time of interview. Infection was associated with younger age and increasing numbers of non-paying sexual partners, but not with duration of prostitution, numbers of clients, or reports of condom failures. When age and numbers of non-paying partners were analysed by logistic regression they remained significantly associated with sexually transmitted infections. CONCLUSIONS--A large and diverse sample of prostitutes had a low prevalence of infection with HIV and high levels of use of condoms in commercial sex. There was a significant risk of other sexually transmitted infections associated with prostitutes' non-commercial sexual relationships, in which unprotected sex is common. Interventions to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections in prostitutes should address both commercial and non-commercial sexual partnerships. PMID:8374417

  2. Field study on the choice of friends in two multi-racial pre-schools (South Africa/London).

    PubMed

    Exenberger, Silvia

    2003-06-01

    The present research examined the influence of the two independent variables sex and race on the choice of friends in pre-school children. Data for this investigation were collected in two pre-schools, one situated in Stellenbosch, South Africa, the other in London, U.K. Both schools have in common that they accommodate children of different racial backgrounds (black, white, and coloured children), but the children's experience with desegregated classrooms differ. Friendship was operational defined with thirteen categories, summarized to the basic category pro-social behaviour. Fifty hours of free-play time were taped with one video camera in South Africa, and hundred hours were taped with two video cameras in London. The results showed that sex and race interact in their effect on the choice of friends. In South Africa race is supposed to be a strong indicator for friendship choices, especially for black children, whereas the black children in London choose friends more or less on the basis of sex. PMID:12872548

  3. Air quality and public health impacts of UK airports. Part II: Impacts and policy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Stettler, Marc E. J.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2013-03-01

    The potential adverse human health impacts of emissions from UK airports have become a significant issue of public concern. We produce an inventory of UK airport emissions - including emissions from aircraft landing and takeoff operations, aircraft auxiliary power units (APUs) and ground support equipment (GSE) - with quantified uncertainty. Emissions due to more than 95% of UK passenger enplanements are accounted for. We apply a multi-scale air quality modelling approach to assess the air quality impacts of UK airports. Using a concentration-response function we estimate that 110 (90% CI: 72-160) early deaths occur in the UK each year (based on 2005 data) due to UK airport emissions. We estimate that up to 65% of the health impacts of UK airports could be mitigated by desulphurising jet fuel, electrifying GSE, avoiding use of APUs and use of single engine taxiing. Two plans for the expansion of UK airport capacity are examined - expansion of London Heathrow and new hub airport in the Thames Estuary. Even if capacity is constrained, we find that the health impacts of UK airports still increases by 170% in 2030 due to an increasing and aging population, increasing emissions, and a changing atmosphere. We estimate that if Heathrow were to be expanded as per previous UK Government plans, UK-wide health impacts in 2030 would increase by 4% relative to the 2030 constrained case, but this increase could become a 48% reduction if emissions mitigation measures were employed. We calculate that 24% of UK-wide aviation-attributable early deaths could be avoided in 2030 if Heathrow were replaced by a new airport in Thames Estuary because the location is downwind of London, where this reduction occurs notwithstanding the increase in aircraft emissions. A Thames hub airport would (isolated from knock-on effects at other airports) cause 60-70% fewer early deaths than an expanded Heathrow, or 55-63% fewer early deaths than an unexpanded Heathrow. Finally, replacing Heathrow by a

  4. Volatile organic compound fluxes and concentrations in London (ClearfLo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valach, Amy; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; MacKenzie, Rob; Hewitt, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from anthropogenic sources such as fuel combustion or evaporative emissions can directly and indirectly affect human health. Some VOCs, such as benzene and 1,3- butadiene are carcinogens. These and other VOCs contribute to the formation of ozone (O3) and aerosol particles, which have effects on human health and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Although in the UK VOC emissions are subject to control under European Commission Directive 2008/50/EC and emission reducing technologies have been implemented, urban air pollution remains a concern. Urban air quality is likely to remain a priority since currently >50% of the global population live in urban areas with trends in urbanization and population migration predicted to increase. The ClearfLo project is a large multi-institutional consortium funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and provides integrated measurements of meteorology, gas phase and particulate composition of the atmosphere over London. Both long term and IOP measurements were made at street and elevated locations at a range of sites across London and its surroundings during 2011 and 2012. Mixing ratios of a selection of nine VOCs were measured using a high sensitivity proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) at a ground level urban background (North Kensington) and kerbside (Marylebone Road) site during the winter IOP. VOC fluxes were measured by virtually disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) at an elevated urban site (King's College Strand) in Aug-Dec 2012. Our results for the first IOP showed that most of the selected compound concentrations depended on traffic emissions, although there was a marked difference between the urban background and kerbside sites. We identified some temperature effects on VOC concentrations. We also present the first analyses of VOC flux measurements over London. Preliminary analyses indicate most compounds associated with vehicle emissions closely

  5. A tale of two cities: Comparison of impacts on CO2 emissions, the indoor environment and health of home energy efficiency strategies in London and Milton Keynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrubsole, C.; Das, P.; Milner, J.; Hamilton, I. G.; Spadaro, J. V.; Oikonomou, E.; Davies, M.; Wilkinson, P.

    2015-11-01

    Dwellings are a substantial source of global CO2 emissions. The energy used in homes for heating, cooking and running electrical appliances is responsible for a quarter of current total UK emissions and is a key target of government policies for greenhouse gas abatement. Policymakers need to understand the potential impact that such decarbonization policies have on the indoor environment and health for a full assessment of costs and benefits. We investigated these impacts in two contrasting settings of the UK: London, a predominantly older city and Milton Keynes, a growing new town. We employed SCRIBE, a building physics-based health impact model of the UK housing stock linked to the English Housing Survey, to examine changes, 2010-2050, in end-use energy demand, CO2 emissions, winter indoor temperatures, airborne pollutant concentrations and associated health impacts. For each location we modelled the existing (2010) housing stock and three future scenarios with different levels of energy efficiency interventions combined with either a business-as-usual, or accelerated decarbonization of the electricity grid approach. The potential for CO2 savings was appreciably greater in London than Milton Keynes except when substantial decarbonization of the electricity grid was assumed, largely because of the lower level of current energy efficiency in London and differences in the type and form of the housing stock. The average net impact on health per thousand population was greater in magnitude under all scenarios in London compared to Milton Keynes and more beneficial when it was assumed that purpose-provided ventilation (PPV) would be part of energy efficiency interventions, but more detrimental when interventions were assumed not to include PPV. These findings illustrate the importance of considering ventilation measures for health protection and the potential variation in the impact of home energy efficiency strategies, suggesting the need for tailored policy

  6. Non-European nurses' perceived barriers to UK nurse registration.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; Westwood, Sue

    2016-05-11

    Aim To conduct a scoping project to identify perceived barriers to UK nurse registration as experienced by internationally educated nurses working as healthcare assistants in the UK. Method Eleven internationally educated nurses working as healthcare assistants in two London hospitals attended two facilitated focus groups. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings Study participants articulated frustration with UK English language testing requirements and a sense of injustice and unfairness relating to: double standards for nurses educated within and outside of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA); and what was perceived, by some, as arbitrary English language testing with unnecessarily high standards. Differences among study participants related to issues of competency and accountability regarding English language skills and passing English language skills tests, with many feeling they were playing 'a game' where the rules kept changing. Conclusion Language testing barriers are impeding UK nurse registration for some internationally educated nurses from outside the EU and EEA who, as a result, are working as healthcare assistants. The provision of English language training by employers would improve their prospects of achieving nurse registration. PMID:27206205

  7. London 2012: prescribing for athletes in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, R G H; Thomas, G P L; Potter, M J; Norris, J H

    2012-01-01

    Aims Prescribing for athletes requires an up-to-date knowledge of the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances. As the London 2012 Olympic Games attract athletes from around the world, we review the current guidelines with respect to all medications licensed for ophthalmic use in the United Kingdom. We describe the process that an ophthalmologist can use to check for permissible medications and also highlight treatments that are contraindicated. Methods We systematically reviewed all 77 drugs listed in Section 11 of the British National Formulary (Issue 63) for use in the treatment of ophthalmic conditions, and referenced these against the 2012 Prohibited List published by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Results The majority of ophthalmic preparations are suitable for use in- and out-of-competition. Some preparations, such as glucocorticoids, are prohibited when administered systemically but permitted for topical administration. Beta-blockers are prohibited in-competition and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are prohibited in- and out-of competition. Conclusion The 2012 Prohibited List has important implications for the pharmacological treatment of ophthalmic conditions in athletes. Clinicians prescribing for athletes have a duty to familiarise themselves with the list in order to avoid causing significant damage to their patient's career and reputation. PMID:22744394

  8. 122. Four Blade Semaphore Tower. Groton, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. Four Blade Semaphore Tower. Groton, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.60. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. Infant mortality in London, 1538-1850: a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Razzell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A review of evidence on infant mortality derived from the London bills of mortality and parish registers indicates that there were major registration problems throughout the whole of the parish register period. One way of addressing these problems is to carry out reconstitution studies of individual London parishes, but there are a number of problems with reconstitution methodology, including the traffic in corpses between parishes both inside and outside of London and the negligence of clergymen in registering both baptisms and burials. In this paper the triangulation of sources has been employed to measure the adequacy of burial registration, including the comparison of data from bills of mortality, parish registers and probate returns, as well as the use of the same-name technique. This research indicates that between 20 and 40 per cent of burials went unregistered in London during the parish register period. PMID:22397160

  10. 124. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 132.16. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 123. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 132.16. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. The Well London program - a cluster randomized trial of community engagement for improving health behaviors and mental wellbeing: baseline survey results

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Well London program used community engagement, complemented by changes to the physical and social neighborhood environment, to improve physical activity levels, healthy eating, and mental wellbeing in the most deprived communities in London. The effectiveness of Well London is being evaluated in a pair-matched cluster randomized trial (CRT). The baseline survey data are reported here. Methods The CRT involved 20 matched pairs of intervention and control communities (defined as UK census lower super output areas (LSOAs); ranked in the 11% most deprived LSOAs in London by the English Indices of Multiple Deprivation) across 20 London boroughs. The primary trial outcomes, sociodemographic information, and environmental neighbourhood characteristics were assessed in three quantitative components within the Well London CRT at baseline: a cross-sectional, interviewer-administered adult household survey; a self-completed, school-based adolescent questionnaire; a fieldworker completed neighborhood environmental audit. Baseline data collection occurred in 2008. Physical activity, healthy eating, and mental wellbeing were assessed using standardized, validated questionnaire tools. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data in the outcomes and other variables in the adult and adolescent surveys. Results There were 4,107 adults and 1,214 adolescent respondents in the baseline surveys. The intervention and control areas were broadly comparable with respect to the primary outcomes and key sociodemographic characteristics. The environmental characteristics of the intervention and control neighborhoods were broadly similar. There was greater between-cluster variation in the primary outcomes in the adult population compared to the adolescent population. Levels of healthy eating, smoking, and self-reported anxiety/depression were similar in the Well London adult population and the national Health Survey for England. Levels of physical activity were higher

  13. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  14. Simulating secondary organic aerosol from missing diesel-related intermediate-volatility organic compound emissions during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ots, Riinu; Young, Dominique E.; Vieno, Massimo; Xu, Lu; Dunmore, Rachel E.; Allan, James D.; Coe, Hugh; Williams, Leah R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Ng, Nga L.; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Bergström, Robert; Di Marco, Chiara; Nemitz, Eiko; Mackenzie, Ian A.; Kuenen, Jeroen J. P.; Green, David C.; Reis, Stefan; Heal, Mathew R.

    2016-05-01

    We present high-resolution (5 km × 5 km) atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM) simulations of the impact of newly estimated traffic-related emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation over the UK for 2012. Our simulations include additional diesel-related intermediate-volatility organic compound (IVOC) emissions derived directly from comprehensive field measurements at an urban background site in London during the 2012 Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign. Our IVOC emissions are added proportionally to VOC emissions, as opposed to proportionally to primary organic aerosol (POA) as has been done by previous ACTM studies seeking to simulate the effects of these missing emissions. Modelled concentrations are evaluated against hourly and daily measurements of organic aerosol (OA) components derived from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements also made during the ClearfLo campaign at three sites in the London area. According to the model simulations, diesel-related IVOCs can explain on average ˜ 30 % of the annual SOA in and around London. Furthermore, the 90th percentile of modelled daily SOA concentrations for the whole year is 3.8 µg m-3, constituting a notable addition to total particulate matter. More measurements of these precursors (currently not included in official emissions inventories) is recommended. During the period of concurrent measurements, SOA concentrations at the Detling rural background location east of London were greater than at the central London location. The model shows that this was caused by an intense pollution plume with a strong gradient of imported SOA passing over the rural location. This demonstrates the value of modelling for supporting the interpretation of measurements taken at different sites or for short durations.

  15. Combined Ground and Space-Based Measurements of Air Quality during the London Olympic Games 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, R. R.; Leigh, R. J.; Singh Anand, J.; McNally, M.; Lawrence, J.; Remedios, J.; Monks, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    During July and August 2012 the Summer Olympic Games were held in London. During this period, unusually high levels of traffic and visitors to the city were expected, it is important to understand the effect this had on the air quality in London during this period. To this end three novel CityScan instruments were installed in London from the 20th July though to the end of September; affording the unique opportunity to monitor the spatial and vertical structure of nitrogen dioxide within the boundary layer in unprecedented detail. The deployment was included as part of the large NERC funded ClearfLo project (Clean Air for London) involving many other institutions and complementary measurement techniques. CityScan is a Hemispherical Scanning Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (HSI-DOAS) which is has been optimised to measure concentrations of nitrogen dioxide. CityScan has a 95° field of view (FOV) between the zenith and 5° below the horizon. Across this FOV there are 128 resolved elements which are measured concurrently, the spectrometer is rotated azimuthally 1° per second providing full hemispherical coverage every 6 minutes. CityScan measures concentrations of nitrogen dioxide over specific lines of sight and due to the extensive field of view of the instrument this produces measurements which are representative over city-wide scales. Nitrogen dioxide is an important air pollutant which is produced in all combustion processes and can reduce lung function; especially in sensitised individuals. These instruments aim to bridge the gap in spatial scales between point source measurements of air quality and satellite measurements of air quality offering additional information on emissions, transport and the chemistry of nitrogen dioxide. More information regarding the CityScan technique can be found at http://www.leos.le.ac.uk/aq/index.html. The first of the three CityScan instruments was located in North Kensington, the second in Soho and third

  16. PLAB and UK graduates’ performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. Design Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners on performance of PLAB graduates and UK graduates at the MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations. Setting Doctors in training for internal medicine or general practice in the United Kingdom. Participants 7829, 5135, and 4387 PLAB graduates on their first attempt at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments from 2001 to 2012 compared with 18 532, 14 094, and 14 376 UK graduates taking the same assessments; 3160 PLAB1 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP AKT during 2007-12 compared with 14 235 UK graduates; and 1411 PLAB2 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP CSA during 2010-12 compared with 6935 UK graduates. Main outcome measures Performance at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments, and MRCGP AKT and CSA assessments in relation to performance on PLAB1 and PLAB2 assessments, as well as to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores. MRCP(UK), MRCGP, and PLAB results were analysed as marks relative to the pass mark at the first attempt. Results PLAB1 marks were a valid predictor of MRCP(UK) Part 1, MRCP(UK) Part 2, and MRCGP AKT (r=0.521, 0.390, and 0.490; all P<0.001). PLAB2 marks correlated with MRCP(UK) PACES and MRCGP CSA (r=0.274, 0.321; both P<0.001). PLAB graduates had significantly lower MRCP(UK) and MRCGP assessments (Glass’s Δ=0.94, 0.91, 1.40, 1.01, and 1.82 for MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES and MRCGP AKT and CSA), and were more likely to fail assessments

  17. Epidemiology of U.K. military burns.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mark Anthony; Moledina, Jamil; Jeffery, Steve L A

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the etiology of U.K. military burns in light of increasing hybrid warfare. Analysis of the nature of these injured personnel will provide commanders with the evidence to plan for on-going and future operations. Case notes of all U.K. Armed Forces burn injured patients who were evacuated to the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine were reviewed. Demographics, burn severity, pattern, and mortality details were included. There were 134 U.K. military personnel with burns requiring return to the United Kingdom during 2001-2007. The median age was 27 (20-62) years. Overall, 60% of burns seen were "accidental." Burning waste, misuse or disrespect of fuel, and scalds were the most prevalent noncombat burns. Areas commonly burned were the face, legs, and hands. During 2006-2007 in the two major conflicts, more than 59% (n = 36) of the burned patients evacuated to the United Kingdom were injured during combat. Burns sustained in combat represent 5.8% of all combat casualties and were commonly associated with other injuries. Improvised explosive device, minestrike, and rocket-propelled grenade were common causes. The mean TBSA affected for both groups was 5% (1-70). The majority of combat burn injuries have been small in size. Greater provision of flame retardant equipment and clothing may reduce the extent and number of combat burns in the future. The numbers of noncombat burns are being reduced by good military discipline. PMID:21422938

  18. Multifractal to monofractal evolution of the London street network.

    PubMed

    Murcio, Roberto; Masucci, A Paolo; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We perform a multifractal analysis of the evolution of London's street network from 1786 to 2010. First, we show that a single fractal dimension, commonly associated with the morphological description of cities, does not suffice to capture the dynamics of the system. Instead, for a proper characterization of such a dynamics, the multifractal spectrum needs to be considered. Our analysis reveals that London evolves from an inhomogeneous fractal structure, which can be described in terms of a multifractal, to a homogeneous one, which converges to monofractality. We argue that London's multifractal to monofractal evolution might be a special outcome of the constraint imposed on its growth by a green belt. Through a series of simulations, we show that multifractal objects, constructed through diffusion limited aggregation, evolve toward monofractality if their growth is constrained by a nonpermeable boundary. PMID:26764655

  19. Multifractal to monofractal evolution of the London street network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcio, Roberto; Masucci, A. Paolo; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We perform a multifractal analysis of the evolution of London's street network from 1786 to 2010. First, we show that a single fractal dimension, commonly associated with the morphological description of cities, does not suffice to capture the dynamics of the system. Instead, for a proper characterization of such a dynamics, the multifractal spectrum needs to be considered. Our analysis reveals that London evolves from an inhomogeneous fractal structure, which can be described in terms of a multifractal, to a homogeneous one, which converges to monofractality. We argue that London's multifractal to monofractal evolution might be a special outcome of the constraint imposed on its growth by a green belt. Through a series of simulations, we show that multifractal objects, constructed through diffusion limited aggregation, evolve toward monofractality if their growth is constrained by a nonpermeable boundary.

  20. The epidemiology of suicide on the London Underground.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    A database containing details of every incident of suicidal behaviour on the London Underground railway system between 1940 and 1990 was assembled from the records of London Underground Ltd and the British Transport Police. The total number of cases was 3240. The mean annual number of suicidal acts on the London Underground system increased from 36.1 (1940-1949) to 94.1 (1980-1989). There were significantly fewer incidents on Sundays than on the other days of the week and the daily rate was highest in the spring. 64% of incidents involved males and the peak age group for both sexes was 25-34 yr. Suicide verdicts were returned for a greater proportion of women than men. Overall case fatality was 55%. However, case fatality rates differed between stations, environmental factors appearing to influence survival. Possible strategies to prevent railway suicides and reduce the lethality of this method are discussed. PMID:8153744

  1. The Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC) in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P.

    2009-09-01

    The Met Office and the Environment Agency in the UK have set up a joint Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC), based at the London offices of the Met Office. This partnership will improve the UK's ability to respond to flooding events by providing an earlier national forecasting and alert service to central and local government departments so as to give them more time to prepare for floods and reduce the risk of loss of life and damage to property. The creation of the centre is in response to a key recommendation of Sir Michael Pitt's Review following the summer 2007 floods over the UK. For the first time, the FFC combines the Environment Agency's expertise in flood risk management and the Met Office's expertise in weather forecasting under one roof. My presentation will describe the benefits it will bring to the emergency responder community. It will also cover the tools available to the centre such as the new generation of high resolution weather models now coming on line. As a result, flood forecasting and warning systems, (which historically have been based on the lack of sufficiently fine scale rainfall information), need to be revisited in the light of the new meteorological modelling capabilities. This is particularly true for surface water flooding, where these new capabilities offer, for the first time, the possibility of providing credible alerts.

  2. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  3. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  4. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  5. "Persons That Live Remote from London": Apothecaries and the Medical Marketplace in Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Wales

    PubMed Central

    Withey, Alun

    2011-01-01

    Summary This article uses evidence from Welsh apothecary shops as a means to access the mechanisms of the "medical marketplace" in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Wales. As a country physically remote from large urban medical centers, and with few large towns, Wales has often been overlooked in terms of medical commerce. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that Welsh apothecaries participated in broad and sophisticated networks of trade with London suppliers. Moreover, their shops contained a wide range of medicines from herbal simples to exotic ingredients and chemical preparations, highlighting the availability of such goods far from large urban centers. PMID:21804184

  6. "Persons that live remote from London": apothecaries and the medical marketplace in seventeenth-and eighteenth-century Wales.

    PubMed

    Withey, Alun

    2011-01-01

    This article uses evidence from Welsh apothecary shops as a means to access the mechanisms of the "medical marketplace" in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Wales. As a country physically remote from large urban medical centers, and with few large towns, Wales has often been overlooked in terms of medical commerce. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that Welsh apothecaries participated in broad and sophisticated networks of trade with London suppliers. Moreover, their shops contained a wide range of medicines from herbal simples to exotic ingredients and chemical preparations, highlighting the availability of such goods far from large urban centers. PMID:21804184

  7. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, Leigh; Bloss, William; Yin, Jianxin; Beddows, David; Harrison, Roy; Zotter, Peter; Prevot, Andre; Green, David

    2014-05-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke in large urban centres such as London is becoming increasingly important with the changing nature of domestic heating partly due to the installation of biomass burning heaters to meet renewable energy targets imposed by the EU and also a rise in so-called recreational burning for aesthetic reasons (Fuller et al., 2013). Recent work in large urban centres (London, Paris and Berlin) has demonstrated an increase in the contribution of wood smoke to ambient particles during winter that can at times exceed traffic emissions. In Europe, biomass burning has been identified as a major cause of exceedances of European air quality limits during winter (Fuller et al., 2013). In light of the changing nature of emissions in urban areas there is a need for on-going measurements to assess the impact of biomass burning in cities like London. Therefore we aimed to determine quantitatively the contribution of biomass burning in London and surrounding rural areas. We also aimed to determine whether local emissions or regional sources were the main source of biomass burning in London. Sources of wood smoke during winter in London were investigated at an urban background site (North Kensington) and two surrounding rural sites (Harwell and Detling) by analysing selected wood smoke chemical tracers. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated, indicating a similar source of these species at the three sites. Based on the conversion factor for levoglucosan, mean wood smoke mass at Detling, North Kensington and Harwell was 0.78, 0.87 and 1.0 µg m-3, respectively. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest source of OC and EC found to be secondary organic aerosols and traffic emissions, respectively. Peaks in levoglucosan concentrations at the sites were observed to coincide with low ambient temperature, suggesting domestic heating as

  8. Parish apprenticeship and the old poor law in London1

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Alysa

    2010-01-01

    This article offers an examination of the patterns and motivations behind parish apprenticeship in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London. It stresses continuity in outlook from parish officials binding children, which involved placements in both the traditional and industrializing sectors of the economy. Evidence on the ages, employment types, and locations of 3,285 pauper apprentices bound from different parts of London between 1767 and 1833 indicates a variety of local patterns. The analysis reveals a pattern of youthful age at binding, a range of employment experiences, and parish-specific links to particular trades and manufactures. PMID:20939134

  9. Biomedical practices from a patient perspective. Experiences of Polish female migrants in Barcelona, Berlin and London.

    PubMed

    Main, Izabella

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the diversity in patients' experience of bio-medicine and contrasts it with the normative view characteristic of health professionals. Ethnographic fieldwork among Polish migrant women in London, Barcelona and Berlin included interviews about their experiences with local healthcare and health professionals. Themes drawn from the narratives are differences between the cities in terms of communication between patients and health professionals, respect for patients' choices and dignity, attitudes to pregnancy and birth (different levels of medicalization), and paediatric care. It is argued that patients continuously negotiate among their own views and expectations based on previous experiences and knowledge from personal communication; internet forums and publications; and the offer of medical services in the countries of their settlement. Patients experience pluralism of therapeutic traditions within and outside bio-medicine. In turn, representatives of bio-medicine are rarely aware of other medical practices and beliefs and this leads to various misunderstandings. By highlighting the pluralism of medical practices in European countries and the increasing mobility of patients, this case study has useful implications for medical anthropologists and health professionals in a broader Western context, such as raising sensitivity to different communication strategies and a diversity of curing traditions and expectations. PMID:27258327

  10. Chemical composition and sources of organic aerosols over London from the ClearfLo 2012 campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, Emanuela; Holmes, Rachel; Hopkins, James; Lee, James; Harrison, Roy; Hamilton, Jacqueline

    2014-05-01

    Air quality in urban areas represents a major public health issue with around one third of the European population concentrated in cities and numbers expected to increase at global scale, particularly in developing countries. Particulate matter (PM) represents a primary threat for human health as numerous studies have confirmed the association between increased levels of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases with the exposure to PM. Despite considerable efforts made in improving air quality and progressively stricter emissions regulations, the PM concentrations have not changed much over the past decades for reasons that remain unclear, and highlight that studies on PM source apportionment are required for the formulation of effective policy. We investigated the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) collected during two intensive field campaigns held in winter and summer 2012 in the frame of the project Clean air for London (http://www.clearflo.ac.uk/). PM samples were collected both at a city background site (North Kensington) and at a rural site 50 km southeast of London (Detling) with 8 to 24 hours sampling schedule and analysed using off-line methods. Thermal-optical analysis was used to quantify OC-EC components while a suite of soft ionization mass spectrometric techniques was deployed for detailed chemical characterization. Liquid chromatography mass Spectrometry (LC-MSn) was mostly used for the simultaneous detection and quantification of various tracers for both primary and secondary OA sources. Well-established markers for wood burning primary OA like levoglucosan and azelaic acid were quantified together with various classes of nitroaromatics including methyl-nitrocatechols that are potential tracers for wood burning secondary OA. In addition, oxidation products of biogenic VOCs such as isoprene and monoterpenes were also quantified for both seasons and sites. A non-negligible contribution from biogenic SOA to urban OA was found in summertime

  11. An observational study of retail availability and in-store marketing of e-cigarettes in London: potential to undermine recent tobacco control gains?

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Robert; Myers, Allison E; Ribisl, Kurt M; Marteau, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives E-cigarette companies and vendors claim the potential of e-cigarettes to help smokers reduce or quit tobacco use. E-cigarettes also have the potential to renormalise smoking. The purpose of this study was to describe the availability and in-store marketing of e-cigarettes in London, UK stores selling tobacco and alcohol. Design Observational study. Setting Small and large stores selling alcohol and tobacco in London, UK. Primary and secondary outcome measures The number of stores selling e-cigarettes, the number of stores with an interior or exterior e-cigarette advertisement, the number of stores with an e-cigarette point-of-sale movable display, store size, deprivation index score for store's corresponding lower super output area. Results Audits were completed in 108 of 128 selected stores. 62 of the audited stores (57%) sold e-cigarettes. E-cigarette availability was unrelated to store size. There was a statistically non-significant trend towards increased availability in more deprived areas (p=0.069). 31 of the 62 stores (50%) selling e-cigarettes had a point-of-sale movable display, with all but one found in small stores. Two small stores had interior advertisements and eight had exterior advertisements. No advertisements were observed in large stores. Conclusions This audit revealed widespread availability of e-cigarettes and in-store marketing in London, UK. Even if e-cigarettes prove to be an effective cessation aid, their sale and use are resulting in an increasing public presence of cigarette-like images and smoking behaviour. After decades of work to denormalise smoking, these findings raise the question of whether e-cigarettes are renormalising smoking. PMID:24366581

  12. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  13. Autistic Disorder in Nineteenth-Century London. Three Case Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, Mitzi; Shattock, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the existence, description, perception, treatment, and outcome of symptoms consistent with autistic disorder in nineteenth-century London, England, based on case histories from the notes of Dr William Howship Dickinson at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children. Three cases meeting the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder…

  14. Exploring the Impact of Aspects of the London Leadership Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Pam; Matthews, Peter; Day, Christopher; Gu, Qing

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the methodology adopted for the formative evaluation of aspects of the London Leadership Strategy (LLS). The LLS is an ambitious example of a program designed and supported by the National College of School Leadership in England (NCSL) to enhance leadership and management so as to improve the quality of education and raise…

  15. In London, a Working-Class University Wrestles with Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    Patrick McGhee, vice chancellor of the University of East London, has a lot in common with many of the 28,000 students at the large urban institution he leads. He was the first in his family to attend university. And he dislikes much about the government's higher-education reform efforts, which he has deemed "misguided, premature, unproven and…

  16. Battersea: Education in a London Parish since 1750

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the development of educational institutions and buildings in one slice of a big city over a long timescale. The city is London and the slice Battersea, an inner suburb of mixed character and volatile fortunes. The narrative explores the shifts and interactions between state and voluntary provision, local community needs and…

  17. Connecting Londoners with Their City through Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Frazer

    2013-01-01

    London is one of the most complex, dynamic and diverse cities in the world, with 8 million residents, over 300 languages spoken in its schools, and some 30 million overseas visitors every year. Reaching out to and connecting all these people with the city's heritage while catering to their many interests, motivations and learning needs is a huge…

  18. Case Study: North Laurel High School, London, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    When North Laurel High School, London, Kentucky, opened in Fall 1992, students and teachers entered a new facility and a new era of commitment to excellence for all students. In Spring 1993, North Laurel joined the Southern Regional Education Board's High Schools That Work initiative. The new school replaced the general track and raised graduation…

  19. The University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Bartrip, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This research note gives details of 2 releases of audio recordings available from speakers who stutter that can be accessed on the Web. Method: Most of the recordings are from school-age children. These are available on the University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS) Web site, and information is provided about how to…

  20. Microform Applications Within the City of London Polytechnic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Alan

    A review is made of the possible applications within the libraries of the City of London Polytechnic of the three basic types of microforms--microfilm, microfiche, and microopaques. Major uses outlined involve: 1) the exploitation of existing data bases; 2) the storage of back issues of periodicals; 3) the presentation of programed instruction; 4)…

  1. Intergenerational Learning between Children and Grandparents in East London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Charmian; Ruby, Mahera; Jessel, John; Gregory, Eve; Arju, Tahera

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the learning exchange between three- to six-year-old children and their grandparents, in Sylheti/Bengali-speaking families of Bangladeshi origin and monolingual English-speaking families living in east London. The following concepts from sociocultural theory are applied to this new area of intergenerational learning:…

  2. Gender Politics and Privatization in the London Borough of Camden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Lisa D.

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the differential impact of the privatization of social services on women in the London borough of Camden. Concludes that women will suffer greater decline than men in employment, wages, and status as a result of the privatization taking place in Great Britain. (JDH)

  3. Developing an Integrated Institutional Repository at Imperial College London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afshari, Fereshteh; Jones, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to demonstrate how a highly integrated approach to repository development and deployment can be beneficial in producing a successful archive. Design/methodology/approach: Imperial College London undertook a significant specifications process to gather and formalise requirements for its repository system. This was done…

  4. Amputations at the London Hospital 1852-1857

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Flora, H S; Ham, R J

    2001-01-01

    Between 1852 and 1857 at the London Hospital, 142 amputations were performed in 136 patients. The most common indication was an injury sustained at work. Overall mortality was 46% and the death rate was especially high for lower-limb amputations. Most deaths were due to postoperative sepsis. Those who received chloroform anaesthesia did worse than those who received ether. PMID:11461989

  5. Martha Whiteley of Imperial College, London: A Pioneering Woman Chemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Rafaelle M.; Nicholson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Martha Whiteley (1866-1956) was one of the most important women chemists in the United Kingdom in the first half of the 20th century. In a male-dominated field, she was an academic on the staff of a co-educational university, Imperial College, London, where she carried out research of her own choosing, rather than assisting a male professor. She…

  6. A fatal case of Lassa fever in London, January 2009.

    PubMed

    Kitching, A; Addiman, S; Cathcart, S; Bischop, L; Krahé, D; Nicholas, M; Coakley, J; Lloyd, G; Brooks, T; Morgan, D; Turbitt, D

    2009-02-12

    In January 2009, the eleventh [corrected] case of Lassa fever imported to the United Kingdom was diagnosed in London. Risk assessment of 328 healthcare contacts with potential direct exposure to Lassa virus - through contact with the case or exposure to bodily fluids - was undertaken. No contacts were assessed to be at high risk of infection and no secondary clinical cases identified. PMID:19215723

  7. Education in the attic: an insight into the educational services of the Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret, London Bridge.

    PubMed

    Edge, Stevie

    2009-01-01

    Hidden for almost a century in the attic of St Thomas' Church the oldest operating theatre in Britain is now part of a museum. This precious building now houses a collection of pre-anaesthetic tools, items relating to medicine in the home and various Apothecary displays. The museum aims to preserve the theatre and items relating to medicine, in order to contribute to the understanding of the development of medical knowledge, with particular reference to St Thomas' hospital. An independent museum with a long history of educational provision: this article explores some of the education services of The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret at London Bridge. PMID:20481364

  8. The secret garden? Elite metropolitan geographies in the contemporary UK

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Niall; Savage, Mike

    2015-01-01

    There is an enduring, indeed increasing awareness of the role of spatial location in defining and reinforcing inequality in this country and beyond. In the UK, much of the debate around these issues has focussed on the established trope of a long-standing ‘north-south divide’, a divide which appears to have deepened in recent decades with the inexorable de-industrialisation of northern Britain presented in stark counterpoint to the burgeoning concentration of wealth in London and the south-east, driven by the financial and ancillary services sectors. Due to a lack of available data, such debates have tended to focus solely on economic inequalities between places, and until now there was little understanding of how these disparities played out in the social and cultural domains. This paper significantly advances our understanding of the true meaning of spatial inequality in the UK by broadening that definition to encompass not only the economic, but also the social and cultural arenas, using data available from the BBC's Great British Class Survey experiment. We argue that these data shine a light not only on the economic inequalities between different parts of the country which existing debates have already uncovered but to understand how these are both reinforced and mediated across the social and cultural dimensions. Fundamentally, we concur with a great many others in seeing London and the south-east as a vortex for economic accumulation but it is also much more than that; it is a space where the coming together of intense economic, social and cultural resources enables the crystallisation of particular and nuanced forms of elite social class formations, formations in which place is not incidental but integral to their very existence. PMID:26640301

  9. Turbulent Flow at 190 m Height Above London During 2006-2008: A Climatology and the Applicability of Similarity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. R.; Lacser, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Padhra, A.; Belcher, S. E.; Nemitz, E.; Helfter, C.; Famulari, D.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2010-10-01

    Flow and turbulence above urban terrain is more complex than above rural terrain, due to the different momentum and heat transfer characteristics that are affected by the presence of buildings (e.g. pressure variations around buildings). The applicability of similarity theory (as developed over rural terrain) is tested using observations of flow from a sonic anemometer located at 190.3 m height in London, U.K. using about 6500 h of data. Turbulence statistics—dimensionless wind speed and temperature, standard deviations and correlation coefficients for momentum and heat transfer—were analysed in three ways. First, turbulence statistics were plotted as a function only of a local stability parameter z/Λ (where Λ is the local Obukhov length and z is the height above ground); the σ i / u * values ( i = u, v, w) for neutral conditions are 2.3, 1.85 and 1.35 respectively, similar to canonical values. Second, analysis of urban mixed-layer formulations during daytime convective conditions over London was undertaken, showing that atmospheric turbulence at high altitude over large cities might not behave dissimilarly from that over rural terrain. Third, correlation coefficients for heat and momentum were analyzed with respect to local stability. The results give confidence in using the framework of local similarity for turbulence measured over London, and perhaps other cities. However, the following caveats for our data are worth noting: (i) the terrain is reasonably flat, (ii) building heights vary little over a large area, and (iii) the sensor height is above the mean roughness sublayer depth.

  10. The who and where of clinical skills teaching: a review from the UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Borneuf, Anne-Marie; Haigh, Carol

    2010-02-01

    Over the years, the debate on clinical skill acquisition in Nursing is one that has been subject to constant scrutiny within educational settings, locally and globally. Indeed, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) have endeavoured to provide some clarity with the publication of the Essential Skills Cluster statements [NMC, 2006. Advance Information Regarding Essential Skill Clusters for Preregistration Nursing Programmes (NMC Circular 35/2006). NMC, London] and the recently updated Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice [NMC, 2008. Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice: NMC Standards for Mentors, Practice Teachers and Teachers, second ed. NMC, London]. In this paper, we seek to provide a review of the evidence and debate produced thus far surrounding skills acquisition in general and the role of the nurse lecturer in particular from a UK perspective. PMID:19692151

  11. London Challenge: Surveys of Pupils and Teachers, 2005. Research Report RR718

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridley, Kate; Knight, Sarah; Scott, Emma; Benton, Tom; Woodthorpe, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The London Challenge is a Department for Education and Skills (DfES) initiative, which aims to raise levels of attainment in London secondary schools and to create a world class education system in the capital. In 2005, London Challenge commissioned the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to carry out a survey of Year 7 pupils,…

  12. 33 CFR 165.140 - New London Harbor, Connecticut-security zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New London Harbor, Connecticut... London Harbor, Connecticut—security zone. (a) Security zones—(1) Security Zone A. The waters of the..., west of the Naval Submarine Base, New London, CT, enclosed by a line beginning at a point on...

  13. 33 CFR 165.140 - New London Harbor, Connecticut-security zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New London Harbor, Connecticut... London Harbor, Connecticut—security zone. (a) Security zones—(1) Security Zone A. The waters of the..., west of the Naval Submarine Base, New London, CT, enclosed by a line beginning at a point on...

  14. Inner London's Education Authority: Reflections on ILEA Twenty-Five Years after Closure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    It is 25 years since the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) was abolished and management of education in central London transferred to 13 London boroughs. The author reflects on the experience of being an ex-ILEA head teacher, and of managing one of the new local education authorities in the immediate post-ILEA period. He begins by commenting…

  15. Building a Hypertextual Digital Library in the Humanities: A Case Study on London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Gregory; Smith, David A.; Wulfman, Clifford E.

    This paper describes the creation of a new humanities digital library collection: 11,000,000 words and 10,000 images representing books, images, and maps on pre-twentieth century London and its environs. The London collection contained far more dense and precise information than the materials from the Greco-Roman world. The London collection thus…

  16. London through Rose-Colored Graphics: Visual Rhetoric and Information Graphic Design in Charles Booth's Maps of London Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Miles A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine a historical information graphic--Charles Booth's maps of London poverty (1889-1902)--to analyze the cultural basis of ideas of transparency and clarity in information graphics. I argue that Booth's maps derive their rhetorical power from contemporary visual culture as much as from their scientific authority. The visual…

  17. UK role 4 military infection services: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Dufty, Ngozi E; Bailey, M S

    2013-09-01

    NATO describes 'Role 4' military medical services as those provided for the definitive care of patients who cannot be treated within a theatre of operations and these are usually located in a military force's country of origin and may include the involvement of civilian medical services. The UK Defence Medical Services have a proud history of developing and providing clinical services in infectious diseases and tropical medicine, sexual health and HIV medicine, and medical microbiology and virology. These UK Role 4 Military Infection Services have adapted well to recent overseas deployments, but new challenges will arise due to current military cutbacks and a greater diversity of contingency operations in the future. Further evidence-based development of these services will require leadership by military clinicians and improved communication and support for 'reach-back' services. PMID:24109133

  18. The Experience of Antiretroviral Treatment for Black West African Women who are HIV Positive and Living in London: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Johanna; Smith, Jonathan A; Poliquin, Elizabeth; Anderson, Jane; Horne, Rob

    2016-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) offers a powerful intervention in HIV but effectiveness can be compromised by inadequate adherence. This paper is a detailed examination of the experience of medication in a purposively selected group of people living with HIV. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 HIV positive, West African women of black heritage living in London, UK. This group was of interest since it is the second largest group affected by HIV in the UK. Interviews were subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis, an idiographic, experiential, qualitative approach. The paper details the women's negative experience of treatment. ART can be considered difficult and unrelenting and may be disconnected from the women's sense of health or illness. Participants' social context often exacerbated the difficulties. Some reported an improvement in their feelings about the medication over time. These findings point to some intrinsic and social motivators which could act as spurs to adherence. PMID:26767539

  19. Geographically varying associations between personality and life satisfaction in the London metropolitan area

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Markus; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Lamb, Michael E.; Gosling, Samuel D.; Rentfrow, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Residential location is thought to influence people’s well-being, but different individuals may value residential areas differently. We examined how life satisfaction and personality traits are geographically distributed within the UK London metropolitan area, and how the strength of associations between personality traits and life satisfaction vary by residential location (i.e., personality–neighborhood interactions). Residential area was recorded at the level of postal districts (216 districts, n = 56,019 participants). Results indicated that the strength of associations between personality traits and life satisfaction depended on neighborhood characteristics. Higher openness to experience was more positively associated with life satisfaction in postal districts characterized by higher average openness to experience, population density, and ethnic diversity. Higher agreeableness and conscientiousness were more strongly associated with life satisfaction in postal districts with lower overall levels of life satisfaction. The associations of extraversion and emotional stability were not modified by neighborhood characteristics. These findings suggest that people’s life satisfaction depends, in part, on the interaction between individual personality and particular features of the places they live. PMID:25583480

  20. Contact sensitivity to chromate: comparison at a London contact dermatitis clinic over a 10-year period.

    PubMed

    Olsavszky, R; Rycroft, R J; White, I R; McFadden, J P

    1998-06-01

    It has been argued that for chromate sensitivity to be reduced, then ferrous sulfate should be added to cement. This has not yet been done in the UK. To explore this further, we have looked at the comparative sensitization rates of patients attending the St. John's Institute of Dermatology Contact Dermatitis Clinic between the years 1982-3 and 1992-3. Patch-test-positive rates for females were not significantly different between the 2 populations studied (1982-3, 1.59% and 1992-3, 1.99% p NS). Similarly, there was no significantly different rate between the males (1982-3, 3.99% and 1992-3, 4.25% p NS) in the same time period. There was no difference in the distribution of eczema in chromate-positive subjects, nor of cobalt co-sensitization, a crude indicator of sensitization via cement. This work demonstrates no appreciable difference in the frequency of chromate sensitivity between the early 1980s and 1990s in London. Adding ferrous sulfate to cement may help to lower the frequency in the future. PMID:9687032

  1. Integrating research & teaching: the Queen Mary, University of London module in Geodiversity & Geoconservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, M.

    2012-04-01

    The School of Geography at Queen Mary, University of London has been running a Level 6 (undergraduate) module in "Geodiversity & Geoconservation" since 2004. The course is based around the book Geodiversity: valuing and conserving abiotic nature (John Wiley, 2004) but lectures are used to update each topic based on the latest research. The course is divided into 5 parts: 1. Defining and describing geodiversity - which discusses the concept of geodiversity, its definition and the nature of the geodiversity of Planet Earth; 2. Values of, and threats to, geodiversity - a lecture on valuing geodiversity is now based around important research on the role of geodiversity in "ecosystem services" assessments. A second lecture covers the major threats to geodiversity; 3. The protected area approach - lectures here cover geological World Heritage Sites, Global Geoparks, GSSPs, and national geoconservation systems in the UK, USA and other parts of the world; 4. Protecting geodiversity in the wider landscape - the contribution of geology and geomorphology to landscape character are described, together with the role of land-use planning and policy-making in protecting geodiversity. 5. Putting it all together - lectures here emphasize that geodiversity is an important basis for geoconservation, that different geoconservation methods are appropriate to different elements of geodiversity, and that integrated geo/bio conservation is essential. A field trip to three Chalk/Quaternary Sites of Special Scientific Interest in East Sussex is included which discusses some of the planning issues that have arisen at these sites, a theme that is expanded in the lectures.

  2. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men from the age of 50 years in the UK.

    PubMed

    Compston, J; Cooper, A; Cooper, C; Francis, R; Kanis, J A; Marsh, D; McCloskey, E V; Reid, D M; Selby, P; Wilkins, M

    2009-02-20

    In 1999 and 2000 the Royal College of Physicians published guidelines for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis [Royal College of Physicians. Osteoporosis: clinical guidelines for the prevention and treatment. London: Royal College of Physicians; 1999; Royal College of Physicians and Bone and Tooth Society of Great Britain. Update on pharmacological interventions and an algorithm for management. London, UK: Royal College of Physicians; 2000.; Royal College of Physicians. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Guidelines on prevention and treatment; Bone and Tooth Society of Great Britain, National Osteoporosis Society and Royal College of Physicians. London, UK: Royal College of Physicians; 2002]. Since then, there have been significant advances in the field of osteoporosis including the development of new techniques for measuring bone mineral density, improved methods of assessing fracture risk and new treatments that have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of fractures. Against this background, the National Osteoporosis Guideline Group (NOGG), in collaboration with many Societies in the UK, have updated the original guidelines [Royal College of Physicians, National Osteoporosis Guideline Group on behalf of the Bone Research Society, British Geriatrics Society, British Orthopaedic Association, British Society of Rheumatology, National Osteoporosis Society, Osteoporosis 2000, Osteoporosis Dorset, Primary Care Rheumatology Society, Society for Endocrinology. Osteoporosis. Clinical guideline for prevention and treatment, Executive Summary. University of Sheffield Press; 2008], a practical summary of which is detailed below. The management algorithms are underpinned by a health economic analysis applied to the epidemiology of fracture in the UK. PMID:19135323

  3. Communicating geohazard information for emergency responders, a case study from the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Vanessa; Cooper, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    SSS11.4/ESSI4.6/HS11.39/NH9.13 Communication of uncertain information in earth sciences: data, models and visualization Communicating geohazard information for emergency responders, a case study from the UK. Cooper, A. H.1, Banks, V.J.1, Cowup, P.2, Curness, J.3, Davis, R.4, Dawson, L3. and Gazzard, L.4 1 British Geological Survey, Keyworth, NG12 5GG, UK 2 London Fire Brigade, 169 Union Street, London, SE1 0LL, UK 3.Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry, CV1 5FB, UK 4.Avon Fire and Rescue, Temple Back, Bristol, BS1 6EU, UK. In February 2013 a sinkhole opened beneath a Florida Home resulting in the loss of a life and demolition of the affected home. The resulting void was in the order of 15 m deep. Neighbouring homes also had to be demolished. Television footage of this unfortunate incident resonated with an Assistant Commissioner of the London Fire Brigade who questioned whether or not such a feature would be recognised in the UK and if so, how the emergency response would be managed. Stemming from this, the British Geological Survey was invited to work with the Chief Fire Officers Association Urban Search and Rescue working group on geohazards. The aim of this group was to develop national tactical operational guidance on geohazards that would form the basis for regional guidance and training. The project was addressed collaboratively providing opportunities for two students from the Coventry University Disaster Management course, that were on placements with Avon Fire and Rescue, to work with the BGS to develop the guidance. Key to the success of the project was an iterative approach to knowledge exchange with respect to firstly, the characterization of the geohazards, and the processes and uncertainties associated with them and secondly, with respect to emergency responders' needs and priorities. Effective communication was achieved through challenging and rationalising the geoscience language for the end user and through a series of customised

  4. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  5. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  6. The sexual attitudes and lifestyles of London's Eastern Europeans (SALLEE Project): design and methods

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since May 2004, ten Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries have joined the European Union, leading to a large influx of CEE migrants to the United Kingdom (UK). The SALLEE project (sexual attitudes and lifestyles of London's Eastern Europeans) set out to establish an understanding of the sexual lifestyles and reproductive health risks of CEE migrants. CEE nationals make up a small minority of the population resident in the UK with no sampling frame from which to select a probability sample. There is also difficulty estimating the socio-demographic and geographical distribution of the population. In addition, measuring self-reported sexual behaviour which is generally found to be problematic, may be compounded among people from a range of different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This paper will describe the methods adopted by the SALLEE project to address these challenges. Methods The research was undertaken using quantitative and qualitative methods: a cross-sectional survey of CEE migrants based on three convenience samples (recruited from community venues, sexual health clinics and from the Internet) and semi-structured in-depth interviews with a purposively selected sample of CEE migrants. A detailed social mapping exercise of the CEE community was conducted prior to commencement of the survey to identify places where CEE migrants could be recruited. A total of 3,005 respondents took part in the cross-sectional survey, including 2,276 respondents in the community sample, 357 in the clinic sample and 372 in the Internet sample. 40 in-depth qualitative interviews were undertaken with a range of individuals, as determined by the interview quota matrix. Discussion The SALLEE project has benefited from using quantitative research to provide generalisable data on a range of variables and qualitative research to add in-depth understanding and interpretation. The social mapping exercise successfully located a large number of CEE migrants for the

  7. A mathematical model of the London riots and their policing

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Toby P.; Fry, Hannah M.; Wilson, Alan G.; Bishop, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    In August 2011, several areas of London experienced episodes of large-scale disorder, comprising looting, rioting and violence. Much subsequent discourse has questioned the adequacy of the police response, in terms of the resources available and strategies used. In this article, we present a mathematical model of the spatial development of the disorder, which can be used to examine the effect of varying policing arrangements. The model is capable of simulating the general emergent patterns of the events and focusses on three fundamental aspects: the apparently-contagious nature of participation; the distances travelled to riot locations; and the deterrent effect of policing. We demonstrate that the spatial configuration of London places some areas at naturally higher risk than others, highlighting the importance of spatial considerations when planning for such events. We also investigate the consequences of varying police numbers and reaction time, which has the potential to guide policy in this area. PMID:23425781

  8. Rock and mineral physics at University College London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Paul; Meredith, Philip; Price, David

    The Department of Geological Sciences at University College London (UCL), has undergone a period of major expansion and growth as a result of the restructuring of geology departments within the University of London that was carried out in 1982. This exercise produced the amalgamation of selected parts of the Department of Geological Sciences of Queen Mary College and the Department of Geology, UCL, on the UCL site. The creation of this strengthened grouping has been successful in attracting a significant number of active researchers in the field of rock and mineral physics (RMP) to the new UCL department. As a result, the academic staff has more than douhled since 1982 and now stands at 31.

  9. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK's Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours.

    PubMed

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood-brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  10. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...°, 1,400 yards; 246°, 925 yards; 217°, 1,380 yards; and 235°, 1,450 yards. (2) Anchorage B. In the...,460 yards; 009°, 2,480 yards; 026°, 1,175 yards; and 008°, 1,075 yards. (3) Anchorage C. In the Thames River southward of New London Harbor, bounded by lines connecting a point bearing 100°, 450 yards...

  11. New series for agricultural prices in London, 1770–1914.

    PubMed

    Solar, Peter M; Klovland, Jan Tore

    2011-01-01

    New annual series for the prices of major agricultural commodities sold in London markets between 1770 and 1914 are presented. These series are based on bimonthly observations drawn from newspaper market reports. The products covered are wheat, barley (grinding and malting), oats, potatoes, hay, butter, beef, mutton, and pork. Annual prices are calculated for both calendar and production years. The new series are compared to existing series. PMID:21328804

  12. Fluoride in UK rivers.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Neal, Margaret; Davies, Helen; Smith, Jennifer

    2003-10-01

    Fluoride concentrations in eastern UK rivers (the Humber, Tweed, Wear, Great Ouse and Thames) are described based on information collected within the Land-Ocean Interaction Study (LOIS) and by the Environment Agency (EA) of England and Wales. The results show varied fluoride concentrations across the region, with a range from <0.01 to >10 mg l(-1); and mean, median and range in mean concentrations of 0.30, 0.21 and 0.05-3.38 mg l(-1) (excluding one outlier point), respectively. Within the main rivers and tributaries, the mean fluoride concentration varied from approximately 0.5 to over 2 mg l(-1) and the highest values occurred within the Don basin (Don, Dearne and Rother) and parts of the Trent basin (upper Tame and mid-upper Derbyshire Derwent) in highly industrialised and urbanised areas (Sheffield and Rotherham in the Don basin; Birmingham and Derby on the Trent). For localised inputs to the rivers, fluoride concentrations were slightly higher, and considerably higher in one outlier case. Correspondingly, the other rivers examined typically had mean fluoride concentrations between approximately 0.2 and 0.5 mg l(-1), but fluoride concentrations were lower in the headwater areas. As there is much less information on fluoride levels in upland areas, extensive data collected as part of an acid waters survey are used to show that fluoride concentrations are generally less than 0.1 mg l(-1) for the upland UK. The data are summarised in terms of both fluoride concentrations and flux, and the values are cross-referenced to other determinands collected within LOIS. The high positive correlation with boron and negative correlation with flow show the importance of point source (sewage) inputs of fluoride, while strong positive correlations between fluoride and barium indicate the relative importance of vein mineralisation in the bedrock in supplying fluoride to the waters of the Yorkshire Ouse and its tributaries. There seems to be some process that limits the fluoride

  13. Investigation of the emissions and profiles of a wide range of VOCs during the Clean air for London project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Rachel; Lidster, Richard; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Lee, James; Hopkins, James; Whalley, Lisa; Lewis, Alistair

    2014-05-01

    The majority of the World's population live in polluted urbanized areas. Poor air quality is shortening life expectancy of people in the UK by an average 7-8 months and costs society around £20 billion per year.[1] Despite this, our understanding of atmospheric processing in urban environments and its effect on air quality is incomplete. Air quality models are used to predict how air quality changes given different concentrations of pollution precursors, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The urban environment of megacities pose a unique challenge for air quality measurements and modelling, due to high population densities, pollution levels and complex infrastructure. For over 60 years the air quality in London has been monitored, however the existing measurements are limited to a small group of compounds. In order to fully understand the chemical and physical processes that occur in London, more intensive and comprehensive measurements should be made. The Clean air for London (ClearfLo) project was conducted to investigate the air quality, in particular the boundary layer pollution, of London. A relatively new technique, comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) [2] was combined with a well-established dual channel GC (DC-GC) [3] system to provide a more comprehensive measurement of VOCs. A total of 78 individual VOCs (36 aliphatics, 19 monoaromatics, 21 oxygenated and 2 halogenated) and 10 groups of VOCs (8 aliphatic, 1 monoaromatic and 1 monoterpene) from C1-C13+ were quantified. Seasonal and diurnal profiles of these VOCs have been found which show the influence of emission source and chemical processing. Including these extra VOCs should enhance the prediction capability of air quality models thus informing policy makers on how to potentially improve air quality in megacities. References 1. House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee, Air Quality: A follow-up report, Ninth Report of session 2012-12. 2. Lidster, R.T., J.F. Hamilton

  14. Medicine Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

    Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

  15. Anthropogenic and geogenic impacts on arsenic bioaccessibility in UK topsoils.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Cave, M R; Wragg, J

    2012-10-01

    Predictive linear regression (LR) modelling between bioaccessible arsenic (B-As) and a range of total elemental compositions and soil properties was executed in order to assess the potential for developing a national B-As dataset for the UK. LR indicates that total arsenic (As) is the only highly significant independent variable for estimating B-As in urban areas where it explains 75-92% of the variance. The broad compatibility of the London, Glasgow and Swansea regression models suggests that application of these models to estimate bioaccessible As in UK soils impacted by diffuse anthropogenic urban contamination and non-ferrous metal processing should be relatively accurate. In areas dominated by Jurassic ironstones and associated clays and limestones, total As, P and pH are significant, accounting for 53, 14 and 5%, respectively, of the B-As variance. Models based on total As as the sole predictor in the combined Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary ironstones datasets explain about 40% of the B-As variance. The median As bioaccessible fraction (%As-BAF) is 19 to 28% in the anthropogenic contamination impacted urban domains, but much lower (5-9%) in geogenic terrains dominated by ironstones. Results of this study can be used as part of a lines of evidence approach to localised risk assessment but should not be used to replace bioaccessibility testing at individual sites where local conditions may vary considerably from the broad overview presented in this study. PMID:22842593

  16. CIRM and UKRMP: Different Ways to Invest in Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-07-01

    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) and the UK Regenerative Medicine Platform (UKRMP) have similar objectives, but their histories, funding mechanisms, and governance could hardly be more different. Here, we compare the two programs and explore their impact in translating stem cell research into clinical applications. PMID:27392224

  17. UK businesses bag innovation awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Five UK firms have received innovation awards from the Institute of Physics (IOP), which publishes Physics World. Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging, Metrasens, M Squared Lasers, Silixa and Tracerco have all won an IOP award for developing new innovative products.

  18. Researchers dodge UK migration cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2011-03-01

    Research scientists are among those to be prioritized under the UK government's new immigration rules that will impose an annual cap on the number of work visas issued to those from outside the European Union (EU).

  19. UK to support open access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The UK government has "widely accepted" the recommendations of a major report into open-access publishing that was released in June by a 15-strong working group led by the British sociologist Janet Finch.

  20. Aircraft trace gas measurements during the London 2012 Olympics: Air quality and emission fluxes derived from sampling upwind and downwind of a megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G.; O'Shea, S.; Muller, J.; Jones, B.; O'Sullivan, D.; Lee, J. D.; Bauguitte, S.; Gallagher, M. W.; Percival, C.; Barratt, B.; McQuaid, J. B.; Illingworth, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements recorded during July and August 2012, across the period of the London 2012 Summer Olympics and simultaneous with the Clear air for London (ClearfLo) ground-based measurement and modelling campaign. Through long-term (2-year) and intensive observation periods (Winter 2011 and Summer 2012), the ClearfLo programme aims to better understand emissions, as well as the chemical, dynamical and micro-meteorological processes which modulate air quality in the London urban environment - an important risk factor for both acute and chronic health effects. The work presented here focuses on two contrasting case studies within the summer ClearfLo period: 30 July 2012 and 9 August 2012, representing relatively clean background and polluted background cases, respectively, and characterised by well-mixed Atlantic westerly maritime inflow in the former and stagnant air (high pressure) in the latter. Measurements of CO, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, HCN, and other gases measured on board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft will be presented and interpreted, with emphasis on observed concentration gradients and tracer-tracer correlations as well as airmass vertical structure and airmass history upwind and downwind of central London in each case. By applying a simple advective model and making use of vertically resolved thermodynamic and composition data, we are able to derive emission strengths for these gases that are representative of the total enclosed surface area. Example emissions for these two cases range between 6x105 kg(C)/hr and 9x105 kg(C)/hr for CO2, and ~0.6x105 kg(C)/hr for CH4. This airborne sampling methodology highlights the unique utility of aircraft measurements to routinely and climatologically characterise emissions from area sources such as cities, and points to future missions to target localised hotspots and distributed point sources.

  1. International differences in sport medicine access and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Neil; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary I undertook the 2012 ECOSEP travelling fellowship, sponsored by Bauerfeind, between May and August 2012, which involved visiting 5 European sport medicine centres and spending approximately one week in each centre. The 5 centres included: National Track and Field Centre, SEGAS, Thessaloniki, Greece; Professional School in Sport & Exercise Medicine, University of Barcelona, Spain; Sport Medicine Frankfurt Institute, Germany; Isokinetic Medical Group, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, Bologna, Italy, and Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End Hospital, England. Throughout the fellowship, the clinical cases which were routinely encountered were documented. The following sections detail my experiences throughout the fellowship, the sports of the athletes and the injuries which were treated at each of the sport medicine centres during the fellowship visit and the different forms of management employed. PMID:23738305

  2. Atmospheric ethanol in London and the potential impacts of future fuel formulations.

    PubMed

    Dunmore, Rachel E; Whalley, Lisa K; Sherwen, Tomás; Evans, Mathew J; Heard, Dwayne E; Hopkins, James R; Lee, James D; Lewis, Alastair C; Lidster, Richard T; Rickard, Andrew R; Hamilton, Jacqueline F

    2016-07-18

    There is growing global consumption of non-fossil fuels such as ethanol made from renewable biomass. Previous studies have shown that one of the main air quality disadvantages of using ethanol blended fuels is a significant increase in the production of acetaldehyde, an unregulated and toxic pollutant. Most studies on the impacts of ethanol blended gasoline have been carried out in the US and Brazil, with much less focus on the UK and Europe. We report time resolved measurements of ethanol in London during the winter and summer of 2012. In both seasons the mean mixing ratio of ethanol was around 5 ppb, with maximum values over 30 ppb, making ethanol currently the most abundant VOC in London air. We identify a road transport related source, with 'rush-hour' peaks observed. Ethanol is strongly correlated with other road transport-related emissions, such as small aromatics and light alkanes, and has no relationship to summer biogenic emissions. To determine the impact of road transport-related ethanol emission on secondary species (i.e. acetaldehyde and ozone), we use both a chemically detailed box model (incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism, MCM) and a global and nested regional scale chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), on various processing time scales. Using the MCM model, only 16% of the modelled acetaldehyde was formed from ethanol oxidation. However, the model significantly underpredicts the total levels of acetaldehyde, indicating a missing primary emission source, that appears to be traffic-related. Further support for a primary emission source comes from the regional scale model simulations, where the observed concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde can only be reconciled with the inclusion of large primary emissions. Although only constrained by one set of observations, the regional modelling suggests a European ethanol source similar in magnitude to that of ethane (∼60 Gg per year) and greater than that of acetaldehyde (∼10 Gg per year). The

  3. Audit of the job satisfaction levels of the UK radiography and physics workforce in UK radiotherapy centres 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beardmore, C; Patel, I; Massey, J; Wong, H; Probst, H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Workforce planning reports identify a staff shortfall that jeopardizes the ability of UK radiotherapy centres to meet future demands. Obtaining an understanding of the work experiences of radiotherapy professionals will support the development of strategies to increase job satisfaction, productivity and effectiveness. Methods: A quantitative survey assessed job satisfaction, attitudes to incident reporting, stress and burnout, opportunities for professional development, workload, retention and turnover. Clinical oncologists were not included, as the Royal College of Radiologists, London, UK, had recently assessed their members' satisfaction. All questions were taken from validated instruments or adapted from the “UK National Health Service Staff Survey”. Results: The survey yielded 658 completed responses (approximately 16% response rate), from public and private sectors. Over a third (36%) of respondents were classified as satisfied for job satisfaction with 11% dissatisfied and the remaining 53% ambivalent. A significant proportion of clinical staff (37.5%) report high emotional exhaustion. Presenteeism was an issue with 42.4% attending work despite feeling unable to fulfil their role. Conclusion: Radiotherapy professionals are prone to the effects of compassion fatigue and burnout. Attention must be paid to workload and its impact on practitioners' job satisfaction. Professional development that is supported and informed by a performance development review is a simple and effective means of enhancing satisfaction. Individuals have a responsibility to themselves and their colleagues as their behaviours and attitudes influence job satisfaction. Advances in knowledge: This work identifies areas for future research to enhance the professional resilience of practitioners, in order to provide high-quality treatments. PMID:24786316

  4. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process. PMID:27544982

  5. Comparison of methods for evaluation of wood smoke and estimation of UK ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Hu, L.; Yin, J.

    2012-09-01

    Airborne concentrations of the wood smoke tracers, levoglucosan and fine potassium have been measured at urban and rural sites in the United Kingdom alongside measurements with a multi-wavelength aethalometer. The UK sites, and especially those in cities, show low ratios of levoglucosan to potassium in comparison to the majority of published data. It is concluded that there may be two distinct source types, one from wood stoves and fireplaces with a high organic carbon content, best represented by levoglucosan, the other from larger, modern appliances with a very high burn-out efficiency, best represented by potassium. Based upon levoglucosan concentrations and a conversion factor of 11.2 from levoglucosan to wood smoke mass, average concentrations of wood smoke including winter and summer sampling periods are 0.23 μg m-3 in Birmingham and 0.33 μg m-3 in London, well below concentrations typical of other northern European urban areas. There may be a further contribution from sources of potassium-rich emissions amounting to an estimated 0.08 μg m-3 in Birmingham and 0.30 μg m-3 in London. Concentrations were highly correlated between two London sites separated by 4 km suggesting that a regional source is responsible. Data from the aethalometer are either supportive of these conclusions or suggest higher concentrations, depending upon the way in which the data are analysed.

  6. Comparison of methods for evaluation of wood smoke and estimation of UK ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Hu, L.; Yin, J.

    2012-03-01

    Airborne concentrations of the wood smoke tracers, levoglucosan and fine potassium have been measured at urban and rural sites in the United Kingdom alongside measurements with a multi-wavelength aethalometer. The UK sites, and especially those in cities, show low ratios of levoglucosan to potassium in comparison to the majority of published data. It is concluded that there may be two distinct source types, one from wood stoves and fireplaces with a high organic carbon content, best represented by levoglucosan, the other from larger, modern appliances with a very high burn-out efficiency, best represented by potassium. Based upon levoglucosan concentrations and a conversion factor of 11.2 from levoglucosan to wood smoke mass, average concentrations of wood smoke including winter and summer sampling periods are 0.23 μg m-3 in Birmingham and 0.33 μg m-3 in London, well below concentrations typical of other northern European urban areas. There may be a further contribution from sources of potassium-rich emissions amounting to an estimated 0.08 μg m-3 in Birmingham and 0.30 μg m-3 in London. Concentrations were highly correlated between two London sites separated by 4 km suggesting that an advected regional source is responsible. Data from the aethalometer are either supportive of these conclusions or suggest higher concentrations, depending upon the way in which the data are analysed.

  7. Air pollution dispersion models for human exposure predictions in London.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Kelly, Frank J; Ross Anderson, H; Carslaw, David C

    2013-01-01

    The London household survey has shown that people travel and are exposed to air pollutants differently. This argues for human exposure to be based upon space-time-activity data and spatio-temporal air quality predictions. For the latter, we have demonstrated the role that dispersion models can play by using two complimentary models, KCLurban, which gives source apportionment information, and Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ)-urban, which predicts hourly air quality. The KCLurban model is in close agreement with observations of NO(X), NO(2) and particulate matter (PM)(10/2.5), having a small normalised mean bias (-6% to 4%) and a large Index of Agreement (0.71-0.88). The temporal trends of NO(X) from the CMAQ-urban model are also in reasonable agreement with observations. Spatially, NO(2) predictions show that within 10's of metres of major roads, concentrations can range from approximately 10-20 p.p.b. up to 70 p.p.b. and that for PM(10/2.5) central London roadside concentrations are approximately double the suburban background concentrations. Exposure to different PM sources is important and we predict that brake wear-related PM(10) concentrations are approximately eight times greater near major roads than at suburban background locations. Temporally, we have shown that average NO(X) concentrations close to roads can range by a factor of approximately six between the early morning minimum and morning rush hour maximum periods. These results present strong arguments for the hybrid exposure model under development at King's and, in future, for in-building models and a model for the London Underground. PMID:23443237

  8. Prosecuting attempted suicides in London: 1891-1913.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2009-12-01

    A study of 30 cases of attempted suicide tried at the Old Bailey criminal court in London (England) from 1891 to 1913 indicated that having made prior attempts was the only predictor of the severity of the sentence. 22 individuals were tried for murdering or attempting to murder their child and also attempting suicide. None of the murderers but half of the attempted murderers were found not guilty, or guilty then released. Mothers used drowning more than did fathers and were more likely to be found not guilty. PMID:20099544

  9. Two daily smoke maxima in eighteenth century London air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles

    Varied electrostatics experiments followed Benjamin Franklin's pioneering atmospheric investigations. In Knightsbridge, Central London, John Read (1726-1814) installed a sensing rod in the upper part of his house and, using a pith ball electrometer and Franklin chimes, monitored atmospheric electricity from 1789 to 1791. Atmospheric electricity is sensitive to weather and smoke pollution. In calm weather conditions, Read observed two daily electrification maxima in moderate weather, around 9 am and 7 pm. This is likely to represent a double diurnal cycle in urban smoke. Before the motor car and steam railways, one source of the double maximum smoke pattern was the daily routine of fire lighting for domestic heating.

  10. Lessons for climate policy from The Great Stink of London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuce, A.

    2012-12-01

    A rapidly growing population and the introduction of the flush toilet in nineteenth-century London caused a crisis with sewage pollution in the River Thames (Halliday, 1999). There were decades of delays in implementing solutions owing to: inadequate governance institutions; political inertia; difficulties with financing; opposition from vested interests; scientific uncertainties; and technological challenges. Effective counter-measures were started only once the problem arose, quite literally, under the noses of parliamentarians. There are parallels, some of them pointed out earlier by Alley et al (2010), between the sewage crisis in Victorian London and the current problem with climate change. Both involve the unsustainable use of a common resource (a river, the atmosphere) for the unconstrained disposal of human waste products. Alley (2011) estimated that the costs of providing clean water and sanitation are comparable to the expected costs of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Despite the similarities, the climate change issue is actually much more difficult because of: a) the unequal and uncertain global distribution of cause and effect; b) its long, intergenerational time lines; c) the insufficiency of adequate institutions, conventions or the tools— political, moral or economic—for tackling the climate crisis. This analysis is consistent with the model proposed by Gardiner (2011) in his book A Perfect Moral Storm. The three "storms" he identifies, the global, intergenerational and theoretical storms, combine in a powerful synergy to create a challenge of unprecedented intractability, providing opportunities for what Gardiner calls moral corruption: the obscuring of the buck-passing and procrastination that characterizes climate policy today. In Victorian London, the crucial steps to solve the sewage crises were not taken until the stench from the River Thames during the hot summer of 1858 rendered the House of Commons uninhabitable. A greater stink of a

  11. Contribution of wood burning to PM10 in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Gary W.; Tremper, Anja H.; Baker, Timothy D.; Yttri, Karl Espen; Butterfield, David

    2014-04-01

    Ahead of measures to incentivise wood heating, the current level of wood burning in London was assessed by two tracer methods; i) a six week campaign of daily measurements of levoglucosan along a 38 km transect across the city during winter 2010, ii) a three year (2009-2011) measurement programme of black carbon and particulate matter from wood burning using differential IR and UV absorption by Aethalometer. Mean winter levoglucosan concentrations were 160 ± 17 ng m-3 in central London and 30 ± 26 ng m-3 greater in the suburbs, with good temporal correlation (r2 = 0.68-0.98) between sampling sites. Sensitivity testing found that the aethalometer wood burning tracer method was more sensitive to the assumed value of the Ångström coefficient for fossil fuel black carbon than it was to the Ångström coefficient for wood burning PM, and that the model was optimised with Ångström coefficient for fossil fuel black carbon of 0.96. The aethalometer and levoglucosan estimates of mean PM from wood burning were in good agreement during the winter campaign; 1.8 μg m-3 (levoglucosan) and 2.0 μg m-3 (aethalometer); i.e. between 7% and 9% of mean PM10 across the London transect. Analysis of wood burning tracers with respect to wind speed suggested that wood burning PM was dominated by sources within the city. Concentrations of aethalometer and levoglucosan wood burning tracers were a greatest at weekends suggesting discretionary or secondary domestic wood burning rather than wood being used as a main heating source. Aethalometer wood burning tracers suggests that the annual mean concentration of PM10 from wood burning was 1.1 μg m-3. To put this in a policy context, this PM10 from wood burning is considerably greater than the city-wide mean PM10 reduction of 0.17 μg m-3 predicted from the first two phases of the London Low Emission Zone which was introduced to reduce PM from traffic sources.

  12. Trust, Autonomy and Relationships: The Help-Seeking Preferences of Young People in Secondary Level Schools in London (UK)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavey, Gerard; Rothi, Despina; Paul, Rini

    2011-01-01

    Help-seeking among young people is complicated, often determined vicariously by the ability of adults, family or professionals, to recognize, and respond to, their difficulties. We know very little about the complex concerns of teenage young people and how they impact on help-seeking preferences. We aimed to ascertain the help-seeking preferences…

  13. Pharma Pricing & Market Access Europe 2016--Health Network Communications' Tenth Annual Conference (February 23-25, 2016--London, UK).

    PubMed

    D'Souza, P

    2016-03-01

    Tighter national budgets and escalating drug prices continue to present challenges for pharmaceutical market access strategies and societal cost of care. As pharmaceutical companies and medical governmental advisory organizations enter tougher negotiations, hospital trusts and other dispensary firms face barriers to receiving the best medical treatment, and as a result patient access is limited. The 2016 HealthNetwork Communications' Pharma Pricing & Market Access Europe meeting brought together pharmaceutical, medical governmental advisory and stakeholders and market access/pricing consultants, to encourage discussions and negotiations into how to improve the drug pricing system and consequential market access strategies while achieving the respective reimbursement and affordability objectives. PMID:27186595

  14. Online Information 96. Proceedings of the International Online Information Meeting (20th, London, England, UK, December 3-5, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raitt, David I., Ed.; Jeapes, Ben, Ed.

    This proceedings volume contains 68 papers. Subjects addressed include: access to information; the future of information managers/librarians; intelligent agents; changing roles of library users; disintermediation; Internet review sites; World Wide Web (WWW) search engines; Java; online searching; future of online education; integrated information…

  15. Mutual learning and research messages: India, UK, and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    India and UK have had a long history together, since the times of the British Raj. Most of what Indian psychiatry is today, finds its roots in ancient Indian texts and medicine systems as much as it is influenced by the European system. Psychiatric research in India is growing. It is being influenced by research in the UK and Europe and is influencing them at the same time. In addition to the sharing of ideas and the know-how, there has also been a good amount of sharing of mental health professionals and research samples in the form of immigrants from India to the UK. The Indian mental health professionals based in UK have done a good amount of research with a focus on these Indian immigrants, giving an insight into cross-cultural aspects of some major psychiatric disorders. This article discusses the impact that research in these countries has had on each other and the contributions that have resulted from it. PMID:21836716

  16. Women's beliefs about medication use during their pregnancy: a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Twigg, M J; Lupattelli, A; Nordeng, H

    2016-08-01

    Background Previous research has examined the number and extent of medicines taking in pregnant women but not their beliefs and risk perception surrounding their use. Objective To describe beliefs and risk perception associated with medicines use for the treatment of common acute conditions among UK women and explore whether this is related to actual medicines use. Settings Cross-sectional, web-based study in the UK. Methods Pregnant women and mothers within 1 year of giving birth were invited to participate in an online cross-sectional questionnaire-based study via a pregnancy website in the UK. Anonymous data were collected from women regarding their use of medicines (both over-the-counter and prescribed) and their beliefs regarding medicines use during pregnancy. Main outcome measures Pregnant women's beliefs about medicines and their relation to pharmacological treatment of acute conditions in pregnancy. Results Pharmacological treatment of conditions in pregnancy ranged from 65.4 % for urinary tract infections (UTIs) to 1.1 % for sleeping problems. Almost three out of ten women avoided using some medications during pregnancy. For heartburn and UTIs, women who did not treat the condition viewed medicines in general as being overused, more harmful and less beneficial, than those who treated the condition. In general, UK pregnant women perceived medicines to be beneficial and slightly overused. Conclusions Women's beliefs about medications impact on treatment of specific conditions in pregnancy such as heartburn and UTIs. Healthcare professionals should explore patient's beliefs regarding medication at the first maternity care visit to promote appropriate medication use in pregnancy. PMID:27241342

  17. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  18. Carrington-L5: The UK/US Operational Space Weather Monitoring Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichas, Markos; Gibbs, Mark; Harrison, Richard; Green, Lucie; Eastwood, Jonathan; Bentley, Bob; Bisi, Mario; Bogdanova, Yulia; Davies, Jackie; D'Arrigo, Paolo; Eyles, Chris; Fazakerley, Andrew; Hapgood, Mike; Jackson, David; Kataria, Dhiren; Monchieri, Emanuele; Windred, Phil

    2015-06-01

    Airbus Defence and Space (UK) has carried out a study to investigate the possibilities for an operational space weather mission, in collaboration with the Met Office, RAL, MSSL and Imperial College London. The study looked at the user requirements for an operational mission, a model instrument payload, and a mission/spacecraft concept. A particular focus is cost effectiveness and timelineness of the data, suitable for 24/7 operational forecasting needs. We have focussed on a mission at L5 assuming that a mission to L1 will already occur, on the basis that L5 (Earth trailing) offers the greatest benefit for the earliest possible warning on hazardous SWE events and the most accurate SWE predictions. The baseline payload has been selected to cover all UK Met Office/NOAA's users priorities for L5 using instruments with extensive UK/US heritage, consisting of: heliospheric imager, coronograph, magnetograph, magnetometer, solar wind analyser and radiation monitor. The platform and subsystems are based on extensive re-use from past Airbus Defence and Space spacecraft to minimize the development cost and a Falcon-9 launcher has been selected on the same basis. A schedule analysis shows that the earliest launch could be achieved by 2020, assuming Phase A kick-off in 2015-2016. The study team have selected the name "Carrington" for the mission, reflecting the UK's proud history in this domain.

  19. Carrington-L5: The UK/US Space Weather Operational Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Trichas, M.

    2015-12-01

    Airbus Defence and Space (UK) have carried out a study for an operational L5 space weather mission, in collaboration with RAL, the UK Met Office, UCL and Imperial College London. The study looked at the user requirements for an operational mission, a model instrument payload, and a mission/spacecraft concept. A particular focus is cost effectiveness and timelineness of the data, suitable for operational forecasting needs. The study focussed on a mission at L5 assuming that a US mission to L1 will already occur, on the basis that L5 offers the greatest benefit for SWE predictions. The baseline payload has been selected to address all MOSWOC/SWPC priorities using UK/US instruments, consisting of: a heliospheric imager, coronagraph, EUV imager, magnetograph, magnetometer, solar wind analyser and radiation monitor. The platform is based on extensive re-use from Airbus' past missions to minimize the cost and a Falcon-9 launcher has been selected on the same basis. A schedule analysis shows that the earliest launch could occur in 2020, assuming Phase A KO in 2015. The study team have selected the name "Carrington" for the mission, reflecting the UK's proud history in this domain.

  20. Public health assessment for US Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, New London County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980906515. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-26

    The New London Submarine Base was divided by the town boundaries of Groton to the south and Ledyard to the north in New London County, Connecticut. In 1983, the Navy identified 16 potential source areas of environmental contamination during their investigations. The submarine base was listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List in August 1990 because of the potential for on-base groundwater contamination to migrate to off-base residential wells that are close to the New London Submarine Base.

  1. Vulnerable Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  2. Medicine Tracker

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine! TIME MEDICINE DOSAGE Name: Physician’s Information Name: Phone Number: NOTES ✓ Mon 11/19 Morning Antibiotic 1 tsp. With food ✓ For more useful tools, visit www.aapcc.org POISON HELP LINE: 1-800-222-1222 Lost track of your meds? Think you may have taken ...

  3. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2003-03-01

    Complementary medicine has become an important subject for rheumatologists, not least because many patients try complementary treatments. Recent clinical trials yield promising results. In particular, evidence suggests that several herbal medicines and dietary supplements can alleviate the pain of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Clearly, rigorous testing of complementary treatments is possible, and considering their popularity, should be encouraged. PMID:12598804

  4. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

  5. Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

  6. Trends in the stem cell and regenerative medicine industry.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Dusko

    2012-09-01

    The World Stem Cell Regenerative Medicine Congress series, now in its 7th year, is organized annually in the USA, Europe and Asia by Terrapinn, a business media company with its head office in London, and has grown over the last several years into the largest and probably the most important strategic stem cell conference where regulators, investors, big pharma, and small and medium enterprises gather to share and create synergy in developing and commercializing stem cell applications. The conference, held in London on 21-23 May 2012, only confirmed that this series is the meeting to attend if you want to get a clear understanding of trends in the stem cell and regenerative medicine industry. PMID:22954435

  7. Use of contraception in women who present for termination of pregnancy in inner London.

    PubMed

    Price, S J; Barrett, G; Smith, C; Paterson, C

    1997-11-01

    To assess the contraceptive needs of induced abortion patients, a 3-month (1992-93) prospective study was conducted of 269 women presenting to a National Health Service clinic in London, England, for pregnancy termination. 163 women (62.6%) had been using contraception--primarily condoms--around the time they became pregnant, but 86 failed to use the method correctly. Another 81 women (31.2%) had used contraceptives in the past, but not at the time of the index conception. 73 of these women were former pill users and 39 had used condoms. 39.5% of these women had discontinued use because of contraceptive side effects, particularly nausea. Finally, 16 women (6.2%) had never used a contraceptive method. 15 of these women were from outside the UK and had difficulties speaking English. When asked what form of contraception they would like to use in the future, 48.8% of abortion patients identified the pill, 11.9% wanted Depo-Provera, 7.3% chose condoms, and 6.5% wanted the IUD. Chemists were a major source of contraceptive supplies for women in this study, and this trend may represent a way of avoiding discussions of sexual activity with health professionals. Among the recommendations emerging from this study are more widespread education about and availability of emergency contraception, health promotion education in pharmacies, enhanced training of general practitioners in pill prescribing criteria and counseling, efforts to prevent repeat unwanted pregnancies, and the preparation of educational materials for non-English speaking family planning clients. PMID:9392968

  8. The Educational and Employment Aspirations of Adolescents from Areas of High Deprivation in London.

    PubMed

    Frostick, Caroline; Phillips, Gemma; Renton, Adrian; Moore, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Adolescents from areas of high deprivation are often assumed to have low aspirations for the future. However, recent research has suggested otherwise and there have been calls for more substantial investigation into the relationship between poverty and aspiration. This article reports levels and variation in aspiration from 1214 adolescents (49.5 % male; 50.5 % female) living in areas of high deprivation across 20 London boroughs. A strength of this study is our large and diverse population of low socio-economic status (SES) adolescents, comprising of white British (22 %), black African (21 %), black Caribbean (9 %), Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi/Other Asian (24 %), mixed ethnicity (9 %), and 15 % defining themselves as Other. Our measures indicated a high group level of reported aspiration with notable variations. Females reported higher educational (but not occupational) aspirations than males; white British students reported lower educational and occupational aspirations than other ethnic groups; and black African children reported the highest educational aspirations. Perceived parental support for education had the largest positive association with aspirations. In contrast to previous findings from studies carried out in the United States, aspirations were found to be negatively associated with perceptions of school and school peer environment. These measures explored feelings of safety, happiness and belonging within the school environment and school peer group. We discuss possible explanations for this unexpected finding within our population of adolescents from UK state schools and how it might affect future policy interventions. This study makes an important contribution to the literature on adolescent aspirations because of the unique nature of the data sample and the multiple domains of functioning and aspiration measured. PMID:26346034

  9. Personal exposures to airborne metals in London taxi drivers and office workers in 1995 and 1996.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, G D; Harrison, R M; Lynam, D R

    1999-09-01

    In 1995, a petroleum marketer introduced a diesel fuel additive in the UK containing Mn as MMT (methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl). A small study of personal exposures to airborne Mn in London was conducted before and after introduction of the additive to identify any major impact of the additive on exposures. In 1995, personal exposures to Mn were measured in two groups, taxi drivers and office workers (10 subjects per group) for two consecutive 7-day periods. A similar study was carried out in 1996 to determine if exposures had changed. Samples were also analyzed for Ca, Al, Mg and Pb. In 1996, exposures to aerosol mass as total suspended particulates (TSP) and PM2.5 were measured in addition to the metals. Manganese exposures in this cohort did not increase as a result of introduction of the additive. However, a significant source of Mn exposure was discovered during the conduct of these tests. The mean exposure to Mn was higher among the office workers in both years than that of the taxi drivers. This was due to the fact that approximately half of the office workers commuted via the underground railway system where airborne dust and metal concentrations are significantly elevated over those in the general environment. Similar results have been noted in other cities having underground rail systems. Exposure to Mn, Pb, Ca, and Mg were not significantly different between the 2 years. Taxi drivers had higher exposures than office workers to Mg and Pb in both years. Commuting via the underground also had a significant impact on exposures to TSP, PM2.5, Al, and Ca, but had little effect on exposures to Mg. The aerosol in the underground was particularly enriched in Mn, approximately 10-fold, when compared to the aerosol in the general environment. There are several possible sources for this Mn, including mechanical wear of the steel wheels on the steel rais, vaporization of metal from sparking of the third rail, or brake wear. PMID:10535124

  10. Food, home and health: the meanings of food amongst Bengali Women in London

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores the nature of food and plants and their meanings in a British Bengali urban context. It focuses on the nature of plants and food in terms of their role in home making, transnational connections, generational change and concepts of health. Methods An ethnographic approach to the research was taken, specific methods included participant observation, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. Thirty women of Bengali origin were mostly composed of “mother” and “daughter” pairs. The mothers were over 45 years old and had migrated from Bangladesh as adults and their grown-up daughters grew up in the UK. Results Food and plants play an important role in the construction of home “here” (London) while continuing to connect people to home “there” (Sylhet). This role, however, changes and is re-defined across generations. Looking at perceptions of “healthy” and “unhealthy” food, particularly in the context of Bengali food, multiple views of what constitutes “healthy” food exist. However, there appeared to be little two-way dialogue about this concept between the research participants and health professionals. This seems to be based on “cultural” and power differences that need to be addressed for a meaningful dialogue to occur. Conclusion In summary, this paper argues that while food is critical to the familial spaces of home (both locally and globally), it is defined by a complex interplay of actors and wider meanings as illustrated by concepts of health and what constitutes Bengali food. Therefore, we call for greater dialogue between health professionals and those they interact with, to allow for an enhanced appreciation of the dynamic nature of food and plants and the diverse perceptions of the role that they play in promoting health. PMID:24886061

  11. Molecular Self-Assembly Driven by London Dispersion Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guo; Cooper, Valentino R; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions are crucial to a variety of kinetic and dynamic processes at surfaces. Whereas strong chemisorption bonds are known to facilitate molecular binding, the importance of the weaker yet ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions remains elusive in most cases. Here we use first-principles calculations combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to unambiguously demonstrate the vital role that vdW interactions play in molecular self-assembly, using styrene nanowire growth on silicon as a prototypical example. We find that, only when the London dispersion forces are included, accounting for the attractive parts of vdW interactions, can the effective intermolecular interaction be reversed from being repulsive to attractive. Such attractive interactions, in turn, ensure the preferred growth of long wires under physically realistic conditions as observed experimentally. We further propose a cooperative scheme, invoking the application of an electric field and the selective creation of Si dangling bonds, to drastically improve the ordered arrangement of the molecular structures. The present study represents a significant step forward in the fundamental understanding and precise control of molecular self-assembly guided by London dispersion forces.

  12. Space-Time Analysis of Crime Patterns in Central London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Williams, D.

    2012-07-01

    Crime continues to cast a shadow over citizen well-being in big cities today, while also imposing huge economic and social costs. Timely understanding of how criminality emerges and how crime patterns evolve is crucial to anticipating crime, dealing with it when it occurs and developing public confidence in the police service. Every day, about 10,000 crime incidents are reported by citizens, recorded and geo-referenced in the London Metropolitan Police Service Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) database. The unique nature of this dataset allows the patterns to be explored at particularly fine temporal granularity and at multiple spatial resolutions. This study provides a framework for the exploratory spatio-temporal analysis of crime patterns that combines visual inquiry tools (interactive animations, space-time cubes and map matrices) with cluster analysis (spatial-temporal scan statistics and the self-organizing map). This framework is tested on the CAD dataset for the London Borough of Camden in March 2010. Patterns of crime through space and time are discovered and the clustering methods were evaluated on their ability to facilitate the discovery and interpretation of these patterns.

  13. Daytime CO2 Urban-Regional Scale Surface Fluxes from Airborne Measurements, Eddy-Covariance Observations and Emissions Inventories in Greater London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, A. M.; Grimmond, S. B.; Morgui, J. A.; Kotthaus, S.; Priestman, M.; Barratt, B.

    2014-12-01

    As the global population becomes increasingly urbanized, spatially concentrated centres of anthropogenic CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG) arise. While mitigation measures exist at national and international scales, their implementation will be more effective if linked to the urban-scale of the sources. Routine top-down approaches that quantify emissions of GHG from cities and megacities are needed to understand the dynamics of the urban carbon cycle to eventually define relevant policy decisions. London is the biggest urban conurbation in Western Europe with more than 8 million inhabitants. It emitted roughly 45000 ktn CO2 in 20101. To understand the carbon dynamics and quantify anthropogenic emissions from London, airborne surveys of atmospheric CO2, O3, particles and meteorological variables were carried out over the city, onboard the NERC-ARSF Dornier-228 UK research aircraft. We applied an Integrative Mass Boundary Layer method (IMBL) using airborne CO2 observations obtained in horizontal transects crossing London at 360 m at different times of the day and by sampling upwind-downwind profiles. IMBL CO2 fluxes were compared to an emissions inventory and neighbourhood-scale eddy-covariance fluxes in central London. Daytime fluxes in October 2011 from the IMBL calculations ranged from 46 to 104 μmolCO2 m-2 s-1 and covered 30-70% of the urban region. The IMBL CO2 fluxes were the same order of magnitude as observed eddy-covariance fluxes and were statistically comparable to the emission inventory for the same footprint area. A sensitivity analysis suggested that horizontal variability of the CO2 field in the urban mixing layer is the most critical factor affecting IMBL fluxes. The determination of the boundary height and vertical wind speed had more impact on fluxes calculated from upwind-downwind profiles. Furthermore, low-altitude airborne measurements of CO2 provide the advantage of direct observation of the CO2 urban dome of a megacity and relate the

  14. Air quality and public health impacts of UK airports. Part I: Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettler, M. E. J.; Eastham, S.; Barrett, S. R. H.

    2011-10-01

    The potential adverse human health and climate impacts of emissions from UK airports have become a significant political issue, yet the emissions, air quality impacts and health impacts attributable to UK airports remain largely unstudied. We produce an inventory of UK airport emissions - including aircraft landing and takeoff (LTO) operations and airside support equipment - with uncertainties quantified. The airports studied account for more than 95% of UK air passengers in 2005. We estimate that in 2005, UK airports emitted 10.2 Gg [-23 to +29%] of NO x, 0.73 Gg [-29 to +32%] of SO 2, 11.7 Gg [-42 to +77%] of CO, 1.8 Gg [-59 to +155%] of HC, 2.4 Tg [-13 to +12%] of CO 2, and 0.31 Gg [-36 to +45%] of PM 2.5. This translates to 2.5 Tg [-12 to +12%] CO 2-eq using Global Warming Potentials for a 100-year time horizon. Uncertainty estimates were based on analysis of data from aircraft emissions measurement campaigns and analyses of aircraft operations. The First-Order Approximation (FOA3) - currently the standard approach used to estimate particulate matter emissions from aircraft - is compared to measurements and it is shown that there are discrepancies greater than an order of magnitude for 40% of cases for both organic carbon and black carbon emissions indices. Modified methods to approximate organic carbon emissions, arising from incomplete combustion and lubrication oil, and black carbon are proposed. These alterations lead to factor 8 and a 44% increase in the annual emissions estimates of black and organic carbon particulate matter, respectively, leading to a factor 3.4 increase in total PM 2.5 emissions compared to the current FOA3 methodology. Our estimates of emissions are used in Part II to quantify the air quality and health impacts of UK airports, to assess mitigation options, and to estimate the impacts of a potential London airport expansion.

  15. Engaging the Somali community in the road safety agenda: a process evaluation from the London borough of Hounslow.

    PubMed

    Christie, Nicola; Sleney, Judith; Ahmed, Fatima; Knight, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    In the UK the most disadvantaged in society are more likely than those more affluent to be injured or killed in a road traffic collision and therefore it is a major cause of health inequality. There is a strong link between ethnicity, deprivation and injury. Whilst national road traffic injury data does not collect ethnic origin the London accident and analysis group does in terms of broad categories such as 'white', 'black' and 'Asian'. Analysis of this data revealed the over-representation of child pedestrian casualties from a 'black' ethnic origin. This information led road safety practitioners in one London borough to map child pedestrian casualties against census data which identified the Somali community as being particularly at risk of being involved in a road traffic collision. Working with the community they sought to discuss and address road safety issues and introduced practical evidence based approaches such as child pedestrian training. The process evaluation of the project used a qualitative approach and showed that engaging with community partners and working across organisational boundaries was a useful strategy to gain an understanding of the Somali community. A bottom approach provided the community with a sense of control and involvement which appears to add value in terms of reducing the sense of powerlessness that marginalised communities often feel. In terms of evaluation, small projects like these, lend themselves to a qualitative process evaluation though it has to be accepted that the strength of this evidence may be regarded as weak. Where possible routine injury data needs to take into account ethnicity which is a known risk factor for road casualty involvement which needs to be continually monitored. PMID:22109387

  16. Creating the Strategic Learning Environment at City University London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinsee, Susannah; Bullimore, Anise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the creation of a new approach to the implementation of educational technologies at a UK Higher Education Institution. Driven by changes in technology, an evaluation of the virtual learning environment (VLE) provided the opportunity to reassess the application of technology to the curriculum. However, such an…

  17. The ethics of dental practice in London in the sixteenth century. 1. Henry Chettle's Kind-Harts dreame of 1592. An important lay view.

    PubMed

    Bishop, M

    2012-07-01

    Kind-Harts dreame (Fig. 1) is one of the proto-novels which first appeared in the Elizabethan age of literary wonders. It recounts the dream of the hero - a tooth-drawer (Kind-Hart) - who encounters the shades of five recently deceased characters, each of whom had been a famous star of their day in the London scene. Although short, and with medicine and dentistry occupying only part of the tale, the story contains invaluable detailed information about dental care in late Tudor England as observed by a layman. It is also an amusing read. PMID:22790753

  18. The Osler Club of London, 1928-38: young medical gentlemen, their heroes, liberal education, books, and other matters.

    PubMed

    Lella, J W

    1995-01-01

    This study focuses on the interpretation of the Oslerian legacy reflected in the activities and intellectual emphases of the Osler Club of London during its first 10 years. It argues that the founders and early members of the Club were neophytes in a medical elite, pursuing ideals which were congenial to a subgroup of that elite and in which the Club members had been raised and educated. These ideals may be summed up in the expression "the nineteenth-century, British medical gentleman." Sir William Osler was chosen as patron of the Club because he exemplified important aspects of these ideals. However, in its orientation toward the "British medical gentleman," reflecting the gentility of Osler--including his concern for people, his commitment to teaching, his loyalty to students and medical colleagues, and his interest in the history of medicine, its books, and the broader humanities--the Club missed an important dimension of the Oslerian legacy: an interest in the social institutions and responsibilities of medicine. Finally, this study shows that perhaps the most influential Club founder, A. W. Franklin, in his later life expanded his own vision of medicine to include and even go beyond this latter dimension of the Oslerian legacy. PMID:11609082

  19. Wilderness medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sward, Douglas G.; Bennett, Brad L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human activity in wilderness areas has increased globally in recent decades, leading to increased risk of injury and illness. Wilderness medicine has developed in response to both need and interest. METHODS: The field of wilderness medicine encompasses many areas of interest. Some focus on special circumstances (such as avalanches) while others have a broader scope (such as trauma care). Several core areas of key interest within wilderness medicine are discussed in this study. RESULTS: Wilderness medicine is characterized by remote and improvised care of patients with routine or exotic illnesses or trauma, limited resources and manpower, and delayed evacuation to definitive care. Wilderness medicine is developing rapidly and draws from the breadth of medical and surgical subspecialties as well as the technical fields of mountaineering, climbing, and diving. Research, epidemiology, and evidence-based guidelines are evolving. A hallmark of this field is injury prevention and risk mitigation. The range of topics encompasses high-altitude cerebral edema, decompression sickness, snake envenomation, lightning injury, extremity trauma, and gastroenteritis. Several professional societies, academic fellowships, and training organizations offer education and resources for laypeople and health care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The future of wilderness medicine is unfolding on multiple fronts: education, research, training, technology, communications, and environment. Although wilderness medicine research is technically difficult to perform, it is essential to deepening our understanding of the contribution of specific techniques in achieving improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:25215140

  20. Medicines management.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Anne; Bloomfield, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    All newly registered graduate nurses are required to have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to perform the skills required for patient care, specifically the competencies identified in the Nursing and Midwifery Council's essential skills clusters. This article focuses on the fifth essential skills cluster – medicines management. Nursing students should work to attain the knowledge and skills required for effective medicines management throughout their pre-registration education. The roles and responsibilities of the newly registered graduate nurse in the area of medicines management are discussed in this the final article of the essential skills cluster series. PMID:25872850

  1. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, D; Stroud, P; Fyfe, A

    1998-01-01

    The widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine techniques, often explored by patients without discussion with their primary care physician, is seen as a request from patients for care as well as cure. In this article, we discuss the reasons for the growth of and interest in complementary and alternative medicine in an era of rapidly advancing medical technology. There is, for instance, evidence of the efficacy of supportive techniques such as group psychotherapy in improving adjustment and increasing survival time of cancer patients. We describe current and developing complementary medicine programs as well as opportunities for integration of some complementary techniques into standard medical care. PMID:9584661

  2. Teaching Astronomy in UK Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Paul; Roberts, Sarah; Newsam, Andy; Barclay, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to summarise the good, bad and (occasionally) ugly aspects of teaching astronomy in UK schools. It covers the most common problems reported by teachers when asked about covering the astronomy/space topics in school. Particular focus is given to the GCSE Astronomy qualification offered by Edexcel (which is currently the…

  3. UK partnership targets lung cancer.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Cancer Research UK has joined with two major pharmaceutical companies to launch a large multiarm clinical trial, dubbed the National Lung Matrix trial, to test the effectiveness of promising experimental therapies in treating rare forms of advanced lung cancer. PMID:25002593

  4. The future for clinical scientists in laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, M; Hyde, K; Cumming, A; Peake, I

    2002-08-01

    Clinical science in the UK has been presented with a range of opportunities and new initiatives in recent years. This review summarizes the contribution of clinical scientists to the changing face of laboratory medicine, and describes some recent UK Government initiatives to modernize the scientific service and develop the people who work in it. Recent changes in the regulation of professional practice and the need for maintenance of professional competence are also discussed. PMID:12181021

  5. Diversity in Adoption of Linguistic Features of London English by Chinese and Bangladeshi Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Martha C.; Lau, Lawrence; Sachdev, Itesh

    2011-01-01

    This comparative study, conducted in multicultural London, investigates the occurrence in interviews with a researcher and in constructed same-sex peer conversations of five linguistic features characteristic of London English in the speech of two groups of British-born adolescents: ethnic Bangladeshis and ethnic Chinese of Cantonese heritage. The…

  6. The Increasing Presence of Spanish-Speaking Latinos in London: An Emergent Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the number of Spanish-speaking Latinos in Britain and London has grown considerably. Estimates from different sources put the population in London as high as 300,000. Unfortunately, this growing ethnolinguistic group is an underresearched minority, and information of any kind is hard to come by. In this article, my aim is to…

  7. Engendering City Politics and Educational Thought: Elite Women and the London Labour Party, 1914-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article uses biographical approaches to recover the contribution of hitherto neglected figures in the history of education and the political history of the Left in London. Place and location are important since it is important to grasp the uniqueness of the London County Council within the framework of English local government and of the…

  8. Psychoanalysis of Jack London's "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hongyan

    2015-01-01

    "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang" both are masterpieces of Jack London. The protagonists Buck and White Fang are the incarnation of Jack himself to some extent for the two novels reveal a great deal of the writer. This essay aims at psychoanalyzing Jack London's creative process, the Oedipus complex and the confliction…

  9. Travel in holography continued: from London to Gent to Point Reyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casdin-Silver, Harriet

    1995-02-01

    Since Lake Forest Symposium '91, when her paper recounted her holographic work in three locations, Kiev, Ukraine; Miami Beach, U.S.A.; and Paris, France; the author has worked in the laboratories of the Royal college of Art, London, England; Rijksuniversiteit, Gent, Belgium; Third Dimension, London, England; and in Point Reyes, California, U.S.A. A discussion of these ventures follows.

  10. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... notified by personnel of the New London Submarine Base that such use will interfere with...

  11. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... notified by personnel of the New London Submarine Base that such use will interfere with...

  12. 33 CFR 334.75 - Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Thames River, Naval Submarine....75 Thames River, Naval Submarine Base New London, restricted area. (a) The area: The open waters of... notified by personnel of the New London Submarine Base that such use will interfere with...

  13. The New Education and the Institute of Education, University of London, 1919-1945

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The London Day Training College (LDTC), founded in 1902, soon became the leading institution for the study of education and for the training of teachers in England. In 1932 it was transmuted into the Institute of Education of the University of London. Its title and pre-eminence have continued to this day. In the period 1919-1945 it was closely,…

  14. Access to and utilisation of GP services among Burmese migrants in London: a cross-sectional descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An estimated 10,000 Burmese migrants are currently living in London. No studies have been conducted on their access to health services. Furthermore, most studies on migrants in the United Kingdom (UK) have been conducted at the point of service provision, carrying the risk of selection bias. Our cross-sectional study explored access to and utilisation of General Practice (GP) services by Burmese migrants residing in London. Methods We used a mixed-method approach: a quantitative survey using self-administered questionnaires was complemented by qualitative in-depth interviews for developing the questionnaire and triangulating the findings of the survey. Overall, 137 questionnaires were received (a response rate of 57%) and 11 in-depth interviews conducted. The main outcome variables of the study included GP registration, barriers towards registration, GP consultations, barriers towards consultations, and knowledge on entitlements to health care. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, association tests, and a multivariate analysis using logistic regression. The qualitative information was analysed using content analysis. Results The respondents were young, of roughly equal gender (51.5% female), well educated, and had a fair level of knowledge on health services in the UK. Although the GP registration rate was relatively high (80%, 109 out of 136), GP service utilisation during the last episode of illness, at 56.8% (54 out of 95), was low. The statistical analysis showed that age being younger than 35 years, lacking prior overseas experience, having an unstable immigration status, having a shorter duration of stay, and resorting to self-medication were the main barriers hindering Burmese migrants from accessing primary health care services. These findings were corroborated by the in-depth interviews. Conclusions Our study found that having formal access to primary health care was not sufficient to ensure GP registration and health

  15. Impact on and use of health services by international migrants: questionnaire survey of inner city London A&E attenders

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Sally; Friedland, Jon S; Gothard, Philip; Saxena, Sonia; Millington, Hugh; Eliahoo, Joseph; Le Feuvre, Peter; Holmes, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Background Changing immigration trends pose new challenges for the UK's open access health service and there is considerable speculation that migrants from resource-poor countries place a disproportionate burden on services. Data are needed to inform provision of services to migrant groups and to ensure their access to appropriate health care. We compared sociodemographic characteristics and impact of migrant groups and UK-born patients presenting to a hospital A&E/Walk-In Centre and prior use of community-based General Practitioner (GP) services. Methods We administered an anonymous questionnaire survey of all presenting patients at an A&E/Walk-In Centre at an inner-city London hospital during a 1 month period. Questions related to nationality, immigration status, time in the UK, registration and use of GP services. We compared differences between groups using two-way tables by Chi-Square and Fisher's exact test. We used logistic regression modelling to quantify associations of explanatory variables and outcomes. Results 1611 of 3262 patients completed the survey (response rate 49.4%). 720 (44.7%) were overseas born, representing 87 nationalities, of whom 532 (73.9%) were new migrants to the UK (≤10 years). Overseas born were over-represented in comparison to local estimates (44.7% vs 33.6%; p < 0.001; proportional difference 0.111 [95% CI 0.087–0.136]). Dominant immigration status' were: work permit (24.4%), EU citizens (21.5%), with only 21 (1.3%) political asylum seekers/refugees. 178 (11%) reported nationalities from refugee-generating countries (RGCs), eg, Somalia, who were less likely to speak English. Compared with RGCs, and after adjusting for age and sex, the Australians, New Zealanders, and South Africans (ANS group; OR 0.28 [95% CI 0.11 to 0.71]; p = 0.008) and the Other Migrant (OM) group comprising mainly Europeans (0.13 [0.06 to 0.30]; p = 0.000) were less likely to have GP registration and to have made prior contact with GPs, yet this did not

  16. Ayurvedic Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... in varying forms in Southeast Asia. What the Science Says About the Safety and Side Effects of ... and integrative health approaches you use. What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Ayurvedic Medicine Research ...

  17. Taking Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, it is converted into products called metabolites. Usually, these metabolites are not as strong as the original drug. ... by too much medicine in the body. Drug metabolites often return to the liver and are chemically ...

  18. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    An herb is a plant or plant part used for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are ... go through the testing that drugs do. Some herbs, such as comfrey and ephedra, can cause serious ...

  19. The hospital microbiome project: meeting report for the UK science and innovation network UK-USA workshop ‘beating the superbugs: hospital microbiome studies for tackling antimicrobial resistance’, October 14th 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The UK Science and Innovation Network UK-USA workshop ‘Beating the Superbugs: Hospital Microbiome Studies for tackling Antimicrobial Resistance’ was held on October 14th 2013 at the UK Department of Health, London. The workshop was designed to promote US-UK collaboration on hospital microbiome studies to add a new facet to our collective understanding of antimicrobial resistance. The assembled researchers debated the importance of the hospital microbial community in transmission of disease and as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes, and discussed methodologies, hypotheses, and priorities. A number of complementary approaches were explored, although the importance of the built environment microbiome in disease transmission was not universally accepted. Current whole genome epidemiological methods are being pioneered in the UK and the benefits of moving to community analysis are not necessarily obvious to the pioneers; however, rapid progress in other areas of microbiology suggest to some researchers that hospital microbiome studies will be exceptionally fruitful even in the short term. Collaborative studies will recombine different strengths to tackle the international problems of antimicrobial resistance and hospital and healthcare associated infections.

  20. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress Report from London 2015.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in London from 29 August to 2 September 2015. It is the leading conference in cardiology in the world, with presentations on the latest scientific discoveries, innovations, technology, education, and clinical practices. More than 32,000 delegates and 5,000 exhibitors from 140 countries participated, sharing a number of scientific presentations, including 28 clinical hot lines, 18 clinical trial updates, 20 registry studies, 12 basic and translational science hot line studies, and 4,533 abstract studies. Japan had the highest number of accepted abstracts at the Congress, indicating the great contribution of Japanese scientists and the Japanese Circulation Society. PMID:26459395

  1. Should I pay for your risky behaviours? Evidence from London.

    PubMed

    Miraldo, Marisa; Galizzi, Matteo M; Merla, Anna; Levaggi, Rosella; Schulz, Peter J; Auxilia, Francesco; Castaldi, Silvana; Gelatti, Umberto

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the extent to which respondents from a general population sample in London (July-August 2011) agree or disagree with the NHS covering the healthcare costs related to five risky health behaviours: overeating, unhealthy diet, sedentary life, excess of alcohol, and smoking. For each behaviour, we also directly explore the main factors associated with the likelihood to agree or disagree. Half of the respondents (N=146) manifest agreement with the idea. Wider agreement exists for covering the costs associated smoking, heavy drinking, and sedentary lives than with overeating, or poor diets. With the exception of alcohol drinking and sedentary life, there is an almost one-to-one relationship between the agreement that the NHS should pay the healthcare costs associated with a specific behaviour, and the respondents' actual engagement in that behaviour. Those at higher risk of depending on publicly funded healthcare, are more likely to agree. PMID:24945692

  2. London's changing ethnic landscape, 2001-2011: a cartographic exploration.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Ron; Poulsen, Michael; Forrest, James

    2014-01-01

    London population became increasing more diverse ethnically over the decade 2001-2011, a period when the White population declined, with many commentators suggesting that there has been 'White flight' from some districts in the face of 'invasion' by members of ethnic minority groups. To examine how extensively the city's ethnic landscape changed during that period--and whether suggestions of the operation of 'invasion and succession processes' are valid--this article reports on statistical mapping of small area data for the two censuses. The results identify clearly-defined, substantial blocks of territory within the urban residential fabric where members of each of the main census respondent self-identified ethnic groups are concentrated. These have expanded outwards, into areas from which the White population has clearly withdrawn, though in most cases the rate of cluster areal expansion has been less than the groups' numerical growth. PMID:25080618

  3. SETI and astrobiology: The Rio Scale and the London Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almár, Iván

    2011-11-01

    The public reaction to a discovery, the character of the corresponding risk communication, as well as the possible impact on science and society all depend on the character of the phenomenon discovered, on the method of discovery, on the distance to the phenomenon and, last but not least, on the reliability of the announcement itself. The Rio Scale - proposed together with Jill Tarter just a decade ago at an IAA symposium in Rio de Janeiro - attempts to quantify the relative importance of such a “low probability, high consequence event”, namely the announcement of an ETI discovery. After the publication of the book “The Eerie Silence” by Paul Davies it is necessary to control how the recently suggested possible “technosignatures” or “technomarkers” mentioned in this book could be evaluated by the Rio Scale. The new London Scale, proposed at the Royal Society meeting in January 2010, in London, is a similar attempt to quantify the impact of an announcement regarding the discovery of ET life on an analogous ordinal scale between zero and ten. Here again the new concept of a “shadow biosphere” raised in this book deserves a special attention since a “weird form of life” found on Earth would not necessarily have an extraterrestrial origin, nevertheless it might be an important discovery in itself. Several arguments are presented that methods, aims and targets of “search for ET life” and “search for ET intelligence” are recently converging. The new problem is raised whether a unification of these two scales is necessary as a consequence of the convergence of the two subjects. Finally, it is suggested that experts in social sciences should take the structure of the respective scales into consideration when investigating case by case the possible effects on the society of such discoveries.

  4. The Paediatric Board of the Royal College of Physicians of London: its role in the college.

    PubMed

    Chambers, T

    1992-01-01

    Conscious of its responsibilities to its Fellows and Members who are paediatricians, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) is anxious to play its part, along with others, in maintaining and improving standards in paediatrics. Recognising the importance and prominence of the specialty within the generality of specialist medicine, and alongside general internal medicine, it has established a Paediatric Board, reporting directly to Council, which will deal with and advise on all matters concerning paediatrics and child health, and thus enhance the autonomy and influence of the specialty both within the College and on medical affairs in general. It will do this in close association with the British Paediatric Association (BPA) which will nominate members of the Board. In particular the RCP will continue to set standards in paediatrics through examinations, accreditation, representatives on consultant advisory appointment committees, and its membership of the GMC and the Conference of Medical Royal Colleges and their Faculties, to which the Paediatric Board will make a substantial contribution. The network of regional paediatric advisers to the RCP will ensure that the Board is kept in touch with paediatric opinion throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Relationships with Scottish paediatrics and paediatricians will be important, for example, in the organisation and development of the MRCP(UK) examination and its paediatric Part II. Links with paediatricians in the Irish Republic exist through the Joint Committee on Higher Medical Training. PMID:1573597

  5. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Take these simple steps to avoid problems with medicines. Follow the directions on the medicine label carefully. ...

  6. Preparing for Disaster: Response Matrices in the USA and UK

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Laura H.

    2008-01-01

    Disasters, whether man-made or naturally occurring, require complex responses across multiple government agencies and private sector elements, including the media. These factors mandate that, for effective disaster management and because of the unpredictability of such events, response structures must be in place in advance, ready to be activated on short notice, with lines of responsibility clearly delineated and mechanisms for coordination of efforts already established. Disaster response experiences in the USA and the UK were reviewed at a conference convened by the New York Academy of Medicine and the Royal Society of Medicine in June 2007. Lessons to be drawn from these comparisons were sought. The importance of careful advance planning, clear delineation of spheres of responsibility and response roles, effective mechanisms for communication at all levels, and provision for adequate communication with the public were all identified as key elements of effective response mechanisms. PMID:18756376

  7. Preparing for disaster: response matrices in the USA and UK.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laura H; Barondess, Jeremiah A

    2008-11-01

    Disasters, whether man-made or naturally occurring, require complex responses across multiple government agencies and private sector elements, including the media. These factors mandate that, for effective disaster management and because of the unpredictability of such events, response structures must be in place in advance, ready to be activated on short notice, with lines of responsibility clearly delineated and mechanisms for coordination of efforts already established. Disaster response experiences in the USA and the UK were reviewed at a conference convened by the New York Academy of Medicine and the Royal Society of Medicine in June 2007. Lessons to be drawn from these comparisons were sought. The importance of careful advance planning, clear delineation of spheres of responsibility and response roles, effective mechanisms for communication at all levels, and provision for adequate communication with the public were all identified as key elements of effective response mechanisms. PMID:18756376

  8. A transatlantic comparison of training in emergency medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, J P; Weber, J E

    1998-01-01

    The system of training in accident and emergency (A&E) medicine in the United Kingdom is at a critical and much earlier stage of development than in the United States. Transatlantic comparison offers the opportunity to explore possible ways of improving training in the United Kingdom. Comparison revealed deficiencies in the UK training system in the following: prehospital care training, formal theoretical teaching, close supervision in a clinical setting, and in-service training examinations. Implementation of measures designed to address these deficiencies would enhance UK training in A&E medicine. PMID:9639180

  9. Recent TB transmission, clustering and predictors of large clusters in London, 2010–2012: results from first 3 years of universal MIRU-VNTR strain typing

    PubMed Central

    Hamblion, Esther L; Le Menach, Arnaud; Anderson, Laura F; Lalor, Maeve K; Brown, Tim; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Anderson, Charlotte; Maguire, Helen; Anderson, Sarah R

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of TB has doubled in the last 20 years in London. A better understanding of risk groups for recent transmission is required to effectively target interventions. We investigated the molecular epidemiological characteristics of TB cases to estimate the proportion of cases due to recent transmission, and identify predictors for belonging to a cluster. Methods The study population included all culture-positive TB cases in London residents, notified between January 2010 and December 2012, strain typed using 24-loci multiple interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for clustering using sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of cases and for cluster size based on the characteristics of the first two cases. Results There were 10 147 cases of which 5728 (57%) were culture confirmed and 4790 isolates (84%) were typed. 2194 (46%) were clustered in 570 clusters, and the estimated proportion attributable to recent transmission was 34%. Clustered cases were more likely to be UK born, have pulmonary TB, a previous diagnosis, a history of substance abuse or alcohol abuse and imprisonment, be of white, Indian, black-African or Caribbean ethnicity. The time between notification of the first two cases was more likely to be <90 days in large clusters. Conclusions Up to a third of TB cases in London may be due to recent transmission. Resources should be directed to the timely investigation of clusters involving cases with risk factors, particularly those with a short period between the first two cases, to interrupt onward transmission of TB. PMID:27417280

  10. Sustaining International CBRN Centers of Excellence with a Focus on Nuclear Security and Safeguards: Initial Scoping Session London, 23-24 September 2013 SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Roger G.; Frazar, Sarah L.

    2013-12-12

    This report provides a summary-level description of the key information, observations, ideas, and recommendations expressed during the subject meeting. The report is organized to correspond to the meeting agenda provided in Appendix 1 and includes references to several of the participants listed in Appendix 2 .The meeting venue was Lloyd’s Register in the City of London. Lloyd’s Register graciously accommodated the request of The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) with whom it works on various safeguards activities commissioned by NNSA. PNNL and NNSA also shared the goal of the meeting/study with the United Kingdom (UK) Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and the Department of Energy and Climate Change with whom they coordinated the participant list.

  11. Challenges in researching migration status, health and health service use: an intersectional analysis of a South London community

    PubMed Central

    Gazard, Billy; Frissa, Souci; Nellums, Laura; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the associations between migration status and health-related outcomes and to examine whether and how the effect of migration status changes when it is disaggregated by length of residence, first language, reason for migration and combined with ethnicity. Design. A total of 1698 adults were interviewed from 1076 randomly selected households in two South London boroughs. We described the socio-demographic and socio-economic differences between migrants and non-migrants and compared the prevalence of health-related outcomes by migration status, length of residence, first language, reason for migration and migration status within ethnic groups. Unadjusted models and models adjusted for socio-demographic and socio-economic indicators are presented. Results. Migrants were disadvantaged in terms of socio-economic status but few differences were found between migrant and non-migrants regarding health or health service use indicators; migration status was associated with decreased hazardous alcohol use, functional limitations due to poor mental health and not being registered with a general practitioner. Important differences emerged when migration status was disaggregated by length of residence in the UK, first language, reason for migration and intersected with ethnicity. The association between migration status and functional limitations due to poor mental health was only seen in White migrants, migrants whose first language was not English and migrants who had moved to the UK for work or a better life or for asylum or political reasons. There was no association between migration status and self-rated health overall, but Black African migrants had decreased odds for reporting poor health compared to their non-migrant counterparts [odds ratio = 0.15 (0.05–0.48), p < 0.01]. Conclusions. Disaggregating migration status by length of residence, first language and reason for migration as well as intersecting it with ethnicity leads

  12. UK report on waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.

    1995-09-01

    Arising jointly from the National and European Union requirements for more intensive attention to be paid to the environment, the United Kingdom (UK) has taken many strides forward in protecting the environment from pollution and preventing harm to human health arising from the handling, transport and disposal of wastes. Major adjustments are taking place in Europe following the opening up of the Eastern European countries. The consequences of the illegal movement of wastes and its mistreatment and disposal are now recognised within the European Union. The UK as a member State is well aware of the consequences which arise from the lack of proper waste management. This paper discusses waste management and legislation pertaining to waste management in the United Kingdom.

  13. Mesopotamian medicine.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots. PMID:17378276

  14. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  15. Precision engineering for optical applications: knowledge transfer into UK industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Christopher; Shore, Paul

    2009-06-01

    A means of facilitating the transfer of precision engineering knowledge and skills from academic institutions and their research partners into UK optics and optical engineering companies is described. The process involves the creation of an Integrated Knowledge Centre (IKC), a partnership led by Cranfield University with the support of the University of Cambridge, University College London, and the OpTIC technium. This paper describes the development of the three main vehicles for knowledge transfer. These are a Masters level postgraduate degree course (the Cranfield University led MSc in "Ultra Precision Technologies"), a portfolio of industrial short courses which are designed to address key skills shortages in the fields of precision engineering for optical applications, and an e-learning package in precision engineering. The main issues encountered during the development of the knowledge transfer teaching and learning packages are discussed, and the outcomes from the first year of knowledge transfer activities are described. In overall summary, the results demonstrate how the Integrated Knowledge Centre in Ultra Precision and Structured Surfaces' approach to knowledge transfer has been effective in addressing the engineering skills gap in precision optics based industries.

  16. The impact of migration on the sexual health, behaviours and attitudes of Central and East European gay/bisexual men in London

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Richard C.M.; Parutis, Violetta; Gerry, Christopher J.; Burns, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Building on an earlier quantitative study which found that gay/bisexual men from Central and Eastern Europe were at greater risk of sexual ill health following migration to the UK, the aim of this qualitative study is to explore how the process of migration itself may have influenced the migrants’ sexual behaviour and attitudes. Methods To address these questions, we conducted 17 in-depth interviews in London with gay/bisexual male migrants from Central and Eastern Europe, drawing on Fisher and Fisher's Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model as an interpretive framework. Results We find that the sexual behaviours of our respondents have been significantly influenced by the process of migration itself. In particular, extricating themselves from the traditional systems of social control in their home societies and having greater access to gay venues in London resulted in their increased sexual activity, particularly in the first phase of migration. High-risk sexual behaviour was found to be a factor of sexual mixing, the use of commercial sex and perceptions of risk in the UKvis-á-vis Central and Eastern Europe, with each of these factors also influenced by the process of migration. Risk-prevention behaviour depended upon the possession of appropriate risk-prevention information, motivation to use condoms and appropriate behavioural skills, with the latter two factors in particular influenced by social mores in the home country and the UK. Conclusions The interviews suggested a number of migration-related factors that increased the STI and HIV risk for these migrants. A number of potentially important policy recommendations stem from our analysis. PMID:23597207

  17. Samuel Holden Parsons Lee (1772-1863): American physician, entrepreneur and selfless fighter of the 1798 Yellow Fever epidemic of New London, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Mattie, James K; Desai, Sukumar P

    2015-02-01

    Samuel Holden Parsons Lee practised medicine at a time when the germ theory of disease had not yet been proposed and antibiotics remained undiscovered. In 1798 he served selflessly as the only physician in town who was willing to battle the Yellow Fever outbreak of New London, Connecticut. Because he practised at the dawn of the age of patent medicine, unfortunately his name also came to be associated with medical quackery. We argue that his contributions have been grossly underestimated. He compounded and vended medications - including bilious pills and bitters - that were gold standards of the day. Moreover, one preparation for treatment of kidney stones led to his sub-specialization in this field and was met with such success that its sale continued for nearly 100 years after his death. While a talented medical man, Lee also had a knack for business, finding success in trading, whaling and real estate. PMID:24585580

  18. Household hazardous waste data for the UK by direct sampling.

    PubMed

    Slack, Rebecca J; Bonin, Michael; Gronow, Jan R; Van Santen, Anton; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2007-04-01

    The amount of household hazardous waste (HHW) disposed of in the United Kingdom (UK) requires assessment. This paper describes a direct analysis study carried out in three areas in southeast England involving over 500 households. Each participating householder was provided with a special bin in which to place items corresponding to a list of HHW. The amount of waste collected was split into nine broad categories: batteries, home maintenance (DIY), vehicle upkeep, pesticides, pet care, pharmaceuticals, photographic chemicals, household cleaners, and printer cartridges. Over 1 T of waste was collected from the sample households over a 32-week period, which would correspond to an estimated 51,000 T if extrapolated to the UK population for the same period or over 7,000 T per month. Details of likely disposal routes adopted by householders were also sought, demonstrating the different pathways selected for different waste categories. Co-disposal with residual household waste dominated for waste batteries and veterinary medicines, hence avoiding classification as hazardous waste under new UK waste regulations. The information can be used to set a baseline for the management of HHW and provides information for an environmental risk assessment of the disposal of such wastes to landfill. PMID:17438817

  19. Wilderness Medicine.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Whitney; Bright, Steven; Burns, Patrick; Townes, David

    2016-03-01

    Wilderness medicine encompasses prevention and treatment of illness and injury, education and training, emergency medical services, and search and rescue in the wilderness. Although traumatic injuries, including minor injuries, outnumber medical illness as the cause of morbidity in the wilderness, basic understanding of the prevention and management of injury and illness, including recognition, identification, treatment, initial management, and stabilization, is essential, in addition to the ability to facilitate evacuation of affected patients. An important theme throughout wilderness medicine is planning and preparation for the best- and worst-case scenarios, and being ready for the unexpected. PMID:26900118

  20. Career progression of men and women doctors in the UK NHS: a questionnaire study of the UK medical qualifiers of 1993 in 2010/2011

    PubMed Central

    Svirko, Elena; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To report the career progression of a cohort of UK medical graduates in mid-career, comparing men and women. Design Postal and questionnaire survey conducted in 2010/2011, with comparisons with earlier surveys. Setting UK. Participants In total, 2507 responding UK medical graduates of 1993. Main outcome measures Doctors’ career specialties, grade, work location and working pattern in 2010/2011 and equivalent data in earlier years. Results The respondents represented 72% of the contactable cohort; 90% were working in UK medicine and 7% in medicine outside the UK; 87% were in the UK NHS (87% of men and 86% of women). Of doctors in the NHS, 70.6% of men and 52.0% of women were in the hospital specialties and the great majority of the others were in general practice. Within hospital specialties, a higher percentage of men than women were in surgery, and a higher percentage of women than men were in paediatrics, obstetrics and gynaecology, clinical oncology, pathology and psychiatry. In the NHS, 63% of women and 8% of men were working less-than-full-time (in general practice, 19% of men and 83% of women; and in hospital specialties, 3% of men and 46% of women). Among doctors who had always worked full-time, 94% of men and 87% of women GPs were GP principals; in hospital practice, 96% of men and 93% of women had reached consultant level. Conclusions The 1993 graduates show a continuing high level of commitment to the NHS. Gender differences in seniority lessened considerably when comparing doctors who had always worked full-time. PMID:25408921

  1. Measurement of NOx fluxes by eddy covariance from the BT tower, London during the ClearfLo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, James; Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Tremper, Anja; Stocker, Jenny; Carruthers, David

    2014-05-01

    The vast majority of air pollutants are emitted directly into the atmosphere from activities occurring at the Earth's surface. One of the key anthropogenic pollutants is NOx (defined as the sum of NO and NO2), which is emitted as a result of most anthropogenic combustion processes. Whilst the chemical reactions and atmospheric processing of NOx are reasonably well understood, and can be modelled with some skill, large uncertainties arise in models due to uncertainty associated with the rate of emissions. In recent years it has become clear that measured trends in certain pollutants, for example NO2, have not followed trends predicted by inventories. Continued exceedances of certain air pollution targets are of significant concern to governments, who have identified reducing this uncertainty associated with emissions as key evidence need. As part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project, concentrations and fluxes of NOx were measured from the top of the BT tower, which is a 188m high telecommunications tower, situated in central London (51o31'17.4'N; 0o8'20.04W). The tower is surrounded by a mixture of commercial and residential buildings with an average height of 15 m. The typical daytime flux footprint of the tower is dominated by commercial/residential buildings and roads (82%) but also includes urban parkland (13%) and impervious ground (5%). High time resolution (10 Hz) chemiluminescence measurements of NO and NO2 (photolytic conversion to NO followed by chemiluminescence) were combined with fast turbulence measurements from a sonic anemometer to calculate fluxes using the eddy covariance technique. In brief, NOx fluxes per notional half-hourly averaging period were obtained by maximising the covariance between instantaneous (i.e. mean for the averaging period subtracted from each 10 Hz data point) fluctuations of NOx mixing ratio and vertical wind velocity. 24 hour NOx flux measurements were made on 36 days

  2. Impact of Waterpipe Tobacco Pack Health Warnings on Waterpipe Smoking Attitudes: A Qualitative Analysis among Regular Users in London

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, Mohammed; Bakir, Ali; Ali, Mohammed; Grant, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the rise in prevalence of waterpipe tobacco smoking, it has received little legislative enforcement from governing bodies, especially in the area of health warning labels. Methods. Twenty regular waterpipe tobacco smokers from London took part in five focus groups discussing the impact of waterpipe tobacco pack health warnings on their attitudes towards waterpipe smoking. We presented them with existing and mock waterpipe tobacco products, designed to be compliant with current and future UK/EU legislation. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results. Participants felt packs were less attractive and health warnings were more impactful as health warnings increased in size and packaging became less branded. However, participants highlighted their lack of exposure to waterpipe tobacco pack health warnings due to the inherent nature of waterpipe smoking, that is, smoking in a café with the apparatus already prepacked by staff. Health warnings at the point of consumption had more reported impact than health warnings at the point of sale. Conclusions. Waterpipe tobacco pack health warnings are likely to be effective if compliant with existing laws and exposed to end-users. Legislations should be reviewed to extend health warning labels to waterpipe accessories, particularly the apparatus, and to waterpipe-serving premises. PMID:26273642

  3. Radical observations during the Clean air for London project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Stone, D.; Clancy, N.; Lee, J. D.; Laufs, S.; Kleffmann, J.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    With greater than 50 % of the global population residing in urban conurbations, poor urban air quality has a demonstrable effect on human health. OH and HO2 radicals, (collectively termed HOx) together with RO2 radicals, mediate virtually all of the oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere, being responsible for the transformation of primary emissions into secondary pollutants such as NO2, O3 and particulates. Understanding the chemistry of free-radicals in the atmosphere is essential in improving predictions of the lifetimes of pollutants and spatial scales of their transport within urban areas. Results from earlier field campaigns in urban and polluted regions have demonstrated the significance of HONO photolysis and alkene ozonolysis in the production of HOx radicals. In many cases, however, measurements of HONO have not been made, reducing the ability to evaluate model successes for OH in these environments. Here we present measurements of OH, HO2, RO2 and OH reactivity taken during the wintertime (January - February, 2012) and summertime (July - August, 2012) as part of the Clean air for London (ClearfLo) project in London. RO2 was detected using a newly developed flow-reactor laser-induced fluorescence technique which is able to discriminate between HO2 and organic peroxy radicals [1]. Low concentrations of radicals were observed during the wintertime, midday [OH], [HO2] and [RO2] were ~ 0.04, 0.8 and 1.5 pptv respectively, comparable to observations of radicals at other urban locations in winter [2,3,4], and which displayed a negative correlation with NO concentrations. OH reactivity was high and largely tracked the diurnal profiles of NOx and CO, with the highest reactivity ~100 s-1 observed during the morning rush hour. Analysis of factors controlling OH concentrations during the wintertime suggests that the formation of OH from the photolysis of O3 and subsequent reaction of O(1D) with H2O is a minor contribution both under high and low NOx conditions owing

  4. Monetary costs of agitation in older adults with Alzheimer's disease in the UK: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephen; Patel, Nishma; Baio, Gianluca; Kelly, Lynsey; Lewis-Holmes, Elanor; Omar, Rumana Z; Katona, Cornelius; Cooper, Claudia; Livingston, Gill

    2015-01-01

    Objective While nearly half of all people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have agitation symptoms every month, little is known about the costs of agitation in AD. We calculated the monetary costs associated with agitation in older adults with AD in the UK from a National Health Service and personal social services perspective. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting London and the South East Region of the UK (LASER-AD study). Participants 224 people with AD recruited between July 2002 and January 2003 and followed up for 54 months. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was health and social care costs, including accommodation costs and costs of contacts with health and social care services. Agitation was assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) agitation score. Results After adjustment, health and social care costs varied significantly by agitation, from £29 000 over a 1 year period with no agitation symptoms (NPI agitation score=0) to £57 000 at the most severe levels of agitation (NPI agitation score=12; p=0.01). The mean excess cost associated with agitation per person with AD was £4091 a year, accounting for 12% of the health and social care costs of AD in our data, and equating to £2 billion a year across all people with AD in the UK. Conclusions Agitation in people with AD represents a substantial monetary burden over and above the costs associated with cognitive impairment. PMID:25770235

  5. 'Ye Olde Hot Aire': reporting on human contributions to climate change in the UK tabloid press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boykoff, Maxwell T.; Mansfield, Maria

    2008-04-01

    This letter explores daily print media coverage of climate change in four United Kingdom (UK) tabloid newspapers: The Sun (and News of the World), Daily Mail (and Mail on Sunday), the Daily Express (and Sunday Express), and the Mirror (and Sunday Mirror). Through examinations of content in articles over the last seven years (2000 2006), triangulated with semi-structured interviews of journalists and editors, the study finds that UK tabloid coverage significantly diverged from the scientific consensus that humans contribute to climate change. Moreover, there was no consistent increase in the percentage of accurate coverage throughout the period of analysis and across all tabloid newspapers, and these findings are not consistent with recent trends documented in United States and UK 'prestige press' or broadsheet newspaper reporting. Findings from interviews indicate that inaccurate reporting may be linked to the lack of specialist journalists in the tabloid press. This study therefore contributes to wider discussions of socio-economic inequality, media and the environment. Looking to newspapers that are consumed by typically working class readership, this article contributes to ongoing investigations related to what media representations mean for ongoing science policy interactions as well as potentialities for public engagement. Headline from a Daily Mail article analyzed during this study, which claimed to 'debunk the myth of global warming' (Hanlon 2003 Ye olde hot aire Daily Mail London (8 April) p 17).

  6. Genomics education for medical professionals - the current UK landscape.

    PubMed

    Slade, Ingrid; Subramanian, Deepak N; Burton, Hilary

    2016-08-01

    Genomics education in the UK is at an early stage of development, and its pace of evolution has lagged behind that of the genomics research upon which it is based. As a result, knowledge of genomics and its applications remains limited among non-specialist clinicians. In this review article, we describe the complex landscape for genomics education within the UK, and highlight the large number and variety of organisations that can influence, direct and provide genomics training to medical professionals. Postgraduate genomics education is being shaped by the work of the Health Education England (HEE) Genomics Education Programme, working in conjunction with the Joint Committee on Genomics in Medicine. The success of their work will be greatly enhanced by the full cooperation and engagement of the many groups, societies and organisations involved with medical education and training (such as the royal colleges). Without this cooperation, there is a risk of poor coordination and unnecessary duplication of work. Leadership from an organisation such as the HEE Genomics Education Programme will have a key role in guiding the formulation and delivery of genomics education policy by various stakeholders among the different disciplines in medicine. PMID:27481379

  7. Natural medicine: the genus Angelica.

    PubMed

    Sarker, S D; Nahar, L

    2004-06-01

    More than 60 species of medicinal plants belong to the genus Angelica (Family: Apiaceae). Many of these species have long been used in ancient traditional medicine systems, especially in the far-east. Various herbal preparations containing Angelica species are available over-the-counter, not only in the far-eastern countries, but also in the western countries like USA, UK, Germany, etc. For centuries, many species of this genus, e.g. A. acutiloba, A. archangelica, A. atropupurea, A. dahurica, A. japonica, A. glauca, A. gigas, A. koreana, A. sinensis, A. sylvestris, etc., have been used traditionally as anti-inflammatory, diuretic, expectorant and diaphoretic, and remedy for colds, flu, influenza, hepatitis, arthritis, indigestion, coughs, chronic bronchitis, pleurisy, typhoid, headaches, wind, fever, colic, travel sickness, rheumatism, bacterial and fungal infections and diseases of the urinary organs. Active principles isolated from these plants mainly include various types of coumarins, acetylenic compounds, chalcones, sesquiterpenes and polysaccharides. This review evaluates the importance of the genus Angelica in relation to its traditional medicinal uses, alternative medicinal uses in the modern society and potential for drug development, and summarises results of various scientific studies on Angelica species or Angelica-containing preparations for their bioactivities including, antimicrobial, anticancer, antitumour, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, etc. PMID:15180579

  8. The UK Crop Plant Bioinformatics Network (UK CropNet)

    PubMed Central

    May, Sean

    2000-01-01

    UK CropNet currently provides a range of databases (and database-mining tools) to the plant community that are all freely accessible through our website (http://ukcrop.net/). Recent upgrades have meant that we can now expand the range of available facilities (e.g. addition of new databases) whilst also strengthening and improving access to existing services (e.g. providing a BLAST search facility against sequences in our databases). This article will briefly outline these and other new developments in our service. PMID:11119312

  9. Bioenergetic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Russell H

    2014-01-01

    Here we discuss a specific therapeutic strategy we call ‘bioenergetic medicine’. Bioenergetic medicine refers to the manipulation of bioenergetic fluxes to positively affect health. Bioenergetic medicine approaches rely heavily on the law of mass action, and impact systems that monitor and respond to the manipulated flux. Since classically defined energy metabolism pathways intersect and intertwine, targeting one flux also tends to change other fluxes, which complicates treatment design. Such indirect effects, fortunately, are to some extent predictable, and from a therapeutic perspective may also be desirable. Bioenergetic medicine-based interventions already exist for some diseases, and because bioenergetic medicine interventions are presently feasible, new approaches to treat certain conditions, including some neurodegenerative conditions and cancers, are beginning to transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24004341

  10. Medicinal Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  11. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  12. [Osteopathic medicine].

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Lepers, Y; Salem, W

    2011-09-01

    Osteopathy is originated in the 19th century in the United States. Andrew Taylor Still seek for an alternative medical system to the orthodox medicine largely empirical and advocating bloodletting, calomel, etc., all of which was resumed with terms like" heroic medicine". Osteopathy as other alternative medical practices (homeopathy, eclecticism, etc.) based on rational and metaphysical postulates as vitalism or the fact that man is a divinely ordained machine. Still's approach was essentially manual and based on manipulation of the joints. Today osteopaths challenge these dogmas and seek to agree their practice within scientific biomedical standards. Even if strong randomized clinical trials are lacking, several surveys report how osteopathy gained public notoriety. Several recent meta-analyses pinpoint the benefit of the spinal manipulative treatment and even if there is no evidence that such an approach is superior to other advocated therapies there is no evidence that these therapies are more effective than the first one. The major indications for such a treatment are cervical and low back pain, either chronic or acute. The quality of the relationship between the practitioner and patient together with the placebo effect are important components of a treatment effect. Osteopathic education is an important aspect and only higher education institutions, i.e. universities can achieve and maintain adequate standards. Materia medica and surgery represent the two major therapeutic mainstreams in medicine; osteopathy considered as manual medicine could be the third one. PMID:22034767

  13. Managing Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... other strategies that don’t use medicine have • Call the ADEAR Center toll-free: 1-800-438-4380 been tried. ... dose, patient’s name, dosage frequency, and expiration date. • ... Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center is a service of the National Institute on ...

  14. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern medical practice in New York State is presented. After an overview of professional regulation in the state, licensing requirements/procedures for medicine are described including education and postgraduate training requirements, state licensing examinations, and application…

  15. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    New York State education law, rules, and regulations concerning the practice of medicine are presented, along with requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a physician. State statutory provisions cover: duration and registration of a license, practice and regulation of the profession, supervision by the Board…

  16. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  17. Medical Practice, Urban Politics and Patronage: The London ‘Commonalty’ of Physicians and Surgeons of the 1420s *

    PubMed Central

    Ralley, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Medical practice in fifteenth-century England is often seen as suffering from the low status and unregulated practice of which Thomas Linacre later complained. Unlike in many European cities, the provision of physic was uncontrolled, and while urban guilds oversaw surgery as a manual art, no comprehensive system of medical organisation or regulation existed. However, in a remarkable episode of the 1420s, a group of university-trained physicians and elite surgeons associated with Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, briefly established just such a system. While their efforts initially secured approval for a national scheme, it was only in the City of London that they succeeded in implementing their plans. The detailed ordinances of the collegiate ‘commonalty’ they founded provide a unique insight into their attitudes. Drawing on continental models, they attempted to control all medicine within the city by establishing a hierarchy of practitioners, preventing illicit and incompetent practice, and offering treatment to even the poorest Londoners. Yet they failed to appreciate the vested interests of civic politics: achieving these aims meant curtailing the rights of the powerful Grocers and the Barbers, a fact made clear by their adjudication of a case involving two members of the Barbers’ Company, and the Barbers’ subsequent riposte—a mayoral petition that heralded the commonalty’s end. Its founder surgeons went on to revitalise their Surgeons’ Fellowship, which continued independently of the Barbers until a merger in 1540; in contrast, the physicians withdrew from civic affairs, and physic remained entirely unregulated until episcopal licensing was instituted in 1511. PMID:27019518

  18. Stability of topological defects in chiral superconductors: London theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Vakaryuk, V.

    2011-12-22

    This paper examines the thermodynamic stability of chiral domain walls and vortices-topological defects which can exist in chiral superconductors. Using London theory it is demonstrated that at sufficiently small applied and chiral fields the existence of domain walls and vortices in the sample is not favored and the sample's configuration is a single domain. The particular chirality of the single-domain configuration is neither favored nor disfavored by the applied field. Increasing the field leads to an entry of a domain-wall loop or a vortex into the sample. The formation of a straight domain wall is never preferred in equilibrium. Values of the entry (critical) fields for both types of defects, as well as the equilibrium size of the domain-wall loop, are calculated. We also consider a mesoscopic chiral sample and calculate its zero-field magnetization, susceptibility, and a change in the magnetic moment due to a vortex or a domain-wall entry. We show that in the case of a soft domain wall whose energetics is dominated by the chiral current (and not by the surface tension) its behavior in mesoscopic samples is substantially different from that in the bulk case and can be used for a controllable transfer of edge excitations. The applicability of these results to Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} - a tentative chiral superconductor - is discussed.

  19. Carbon in black crusts from the Tower of London

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandra Bonazza; Peter Brimblecombe; Carlota M. Grossi; Cristina Sabbioni

    2007-06-15

    This paper investigates the origin, fluxes, and transformation of carbon compounds within black crusts on the stone walls of the Tower of London. The crusts were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon, including the water soluble fraction. The stratigraphy of the old, thicker crusts highlighted the presence of prismatic particles, spherical aluminosilicates and metals, and carbonaceous particles. These are indicative of wood, coal and oil combustion processes. Elemental carbon and low solubility compounds such as oxalates appeared to be conserved because of long residence times. Conversely, more soluble ions, like chloride and formate would be removed from the layers relatively quickly by rainfall. At higher organic carbon concentrations acetic acid may be produced within the crusts from biological transformations. Currently, traffic sources contribute to increasingly organic rich crusts. The deposition of elemental carbon to buildings darkens surfaces and has important aesthetic implications. The increased organic content may have further aesthetic consequence by changing the color of buildings to warmer tones, particularly browns and yellows. Management of historic buildings requires us to recognize the shift away from simple gypsum crusts to those richer in organic materials. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Anatomists and entrepreneurs in early eighteenth-century London.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Anita

    2004-04-01

    Anatomical demonstration in the eighteenth century took place in many formats. In this essay I discuss public anatomical demonstration as performed by entrepreneurial anatomists in London between 1700 and 1740. These anatomists offered courses, advertised in newspapers, to anyone who was willing to pay. In contrast to courses offered in official settings to prospective physicians and surgeons, these courses emphasized natural philosophy and natural theology rather than practical knowledge. Entrepreneurial lecturers also aimed to entertain. In this article I examine the lectures of James Douglas, William Cheselden, and Frank Nicholls, each of whom differed significantly from the others in style and content but were all anatomical entrepreneurs. All of them, moreover, employed not only human cadavers but also living and dead animals in their lessons. I examine the content of the lectures and the motivations of the lecturers' audiences. I also argue that the prevailing historiographical representation of eighteenth-century science as "polite" requires considerable revision to accommodate as impolite an activity as public anatomy. PMID:15109154

  1. INVITATION : Latest astronomical results from ISO: Press briefing in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    Representatives of the media are invited to attend the briefing at the Institute of Physics, which will commence with registration and demonstrations at 10:00 a.m. London time. As of 10:30, Paul Murdin, Head of Astronomy at PPARC will initiate the briefing on behalf of PPARC. Reinhard Genzel, a German astronomer and Director of the Max Planck Institute, will make an independent assessment of ISO's achievements and announce some recent discoveries. Martin Kessler, the European Space Agency's project scientist, will summarize the extent of ISO's observations and describe the continuing work of analysis. At 11:45 (after questions) ISO scientists will be available for interviews, with quiet rooms for radio interviews and a scale model of ISO as backdrop for TV interviews and still pictures. Other facilities will include digital images from ISO, and a demonstration of educational project work. To coincide with the event, ESA will distribute a video news release, an Information Note, and new pictures from ISO. After the briefing there will be a buffet lunch. The nearest underground stations to the Institute of Physics are Great Portland Street and Regent's Park. Representatives of the media wishing to attend are requested to return by fax (+33(0)1.53.69.76.90) the attached accreditation form. For further information, please contact : ESA Public Relations Division Tel : +33(0)1.53.69.71.55 Fax : +33(0)1.53.69.76.90

  2. Outcomes of domestic violence screening at an acute London trust: are there missed opportunities for intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Bartley, Angela; Bayly, Jude; Dutey-Magni, Peter; Edwards, Sarah; Madge, Sara; Miller, Charlotte; Nicholas, Rachel; Radhakrishnan, Sheila; Sathia, Leena; Swarbrick, Helen; Blaikie, Dee; Rodger, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Domestic violence screening is advocated in some healthcare settings. Evidence that it increases referral to support agencies or improves health outcomes is limited. This study aimed to (1) investigate the proportion of hospital patients reporting domestic violence, (2) describe characteristics and previous hospital attendances of affected patients and (3) assess referrals to an in-house domestic violence advisor from Camden Safety Net. Design A series of observational studies. Setting Three outpatient clinics at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust. Participants 10 158 patients screened for domestic violence in community gynaecology, genitourinary medicine (GUM) and HIV medicine clinics between 1 October 2013 and 30 June 2014. Also 2253 Camden Safety Net referrals over the same period. Main outcome measures (1) Percentage reporting domestic violence by age group gender, ethnicity and clinic. (2) Rates of hospital attendances in the past 3 years for those screening positive and negative. (3) Characteristics, uptake and risk assessment results for hospital in-house domestic violence referrals compared with Camden Safety Net referrals from other sources. Results Of the 10 158 patients screened, 57.4% were female with a median age of 30 years. Overall, 7.1% reported ever-experiencing domestic violence, ranging from 5.7% in GUM to 29.4% in HIV services. People screening positive for domestic violence had higher rates of previous emergency department attendances (rate ratio (RR) 1.63, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.48), emergency inpatient admissions (RR 2.27, 95% CI 1.37 to 3.84) and day-case admissions (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.43) than those screening negative. The 77 hospital referrals to the hospital-based domestic violence advisor during the study period were more likely to be taken up and to be classified as high risk than referrals from elsewhere. Conclusions Selective screening for domestic violence in high-risk hospital clinic populations has the

  3. UK mining invests, suppliers profit

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-15

    In the midst of a major economic crisis in the United Kingdom, equipment suppliers have been reporting a number of considerable purchases by British coal mining companies. In December 2008, Liebherr-Great Britain delivered the first two of four Rq350 Litronic hydraulic excavators for use at the Broken Cross opencast coal site in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Ten Terex TR100 rigid haulers were delivered to the site in late 2008. Hatfield Colliery at Stainforth, South Yorkshire, has been reopened by PowerFuel. The main equipment for two longwall faces was supplied by Joy Mining Machinery UK Ltd. 2 photos.

  4. Uveal Melanoma UK National Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nathan, P; Cohen, V; Coupland, S; Curtis, K; Damato, B; Evans, J; Fenwick, S; Kirkpatrick, L; Li, O; Marshall, E; McGuirk, K; Ottensmeier, C; Pearce, N; Salvi, S; Stedman, B; Szlosarek, P; Turnbull, N

    2015-11-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) uveal melanoma guideline development group used an evidence based systematic approach (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN)) to make recommendations in key areas of uncertainty in the field including: the use and effectiveness of new technologies for prognostication, the appropriate pathway for the surveillance of patients following treatment for primary uveal melanoma, the use and effectiveness of new technologies in the treatment of hepatic recurrence and the use of systemic treatments. The guidelines were sent for international peer review and have been accredited by NICE. A summary of key recommendations is presented. The full documents are available on the Melanoma Focus website. PMID:26278648

  5. Apprentices in Trouble: Some Problems in the Training of Surgeons and Apothecaries in Seventeenth Century London

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas R.

    1979-01-01

    Mayor's Court interrogatories and depositions in six disputes between apprentices and their surgeon and apothecary masters in London in 1654-1684 are reviewed. Evidence is presented to illustrate aspects of the operation of the apprentice system. PMID:377827

  6. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Petersson, K. F.; White, I. R.; Henshaw, S. J.; Nickless, G.; Lovelock, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Dunbar, T.; Wood, C. R.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from two tracer (cyclic perfluorocarbon) experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment) campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study vertical dispersion profiles and transport times in central London. Vertical gradients are contrasted with the relevant Pasquill stability classes. Estimation of lateral advection and vertical mixing times are made and compared with previous measurements. Data are then compared with a simple operational dispersion model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign. This correlates dosage with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analyses illustrate the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  7. Dance medicine.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, S R

    1984-08-01

    Dance medicine is a subdivision of sports medicine that utilizes the same basic orthopedic concepts. It studies motions common to dance, which may not be common to other athletic activity, and the injuries that develop secondary to these peculiar movements. The best defense mechanism against injury and overuse syndrome development is a well-toned, strong, flexible body. Appropriate alignment and range of motion of large joints are necessities for dance activity. Biomechanical analyses are useful in treating and guiding the dancer through injuries that she may incur as well as prevention of such injuries. "Forcing the turnout" is a common problem with many dancers. This motion causes pedal pronation and a myriad of overuse syndromes that can be related to pronatory changes. PMID:6536400

  8. Challenges faced when using radiocarbon measurements to estimate fossil fuel emissions in the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Rigby, M. L.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the anthropogenic component of carbon dioxide emissions from direct atmospheric measurements is difficult, due to the large natural carbon dioxide fluxes. One way of determining the fossil fuel component of atmospheric carbon dioxide is the use of radiocarbon measurements. Whilst carbon reservoirs with a reasonably fast carbon exchange rate all have a similar radiocarbon content, fossil fuels are completely devoid of radiocarbon due to their age. Previous studies have 14CO2 (UK) this approach is compromised by the high density of 14CO2 emitting nuclear power plants. Of the 16 nuclear reactors in the UK, 14 are advanced gas cooled reactors, which have one of the highest 14CO2 emission rates of all reactor types. These radiocarbon emissions not only lead to a serious underestimation of the recently added fossil fuel CO2, by masking the depletion of 14C in CO2, but can in fact overshadow the depletion by a factor of 2 or more. While a correction for this enhancement can be applied, the emissions from the nuclear power plants are highly variable, and an accurate correction is therefore not straightforward. We present the first attempt to quantify UK fossil fuel CO2 emissions through the use of 14CO2. We employ a sampling strategy that makes use of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, in combination with nuclear industry emission estimates, to forecast "good" sampling times, in an attempt to minimize the correction due to emissions from the nuclear industry. As part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project, 14CO2measurements are performed at two measurement sites in the UK and Ireland, as well as during science flights around the UK. The measurement locations have been chosen with a focus on high emitting regions such as London and the Midlands. We discuss the unique challenges that face the determination of fossil fuel emissions through radiocarbon measurements in the UK and our sampling strategy to deal with them. In addition we

  9. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evista); Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... Your doctor may prescribe medicines to help lower your risk of fractures. These medicines make the bones in your hips, spine, and other areas denser. ...

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  11. ADHD Medicines (for Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes ADHD Medicines KidsHealth > For Kids > ADHD Medicines Print A A ... doctor can decide if ADHD medicine is needed. Medicine and the Mind There are a lot of ...

  12. Pregnancy and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy and medicines fact sheet ePublications Pregnancy and medicines fact sheet Print this fact sheet Pregnancy and ... pregnancy and medicines Is it safe to use medicine while I am pregnant? There is no clear- ...

  13. Pregnancy and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the- ... care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be ...

  14. Medicines by Design

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education > Medicines By Design Medicines By Design Spotlight Nature's Medicine Cabinet A Medicine's Life Inside the Body ... CYP 450 enzymes » more Chapter 3: Drugs from Nature, Then and Now Drugs from plants, oceans and ...

  15. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ... types of care, it is called integrative medicine. Alternative medicine is used instead of mainstream medical care. The ...

  16. Medicine safety and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine is made to look and taste like candy. Children are curious and attracted to medicine. Most ... like you. DO NOT call medicine or vitamins candy. Children like candy and will get into medicine ...

  17. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  18. Haptic medicine.

    PubMed

    Mason, Cindy; Mason, Earl

    2009-01-01

    The paper introduces haptic medicine--healthcare based on loving touch for healing and preventing disease. We describe the effects of loving touch (a square inch of our skin has over 1000 nerves) on the body, brain and mind. We describe two web-based health education and media projects. The first, HYPERLINK "http://www.21stcenturymed.org" www.21stcenturymed.org is a place for health practitioners to start learning about touch and resources. The second project, Humans Without Borders, is a multi-lingual self help education website for everyday people. Teaching materials for these projects are based on our previous work with a form of haptic medicine known as psychophysiophilosophy with patients at Stanford Hospital, Kaiser Permanente and Lucille Packard Children's Hospital. We describe psychophysiophilosophy, relate motherly love to recent discoveries in neurosciences and give hints on ways to increase motherly love in each of us. We present a plan for moving into the future by re-introducing haptic medicine into our daily lives through self-help and as an adjunct for current physician practice. There is an exercise in self-help for the reader and an appendix of recent clinical research with profound benefits on the use of human touch for over 40 conditions. PMID:19745495

  19. Environmental enforcement in the UK.

    PubMed

    Stott, David

    2009-03-01

    In the UK, the Environment Agency is responsible for enforcement of environmental legislation and offences committed under such laws and regulations. Under the current regime, if deemed serious enough, offenders are taken to court. In the past eight years, there have been approximately 1600 cases (including approximately 800 prosecutions) per year with 61% being for illegal disposal of wastes and a further 26% being for water pollution incidents. The level of fine has been relatively small at around pound sterling 6700 per conviction for water offences and pound sterling 3700 for waste offences. This is possibly due to a lack of awareness of the damage caused in environmental offending by the courts. New legislation in the form of the Regulatory Enforcement and Sanctions Act 2008 is likely to change the way offences are assessed and treated by the Agency and a proportion of cases will be dealt with by the Agency itself, with appeals being handled by a Tribunal and only the most serious cases going to the criminal courts. The efficacy of this approach has yet to be tested in the UK but may speed up the process and lead to more appropriate sanctions being levied. PMID:19280025

  20. Public health response to two incidents of confirmed MERS-CoV cases travelling on flights through London Heathrow Airport in 2014 – lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Parry-Ford, F; Boddington, N; Pebody, R; Phin, N

    2015-01-01

    In May 2014, Public Health England was alerted to two separate laboratory-confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection who transited through London Heathrow Airport while symptomatic on flights from Saudi Arabia to the United States of America. We present the rationale for the public health response to both incidents, and report results of contact tracing. Following a risk assessment, passengers seated two seats around the cases were prioritised for contact tracing and a proactive media approach was used to alert all passengers on the planes of their possible exposure in both incidents. In total, 64 United Kingdom (UK) residents were successfully contacted, 14 of whom were sat in the priority area two seats all around the case(s). Five passengers reported respiratory symptoms within 14 days of the flight, but all tested were negative for MERS-CoV. Details of non-UK residents were passed on to relevant World Health Organization International Health Regulation focal points for follow-up, and no further cases were reported back. Different approaches were used to manage contact tracing for each flight due to variations in the quality and timeliness of the passenger contact information provided by the airlines involved. No evidence of symptomatic onward transmission was found. PMID:25990234

  1. Undergraduate Teaching in Geriatric Medicine: The Role of National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Adrian; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John; Masud, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent international concern that the teaching of geriatrics may be in decline. Research has suggested that support for geriatrics in national undergraduate curricula is the key to effective delivery of teaching in the specialty. We set out to determine the geriatric medicine content in the U.K. generic curriculum, reviewing this in…

  2. Conference report: the third BIRAX Regenerative Medicine Conference.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alasdair G; Easterbrook, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The third Britain/Israel Research and Academic Exchange Partnership Regenerative Medicine conference was recently held in Oxford (UK). This conference report summarizes highlights from the scientific program. There is a particular emphasis on internationally collaborative projects funded by this initiative, the young researchers' symposium, and a lively panel session focused on the relationships between industry and academia. PMID:27404395

  3. Entrepreneurship Education and Veterinary Medicine: Enhancing Employable Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Colette; Treanor, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper has the purpose of exploring the potential for entrepreneurship education within veterinary medicine. It aims to examine some of the key themes in the entrepreneurship education literature, discuss the make-up of the UK veterinary sector, consider veterinary curricula requirements and illustrate how entrepreneurship education…

  4. Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    2000-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Space Biology and Medicine points out that space medicine is unique among space sciences, because in addition to addressing questions of fundamental scientific interest, it must address clinical or human health and safety issues as well. Efforts to identify how microgravity affects human physiology began in earnest by the United States in 1960 with the establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) Life Sciences program. Before the first human space missions, prediction about the physiological effects of microgravity in space ranged from extremely severe to none at all. The understanding that has developed from our experiences in space to date allows us to be guardedly optimistic about the ultimate accommodations of humans to space flight. Only by our travels into the microgravity environment of space have we begun to unravel the mysteries associated with gravity's role in shaping human physiology. Space medicine is still at its very earliest stages. Development of this field has been slow for several reasons, including the limited number of space flights, the small number of research subjects, and the competition within the life sciences community and other disciplines for flight opportunities. The physiological changes incurred during space flight may have a dramatic effect on the course of an injury or illness. These physiological changes present an exciting challenge for the field of space medicine: how to best preserve human health and safety while simultaneously deciphering the effects of microgravity on human performance. As the United States considers the future of humans in long-term space travel, it is essential that the many mysteries as to how microgravity affects human systems be addressed with vigor. Based on the current state of our knowledge, the justification is excellent indeed compelling- for NASA to develop a sophisticated capability in space medicine. Teams of physicians

  5. The Olympic Regeneration in East London (ORiEL) study: protocol for a prospective controlled quasi-experiment to evaluate the impact of urban regeneration on young people and their families

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Neil R; Clark, Charlotte; Fahy, Amanda E; Tharmaratnam, Vanathi; Lewis, Daniel J; Thompson, Claire; Renton, Adrian; Moore, Derek G; Bhui, Kamaldeep S; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Eldridge, Sandra; Petticrew, Mark; Greenhalgh, Tricia; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Cummins, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Recent systematic reviews suggest that there is a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of large-scale urban regeneration programmes in improving health and well-being and alleviating health inequalities. The development of the Olympic Park in Stratford for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games provides the opportunity to take advantage of a natural experiment to examine the impact of large-scale urban regeneration on the health and well-being of young people and their families. Design and methods A prospective school-based survey of adolescents (11–12 years) with parent data collected through face-to-face interviews at home. Adolescents will be recruited from six randomly selected schools in an area receiving large-scale urban regeneration (London Borough of Newham) and compared with adolescents in 18 schools in three comparison areas with no equivalent regeneration (London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Hackney and Barking & Dagenham). Baseline data will be completed prior to the start of the London Olympics (July 2012) with follow-up at 6 and 18 months postintervention. Primary outcomes are: pre–post change in adolescent and parent mental health and well-being, physical activity and parental employment status. Secondary outcomes include: pre–post change in social cohesion, smoking, alcohol use, diet and body mass index. The study will account for individual and environmental contextual effects in evaluating changes to identified outcomes. A nested longitudinal qualitative study will explore families’ experiences of regeneration in order to unpack the process by which regeneration impacts on health and well-being. Ethics and dissemination The study has approval from Queen Mary University of London Ethics Committee (QMREC2011/40), the Association of Directors of Children's Services (RGE110927) and the London Boroughs Research Governance Framework (CERGF113). Fieldworkers have had advanced Criminal Records Bureau clearance. Findings

  6. An Introduction to ESERO-UK, the UK Space Education Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Allan; Mather, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the UK branch of the European Space Education Resource Office (ESERO-UK), also known as the UK Space Education Office. It is a teaching project designed to use space to enthuse primary and secondary students to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects. The office is funded by the European Space…

  7. Down and Out in London: Addictive Behaviors in Homelessness.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Steve; Dreyer, Jenny; Clark, Luke; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta

    2016-06-01

    Backgrounds and aims Problem gambling occurs at higher levels in the homeless than the general population. Past work has not established the extent to which problem gambling is a cause or consequence of homelessness. This study sought to replicate recent observations of elevated rates of problem gambling in a British homeless sample, and extend that finding by characterizing (a) the temporal sequencing of the effect, (b) relationships with drug and alcohol misuse, and (c) awareness and access of treatment services for gambling by the homeless. Methods We recruited 72 participants from homeless centers in Westminster, London, and used the Problem Gambling Severity Index to assess gambling involvement, as well as DSM-IV criteria for substance and alcohol use disorders. A life-events scale was administered to establish the temporal ordering of problem gambling and homelessness. Results Problem gambling was evident in 23.6% of the sample. In participants who endorsed any gambling symptomatology, the majority were categorized as problem gamblers. Within those problem gamblers, 82.4% indicated that gambling preceded their homelessness. Participants displayed high rates of substance (31.9%) and alcohol dependence (23.6%); these were not correlated with PGSI scores. Awareness of treatment for gambling was significantly lower than for substance and alcohol use disorders, and actual access of gambling support was minimal. Discussion and conclusions Problem gambling is an under-recognized health issue in the homeless. Our observation that gambling typically precedes homelessness strengthens its role as a causal factor. Despite the elevated prevalence rates, awareness and utilization of gambling support opportunities were low compared with services for substance use disorders. PMID:27348556

  8. Work characteristics and psychiatric disorder in civil servants in London.

    PubMed Central

    Stansfeld, S A; North, F M; White, I; Marmot, M G

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To describe the association between self reported and externally assessed work characteristics and psychiatric disorder. DESIGN--Analysis of questionnaire data collected from the first phase of the Whitehall II study, a cohort study of an employed population. SETTING--Twenty civil service departments in London. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 6900 male and 3414 female civil servants aged 35-55 years. MAIN RESULTS--High levels of subjective social support at work, control at work, job variety, and skill use were associated with greater satisfaction and wellbeing and less psychiatric disorder measured by the 30 item general health questionnaire (GHQ). High levels of subjective work pace and conflicting demands were associated with less satisfaction and wellbeing and greater psychiatric disorder. The combined effects of work characteristics were similar to the effects of the work characteristics considered separately, except that for men there was a small interaction between psychological demands and control on the GHQ. There was little overall support for the two factor job strain model. In contrast, objective indices of work were generally not associated with the psychological indices. Findings in men and women were generally comparable and were not significantly influenced by employment grade. CONCLUSIONS--Negative affectivity and a tendency to report negatively about both work and the psychological indices may partly explain the difference in the findings between subjective and objective work characteristics. However, subjective work characteristics were still associated with psychiatric disorder after adjusting for negative affectivity. The potential confounding effects of employment grade did not explain the association between either subjective or objective work characteristics and the psychological indices. While modifications to the work environment may directly reduce certain adverse physical health effects, the influence of work place design and

  9. Leadership Practices in German and UK Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to determine whether leadership practices vary between German and UK organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The author used self-assessment documents submitted by German and UK organisations to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM), to identify leadership practices in both countries. A…

  10. The Geomatics.org.UK Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramald, Tom; Powell, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how pupils can benefit from some unusual and exciting free resources of geomatics.org.uk. Geomatics.org.uk is a project that provides free resources to support teaching and learning in a variety of subjects including maths and geography, often in a cross-curricular way. Via the project website, it is possible,…

  11. Implementing Critical Skills in UK Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, M.; Wilkinson, J. E.; Mcphee, A.; McQueen, I.; McConnell, F.; Baron, S.

    2006-01-01

    Cooperative learning, which is a relatively new form of pedagogy developed in North America, has recently been introduced into a number of schools in the UK. One such form of this pedagogy is referred to as Critical Skills. Two systematic evaluations of pilot projects which have implemented Critical Skills in UK schools have recently been…

  12. UK Policy on Folate Fortification of Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency has decided not to recommend fortification of foods with folate, the family of vitamins associated with the prevention of neural tube defects in babies. This is a change in attitude from previous recommendations made by a series of committees and reports in the UK. Notably, it differs from US policy on the matter. The…

  13. Sustainable psychiatry in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Yarlagadda, Sucharita; Maughan, Daniel; Lingwood, Susie; Davison, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Demands on our mental health services are growing as financial pressures increase. In addition, there are regular changes to service design and commissioning. The current political mantra is ‘more and more, of better quality, for less and less, please’. We suggest that mental health services need to actively respond to these constraints and that clinical transformation is needed to move towards a more sustainable system of healthcare. Emphasis on prevention, patient empowerment and leaner, greener services is required alongside more extensive use of technologies. Focusing on these areas will make mental health services more responsive to the challenges we face and serve to future-proof psychiatry in the UK. Services need to be delivered to provide maximum benefit to the health of our patients, but also to our society and the environment. PMID:25505629

  14. The UK Space & Planetary Robotics Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, A.; Barnes, D.; Buckland, R.; Welch, C.; Garry, J.; Zarnecki, J.; Gebbie, J.; Green, A.; Smith, M.; Hall, D.; McInnes, C.; Winfield, A.; Nehmzhow, U.; Ball, A.

    A number of academic engineering research groups around the UK have become increasingly interested in the applications of robotics or robotics techniques to solving problems in space engineering. Although these groups have sprung up independently and have worked in essentially independent areas, they are seeking to form themselves into a network offering a diverse range of expertise within the UK with the capability of developing complete space robotic systems. Space robotics is an area in which the UK has dabbled in the past, but for the first time, the UK offers a solid base of expertise in mobile robotics and associated space engineering which would enable the UK to contribute to European space robotics projects funded by ESA and/ or national agencies. To that end, following the inaugural meeting of the Space & Planetary Robotics Network, an extended group of interested parties will be putting forward an application to EPSRC for Network funding.

  15. History of geriatric medicine: from Hippocrates to Marjory Warren.

    PubMed

    Ritch, A

    2012-01-01

    It is widely assumed that geriatric medicine was an invention of the twentieth century. However, from the time of Hippocrates, there has been interest in the prolongation of the lifespan, the maintenance of health in old age and agerelated disease patterns. The debate about whether old age was a natural phenomenon or a disease state was not resolved until the nineteenth century. Calls for medicine relating to old age to be recognised as a discrete entity at the time when medical specialisation was developing were disregarded until the second half of the twentieth century. This review discusses the history of the theories of ageing and of disease and the practice of medicine for older people from the classical period up to Marjory Warren's initiative in London in 1935 and the development of geriatrics as a medical specialty. PMID:23240126

  16. The experiences of implementing generic medicine policy in eight countries: A review and recommendations for a successful promotion of generic medicine use.

    PubMed

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Alrasheedy, Alian A; McLachlan, Andrew; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2014-12-01

    Generic medicines are clinically interchangeable with original brand medicines and have the same quality, efficacy and safety profiles. They are, nevertheless, much cheaper in price. Thus, while providing the same therapeutic outcomes, generic medicines lead to substantial savings for healthcare systems. Therefore, the quality use of generic medicines is promoted in many countries. In this paper, we reviewed the role of generic medicines in healthcare systems and the experiences of promoting the use of generic medicines in eight selected countries, namely the United States (US), the United Kingdom (UK), Sweden, Finland, Australia, Japan, Malaysia and Thailand. The review showed that there are different main policies adopted to promote generic medicines such as generic substitution in the US, generic prescribing in the UK and mandatory generic substitution in Sweden and Finland. To effectively and successfully implement the main policy, different complementary policies and initiatives were necessarily introduced. Barriers to generic medicine use varied between countries from negative perceptions about generic medicines to lack of a coherent generic medicine policy, while facilitators included availability of information about generic medicines to both healthcare professionals and patients, brand interchangeability guidelines, regulations that support generic substitution by pharmacists, and incentives to both healthcare professionals and patients. PMID:25561861

  17. The experiences of implementing generic medicine policy in eight countries: A review and recommendations for a successful promotion of generic medicine use

    PubMed Central

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Alrasheedy, Alian A.; McLachlan, Andrew; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; AL-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2013-01-01

    Generic medicines are clinically interchangeable with original brand medicines and have the same quality, efficacy and safety profiles. They are, nevertheless, much cheaper in price. Thus, while providing the same therapeutic outcomes, generic medicines lead to substantial savings for healthcare systems. Therefore, the quality use of generic medicines is promoted in many countries. In this paper, we reviewed the role of generic medicines in healthcare systems and the experiences of promoting the use of generic medicines in eight selected countries, namely the United States (US), the United Kingdom (UK), Sweden, Finland, Australia, Japan, Malaysia and Thailand. The review showed that there are different main policies adopted to promote generic medicines such as generic substitution in the US, generic prescribing in the UK and mandatory generic substitution in Sweden and Finland. To effectively and successfully implement the main policy, different complementary policies and initiatives were necessarily introduced. Barriers to generic medicine use varied between countries from negative perceptions about generic medicines to lack of a coherent generic medicine policy, while facilitators included availability of information about generic medicines to both healthcare professionals and patients, brand interchangeability guidelines, regulations that support generic substitution by pharmacists, and incentives to both healthcare professionals and patients. PMID:25561861

  18. Anthropogenic greenhouse gas contribution to UK autumn flood risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pall, Pardeep; Aina, Tolu; Stone, Dáithí; Stott, Peter; Nozawa, Toru; Hilberts, Arno; Lohmann, Dag; Allen, Myles

    2010-05-01

    climate model adequately represents autumn synoptic conditions, and that our precipitation-runoff model adequately represents England & Wales runoff variability. Moreover, our model results indicate 20th century anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions significantly (at the 10% level) increased England & Wales flood risk in Autumn 2000 and most probably about trebled it. This pilot demonstration of the Probabilistic Event Attribution framework forms the foundation for an ongoing long-term project to provide operational attribution statements for extreme weather-related events worldwide. References: -------------- 1. Hegerl, G.C. et al. Understanding and attributing climate change. In Climate change 2007: The physical science basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [eds Solomon, S. et al.] (Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA) (2007). 2. Stott, P.A. et al. Detection and attribution of climate change: a regional perspective. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, submitted. 3. Alexander, L.V. & Jones, P.D. Updated precipitation series for the U.K. and discussion of recent extremes. Atmos. Sci. Lett. 1, 142-150 (2001). 4. Marsh, T.J. & Dale, M. The UK floods of 2000-2001 : A hydrometeorological appraisal. J. Chartered Inst. Water Environ. Manage. 16, 180-188 (2002). 5. Association of British Insurers. Flooding: A partnership approach to protecting people. http://www.abi.org.uk/Display/File/301/Flooding_-_A_Partnership_Approach_to_Protecting_People.doc (2001). 6. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. To what degree can the October/November 2000 flood events be attributed to climate change? DEFRA FD2304 Final Report, London, 36 pp. (2001). 7. Environment Agency. Lessons learned: Autumn 2000 floods. Environment Agency, Bristol, 56 pp. (2001). 8. Allen, M.R. Liability for climate change. Nature 421, 891-892 (2003). 9. Stone, D.A. & Allen, M.R. The

  19. Towards an operational lidar network across the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Mariana; Horseman, Andrew; Turp, Myles; Buxmann, Joelle; Sugier, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    The Met Office has been operating a ceilometer network since 2012. This network consists of 11 Jenoptik Nimbus ceilometers (operating at 1064 nm) and 32 Vaisala ceilometers (25 CL31, operating at 910 nm and 7 CT25 operating at 905 nm). The data are available in near real time (NRT) (15 min for Jenoptik and 1 h for Vaisala). In 2014, six additional stations from Met Éireann (Ireland) were added to the network (5 CL31 and 1 CT25). Visualisation of attenuated backscatter and cloud base height are available from http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/lidarnet/lcbr-network.html. The main customers are the Met Office Hazard Centre which provides a quick response to customers requiring forecast information to manage a wide variety of environmental incidents and the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), also based at the Met Office, which monitor volcanic ash events. As a response to the strong impact of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010, the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) financed a lidar - sunphotometer network for NRT monitoring of the volcanic ash. This new network will consist of nine fixed sites and one mobile unit, each equipped with a lidar and a sunphotometer. The sunphotometers were acquired from Cimel Electronique (CE318-NE DPS9). The lidars were acquired from Raymetrics. They operate at 355 nm and have receiving channels at 355 nm (parallel and perpendicular polarization) and 387 nm (N2 Raman). The first two lidar systems were deployed in November 2014 at Camborne (SW England) and the data are under evaluation. The network is planned to be operational in 2016. Initially, the NRT data will consist of quick look plots of the total range corrected signal and volume depolarization ratio from lidar and aerosol optical depth from sunphotometer (including 355nm, through interpolation). During EGU presentation, the following features will be emphasized: IT considerations for the operational network, data quality assurance (including error estimates) for the

  20. A study of HIV positive undocumented African migrants' access to health services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Whyte, James; Whyte, Maria D; Hires, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Newly immigrated persons, whatever their origin, tend to fall in the lower socioeconomic levels. In fact, failure of an asylum application renders one destitute in a large proportion of cases, often resulting in a profound lack of access to basic necessities. With over a third of HIV positive failed asylum seekers reporting no income, and the remainder reporting highly limited resources, poverty is a reality for the vast majority. The purpose of the study was to determine the basic social processes that guide HIV positive undocumented migrant's efforts to gain health services in the UK. The study used the Grounded Theory Approach. Theoretical saturation occurred after 16 participants were included in the study. The data included reflections of the prominent factors related to the establishment of a safe and productive life and the ability of individuals to remain within the UK. The data reflected heavily upon the ability of migrants to enter the medical care system during their asylum period, and on an emerging pattern of service denial after loss on immigration appeal. The findings of this study are notable in that they have demonstrated sequence of events along a timeline related to the interaction between the asylum process and access to health-related services. The results reflect that African migrants maintain a degree of formal access to health services during the period that they possess legal access to services and informal access after the failure of their asylum claim. The purpose of this paper is to examine the basic social processes that characterize efforts to gain access to health services among HIV positive undocumented African migrants to the UK. The most recent estimates indicate that there are a total of 618,000 migrants who lack legal status within the UK. Other studies have placed the number of undocumented migrants within the UK in the range of 525,000-950,000. More than 442,000 are thought to dwell in the London metropolitan area. Even in

  1. Providing a genitourinary medicine colposcopy service.

    PubMed

    Sonnex, C

    2014-02-01

    Between 15 and 30 years ago, the management of women with abnormal cervical cytology fell within the remit of GU Medicine. This involved performing colposcopy. With the introduction of certification for colposcopists in 1998, most GU Medicine clinicians stopped providing a colposcopy service. As certification is not required for using the colposcope to diagnose and manage other ano-genital conditions, a GU Medicine-based colposcopy service was introduced at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, to assess young women with post-coital bleeding (PCB). One of the objectives of this study was to review this service. In 2011, local guidelines were implemented advising referral to the department of GU Medicine for women under the age of 40 years presenting with PCB with or without inter-menstrual bleeding (IMB) and with no history of previous cervical pathology. A case note review was undertaken for 357 consecutive patients to document clinical findings and management and to determine whether this was an appropriate route of referral. Cervical pathology was found to be uncommon and easily treated within the GU Medicine setting. The provision of a colposcopy service by GU Medicine nurse practitioners or doctors is achievable but requires appropriate training. Importantly, once obtained, these skills can be easily and usefully transferred to examining the vulva, penis, anus and anal canal. PMID:23893915

  2. Interpretive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the

  3. Are the birch trees in Southern England a source of Betula pollen for North London?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjøth, C. A.; Smith, M.; Brandt, J.; Emberlin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Birch pollen is highly allergenic. Knowledge of daily variations, atmospheric transport and source areas of birch pollen is important for exposure studies and for warnings to the public, especially for large cities such as London. Our results show that broad-leaved forests with high birch tree densities are located to the south and west of London. Bi-hourly Betula pollen concentrations for all the days included in the study, and for all available days with high birch pollen counts (daily average birch pollen counts >80 grains/m3), show that, on average, there is a peak between 1400 hours and 1600 hours. Back-trajectory analysis showed that, on days with high birch pollen counts ( n = 60), 80% of air masses arriving at the time of peak diurnal birch pollen count approached North London from the south in a 180 degree arc from due east to due west. Detailed investigations of three Betula pollen episodes, with distinctly different diurnal patterns compared to the mean daily cycle, were used to illustrate how night-time maxima (2200-0400 hours) in Betula pollen counts could be the result of transport from distant sources or long transport times caused by slow moving air masses. We conclude that the Betula pollen recorded in North London could originate from sources found to the west and south of the city and not just trees within London itself. Possible sources outside the city include Continental Europe and the Betula trees within the broad-leaved forests of Southern England.

  4. The Met Office NWP-based Nowcasting Demonstration Project for the summer 2012 floods and London Olympics 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Susan P.; Li, Zhihong; Simonin, David; Tubbs, Robert; Kelly, Graeme; Caron, Jean-Francois

    2013-04-01

    The Met Office developed a high resolution (1.5km) NWP system covering southern England and Wales for nowcasting (NDP) for the London Olympics 2012 using the Unified Model and hourly cycling 4D-Var data assimilation. The system produces 6 hour forecasts every hour. This has been running near-real-time since March 2012 on the IBM Power 6 and moved to the new IBM Power 7 in September 2012. The system uses latent heat nudging of radar derived rain rates provided every 15mins, direct assimilation in VAR of an hourly 3D cloud cover analysis and high time frequency subhourly radar Doppler winds (6 per hour), wind profiler and MSG SEVIRI upper tropospheric water vapour channels every 15mins as well as hourly surface synoptic reports and AMDAR reports. Eumetsat Satellite winds (AMVs) are used but they are very coarse horizontally and temporally eg at T-30mins only. The domain includes 8 of the UK network radars of which 5 were providing Doppler radial winds by the time of the Olympics and 4 wind. Boundary condition updates were provided every 30mins from 1.5km resolution 6hourly forecasts from a 3hourly cycling 3-km 3D-VAR for the UK region, UKV model. The NDP uses a 4D-Var data assimilation system with 1/2 UM resolution (i.e. 3km), hourly assimilation windows with 10 minute LS states, and 100 second timestep. The PF model and its adjoint have dimensions of 180 x 144 x 70. Observations are extracted in the observation time window T-30 mins to T+30 mins. The 1.5km UM (360 x 288 x 70) uses 50 sec time-stepping on 6 nodes in 12 x16 decomposition. 4D-Var increments are added to UM at the initial forecast time T-30 mins (at first UM time step). A 45 minute data cutoff was used and forecasts were available within 1 hour of nominal analysis time ie taking 15mins for observation processing, data assimilation and forecast. Summer 2012 was an excellent time to assess the skill of the system for flash flood prediction due to the extreme weather over the UK during that period

  5. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  6. Medicinal cannabis.

    PubMed

    Murnion, Bridin

    2015-12-01

    A number of therapeutic uses of cannabis and its derivatives have been postulated from preclinical investigations. Possible clinical indications include spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis, cancer-associated nausea and vomiting, cancer pain and HIV neuropathy. However, evidence is limited, may reflect subjective rather than objective outcomes, and is not conclusive. Controversies lie in how to produce, supply and administer cannabinoid products. Introduction of cannabinoids therapeutically should be supported by a regulatory and educational framework that minimises the risk of harm to patients and the community. The Regulator of Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2014 is under consideration in Australia to address this. Nabiximols is the only cannabinoid on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods at present, although cannabidiol has been recommended for inclusion in Schedule 4. PMID:26843715

  7. Medicinal cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Murnion, Bridin

    2015-01-01

    Summary A number of therapeutic uses of cannabis and its derivatives have been postulated from preclinical investigations. Possible clinical indications include spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis, cancer-associated nausea and vomiting, cancer pain and HIV neuropathy. However, evidence is limited, may reflect subjective rather than objective outcomes, and is not conclusive. Controversies lie in how to produce, supply and administer cannabinoid products. Introduction of cannabinoids therapeutically should be supported by a regulatory and educational framework that minimises the risk of harm to patients and the community. The Regulator of Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2014 is under consideration in Australia to address this. Nabiximols is the only cannabinoid on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods at present, although cannabidiol has been recommended for inclusion in Schedule 4. PMID:26843715

  8. UK malaria treatment guidelines 2016.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Bell, David J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Whitty, Christopher J M; Chiodini, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    1.Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1300-1800 cases reported each year, and 2-11 deaths. 2. Approximately three quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. 3. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other species of plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. 4. Mixed infections with more than one species of parasite can occur; they commonly involve P. falciparum with the attendant risks of severe malaria. 5. There are no typical clinical features of malaria; even fever is not invariably present. Malaria in children (and sometimes in adults) may present with misleading symptoms such as gastrointestinal features, sore throat or lower respiratory complaints. 6. A diagnosis of malaria must always be sought in a feverish or sick child or adult who has visited malaria-endemic areas. Specific country information on malaria can be found at http://travelhealthpro.org.uk/. P. falciparum infection rarely presents more than six months after exposure but presentation of other species can occur more than a year after exposure. 7. Management of malaria depends on awareness of the diagnosis and on performing the correct diagnostic tests: the diagnosis cannot be excluded until more than one blood specimen has been examined. Other travel related infections, especially viral haemorrhagic fevers, should also be considered. 8. The optimum diagnostic procedure is examination of thick and thin blood films by an expert to detect and speciate the malarial parasites. P. falciparum and P. vivax (depending upon the product) malaria can be diagnosed almost as accurately using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) which detect plasmodial antigens. RDTs for other Plasmodium species are not as reliable. 9

  9. High rate of lymphoma among a UK cohort of adolescents with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection transitioning to adult care in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Eades, Chris P; Herbert, Sophie A; Edwards, Simon G; Waters, Laura J; Peake, Tabitha; Miller, Robert F; Jungmann, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Among an inner London UK cohort of 147 adolescents transitioning from paediatric into adult care between 2007 and 2015, a new diagnosis of lymphoma was made in five patients; incidence rate = 0.425/100 person-years (95% confidence interval = 0.424-0.426). Previously described risk factors, including low nadir CD4 cell count and ongoing HIV-1 viraemia, appeared to be important. These data suggest that careful surveillance and a low threshold for investigating relevant symptoms continue to be essential for such patients. PMID:26558727

  10. ‘By Merit Raised to That Bad Eminence’: Christopher Merrett, Artisanal Knowledge, and Professional Reform in Restoration London

    PubMed Central

    Mauck, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the career and reform agenda of Christopher Merrett as a means of evaluating the changing conditions of medical knowledge production in late seventeenth-century London. This period was characterised by increasing competition between medical practitioners, resulting from the growing consumer demand for medical commodities and services, the reduced ability of elite physicians to control medical practice, and the appearance of alternative methods of producing medical knowledge – particularly experimental methods. This competition resulted in heated exchanges between physicians, apothecaries, and virtuosi, in which Merrett played an active part. As a prominent member of both the Royal Society and the Royal College of Physicians, Merrett sought to mediate between the two institutions by introducing professional reforms designed to alleviate competition and improve medical knowledge.These reforms entailed sweeping changes to medical regulation and education that integrated the traditional reliance on Galenic principles with knowledge derived from experiment and artisanal practices. The emphasis Merrett placed on the trades suggests the important role artisanal knowledge played in his efforts to reorganise medicine and improve knowledge of bodily processes. PMID:23752982

  11. The UK register of HIV seroconverters: methods and analytical issues. UK register of HIV seroconverters (UKRHS) Steering Committee.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A Register of HIV-infected persons who have had a negative antibody test within 3 years of their first antibody positive test (seroconverters) is being set up in the UK to monitor the distribution of times from HIV seroconversion to AIDS (the incubation period) and to death. It will also provide a national resource for use by those designing studies in this group of individuals. Clinicians caring for HIV-positive persons in Genito-Urinary Medicine, Infectious Disease and other departments throughout the UK were asked to participate by providing information on eligible subjects. Most laboratories undertaking HIV antibody testing were also contacted and asked to provide the name of the attending clinician for all seroconverters identified through the HIV laboratory reporting systems of the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC) and the Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health (SCIEH) and for any other seroconverters known to them but not identified by CDSC or SCIEH. Data items sought for the Register include: sex, ethnic group, probable route of HIV transmission, annual CD4 counts, details of therapy and prophylaxis prescribed, AIDS-defining events and vital status. Follow up information is collected annually. Wherever possible, all seroconverters known to a clinic have been identified, whether currently alive or dead, either from clinic records or laboratory reporting or both. The objective is to establish and update a complete register of seroconverters on a long-term to basis to provide reliable estimates of the incubation period on which future projections of AIDS cases in the UK can be made. PMID:8870628

  12. Life cycle assessment of energy from waste via anaerobic digestion: a UK case study.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Sara; Lettieri, Paola; Borello, Domenico; Clift, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Particularly in the UK, there is potential for use of large-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) plants to treat food waste, possibly along with other organic wastes, to produce biogas. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment to compare the environmental impacts of AD with energy and organic fertiliser production against two alternative approaches: incineration with energy production by CHP and landfill with electricity production. In particular the paper investigates the dependency of the results on some specific assumptions and key process parameters. The input Life Cycle Inventory data are specific to the Greater London area, UK. Anaerobic digestion emerges as the best treatment option in terms of total CO2 and total SO2 saved, when energy and organic fertiliser substitute non-renewable electricity, heat and inorganic fertiliser. For photochemical ozone and nutrient enrichment potentials, AD is the second option while incineration is shown to be the most environmentally friendly solution. The robustness of the model is investigated with a sensitivity analysis. The most critical assumption concerns the quantity and quality of the energy substituted by the biogas production. Two key issues affect the development and deployment of future anaerobic digestion plants: maximising the electricity produced by the CHP unit fuelled by biogas and to defining the future energy scenario in which the plant will be embedded. PMID:24112851

  13. Measurement of personal exposure to volatile organic compounds and particle associated PAH in three UK regions.

    PubMed

    Saborit, Juana Mari Delgado; Aquilina, Noel J; Meddings, Claire; Baker, Stephen; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Harrison, Roy M

    2009-06-15

    Personal exposures to 15 volatile organic compounds (VOC) and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of 100 adult nonsmokers living in three UK areas, namely London, West Midlands, and rural South Wales, were measured using an actively pumped sampler carried around by the volunteers for 5/1 (VOC/PAH) consecutive 24-h periods, following their normal lifestyle. Results from personal exposure measurements categorized by geographical location, type of dwelling, and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) are presented. The average personal exposure concentration to benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and benzo(a)pyrene representing the main carcinogenic components of the VOC and PAH mixture were 2.2 +/- 2.5 microg/m3, 0.4 +/- 0.7 microg/m3, and 0.3 +/- 0.7 ng/m3 respectively. The association of a number of generic factors with personal exposure concentrations was investigated, including first-line property, traffic, the presence of an integral garage, and ETS. Only living in houses with integral garages and being exposed to ETS were identified as unequivocal contributors to VOC personal exposure, while only ETS had a clear effect upon PAH personal exposures. The measurements of personal exposures were compared with health-based European and UK air quality guidelines, with some exceedences occurring. Activities contributing to high personal exposures included the use of a fireplace in the home, ETS exposure, DIY (i.e., construction and craftwork activities), and photocopying, among others. PMID:19603680

  14. Subgroup differences in psychosocial factors relating to coronary heart disease in the UK South Asian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Emily D.; Nazroo, James Y.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To explore the differences in psychosocial risk factors related to coronary heart disease (CHD) between South Asian subgroups in the UK. South Asian people suffer significantly higher rates of CHD than other ethnic groups, but vulnerability varies between South Asian subgroups, in terms of both CHD rates and risk profiles. Psychosocial factors may contribute to the excess CHD propensity that is observed; however, subgroup heterogeneity in psychosocial disadvantage has not previously been systematically explored. Methods With a cross-sectional design, 1065 healthy South Asian and 818 white men and women from West London, UK, completed psychosocial questionnaires. Psychosocial profiles were compared between South Asian religious groups and the white sample, using analyses of covariance and post hoc tests. Results Of the South Asian sample, 50.5% was Sikh, 28.0% was Hindu, and 15.8% was Muslim. Muslim participants were more socioeconomically deprived and experienced higher levels of chronic stress, including financial strain, low social cohesion, and racial discrimination, compared with other South Asian religious groups. In terms of health behaviors, Muslim men smoked more than Sikhs and Hindus, and Muslims also reported lower alcohol consumption and were less physically active than other groups. Conclusion This study found that Muslims were exposed to more psychosocial and behavioral adversity than Sikhs and Hindus, and highlights the importance of investigating subgroup heterogeneity in South Asian CHD risk. PMID:20846539

  15. RNRFA: an R package to interact with the UK National River Flow Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitolo, Claudia; Fry, Matthew; Buytaert, Wouter

    2015-04-01

    The UK National River Flow Archive (NRFA) serves daily streamflow data, spatial rainfall averages and information regarding elevation, geology, land cover and FEH related catchment descriptors. In order to view, filter and download data, users are required to use a web interface which has several limitations. For instance, only one station can be selected at a time, therefore the bulk download of multiple datasets (whenever possible) can become a rather tedious task. An application programming interface to the NRFA web services is currently under development but no application has been built yet to interact with its services. A joint effort between Imperial College London and the UK Centre of Ecology and Hydrology has led to the development of an open source project, the R package "rnrfa", to provide alternative and more efficient access and usage of the following NRFA web services: - Metadata catalogue - Catalogue filters based on a geographical bounding-box - Catalogue filters based on metadata entries - Gauged daily data for about 400 stations available in WaterML2 format, the OGC standard used to describe hydrological time series. The rnrfa package, beside being a convenient stand-alone application, is also an ideal back-end tool for virtual observatory type web applications as it simplifies the interaction between data provider and data consumers.

  16. To Moscow with love: partial reconstruction of Vygotsky's trip to London.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, René; Zavershneva, Ekaterina

    2011-12-01

    The Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934) left the Soviet Union only once to attend a conference on the education of the deaf in London. So far almost nothing was known about this trip, which took place in a period when Vygotsky was still completely unknown as a psychologist, both inside his own country and abroad. Making use of a newly discovered notebook, it proved possible to partially reconstruct Vygotsky's journey and stay in London. Vygotsky's very personal remarks show him to have been a very sensitive and spirited man, who was prey to strong emotions during the conference and afterwards. Rather surprisingly, Vygotsky's own paper about the education of the deaf was never presented during the conference and the stay in London appears to have had a limited value for his own scientific development. PMID:21626140

  17. An analysis of population and social change in London wards in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Congdon, P

    1989-01-01

    "This paper discusses the estimation and projection of small area populations in London, [England] and considers trends in intercensal social and demographic indices which can be calculated using these estimates. Information available annually on vital statistics and electorates is combined with detailed data from the Census Small Area Statistics to derive demographic component based population estimates for London's electoral wards over five year periods. The availability of age disaggregated population estimates permits derivation of small area social indicators for intercensal years, for example, of unemployment and mortality. Trends in spatial inequality of such indicators during the 1980s are analysed and point to continuing wide differentials. A typology of population and social indicators gives an indication of the small area distribution of the recent population turnaround in inner London, and of its association with other social processes such as gentrification and ethnic concentration." PMID:12282380

  18. Using GIS to Understand and Prioritise Worker Movements during the 2012 London Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, I. M.

    2013-05-01

    The performance of the transport network and the associated movement of people was one of the most critical elements to London's successful delivery of the 2012 Olympic Games. During the planning stages Transport for London asked the London Borough of Newham to mitigate the impact of the authority's 13 500 employees on transport infrastructure close to the Olympic Park. To achieve this, the authority needed to understand the geographic distribution of its workforce and the demand it placed on roads and local transport hubs. The authority's Geospatial Team led the research based on four cross-referenced data sources, and spatial analysis was used to determine priorities for special absence arrangements and a commissioned coach service. The research was used to support a targeted information campaign but also presented considerations on large-scale data collection, the use of Human Resources data, and the degree to which the movement of people can be measured and managed.

  19. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Petersson, K. F.; White, I. R.; Henshaw, S. J.; Nickless, G.; Lovelock, A.; Barlow, J. F.; Dunbar, T.; Wood, C. R.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2009-11-01

    There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from cyclic perfluorocarbon tracer experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment) campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study dispersion over a large vertical gradient. These gradients are then compared with classical Gaussian profiles of the relevant stability classes over a range of distances as well as interpretation of data with reference to both anemometry and LIDAR measurements made. Data are then compared with an operational model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign looking at dosage compared with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analysis illustrates the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  20. John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911): An adornment to the London Hospital.

    PubMed

    Swash, Michael

    2015-02-01

    John Hughlings Jackson was associated with the London Hospital as a Lecturer and Physician for nearly 40 years while also on the staff at The National Hospital, Queen Square. His experience at the two hospitals was complementary; sometimes, a patient would be exchanged between the two hospitals. At the London Hospital, he was especially revered by students, colleagues and even by the House Governor, for his knowledge and his contributions to neurology. His ideas helped to resolve the chaotic contemporary understanding of neurological phenomena into a coherent whole, determining the direction of future neurological research in the following century. His life and work was supported and strengthened by the help and friendship of his colleagues at the London Hospital, especially Sir Jonathan Hutchinson. PMID:25585567

  1. Learning from UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Australian Government is wise to examine other health care systems as it strives to improve the quality of care and address rising costs to both governments and individuals. Focus is currently on the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) stands out as one that delivers good care at a reasonable price to all who need it. The Australian and UK systems have many similarities: universal access, tax payer support, no or low cost at point of delivery, and good population health outcomes. They also face similar pressures on services from aging, increasingly unwell yet expectant populations.However, there are also differences, largely in the way that health care is funded, organised and delivered. The NHS is a huge system for 60 million people in four home countries with diverging policies. Within England, the system is managed through 10 strategic health authorities, each responsible for about 5 million people and having the right to interpret national policy. Population based health care, including tertiary care, is funded locally via primary care trusts. PMID:19283244

  2. Lessons from UK Digitization research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Eamon T.

    2002-08-01

    The paper describes the findings and approach of Ex NEAR HORIZONS, which as part of a series of trials, aimed to explore the performance characteristics and potential operational benefits of a number of technology inserts for the UK Digitization Programme. Although the exercise contained 5 discrete options (hypotheses) for improvement in Command, Control, Communications, Computing and Information (C4I) this paper explores only two of these: a web-based approach and the provision of technology to support distributed and co-located collaborative team working. Despite the commercial world moving towards an information exchange model based on publish and subscribe, the trial found that, although the concept was well received, the implications for changes in organsiation and process were substantial. When working collaboratively in a distributed environment, the findings indicate difficulties in gaining an initial shared understanding of the situation and to exercise command. The participants were a wide range of regular British Army Officers, not only to provide broad views on current military benefits but also to move away from the traditional trials, which tend to expose a single HQ, with prescriptive processes and organizations to the technology. The innovative trial was considered to have been very successful, gathering a considerable body of valuable data and identifying clear paths for exploitation of information technologies to support the military decision- maker. The paper extrapolates the findings of the trial to provide comment on the potential difficulties facing the concept of Network Centric Warfare.

  3. UK organisation of access care.

    PubMed

    Wilmink, Teun; Powers, Sarah; Baharani, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    National UK audits show that 73% of patients start renal replacement therapy (RRT) with haemodialysis (HD). However, 59% of those start HD on non-permanent access in the form of a tunnelled line (TL) or a non-tunnelled line (NTL), 40% on an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and 1% on an arteriovenous graft (AVG). After 3 months, the number of patients dialysing on AVF was only 41%. Late referrals, within 90 days of starting dialysis to the renal service, occur in one-fifth of all incident HD patients. Referral to a surgeon was an important determinant of mode of access at first dialysis. However, referral to a surgeon occurred in 67% of patients who were known to the nephrologist for over a year and in 46% of patients who were known to nephrology less than a year but more than 90 days. Best practice tariffs of the National Health Service (NHS) payment by results program have set a target of 75% of prevalent HD occurring via an AVF or AVG in 2011/2012, rising to 85% in 2013/2014. We suggest that this target is best achieved by increasing timely referral to a surgeon for creation of access before HD is needed. PMID:25751543

  4. Seasonal influenza vaccination delivery through community pharmacists in England: evaluation of the London pilot

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Katherine; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Watson, Conall; Baguelin, Marc; Choga, Lethiwe; Patel, Anika; Raj, Thara; Jit, Mark; Griffiths, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and cost of the pan-London pharmacy initiative, a programme that allows administration of seasonal influenza vaccination to eligible patients at pharmacies. Design We analysed 2013–2015 data on vaccination uptake in pharmacies via the Sonar reporting system, and the total vaccination uptake via 2011–2015 ImmForm general practitioner (GP) reporting system data. We conducted an online survey of London pharmacists who participate in the programme to assess time use data, vaccine choice, investment costs and opinions about the programme. We conducted an online survey of London GPs to assess vaccine choice of vaccine and opinions about the pharmacy vaccine delivery programme. Setting All London boroughs. Participants London-based GPs, and pharmacies that currently offer seasonal flu vaccination. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures Comparison of annual vaccine uptake in London across risk groups from years before pharmacy vaccination introduction to after pharmacy vaccination introduction. Completeness of vaccine uptake reporting data. Cost to the National Health Service (NHS) of flu vaccine delivery at pharmacies with that at GPs. Cost to pharmacists of flu delivery. Opinions of pharmacists and GPs regarding the flu vaccine pharmacy initiative. Results No significant change in the uptake of seasonal vaccination in any of the risk groups as a result of the pharmacy initiative. While on average a pharmacy-administered flu vaccine dose costs the NHS up to £2.35 less than a dose administered at a GP, a comparison of the 2 recording systems suggests there is substantial loss of data. Conclusions Flu vaccine delivery through pharmacies shows potential for improving convenience for vaccine recipients. However, there is no evidence that vaccination uptake increases and the use of 2 separate recording systems leads to time-consuming data entry and missing vaccine record data. PMID:26883237

  5. Developing an Integrated Approach for Local Urban Climate Models in London from Neighbourhood to Street Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, M.; Davies, M.; Steadman, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    We currently have an incomplete understanding of how weather varies across London and how the city's microclimate will intensify levels of heat, cold and air pollution in the future. There is a need to target priority areas of the city and to promote design guidance on climate change mitigation strategies. As a result of improvements in the accuracy of local weather data in London, an opportunity is emerging for designers and planners of the built environment to measure the impact of their designs on local urban climate and to enhance the designer's role in creating more informed design choices at an urban micro-scale. However, modelling the different components of the urban environment separately and then collating and comparing the results invariably leads to discrepancies in the output of local urban climate modelling tools designed to work at different scales. Of particular interest is why marked differences appear between the data extracted from local urban climate models when we change the scale of modelling from city to building scale. An example of such differences is those that have been observed in relation to the London Unified Model and London Site Specific Air Temperature model. In order to avoid these discrepancies we need a method for understanding and assessing how the urban environment impacts on local urban climate as a whole. A step to achieving this is by developing inter-linkages between assessment tools. Accurate information on the net impact of the urban environment on the local urban climate will in turn facilitate more accurate predictions of future energy demand and realistic scenarios for comfort and health. This paper will present two key topographies of London's urban environment that influence local urban climate: land use and street canyons. It will look at the possibilities for developing an integrated approach to modelling London's local urban climate from the neighbourhood to the street scale.

  6. Preventing HIV with Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information in Spanish ( en español ) Preventing HIV with medicine Get medicine right after you are exposed to ... to top More information on Preventing HIV with medicine Explore other publications and websites National HIV and ...

  7. Storing your medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000534.htm Storing your medicines To use the sharing features on this page, ... child latch or lock. Do not use Damaged Medicine Damaged medicine may make you sick. DO NOT ...

  8. Taking multiple medicines safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000883.htm Taking multiple medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... directed. Why you may Need More Than one Medicine You may take more than one medicine to ...

  9. Managing Your Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Managing Your Medicines Updated:Sep 2,2016 If you have heart ... Weight • Tools & Resources Heart Insight Supplement: Know Your Medicines Keeping track of your medicines can be overwhelming. ...

  10. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  11. Medicines: Use Them Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Track of Your Medicines Taking Medicines Safely Saving Money on Medicines, Shopping Online For More Information about ... half doses of a prescription drug to save money. ( Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you ...

  12. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  13. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... reducing sodium in your diet, you may need medicines. Blood pressure medicines work in different ways to lower blood pressure. ... and widen blood vessels. Often, two or more medicines work better than one. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  14. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  15. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  16. Prescriptions and proscriptions: moralising sleep medicines.

    PubMed

    Gabe, Jonathan; Coveney, Catherine M; Williams, Simon J

    2016-05-01

    The pharmaceuticalisation of sleep is a contentious issue. Sleep medicines get a 'bad press' due to their potential for dependence and other side effects, including studies reporting increased mortality risks for long-term users. Yet relatively little qualitative social science research has been conducted into how people understand and negotiate their use/non-use of sleep medicines in the context of their everyday lives. This paper draws on focus group data collected in the UK to elicit collective views on and experiences of prescription hypnotics across different social contexts. Respondents, we show, drew on a range of moral repertoires which allowed them to present themselves and their relationships with hypnotics in different ways. Six distinct repertoires about hypnotic use are identified in this regard: the 'deserving' patient, the 'responsible' user, the 'compliant' patient, the 'addict', the 'sinful' user and the 'noble' non user. These users and non-users are constructed drawing on cross-cutting themes of addiction and control, ambivalence and reflexivity. Such issues are in turn discussed in relation to recent sociological debates on the pharmaceuticalisation/de-pharmaceuticalisation of everyday life and the consumption of medicines in the UK today. PMID:26586293

  17. Airborne observed and receptor-oriented modelled urban increments of anthropogenic CO2, CO and NOX concentrations in the megacity of London in summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font Font, Anna Maria; Morguí, Josep Anton; Lee, James; McQuaid, Jim B.; Barratt, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    scaled emissions were used. Modelled urban increments of CO correlated well with observations of excess CO (R>0.81) with a slope close to 1:1 when using scaled emissions (0.69-1.10, 2σ). Modelled CO2ff correlated well with observed excess CO2 when using temporal scaled emissions (R=0.83) with a slope ranging from 0.58:1 to 0.99:1 (2σ). The CO/CO2ff ratio from modelled increments was 5.8±0.6 ppb ppm-1. Results show the CO/CO2ff ratio from observed excess abundances and from the EDGAR emissions inventory were in accordance for the city of London for the survey campaign. Future studies will involve using other emissions inventories such as the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for the UK and the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI); and model urban increments of other airborne campaigns.

  18. Radiological surveys of naval facilities in the New London Harbor and on the Thames River, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, M.O.; Blanchard, R.L. )

    1991-12-01

    This report presents results of the surveys conducted by NAREL personnel to assess levels of environmental radioactivity resulting from maintenance and operation of nuclear-powered warships at the New London Submarine Base (NLSB). General Dynamics Electric Boat Division, Sound Signature Facility, and the State Pier, all located within New London, Connecticut, Harbor on the Thames River. The purpose of the survey was to determine if activities related to nuclear-powered warships resulted in release of radionuclides which may contribute to significant population exposure of contamination of the environment.

  19. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-10-01

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same "direct relativistic mapping" between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  20. Rydberg-London potential for diatomic molecules and unbonded atom pairs.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kevin; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2004-12-01

    We propose and test a pair potential that is accurate at all relevant distances and simple enough for use in large-scale computer simulations. A combination of the Rydberg potential from spectroscopy and the London inverse-sixth-power energy, the proposed form fits spectroscopically determined potentials better than the Morse, Varnshi, and Hulburt-Hirschfelder potentials and much better than the Lennard-Jones and harmonic potentials. At long distances, it goes smoothly to the London force appropriate for gases and preserves van der Waals's "continuity of the gas and liquid states," which is routinely violated by coefficients assigned to the Lennard-Jones 6-12 form. PMID:15634034

  1. "Walking and watching" in queer London: Sarah Waters' Tipping The Velvet and The Night Watch.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that Sarah Waters' representation of London in her historical fictions Tipping the Velvet and The Night Watch is used to delineate the gendered bodies and sexual identities of her characters. A historical summary demonstrates that female masculinity was slowly mapped onto sexual identity between the 1880s and 1940s in Britain. The article argues that Waters' "inventive" use of this history allows her to question the construction of both historical and contemporary identifications. The way that Waters' characters are constricted and liberated by London's urban landscape demonstrates the spatial and temporal contingency of both gender and sexuality. PMID:23855943

  2. The perception of the South African Nursing Association by registered nurses of the East London branch.

    PubMed

    Bellad-Ellis, P; Fourie, W J; Keogh, J J

    1990-12-01

    A growth rate in the average attendance of SANA branch meetings in East London was noted over the past five years, with the highest attendance figure during 1988. Despite this improvement an attendance figure of 17.05% is unacceptably low. The question of such poor attendance at the East London branch prompted the researchers to investigate the issue. Some of the interesting findings are that marital status and young children were not found to be reasons for not attending meetings. Members felt that SANA met their expectations in most respects, however, they felt that SANA did not do enough in respect of negotiations for improved salaries and conditions of service. PMID:2091858

  3. Medicine organizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Ricardo; Belchior, Ismael

    2015-04-01

    In the last year of secondary school, students studying physics and chemistry are incentivized to do a project where they must put in practice their improvement of scientific knowledge and skills, like observation of phenomena and analysis of data with scientific knowledge. In this project a group of students, tutored by the teacher, wanted to build an instrument that helps people to take their medical drugs at the right time. This instrument must have some compartments with an alarm and an LED light where the people can put their medical drugs. The instrument must be easily programed using an android program that also registers if the medicine has been taken. The students needed to simulate the hardware and software, draw the electronic system and build the final product. At the end of the school year, a public oral presentation was prepared by each group of students and presented to the school community. They are also encouraged to participate in national and international scientific shows and competitions.

  4. UK now claims world's top discovery rate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    UK explorers are a bit more cheerful these days even though no one has discovered a giant field or anything elephant-sized. The reason is a benign tax regime and a growing confidence among industry explorers. This last has resulted in discovery of many smaller fields - particularly gas, some potentially commercial. It is claimed that the UK's discovery rate is now the highest in the world.

  5. Pentecostal and Catholic Migrant Churches in London--The Role of Ideologies in the Language Planning of Faith Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Ana; Kwapong, Amoafi; Woodham, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The former British Labour Government acknowledged that religious practices play an important role in the development of children's identities [DCFS. (2009). "Your child, your schools, our future: building a 21st century schools system." London: HMSO; DfES (2007). "Curriculum review: Diversity and citizenship." London: HMSO]. However, little is…

  6. 'Islamic fatalism': life and suffering among Bangladeshi psychiatric patients and their families in London--an interview study 2.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An interview study of 44 Bangladeshi patients and relatives in eastern London demonstrated frequent appeals to God and deprecation of personal agency. This paper offers an interpretation of this apparent 'fatalism', which argues for the logical downplaying of human agency and ambition in archaic Arabia, contemporary rural Sylhet and among first generation Sylheti migrants in London. PMID:24670160

  7. Adaptation and Validation of the Tower of London Test of Planning and Problem Solving in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, J. D.; Dagnan, D.; Evans, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a need for validated, standardised tools for the assessment of executive functions in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). This study examines the validity of a test of planning and problem solving (Tower of London) with adults with ID. Method: Participants completed an adapted version of the Tower of London (ToL) while…

  8. Research & development in the dark: what does it take to make one medicine? And what could it take?

    PubMed

    Reid, J; Balasegaram, M

    2016-08-01

    Earlier this year a series of advertisements appeared in London's Westminster tube stations asking viewers to consider a seemingly simple question, 'what does it take to make one medicine?' But as it turns out, this question is not so simple to answer. In this commentary we highlight some key considerations and questions on what it takes to make one medicine, and what it could take to develop medicines that meet people's health needs and are accessible and affordable for all who need them. PMID:27373528

  9. PCB and organochlorine pesticide burden in eels in the lower Thames River (UK).

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Monika D; Chaemfa, Chakra; Hughes, David; Johnson, Andrew C; Jones, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-five European eels (Anguilla anguilla), caught in 2007 in the river Thames upstream and downstream of both London and the tidal limit, were analysed for PCBs and organochlorine pesticides. Most chemicals were detectable in every fish, although they have been banned or severely restricted for many years. In general, the tidal eels were more contaminated than upstream ones, which was related to their higher lipid contents. The ICES7 indicator PCB concentrations ranged overall from 4.2 to 124μgkg(-1) fresh weight with averages of 33 and 56μgkg(-1) for the upstream and tidal eels; 3.5-104μgkg(-1), average 26 and 48μgkg(-1) of that were ICES6 PCBs. Total DDT was on average 16μgkg(-1) (1.7-38μgkg(-1)) upstream and 18μgkg(-1) (8.6-35μgkg(-1)) downstream with about half of that provided by pp'DDE. Lindane (γ-HCH) was found at up to 2.8μgkg(-1) (averages 0.58 and 1.1μgkg(-1) upstream and downstream) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was on average 1.9 and 2.5μgkg(-1) in the two groups with a maximum of 6.4μgkg(-1) in each. Therefore all individuals passed the European Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) of 10μgkg(-1) for HCB. PCB contamination was fairly typical for recent UK eel data, whilst DDE and lindane concentrations were lower than most previous UK eel studies, perhaps reflecting a downward trend. Although not as highly contaminated as some eels from previous UK and European studies, the presence of so many of these chemicals, with their known health effects may represent a stress for the fish or higher predators, such as birds. PMID:25078785

  10. The Academic Backbone: longitudinal continuities in educational achievement from secondary school and medical school to MRCP(UK) and the specialist register in UK medical students and doctors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Selection of medical students in the UK is still largely based on prior academic achievement, although doubts have been expressed as to whether performance in earlier life is predictive of outcomes later in medical school or post-graduate education. This study analyses data from five longitudinal studies of UK medical students and doctors from the early 1970s until the early 2000s. Two of the studies used the AH5, a group test of general intelligence (that is, intellectual aptitude). Sex and ethnic differences were also analyzed in light of the changing demographics of medical students over the past decades. Methods Data from five cohort studies were available: the Westminster Study (began clinical studies from 1975 to 1982), the 1980, 1985, and 1990 cohort studies (entered medical school in 1981, 1986, and 1991), and the University College London Medical School (UCLMS) Cohort Study (entered clinical studies in 2005 and 2006). Different studies had different outcome measures, but most had performance on basic medical sciences and clinical examinations at medical school, performance in Membership of the Royal Colleges of Physicians (MRCP(UK)) examinations, and being on the General Medical Council Specialist Register. Results Correlation matrices and path analyses are presented. There were robust correlations across different years at medical school, and medical school performance also predicted MRCP(UK) performance and being on the GMC Specialist Register. A-levels correlated somewhat less with undergraduate and post-graduate performance, but there was restriction of range in entrants. General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE)/O-level results also predicted undergraduate and post-graduate outcomes, but less so than did A-level results, but there may be incremental validity for clinical and post-graduate performance. The AH5 had some significant correlations with outcome, but they were inconsistent. Sex and ethnicity also had predictive effects on

  11. Handheld computers in medicine: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Horsley, A; Forster, L

    2005-07-01

    Handheld computers are now a common sight in medicine, but there are scarce data on who actually uses them and what functions are found to be most useful. This is the first study of handheld computer use in a British hospital, and shows that there is already considerable use and acceptance of the technology, with 22 of 55 (40%) physicians possessing and using such a device. Doctors in training grades are more likely to make use of medical software, particularly textbooks, calculators, and formularies. The main barriers to greater use of this technology were cost of software and poor applicability to UK practice. PMID:15998828

  12. {Semantic metadata application for information resources systematization in water spectroscopy} A.Fazliev (1), A.Privezentsev (1), J.Tennyson (2) (1) Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia, (2) University College London, London, UK (faz@iao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazliev, A.

    2009-04-01

    The information and knowledge layers of information-computational system for water spectroscopy are described. Semantic metadata for all the tasks of domain information model that are the basis of the layers have been studied. The principle of semantic metadata determination and mechanisms of the usage during information systematization in molecular spectroscopy has been revealed. The software developed for the work with semantic metadata is described as well. Formation of domain model in the framework of Semantic Web is based on the use of explicit specification of its conceptualization or, in other words, its ontologies. Formation of conceptualization for molecular spectroscopy was described in Refs. 1, 2. In these works two chains of task are selected for zeroth approximation for knowledge domain description. These are direct tasks chain and inverse tasks chain. Solution schemes of these tasks defined approximation of data layer for knowledge domain conceptualization. Spectroscopy tasks solutions properties lead to a step-by-step extension of molecular spectroscopy conceptualization. Information layer of information system corresponds to this extension. An advantage of molecular spectroscopy model designed in a form of tasks chain is actualized in the fact that one can explicitly define data and metadata at each step of solution of these molecular spectroscopy chain tasks. Metadata structure (tasks solutions properties) in knowledge domain also has form of a chain in which input data and metadata of the previous task become metadata of the following tasks. The term metadata is used in its narrow sense: metadata are the properties of spectroscopy tasks solutions. Semantic metadata represented with the help of OWL 3 are formed automatically and they are individuals of classes (A-box). Unification of T-box and A-box is an ontology that can be processed with the help of inference engine. In this work we analyzed the formation of individuals of molecular spectroscopy applied ontologies as well as the software used for their creation by means of OWL DL language. The results of this work are presented in a form of an information layer and a knowledge layer in W@DIS information system 4. 1 FORMATION OF INDIVIDUALS OF WATER SPECTROSCOPY APPLIED ONTOLOGY Applied tasks ontology contains explicit description of input an output data of physical tasks solved in two chains of molecular spectroscopy tasks. Besides physical concepts, related to spectroscopy tasks solutions, an information source, which is a key concept of knowledge domain information model, is also used. Each solution of knowledge domain task is linked to the information source which contains a reference on published task solution, molecule and task solution properties. Each information source allows us to identify a certain knowledge domain task solution contained in the information system. Water spectroscopy applied ontology classes are formed on the basis of molecular spectroscopy concepts taxonomy. They are defined by constrains on properties of the selected conceptualization. Extension of applied ontology in W@DIS information system is actualized according to two scenarios. Individuals (ontology facts or axioms) formation is actualized during the task solution upload in the information system. Ontology user operation that implies molecular spectroscopy taxonomy and individuals is performed solely by the user. For this purpose Protege ontology editor was used. For the formation, processing and visualization of knowledge domain tasks individuals a software was designed and implemented. Method of individual formation determines the sequence of steps of created ontology individuals' generation. Tasks solutions properties (metadata) have qualitative and quantitative values. Qualitative metadata are regarded as metadata describing qualitative side of a task such as solution method or other information that can be explicitly specified by object properties of OWL DL language. Quantitative metadata are metadata that describe quantitative properties of task solution such as minimal and maximal data value or other information that can be explicitly obtained by programmed algorithmic operations. These metadata are related to DatatypeProperty properties of OWL specification language Quantitative metadata can be obtained automatically during data upload into information system. Since ObjectProperty values are objects, processing of qualitative metadata requires logical constraints. In case of the task solved in W@DIS ICS qualitative metadata can be formed automatically (for example in spectral functions calculation task). The used methods of translation of qualitative metadata into quantitative is characterized as roughened representation of knowledge in knowledge domain. The existence of two ways of data obtainment is a key moment in the formation of applied ontology of molecular spectroscopy task. experimental method (metadata for experimental data contain description of equipment, experiment conditions and so on) on the initial stage and inverse task solution on the following stages; calculation method (metadata for calculation data are closely related to the metadata used for the description of physical and mathematical models of molecular spectroscopy) 2 SOFTWARE FOR ONTOLOGY OPERATION Data collection in water spectroscopy information system is organized in a form of workflow that contains such operations as information source creation, entry of bibliographic data on publications, formation of uploaded data schema an so on. Metadata are generated in information source as well. Two methods are used for their formation: automatic metadata generation and manual metadata generation (performed by user). Software implementation of support of actions related to metadata formation is performed by META+ module. Functions of META+ module can be divided into two groups. The first groups contains the functions necessary to software developer while the second one the functions necessary to a user of the information system. META+ module functions necessary to the developer are: 1. creation of taxonomy (T-boxes) of applied ontology classes of knowledge domain tasks; 2. creation of instances of task classes; 3. creation of data schemes of tasks in a form of an XML-pattern and based on XML-syntax. XML-pattern is developed for instances generator and created according to certain rules imposed on software generator implementation. 4. implementation of metadata values calculation algorithms; 5. creation of a request interface and additional knowledge processing function for the solution of these task; 6. unification of the created functions and interfaces into one information system The following sequence is universal for the generation of task classes' individuals that form chains. Special interfaces for user operations management are designed for software developer in META+ module. There are means for qualitative metadata values updating during data reuploading to information source. The list of functions necessary to end user contains: - data sets visualization and editing, taking into account their metadata, e.g.: display of unique number of bands in transitions for a certain data source; - export of OWL/RDF models from information system to the environment in XML-syntax; - visualization of instances of classes of applied ontology tasks on molecular spectroscopy; - import of OWL/RDF models into the information system and their integration with domain vocabulary; - formation of additional knowledge of knowledge domain for the construction of ontological instances of task classes using GTML-formats and their processing; - formation of additional knowledge in knowledge domain for the construction of instances of task classes, using software algorithm for data sets processing; - function of semantic search implementation using an interface that formulates questions in a form of related triplets in order for getting an adequate answer. 3 STRUCTURE OF META+ MODULE META+ software module that provides the above functions contains the following components: - a knowledge base that stores semantic metadata and taxonomies of information system; - software libraries POWL and RAP 5 created by third-party developer and providing access to ontological storage; - function classes and libraries that form the core of the module and perform the tasks of formation, storage and visualization of classes instances; - configuration files and module patterns that allow one to adjust and organize operation of different functional blocks; META+ module also contains scripts and patterns implemented according to the rules of W@DIS information system development environment. - scripts for interaction with environment by means of the software core of information system. These scripts provide organizing web-oriented interactive communication; - patterns for the formation of functionality visualization realized by the scripts Software core of scientific information-computational system W@DIS is created with the help of MVC (Model - View - Controller) design pattern that allows us to separate logic of application from its representation. It realizes the interaction of three logical components, actualizing interactivity with the environment via Web and performing its preprocessing. Functions of «Controller» logical component are realized with the help of scripts designed according to the rules imposed by software core of the information system. Each script represents a definite object-oriented class with obligatory class method of script initiation called "start". Functions of actualization of domain application operation results representation (i.e. "View" component) are sets of HTML-patterns that allow one to visualize the results of domain applications operation with the help of additional constructions processed by software core of the system. Besides the interaction with the software core of the scientific information system this module also deals with configuration files of software core and its database. Such organization of work provides closer integration with software core and deeper and more adequate connection in operating system support. 4 CONCLUSION In this work the problems of semantic metadata creation in information system oriented on information representation in the area of molecular spectroscopy have been discussed. The described method of semantic metadata and functions formation as well as realization and structure of META+ module have been described. Architecture of META+ module is closely related to the existing software of "Molecular spectroscopy" scientific information system. Realization of the module is performed with the use of modern approaches to Web-oriented applications development. It uses the existing applied interfaces. The developed software allows us to: - perform automatic metadata annotation of calculated tasks solutions directly in the information system; - perform automatic annotation of metadata on the solution of tasks on task solution results uploading outside the information system forming an instance of the solved task on the basis of entry data; - use ontological instances of task solution for identification of data in information tasks of viewing, comparison and search solved by information system; - export applied tasks ontologies for the operation with them by external means; - solve the task of semantic search according to the pattern and using question-answer type interface. 5 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors are grateful to RFBR for the financial support of development of distributed information system for molecular spectroscopy. REFERENCES A.D.Bykov, A.Z. Fazliev, N.N.Filippov, A.V. Kozodoev, A.I.Privezentsev, L.N.Sinitsa, M.V.Tonkov and M.Yu.Tretyakov, Distributed information system on atmospheric spectroscopy // Geophysical Research Abstracts, SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-01906, 2007, v. 9, p. 01906. A.I.Prevezentsev, A.Z. Fazliev Applied task ontology for molecular spectroscopy information resources systematization. The Proceedings of 9th Russian scientific conference "Electronic libraries: advanced methods and technologies, electronic collections" - RCDL'2007, Pereslavl Zalesskii, 2007, part.1, 2007, P.201-210. OWL Web Ontology Language Semantics and Abstract Syntax, W3C Recommendation 10 February 2004, http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/REC-owl-semantics-20040210/ W@DIS information system, http://wadis.saga.iao.ru RAP library, http://www4.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/bizer/rdfapi/.

  13. Developing the next Generation of Black and Global Majority Leaders for London Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lauri; Campbell-Stephens, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to discuss the views of black and ethnic minority school leaders about the "Investing in Diversity" program, a black-led program developed in 2004 to address the underrepresentation of black leaders in the London schools. Major themes are identified from interviews with black and South Asian women graduates of the…

  14. London Schools and the Black Child: Towards a Vision of Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apiah, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Describes a conference on black students in London's schools, focusing on continuing achievement gaps and solutions proposed by various experts. Addresses such issues as equitable resources, parent-school relationships, teacher-student relationships, street culture, and personal development. Includes recommendations for Local Education Agencies…

  15. Acute kidney injury: highlights from the ERA-EDTA Congress in London.

    PubMed

    Sever, Mehmet Sukru

    2016-02-01

    The ERA-EDTA 52nd Congress was held in London, 28-31 May 2015. In the scientific programme, overall, during the symposium, there were 18 lectures, 3 minilectures, 15 free communications and 135 poster presentations on acute kidney injury (AKI). Among many excellent reports and presentations, I selected three hot topics on AKI for the readership of Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. PMID:26769681

  16. 33 CFR 100.101 - Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT. 100.101 Section 100.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.101...

  17. 33 CFR 100.101 - Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT. 100.101 Section 100.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.101...

  18. Different Spaces: Learning and Literacy with Children and Their Grandparents in East London Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessel, John; Kenner, Charmian; Gregory, Eve; Ruby, Mahera; Arju, Tahera

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates informal learning, literacy and language development occurring in the home through exchanges between children of three to six years of age and their grandparents in Sylheti/Bengali-speaking families of Bangladeshi origin and monolingual English-speaking families of mixed ethnicity living in east London. A survey identifying…

  19. Scenarios of London Local Authorities' Engagement with Evidence Bases for Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Hallami, Mariam; Brown, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the use of research and evidence in the formation of education policy within London local authorities. In particular it explores the policy processes in three local authorities, and observes the role of research and the interplay between research and policy within each. We begin the paper with a general overview of policy…

  20. 77 FR 16198 - Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public..., Thames River, New London, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes to establish temporary safety and security zones on the Thames River near...