Science.gov

Sample records for medium dynamics surface

  1. The dynamic deformation of a layered viscoelastic medium under surface excitation.

    PubMed

    Aglyamov, Salavat R; Wang, Shang; Karpiouk, Andrei B; Li, Jiasong; Twa, Michael; Emelianov, Stanislav Y; Larin, Kirill V

    2015-06-01

    In this study the dynamic behavior of a layered viscoelastic medium in response to the harmonic and impulsive acoustic radiation force applied to its surface was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. An analytical solution for a layered viscoelastic compressible medium in frequency and time domains was obtained using the Hankel transform. A special incompressible case was considered to model soft biological tissues. To verify our theoretical model, experiments were performed using tissue-like gel-based phantoms with varying mechanical properties. A 3.5 MHz single-element focused ultrasound transducer was used to apply the radiation force at the surface of the phantoms. A phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography system was used to track the displacements of the phantom surface. Theoretically predicted displacements were compared with experimental measurements. The role of the depth dependence of the elastic properties of a medium in its response to an acoustic pulse at the surface was studied. It was shown that the low-frequency vibrations at the surface are more sensitive to the deep layers than high-frequency ones. Therefore, the proposed model in combination with spectral analysis can be used to evaluate depth-dependent distribution of the mechanical properties based on the measurements of the surface deformation. PMID:25974168

  2. Molecular dynamics study of oil detachment from an amorphous silica surface in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaxuan; Si, Hao; Chen, Wenyang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the mechanism of oil detachment from optical glass in water medium is studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. At the beginning, some undecane molecules are adsorbed on the amorphous silica surface to get contaminated glass. Upon addition of 6000 water molecules, most of the undecane molecules on the substrate surface can be detached from an amorphous silica surface through three stages. The formation of different directions of water channels is vital for oil detachment. The electrostatic interaction of water substrate contributes to disturbing the aggregates of undecane molecules and the H-bonding interaction between the water molecules is helpful for the oil puddle away from the substrate. However, there is still some oil molecules residue on the substrate surface after water cleaning. The simulation results showed that the specific ring potential well of amorphous silica surface will hinder the detachment of oil molecules. We also find that the formation of the specific ring potential well is related to the number of atoms and the average radius in silica atomic rings. Increasing the upward lift force, which acts on the hydrocarbon tail of oil molecules, will be benefit to clear the oil pollution residues from the glass surface.

  3. Increasing the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene-Polyamide-6,6 Nanocomposites by Surface-Grafted Polymer Chains: Calculation with Molecular Dynamics and Effective-Medium Approximation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangyang; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2016-02-25

    By employing reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution, the effect of surface-grafted chains on the thermal conductivity of graphene-polyamide-6.6 (PA) nanocomposites has been investigated. The interfacial thermal conductivity perpendicular to the graphene plane is proportional to the grafting density, while it first increases and then saturates with the grafting length. Meanwhile, the intrinsic in-plane thermal conductivity of graphene drops sharply as the grafting density increases. The maximum overall thermal conductivity of nanocomposites appears at an intermediate grafting density because of these two competing effects. The thermal conductivity of the composite parallel to the graphene plane increases with the grafting density and grafting length which is attributed to better interfacial coupling between graphene and PA. There exists an optimal balance between grafting density and grafting length to obtain the highest interfacial and parallel thermal conductivity. Two empirical formulas are suggested, which quantitatively account for the effects of grafting length and density on the interfacial and parallel thermal conductivity. Combined with effective medium approximation, for ungrafted graphene in random orientation, the model overestimates the thermal conductivity at low graphene volume fraction (f < 10%) compared with experiments, while it underestimates it at high graphene volume fraction (f > 10%). For unoriented grafted graphene, the model matches the experimental results well. In short, this work provides some valuable guides to obtain the nanocomposites with high thermal conductivity by grafting chain on the surface of graphene. PMID:26800434

  4. Medium-scale surface temperature mission: MUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duthil, Philippe; Vidal, Alain; Dubet, Dominique

    1997-12-01

    The medium scale surface temperature (MUST) mission, studied in the frame of a European Commission (DG XII) contract, is a large swath (1200 Km), medium resolution (250 m) thermal infra-red imager mission devoted to retrieve the land surface temperature in order to serve various applications. These applications are firstly those concerned with the soil and vegetation water status (agriculture, irrigation and water resources management) as evapotranspiration and soil moisture can be inferred from surface temperature through relevant models. The other applications are either directly using the surface temperature (some frosts conditions assessment) or the air temperature that is itself derived from surface temperature extrapolation (urban heat island, some air frosts conditions). The project basically aimed to demonstrate the relevance and efficiency of the MUST mission products in the relevant application fields and to assess the economical benefits of the mission. Also in the course of the study the design of a medium resolution, large swath thermal imager, providing the appropriate performance required by the users while compact and affordable, was produced. Finally the operational implementation of the system and especially the ground segment was considered.

  5. Dynamics at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamical Friction in a Gaseous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyosun; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2009-10-01

    Using high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag force on, a very massive perturber Mp moving at velocity Vp through a uniform gaseous medium of adiabatic sound speed a ∞. We model the perturber as a Plummer potential with softening radius rs , and run various models with differing A=GM_p/(a_∞ ^2r_s) and M=V_p/a_∞ by imposing cylindrical symmetry with respect to the line of perturber motion. For supersonic cases, a massive perturber quickly develops nonlinear flows that produce a detached bow shock and a vortex ring, which is unlike in the linear cases where Mach cones are bounded by low-amplitude Mach waves. The flows behind the shock are initially non-steady, displaying quasi-periodic, overstable oscillations of the vortex ring and the shock. The vortex ring is eventually shed downstream and the flows evolve toward a quasi-steady state where the density wake near the perturber is in near hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that the detached shock distance δ and the nonlinear drag force F depend solely on η = A/M^2-1) such that δ/rs = η and F/F_lin=(η/2)^{-0.45} for 100 > η>2, where F lin is the linear drag force of Ostriker. The reduction of F compared with F lin is caused by front-back symmetry in the nonlinear density wakes. In subsonic cases, the flows without involving a shock do not readily reach a steady state. Nevertheless, the subsonic density wake near a perturber is close to being hydrostatic, resulting in the drag force similar to the linear case. Our results suggest that dynamical friction of a very massive object as in a merger of black holes near a galaxy center will take considerably longer than the linear prediction.

  7. Collective dynamics in strongly coupled dusty plasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amita; Dharodi, Vikram; Tiwari, Sanat; Tiwari

    2014-12-01

    A simplified description of dynamical response of strongly coupled medium is desirable in many contexts of physics. The dusty plasma medium can play an important role in this regard due to its uniqueness, as its dynamical response typically falls within the perceptible grasp of human senses. Furthermore, even at room temperature and normal densities it can be easily prepared to be in a strongly coupled regime. A simplified phenomenological fluid model based on the visco - elastic behaviour of the medium is often invoked to represent the collective dynamical response of a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium. The manuscript reviews the role of this particular Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) fluid model in capturing the collective properties exhibited by the medium. In addition the paper also provides new insights on the collective behaviour predicted by the model for the medium, in terms of coherent structures, instabilities, transport and mixing properties.

  8. Tear film dynamics: modeling the glycocalyx as a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Javed; Mastroberardinob, , Antonio; Braun, Richard; Anderson, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The human tear film is a complex fluid structure composed of multiple layers: an aqueous layer that comprises most of the film and an outermost thinner lipid layer coat a forest of large transmembrane mucins at the epithelial surface. The glycocalyx helps provide stability to the ocular surface by assisting the tear film to wet it. It is also permeable to water, but less so to ions. We formulate a thin film model based on lubrication theory in order to understand the dynamics between the aqueous layer and the glycocalyx, which we treat as a rigid porous medium. We present numerical solutions for the evolution of the tear film and discuss the roles played by the key parameters of the system. This work was supported by the Simons Foundation Grant No. 281839.

  9. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyosun; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.k

    2009-10-01

    Using high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag force on, a very massive perturber M{sub p} moving at velocity V{sub p} through a uniform gaseous medium of adiabatic sound speed a{sub i}nfinity. We model the perturber as a Plummer potential with softening radius r{sub s} , and run various models with differing A=GM{sub p}/(a{sub i}nfinity{sup 2}r{sub s}) and M=V{sub p}/a{sub i}nfinity by imposing cylindrical symmetry with respect to the line of perturber motion. For supersonic cases, a massive perturber quickly develops nonlinear flows that produce a detached bow shock and a vortex ring, which is unlike in the linear cases where Mach cones are bounded by low-amplitude Mach waves. The flows behind the shock are initially non-steady, displaying quasi-periodic, overstable oscillations of the vortex ring and the shock. The vortex ring is eventually shed downstream and the flows evolve toward a quasi-steady state where the density wake near the perturber is in near hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that the detached shock distance delta and the nonlinear drag force F depend solely on eta=A/(M{sup 2}-1) such that delta/r{sub s} = eta and F/F{sub lin}=(eta/2){sup -0.45} for 100 >eta>2, where F {sub lin} is the linear drag force of Ostriker. The reduction of F compared with F{sub lin} is caused by front-back symmetry in the nonlinear density wakes. In subsonic cases, the flows without involving a shock do not readily reach a steady state. Nevertheless, the subsonic density wake near a perturber is close to being hydrostatic, resulting in the drag force similar to the linear case. Our results suggest that dynamical friction of a very massive object as in a merger of black holes near a galaxy center will take considerably longer than the linear prediction.

  10. Hypernuclei and in-medium chiral dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, P.

    2008-04-01

    A recently introduced relativistic nuclear energy density functional, constrained by features of low-energy QCD, is extended to describe the structure of hypernuclei. The density-dependent mean field and the spin-orbit potential of a Λ-hyperon in a nucleus, are consistently calculated using the SU(3) extension of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. The leading long-range ΛN interaction arises from kaon-exchange and 2π-exchange with a Σ-hyperon in the intermediate state. Scalar and vector mean fields, originating from in-medium changes of the quark condensates, produce a sizeable short-range spin-orbit interaction. The model, when applied to oxygen as a test case, provides a natural explanation for the smallness of the effective Λ spin-orbit potential: an almost complete cancellation between the background contributions (scalar and vector) and the long-range terms generated by two-pion exchange.

  11. Dynamics of osmosis in a porous medium

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Silvana S. S.; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    We derive from kinetic theory, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics the minimal continuum-level equations governing the flow of a binary, non-electrolytic mixture in an isotropic porous medium with osmotic effects. For dilute mixtures, these equations are linear and in this limit provide a theoretical basis for the widely used semi-empirical relations of Kedem & Katchalsky (Kedem & Katchalsky 1958 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 27, 229–246 (doi:10.1016/0006-3002(58)90330-5), which have hitherto been validated experimentally but not theoretically. The above linearity between the fluxes and the driving forces breaks down for concentrated or non-ideal mixtures, for which our equations go beyond the Kedem–Katchalsky formulation. We show that the heretofore empirical solute permeability coefficient reflects the momentum transfer between the solute molecules that are rejected at a pore entrance and the solvent molecules entering the pore space; it can be related to the inefficiency of a Maxwellian demi-demon. PMID:26064566

  12. Dynamics of osmosis in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Silvana S S; Cartwright, Julyan H E

    2014-11-01

    We derive from kinetic theory, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics the minimal continuum-level equations governing the flow of a binary, non-electrolytic mixture in an isotropic porous medium with osmotic effects. For dilute mixtures, these equations are linear and in this limit provide a theoretical basis for the widely used semi-empirical relations of Kedem & Katchalsky (Kedem & Katchalsky 1958 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 27, 229-246 (doi:10.1016/0006-3002(58)90330-5), which have hitherto been validated experimentally but not theoretically. The above linearity between the fluxes and the driving forces breaks down for concentrated or non-ideal mixtures, for which our equations go beyond the Kedem-Katchalsky formulation. We show that the heretofore empirical solute permeability coefficient reflects the momentum transfer between the solute molecules that are rejected at a pore entrance and the solvent molecules entering the pore space; it can be related to the inefficiency of a Maxwellian demi-demon. PMID:26064566

  13. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  14. Pulse dynamics in an unstable medium

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, N.J.; Ierley, G.R.; Worthing, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is presented of a one-dimensional, nonlinear partial differential equation that describes evolution of dispersive, long-wave instability. The solutions, under certain specific conditions, take the form of trains of well-separated pulses. The dynamics of such patterns of pulses is investigated using singular perturbation theory and with numerical simulation. These tools permit the formulation of a theory of pulse interaction, and enable the mapping out of the range of behavior in parameter space. There are regimes in which steady trains form; such states can be studied with the asymptotic, pulse-interaction theory. In other regimes, pulse trains are unstable to global, wave-like modes or its radiation. This can precipitate more violent phenomena involving pulse creation, or generate periodic states which may follow Shil`nikov`s route to temporal chaos. The asymptotic theory is generalized lo take some account of radiative dynamics. In the limit of small dispersion, steady trains largely cease to exist; the system follows various pathways to temporal complexity and typical-bifurcation sequences are sketched out. The investigation guides us to a critical appraisal of the asymptotic theory and uncovers the wealth of different types of behavior present in the system.

  15. Dynamical charge fluctuations in the hadronic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Bhanu; Aggarwal, Madan M.; Sahoo, Nihar Ranjan; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamical charge fluctuations have been studied in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions by using hadronic model simulations, such as Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) and Heavy Ion Jet Interaction Generator (HIJING). The evolution of fluctuations has been calculated at different time steps during the collision as well as at different observation windows in pseudorapidity (△η ) . The final state effects on the fluctuations have been investigated by varying △η and the time steps with the aim of obtaining an optimum observation window for capturing maximum fluctuations. It is found that △η between 2.0 and 3.5 gives the best coverage for the fluctuations studies. The results of these model calculations for Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 7.7 to 200 GeV and for Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV are presented and compared to the available experimental data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  16. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Bryan Kapral, Raymond

    2015-04-21

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media.

  17. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Bryan; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media.

  18. Dynamic scheduling of medium-grained processes on multicomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Kale, L.V. )

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a scheme for dynamic scheduling of medium-grained processes. The basic scheme and its adaptive extensions are described, and contrasted with two other schemes that have been proposed. The performance of all the three schemes on a 64 processor IPSC/2 hypercube is presented and analyzed. The experimental results are shown.

  19. Effective reconstruction of dynamics of medium response spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2008-10-01

    A new algorithm is suggested to visualize the dynamics of medium response spectrum in terahertz diapason by the singly measured set of partially intersected integral characteristics of the signal. The algorithm is based on SVD method and window sliding method. The analysis, we carried out, demonstrates many advantages of the new algorithm in com-parison with the Gabor-Fourier approach, which allows obtaining the dynamics of only one spectral line for one set of measurements. Among which it is necessary to mention the possibility to get the dynamics of many spectral components simultaneously for one set of measurements as well and therefore to get the complete information about the spectrum dynamics. This allows to identify specific materials with known spectral lines and to distinguish materials with similar spectra, which is of great importance for the detection and identification of different chemicals, pharmaceutical substances and explosives. To demonstrate the efficiency of a proposed algorithm, we compare spectrum dynamics of chocolate and soap, which possess the similar spectra. Our investigation shows that their dynamics widely vary in spec-tral lines. The proposed algorithm can be also applied to voice identification and to reconstruction of a laser beam profile with a great number of local maxima. Developed algorithm allows to measure the characteristic time of medium responce. It is very important for various problems of spectroscopy.

  20. Dynamics of rising bubble inside a viscosity-stratified medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Premlata, A. R.; Sahu, Kirti

    2015-11-01

    The rising bubble dynamics in an unconfined quiescent viscosity-stratified medium has been numerically investigated. This is frequently encountered in industrial as well as natural phenomena. In spite of the large number of studies carried out on bubbles and drops, very few studies have examined the influence of viscosity stratification on bubble rise dynamics. To the best of our knowledge, none of them have isolated the effects of viscosity-stratification alone, even though it is known to influence the dynamics extensively, which is the main objective of the present study. By conducting time-dependent simulations, we present a library of bubble shapes in the Gallilei and the Eötvös numbers plane. Our results demonstrate some counter-intuitive phenomena for certain range of parameters due to the presence of viscosity stratification in the surrounding fluid. We found that in a linearly increasing viscosity medium, for certain values of parameters, bubble undergoes large deformation by forming an elongated skirt, while the skirt tends to physically separate the wake region from the rest of the surrounding fluid. This peculiar dynamics is attributed to the migration of less viscous fluid that is carried in the wake of the bubble as it rises, and thereby creating an increase.

  1. Dynamical friction for supersonic motion in a homogeneous gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Daniel; Kuiper, Rolf; Schmidt, Franziska; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-05-01

    Context. The supersonic motion of gravitating objects through a gaseous ambient medium constitutes a classical problem in theoretical astrophysics. Its application covers a broad range of objects and scales from planetesimals, planets, and all kind of stars up to galaxies and black holes. In particular, the dynamical friction caused by the wake that forms behind the object plays an important role for the dynamics of the system. To calculate the dynamical friction for a particular system, standard formulae based on linear theory are often used. Aims: It is our goal to check the general validity of these formulae and provide suitable expressions for the dynamical friction acting on the moving object, based on the basic physical parameters of the problem: first, the mass, radius, and velocity of the perturber; second, the gas mass density, soundspeed, and adiabatic index of the gaseous medium; and finally, the size of the forming wake. Methods: We perform dedicated sequences of high-resolution numerical studies of rigid bodies moving supersonically through a homogeneous ambient medium and calculate the total drag acting on the object, which is the sum of gravitational and hydrodynamical drag. We study cases without gravity with purely hydrodynamical drag, as well as gravitating objects. In various numerical experiments, we determine the drag force acting on the moving body and its dependence on the basic physical parameters of the problem, as given above. From the final equilibrium state of the simulations, for gravitating objects we compute the dynamical friction by direct numerical integration of the gravitational pull acting on the embedded object. Results: The numerical experiments confirm the known scaling laws for the dependence of the dynamical friction on the basic physical parameters as derived in earlier semi-analytical studies. As a new important result we find that the shock's stand-off distance is revealed as the minimum spatial interaction scale of

  2. Dynamical friction for supersonic motion in a homogeneous gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Daniel; Kuiper, Rolf; Schmidt, Franziska; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    Context. The supersonic motion of gravitating objects through a gaseous ambient medium constitutes a classical problem in theoretical astrophysics. Its application covers a broad range of objects and scales from planetesimals, planets, and all kind of stars up to galaxies and black holes. In particular, the dynamical friction caused by the wake that forms behind the object plays an important role for the dynamics of the system. To calculate the dynamical friction for a particular system, standard formulae based on linear theory are often used. Aims: It is our goal to check the general validity of these formulae and provide suitable expressions for the dynamical friction acting on the moving object, based on the basic physical parameters of the problem: first, the mass, radius, and velocity of the perturber; second, the gas mass density, soundspeed, and adiabatic index of the gaseous medium; and finally, the size of the forming wake. Methods: We perform dedicated sequences of high-resolution numerical studies of rigid bodies moving supersonically through a homogeneous ambient medium and calculate the total drag acting on the object, which is the sum of gravitational and hydrodynamical drag. We study cases without gravity with purely hydrodynamical drag, as well as gravitating objects. In various numerical experiments, we determine the drag force acting on the moving body and its dependence on the basic physical parameters of the problem, as given above. From the final equilibrium state of the simulations, for gravitating objects we compute the dynamical friction by direct numerical integration of the gravitational pull acting on the embedded object. Results: The numerical experiments confirm the known scaling laws for the dependence of the dynamical friction on the basic physical parameters as derived in earlier semi-analytical studies. As a new important result we find that the shock's stand-off distance is revealed as the minimum spatial interaction scale of

  3. Dynamics of rising bubble inside a viscosity-stratified medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premlata, A. R.; Tripathi, Manoj Kumar; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2015-07-01

    The rising bubble dynamics in an unconfined quiescent viscosity-stratified medium has been numerically investigated. This is frequently encountered in industrial as well as natural phenomena. In spite of the large number of studies carried out on bubbles and drops, very few studies have examined the influence of viscosity stratification on bubble rise dynamics. To the best of our knowledge, none of them have isolated the effects of viscosity-stratification alone, even though it is known to influence the dynamics extensively, which is the main objective of the present study. By conducting time-dependent simulations, we present a library of bubble shapes in the Galilei and the Eötvös numbers plane. Our results demonstrate some counter-intuitive phenomena for certain range of parameters due to the presence of viscosity stratification in the surrounding fluid. We found that in a linearly increasing viscosity medium, for certain values of parameters, bubble undergoes large deformation by forming an elongated skirt, while the skirt tends to physically separate the wake region from the rest of the surrounding fluid. This peculiar dynamics is attributed to the migration of less viscous fluid that is carried in the wake of the bubble as it rises, and thereby creating an increasingly larger viscosity contrast between the fluid occupied in the wake region and the surrounding fluid, unlike that observed in a constant viscosity medium. It is also observed that the effect of viscosity stratification is qualitatively different for different regimes of the dimensionless parameters. In future, it will be interesting to investigate this problem in three-dimensions.

  4. Dynamics of a supernova envelope in a cloudy interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, V. V.; Vasiliev, E. O.; Kovalenko, I. G.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2015-07-01

    The evolution of a supernova remnant in a cloudy medium as a function of the volume filling factor of the clouds is studied in a three-dimensional axially symmetrical model. The model includes the mixing of heavy elements (metals) ejected by the supernova and their contribution to radiative losses. The interaction of the supernova envelope with the cloudy phase of the interstellar medium leads to nonsimultaneous, and on average earlier, onsets of the radiative phase in different parts of the supernova envelope. Growth in the volume filling factor f leads to a decrease in the time for the transition of the envelope to the radiative phase and a decrease in the envelope's mean radius, due to the increased energy losses by the envelope in the cloudy medium. When the development of hydrodynamical instabilities in the supernova envelope is efficient, the thermal energy falls as E t ~ t -2.3, for the propagation of the supernova remnant through either a homogeneous or a cloudy medium. When the volume filling factor is f ≳ 0.1, a layer with excess kinetic energy andmomentumforms far behind the global shock front from the supernova, which traps the hot gas of the cavity in the central part of the supernova remnant. Metals ejected by the supernova are also enclosed in the central region of the remnant, where the initial (high) metallicity is essentially preserved. Thus, the interaction of the supernova envelope with the cloudy interstellar medium appreciably changes the dynamics and structure of the distribution of the gas in the remnant. This affects the observational characteristics of the remnant, in particularly, leading to substantial fluctuations of the emissionmeasure of the gas with T > 105 K and the velocity dispersion of the ionized gas.

  5. Dynamical Evolution of Interacting Photon Pulses in Rydberg Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bing; Yang, Liu; Wu, Jin-Hui; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Xiao, Min

    2016-05-01

    We present a study to simulate the absorption and propagation of single photon pulses under their mutual effective interaction in Rydberg atomic ensemble.The study is based on the complete dynamics of the involved quantum fields in Rydberg medium of electromagnetically induced transparency, and considers the tunable control fields to stop and regenerate photon pulses. We find that photons of opposite-sign detunings can have distinct dynamical behaviors when they approach each other. The space-time dependent dissipation of photons under mutual interaction and the passages toward the stopped photons with different control fields are also illustrated in terms of the evolutions of their quantum field profiles. These processes can be applied to implementing various quantum devices such as photon switchers and photon-photon gates.

  6. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J.; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  7. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J.; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  8. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-02-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. PMID:25533102

  9. The dynamic mathematical model of heavy-medium cyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Jianping

    1997-12-31

    For ascertaining the effect of the various variables during the coal separation process of heavy medium (HM) cyclone, a dynamic mathematical model for simulating the separating process of the HM cyclone has been developed based on data obtained through both laboratory and industrial experiments. As evidenced by the result of study, increase to a certain extent of inlet pressure and media-coal ratio may result in higher separating precision. The effect of rheological property of the suspension is particularly important, and often plays a decisive role in this respect. The research-derived model can either be used for predicting the separating process and performance or for effecting process control of a HM cyclone through simulating its operation.

  10. Optical Surface Transformation: Changing the optical surface by homogeneous optic-null medium at will

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-10-01

    A new theory on designing electromagnetic/optical devices is proposed, namely, an optical surface transformation (OST). One arbitrary surface can establish the corresponding relationship with another surface entirely optically with an optic-null medium (ONM), (i.e. the electromagnetic wave propagates from one surface to its equivalent surface without any phase delay). Many novel optical devices can be designed by an OST with the help of an ONM. Compared with traditional devices designed by Transformation Optics, our optical surface-reshaping devices have two main advantages. Firstly, the design process is very simple (i.e. we do not need to consider any mathematics on how to make a coordinate transformation, and what we need to do is simply to design the shapes of the input and the output surfaces of the devices). Secondly, we only need one homogeneous anisotropic medium to realize all devices designed by this method. Our method will explore a new way to design novel optical devices without considering any coordinate transformations.

  11. Optical Surface Transformation: Changing the optical surface by homogeneous optic-null medium at will

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    A new theory on designing electromagnetic/optical devices is proposed, namely, an optical surface transformation (OST). One arbitrary surface can establish the corresponding relationship with another surface entirely optically with an optic-null medium (ONM), (i.e. the electromagnetic wave propagates from one surface to its equivalent surface without any phase delay). Many novel optical devices can be designed by an OST with the help of an ONM. Compared with traditional devices designed by Transformation Optics, our optical surface-reshaping devices have two main advantages. Firstly, the design process is very simple (i.e. we do not need to consider any mathematics on how to make a coordinate transformation, and what we need to do is simply to design the shapes of the input and the output surfaces of the devices). Secondly, we only need one homogeneous anisotropic medium to realize all devices designed by this method. Our method will explore a new way to design novel optical devices without considering any coordinate transformations. PMID:26515406

  12. Dynamical Modeling of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, Jeremiah U.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent review it is said that free-surface flows 'represent some of the difficult remaining challenges in computational fluid dynamics'. There has been progress with the development of new approaches to treating interfaces, such as the level-set method and the improvement of older methods such as the VOF method. A common theme of many of the new developments has been the regularization of discontinuities at the interface. One example of this approach is the continuum surface force (CSF) formulation for surface tension, which replaces the surface stress given by Laplace's equation by an equivalent volume force. Here, we describe how CSF formulation might be made more useful. Specifically, we consider a derivation of the CSF equations from a minimization of surface energy as outlined by Jacqmin (1996). This reformulation suggests that if one eliminates the computation of curvature in terms of a unit normal vector, parasitic currents may be eliminated. For this reformulation to work, it is necessary that transition region thickness be controlled. Various means for this, in addition to the one discussed by Jacqmin (1996), are discussed.

  13. Dynamics of Nanostructures at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Andreas K.

    2001-02-28

    Currently, much effort is being devoted to the goal of achieving useful nanotechnologies, which depend on the ability to control and manipulate things on a very small scale. One promising approach to the construction of nanostructures is 'self-assembly', which means that under suitable conditions desired nanostructures might form automatically due to physical and chemical forces. Remarkably, the forces controlling such self-assembly mechanisms are only poorly understood, even though highly successful examples of self-assembly are known in nature (e.g., complex biochemical machinery regularly self-assembles in the conditions inside living cells). This talk will highlight basic measurements of fundamental forces governing the dynamics of nanostructures at prototypical metal surfaces. We use advanced surface microscopy techniques to track the motions of very small structures in real time and up to atomic resolution. One classic example of self-organized nanostructures are networks of surface dislocations (linear crystal defects). The direct observation of thermally activated atomic motions of dislocations in a reconstructed gold surface allows us to measure the forces stabilizing the remarkable long-range order of this nanostructure. In another example, the rapid migration of nano-scale tin crystals deposited on a pure copper surface was traced to an atomic repulsion between tin atoms absorbed on the crystal surface and bronze alloy formed in the footprint of the tin crystals. It is intriguing to consider the clusters as simple chemo-mechanical energy transducers, essentially tiny linear motors built of 100,000 Sn atoms. We can support this view by providing estimates of the power and energy-efficiency of these nano-motors.

  14. Effective medium potentials for molecule-surface interactions: H2 on Cu and Ni surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørskov, J. K.

    1989-06-01

    A new approximate method is developed for the calculation of the adiabatic potential energy surface for a molecule outside a metal surface. It is computationally fast enough to be useful in simulations of the dynamics of adsorbing and desorbing molecules. The method is characterized by the fact that the functional form of the total energy expression is derived from density functional theory, that each of the terms entering can be given a precise physical interpretation, and that most of the parameters entering can be calculated, within the local density approximation. The method is explicitly derived for H2 outside metal surfaces and the applicability is illustrated for H2 adsorbing on various Cu and Ni surfaces. Although very approximate, the calculated potentials seem to include a number of features observed experimentally: Ni is more active in dissociating H2 than Cu, and open surfaces are more active than close-packed ones. Moreover, the method is simple enough that one can contemplate studying variations in dissociation pathways over the surface unit cell. For the Cu surfaces these variations are substantial accounting for at least part of the variation of the sticking coefficient with the kinetic energy of the incoming molecule. Because of the transparent nature of the energy expression, all these trends can be given a simple physical interpretation.

  15. In-medium chiral SU (3) dynamics and hypernuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, P.; Kaiser, N.; Vretenar, D.; Weise, W.

    2007-12-01

    A previously introduced relativistic energy density functional, successfully applied to ordinary nuclei, is extended to hypernuclei. The density-dependent mean field and the spin-orbit potential are consistently calculated for a Λ hyperon in the nucleus using the SU (3) extension of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. The leading long range ΛN interaction arises from kaon-exchange and 2π-exchange with Σ hyperon in the intermediate state. Scalar and vector mean fields reflecting in-medium changes of the quark condensates are constrained by QCD sum rules. The model, applied to oxygen as a test case, describes spectroscopic data in good agreement with experiment. In particular, the smallness of the Λ spin-orbit interaction finds a natural explanation in terms of an almost complete cancellation between scalar-vector background contributions and long-range terms generated by two-pion exchange.

  16. Slow dynamics of ablated zone observed around the density fluctuation ridge of fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Masato; Kulinich, Sergei A.; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2013-12-01

    In-situ shadowgraph images were recorded to follow and study processes during laser ablation of Sn targets in pressurized carbon dioxide medium. The dynamics of the low-density region with a bubble-like structure forming by ablated Sn in CO2 at different pressures was studied. The lifetime of the region is shown to be pressure-dependent, being the longest near the density fluctuation ridge of the medium, i.e., at 8.8 MPa at 40 °C. The present work is to report on the slower dynamics of ablated zone near the medium density fluctuation maximum, which can be used in nanoparticle synthesis and processing.

  17. AN ATTRACTOR FOR THE DYNAMICAL STATE OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Juncher, Diana; Hansen, Steen H.; Maccio, Andrea V.

    2012-02-20

    Galaxy clusters provide us with important information about the cosmology of our universe. Observations of the X-ray radiation or of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect allow us to measure the density and temperature of the hot intergalactic medium between the galaxies in a cluster, which then allow us to calculate the total mass of the galaxy cluster. However, no simple connection between the density and the temperature profiles has been identified. Here, we use controlled high-resolution numerical simulations to identify a relation between the density and temperature of the gas in equilibrated galaxy clusters. We demonstrate that the temperature-density relation is a real attractor, by showing that a wide range of equilibrated structures all move toward the attractor when perturbed and subsequently allowed to relax. For structures that have undergone sufficient perturbations for this connection to hold, one can therefore extract the mass profile directly from the X-ray intensity profile.

  18. Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin; Pu Ye; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2005-06-15

    We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Photochemical dynamics of surface oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.

    1992-01-01

    The period 8/01/91-7/31/92 is the first year of a new project titled Photochemical Dynamics of Surface Oriented Molecules'', initiated with DOE Support. The main objective of this project is to understand the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions by studying photochemical dynamics of surface-oriented molecules. In addition, the mechanisms of photon-surface interactions need to be elucidated. The strategy is to carry out experiments to measure the translational energy distribution, as a function of the angle from the surface normal, of the photoproducts by time-of-flight (TOF) technique by varying the photon wavelength, intensity, polarization, and pulse duration. By choosing adsorbates with different bonding configuration, the effects of adsorbate orientation on surface photochemical dynamics can be studied.

  20. Laser surface modification of boronickelized medium carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Pertek, Aleksandra; Kulka, Michał; Klimek, Leszek

    2015-11-01

    A two-step process was applied to produce the multicomponent boride layers. Boronickelizing consisted of nickel plating and diffusion boriding. Two different methods of heat treatment of boronickelized C45 steel were used: a typical through-hardening, and a laser surface modification with remelting. Microstructure and some mechanical properties of these layers were examined. Microstructural characterization was studied using optical microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction. The laser modification improved wear resistance, cohesion as well as low-cycle fatigue of the boronickelized layer. Compressive stresses, occurring after laser remelting, could be the reason for the advantageous mechanical behavior of the layer.

  1. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  2. Nonuniversal surface behavior of dynamic phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Riego, Patricia; Berger, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the dynamic phase transition (DPT) of the kinetic Ising model in systems with surfaces within the mean-field approximation. Varying the surface exchange coupling strength J(s), the amplitude of the externally applied oscillating field h(0), and its period P, we explore the dynamic behavior of the layer-dependent magnetization and the associated DPTs. The surface phase diagram shows several features that resemble those of the equilibrium case, with an extraordinary bulk transition and a surface transition for high J(s) values, independent from the value of h(0). For low J(s), however, h(0) is found to be a crucial parameter that leads to nonuniversal surface behavior at the ordinary bulk transition point. Specifically, we observed here a bulk-supported surface DPT for high field amplitudes h(0) and correspondingly short critical periods P(c), whereas this surface transition simultaneous to the bulk one is suppressed for slow critical dynamics occurring for low values of h(0). The suppression of the DPT for low h(0) not only occurs for the topmost surface layer, but also affects a significant number of subsurface layers. We find that the key physical quantity that explains this nonuniversal behavior is the time correlation between the dynamic surface and bulk magnetizations at the bulk critical point. This time correlation has to pass a threshold value to trigger a bulk-induced DPT in the surface layers. Otherwise, dynamic phase transitions are absent at the surface in stark contrast to the equilibrium behavior of the corresponding thermodynamic Ising model. Also, we have analyzed the penetration depth of the dynamically ordered phase for the surface DPT that occurs for large J(s) values. Here we find that the penetration depth depends strongly on J(s) and behaves identically to the corresponding equilibrium Ising model. PMID:26172695

  3. Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, Albert J.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Papers for this special issue on 'Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling' heralds from papers submitted after the 2014 annual meeting of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System or CSDMS. CSDMS facilitates a diverse community of experts (now in 68 countries) that collectively investigate the Earth's surface-the dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, by promoting, developing, supporting and disseminating integrated open source software modules. By organizing more than 1500 researchers, CSDMS has the privilege of identifying community strengths and weaknesses in the practice of software development. We recognize, for example, that progress has been slow on identifying and quantifying uncertainty and sensitivity in numerical modeling of earth's surface dynamics. This special issue is meant to raise awareness for these important subjects and highlight state-of-the-art progress.

  4. Crowds as an Excitable Medium for Spiral Wave Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Andrea; Greco, Edwin; Fenton, Flavio

    Spiral wave (SW) patterns are studied in many physical, biological, and chemical excitable systems. Of particular importance are SW of electrical activity that develop in the heart and give rise to arrhythmias such as tachycardia (single SW) and fibrillation (multiple SWs). We investigate if a crowd of people given simple rules for activation and deactivation, modeled on cardiac cells, can act as a living simulation for SW dynamics. For group sizes ranging from 50 to 650 people we demonstrate, experimentally, the existence of stable spiral waves and of spiral wave breakup leading to chaotic dynamics. Numerical simulation predicts the simple rules lead to well define wave fronts. People, however, respond with various degrees of anticipation and misinformation. This human behavior can lead to smoothed fronts or even lead to spiral wave breakup and chaos. We present a new cell model that includes variations in reaction to account for the observed behavior in crowds. This model may be useful in the study of coupling and decoupling of cardiac cells that lead to arrhythmic behavior. Supported by NSF.

  5. DYNAMICALLY DRIVEN EVOLUTION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN M51

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, Jin; Scoville, Nick; Potts, Ashley E.; Carpenter, John M.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Patience, Jenny; Sargent, Anneila I.; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; La Vigne, Misty A.; Vogel, Stuart N.; White, Stephen M.; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Pound, Marc W.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bock, Douglas C. J.; Hawkins, David; Hodges, Mark; Lamb, James W.; Kemball, Athol

    2009-08-01

    Massive star formation occurs in giant molecular clouds (GMCs); an understanding of the evolution of GMCs is a prerequisite to develop theories of star formation and galaxy evolution. We report the highest-fidelity observations of the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 in carbon monoxide (CO) emission, revealing the evolution of GMCs vis-a-vis the large-scale galactic structure and dynamics. The most massive GMCs (giant molecular associations (GMAs)) are first assembled and then broken up as the gas flow through the spiral arms. The GMAs and their H{sub 2} molecules are not fully dissociated into atomic gas as predicted in stellar feedback scenarios, but are fragmented into smaller GMCs upon leaving the spiral arms. The remnants of GMAs are detected as the chains of GMCs that emerge from the spiral arms into interarm regions. The kinematic shear within the spiral arms is sufficient to unbind the GMAs against self-gravity. We conclude that the evolution of GMCs is driven by large-scale galactic dynamics-their coagulation into GMAs is due to spiral arm streaming motions upon entering the arms, followed by fragmentation due to shear as they leave the arms on the downstream side. In M51, the majority of the gas remains molecular from arm entry through the interarm region and into the next spiral arm passage.

  6. Surface dynamics of liquids in porous media.

    PubMed

    Korb, J P

    2001-01-01

    We report remarkable differences in the 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data (NMRD) between water and other common aprotic solvents such as acetone when in contact with high surface area calibrated microporous chromatographic silica glasses that contain trace paramagnetic impurities located at or close to the pore surface. All these differences have been related to the particular chemical behaviors and dynamics of these liquids at the pore surface. We apply this technique to probe the structure and dynamics of water and oil at the surface of calibrated macroporous systems, where similar surface dynamics effects have been observed. This technique is also applied to follow the first hydration stage of a white cement-paste. Last, we present an analysis of the magnetic field dependence of 1H nuclear relaxation data to exhibit the microporosity of ultra high performance concretes. PMID:11445312

  7. Backscattering of linearly polarized light from turbid tissue-like scattering medium with rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alexander; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Markhvida, Igor; Lee, Tim K.; Meglinski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of further development of a unified computational tool for the needs of biomedical optics, we introduce an electric field Monte Carlo (MC) model for simulation of backscattering of coherent linearly polarized light from a turbid tissue-like scattering medium with a rough surface. We consider the laser speckle patterns formation and the role of surface roughness in the depolarization of linearly polarized light backscattered from the medium. The mutual phase shifts due to the photons' pathlength difference within the medium and due to reflection/refraction on the rough surface of the medium are taken into account. The validation of the model includes the creation of the phantoms of various roughness and optical properties, measurements of co- and cross-polarized components of the backscattered/reflected light, its analysis and extensive computer modeling accelerated by parallel computing on the NVIDIA graphics processing units using compute unified device architecture (CUDA). The analysis of the spatial intensity distribution is based on second-order statistics that shows a strong correlation with the surface roughness, both with the results of modeling and experiment. The results of modeling show a good agreement with the results of experimental measurements on phantoms mimicking human skin. The developed MC approach can be used for the direct simulation of light scattered by the turbid scattering medium with various roughness of the surface.

  8. On the Rupture Dynamics of Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting in a Stratified Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2015-04-01

    One significant feature of a shallow dip-slip earthquake is the broken symmetry of seismic motion in the proximity of the rupturing fault plane. In general, the strong motion is much larger on the hanging wall than on the footwall, but the mechanics behind this asymmetry has not been wholly understood yet. Therefore, in this contribution, based on finite difference calculations and dynamic photoelasticity, we try to deepen our understanding on the rupture dynamics of a shallow dip-slip fault plane numerically as well as experimentally. In our two-dimensional crack-like rupture models, a flat vertical or inclined fault plane is prepared in a monolithic (first model) or stratified (second model) linear elastic medium. In the basic first model, as predicted numerically by Uenishi and Madariaga (Eos 2005), the primary fault rupture approaching the horizontal free surface may induce four Rayleigh-type waves, two Rayleigh waves propagating along the free surface to the far field and the other two interface waves travelling back downwards along the ruptured fault plane. In the case of the inclined fault plane, the interaction of the interface and Rayleigh waves may generate a strong shear wave (corner wave) and cause stronger disturbances in the hanging wall. The corner wave may exist only when the fault plane is asymmetrically inclined. On the contrary, in the second model, symmetry of seismic motion may be broken even in geometrically symmetric cases if the secondary rupture is allowed at an interface between geological layers. For instance, if primary vertical fault rupture propagates from depth and interferes with a horizontal interface obeying a tensile fracture criterion, the interface segments on which the primary fault rupture produces dynamic compression (in the relatively rising hanging wall) may remain unbroken and only some interface segments in the subsiding footwall may be fractured in tension. That is, in the hanging wall, the dynamic disturbances in the

  9. Formation of bubbly horizon in liquid-saturated porous medium by surface temperature oscillation.

    PubMed

    Goldobin, Denis S; Krauzin, Pavel V

    2015-12-01

    We study nonisothermal diffusion transport of a weakly soluble substance in a liquid-saturated porous medium in contact with a reservoir of this substance. The surface temperature of the porous medium half-space oscillates in time, which results in a decaying solubility wave propagating deep into the porous medium. In this system, zones of saturated solution and nondissolved phase coexist with ones of undersaturated solution. The effect is first considered for the case of annual oscillation of the surface temperature of water-saturated ground in contact with the atmosphere. We reveal the phenomenon of formation of a near-surface bubbly horizon due to temperature oscillation. An analytical theory of the phenomenon is developed. Further, the treatment is extended to the case of higher frequency oscillations and the case of weakly soluble solids and liquids. PMID:26764828

  10. Formation of bubbly horizon in liquid-saturated porous medium by surface temperature oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Krauzin, Pavel V.

    2015-12-01

    We study nonisothermal diffusion transport of a weakly soluble substance in a liquid-saturated porous medium in contact with a reservoir of this substance. The surface temperature of the porous medium half-space oscillates in time, which results in a decaying solubility wave propagating deep into the porous medium. In this system, zones of saturated solution and nondissolved phase coexist with ones of undersaturated solution. The effect is first considered for the case of annual oscillation of the surface temperature of water-saturated ground in contact with the atmosphere. We reveal the phenomenon of formation of a near-surface bubbly horizon due to temperature oscillation. An analytical theory of the phenomenon is developed. Further, the treatment is extended to the case of higher frequency oscillations and the case of weakly soluble solids and liquids.

  11. Intersonic and Supersonic ruptures in a model of dynamic rupture in a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Elbanna, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The velocity structure in the lithosphere is quite complex and is rarely homogeneous. Wave reflection, transmission, and diffraction from the boundaries of the different layers and inclusions are expected to lead to a rich dynamic response and significantly affect rupture propagation on embedded faults. Here, we report our work on modeling dynamic rupture in an elastic domain with an embedded soft (stiff) layer as a first step towards modeling rupture propagation in realistic velocity structures. We use the Finite Element method (Pylith) to simulate rupture on a 2D in-plane fault embedded in an elastic full space. The simulated domain is 30 km wide and 100km long. Absorbing boundary conditions are used around the edges of the domain to simulate an infinite extension in all directions. The fault operates under linear slip-weakening friction law. We initiate the rupture by artificially overstressing a localized region near the left edge of the fault. We consider embedded soft/stiff layers with 20% to 60% reduction/increase of wave velocity respectively. The embedded layers are placed at different distances from the fault surface. We observed that the existence of a soft layer significantly shortens the transition length to supershear propagation through the Burridge-Andrews mechanism. The higher the material contrast, the shorter the transition length to supershear propagation becomes. We also observe that supershear rupture could be generated at pretress values that are lower than what is theoretically predicted for a homogeneous medium. We find that the distance from the lower boundary of the soft layer to the fault surface has a stronger influence on the supershear transition length as opposed to the thickness of the soft layer. In the existence of an embedded stiffer layer we found that rupture could propagate faster than the fault zone P-wave speed. In this case, the propagating rupture generate two Mach cones; one is associated with the shear wave, and the

  12. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3: Structure Medium Interaction, Case Studies in Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Structure and medium interactions topics are addressed. Topics include: a failure analysis of underground concrete structures subjected to blast loadings, an optimization design procedure for concrete slabs, and a discussion of the transient response of a cylindrical shell submerged in a fluid. Case studies in dynamics are presented which include an examination of a shock isolation platform for a seasparrow launcher, a discussion of hydrofoil fatigue load environments, and an investigation of the dynamic characteristics of turbine generators and low tuned foundations.

  13. Dynamic Land Surface Classifcations using Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H.; Tian, Y.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface emissivity in microwave frequencies is critical to the remote sensing of soil moisture, precipitation, and vegetation. Different land surfaces have different spectral signatures in the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Their spatial and temporal behaviors are also highly variable. These properties are yet not well understood in microwave frequencies, despite their capability in detecting water-related variables in the atmosphere and land surface. A classification scheme was developed to stratify the Earth's land surfaces based on their seasonally dynamic microwave signatures. An unsupervised clustering approach was used identify and distinguish data groupings along two microwave based indicies. Land surface data clusters were mapped to determine their spatial relationships to known land cover groupings. Differences in land surface clusters were analyzed in their spatial consistency and their direction and magnitude of land surface change. It was found that vegetation and topography were the predominant contributors to change between seasons. Land surface extremes of sandy desert and closed canopy tropical forest displayed minimal intra-annual variability while transitional zones, such as the Sahel and North American temperate forests, exhibited the most variability. Distinct microwave signatures varied between seasons along a latittudinal gradient. Overall variability in land surface types increased at high lattitudes. This classification will help inform research studies maniputlating the microwave frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum to better characterize land surface dynamics, and will be very useful in the validation of radiative transfer models and quantification of uncertainty in global precipitation monitoring.

  14. Dynamic aspects of the Southern-Hemisphere medium-scale waves during the southern summer season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Nune, Durga P.

    1987-01-01

    The role of medium-scale waves on three dynamic aspects of the Southern-Hemisphere general circulation is examined using data generated by the FGGE analyses of the ECMWF. The momentum and sensible heat transports by the medium-scale waves are discussed. The effects of medium-scale waves on atmospheric circulation of the Southern Hemisphere during the summer, in particular the vacillation of atmospheric energetics, are investigated. The horizontal and vertical structures and the transport properties of this wave regime and their relation to downstream development in the Southern Hemisphere are analyzed. It is observed that medium-scale waves supply about a half of the total eddy transport of sensible heat and momentum; the wave regime contributes to the time average of various energy contents and energetic components of atmospheric motion during the southern summer; and the wave regime is amplified during the developing stages of downstream development.

  15. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  16. Rank 0 invariant solutions of dynamics of two-phase medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Alexandr

    2016-08-01

    A system of partial differential equations which describes dynamics of two-phase medium is considered. Lie algebra of symmetry group of this system was found. For some 4-dimensional subalgebras of invariant solutions is found. All other 4-dimensional subalgebras will give only partial invariant solutions of this system.

  17. Live Theatre: A Dynamic Medium for Engaging with Intercultural Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cynthia D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss live theatre as a highly effective and dynamic medium for facilitating meaningful engagement with research on intercultural education. I make the case that ethnographic, or research-based, theatre can productively showcase challenging social issues and the sometimes confusing, poignant and humorous complexities of…

  18. Dynamics of polymer thin films and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2007-12-01

    The dynamics of thin polymer films display many differences from the bulk dynamics. Different modes of motions in polymers are affected by confinement in different ways. The enhancement in the dynamics of some modes of motion can cause anomalies in the glass transition temperature (Tg) of thin films, while other modes of motion such as diffusion can be substantially slowed down due to the confinement effects. In this thesis, different modes of dynamics are probed using different techniques. The interface healing of two identical polymer surfaces is used as a probe of segmental motion in the direction normal to the plane of the films and it is shown that this mode of motion is slowed down at temperatures above bulk glass transition, while the glass transition itself is decreased indicating that the type of motion responsible for the glass transition is enhanced. The glass transition measurements at different cooling rates indicate that this enhancement only happens at temperatures close to or below bulk glass transition temperature and it is not expected to be detected at higher temperatures where the system is in the melt state. It is shown that the sample preparation technique is not a factor in observing this enhanced dynamics, while the existence of the free surface can be important in observed reductions in the glass transition temperature. The dynamics near the free surface is further studied using a novel nano-deformation technique, and it is shown that the dynamics near the free surface is in fact enhanced compared to the bulk dynamics and this enhancement is increased as the temperature is decreased further below Tg. It is also shown that this mode of relaxation is much different from the bulk modes of relaxations, and a direct relationship between this enhanced motion and Tg reduction in thin films can be established. The results presented in this thesis can lead to a possible universal picture that can resolve the behavior of different modes of motions in

  19. Glassy Dynamics Altered by a Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Ophelia

    Studies of polymer dynamics in thin films showed that a highly mobile region exists at the free surface of most if not all polymers. In this talk, I shall review some of these observations, with highlights given to the recent findings that chain flexibility and connectivity may on occasions be necessary for the free surface to exercise its influence. Afterward, I shall ponder on how the influence of the free surface may penetrate as far as several polymer radii of gyration into the inner region, as found both in experiments and simulations. Near the glass transition temperature, our MD simulations showed that the dynamics consist mainly of string-like particle hopping motions, as found by others. Importantly, as the temperature decreases, the hopping motions become increasingly repetitive and back-and-forth, contributing no structural relaxations. We propose that structural relaxations are then brought about by pair-interactions between strings. Near the free surface, however, similar repetitive hopping motions are only observed sufficiently far removed from the free surface. We propose that the free surface induces a penetrating surface mobile region by breaking the memory in the particle dynamics. A possible mechanism based on string interactions will be discussed. We are grateful to the support of NSF through Project DMR-1310536 and Hong Kong GRF Grant 15301014.

  20. Surface treatment of a polypropylene film with a nitrogen DBD at medium pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morent, R.; de Geyter, N.; Gengembre, L.; Leys, C.; Payen, E.; van Vlierberghe, S.; Schacht, E.

    2008-09-01

    Surface treatment of polymer films is usually necessary to improve surface wetting and adhesion characteristics. Traditional liquid chemical processes have several disadvantages in contrast to dry finishing processes, like plasma technology. Dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure are extensively studied for surface treatment, however, almost no research has been done on surface treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure. Therefore, in this paper, a polypropylene (PP) film is plasma-treated with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in nitrogen at medium pressure (5.0 kPa). The surface properties of the plasma-treated samples are examined using contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that the surface wettability is significantly enhanced after plasma treatment. The incorporation of nitrogen on the surface is significant (10 at%), demonstrating the ability of the used DBD set-up to generate nitrogen-containing functional groups on the PP surface. Nevertheless, a considerable amount of oxygen (10 at%) is incorporated onto the PP surface underlining the extreme reactivity of oxygen active species and the difficulty in overcoming the air contamination problem. Moreover, AFM analysis reveals that the nitrogen plasma creates large changes in the surface morphology of the PP film due to the selective etching of the amorphous regions of the polymer film.

  1. Nanorod mediated surface plasmon resonance sensor based on effective medium theory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel nanorod mediated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was investigated for enhancing sensitivity of the sensor. The theoretical model containing an anisotropic layer of nanorod was investigated using four-layer Fresnel equations and effective medium theory. The properties of the nanorod me...

  2. SATELLITE DYNAMICS ON THE LAPLACE SURFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Touma, Jihad; Namouni, Fathi E-mail: jihad.touma@gmail.com

    2009-03-15

    The orbital dynamics of most planetary satellites is governed by the quadrupole moment from the equatorial bulge of the host planet and the tidal field from the Sun. On the Laplace surface, the long-term orbital evolution driven by the combined effects of these forces is zero, so that orbits have a fixed orientation and shape. The 'classical' Laplace surface is defined for circular orbits, and coincides with the planet's equator at small planetocentric distances and with its orbital plane at large distances. A dissipative circumplanetary disk should settle to this surface, and hence satellites formed from such a disk are likely to orbit in or near the classical Laplace surface. This paper studies the properties of Laplace surfaces. Our principal results are: (1) if the planetary obliquity exceeds 68.{sup 0}875, there is a range of semimajor axes in which the classical Laplace surface is unstable; (2) at some obliquities and planetocentric distances, there is a distinct Laplace surface consisting of nested eccentric orbits, which bifurcates from the classical Laplace surface at the point where instability sets in; (3) there is also a 'polar' Laplace surface perpendicular to the line of nodes of the planetary equator on the planetary orbit; (4) for circular orbits, the polar Laplace surface is stable at small planetocentric distances and unstable at large distances; (5) at the onset of instability, this polar Laplace surface bifurcates into two polar Laplace surfaces composed of nested eccentric orbits.

  3. Dislocation-driven surface dynamics on solids.

    PubMed

    Kodambaka, S; Khare, S V; Swiech, W; Ohmori, K; Petrov, I; Greene, J E

    2004-05-01

    Dislocations are line defects that bound plastically deformed regions in crystalline solids. Dislocations terminating on the surface of materials can strongly influence nanostructural and interfacial stability, mechanical properties, chemical reactions, transport phenomena, and other surface processes. While most theoretical and experimental studies have focused on dislocation motion in bulk solids under applied stress and step formation due to dislocations at surfaces during crystal growth, very little is known about the effects of dislocations on surface dynamics and morphological evolution. Here we investigate the near-equilibrium dynamics of surface-terminated dislocations using low-energy electron microscopy. We observe, in real time, the thermally driven nucleation and shape-preserving growth of spiral steps rotating at constant temperature-dependent angular velocities around cores of dislocations terminating on the (111) surface of TiN in the absence of applied external stress or net mass change. We attribute this phenomenon to point-defect migration from the bulk to the surface along dislocation lines. Our results demonstrate that dislocation-mediated surface roughening can occur even in the absence of deposition or evaporation, and provide fundamental insights into mechanisms controlling nanostructural stability. PMID:15129275

  4. A dynamical model of supernova feedback: gas outflows from the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a dynamical model of supernova feedback which follows the evolution of pressurized bubbles driven by supernovae in a multiphase interstellar medium (ISM). The bubbles are followed until the point of break-out into the halo, starting from an initial adiabatic phase to a radiative phase. We show that a key property which sets the fate of bubbles in the ISM is the gas surface density, through the work done by the expansion of bubbles and its role in setting the gas scaleheight. The multiphase description of the ISM is essential, and neglecting it leads to order-of-magnitude differences in the predicted outflow rates. We compare our predicted mass loading and outflow velocities to observations of local and high-redshift galaxies and find good agreement over a wide range of stellar masses and velocities. With the aim of analysing the dependence of the mass loading of the outflow, β (i.e. the ratio between the outflow and star formation rates), on galaxy properties, we embed our model in the galaxy formation simulation, GALFORM, set in the Λ cold dark matter framework. We find that a dependence of β solely on the circular velocity, as is widely assumed in the literature, is actually a poor description of the outflow rate, as large variations with redshift and galaxy properties are obtained. Moreover, we find that below a circular velocity of ≈80 km s-1, the mass loading saturates. A more fundamental relation is that between β and the gas scaleheight of the disc, hg, and the gas fraction, fgas, as β ∝ h^{1.1}_g f^{0.4}_gas, or the gas surface density, Σg, and the gas fraction, as β ∝ Σ ^{-0.6}_g f^{0.8}_gas. We find that using the new mass loading model leads to a shallower faint-end slope in the predicted optical and near-IR galaxy luminosity functions.

  5. DYNAMICS OF PLASMID TRANSFER ON SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A protocol was developed to study the dynamics of growth and plasmid transfer in surface populations of bacteria. his method allows for quantitative estimates of cell population densities over time, as well as microscopic observations of colony growth and interactions. sing this ...

  6. ACTIVE MEDIA: Dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a liquid laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barikhin, B. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu; Kudryavkin, E. V.; Nedolugov, V. I.

    1991-07-01

    Fast cinematography of holograms and of shadow and interference patterns was combined with an acoustic method in a study of the dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a coaxially pumped dye laser. The main mechanism of the formation of these inhomogeneities was related to acoustic waves created by the deformation of the walls of a dye cell created by electrical pulses applied to the pump flashlamp. Multipulse operation of this laser could be achieved and the off-duty factor could be reduced if the active medium was excited by the strongest possible pump pulses.

  7. How the solar dynamics can influence the Sun-Earth medium term relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Lefebvre, Sandrine

    2011-02-01

    We recall how the Sun is introduced in the present climatic models and discuss why the solar standard model (SSM) framework is insufficient to describe the Sun-Earth medium term relationship. We then report on the different sources of variability. The SoHO mission allows a comparison between two successive solar minima and puts new constraints on the internal rotation profile. The coming space missions SDO and PICARD will add crucial information on internal circulations and on the superficial asphericity. The interplay between the solar dynamics and terrestrial atmospheric models is in its infancy, it calls for medium term uninterrupted solar observations which will take benefit of a formation flying concept.

  8. Changing Emulsion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob; Chen, Haosheng

    2015-11-01

    We elucidate the effect of heterogeneous surface wettability on the morphology and dynamics of microfluidic emulsions, generated by a co-flowing device. We first design a useful methodology of modifying a micro-capillary with desired heterogeneous wettability, such as alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Subsequently, the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion in the micro-capillary are investigated. Our experimental data reveal a universal critical time scale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain intact, whereas below this time-scale emulsions become adhesive or inverse. A simple model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition. These results show a control of emulsion dynamics by tuning the droplet size and the Capillary number, the ratio of viscous to surface effects, with heterogeneous surface wettability.

  9. Lateral plume spreading in a medium size river plume using surface Lagrangian drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakoulaki, Georgia; MacDonald, Daniel; Cole, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Groups of 27 Lagrangian drifters deployed in the Merrimack River plume over twelve tides, with river discharges ranging between 150-800 m3/s, are used to understand the external forcing mechanisms responsible for the extent of spreading in river plumes. The transition of buoyant flow from a confined estuary to an unconfined coastal ocean introduces the complicated phenomenon of lateral spreading, which occurs preferentially near the surface and results in a flow that spreads laterally as plume water propagates forward in the direction of mean flow. In this work, the temporal and spatial scales of the active spreading region are estimated in the sampled plumes and related to environmental parameters at the river mouth such as inflow river discharge, initial drifter velocity at the point of release, initial reduced gravity and initial internal wave speed. The initial wave speed was found to be the environmental parameter that best predicts the magnitude of the spatial and temporal scales of the active spreading region. Previous studies have asserted the importance of initial plume parameters in near-field plume evolution and here we extrapolate this idea to the mid-field. Interestingly, we find that that lateral plume spreading is arrested at approximately one inertial radius from the river mouth. We therefore propose that the shutdown of spreading is controlled almost exclusively by Coriolis force and it is responsible for converting spreading motion to spinning motion after the mid field region. The outcomes of this research are widely applicable to other energetic, medium size river plume systems and to the author's knowledge this is the first study to estimate lateral plume expansion using observations beyond the immediate near field region of a river plume. This work will provide further development in understanding plume dynamics and the fundamental physical processes that influence coastal ecosystems.

  10. A dynamic and stationary rheological study of erythrocytes incubated in a glucose medium.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Bibiana; Foresto, Patricia; D'Arrigo, Mabel; Valverde, Juana; Rasia, Rodolfo

    2005-02-28

    A higher than normal glucose concentration in a suspending medium may produce non-enzymatic glycosylation of erythrocyte proteins. This process can modify the viscoelastic properties of erythrocytes. In this paper, we studied the possible relationship between glucose concentration in a suspending medium and erythrocyte rheological parameters. Human venous blood was obtained from the antecubital veins of 10 healthy volunteers. Blood samples were anticoagulated with EDTA and centrifuged. Red blood cells (RBCs) were washed and subsequently divided in aliquots, which were incubated in vitro with glucose solutions of different concentrations. Dynamic and stationary viscoelastic parameters of RBCs were determined by laser diffractometry in an Erythrodeformeter. Aggregate shape parameter (ASP) of the RBCs was determined by digital image processing. Significant changes were observed both in ASP and in rheological parameters when the glucose concentration in the medium was increased, demonstrating that a glucose concentration as low as 1% induces alterations in the mechanical properties of RBCs. PMID:15680283

  11. Dynamic wetting on anisotropic patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Nita, Satoshi; Shiomi, Junichiro; Amberg, Gustav; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as occurs when a droplet of a wetting liquid is brought in contact with a dry solid, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. We have recently quantified the hindering effect of fairly isotropic micron-sized patterns on the substrate. Here we will study highly anisotropic surfaces, such as parallel grooves, either perpendicular or parallel to an advancing contact line. This is done by detailed phase field simulations and experiments on structured silicon surfaces. The dynamic wetting behavior of drops on the grooved surfaces is governed by the combined interplay of the wetting line friction and the internal viscous dissipation. Influence of roughness is quantified in terms of the energy dissipation rate at the contact line using the experiment-simulation combined analysis. The energy dissipation of the contact line at the different part of the groove will be discussed. The performance of the model is assessed by comparing its predictions with the experimental data. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., S.N., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  12. Dynamics of surface dipole and tripole solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media with optical lattice field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2013-10-01

    We find the existence conditions for stationary dipole and tripole surface solitons formed at the interface of a nonlocal nonlinear medium and a lattice with linearly modulated frequency. We investigate how the degree of nonlocality, the depth, and the modulation frequency of the optical lattice field affect on the existence of the surface solitons and their dynamics. The relationship between the power and the model parameters is identified. The stability of the surface dipole and tripole solitons is numerically investigated.

  13. Unusual spiral wave dynamics in the Kessler-Levine model of an excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, N.; Bodenschatz, E.; Zykov, V. S.

    2015-05-01

    The Kessler-Levine model is a two-component reaction-diffusion system that describes spatiotemporal dynamics of the messenger molecules in a cell-to-cell signaling process during the aggregation of social amoeba cells. An excitation wave arising in the model has a phase wave at the wave back, which simply follows the wave front after a fixed time interval with the same propagation velocity. Generally speaking, the medium excitability and the refractoriness are two important factors which determine the spiral wave dynamics in any excitable media. The model allows us to separate these two factors relatively easily since the medium refractoriness can be changed independently of the medium excitability. For rigidly rotating waves, the universal relationship has been established by using a modified free-boundary approach, which assumes that the front and the back of a propagating wave are thin in comparison to the wave plateau. By taking a finite thickness of the domain boundary into consideration, the validity of the proposed excitability measure has been essentially improved. A novel method of numerical simulation to suppress the spiral wave instabilities is introduced. The trajectories of the spiral tip observed for a long refractory period have been investigated under a systematic variation of the medium refractoriness.

  14. Dynamics of shock wave propagation and interphase process in liquid-vapor medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pokusaev, B.G.; Pribaturin, N.A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper considers the experimental results and physical effects on the pressure wave dynamics of a vapour-liquid two-phase medium of bubble and slug structure. The role of destruction and collapse of bubbles and slugs, phase transition (condensation and evaporation) on pressure wave dynamics is also studied. The general mechanisms of the wave formation, behavior and instability of a vapour-liquid structure under pressure waves, basic peculiarities of the interface heat transfer are obtained. In the experiments it has been shown that for the bubble medium the shock wave can be transformed into the powerful pressure pulse with an amplitude greater then the amplitude of the initial pressure wave. For the slug medium a characteristic structure of the amplificated wave is {open_quotes}comb{close_quotes} - like wave. It has been shown that the wave amplification caused by generation of secondary waves in a medium caused by destruction and collapse of bubbles and slugs. The obtained results can be useful at transient and emergency operational regimes of nuclear reactors, fuel tank, pipelines with two-phase flows and for development of safety models for chemical industry.

  15. Development of an extended BIEM and its application to the analysis of earthquake dynamic rupture interacting with a medium interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, T.; Kame, N.

    2013-12-01

    An extended boundary integral equation method (XBIEM) has been recently proposed for the analysis of dynamic crack growth (=dynamic earthquake rupture model) in an inhomogeneous medium consisting of homogeneous sub-regions. Originally XBIEM is applicable to non-planar geometry of cracks and medium interfaces, but it has been demonstrated only for a simple planar crack along a bimaterial interface. Here we developed a code to analyse non-planar rupture with non-planar interfaces in a mode III problem, and applied it to a dynamic rupture problem across a planar bimaterial interface to investigate the effect of medium inhomogeneity. For this purpose, we firstly derived all the displacement and displacement velocity kernels in a unified analytic discretized form, in addition to the stress kernels already derived, necessary for versatile geometry of boundaries (i.e., cracks and interfaces) and checked all the kernel components in the simulation of wave propagation across a non-planar interface cutting a homogeneous medium. Then we validated our code in a wave reflection-transmission problem across a planar bimaterial interface. Secondly, in order to realize the analysis of dynamic rupture crossing a bimaterial interface we introduced a new implicit time-stepping scheme for instantaneously interacting boundary elements on the crack and medium interface. Such interactions only appear in the crack's crossing the interface. Otherwise we can use the explicit scheme as employed for BIEM in a homogeneous medium. We validated our numerical code for the crack growth in a homogeneous medium cut with a planar interface and found that our new scheme worked well. Finally, we tackled dynamic rupture propagation on a planar fault embedded normal to the planar interface of a bimaterial. Spontaneous rupture was allowed not only on the planar main fault but also on the interfacial fault and it is controlled by different slip-weakening laws on each of them: each peak strength is

  16. Study of multiband disordered systems using the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yi; Terletska, Hanna; Moore, C.; Ekuma, Chinedu; Tam, Ka-Ming; Berlijn, Tom; Ku, Wei; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-11-06

    We generalize the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation to multiband disordered systems. Using our extended formalism, we perform a systematic study of the nonlocal correlation effects induced by disorder on the density of states and the mobility edge of the three-dimensional two-band Anderson model. We include interband and intraband hopping and an intraband disorder potential. Our results are consistent with those obtained by the transfer matrix and the kernel polynomial methods. We also apply the method to KxFe2-ySe2 with Fe vacancies. Despite the strong vacancy disorder and anisotropy, we find the material is not an Anderson insulator. Moreover our resultsmore » demonstrate the application of the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation method to study Anderson localization in real materials.« less

  17. Study of multiband disordered systems using the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Terletska, Hanna; Moore, C.; Ekuma, Chinedu; Tam, Ka-Ming; Berlijn, Tom; Ku, Wei; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-11-06

    We generalize the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation to multiband disordered systems. Using our extended formalism, we perform a systematic study of the nonlocal correlation effects induced by disorder on the density of states and the mobility edge of the three-dimensional two-band Anderson model. We include interband and intraband hopping and an intraband disorder potential. Our results are consistent with those obtained by the transfer matrix and the kernel polynomial methods. We also apply the method to KxFe2-ySe2 with Fe vacancies. Despite the strong vacancy disorder and anisotropy, we find the material is not an Anderson insulator. Moreover our results demonstrate the application of the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation method to study Anderson localization in real materials.

  18. Classical 2d dynamics simulations of metallic spheres in highly viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, Peter; Hubler, Alfred

    2007-03-01

    We study the classical dynamics computations of metallic spheres immersed in highly viscous, but weakly conducting medium while exposed to the electro-static field of external electrodes of varying geometries. We represent the system's charge dynamics by the spheres' multipole moments as induced by the electrodes. We theoretically derive the force contributions on an individual sphere including feedback effects, and compare these with results from finite-element computations. We find an individual sphere to oscillate between opposite electrodes only if sufficient charge is retained on the sphere on its path for given material parameters of the medium and distance between the electrodes. We discuss the system's parameter ranges necessary for line arrangements of multiple spheres to emerge. Finally, we compare our computations with an experiment of ballbearings in castor oil.

  19. Traveling waves and dynamical formation of autonomous pacemakers in a bistable medium with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelev, Igor A.; Vadivasova, Tatiana E.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2015-03-01

    The problem of spatiotemporal pattern formation in the wall of arterial vesselsmay be reduced to 1D or 2D models of nonlinear active medium. We address this problem using the discrete array of non-oscillating (bistable) active units. We show how the specific choice of initial conditions in a 1D model with periodic boundary conditions triggers the self-sustained behaviour. We reveal the core of observed effects being the dynamical formation of localized (few-element size) autonomous pacemakers.

  20. Extraction of near-surface properties for a lossy layered medium using the propagator matrix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehta, K.; Snieder, R.; Graizer, V.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface properties play an important role in advancing earthquake hazard assessment. Other areas where near-surface properties are crucial include civil engineering and detection and delineation of potable groundwater. From an exploration point of view, near-surface properties are needed for wavefield separation and correcting for the local near-receiver structure. It has been shown that these properties can be estimated for a lossless homogeneous medium using the propagator matrix. To estimate the near-surface properties, we apply deconvolution to passive borehole recordings of waves excited by an earthquake. Deconvolution of these incoherent waveforms recorded by the sensors at different depths in the borehole with the recording at the surface results in waves that propagate upwards and downwards along the array. These waves, obtained by deconvolution, can be used to estimate the P- and S-wave velocities near the surface. As opposed to waves obtained by cross-correlation that represent filtered version of the sum of causal and acausal Green's function between the two receivers, the waves obtained by deconvolution represent the elements of the propagator matrix. Finally, we show analytically the extension of the propagator matrix analysis to a lossy layered medium for a special case of normal incidence. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  1. DYNAMICAL FRICTION IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM WITH A LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2012-02-01

    The dynamical friction force experienced by a massive gravitating body moving through a gaseous medium is modified by sufficiently strong large-scale magnetic fields. Using linear perturbation theory, we calculate the structure of the wake generated by, and the gravitational drag force on, a body traveling in a straight-line trajectory in a uniformly magnetized medium. The functional form of the drag force as a function of the Mach number ({identical_to} V{sub 0}/c{sub s} , where V{sub 0} is the velocity of the body and c{sub s} is the sound speed) depends on the strength of the magnetic field and on the angle between the velocity of the perturber and the direction of the magnetic field. In particular, the peak value of the drag force is not near Mach number {approx}1 for a perturber moving in a sufficiently magnetized medium. As a rule of thumb, we may state that for supersonic motion, magnetic fields act to suppress dynamical friction; for subsonic motion, they tend to enhance dynamical friction. For perturbers moving along the magnetic field lines, the drag force at some subsonic Mach numbers may be stronger than at supersonic velocities. We also mention the relevance of our findings to black hole coalescence in galactic nuclei.

  2. Medium optimization for the production of recombinant nattokinase by Bacillus subtilis using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po Ting; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2007-01-01

    Nattokinase is a potent fibrinolytic enzyme with the potential for fighting cardiovascular diseases. Most recently, a new Bacillus subtilis/Escherichia coli (B. subtilis/E. coli) shuttle vector has been developed to achieve stable production of recombinant nattokinase in B. subtilis (Chen; et al. 2007, 23, 808-813). With this developed B. subtilis strain, the design of an optimum but cost-effective medium for high-level production of recombinant nattokinase was attempted by using response surface methodology. On the basis of the Plackett-Burman design, three critical medium components were selected. Subsequently, the optimum combination of selected factors was investigated by the Box-Behnken design. As a result, it gave the predicted maximum production of recombinant nattokinase with 71 500 CU/mL for shake-flask cultures when the concentrations of soybean hydrolysate, potassium phosphate, and calcium chloride in medium were at 6.100, 0.415, and 0.015%, respectively. This was further verified by a duplicated experiment. Moreover, the production scheme based on the optimum medium was scaled up in a fermenter. The batch fermentation of 3 L was carried out by controlling the condition at 37 degrees C and dissolved oxygen reaching 20% of air saturation level while the fermentation pH was initially set at 8.5. Without the need for controlling the broth pH, recombinant nattokinase production with a yield of 77 400 CU/mL (corresponding to 560 mg/L) could be obtained in the culture broth within 24 h. In particular, the recombinant B. subtilis strain was found fully stable at the end of fermentation when grown on the optimum medium. Overall, it indicates the success of this experimental design approach in formulating a simple and cost-effective medium, which provides the developed strain with sufficient nutrient supplements for stable and high-level production of recombinant nattokinase in a fermenter. PMID:17914859

  3. Bioinspired, dynamic, structured surfaces for biofilm prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Alexander K.

    Bacteria primarily exist in robust, surface-associated communities known as biofilms, ubiquitous in both natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms resist a wide range of biocidal treatments and pose persistent pathogenic threats. Treatment of adherent biofilm is difficult, costly, and, in medical systems such as catheters, frequently impossible. Adding to the challenge, we have discovered that biofilm can be both impenetrable to vapors and extremely nonwetting, repelling even low surface tension commercial antimicrobials. Our study shows multiple contributing factors, including biochemical components and multiscale reentrant topography. Reliant on surface chemistry, conventional strategies for preventing biofilm only transiently affect attachment and/or are environmentally toxic. In this work, we look to Nature's antifouling solutions, such as the dynamic spiny skin of the echinoderm, and we develop a versatile surface nanofabrication platform. Our benchtop approach unites soft lithography, electrodeposition, mold deformation, and material selection to enable many degrees of freedom—material, geometric, mechanical, dynamic—that can be programmed starting from a single master structure. The mechanical properties of the bio-inspired nanostructures, verified by AFM, are precisely and rationally tunable. We examine how synthetic dynamic nanostructured surfaces control the attachment of pathogenic biofilms. The parameters governing long-range patterning of bacteria on high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanoarrays are combinatorially elucidated, and we discover that sufficiently low effective stiffness of these HAR arrays mechanoselectively inhibits ˜40% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm attachment. Inspired by the active echinoderm skin, we design and fabricate externally actuated dynamic elastomer surfaces with active surface microtopography. We extract from a large parameter space the critical topographic length scales and actuation time scales for achieving

  4. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A. PMID:27612817

  5. Dynamic bioactive stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Heather Marie

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and development of antimicrobial and anticoagulant surfaces of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) polymers. Aliphatic polymeric surfaces of PE and PP polymers functionalized using click chemistry reactions by the attachment of --COOH groups via microwave plasma reactions followed by functionalization with alkyne moieties. Azide containing ampicillin (AMP) was synthesized and subsequently clicked into the alkyne prepared PE and PP surfaces. Compared to non-functionalized PP and PE surfaces, the AMP clicked surfaces exhibited substantially enhanced antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. To expand the biocompatibility of polymeric surface anticoagulant attributes, PE and PTFE surfaces were functionalized with pH-responsive poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polyelectrolyte tethers terminated with NH2 and COOH groups. The goal of these studies was to develop switchable stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces that interact with biological environments and display simultaneous antimicrobial and anticoagulant properties. Antimicrobial AMP was covalently attached to --COOH terminal ends of protected PAA, while anticoagulant heparin (HEP) was attached to terminal --NH2 groups of P2VP. When pH < 2.3, the P2VP segments are protonated and extend, but for pH > 5.5, they collapse while the PAA segments extend. Such surfaces, when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, inhibit bacterial growth due to the presence of AMP, as well as are effective anticoagulants due to the presence of covalently attached HEP. Comparison of these "dynamic" pH responsive surfaces with "static" surfaces terminated with AMP entities show significant enhancement of longevity and surface activity against microbial film formation. The last portion of this dissertation focuses on the covalent attachment of living T1 and Φ11 bacteriophages (phages) on PE and PTFE surface

  6. Optimization of a natural medium for cellulase by a marine Aspergillus niger using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Hui-Yin; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2012-08-01

    The components of a natural medium were optimized to produce cellulase from a marine Aspergillus niger under solid state fermentation conditions by response surface methodology. Eichhornia crassipes and natural seawater were used as a major substrate and a source of mineral salts, respectively. Mineral salts of natural seawater could increase cellulase production. Raw corn cob and raw rice straw showed a significant positive effect on cellulase production. The optimum natural medium consisted of 76.9 % E. crassipes (w/w), 8.9 % raw corn cob (w/w), 3.5 % raw rice straw (w/w), 10.7 % raw wheat bran (w/w), and natural seawater (2.33 times the weight of the dry substrates). Incubation for 96 h in the natural medium increased the biomass to the maximum. The cellulase production was 17.80 U/g the dry weight of substrates after incubation for 144 h. The natural medium avoided supplying chemicals and pretreating substrates. It is promising for future practical fermentation of environment-friendly producing cellulase. PMID:22644643

  7. Dynamical surface affinity of diphasic liquids as a probe of wettability of multimodal porous media.

    PubMed

    Korb, J-P; Freiman, G; Nicot, B; Ligneul, P

    2009-12-01

    We introduce a method for estimating the wettability of rock/oil/brine systems using noninvasive in situ nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion. This technique scans over a large range of applied magnetic fields and yields unique information about the extent to which a fluid is dynamically correlated with a solid rock surface. Unlike conventional transverse relaxation studies, this approach is a direct probe of the dynamical surface affinity of fluids. To quantify these features we introduce a microscopic dynamical surface affinity index which measures the dynamical correlation (i.e., the microscopic wettability) between the diffusive fluid and the fixed paramagnetic relaxation sources at the pore surfaces. We apply this method to carbonate reservoir rocks which are known to hold about two thirds of the world's oil reserves. Although this nondestructive method concerns here an application to rocks, it could be generalized as an in situ liquid/surface affinity indicator for any multimodal porous medium including porous biological media. PMID:20365175

  8. Monitoring vegetation dynamics with medium resolution MODIS-EVI time series at sub-regional scale in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovyk, Olena; Landmann, Tobias; Erasmus, Barend F. N.; Tewes, Andreas; Schellberg, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Currently there is a lack of knowledge on spatio-temporal patterns of land surface dynamics at medium spatial scale in southern Africa, even though this information is essential for better understanding of ecosystem response to climatic variability and human-induced land transformations. In this study, we analysed vegetation dynamics across a large area in southern Africa using the 14-years (2000-2013) of medium spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS-EVI time-series data. Specifically, we investigated temporal changes in the time series of key phenometrics including overall greenness, peak and timing of annual greenness over the monitoring period and study region. In order to specifically capture spatial and per pixel vegetation changes over time, we calculated trends in these phenometrics using a robust trend analysis method. The results showed that interannual vegetation dynamics followed precipitation patterns with clearly differentiated seasonality. The earliest peak greenness during 2000-2013 occurred at the end of January in the year 2000 and the latest peak greenness was observed at the mid of March in 2012. Specifically spatial patterns of long-term vegetation trends allowed mapping areas of (i) decrease or increase in overall greenness, (ii) decrease or increase of peak greenness, and (iii) shifts in timing of occurrence of peak greenness over the 14-year monitoring period. The observed vegetation decline in the study area was mainly attributed to human-induced factors. The obtained information is useful to guide selection of field sites for detailed vegetation studies and land rehabilitation interventions and serve as an input for a range of land surface models.

  9. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  10. On the Dynamical and Physical State of the ``Diffuse Ionized Medium'' in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew D.

    1997-12-01

    We report the initial results from a program to study the morphology, physical state, and kinematics of the ``diffuse ionized medium'' (DIM) in a sample of the nearest and brightest late-type galaxies. For each of five galaxies (NGC 2403, M81, NGC 4395, M51, and M101), we have analyzed deep narrowband Hα images of the entire star-forming disk and long-slit spectra of the inner (~10 kpc) disk with a resolution of 40-75 km s-1. We find that the DIM covers most of the star-forming disk and is morphologically related to the presence of high surface brightness gas (the giant H II regions). The DIM and the giant H II regions differ systematically in their physical and dynamical state. The DIM is characterized by enhanced emission in the low-ionization forbidden lines ([O I], [N II], and [S II]), and even the high-ionization [O III] λ5007 line is moderately strong in the DIM in at least three cases. This last result contrasts with upper limits on the [O III] surface brightness in the local DIM of our own Galaxy (the ``Reynolds Layer''). We directly verify the inference made by Lehnert and Heckman that the DIM contributes significantly to the spatially integrated (global) emission-line ratios measured in late-type galaxies. We also find that the DIM is more disturbed kinematically than the gas in the giant H II regions. The deconvolved (intrinsic) widths of the Hα and [N II] λ6584 lines range from 30 to 100 km s-1 (FWHM) in the DIM compared to 20-50 km s-1 in the giant H II regions. The high-ionization gas in the DIM is more kinematically disturbed than the low-ionization gas: the [O III] λ5007 lines have intrinsic widths of 70-150 km s-1. The differing kinematics implies that the DIM is not a single monolithic phase of the ISM. Instead, it may consist of a ``quiescent'' DIM with a low ionization state and small scale height (few hundred parsec) and a ``disturbed'' DIM with a high ionization state and moderate scale height (0.5-1 kpc). We argue that the quiescent DIM

  11. Dynamic Maintenance and Visualization of Molecular Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, C L; Pascucci, V; Shamir, A; Holt, R J; Netravali, A N

    2004-12-16

    Molecular surface computations are often necessary in order to perform synthetic drug design. A critical step in this process is the computation and update of an exact boundary representation for the molecular surface (e.g. the Lee-Richards surface). In this paper they introduce efficient techniques for computing a molecular surface boundary representation as a set of NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines) patches. This representation introduces for molecules the same geometric data structure used in the solid modeling community and enables immediate access to a wide range of modeling operations and techniques. Furthermore, this allows the use of any general solid modeling or visualization system as a molecular modeling interface. However, using such a representation in a molecular modeling environment raises several efficiency and update constraints, especially in a dynamic setting. For example, changes in the probe radius result in both geometric and topological changes to the set of patches. The techniques provide the option of trading accuracy of the representation for the efficiency of the computation, while still tracking the changes in the set of patches. In particular, they discuss two main classes of dynamic updates: one that keeps the topology of the molecular configuration fixed, and a more complicated case where the topology may be updated continuously. In general the generated output surface is represented in a format that can be loaded into standard solid modeling systems. It can also be directly triangulated or rendered, possibly at different levels of resolution, by a standard graphics library such as OpenGL without any additional effort.

  12. Influence of Kerr-like medium on the dynamics of a two-mode Raman coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha; Gilhare, Karuna

    2016-08-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of an effective two-level atom interacting with two modes via Raman process inside an ideal cavity in the presence of Kerr non-linearity. The cavity modes interact both with the atom as well as the Kerr-like medium. The unitary transformation method presented here, not only solves the time-dependent problem, but also provides the eigensolutions of the interacting Hamiltonian at the same time. We study the atomic-population dynamics and the dynamics of the photon statistics in the two cavity modes. The influence of the Kerr-like medium on the statistics of the field is explored and it is observed that Kerr medium introduces antibunching in mode 1 and this effect is enhanced by a stronger interaction with the non-linear medium. In the high non-linear coupling regime anticorrelated beam become correlated. Kerr medium also introduces non-classical correlation between the two modes.

  13. Envelope Synthesis on the Free Surface of a Random Elastic Medium Based on the Markov Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, K.; Sato, H.; Nishimura, T.

    2008-12-01

    Short-period seismograms mostly consist of the waves scattered by random inhomogeneities of the solid earth. For P-waves, the apparent duration is broadened and the transverse amplitude is excited with travel distance increasing. Usually, we observe the seismic waves on the free surface. For the homogeneous medium case, the vertical incident P-wave amplitude is doubled at the free surface; however, for the inhomogeneous medium case it has not been clear how the free surface affects wave amplitudes since the ray directions are widely distributed because of scattering. Here, we develop the synthesis of vector-wave envelopes on the free surface of a random medium. When the wave length is shorter than the correlation distance of 3-D infinite random media, characterized by a Gaussian autocorrelation function, Sato (2006) derives analytical solutions of vector-wave envelopes on the basis of the Markov approximation, which is a stochastic extension of the split stem method to solve the parabolic wave equation. We extend his method for the synthesis of vector-wave envelopes on the free surface of a random medium. In the Markov approximation, Mean square (MS) envelopes are calculated by using the Fourier transform of two-frequency mutual coherence function (TFMCF) with respect to the angular frequency. The TFMCF is statistically defined on the transverse plane, which is perpendicular to the global ray direction. The Fourier transform of the TFMCF with respect to the transverse coordinates gives the angular spectrum that shows the distribution of ray directions. This angular spectrum has a sharp peak in the global ray direction just after the direct wave arrival and gradually increases its width with the lapse time increasing. We can calculate vector-wave envelopes in the infinite space, simply projecting the angular spectrum to each component and integrating it in the wavenumber space. We calculate the vector-wave envelopes on the free surface by multiplying the

  14. The Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo-Christensen, Erik; Oberholtzer, J. David

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment is designed to provide the basic data needed to understand the wind-wave interactions in the open ocean. During the period of October 1990 through March 1991 two discus, four meteorological buoys, and several other specialized buoys will collect continuous in-situ data. During three intensive periods of study, several aircraft and an airship will collect synoptic data from the study area in the Atlantic east of the Wallops Flight Facility. Data from the buoys will be collected by aircraft and ARGOS data links. Instrumentation descriptions as well as preliminary data from the first intensive study period are presented.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics of Biofilm Growth on Sediment Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Murdoch, L. C.; Faybishenko, B.

    2013-12-01

    Bioclogging often begins with the establishment of small colonies (microcolonies), which then form biofilms on the surfaces of a porous medium. These biofilm-porous media surfaces are not simple coatings of single microbes, but complex assemblages of cooperative and competing microbes, interacting with their chemical environment. This leads one to ask: what are the underlying dynamics involved with biofilm growth? To begin answering this question, we have extended the work of Kot et al. (1992, Bull. Mathematical Bio.) from a fully mixed chemostat to an idealized, one-dimensional, biofilm environment, taking into account a simple predator-prey microbial competition, with the prey feeding on a specified food source. With a variable (periodic) food source, Kot et al. (1992) were able to demonstrate chaotic dynamics in the coupled substrate-prey-predator system. Initially, deterministic chaos was thought by many to be mainly a mathematical phenomenon. However, several recent publications (e.g., Becks et al, 2005, Nature Letters; Graham et al. 2007, Int. Soc Microb. Eco. J.; Beninca et al., 2008, Nature Letters; Saleh, 2011, IJBAS) have brought together, using experimental studies and relevant mathematics, a breakthrough discovery that deterministic chaos is present in relatively simple biochemical systems. Two of us (Faybishenko and Molz, 2013, Procedia Environ. Sci)) have numerically analyzed a mathematical model of rhizosphere dynamics (Kravchenko et al., 2004, Microbiology) and detected patterns of nonlinear dynamical interactions supporting evidence of synchronized synergetic oscillations of microbial populations, carbon and oxygen concentrations driven by root exudation into a fully mixed system. In this study, we have extended the application of the Kot et al. model to investigate a spatially-dependent biofilm system. We will present the results of numerical simulations obtained using COMSOL Multi-Physics software, which we used to determine the nature of the

  16. Surface response of a viscoelastic medium to subsurface acoustic sources with application to medical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, Thomas J.; Yazicioglu, Yigit; Loth, Francis

    2003-02-01

    The response at the surface of an isotropic viscoelastic medium to buried fundamental acoustic sources is studied theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Finite and infinitesimal monopole and dipole sources within the low audible frequency range (40-400 Hz) are considered. Analytical and numerical integral solutions that account for compression, shear and surface wave response to the buried sources are formulated and compared with numerical finite element simulations and experimental studies on finite dimension phantom models. It is found that at low audible frequencies, compression and shear wave propagation from point sources can both be significant, with shear wave effects becoming less significant as frequency increases. Additionally, it is shown that simple closed-form analytical approximations based on an infinite medium model agree well with numerically obtained ``exact'' half-space solutions for the frequency range and material of interest in this study. The focus here is on developing a better understanding of how biological soft tissue affects the transmission of vibro-acoustic energy from biological acoustic sources below the skin surface, whose typical spectral content is in the low audible frequency range. Examples include sound radiated from pulmonary, gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular system functions, such as breath sounds, bowel sounds and vascular bruits, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere. PMID:26583741

  18. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar Das, Amita; Sen, Abhijit; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-03-15

    The existence and evolution of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium are investigated in a first principles approach using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of particles interacting via a Yukawa potential. These localized structures are found to exist in both weakly and strongly coupled regimes with their structures becoming sharper as the correlation effects between the dust particles get stronger. A surprising result, compared to fluid simulations, is the existence of rarefactive soliton-like structures in our non-dissipative system, a feature that arises from the charge conjugation symmetry property of the Yukawa fluid. Our simulation findings closely resemble many diverse experimental results reported in the past.

  20. Observing Global Surface Water Flood Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul D.; Neal, Jefferey C.; Alsdorf, Douglas; Schumann, Guy J.-P.

    2014-05-01

    Flood waves moving along river systems are both a key determinant of globally important biogeochemical and ecological processes and, at particular times and particular places, a major environmental hazard. In developed countries, sophisticated observing networks and ancillary data, such as channel bathymetry and floodplain terrain, exist with which to understand and model floods. However, at global scales, satellite data currently provide the only means of undertaking such studies. At present, there is no satellite mission dedicated to observing surface water dynamics and, therefore, surface water scientists make use of a range of sensors developed for other purposes that are distinctly sub-optimal for the task in hand. Nevertheless, by careful combination of the data available from topographic mapping, oceanographic, cryospheric and geodetic satellites, progress in understanding some of the world's major river, floodplain and wetland systems can be made. This paper reviews the surface water data sets available to hydrologists on a global scale and the recent progress made in the field. Further, the paper looks forward to the proposed NASA/CNES Surface Water Ocean Topography satellite mission that may for the first time provide an instrument that meets the needs of the hydrology community.

  1. Medium optimization by combination of response surface methodology and desirability function: an application in glutamine production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinshan; Ma, Cuiqing; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Ping

    2007-03-01

    An optimization strategy based on desirability function approach (DFA) together with response surface methodology (RSM) has been used to optimize production medium in L-glutamine fermentation. Fermentation problems often force to reach a compromise between different experimental variables in order to achieve the most suitable strategy applying in industrial production. The importance of the use of multi-objective optimization methods lies in the ability to cope with this kind of problems. A sequential RSM with different combinations of glucose and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) was performed to attain the optimal medium (OM-1) in glutamine production. Based on the result of RSM and the evaluation of production cost, a more economical optimal medium (OM-2) was obtained with the aid of DFA. In DFA study, glutamate, the main by-product in glutamine fermentation as another response was considered. Compared with OM-1 in validated experiment, similar amounts of glutamine were obtained in OM-2 while the concentration of glutamate and the production cost decreased by 53.6 and 7.1%, respectively. PMID:17119957

  2. Optimization of Medium Using Response Surface Methodology for Lipid Production by Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fangfang; Long, Lijuan; Sun, Xiumei; Wu, Hualian; Li, Tao; Xiang, Wenzhou

    2014-01-01

    Lipid production is an important indicator for assessing microalgal species for biodiesel production. In this work, the effects of medium composition on lipid production by Scenedesmus sp. were investigated using the response surface methodology. The results of a Plackett–Burman design experiment revealed that NaHCO3, NaH2PO4·2H2O and NaNO3 were three factors significantly influencing lipid production, which were further optimized by a Box–Behnken design. The optimal medium was found to contain 3.07 g L−1 NaHCO3, 15.49 mg L−1 NaH2PO4·2H2O and 803.21 mg L−1 NaNO3. Using the optimal conditions previously determined, the lipid production (304.02 mg·L−1) increased 54.64% more than that using the initial medium, which agreed well with the predicted value 309.50 mg L−1. Additionally, lipid analysis found that palmitic acid (C16:0) and oleic acid (C18:1) dominantly constituted the algal fatty acids (about 60% of the total fatty acids) and a much higher content of neutral lipid accounted for 82.32% of total lipids, which strongly proved that Scenedesmus sp. is a very promising feedstock for biodiesel production. PMID:24663113

  3. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method. PMID:26683462

  4. Experimental Studies of Dynamics at Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Thomas Avery

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of thermal and photoinduced processes on metal surfaces point to the importance of transient intermediate species in the understanding of dynamics. Experiments were performed using photoinduced desorption (PID), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), high-resolution and time -resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS and TREELS), and femtosecond multiphoton photoemission spectroscopy. The thermal and photoinduced reactions of Mo(CO)_6 adsorbed on Rh(100) were studied to better understand energy transfer between a photoexcited molecule and a metal surface. The Mo(CO)_6 partially dissociated upon adsorption, allowing a comparison to be made between Mo(CO)_6 adsorbed on the fragment-covered surface and a more ordered CO-covered surface. The energy transfer rate was found to be larger on the fragment-covered surface. The thermal reaction of hydrogen gas with oxygen adsorbed on Pt(111) was studied with TREELS between 130 and 160 K, observing the modes associated with hydroxyl adsorbed on the surface as a function of time while the sample, preadsorbed with atomic oxygen, was exposed to hydrogen gas. In coordination between Monte Carlo calculations and kinetic simulations, a model was developed whereby the reaction to form hydroxyl occurred between a molecular hydrogen precursor and oxygen at island boundaries. The photoinduced reaction of adsorbed atomic hydrogen and molecular oxygen to form hydroxyl and water on Pt(111) was studied in order to understand the reactivity of the hot oxygen atoms produced by photodissociation of molecular oxygen. The final products of the two oxygen -hydrogen reactions were the same. A measurement was made of the cross section for NO photodesorption from Pt(111) at 90 K. All of these experiments pointed to a need to make transient measurements on the ultrashort time scale in order to develop a more microscopic understanding of the dynamical processes that are occurring. As a result, a novel time-of-flight analyzer was

  5. Dynamic wormholes, antitrapped surfaces, and energy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Visser, M.

    1998-08-01

    It is by now apparent that topology is too crude a tool to accurately characterize a generic traversable wormhole. In two earlier papers we developed a complete characterization of generic but static traversable wormholes, and in the present paper extend the discussion to arbitrary time-dependent (dynamical) wormholes. A local definition of a wormhole throat, free from assumptions about asymptotic flatness, symmetries, future and past null infinities, embedding diagrams, topology, and even time dependence is developed that accurately captures the essence of what a wormhole throat is, and where it is located. Adapting and extending a suggestion due to Page, we define a wormhole throat to be a marginally anti-trapped surface, that is, a closed two-dimensional spatial hypersurface such that one of the two future-directed null geodesic congruences orthogonal to it is just beginning to diverge. Typically a dynamic wormhole will possess {ital two} such throats, corresponding to the two orthogonal null geodesic congruences, and these two throats will not coincide (though they do coalesce into a single throat in the static limit). The divergence property of the null geodesics at the marginally anti-trapped surface generalizes the {open_quotes}flare-out{close_quotes} condition for an arbitrary wormhole. We derive theorems regarding violations of the null energy condition (NEC) at and near these throats and find that, even for wormholes with arbitrary time dependence, the violation of the NEC is a generic property of wormhole throats. We also discuss wormhole throats in the presence of fully antisymmetric torsion and find that the energy condition violations {ital cannot} be dumped into the torsion degrees of freedom. Finally by means of a concrete example we demonstrate that even temporary suspension of energy-condition violations is incompatible with the flare-out property of dynamic throats. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Response surface optimization of culture medium for enhanced docosahexaenoic acid production by a Malaysian thraustochytrid

    PubMed Central

    Manikan, Vidyah; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) plays a vital role in the enhancement of human health, particularly for cognitive, neurological, and visual functions. Marine microalgae, such as members of the genus Aurantiochytrium, are rich in DHA and represent a promising source of omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, levels of glucose, yeast extract, sodium glutamate and sea salt were optimized for enhanced lipid and DHA production by a Malaysian isolate of thraustochytrid, Aurantiochytrium sp. SW1, using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized medium contained 60 g/L glucose, 2 g/L yeast extract, 24 g/L sodium glutamate and 6 g/L sea salt. This combination produced 17.8 g/L biomass containing 53.9% lipid (9.6 g/L) which contained 44.07% DHA (4.23 g/L). The optimized medium was used in a scale-up run, where a 5 L bench-top bioreactor was employed to verify the applicability of the medium at larger scale. This produced 24.46 g/L biomass containing 38.43% lipid (9.4 g/L), of which 47.87% was DHA (4.5 g/L). The total amount of DHA produced was 25% higher than that produced in the original medium prior to optimization. This result suggests that Aurantiochytrium sp. SW1 could be developed for industrial application as a commercial DHA-producing microorganism. PMID:25721623

  7. A dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of effective temperature in a vibrated granular medium.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yixin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Kou, Binquan; Li, Xiangting; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Wang, Yujie

    2014-08-01

    We present a dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of the effective temperature Teff in a vibrated granular medium. By tracking the directed motion and the fluctuation dynamics of the tracers inside, we obtained Teff of the system using the Einstein relationship. We found that as the system unjams with increasing vibration intensities Γ, the structural relaxation time τ increases substantially which can be fitted by an Arrhenius law using Teff. And the characteristic energy scale of structural relaxation yielded by the Arrhenius fitting is E = 0.20 ± 0.02pd(3), where p is the pressure and d is the background particle diameter, which is consistent with those from hard sphere simulations in which the structural relaxation happens via the opening up of free volume against pressure. PMID:24930865

  8. Study of the Surface Heterogeneity of icy dwarf?planets and other medium size Kuiper Belt objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Emery, Josh P.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a comprehensive analysis of the surface heterogeneity of a selected sample of dwarf-planets and candidates to be considered as dwarf-planets. The sample has been carefully selected to reach the scientific goals with a relative low cost in observing time. The research proposed here will be based on the analysis of the light-curve of these objects obtained using IRAC/Spitzer photometry. KBOs likely retain some of the most primitive material in the Solar System. Models of the retention of volatiles by small-bodies in the Solar System show that dwarf-planets can retain most of the original inventory of volatiles. A good example is Pluto. The surface of this body is formed by patches of CH4, N2 and CO and exhibits a large degree of surface heterogeneity. Our preliminary results of the IRAC/Spitzer light curves of Pluto, obtained by this group in 2004 and 2014, show the potential of these data to map the surface distribution of the different species of ices on the surface of KBOs. For this project we have selected six objects (out of a list of 15) that are ideal for this study using Spitzer photometry. Our sample covers two classes of bodies: Eris, Makemake and Haumea, all large enough to retain volatiles and so how signs of sublimation and condensation cycles on their surfaces; and Quaoar, Varuna and Ixion (D<1000 km) that may not have retained volatiles. If signs of heterogeneity are detected on IRAC data from these medium bodies (as suggested by previous studies) this could be due to a combination of collisions and irradiation. By addressing the compositional heterogeneity of this sample of KBOs the proposed work will address gaps in the scientific knowledge of the chemical and dynamical history of the outer Solar System as well as other planetary systems.}

  9. Ethanol oxidation on Pt single-crystal electrodes: surface-structure effects in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Busó-Rogero, Carlos; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-07-21

    Ethanol oxidation in 0.1 M NaOH on single-crystal electrodes has been studied using electrochemical and FTIR techniques. The results show that the activity order is the opposite of that found in acidic solutions. The Pt(111) electrode displays the highest currents and also the highest onset potential of all the electrodes. The onset potential for the oxidation of ethanol is linked to the adsorption of OH on the electrode surface. However, small (or even negligible) amounts of CO(ads) and carbonate are detected by FTIR, which implies that cleavage of the C-C bond is not favored in this medium. The activity of the electrodes diminishes quickly upon cycling. The diminution of the activity is proportional to the measured currents and is linked to the formation and polymerization of acetaldehyde, which adsorbs onto the electrode surface and prevents further oxidation. PMID:24782218

  10. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, Stavros

    2013-11-19

    Techniques are provided for enhancing the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium such as tissue, water and smoke. Examples of such an object include a vein located below the skin, a mine located below the surface of the sea and a human in a location covered by smoke. The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the utilization of structured illumination. In the specific application of this invention to image the veins in the arm or other part of the body, the issue of how to control the intensity of the image of a metal object (such as a needle) that must be inserted into the vein is also addressed.

  11. Surface complexation reaction for phase transfer of hydrophobic quantum dot from nonpolar to polar medium.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Satyapriya; Roy, Shilaj; Pramanik, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2014-09-01

    Chemical reaction between oleate-capped Zn(x)Cd(1-x)S quantum dots (Qdots) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) led to formation of a surface complex, which was accompanied by transfer of hydrophobic Qdots from nonpolar (hexane) to polar (water) medium with high efficiency. The stability of the complex on the surface was achieved via involvement of dangling sulfide bonds. Moreover, the transferred hydrophilic Qdots--herein called as quantum dot complex (QDC)--exhibited new and superior optical properties in comparison to bare inorganic complexes with retention of the dimension and core structure of the Qdots. Finally, the new and superior optical properties of water-soluble QDC make them potentially useful for biological--in addition to light emitting device (LED)--applications. PMID:25133937

  12. In-medium short-range dynamics of nucleons: Recent theoretical and experimental advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atti, Claudio Ciofi degli

    2015-08-01

    The investigation of in-medium short-range dynamics of nucleons, usually referred to as the study of short-range correlations (SRCs), is a key issue in nuclear and hadronic physics. As a matter of fact, even in the simplified assumption that the nucleus could be described as a system of protons and neutrons interacting via effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, several non trivial problems arise concerning the description of in-medium (NN short-range dynamics, namely: (i) the behavior of the NN interaction at short inter-nucleon distances in medium cannot be uniquely constrained by the experimental NN scattering phase shifts due to off-shell effects; (ii) by rigorous renormalization group (RG) techniques entire families of phase equivalent interactions differing in the short-range part can be derived; (iii) the in-medium NN interaction may be, in principle, different from the free one; (iv) when the short inter-nucleon separation is of the order of the nucleon size, the question arises of possible effects from quark and gluon degrees of freedom. For more than fifty years, experimental evidence of SRCs has been searched by means of various kinds of nuclear reactions, without however convincing results, mainly because the effects of SRCs arise from non observable quantities, like, e.g., the momentum distributions, and have been extracted from observable cross sections where short- and long-range effects, effects from nucleonic and non nucleonic degrees of freedom, and effects from final state interaction, could not be unambiguously separated out. Recent years, however, were witness of new progress in the field: from one side, theoretical and computational progress has allowed one to solve ab initio the many-nucleon non relativistic Schrödinger equation in terms of realistic NN interactions, obtaining realistic microscopic wave functions, unless the case of parametrized wave functions used frequently in the past, moreover the development of advanced treatments

  13. Free surface dynamics of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou; Lam, Michael; Lin, Te-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Spreading thin films of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) are known to behave very differently to those of isotropic fluids. The polar interactions of the rod-like molecules with each other, and the interactions with the underlying substrate, can lead to intricate patterns and instabilities that are not yet fully understood. The physics of a system even as simple as a film of NLC spreading slowly over a surface (inclined or horizontal) are remarkably complex: the outcome depends strongly on the details of the NLC's behavior at both the substrate and the free surface (so-called ``anchoring'' effects). We will present a dynamic flow model that takes careful account of such nematic-substrate and nematic-free surface interactions. We will present model simulations for several different flow scenarios that indicate the variety of behavior that can emerge. Spreading over a horizontal substrate may exhibit a range of unstable behavior. Flow down an incline also exhibits intriguing instabilities: in addition to the usual transverse fingering, instabilities can be manifested behind the flowing front in a manner reminiscent of Newtonian flow down an inverted substrate. NSF DMS-1211713.

  14. Bubble Dynamics on a Heated Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Rashidnia, N.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we study steady and oscillatory thermocapillary and natural convective flows generated by a bubble on a heated solid surface. The interaction between gas and vapor bubbles with the surrounding fluid is of interest for both space and ground-based processing. A combined numerical-experimental approach is adopted here. The temperature field is visualized using Mach-Zehnder and/or Wollaston Prism Interferometry and the flow field is observed by a laser sheet flow visualization technique. A finite element numerical model is developed which solves the transient two-dimensional continuity, momentum, and energy equations and includes the effects of temperature-dependent surface tension and bubble surface deformation. Below the critical Marangoni number, the steady state low-g and 1-g temperature and velocity fields predicted by the finite element model are in excellent agreement with both the visualization experiments in our laboratory and recently published experimental results in the literature. Above the critical Marangoni number, the model predicts an oscillatory flow which is also closely confirmed by experiments. It is shown that the dynamics of the oscillatory flow are directly controlled by the thermal and hydrodynamic interactions brought about by combined natural and thermocapillary convection. Therefore, as numerical simulations show, there are considerable differences between the 1-g and low-g temperature and flow fields at both low and high Marangoni numbers. This has serious implications for both materials processing and fluid management in space.

  15. Optically Transparent Porous Medium for Nondestructive Studies of Microbial Biofilm Architecture and Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leis, Andrew P.; Schlicher, Sven; Franke, Hilmar; Strathmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel and noninvasive, microscopy-based method for visualizing the structure and dynamics of microbial biofilms, individual fluorescent microbial cells, and inorganic colloids within a model porous medium. Biofilms growing in flow cells packed with granules of an amorphous fluoropolymer could be visualized as a consequence of refractive index matching between the solid fluoropolymer grains and the aqueous immersion medium. In conjunction with the capabilities of confocal microscopy for nondestructive optical sectioning, the use of amorphous fluoropolymers as a solid matrix permits observation of organisms and dynamic processes to a depth of 2 to 3 mm, whereas sediment biofilms growing in sand-filled flow cells can only be visualized in the region adjacent to the flow cell wall. This method differs fundamentally from other refractive index-matching applications in that optical transparency was achieved by matching a solid phase to water (and not vice versa), thereby permitting real-time microscopic studies of particulate-containing, low-refractive-index media such as biological and chromatographic systems. PMID:16085878

  16. Dynamics of surface tension in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Leslie, F. W.; Hong, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, in low and microgravity environments, have been studied. Numerical computations of the dynamics of bubble shapes have been carried out (1) linear time-dependent functions of spin-up and spin-down in low and microgravity environments, (2) linear time-dependent functions of increasing and decreasing gravity environment at high and low rotating cylinder speeds, (3) time-dependent step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low-gravity environment, and (4) sinusoidal function oscillation of the gravity environment at high and low rotating cylinder speeds.

  17. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  18. Chain dynamics near surfaces: an unconventional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-Loup; Green, Peter

    2001-03-01

    Chain dynamics near surfaces: an unconventional approach Jean-Loup Masson and Peter F. Green Graduate Program in Materials Science and Department of Chemical Engineering The University of Texas at Austin When the thickness of a polymer film is comparable to the radius of gyration, or a few radii of gyration, of the polymer chains, the properties of the film can differ appreciably from the bulk. Indeed, recent studies have documented the existence of changes of the glass transition, translational chain diffusion and the viscosity, with decreasing film thickness. For liquid films, a few tens of nanometers thick, on substrates, the disjoining pressure has a significant effect on the stability of the film. This can result on the formation of patterns reflecting fluctuations in the local film thickness. The structural, time-dependent, evolution of the film is a reflection of the effects of the disjoining pressure together with the translational dynamics of the chains. This presentation discusses the structural evolution of a thin polymer film in light of theoretical models to gain insight into the manner in which the diffusion and viscosity of the polymer changes with decreasing film thickness.

  19. Differential dopaminergic regulation of inwardly rectifying potassium channel mediated subthreshold dynamics in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Zhu, Junling; Dai, Dongqing; Xing, Junling; He, Jiahou; Fu, Zhanyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Zhuyi; Wang, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    The dorsal striatum plays a key role in motor control and cognitive processes. Proper functioning of the striatum relies on the fine dynamic balance between the direct pathway projection medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express D1 dopamine receptor (D1 MSNs) and indirect pathway projection MSNs that express D2 dopamine receptor (D2 MSNs). The inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (Kir), which express on both D1 and D2 MSNs, participate in the subthreshold dynamics including the membrane resonance and dendritic integration. However, it remains unclear whether dopamine differentially regulates Kir mediated subthreshold dynamics in two subtypes MSNs. Using transgenic mice that express either tdTomato in D1 MSNs or eGFP in D2 MSNs, we explored the Kir mediated subthreshold dynamics in D1 or D2 MSNs with whole cell patch clamp recording in acute brain slices. We found that D1 receptor agonist increased the Kir current while D2 receptor activation decreased the Kir conductance. The dopamine regulation of the Kir enhanced the resonant frequency and reduced the resonant impedance of D1 MSNs. The converse is ture for D2 MSNs. It also caused an opposing effect on dendritic integration between D1 and D2 MSNs, which can promote stability of the two pathways. The D1 receptor activation modulated Kir through cAMP-PKA signaling, whereas the D2 receptor modulated Kir through PLC-PKC signaling. Our findings demonstrated the differential dopaminergic regulation role of Kir, which mediates distinct subthreshold dynamics, and thus, contributes to the role of dopamine in fine tuning the balance of the striatal direct and indirect pathway activities. PMID:27018450

  20. Insights into Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Structure by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bonito, Cátia A; Leandro, Paula; Ventura, Fátima V; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-08-01

    The medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (mFAO) pathway. Its deficiency is the most common genetic disorder of mFAO. Many of the MCAD disease-causing variants, including the most common p.K304E variant, show loss of function due to protein misfolding. Herein, we used molecular dynamics simulations to provide insights into the structural stability and dynamic behavior of MCAD wild-type (MCADwt) and validate a structure that would allow reliable new studies on its variants. Our results revealed that in both proteins the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) has an important structural role on the tetramer stability and also in maintaining the volume of the enzyme catalytic pockets. We confirmed that the presence of substrate changes the dynamics of the catalytic pockets and increases FAD affinity. A comparison between the porcine MCADwt (pMCADwt) and human MCADwt (hMCADwt) structures revealed that both proteins are essentially similar and that the reversion of the double mutant E376G/T255E of hMCAD enzyme does not affect the structure of the protein neither its behavior in simulation. Our validated hMCADwt structure is crucial for complementing and accelerating the experimental studies aiming for the discovery and development of potential stabilizers of MCAD variants as candidates for the treatment of MCAD deficiency (MCADD). PMID:26992026

  1. An effective medium study of surface plasmon polaritons in nanostructured gratings using attenuated total reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tyboroski, M. H.; Anderson, N. R.; Camley, R. E.

    2014-01-07

    Recent work studied surface plasmon resonances in structured materials by the method of attenuated total reflection using a prism on top of a metallic grating. That calculation considered Transverse Magnetic polarized radiation, involved an expansion in 121 Fourier modes, and found a number of interesting features. Many of these features were attributed to localized plasmons or other factors, which arise from a discrete structure. We use a simple effective medium theory to address the same problem, and find many of the same reflection features observed in the more complex calculation, indicating that localization is not an important factor. We also evaluate the possibility of using some of the new features in the reflection spectrum for bio-sensing and find that the sensitivity of the system to small changes in relative permittivity is increased compared to some standard methods.

  2. Charge states of medium energy He ions scattered from single and poly-crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazawa, T.; Shibuya, K.; Nishimura, T.; Kido, Y.

    2007-03-01

    High-resolution medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) spectroscopy has unveiled fine structures of surfaces and interfaces. However, problematic issues arise due to its excellent energy resolution. In particular, when one uses He+ beams, the He+ fraction η+ (1) for the scattering component from top-layer atoms is frequently non-equilibrated owing to short exit path length. This leads to significant uncertainties of the absolute amount of atoms located on top of a surface. To overcome this difficulty, it is essential to acquire reliable data of equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge fractions and also to model the charge exchange process based on a simple picture. In this paper, we analyze the MEIS spectra from single and poly crystals of Si, Ni and Cu together with c-axis oriented graphite and derive electron capture (σ10) and loss (σ01) cross sections dependent on emerging ion velocity. Here, we assume that a He ion when arrives at a Maffin-tin sphere after a large angle collision takes the He+ state and then undergoes many charge exchanging collisions with valence electrons until leaving an electronic surface. The velocity dependent σ10 and σ01 values derived well reproduce equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge fractions of He+ except for graphite and poly-crystal Si at relatively large emerging angles. Such a deviation comes from the markedly anisotropic distributions of the valence electrons of Si and graphite with strong covalent bonds.

  3. Impact of momentum space anisotropy on heavy quark dynamics in a QGP medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Vinod; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-05-01

    Momentum space anisotropy present in the quark and gluon distribution functions in relativistic heavy ion collisions induces Chromo-Weibel instability in the hot QCD medium created therein. The impact of the Chromo-Weibel instability on the dynamics of a heavy quark (HQ) traversing in the QGP medium is investigated within the framework of kinetic theory by studying the momentum and temperature behavior of HQ drag and diffusion coefficients. The physics of anisotropy is captured in an effective Vlasov term in the transport equation. The effects of the instability are handled by making a relation with the phenomenologically known jet-quenching parameter in RHIC and LHC. Interestingly, the presence of instability significantly affects the temperature and momentum dependences of the HQ drag and diffusion coefficients. These results may have appreciable impact on the experimental observables such as the nuclear suppression factor, RA A(pT) , and the elliptic flow, v2(pT), of heavy mesons in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies which is a matter of future investigation.

  4. Dynamic modeling of mass-flowing linear medium with large amplitude displacement and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Difeng; Tang, Jiali; Ren, Gexue

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a dynamic model of a linear medium with mass flow, such as traveling strings, cables, belts, beams or pipes conveying fluids, is proposed, in the framework of Arbitrary-Lagrange-Euler (ALE) description. The material coordinate is introduced to characterize the mass-flow of the medium, and the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation (ANCF) is employed to capture geometric nonlinearity of the linear media under large displacement and rotation. The governing equations are derived in terms of d'Alembert's principle. When using an ALE description, complex mass-flowing boundary conditions can be easily enforced. Numerical examples are presented to validate the proposed method by comparison with analytical results of simplified models. The computed critical fluid velocity for the stability of a cantilevered pipe conveying fluid is correlated with the available theory in literature. The large amplitude limit-cycle oscillations of flexible pipes conveying fluid are presented, and the effect of the velocity of the fluid on the static equilibrium of the pipe under gravity is investigated.

  5. Simulated dynamic response of a multi-stage compressor with variable molecular weight flow medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Dale A.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model of a multi-stage compressor with variable molecular weight flow medium is derived. The modeled system consists of a five stage, six cylinder, double acting, piston type compressor. Each stage is followed by a water cooled heat exchanger which serves to transfer the heat of compression from the gas. A high molecular weight gas (CFC-12) mixed with air in varying proportions is introduced to the suction of the compressor. Condensation of the heavy gas may occur in the upper stage heat exchangers. The state equations for the system are integrated using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) for determining the system's dynamic and steady state characteristics under varying operating conditions.

  6. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities. PMID:8970122

  7. Photoinduced bulk-surface dynamics: time resolved two photon photoemission signals at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, S.; Willig, F.; Knorr, A.

    2004-06-01

    A free particle theory of photoinduced bulk-surface dynamics at semiconductor surfaces is developed wherein relaxation processes arising from electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering are treated phenomenologically. The role played by bulk-surface dynamics in the thermalization and cooling processes of the bulk and the complementary issue of how bulk dynamics influences the surface state occupancy are both studied. Time resolved 2PPE spectra is analysed both in the context of pure bulk as well as combined bulk-surface dynamics and its relation to the time dependent populations in the conduction band and surface states is discussed.

  8. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  9. Dynamics of the Streptococcus gordonii Transcriptome in Response to Medium, Salivary α-Amylase, and Starch

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Elaine M.; Feng, Xianghui; Pan, Jiachuan; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, interacts with salivary α-amylase via amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). This enzyme hydrolyzes starch to glucose, maltose, and maltodextrins that can be utilized by various oral bacteria for nutrition. Microarray studies demonstrated that AbpA modulates gene expression in response to amylase, suggesting that the amylase-streptococcal interaction may function in ways other than nutrition. The goal of this study was to explore the role of AbpA in gene regulation through comparative transcriptional profiling of wild-type KS1 and AbpA− mutant KS1ΩabpA under various environmental conditions. A portion of the total RNA isolated from mid-log-phase cells grown in 5% CO2 in (i) complex medium with or without amylase, (ii) defined medium (DM) containing 0.8% glucose with/without amylase, and (iii) DM containing 0.2% glucose and amylase with or without starch was reverse transcribed to cDNA and the rest used for RNA sequencing. Changes in the expression of selected genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Maltodextrin-associated genes, fatty acid synthesis genes and competence genes were differentially expressed in a medium-dependent manner. Genes in another cluster containing a putative histidine kinase/response regulator, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, thioredoxin protein, lipoprotein, and cytochrome c-type protein were downregulated in KS1ΩabpA under all of the environmental conditions tested. Thus, AbpA appears to modulate genes associated with maltodextrin utilization/transport and fatty acid synthesis. Importantly, in all growth conditions AbpA was associated with increased expression of a potential two-component signaling system associated with genes involved in reducing oxidative stress, suggesting a role in signal transduction and stress tolerance. PMID:26025889

  10. The dynamic Virtual Fields Method on rubbers at medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Ho; Siviour, Clive R.

    2015-09-01

    Elastomeric materials are widely used for energy absorption applications, often experiencing high strain rate deformations. The mechanical characterization of rubbers at high strain rates presents several experimental difficulties, especially associated with achieving adequate signal to noise ratio and static stress equilibrium, when using a conventional technique such as the split Hopkinson pressure bar. In the present study, these problems are avoided by using the dynamic Virtual Fields Method (VFM) in which acceleration fields, clearly generated by the non-equilibrium state, are utilized as a force measurement with in the frame work of the principle of virtual work equation. In this paper, two dynamic VFM based techniques are used to characterise an EPDM rubber. These are denoted as the linear and nonlinear VFM and are developed for (respectively) medium (drop-weight) and high (gas-gun) strain-rate experiments. The use of the two VFMs combined with high-speed imaging analysed by digital imaging correlation allows the identification of the parameters of a given rubber mechanical model; in this case the Ogden model is used.

  11. Improving the forming capability of laser dynamic forming by using rubber as a forming medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Cuntang

    2016-04-01

    Laser dynamic forming (LDF) is a novel high velocity forming technique, which employs laser-generated shock wave to load the sample. The forming velocity induced by the high energy laser pulse may exceed the critical forming velocity, resulting in the occurrence of premature fracture. To avoid the above premature fracture, rubber is introduced in LDF as a forming medium to prolong the loading duration in this paper. Laser induced shock wave energy is transferred to the sample in different forming stages, so the forming velocity can be kept below the critical forming velocity when the initial laser energy is high for fracture. Bulge forming experiments with and without rubber were performed to study the effect of rubber on loading duration. The experimental results show that, the shock wave energy attenuates during the propagation through the rubber layer, the rubber can avoid the premature fracture. So the plastic deformation can continue, the forming capability of LDF is improved. Due to the severe plastic deformation under rubber compression, adiabatic shear bands (ASB) occur in LDF with rubber. The material softening in ASB leads to the irregular fracture, which is different from the premature fracture pattern (regular fracture) in LDF without rubber. To better understand this deformation behavior, Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the dynamic response and the evolution of ASB of copper sample. The simulation results also indicate the rubber can prolong the loading duration.

  12. Associative networks with diluted patterns: dynamical analysis at low and medium load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, S.; Annibale, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we solve the dynamics of pattern-diluted associative networks, evolving via sequential Glauber update. We derive dynamical equations for the order parameters that quantify the simultaneous pattern recall of the system, and analyse the nature and stability of the stationary solutions by means of linear stability analysis as well as Monte Carlo simulations. We investigate the parallel retrieval capabilities of the system in different regions of the phase space, in particular in the low and medium storage regimes and for finite and extreme pattern dilution. Results show that in the absence of patterns cross-talk, all patterns are recalled symmetrically for any temperature below criticality, while in the presence of pattern cross-talk, symmetric retrieval becomes unstable as temperature is lowered and a hierarchical retrieval takes over. The shape of the hierarchical retrieval occurring at zero temperature is provided. The parallel retrieval capabilities of the network are seen to degrade gracefully in the regime of strong interference, but they are not destroyed.

  13. Synthesis of Formamide and Related Organic Species in the Interstellar Medium via Chemical Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Hase, William L.; Song, Kihyung; Largo, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    We show, by means of direct dynamics simulations, how it is possible to define possible reactants and mechanisms leading to the formation of formamide in the interstellar medium. In particular, different ion–molecule reactions in the gas phase were considered: NH3OH+, NH2OH{}2+, H2COH+, and NH4 + for the ions and NH2OH, H2CO, and NH3 for the partner neutrals. These calculations were combined with high level ab initio calculations to investigate possible further evolution of the products observed. In particular, for formamide, we propose that the NH2OH{}2+ + H2CO reaction can produce an isomer, NH2OCH{}2+, that, after dissociative recombination, can produce neutral formamide, which was observed in space. The direct dynamics do not pre-impose any reaction pathways and in other reactions, we did not observe the formation of formamide or any possible precursor. On the other hand, we obtained other interesting reactions, like the formation of NH2CH{}2+. Finally, some radiative association processes are proposed. All of the results obtained are discussed in light of the species observed in radioastronomy.

  14. A molecular dynamic study of layered hydroxide induced depletion of mobile anions within the extracellular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexey A.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-01

    The strong surface electric charge density of clay mineral host nanolayers enables their use as host-guest nanohybrids in many different areas of application. In particular, layered double hydroxides (LDH) of metals have found applications in medicine. Drug-LDH or gene-LDH nanohybrids are used for targeted delivery of biomedical agents to diseased cells or cancer cells. Fragments of the LDH host nanolayers may remain both within the cell and in the extracellular medium after drug delivery. How these charged nanosheets affect the cell electrostatics is still poorly understood. In the present paper, the idealized case of a single pure Mg2/Al-LDH nanolayer interacting with the extracellular anion environment was investigated to estimate the order of magnitude of a possible shift of the cell membrane equilibrium potential. An approximate dependence of the change in the chloride equilibrium membrane potential on the concentration of pure Mg2/Al-LDH nanosheets was determined.

  15. Consideration for the dynamic depolarization in the effective-medium model for description of optical properties for anisotropic nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Golovan, L. A.; Zabotnov, S. V. Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2009-02-15

    The effective-medium model has been generalized within the dipole approximation, with allowance for the shape anisotropy and dynamic depolarization of semiconductor nanoparticles. The calculations revealed nonmonotonic dependences for the birefringence and dichroism on the nanoparticle size. Comparison of the measured and calculated refractive index dispersion of birefringent porous silicon layers in the near-IR region indicates that consideration for the dynamic depolarization gives a better description of the optical properties for this material in comparison with the generally used effective-medium electrostatic approximation.

  16. The effect of gain medium length on dynamic mode stability in semiconductor lasers with a long intra-cavity filter.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kee; Lee, Chul Wook; Shin, Jang Wook; Sim, Eun Deok; Kim, Jong-Hoi; Lee, Dong Hun; Bang, Dong Soo; Baek, Yong Soon

    2009-12-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the effect of the physical length of gain medium on dynamic mode stability in semiconductor lasers with an intra-cavity filter. In simulation, two types of analysis models were used to examine the lasing properties and to analyze the dynamic mode stability of the external-cavity system, respectively. In experiment, two different kinds of the structures were fabricated and their spectra were analyzed. Both simulation and measurement results show clearly the length of the gain medium has a critical influence on the stability around the peak wavelength of the filter. PMID:20052209

  17. Effective-medium theory of surfaces and metasurfaces containing two-dimensional binary inclusions.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, A

    2010-04-01

    The paper extends one-body effective-medium theory to incorporate the correct second-order interactions in a two-dimensional Maxwell-Garnett theory. The two-body inclusion problem is solved using the averaged dipole moments that are induced by the scattering electromagnetic field on the medium/inclusion system. By incorporating the appropriate polarizability factor in the solutions, conventional right-handed media with binary embeddings are analyzed while a different form for the polarizability term allows the study of the effective properties of a metasurface. In both cases, it is shown that the two-body coefficient to second order in the low area fraction of inclusions is exact, while the corresponding results of the Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman theories are incorrect. This is especially true in the superconducting and holes limits, respectively. In the study of metasurfaces, the requirement for electromagnetic screening of the inclusions as well as the requirement needed to achieve the Fröhlich condition are stated. Negative permittivity and permeability are presented for strong-scattering showing negative resonances for a given frequency spectrum. It is shown that these resonances disappear when we derive the weak-scattering limit. The possibility of obtaining doubly negative effective permittivity and permeability is discussed by using an appropriate polarization for the applied electromagnetic field propagating in the metasurface. Finally, the potential difference and hence voltage and capacitance between binary inclusions is determined for surfaces/metasurfaces which allows, in the case of metasurfaces, the behavior of split-ring-type resonators to be investigated. PMID:20481853

  18. Porous medium coffee ring effect and other factors affecting the first crystallisation time of sodium chloride at the surface of a drying porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidri, F.; Sghaier, N.; Eloukabi, H.; Prat, M.; Nasrallah, S. Ben

    2013-12-01

    We study the distribution of ions in a drying porous medium up to the formation of first crystals at the surface. The study is based on comparisons between numerical simulations and experiments with packings of glass beads. The experimental configuration, which is representative of many previous drying experiments, is characterized by the formation of an efflorescence fairy ring at the surface of the porous medium. The preferential formation of crystals at the periphery is explained by the combined effect of higher evaporation fluxes at the surface periphery, as in the classical coffee ring problem, and variations in the porosity near the wall bordering the packing. It is shown that both effects have a great impact on the time marking the occurrence of first crystals, which is referred to as the first crystallization time. The experiments indicate that the first crystallization time increases with a decreasing bead size for a given initial ion concentration. This is explained by the variation with bead size of the characteristic size of the near wall region where a preferential desaturation of the sample occurs as a result of the porosity increase near the wall. The study also reveals a significant salt supersaturation effect. This represents a noticeable fact in relation with salt weathering issues.

  19. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  20. Acidity-Facilitated Mobilization of Surface Clay Colloid from Natural Sand Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wang, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid mobilization and migration in a soil system has attracted increasing scrutiny for its role in facilitating colloid-borne transport of contaminants in the environments. In many previous studies, pH was evoked as a major factor in mobilizing surface colloids through inducing favorable surface charge and electrostatic conditions. The possible direct role of acidity with H+ as a chemical agent has remained largely obscured behind the indirect role of pH. In this study, we demonstrated through column flow-through tests that cyclical elution of natural sand media with weak acid and base solutions can greatly facilitate detachment and transport of surface clay colloids. We found that while elevating pH to an alkaline condition helped release the loosely-attached surface clays, a pretreatment with H+ could facilitate the mobilization of chemically-bonded clay colloids through lysing of labile Ca and Mg ions. A quantitative relation was observed that 1 mmol H+ could lyse about 0.5 mmol Ca2+ and Mg2+ and subsequently resulted in a release of about 1,200 mg clay during base elution when repulsive force between particles dominated. Natural organic acids such as citric acid and acetic acid in environment-relevant low concentrations (<1mM and pH>5.0) were as effective as HCl with a stronger acidic condition. The small mass ratio of Ca and Mg over colloid released and the nature of weak acid used suggest that the mobilization was less likely due to dissolution of cement casing than lysing of labile interstitial Ca and Mg by H+, which severed Ca and Mg bridging bonds between particles. Natural acidity is generated in abundance from various bio- and geochemical processes; e.g., many plants produce citric acid through citric acid cycle metabolism; biodegradation of dead organic matter forms humic acids. We postulate that natural proton dynamics in tendon with pH oscillation accompanied with various soil biogeochemical processes could play a major role in subsurface clay

  1. Acceleration of electrons by a laser pulse at its output onto an optical surface of the vacuum – transparent medium interface. Laser synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskiy, M. Yu

    2016-05-01

    We consider the electron dynamics in the field of an electromagnetic wave produced at the vacuum – transparent medium interface upon reflection from the boundary, close to total internal reflection. The propagation velocity of a constant phase of the electromagnetic wave along the interface can vary from c/n to infinity (c is the speed of light in vacuum, and n is the refractive index of the medium at the interface). In this case, there emerge regions of positive and negative phases of the field with wavelengths, approximately equal to half the wavelength of the original laser beam, which can propagate at a speed close to that of light in vacuum. If a beam of relativistic electrons propagates along the surface, they can gain energy and accelerate, as well as radiate. With closed trajectories of electron motion, a laser synchrotron will be implemented as a result of many acceleration cycles.

  2. Real-time criteria based on spectral dynamics of medium response for the detection and identification of substance using THz signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2014-10-01

    We propose effective criteria based on the analysis of spectral dynamics of medium response for the detection and identification of dangerous substances at using pulsed THz signal containing a few cycles and fixed absolute phase. These criteria are integral criteria in time. We show the applicability of these criteria for distinguishing the drugs and for drugs detection in the mixture with neutral substances and explosives in transmission mode. We also apply these criteria for the detection of PWM C4 explosive with complicated shape of the surface in reflection mode.

  3. Response surface methodology for the optimization of keratinase production in culture medium containing feathers produced by Kocuria rosea.

    PubMed

    Bernal, C; Diaz, I; Coello, N

    2006-05-01

    A 43-fold increase in keratinase production by Kocuria rosea was achieved in batch fermentation using response surface methodology. Factorial designs were used to select the components of a culture medium that showed a significant effect on keratinase production. An orthogonal-central composite experimental design was performed, with only two (feathers and magnesium) from nine initial compounds being further analyzed by response surface methodology. An optimum keratinase production of 14 886.9 U/mg was obtained with the following medium composition (per litre): NH4Cl, 0.3 g; NaCl, 0.3 g; K2HPO4, 3.2 g; KH2PO4, 4.0 g; MgSO4.6H2O, 0.5 g; yeast extract, 0.1 g; and finely milled feathers, 30 g. The medium was shaken at 400 r/min with an incubation period of 14 h at 40 degrees C. PMID:16699569

  4. Convection and reaction in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium: Nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Jeanne Therese H.; Cardoso, Silvana S. S.

    2012-09-01

    We study numerically the nonlinear interactions between chemical reaction and convective fingering in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium. The reaction enhances stability by consuming a solute that is unstably distributed in a gravitational field. We show that chemical reaction profoundly changes the dynamics of the system, by introducing a steady state, shortening the evolution time, and altering the spatial patterns of velocity and concentration of solute. In the presence of weak reaction, finger growth and merger occur effectively, driving strong convective currents in a thick layer of solute. However, as the reaction becomes stronger, finger growth is inhibited, tip-splitting is enhanced and the layer of solute becomes much thinner. Convection enhances the mass flux of solute consumed by reaction in the boundary layer but has a diminishing effect as reaction strength increases. This nonlinear behavior has striking differences to the density fingering of traveling reaction fronts, for which stronger chemical kinetics result in more effective finger merger owing to an increase in the speed of the front. In a boundary layer, a strong stabilizing effect of reaction can maintain a long-term state of convection in isolated fingers of wavelength comparable to that at onset of instability.

  5. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  6. Dynamic behavior of the incoherent optical spatial solitons in a nonlocal nonlinear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Hui-Ling; Tian, Bo; Xie, Xi-Yang; Sun, Ya

    2015-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of the propagation of incoherent optical spatial solitons in a nonlocal nonlinear medium is investigated. By means of the Hirota method, we obtain the soliton solutions, based on which we find that ? is positively related to ?, but inversely related to ? and ?, whereas ? is independent of them, with ? as the slowly varying amplitude of the beam, ? as the refractive index change, ?, ?, and ? as the unperturbed refractive index, frequency of the propagating beam, and beam intensity distribution, respectively. Head-on and bound-state soliton interactions are both given, and one interaction period decreases with ? and ? increasing in the bound state one. With the external perturbations taken into consideration, the associated chaotic motions of the perturbed model are studied, and the corresponding power spectra and phase projections are obtained. Both the weak and developed chaotic states are investigated, and the difference between them roots in the relative magnitude of nonlinearities and perturbations. Such chaotic motions can be weakened via increasing ? and ? or decreasing ?. Periodic motion is obtained with the nonlinearities and perturbations balanced.

  7. Life-space foam: A medium for motivational and cognitive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir; Aidman, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    General stochastic dynamics, developed in a framework of Feynman path integrals, have been applied to Lewinian field-theoretic psychodynamics [K. Lewin, Field Theory in Social Science, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1951; K. Lewin, Resolving Social Conflicts, and, Field Theory in Social Science, American Psychological Association, Washington, 1997; M. Gold, A Kurt Lewin Reader, the Complete Social Scientist, American Psychological Association, Washington, 1999], resulting in the development of a new concept of life-space foam (LSF) as a natural medium for motivational and cognitive psychodynamics. According to LSF formalisms, the classic Lewinian life space can be macroscopically represented as a smooth manifold with steady force fields and behavioral paths, while at the microscopic level it is more realistically represented as a collection of wildly fluctuating force fields, (loco)motion paths and local geometries (and topologies with holes). A set of least-action principles is used to model the smoothness of global, macro-level LSF paths, fields and geometry. To model the corresponding local, micro-level LSF structures, an adaptive path integral is used, defining a multi-phase and multi-path (multi-field and multi-geometry) transition process from intention to goal-driven action. Application examples of this new approach include (but are not limited to) information processing, motivational fatigue, learning, memory and decision making.

  8. Co-GISAXS technique for investigating surface growth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rainville, Meliha G.; Hoskin, Christa; Ulbrandt, Jeffrey G.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec R.; Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L.; Ludwig, Jr., Karl F.

    2015-12-08

    Detailed quantitative measurement of surface dynamics during thin film growth is a major experimental challenge. Here X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy with coherent hard X-rays is used in a Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (i.e. Co-GISAXS) geometry as a new tool to investigate nanoscale surface dynamics during sputter deposition of a-Si and a-WSi2 thin films. For both films, kinetic roughening during surface growth reaches a dynamic steady state at late times in which the intensity autocorrelation function g2(q,t) becomes stationary. The g2(q,t) functions exhibit compressed exponential behavior at all wavenumbers studied. The overall dynamics are complex, but the most surface sensitive sections of the structure factor and correlation time exhibit power law behaviors consistent with dynamical scaling.

  9. Atomistic spin dynamics and surface magnons.

    PubMed

    Etz, Corina; Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders; Taroni, Andrea; Eriksson, Olle

    2015-06-24

    Atomistic spin dynamics simulations have evolved to become a powerful and versatile tool for simulating dynamic properties of magnetic materials. It has a wide range of applications, for instance switching of magnetic states in bulk and nano-magnets, dynamics of topological magnets, such as skyrmions and vortices and domain wall motion. In this review, after a brief summary of the existing investigation tools for the study of magnons, we focus on calculations of spin-wave excitations in low-dimensional magnets and the effect of relativistic and temperature effects in such structures. In general, we find a good agreement between our results and the experimental values. For material specific studies, the atomistic spin dynamics is combined with electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory from which the required parameters are calculated, such as magnetic exchange interactions, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya vectors. PMID:26030259

  10. Dynamics of magnetic particles near a surface: model and experiments on field-induced disaggregation.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, A; Gao, Y; de Jong, A M; Hulsen, M A; den Toonder, J M J; Prins, M W J

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic particles are widely used in biological research and bioanalytical applications. As the corresponding tools are progressively being miniaturized and integrated, the understanding of particle dynamics and the control of particles down to the level of single particles become important. Here, we describe a numerical model to simulate the dynamic behavior of ensembles of magnetic particles, taking account of magnetic interparticle interactions, interactions with the liquid medium and solid surfaces, as well as thermal diffusive motion of the particles. The model is verified using experimental data of magnetic field-induced disaggregation of magnetic particle clusters near a physical surface, wherein the magnetic field properties, particle size, cluster size, and cluster geometry were varied. Furthermore, the model clarifies how the cluster configuration, cluster alignment, magnitude of the field gradient, and the field repetition rate play a role in the particle disaggregation process. The simulation model will be very useful for further in silico studies on magnetic particle dynamics in biotechnological tools. PMID:24827250

  11. Dynamics of nanoscale ripple relaxation on alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2008-02-01

    As an alloy surface evolves under capillary forces, differing mobilities of the individual components can lead to kinetic alloy decomposition at the surface. In this paper, we address the relaxation of nanoscale sinusoidal ripples on alloy surfaces by considering the effects of both surface and bulk diffusion. In the absence of bulk diffusion, we derive exact analytical expressions for relaxation rates and identify two natural time scales that govern the relaxation dynamics. Bulk diffusion is shown to reduce kinetic surface segregation and enhance relaxation rates, owing to intermixing near the surface. Our results provide a quantitative framework for the interpretation of relaxation experiments on alloy surfaces. PMID:18352033

  12. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  13. Real time chemical dynamics at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, M.; Kleyn, A. W.; Kroes, G. J.

    2002-03-01

    It is a major goal in surface science to make movies of molecules on surfaces, in which the reaction of the molecules on the surface can be followed on a femtosecond time scale, with sub-nanometer resolution. By moving the actors (the molecules) to precisely determined positions on the stage (the surface) at some well-defined moment in time, and subsequently making a space- and time-resolved documentary of what happens next, we would be able to understand the reactive interactions between molecules on surfaces in the greatest possible detail. This would enable us to set the stage and bring together the actors in such a way as to produce the chemical outcomes our society needs, by improving existing catalysts and designing novel catalysts, and by engineering novel reactions on surfaces. Any future director of such movies needs to know which techniques (i.e., which theoretical and experimental methods) hold promise for movie making, what has been done with these techniques, and what can be done with appropriate extensions. The methods we discuss are: (i) the time-dependent wave packet method, which is a theoretical method for simulating molecule-surface reactions with sub-nanometer resolution on a femtosecond time scale, (ii) molecular beam experiments, which allow detailed investigation of the molecule-surface interaction at a molecular level, and (iii) time-resolved laser pump-probe experiments, which allow reactions to be studied with femtosecond resolution. In particular, we discuss (i) theoretical studies of the dissociation reaction of hydrogen on metal surfaces, the reactive system presently understood at the greatest level of detail, (ii) the reactive and non-reactive scattering of heavy diatomics (NO,CO) from metal surfaces, and (iii) the competition between reaction of coadsorbed CO with O and desorption of CO, again on a metal surface. We examine possibilities to extend these methods to make movies at the desired level of detail. We also discuss which

  14. Double transmission-mediums based geometric phase analysis for determining the two surface profiles of transparent object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuli; Liu, Zhanwei

    2016-05-01

    The accurate measurement for the surface profiles of transparent object is of significance for quality control in optical devices and precision instruments. Here, a double transmission-mediums based geometric phase analysis method has been developed to evaluate both the upper and lower surface profiles of transparent object. To do this, the tested transparent object is placed above a preprinted lattice pattern. When viewed from above with a CCD camera, any slope variations of the surfaces will lead to distortions of the transmission-lattice patterns. And when changing one side of object's contact medium, the lattice virtual image with modulated phase is distorted once again. Combined with the derived relationship between phase variations of transmission-lattice patterns and out-of-plane heights of two surfaces, the double-sided surface profiles of transparent object can be reconstructed successfully. With this, the technique, which is verified experimentally, is demonstrated to be a feasible and reliable method. The advantage of this method is that it simplifies the setup and allows a fast estimation of the geometry of a transparent specimen. The double-sided profiles can be decoupled easily according to the big difference of refractive indexes between contact mediums. And the calculation accuracy can be guaranteed by the weighted average from four directions.

  15. Rayleigh and Wood anomalies in the diffraction of acoustic waves from the periodically corrugated surface of an elastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maradudin, A. A.; Simonsen, I.

    2016-05-01

    By the use of the Rayleigh method we have calculated the angular dependence of the reflectivity and the efficiencies of several other diffracted orders when the periodically corrugated surface of an isotropic elastic medium is illuminated by a volume acoustic wave of shear horizontal polarization. These dependencies display the signatures of Rayleigh and Wood anomalies, usually associated with the diffraction of light from a metallic grating. The Rayleigh anomalies occur at angles of incidence at which a diffracted order appears or disappears; the Wood anomalies here are caused by the excitation of the shear horizontal surface acoustic waves supported by the periodically corrugated surface of an isotropic elastic medium. The dispersion curves of these waves in both the nonradiative and radiative regions of the frequency-wavenumber plane are calculated, and used in predicting the angles of incidence at which the Wood anomalies are expected to occur.

  16. Numerical implementation of mathematical model of the dynamics of a porous medium on supercomputers of cluster architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovskaya, O. V.; Sadovskii, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    The parallel computational algorithm for analysis of the processes of elastic-plastic deformation of a porous medium under the action of external dynamic loads is developed. This algorithm is based on the mathematical model taking into account threshold nature of change in the strength of a material under the collapse of pores. The algorithm is implemented in Fortran by means of functions of the MPI library. The parallel program system has been tested on clusters in computations of the propagation of plane longitudinal shock waves of the compression and in computations of the expansion of a cylindrical cavity in an infinite porous medium. The comparison of numerical results and exact solutions has shown their good qualitative and quantitative correspondence. Using the obtained algorithm, the process of propagation of elastic-plastic waves of the compression in a homogenous porous medium, accompanied by the deformation of a skeleton and the collapse of pores, is analyzed.

  17. Principal velocity surfaces in stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recent work by An and Evans has revived interest in the coordinate surfaces that lie along the principal axes of the stress tensor. Here we complete our list of non-axially symmetric systems with local integrals and prove that those principal velocity surfaces exist for all systems with three local integrals. We then demonstrate how systems in non-separable potentials evade the Eddington-An theorem by having distribution functions that lack perfect reflection symmetry in a meridional velocity component, and discuss other consequences of this remarkable theorem.

  18. Effects of storage medium and UV photofunctionalization on time-related changes of titanium surface characteristics and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian-Wei; Chen, Yun; Yang, Guo-Li; Wang, Xiao-Xiang; He, Fu-Ming; Wang, Hui-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Storage in aqueous solution and ultraviolet (UV) photofunctionalization are two applicable methods to overcome the biological aging and increase the bioactivity of titanium. As information regarding the combined effects of storage medium and UV photofunctionalization has never been found in published literatures, this study focused on whether appropriate storage methods and UV photofunctionalization have synergistic effects on the biological properties of aged titanium surfaces. Titanium plates and discs were sandblasted and acid etched and then further prepared in five different modes as using different storage mediums (air or dH2 O) for 4 weeks and then with or without UV treatment. The surface characteristics were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the surfaces, and cellular morphology, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin release were evaluated. The results showed that nanostructures were observed on water-stored titanium surfaces with a size of about 15 × 20 nm(2) . UV treatment was effective to remove the hydrocarbon contamination on titanium surfaces stored in either air or water. UV photofunctionalization further enhanced the already increased bioactivity of modSLA on initial cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin release. Overall, UV photofunctionalization was effective in further enhancing the already increased bioactivity by using dH2 O as storage medium, and the effect of UV treatment was much more overwhelming than that of the storage medium. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 932-940, 2016. PMID:25969950

  19. Dynamic behavior of interfacila water at the silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Cole, David R; Striolo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics properties of water at the silica-liquid interface at ambient temperature. Three different degrees of hydroxylation of a crystalline silica surface were used. To assess the water dynamic properties we calculated the residence probability and in-plane mean square displacement as a function of distance from the surface. The data indicate that water molecules at the fully hydroxylated surface remain longer, on average, in the interfacial region than in the other cases. By assessing the dynamics of molecular dipole moment and hydrogen-hydrogen vector an anisotropic reorientation was discovered for interfacial water in contact with any of the surfaces considered. However, the features of the anisotropic reorientation observed for water molecules depend strongly on the relative orientation of interfacial water molecules and their interactions with surface hydroxyl groups. On the partially hydroxylated surface, where water molecules with hydrogen-down and hydrogen-up orientation are both found, those water molecules associated with surface hydroxyl groups remain at the adsorbed locations longer and reorient slower than the other water molecules. A number of equilibrium properties, including density profiles, hydrogen bond networks, charge densities, and dipole moment densities are also reported to explain the dynamics results.

  20. Assessment of dynamic surface leaching of monolithic surface road materials.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Hélène; Schick, Joachim; Poirier, Jean-Eric

    2016-07-01

    Construction materials have to satisfy, among others, health and environment requirements. To check the environmental compatibility of road construction materials, release of hazardous substances into water must be assessed. Literature mostly describes the leaching behaviour of recycled aggregates for potential use in base or sub-base layers of roads. But little is known about the release of soluble substances by materials mixed with binders and compacted for intended use on road surface. In the present study, we thus performed a diffusion test with sequential renewal of water during a 64 day period according to CEN/TS 16637-2 specifications, on asphalt concretes and hydraulically bound monoliths, two common surface road materials. It is shown that release of dangerous substances is limited in these hydrodynamic conditions. It was particularly true for asphalt concrete leachates where no metallic trace element, sulphate, chloride or fluoride ion could be quantified. This is because of the low hydraulic conductivity and the low polarity of the petroleum hydrocarbon binder of these specimens. For hydraulically bound materials around 20,000 mg/m(2) of sulphate diffused from the monoliths. It is one order of magnitude higher than chloride diffusion and two orders of magnitude higher than fluoride release. No metallic trace element, except small quantities of copper in the last eluate could be quantified. No adverse effect is to be expected for human and environmental health from the leachates of these compacted surface road construction materials, because all the measured parameters were below EU (Council Directive 98/83/EC) or WHO guidelines for drinking water standards. PMID:27039367

  1. Using surface deformation to image reservoir dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Karasaki, K.; Doughty, C.

    2000-02-01

    The inversion of surface deformation data such as tilt, displacement, or strain provides a noninvasive method for monitoring subsurface volume change. Reservoir volume change is related directly to processes such as pressure variations induced by injection and withdrawal. The inversion procedure is illustrated by an application to tiltmeter data from the Hijiori test site in Japan. An inversion of surface tilt data allows one to image flow processes in a fractured granodiorite. Approximately 650 barrels of water, injected 2 km below the surface, produces a peak surface tilt of the order of 0.8 microradians. The authors find that the pattern of volume change in the granodiorite is very asymmetrical, elongated in a north-northwesterly direction, and the maximum volume change is offset by more than 0.7 km to the east of the pumping well. The inversion of a suite of leveling data from the Wilmington oil field in Long Beach, California, images large-scale reservoir volume changes in 12 one- to two-year increments from 1976 to 1996. The influence of various production strategies is seen in the reservoir volume changes. In particular, a steam flood in fault block 2 in the northwest portion of the field produced a sudden decrease in reservoir volume.

  2. Invariant algebraic surfaces for a virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we provide a complete classification of the invariant algebraic surfaces and of the rational first integrals for a well-known virus system. In the proofs, we use the weight-homogeneous polynomials and the method of characteristic curves for solving linear partial differential equations.

  3. Bubble Dynamics on a Heated Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Rashidnia, Nasser

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we study the combined thermocapillary and natural convective flow generated by a bubble on a heated solid surface. The interaction between gas and vapor bubbles with the surrounding fluid is of interest for both space and ground-based processing. On earth, the volumetric forces are dominant, especially, in apparatuses with large volume to surface ratio. But in the reduced gravity environment of orbiting spacecraft, surface forces become more important and the effects of Marangoni convection are easily unmasked. In order to delineate the roles of the various interacting phenomena, a combined numerical-experimental approach is adopted. The temperature field is visualized using Mach-Zehnder interferometry and the flow field is observed by a laser sheet flow visualization technique. A finite element numerical model is developed which solves the two-dimensional momentum and energy equations and includes the effects of bubble surface deformation. Steady state temperature and velocity fields predicted by the finite element model are in excellent qualitative agreement with the experimental results. A parametric study of the interaction between Marangoni and natural convective flows including conditions pertinent to microgravity space experiments is presented. Numerical simulations clearly indicate that there is a considerable difference between 1-g and low-g temperature and flow fields induced by the bubble.

  4. Optimization of medium composition for erythritol production from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Rywińska, Anita; Marcinkiewicz, Marta; Cibis, Edmund; Rymowicz, Waldemar

    2015-08-18

    Several factors affecting erythritol production from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica Wratislavia K1 strain were examined in batch fermentations. Ammonium sulfate, monopotassium phosphate, and sodium chloride were identified as critical medium components that determine the ratio of polyols produced. The central composite rotatable experimental design was used to optimize medium composition for erythritol production. The concentrations of ammonium sulfate, monopotassium phosphate, and sodium chloride in the optimized medium were 2.25, 0.22, and 26.4 g L(-1), respectively. The C:N ratio was found as 81:1. In the optimized medium with 100 g L(-1) of glycerol the Wratislavia K1 strain produced 46.9 g L(-1) of erythritol, which corresponded to a 0.47 g g(-1) yield and a productivity of 0.85 g L(-1) hr(-1). In the fed-batch mode and medium with the total concentration of glycerol at 300 g L(-1) and C:N ratio at 81:1, 132 g L(-1) of erythritol was produced with 0.44 g g(-1) yield and a productivity of 1.01 g L(-1) hr(-1.) PMID:25387364

  5. Size-Dependent Transition to High-Dimensional Chaotic Dynamics in a Two-Dimensional Excitable Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, M.C.; Greenside, H.S.

    1998-03-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of an excitable medium with multiple spiral defects is shown to vary smoothly with system size from short-lived transients for small systems to extensive chaos for large systems. A comparison of the Lyapunov dimension density with the average spiral defect density suggests an average dimension per spiral defect varying between 3 and 7. We discuss some implications of these results for experimental studies of excitable media. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Size-Dependent Transition to High-Dimensional Chaotic Dynamics in a Two-Dimensional Excitable Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew C.; Greenside, Henry S.

    1998-03-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of an excitable medium with multiple spiral defects is shown to vary smoothly with system size from short-lived transients for small systems to extensive chaos for large systems. A comparison of the Lyapunov dimension density with the average spiral defect density suggests an average dimension per spiral defect varying between 3 and 7. We discuss some implications of these results for experimental studies of excitable media.

  7. Structure determination of the CoSi2(111) surface using medium-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoeth, J.; Schins, A. G.; van der Veen, J. F.

    1989-08-01

    The surface structure of epitaxially grown CoSi2 crystals on Si(111) has been investigated with use of medium-energy ion scattering. A Co- or a Si-rich surface composition is obtained, depending on the preparation conditions. The structure of the Co-rich surface is shown to be bulklike, i.e., the crystal is terminated by a Si-Co-Si triple layer. The Si-rich surface is found to have, on top of the last Si-Co-Si triple layer, a Si double layer of the same orientation as the CoSi2 bulk lattice. This accounts for the difficulty to grow a 180°-rotated Si film on top of CoSi2(111) by normal molecular-beam-epitaxy techniques. The topmost Co atoms of the Si-rich surface are eightfold coordinated.

  8. About efficiency of identification of materials using spectrum dynamics of medium response under the action of THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2009-05-01

    A method, suggested by us earlier for identification of materials with close spectra in terahertz range of frequencies and based on the analysis of medium response spectral lines dynamics, is verified experimentally. The temporal dynamics of spectral lines allows to determine relaxation time of rotational transitions as well. A question about measurement time, that is sufficient for determining of material response characteristic time, is discussed. To demonstrate the efficiency of proposed method, we treat the response of soap and chocolate under the action of terahertz pulse with a few cycles. Our investigation shows that it is possible to identify these materials with high probability.

  9. The Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. R.; Oberholtzer, J. D.; Wright, C. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    SWADE was developed to study the dynamics of the wave field development in the open ocean with the following specific objectives: (1) to understand the development of the wave directional spectrum under various conditions; (2) to determine the effect of waves on the air/sea transfers of momentum, heat, and mass; (3) to determine breaking distributions as a function of sea state, wind, and boundary stability; and (4) to provide data and analyses for ERS-1 validation. The experiment is designed for the winter of 1990 to 1991. Four buoys will be deployed for 6 months starting October 1990 and ending March 1991. During that time period, three intensive periods of 2 weeks duration each will be selected for frequent aircraft flights for wave data collection to satisfy scientific studies, as well as ERS-1 validation needs.

  10. Dynamics of Spreading on Micro-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2015-11-01

    Ultrahydrophobic surfaces, due to their large water-repellency characteristic, have a vast variety of applications in technology and nature, such as de-icing of airplane wings, efficiency increase of power plants, and efficiency of pesticides on plants, etc. The significance of ultrahydrophobic surfaces requires enhancing the knowledge on the spreading dynamics on such surfaces. The best way to produce an ultrahydrophobic surface is by patterning of smooth hydrophobic surfaces with micron sized posts. In this research, the micro-textured surfaces have been fabricated by patterning several different sizes of micro-textured posts on Teflon plates. The experimental study has been performed using forced spreading with Tensiometer to obtain the dependencw of dynamic contact angle to the contact line velocity to describe the spreading dynamics of Newtonian liquids on the micro-textured surfaces. The effect of the geometrical descriptions of the micro-posts along with the physical properties of liquids on the spreading dynamics on micro-textured Teflon plates have been also studied.

  11. Surface identification, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Laurent M.; Rudd, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Techniques are presented for the identification and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we develop here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The tessellation is then used to calculate various surface integrals such as volume, area and shape (multiple moment). The principle of surface identification and tessellation is closely related to that used in the generation of the r-reduced surface, a step in the visualization of molecular surfaces used in biology. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code.

  12. Effects of a rough boundary surface on polarization of the scattered field from an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Eom, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combination of the standard Kirchhoff method for rough surface scattering with the Rayleigh phase function radiative transfer method for volume scattering is employed in the present study of the effect of surface roughness on the polarization of the scattered field. It is found that for pure surface scattering, the polarization ratio between zero and 20 deg incidence angles is sensitive to surface roughness change. When both surface and volume scattering are present, however, copolarization nulls by colatitude or degree of polarization at zero to 15 deg incidence angle, and copolarization or crosspolarization nulls by longitude at large incidence angles, are better indicators of surface roughness changes. It is noted that degree of polarization and copolarization nulls by colatitude vary monotonously with incidence angle, while in combined surface and volume scattering these have, respectively, a minimum and a maximum. This characteristic allows the separation of combined surface and volume scattering from pure surface or volume scattering.

  13. Pseudo-viscosity analysis of dynamic compactions of multilayer copper powder medium by punch impact

    SciTech Connect

    Tokushima, Koji; Sano, Yukio

    1995-08-01

    In this paper, the compaction of a multilayer copper powder medium by punch impact is analyzed by a pseudo-viscosity method: equal thickness layers of lower (L) and higher (H) initial densities are arranged alternately. In the early stage of compaction, reflection and transmission of induced shock and elastic waves occur at the interfaces in the medium. As a result, the L layers are selectively compressed at first until the density distribution in the medium is uniform. Compaction then continues by the shock waves propagating through the medium. The final mean is influenced greatly by die wall friction. The influence is less in the L-H type arrangement where an L layer is in direct contact with the punch than in the H-L type arrangement for a given number of layers, because energy loss due to wall friction is smaller in the former. Separation of the punch from the medium and subsequent reimpingement was found to occur in some of the H-L type compactions.

  14. Optimisation of synthetic medium composition for levorin biosynthesis by Streptomyces levoris 99/23 and investigation of its accumulation dynamics using mathematical modelling methods.

    PubMed

    Stanchev, Veselin S; Kozhuharova, Lubka Y; Zhekova, Boriana Y; Gochev, Velizar K

    2010-01-01

    The composition of a synthetic culture medium for levorin biosynthesis by Streptomyces levoris 99/23 was optimised using mathematical modelling methods. The optimal concentrations of the medium components were established by means of an optimum composition design at three factor variation levels. An adequate regression model was obtained. Levorin biosynthesis by Streptomyces levoris 99/23 in the optimised synthetic medium was over 38% higher than in the initial medium. The antibiotic biosynthesis dynamics in the optimised culture medium was studied by means of a non-linear differential equation system. The resultant model was valid. PMID:21033581

  15. Ab inito molecular-dynamics study of EC decomposition process on Li2O2 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yasunobu; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Otani, Minoru

    2015-03-01

    We have simulated electrochemical reactions of the EC molecule decomposition on Li2O2 substrate by ab initio molecular dynamics combined with the effective screening medium method. EC molecules adsorb onto the peroxide spontaneously. We find through the analysis of density of states that the adsorption state is stabilized by hybridization of the sp2 orbital and the surface states of the Li2O2. After adsorption, EC ring opens, which leads to the decomposition of the peroxide and the formation of a carboxy group. This kind of alkyl carbonates formed on the Li2O2 substrate was found in experiments actually Nanosystem Research Institute, AIST; ESICB, Kyoto University

  16. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  17. Response surface optimization of the critical medium components for carbonyl reductase production by Candida viswanathii MTCC 5158.

    PubMed

    Soni, Pankaj; Singh, Manpreet; Kamble, Ashwini L; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2007-03-01

    Culture conditions were optimized for the growth and carbonyl reductase production by a novel yeast strain Candida viswanathii. Response surface methodology was applied for the critical medium components (initial pH, mannitol, yeast extract and calcium chloride) identified earlier by one-factor-at-a-time approach. Central composite design was used for the optimization studies. Using this methodology, the optimal values for the concentration of mannitol, initial pH, yeast extract and calcium chloride were 1.9, 7.5, 1.6 and 4, respectively. This medium was projected to produce, theoretically, growth having an optical density of 1.1 (600 nm) and an enzyme activity of 81.5 U/ml. Using this optimized medium, an experimental growth of 1.1 OD (600 nm) and enzyme activity 80.9 U/ml verified the applied methodology. This approach for medium optimization led to an enhancement of the growth and enzyme activity by 1.3 and 2.3 times higher, respectively, as compared to the unoptimized media. PMID:16697185

  18. Removal of bisphenol A from aqueous medium using molecularly surface imprinted microbeads.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Arica, M Yakup; Liman, Gorkem; Celikbicak, Omur; Salih, Bekir

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare bisphenol A (BPA) imprinted polymers, which can be used for the selective removal of BPA from aqueous medium. The BPA-imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted (NIP) microbeads were synthesized, and characterized by Zeta-sizer, FTIR, SEM and BET method. Bisphenol A was determined in solutions using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). The effect of initial concentration of BPA, the adsorption rate and the pH of the medium on the capacity of BPA-imprinting polymer were studied. Adsorption capacity of BPA was affected by the amount of the incorporated functional monomer in the polymer network. BPA adsorption capacity of MIP-3 and NIP microbeads from aqueous medium was estimated as 76.7 and 59.9 mg g(-1), respectively. The binding efficiencies of BPA-MIP-3 microbeads for different phenolic compounds (i.e., BPA with p-toluidine, 4-aminophenol or 2-naphthol) were explored at binary solutions, and the binding capacities of BPA-imprinted microbeads were found to be 2.79 × 10(-1), 2.39 × 10(-1), 7.59 × 10(-2) and 5.48 × 10(-2) mmol g(-1) microbeads, respectively. The satisfactory results demonstrated that the obtained BPA-MIP microbeads showed an appreciable binding specificity toward BPA than similar structural compounds in the aqueous medium. Moreover, the reusability of BPA-MIP-3 microbeads was tested for several times and no significant loss in adsorption capacity was observed. Finally, the binary and multi-component systems results show that MIP-3 microbeads have special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for template molecule "BPA". PMID:26907596

  19. Optimization of Fermentation Medium for Extracellular Lipase Production from Aspergillus niger Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Zhi; Guo, Hongtao; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    Lipase produced by Aspergillus niger is widely used in various industries. In this study, extracellular lipase production from an industrial producing strain of A. niger was improved by medium optimization. The secondary carbon source, nitrogen source, and lipid were found to be the three most influential factors for lipase production by single-factor experiments. According to the statistical approach, the optimum values of three most influential parameters were determined: 10.5 g/L corn starch, 35.4 g/L soybean meal, and 10.9 g/L soybean oil. Using this optimum medium, the best lipase activity was obtained at 2,171 U/mL, which was 16.4% higher than using the initial medium. All these results confirmed the validity of the model. Furthermore, results of the Box-Behnken Design and quadratic models analysis indicated that the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio significantly influenced the enzyme production, which also suggested that more attention should be paid to the C/N ratio for the optimization of enzyme production. PMID:26366414

  20. Optimization of Fermentation Medium for Extracellular Lipase Production from Aspergillus niger Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Zhi; Guo, Hongtao; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Yunshan

    2015-01-01

    Lipase produced by Aspergillus niger is widely used in various industries. In this study, extracellular lipase production from an industrial producing strain of A. niger was improved by medium optimization. The secondary carbon source, nitrogen source, and lipid were found to be the three most influential factors for lipase production by single-factor experiments. According to the statistical approach, the optimum values of three most influential parameters were determined: 10.5 g/L corn starch, 35.4 g/L soybean meal, and 10.9 g/L soybean oil. Using this optimum medium, the best lipase activity was obtained at 2,171 U/mL, which was 16.4% higher than using the initial medium. All these results confirmed the validity of the model. Furthermore, results of the Box-Behnken Design and quadratic models analysis indicated that the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio significantly influenced the enzyme production, which also suggested that more attention should be paid to the C/N ratio for the optimization of enzyme production. PMID:26366414

  1. Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Yu, Ite A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schrödinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schrödinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schrödinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coherence can be well verified for slow light and light storage. This warrants that the current scheme can be applied to determine the decaying profile of the ground-state coherence as well as the temperature of the EIT medium.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of annealed ZnO surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    The effect of thermally annealing a slab of wurtzite ZnO, terminated by two surfaces, (0001) (which is oxygen-terminated) and (0001{sup ¯}) (which is Zn-terminated), is investigated via molecular dynamics simulation by using reactive force field (ReaxFF). We found that upon heating beyond a threshold temperature of ∼700 K, surface oxygen atoms begin to sublimate from the (0001) surface. The ratio of oxygen leaving the surface at a given temperature increases as the heating temperature increases. A range of phenomena occurring at the atomic level on the (0001) surface has also been explored, such as formation of oxygen dimers on the surface and evolution of partial charge distribution in the slab during the annealing process. It was found that the partial charge distribution as a function of the depth from the surface undergoes a qualitative change when the annealing temperature is above the threshold temperature.

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  4. Ultrafast exciton dynamics at molecular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Nicholas R.

    Further improvements to device performance are necessary to make solar energy conversion a compelling alternative to fossil fuels. Singlet exciton fission and charge separation are two processes that can heavily influence the power conversion efficiency of a solar cell. During exciton fission one singlet excitation converts into two triplet excitons, potentially doubling the photocurrent generated by higher energy photons. There is significant discord over the singlet fission mechanism and of particular interest is whether the process involves a multiexciton intermediate state. I used time-resolved two-photon photoemission to investigate singlet fission in hexacene thin films, a model system with strong electronic coupling. My results indicate that a multiexciton state forms within 40 fs of photoexcitation and loses singlet character on a 280 fs timescale, creating two triplet excitons. This is concordant with the transient absorption spectra of hexacene single crystals and definitively proves that exciton fission in hexacene proceeds through a multiexciton state. This state is likely common to all strongly-coupled systems and my results suggest that a reassessment of the generally-accepted singlet fission mechanism is required. Charge separation is the process of splitting neutral excitons into carriers that occurs at donor-acceptor heterojunctions in organic solar cells. Although this process is essential for device functionality, there are few compelling explanations for why it is highly efficient in certain organic photovoltaic systems. To investigate the charge separation process, I used the model system of charge transfer excitons at hexacene surfaces and time-resolved two-photon photoemission. Charge transfer excitons with sufficient energy spontaneously delocalize, growing from about 14 nm to over 50 nm within 200 fs. Entropy drives this delocalization, as the density of states within the Coulomb potential increases significantly with energy. This charge

  5. Origins of Irish-Medium Education: The Dynamic Core of Language Revitalisation in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O Baoill, Donall P.

    2007-01-01

    The establishment and growth of Irish-medium education has been central to the revitalisation of the language in Northern Ireland in recent years. Historically, the struggle by the minority of Irish speakers in the region to provide all-Irish schools has been both the goal and the engine of renewal and expansion during a period of community and…

  6. Towards a Dynamic Conceptual Framework for English-Medium Education in Multilingual University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dafouz, Emma; Smit, Ute

    2016-01-01

    At a time of increasing internationalization in tertiary education, English-Medium Education in Multilingual University Settings (EMEMUS) has become a common practice. While there is already ample research describing this phenomenon at a local level (Smit and Dafouz 2012a), the theoretical side needs to be elaborated. This article thus aims to…

  7. Structural and dynamical properties of water on chemically modified surfaces: The role of the instantaneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    Surfaces of polymers such as atactic polystyrene (aPS) represent very good model systems for amorphous material surfaces. Such polymer surfaces are usually modified either chemically or physically for a wide range of applications that include friction, lubrication and adhesion. It is thus quite important to understand the structural and dynamical properties of liquids that come in contact with them to achieve the desired functional properties. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water molecules in a slab of water in contact with atactic polystyrene surfaces of varying polarity. We find that the density of water molecules and the number distribution of hydrogen bonds as a function of distance relative to an instantaneous surface exhibit a structure indicative of a layering of water molecules near the water/PS interface. For the dynamics, we use time correlation functions of hydrogen bonds and the incoherent structure function for the water molecules. Our results indicate that the polarity of the surface dramatically affects the dynamics of the interfacial water molecules with the dynamics slowing down with increasing polarity. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR1410290.

  8. Geostrophic dynamics at surfaces in the atmosphere and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, Ross

    Observed dynamics near bounding upper surfaces in the atmosphere and ocean are interpreted in terms of quasi-geostrophic theory. The quasi-geostrophic equations consist of advection of linearized potential vorticity coupled with advection of temperature at the upper and lower bounding surfaces. We show that the standard vertical finite difference formulation of 3D quasi-geostrophic flow accurately represents the flow only down to a critical horizontal scale that decreases with vertical grid spacing. To overcome this constraint, we derive a surface-modal formulation which accurately and efficiently captures both the surface dynamics due to temperature anomalies on the upper and lower boundaries, and the interior dynamics due to potential vorticity anomalies, without the need for high vertical resolution. In the atmosphere, the horizontal wavenumber spectra of wind and temperature near the tropopause have a steep -3 slope at synoptic scales and a shallow -5/3 slope at mesoscales, with a smooth transition between the two regimes from 800km to 200km. We demonstrate that when the surface temperature anomalies are resolved, quasi-geostrophic flow driven by baroclinic instability exhibits such a transition near the tropopause. The horizontal scale of transition between -3 and -5/3 slopes depends on the relative magnitudes of the mean surface temperature gradient and the mean potential vorticity gradient. In the ocean, sea surface height anomalies measured by satellite altimetry exhibit shallower spectral slopes than quasi-geostrophic theory predicts, and faster than expected westward phase propagation of sea surface height in the midlatitudes. We argue that, in some regions, the shallow spectral slopes are due to surface quasi-geostrophic dynamics, and that the westward phase propagation in the midlatitudes is indicative of a transition from a linear Rossby wave regime in the tropics to a nonlinear turbulent regime in the midlatitudes.

  9. Ionization dynamics of water dimer on ice surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    The solid surface provides an effective two-dimensional reaction field because the surface increases the encounter probability of bi-molecular collision reactions. Also, the solid surface stabilizes a reaction intermediate because the excess energy generated by the reaction dissipates into the bath modes of surface. The ice surface in the universe is one of the two dimensional reaction fields. However, it is still unknown how the ice surface affects to the reaction mechanism. In the present study, to elucidate the specific property of the ice surface reaction, ionization dynamics of water dimer adsorbed on the ice surface was theoretically investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method combined with ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital and molecular mechanics) technique, and the result was compared with that of gas phase reaction. It was found that a proton is transferred from H2O+ to H2O within the dimer and the intermediate complex H3O+(OH) is formed in both cases. However, the dynamic features were different from each other. The reaction rate of the proton transfer on the ice surface was three times faster than that in the gas phase. The intermediate complex H3O+(OH) was easily dissociated to H3O+ and OH radical on the ice surface, and the lifetime of the complex was significantly shorter than that of gas phase (100 fs vs. infinite). The reason why the ice surface accelerates the reaction was discussed in the present study.

  10. AschFlow - A dynamic landslide run-out model for medium scale hazard analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Blahut, Jan; van Asch, Theo; van Westen, Cees; Kappes, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Landslides and debris flow hazard assessments require a scale-dependent analysis in order to mitigate damage and other negative consequences at the respective scales of occurrence. Medium or large scale landslide run-out modelling for many possible landslide initiation areas has been a cumbersome task in the past. This arises from the difficulty to precisely define the location and volume of the released mass and from the inability of the run-out models to compute the displacement with a large amount of individual initiation areas (computational exhaustive). Most of the existing physically based run-out models have complications in handling such situations and therefore empirical methods have been used as a practical mean to predict landslides mobility at a medium scale (1:10,000 to 1:50,000). In this context, a simple medium scale numerical model for rapid mass movements in urban and mountainous areas was developed. The deterministic nature of the approach makes it possible to calculate the velocity, height and increase in mass by erosion, resulting in the estimation of various forms of impacts exerted by debris flows at the medium scale The established and implemented model ("AschFlow") is a 2-D one-phase continuum model that simulates, the entrainment, spreading and deposition process of a landslide or debris flow at a medium scale. The flow is thus treated as a single phase material, whose behavior is controlled by rheology (e.g. Voellmy or Bingham). The developed regional model "AschFlow" was applied and evaluated in well documented areas with known past debris flow events.

  11. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface. PMID:27131706

  12. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  13. Some aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and dynamic instabilities in medium and high pressure steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, H. C.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental data for void fraction, incipient point of boiling, initial point of net vapor generation, bubble dynamics, dryout, two-phase flow pressure drop and density-wave oscillations were obtained in long, sodium heated steam generator tubes of different geometries for a wide range of operating conditions and at medium and high pressures. These data and data from literature taken in sodium and electrically heated steam generator tubes were correlated. Aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and density-wave oscillations in these steam generators disclosed include the distribution factor in small- and medium-size diameter steam generator tubes, the characteristic of the transitions at the incipient point of boiling and initial point of net vapor generation, bubble growth during subcooled nucleate flow boiling, the importance of the equivalent length for dryout in non-uniformly heated steam generator tubes and the mechanisms of density-wave oscillations in once-through steam generator tubes.

  14. Surface detection, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, L M; Rudd, R E

    2005-08-01

    New techniques are presented for the detection and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we introduce here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code, and is much less expensive than other techniques such as the solvent-accessible surface.

  15. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface. PMID:27315235

  16. Nonlinear Actuation Dynamics of Driven Casimir Oscillators with Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Waalkens, Holger; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Knoester, Jasper; Palasantzas, George

    2015-11-01

    At separations below 100 nm, Casimir-Lifshitz forces strongly influence the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in dry vacuum conditions. For a micron-size plate oscillating near a surface, which mimics a frequently used setup in experiments with MEMS, we show that the roughness of the surfaces significantly influences the qualitative dynamics of the oscillator. Via a combination of analytical and numerical methods, it is shown that surface roughness leads to a clear increase of initial conditions associated with chaotic motion, that eventually lead to stiction between the surfaces. Since stiction leads to a malfunction of MEMS oscillators, our results are of central interest for the design of microdevices. Moreover, stiction is of significance for fundamentally motivated experiments performed with MEMS.

  17. Potential energy surfaces and reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Tyng.

    1991-11-01

    A simple empirical valence bond (EVB) model approach is suggested for constructing global potential energy surfaces for reactions of polyatomic molecular systems. This approach produces smooth and continuous potential surfaces which can be directly utilized in a dynamical study. Two types of reactions are of special interest, the unimolecular dissociation and the unimolecular isomerization. For the first type, the molecular dissociation dynamics of formaldehyde on the ground electronic surface is investigated through classical trajectory calculations on EVB surfaces. The product state distributions and vector correlations obtained from this study suggest very similar behaviors seen in the experiments. The intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the formic acid dimer is an example of the isomerization reaction. High level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are performed to obtain optimized equilibrium and transition state dimer geometries and also the harmonic frequencies.

  18. Synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Yang, Kun; Deng, Ming; Liu, Cun

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge of impervious surfaces, especially the magnitude, location, geometry, spatial pattern of impervious surfaces, is significant to urban ecosystem studies, including urban hydrology, urban climate, land use planning and resource management.Impervious surface area (ISA) is considered a key indicator of environmental quality and can be used to address complex urban environmental issues, particularly those related to the health of urban watersheds. ISA is also an indicator of non-point source pollution or polluted runoff. Remote sensing offers a consistent framework for representing spatial patterns and rates of urbanization over time through accurate observations of impervious surface area. Most of the existing methods of extracting impervious surface based on remote sensing concentrate on an urban scale, but the rapid and accurate methods of extracting impervious surfaces in a basin scale are nearly nonexistent in China and abroad. In recent years,with the rapid urbanization especially surrounding the Dianchi water body, the impervious surface coverage rate also grows rapidly and results in severe degradation of basin water environment within Dianchi watershed. In this study, we developed an approach to extract impervious surface for Dianci Basin by synergistic using medium-resolution and high-resolution remote sensing imagery. Subpixel percent impervious surfaces at Thematic Mapper (TM) images were mapped using the classification and regression tree(CART) algorithm. Sub-pixel impervious surfaces at 30m resolution were mapped in this study area through regression tree models. The estimated ISA results were evaluated through independent ISA reference data derived from high resolution QuickBird. The results prove the suitability of the approach for a widely automated and mapping of impervious surfaces in a basin scale.

  19. Scaling in a Simple Model for Surface Growth in a Random Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Amnon; Stauffer, Dietrich

    Surface growth in random media is usually governed by both the surface tension and the random local forces. Simulations on lattices mimic the former by imposing a maximum gradient m on the surface heights, and the latter by site-dependent random growth probabilities. Here we consider the limit m --> ∞, where the surface grows at the site with minimal random number, independent of its neighbors. The resulting height distribution obeys a simple scaling law, which is destroyed when local surface tension is included. Our model is equivalent to Yee's simplification of the Bak-Sneppen model for the extinction of biological species, where the height represents the number of times a biological species is exchanged.

  20. Annihilation of craters: Molecular dynamic simulations on a silver surface

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, K. O. E.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2007-12-15

    The ability of silver cluster ions containing 13 atoms to fill in a preexisting crater with a radius of about 28 A ring on a silver (001) target has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and the molecular-dynamics-Monte Carlo corrected effective medium potential. The largest lateral distance r between crater and ion was about three times the radius of the preexisting crater, namely, 75 A ring . The results reveal that when r<20 A ring and r>60 A ring the preexisting crater is partially filled in, and for other distances there is a net growth of the crater. The lattice damage created by the cluster ions, the total sputtering yield, the cluster sputtering yield, and simulated transmission electron microscopy images of the irradiated targets are also presented.

  1. Dynamic focal spots registration algorithm for freeform surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjiang; Zhao, Liping; Chen, I.-Ming

    2013-06-01

    In a wavefront sensing system, the raw data for surface reconstruction, either the slope matrix or curvature matrix, is obtained through centroiding on the focal spot images. Centroiding is to calculate the first moment within a certain area of interest, which encloses the focal spot. As the distribution of focal spots is correlated to the surface sampling condition, while a uniform rectangular grid is good enough to register all the focal spots of a uniformly sampled near flat surface, the focal spots of aspherical or freeform surfaces have varying shapes and sizes depending on the surface geometry. In this case, the normal registration method is not applicable. This paper proposed a dynamic focal spots registration algorithm to automatically analyze the image, identify and register every focal spot for centroiding at one go. Through experiment on a freeform surface with polynomial coefficients up to 10th order, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is proved.

  2. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-21

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10{sup 4} s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses.

  3. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-21

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10(4) s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses. PMID:26093566

  4. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 104 s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ˜1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses.

  5. The Surface-Associated and Secreted MopE Protein of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) Responds to Changes in the Concentration of Copper in the Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Karlsen, Odd A.; Berven, Frode S.; Stafford, Graham P.; Larsen, Øivind; Murrell, J. Colin; Jensen, Harald B.; Fjellbirkeland, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Expression of surface-associated and secreted protein MopE of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) in response to the concentration of copper ions in the growth medium was investigated. The level of protein associated with the cells and secreted to the medium changed when the copper concentration in the medium varied and was highest in cells exposed to copper stress. PMID:12676726

  6. The surface-associated and secreted MopE protein of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) responds to changes in the concentration of copper in the growth medium.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Odd A; Berven, Frode S; Stafford, Graham P; Larsen, Øivind; Murrell, J Colin; Jensen, Harald B; Fjellbirkeland, Anne

    2003-04-01

    Expression of surface-associated and secreted protein MopE of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) in response to the concentration of copper ions in the growth medium was investigated. The level of protein associated with the cells and secreted to the medium changed when the copper concentration in the medium varied and was highest in cells exposed to copper stress. PMID:12676726

  7. Chiral Restoration in a Nuclear Medium ---Probed by S-Wave Pion Dynamics---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienle, P.

    Using 500 MeV (d,^3He π^-) pion transfer reactions in recoil free kinematics, pionic 1s-states were populated in the ^{115,119,123}Sn isotopes and their binding energies and widths determined by precision missing mass spectroscopy. Using these data and corresponding ones from iso-scalar light nuclei nuclei, ^{16}O, ^{20}Ne and ^{28}Si, we determined the pion nucleus s-wave strength parameters, b_0, b_1, Re B_0, and Im B_0. By comparison of the iso-vector pion nucleon strength, determined from pionic hydrogen X-ray spectroscopy b_1^{free}, with the b_1 in a nuclear medium scaled to the density ρ(0), we deduced a scaling factor, the square of the pion decay constant in the vacuum and in nuclear medium, as R = b_1^{free} / b_1 = f^2_{π}(ρ_0)/f^2_{π} = 0.64. Thus from the observed increase of the pion s-wave iso-vector strength in a nuclear medium a reduction of f^2_{π}, the order parameter of chiral symme try breaking, is indicated in accordance with theoretical expectations. This finding is supported by recent π^+ and π^- scattering experiments. A short outlook is given on a future program at RIBF in RIKEN for precision studies of deeply bound 1s-states in heavy nuclei.

  8. Modeling of nanoparticle transport and deposition in a porous medium: Effects of pore surface heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2014-11-01

    Pore surface charge heterogeneity has been found to affect particle retention in flow through porous media. In this study, retention of nanoparticles under different surface blocking conditions is numerically investigated. Micro-CT scanning is used to reconstruct the 3D geometry of sandstone and image-based analysis is used to characterize the pore space and the mineral composition of the rock. Flow of water through the sample is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann method. The motion of nanoparticles is modeled by injection of particles moving under convection and molecular diffusion and recording their trajectories in time. When interacting with the pore surface, particles can be retained onto the surface with a particular deposition rate. As deposited particles hinder the retention of other particles by blocking occupied sites, the deposition is considered to be a second order process. Particle breakthrough under different modeled and real distributions of surface heterogeneity as a function of various surface blocking conditions is investigated. The effect is stronger when parts of the surface are much more favorable for deposition than others. Acknowledgements: Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC BEG08-022) & XSEDE (CTS090017).

  9. Correlation between Dynamic Heterogeneity and Medium-Range Order in Two-Dimensional Glass-Forming Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Araki, Takeaki; Tanaka, Hajime

    2007-11-23

    A glassy state of matter results if crystallization is avoided upon cooling or increasing density. However, the physical factors controlling the ease of vitrification and nature of the glass transition remain elusive. Using numerical simulations of polydisperse hard disks, we find a direct relation between medium-range crystalline ordering and the slow dynamics which characterizes the glass transition. This suggests an intriguing scenario that the strength of frustration controls both the ease of vitrification and nature of the glass transition. Vitrification may be a process of hidden crystalline ordering under frustration, at least in our system.

  10. Experimental evidence of dynamical propagation for solitary waves in ultra slow stochastic non-local Kerr medium.

    PubMed

    Louis, H; Tlidi, M; Louvergneaux, E

    2016-07-11

    We perform a statistical analysis of the optical solitary wave propagation in an ultra-slow stochastic non-local focusing Kerr medium such as liquid crystals. Our experimental results show that the localized beam trajectory presents a dynamical random walk whose beam position versus the propagation distance z depicts two different kind of evolutions A power law is found for the beam position standard deviation during the first stage of propagation. It obeys approximately z3/2 up to ten times the power threshold for solitary wave generation. PMID:27410886

  11. Experimental evidence of dynamical propagation for solitary waves in ultra slow stochastic non-local Kerr medium.

    PubMed

    Louis, H; Tlidi, M; Louvergneaux, E

    2016-07-11

    We perform a statistical analysis of the optical solitary wave propagation in an ultra-slow stochastic non-local focusing Kerr medium such as liquid crystals. Our experimental results show that the localized beam trajectory presents a dynamical random walk whose beam position versus the propagation distance z depicts two different kind of evolutions A power law is found for the beam position standard deviation during the first stage of propagation. It obeys approximately z3/2 up to ten times the power threshold for solitary wave generation. PMID:27410887

  12. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam 7Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Di Meo, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; Lay, J. A.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Parkar, V. V.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Sava, T.; Sgouros, O.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Zerva, K.

    2015-10-01

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass (58Ni) and heavy (208Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×105 pps 7Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  13. Using Dynamic Geometry Software for the Intersection Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koparan, Timur; Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define prospective teacher views about using dynamic geometry software for intersection surfaces. The study was conducted as a case study. For this purpose, data collection tool was developed based on the opinion of two experts. The data collection tool consists of 4 open-ended questions related to the intersection…

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of a ball rolling on a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Lyman, T. C.; Davis, R. B.

    2010-03-01

    An underlying potential energy function can provide visual and intuitive insight into a system's stability and overall behavior. In particular, the motion of a ball moving along a curve or surface in a gravitational field provides a macroscale demonstration of interesting dynamics. We investigate the motion of a small ball rolling along a smooth two-dimensional potential surface. A direct experimental realization of this situation is suitable for demonstrating some classic features of nonlinear dynamics. The results of numerical simulations are directly compared with experimental data. To better characterize the dynamical behavior of the ball, especially when it is undergoing chaotic motion, several descriptive measures are discussed, including time-lag embedding, initial condition maps, power spectra, Lyapunov exponents, and fractal dimensions.

  15. Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer over a Porous Oscillating Stretching Surface in a Viscoelastic Fluid with Porous Medium.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sami Ullah; Ali, Nasir; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the heat transfer in unsteady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) second grade fluid over a porous oscillating stretching surface embedded in porous medium. The flow is induced due to infinite elastic sheet which is stretched periodically. With the help of dimensionless variables, the governing flow equations are reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations. This system has been solved numerically using the finite difference scheme, in which a coordinate transformation is used to transform the semi-infinite physical space to a bounded computational domain. The influence of the involved parameters on the flow, the temperature distribution, the skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number is shown and discussed in detail. The study reveals that an oscillatory sheet embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium generates oscillatory motion in the fluid. The amplitude and phase of oscillations depends on the rheology of the fluid as well as on the other parameters coming through imposed boundary conditions, inclusion of body force term and permeability of the porous medium. It is found that amplitude of flow velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic and mass suction/injection parameters. However, it decreases with increasing the strength of the applied magnetic field. Moreover, the temperature of fluid is a decreasing function of viscoelastic parameter, mass suction/injection parameter and Prandtl number. PMID:26657931

  16. Statistical optimization of the medium composition by response surface methodology to enhance schizophyllan production by Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbing; Zhou, Pengpeng; Yu, Longjiang

    2011-01-01

    The response surface methodology (RSM) involving central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize the fermentation medium for the cell growth and schizophllan production by Schizophyllum commune CGMCC 5.113 in submerged culture at pH 6.5 and 26 degrees C. The four variables involved in this study were glucose, yeast extract, ammonium nitrate, and magnesium sulfate. The statistical analysis of the results showed that, in the range studied, glucose and yeast extract had a highly significant effect on schizophyllan production. The optimal medium for schizophyllan production calculated from the regression model of RSM was as follows: glucose, 18 g/l; yeast extract, 0.5 g/l; NH4NO3, 0.48 g/l; and MgSO4, 0.05 g/l, with a predicted maximum schizophyllan production of 11.74 g/l. These predicted values were experimentally validated. The excellent correlation between predicted and measured values justifies the validity of the response model. The results of bioreactor fermentation also show that the optimized medium enhanced schizophyllan production (12.80 g/l) by S. commune in a 5-1 fermenter. PMID:21630592

  17. Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer over a Porous Oscillating Stretching Surface in a Viscoelastic Fluid with Porous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sami Ullah; Ali, Nasir; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is carried out to study the heat transfer in unsteady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) second grade fluid over a porous oscillating stretching surface embedded in porous medium. The flow is induced due to infinite elastic sheet which is stretched periodically. With the help of dimensionless variables, the governing flow equations are reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations. This system has been solved numerically using the finite difference scheme, in which a coordinate transformation is used to transform the semi-infinite physical space to a bounded computational domain. The influence of the involved parameters on the flow, the temperature distribution, the skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number is shown and discussed in detail. The study reveals that an oscillatory sheet embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium generates oscillatory motion in the fluid. The amplitude and phase of oscillations depends on the rheology of the fluid as well as on the other parameters coming through imposed boundary conditions, inclusion of body force term and permeability of the porous medium. It is found that amplitude of flow velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic and mass suction/injection parameters. However, it decreases with increasing the strength of the applied magnetic field. Moreover, the temperature of fluid is a decreasing function of viscoelastic parameter, mass suction/injection parameter and Prandtl number. PMID:26657931

  18. Optimization of medium components for production of chitin deacetylase by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Z7, using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuanhao; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shengjie; Zhou, Guoying; Liu, Junang

    2014-01-01

    Plackett–Burman design and Box–Behnken response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the medium components for the chitin deacetylase (CDA) activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Z7. Plackett–Burman design was applied to determine the specific medium components affecting CDA activity and found that starch, chitin and MgSO4 were critical in augmenting CDA activity. These significant parameters were further optimized using Box–Behnken RSM and the optimum concentrations of starch, chitin and MgSO4 were found to be 24.4, 8.8 and 0.19 g/L, respectively. The optimum medium composition was chitin 8.8 g/L, starch 24.4 g/L, yeast extract 10g/L, MgSO4 0.19 g/L, K2HPO4 0.3 g/L and NaCl 5 g/L. Under these optimal conditions, the CDA activity of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Z7 increased distinctly from 18.75 to 27.48 U/mL (46.6% increase in total yield). PMID:26740755

  19. Surface dynamics and mechanics in liquid crystal polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Danqing; Broer, Dirk J.

    2015-03-01

    Based on liquid crystal networks we developed `smart' coatings with responsive surface topographies. Either by prepatterning or by the formation of self-organized structures they can be switched on and off in a pre-designed manner. Here we provide an overview of our methods to generate coatings that form surface structures upon the actuation by light. The coating oscillates between a flat surface and a surface with pre-designed 3D micro-patterns by modulating a light source. With recent developments in solid state lighting, light is an attractive trigger medium as it can be integrated in a device for local control or can be used remotely for flood or localized exposure. The basic principle of formation of surface topographies is based on the change of molecular organization in ordered liquid crystal polymer networks. The change in order leads to anisotropic dimensional changes with contraction along the director and expansion to the two perpendicular directions and an increase in volume by the formation of free volume. These two effects work in concert to provide local expansion and contraction in the coating steered by the local direction of molecular orientation. The surface deformation, expressed as the height difference between the activated regions and the non-activated regions divided by the initial film thickness, is of the order of 20%. Switching occurs immediately when the light is switched `on' and `off' and takes several tens of seconds.

  20. Wetting dynamics of alkyl ketene dimer on cellulosic model surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, G.; Bertin, M.; Smrckova, M.

    1999-10-26

    The dynamic wetting of a commercial alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) wax was measured on model cellulosic surfaces. The variables investigated were temperature and the surface composition. The model surfaces consisted of cellulose and cellulose acetate films as well as glass. These surfaces are smooth by industrial standards but not on a molecular level. The objective of the study was to predict the extent of AKD wetting during the time frame of papermaking. For smooth surfaces, AKD particles wet but do not spread on the hydrophilic surfaces investigated. AKD wetting proceeds from the balance of the interfacial forces with the viscous dissipation. The effect of gravity can be neglected for papermaking conditions. The Hoffman-Tanner equation modified for partial wetting provided a very good fit of the dynamic wetting. The slope of the graph is a function of temperature but not of the solid surface composition. Maslyiah's model also fits the experimental results well, but with a physically unrealistic value of the fitting parameter. For partial wetting, the complex but rigorous Cox equation is recommended to estimate the slip length over macroscopic wetting dimensions.

  1. Constitutive Analysis of Dynamic Recrystallization and Flow Behavior of a Medium Carbon Nb-V Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wen-fei; Zhang, Li-wen; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Yi-feng; Shi, Xin-hua

    2016-05-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and flow behavior of a medium carbon Nb-V microalloyed steel was investigated using hot isothermal compression experiments in a wide range of temperatures (1123-1473 K) and strain rates (0.01-10 s-1). The flow stress curves were analyzed comprehensively, and it was found that the flow stress of this steel is higher than C-Mn steel and V microalloyed steel. All the curves obtained can be ranged into three principal types: work hardening, dynamic recovery, and DRX. The DRX behavior of this steel was investigated, including critical strain, kinetics of DRX, and microstructure. The constitutive equation to predict the flow stress of the tested steel was also developed, and the analysis result indicates that the developed model has a high accuracy in predicting the flow stress during hot deformation.

  2. Mapping Impervious Surface Expansion using Medium-resolution Satellite Image Time Series: A Case Study in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Ma, Ronghua; Weng, Qihao; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Chen, Jin; Pan, Yaozhong; Song, Conghe

    2012-01-01

    Cities have been expanding rapidly worldwide, especially over the past few decades. Mapping the dynamic expansion of impervious surface in both space and time is essential for an improved understanding of the urbanization process, land-cover and land-use change, and their impacts on the environment. Landsat and other medium-resolution satellites provide the necessary spatial details and temporal frequency for mapping impervious surface expansion over the past four decades. Since the US Geological Survey opened the historical record of the Landsat image archive for free access in 2008, the decades-old bottleneck of data limitation has gone. Remote-sensing scientists are now rich with data, and the challenge is how to make best use of this precious resource. In this article, we develop an efficient algorithm to map the continuous expansion of impervious surface using a time series of four decades of medium-resolution satellite images. The algorithm is based on a supervised classification of the time-series image stack using a decision tree. Each imerpervious class represents urbanization starting in a different image. The algorithm also allows us to remove inconsistent training samples because impervious expansion is not reversible during the study period. The objective is to extract a time series of complete and consistent impervious surface maps from a corresponding times series of images collected from multiple sensors, and with a minimal amount of image preprocessing effort. The approach was tested in the lower Yangtze River Delta region, one of the fastest urban growth areas in China. Results from nearly four decades of medium-resolution satellite data from the Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM), Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) and China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite (CBERS) show a consistent urbanization process that is consistent with economic development plans and policies. The time-series impervious spatial extent maps derived

  3. Numerical Simulation of MHD Hiemenz Flow of a Micropolar Fluid towards a Nonlinear Stretching Surface through a Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Bhargava, Rama

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the two-dimensional boundary layer problem of Hiemenz flow (two-dimensional flow of a fluid near a stagnation point) of an incompressible micropolar fluid towards a nonlinear stretching surface placed in a porous medium in the presence of transverse magnetic field is examined. The resulting nonlinear differential equations governing the problem have been transformed by a similarity transformation into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically by the Element Free Galerkin method. The influence of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation, temperature, and concentration is shown. Some of the results are compared with the Finite Element Method. Finally, validation of the numerical results is demonstrated for local skin friction ? for hydrodynamic micropolar fluid flow on a linearly stretching surface.

  4. Generation of a medium vacuum pressure by using two different pumping methods in the KRISS dynamic flow-control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. S.; Lim, J. Y.; Khan, W.

    2014-02-01

    Pumping systems with large vacuum chambers have numerous applications in the process industry: for example, mixing of various types of gases as in the semiconductor industry, the calibration of vacuum gauges, the measurement of outgassing rates of various materials in the field of space technology, etc. Most often, these systems are used in the medium vacuum range (10-1 Pa-102 Pa) and in the dynamically-generated pressure mode. We have designed and developed a new dynamic flow system at the KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science) that can be used for such applications with reliability in the range from 0.1 Pa - 133 Pa. In this report, the design philosophy, operational procedure and experimental data for the generated stable pressure points in the chamber of the system are discussed. The data consist the pressure points generated in the medium vacuum range while pumping the chamber of the system by using two different methods: first by using a dry scroll pump and then by using a combination of a turbomolecular pump backed by the same scroll pump. The relative standard deviations in the pressure points were calculated and were found to be greater than 1.5% for the scroll pump and less than 0.5% for the turbomolecular pump.

  5. Influence of wave-packet dynamics on the medium gain of an atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Delagnes, J. C.; Bouchene, M. A.

    2007-10-15

    A sequence of two femtosecond pulses--a strong driving {pi}-polarized pulse and a weak propagating {sigma}-polarized pulse--excites resonantly the S{sub 1/2}{yields}P{sub 1/2} transition of an atomic system. Strong interference effects take place in the system between absorption and emission paths leading to a substantial amplification of the {sigma} pulse. We study the influence of the fine structure on the medium gain when the contribution of the off-resonant P{sub 3/2} level is taken into account. A drastic reduction of the medium gain is obtained. This effect is explained within the bright-state-dark-state formalism where the strong driving pulse creates a wave packet that can be trapped in a state--the bright state--leading to a significant reduction of the gain for the {sigma} pulse. Finally, we also show that periodical gain dependence with the driving pulse energy exhibits a significant change in its period value (compared with expected Rabi oscillations)

  6. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.

  7. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling upmore » of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.« less

  8. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). By comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.

  9. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). By comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps. PMID:25548155

  10. Drop impact dynamics on liquid-infused superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a series of experiments investigating the drop impact dynamics on hydrophobic, air-infused and lubricant-infused superhydrophobic surfaces. To create the superhydrophobic surfaces, smooth Teflon (PTFE) surfaces were roughened by a 240-grit sandpaper. The immiscible and incompressible silicone oils with different viscosities were infused into features of the superhydrophobic surfaces by a skim coating technique. The spreading and retraction dynamics on a series of the tested surfaces will be presented. We will show that the maximal deformation of the drops on lubricant-infused surfaces grows with increasing viscosity ratio between a water drop and the infused oil. We will show that this increase in the maximal deformation with the viscosity ratio is consistent with increasing the velocity and the viscosity of the drops but the rims of the drops destabilize with increasing the drop velocity. Finally, we will demonstrate that increasing the viscosity of the infused oil induces higher viscous force at the contact line, resulting in reduction in the movement of the drops during retraction and corresponding increase in the final drop size.

  11. Drop impact and rebound dynamics on an inclined superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Yong Han; Burton, James; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2014-10-14

    Due to its potential in water-repelling applications, the impact and rebound dynamics of a water drop impinging perpendicular to a horizontal superhydrophobic surface have undergone extensive study. However, drops tend to strike a surface at an angle in applications. In such cases, the physics governing the effects of oblique impact are not well studied or understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to conduct an experiment to investigate the impact and rebound dynamics of a drop at various liquid viscosities, in an isothermal environment, and on a nanocomposite superhydrophobic surface at normal and oblique impact conditions (tilted at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°). This study considered drops falling from various heights to create normal impact Weber numbers ranging from 6 to 110. In addition, drop viscosity was varied by decreasing the temperature for water drops and by utilizing water-glycerol mixtures, which have similar surface tension to water but higher viscosities. Results revealed that oblique and normal drop impact behaved similarly (in terms of maximum drop spread as well as rebound dynamics) at low normal Weber numbers. However, at higher Weber numbers, normal and oblique impact results diverged in terms of maximum spread, which could be related to asymmetry and more complex outcomes. These asymmetry effects became more pronounced as the inclination angle increased, to the point where they dominated the drop impact and rebound characteristics when the surface was inclined at 60°. The drop rebound characteristics on inclined surfaces could be classified into eight different outcomes driven primarily by normal Weber number and drop Ohnesorge numbers. However, it was found that these outcomes were also a function of the receding contact angle, whereby reduced receding angles yielded tail-like structures. Nevertheless, the contact times of the drops with the coating were found to be generally independent of surface inclination. PMID:25216298

  12. Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles on a clay mineral surface in dimethyl sulfoxide medium.

    PubMed

    Németh, József; Rodríguez-Gattorno, Geonel; Díaz, David; Vázquez-Olmos, América R; Dékány, Imre

    2004-03-30

    Nanocrystalline ZnO particles have been prepared with different methods using zinc cyclohexanebutyrate as precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) medium via alkaline hydrolysis. A series of preparations were carried out in the presence of layered silicates (kaolinite and montmorillonite). It was revealed by different measurement techniques that the presence of the clay minerals has a stabilization influence on the size of the ZnO nanocrystals. UV-vis absorption spectra show a blue shift when the nanoparticles are prepared in the presence of the clay minerals. The average particle diameters calculated from the Brus equation ranged from 2.6 to 13.0 nm. The UV-vis spectra of the synthesized nanoparticles did not show any red shift after 2-3 days, demonstrating that stable ZnO nanocrystals are present in the dispersions. The presence of the ZnO nanoparticles was also proven by fluorescence measurements. A number of the nanoparticles are incorporated into the interlamellar space of the clays, and an intercalated structure is formed as proven by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The size of the nanoparticles in the interlamellar space is in the range of 1-2 nm according to the XRD patterns. Transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigations were applied to determine directly the particle size and the size distribution of the nanoparticles. PMID:15835163

  13. Detection of small surface vessels in near, medium, and far infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Milewski, S.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    Protection of naval bases and harbors requires close co-operation between security and access control systems covering land areas and those monitoring sea approach routes. The typical location of naval bases and harbors - usually next to a large city - makes it difficult to detect and identify a threat in the dense regular traffic of various sea vessels (i.e. merchant ships, fishing boats, tourist ships). Due to the properties of vessel control systems, such as AIS (Automatic Identification System), and the effectiveness of radar and optoelectronic systems against different targets it seems that fast motor boats called RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) could be the most serious threat to ships and harbor infrastructure. In the paper the process and conditions for the detection and identification of high-speed boats in the areas of ports and naval bases in the near, medium and far infrared is presented. Based on the results of measurements and recorded thermal images the actual temperature contrast delta T (RIB / sea) will be determined, which will further allow to specify the theoretical ranges of detection and identification of the RIB-type targets for an operating security system. The data will also help to determine the possible advantages of image fusion where the component images are taken in different spectral ranges. This will increase the probability of identifying the object by the multi-sensor security system equipped additionally with the appropriate algorithms for detecting, tracking and performing the fusion of images from the visible and infrared cameras.

  14. Exploring QCD dynamics in medium energy γA semiexclusive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, A. B.; Strikman, M.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that studies of the semiexclusive large angle photon-nucleus reactions: γ + A →h1 +h2 +(A - 1) * with tagged photon beams of energies 6 ÷ 10 GeV which can be performed in Hall D at Thomas Jefferson National Acceleration Facility (TJNAF) would allow to probe several aspects of the QCD dynamics: establish the t-range in which transition from soft to hard dynamics occurs, compare the strength of the interaction of various mesons and baryons with nucleons at the energies of few GeV, as well as look for the color transparency effects.

  15. TiN surface dynamics: role of surface and bulk mass transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bareno, J.; Swiech, W.; Petrova, V.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.; Kodambaka, S.; Khare, S. V.

    2007-02-09

    Transition-metal nitrides, such as TiN, have a wide variety of applications as hard, wear-resistant coatings, as diffusion barriers, and as scratch-resistant and anti-reflective coatings in optics. Understanding the surface morphological and microstructural evolution of these materials is crucial for improving the performance of devices. Studies of surface step dynamics enable determination of the rate-limiting mechanisms, corresponding surface mass transport parameters, and step energies. However, most models describing these phenomena are limited in application to simple elemental metal and semiconductor surfaces. Here, we summarize recent progress toward elucidating the interplay of surface and bulk diffusion processes on morphological evolution of compound surfaces. Specifically, we analyze the coarsening/decay kinetics of two- and three-dimensional TiN(111) islands and the effect of surface-terminated dislocations on TiN(111) steps.

  16. Investigating the dynamics of surface-immobilized DNA nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Katherine E; Trefzer, Martin A; Johnson, Steven; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2016-01-01

    Surface-immobilization of molecules can have a profound influence on their structure, function and dynamics. Toehold-mediated strand displacement is often used in solution to drive synthetic nanomachines made from DNA, but the effects of surface-immobilization on the mechanism and kinetics of this reaction have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we show that the kinetics of strand displacement in surface-immobilized nanomachines are significantly different to those of the solution phase reaction, and we attribute this to the effects of intermolecular interactions within the DNA layer. We demonstrate that the dynamics of strand displacement can be manipulated by changing strand length, concentration and G/C content. By inserting mismatched bases it is also possible to tune the rates of the constituent displacement processes (toehold-binding and branch migration) independently, and information can be encoded in the time-dependence of the overall reaction. Our findings will facilitate the rational design of surface-immobilized dynamic DNA nanomachines, including computing devices and track-based motors. PMID:27387252

  17. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  18. Investigating the dynamics of surface-immobilized DNA nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Katherine E.; Trefzer, Martin A.; Johnson, Steven; Tyrrell, Andy M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface-immobilization of molecules can have a profound influence on their structure, function and dynamics. Toehold-mediated strand displacement is often used in solution to drive synthetic nanomachines made from DNA, but the effects of surface-immobilization on the mechanism and kinetics of this reaction have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we show that the kinetics of strand displacement in surface-immobilized nanomachines are significantly different to those of the solution phase reaction, and we attribute this to the effects of intermolecular interactions within the DNA layer. We demonstrate that the dynamics of strand displacement can be manipulated by changing strand length, concentration and G/C content. By inserting mismatched bases it is also possible to tune the rates of the constituent displacement processes (toehold-binding and branch migration) independently, and information can be encoded in the time-dependence of the overall reaction. Our findings will facilitate the rational design of surface-immobilized dynamic DNA nanomachines, including computing devices and track-based motors. PMID:27387252

  19. Efficient modelling of droplet dynamics on complex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Karapetsas, George; Chamakos, Nikolaos T; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the dynamics of droplet interaction with smooth or structured solid surfaces using a novel sharp-interface scheme which allows the efficient modelling of multiple dynamic contact lines. The liquid-gas and liquid-solid interfaces are treated in a unified context and the dynamic contact angle emerges simply due to the combined action of the disjoining and capillary pressure, and viscous stresses without the need of an explicit boundary condition or any requirement for the predefinition of the number and position of the contact lines. The latter, as it is shown, renders the model able to handle interfacial flows with topological changes, e.g. in the case of an impinging droplet on a structured surface. Then it is possible to predict, depending on the impact velocity, whether the droplet will fully or partially impregnate the structures of the solid, or will result in a 'fakir', i.e. suspended, state. In the case of a droplet sliding on an inclined substrate, we also demonstrate the built-in capability of our model to provide a prediction for either static or dynamic contact angle hysteresis. We focus our study on hydrophobic surfaces and examine the effect of the geometrical characteristics of the solid surface. It is shown that the presence of air inclusions trapped in the micro-structure of a hydrophobic substrate (Cassie-Baxter state) result in the decrease of contact angle hysteresis and in the increase of the droplet migration velocity in agreement with experimental observations for super-hydrophobic surfaces. Moreover, we perform 3D simulations which are in line with the 2D ones regarding the droplet mobility and also indicate that the contact angle hysteresis may be significantly affected by the directionality of the structures with respect to the droplet motion. PMID:26828706

  20. Efficient modelling of droplet dynamics on complex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetsas, George; Chamakos, Nikolaos T.; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the dynamics of droplet interaction with smooth or structured solid surfaces using a novel sharp-interface scheme which allows the efficient modelling of multiple dynamic contact lines. The liquid-gas and liquid-solid interfaces are treated in a unified context and the dynamic contact angle emerges simply due to the combined action of the disjoining and capillary pressure, and viscous stresses without the need of an explicit boundary condition or any requirement for the predefinition of the number and position of the contact lines. The latter, as it is shown, renders the model able to handle interfacial flows with topological changes, e.g. in the case of an impinging droplet on a structured surface. Then it is possible to predict, depending on the impact velocity, whether the droplet will fully or partially impregnate the structures of the solid, or will result in a ‘fakir’, i.e. suspended, state. In the case of a droplet sliding on an inclined substrate, we also demonstrate the built-in capability of our model to provide a prediction for either static or dynamic contact angle hysteresis. We focus our study on hydrophobic surfaces and examine the effect of the geometrical characteristics of the solid surface. It is shown that the presence of air inclusions trapped in the micro-structure of a hydrophobic substrate (Cassie-Baxter state) result in the decrease of contact angle hysteresis and in the increase of the droplet migration velocity in agreement with experimental observations for super-hydrophobic surfaces. Moreover, we perform 3D simulations which are in line with the 2D ones regarding the droplet mobility and also indicate that the contact angle hysteresis may be significantly affected by the directionality of the structures with respect to the droplet motion.

  1. Dynamic Characteristics of High Intensity Shock Effect for Medium Weight Shock Testing Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Feng; Sai, Jiangang; Yun, He; Bo, Gao

    This paper analyses the dynamic characteristics of MWMS by optimizing the design of the anvil table to ensure the waveform in allowing limit, simulating the impact of MWMS, and demonstrating the influence of the low-pass filter and the height of hammer drop to test results.

  2. Experimental study of the dynamics of penetration of a solid body into a soil medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Vl. V.; Balandin, Vl. Vl.; Bragov, A. M.; Kotov, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental system is developed to determine the main parameters of the impact and penetration of a solid deformable body into a soft soil medium. This system is based on the technique of an inverse experiment with a measuring rod and the technique of a direct experiment with photo recording and the application of a shadow picture of the interaction of a striker with a soil target. To verify these techniques, the collision of a solid body with soil is studied by a numerical calculation and the time intervals in which the change of the resistance force is proportional to the penetration velocity squared are determined. The penetration resistance coefficients determined in direct and inverse experiments are shown to agree with each other in the collision velocity range 80-400 m/s, which supports the validity of the techniques and the reliability of measuring the total load.

  3. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications. PMID:22235939

  4. Real-time atomic resolution dynamics of glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Sumit Ravindra

    Although glasses are commonplace materials found in every walk of life, they have managed to remain mysterious for centuries. The origins of the defining characteristic of glasses, the glass transition, remain unknown. The glass transition is accompanied by a catastrophic increase in viscosity with a superexponential pace whose underlying reason has been difficult to pin down. Cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR) are playing an increasingly important role in explaining these phenomena. As CRR are only a few nanometers in size, much information can be gained by imaging studies of glasses at the atomic scale. This thesis employs the atomic resolution capabilities of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study glass surfaces in real-time. Initial experiments on metallic glass surfaces discovered localized two-state dynamics of atomic clusters (2-8 atomic diameters) active even below the glass transition temperature (Tg). Atomic scale evidence of spatial and temporal heterogeneity was acquired. After multiple metallic glass surfaces were shown to exhibit these dynamics, it was proposed to be a universal phenomenon on glass surfaces with similar size distribution in terms of their average weighted diameter. The clusters were also shown to be thermally-activated by studying their temperature behavior. Similar dynamics were discovered on amorphous-silicon, which is an important electronic material, amidst the debate whether or not it is a glass. Further, the two-state dynamics were demonstrated to be quenched after the incorporation of hydrogen during the growth process. Individual CRRs are studied while simultaneously ramping their temperature. The single cluster traces showed marked shifts in the local equilibria illustrating a temperature-sensitive energy landscape. It was deduced that spatial heterogeneity (differences in rates at different sites) is the major contributor to the non-exponential glassy relaxations rather than temporal heterogeneity (differences in

  5. Dynamic Imaging of Surface Motion with a Stereo Borescope

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Berninger, Stuart Baker

    2008-12-11

    A new stereo borescope has been investigated that would provide a time-resolved calibrated method of recording the motion and deformation of a three-dimensional (3-D) surface during explosively driven dynamic shock experiments at the Nevada Test Site. In these experiments, geometries would likely prove to be incompatible with conventional direct optical systems. Single line-of-sight borescopes lack adequate depth-of-field for quantitative imaging of the 3-D surface. To improve depth-of-field and provide time resolution, a stereo borescope has been fabricated for use with a nine-frame framing camera. At one end, stereo optics couple light from the dynamic surface into a pair of flexible 1-mm-diameter correlated fiber-optic bundles. At the other end, small-format lenses (~3 mm) interface with the framing camera, which is set up to simultaneously record the separate-perspective views. All nine frames could be recorded in a period as short as 1.8 μs, and spatial resolution is optimized to 11 line-pairs per mm. To achieve pseudo 3-D depth perception, photogrammetric analysis has been demonstrated with commercial software from ADAM technology (Australia). This paper presents the results from time-resolved stereo images of dynamic surfaces collected in a series of high-explosives experiments at the National Security Technologies, LLC, “Boom Box” in Santa Barbara, CA. Experience with the stereo borescope has suggested other potentially useful stereoscopic applications, such as stereo viewing of moving surfaces on the interiors of engines and the heating of moving components, and the viewing material deposition on interior surfaces during machine operations and fabrication processes.

  6. Demonstration of surface plasmons in metal island films and the effect of the surrounding medium--An undergraduate experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Orfanides, P.; Buckner, T. F.; Buncick, M. C.; Meriaudeau, F.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present a demonstration of the surface plasmon phenomenon as it occurs in thin metal island films. The metal films are deposited on glass microscope slides. The effect of the surface plasmon resonance may be observed visually on the slide without further apparatus. Heating the film changes the shape of the islands and therefore the resonant frequency of the surface plasmon and changes the color of the film. Placing the film in a dielectric medium changes the resonance condition for the surface plasmon again and changes the color again. We show this by coating the slides with commercially available liquids with different indices of refraction. We present a theoretical model that assumes the islands are oblate spheroids. There are enough details given so that the equations can be programed and the theoretical optical absorbance can be reproduced. We also present a modification to the theory so that the shift in resonant frequency can be calculated when the spheroids are immersed in the index fluids. We describe our apparatus for making thin films and our optical spectrometer system. We then present optical absorbance measurements of thin films of both Ag and Au in air and in two liquids with different indices of refraction. (c) 2000 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  7. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management. PMID:25350507

  8. Modeling Apple Surface Temperature Dynamics Based on Weather Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00–18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of “Fuji” apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management. PMID:25350507

  9. Dynamic surface tension of natural surfactant extract under superimposed oscillations.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prasika I; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Bold, Geoff T

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant dysfunction plays a major role in respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This research seeks to determine whether the use of natural surfactant, Curosurf™ (Cheisi Farmaceutici, Parma, Italy), accompanied with pressure oscillations at the level of the alveoli can reduce the surface tension in the lung, thereby making it easier for infants with RDS to maintain the required level of functional residual capacity (FRC) without collapse. To simulate the alveolar environment, dynamic surface tension measurements were performed on a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) type device and showed that introducing superimposed oscillations about the tidal volume excursion between 10 and 70 Hz in a surfactant bubble lowers interfacial surface tension below values observed using tidal volume excursion alone. The specific mechanisms responsible for this improvement are yet to be established; however it is believed that one mechanism may be the rapid transient changes in the interfacial area increase the number of interfacial binding sites for surfactant molecules, increasing adsorption and diffusion to the interface, thereby decreasing interfacial surface tension. Existing mathematical models in the literature reproduce trends noticed in experiments in the range of breathing frequencies only. Thus, a modification is introduced to an existing model to both incorporate superimposed pressure oscillations and demonstrate that these may improve the dynamic surface tension in the alveoli. PMID:20883997

  10. Dynamic changes in PDMS surface morphology in femtosecond laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heh-Young; Sidhu, Mehra S; Lee, Heung Soon; Jeoung, Sae Chae

    2015-07-27

    We have investigated the effect of the dynamics of crater size on the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surface morphology in fs-laser micro-processing. PDMS surface was processed with varying both inter-pulse interval and inter-spot distance between successive laser pulses. With keeping the interval of 5 ms crater shape is round even if the spot is overlapped in space. But decreasing the interval to 0.02 ms the shape of the crater is no longer round. Decreasing the inter-distance between the craters results in roughened surface morphology even at time intervals of 5 ms. Temporal dependence of single-shot fs-laser induced crater size was measured as a function of time delay. Within 0.1 ms after pulse irradiation with a fluence of 4.8 J/cm2 on PDMS surface the crater size has reached to its maximum values and then decreased with a time constant of about 0.3 ms. The surface morphology after fs-laser pulse irradiation is strongly dependent on not only inter-spot distance between successive laser pulse but also their inter-pulse intervals. By proposing a theoretical model on their dynamic features, we will try to explain the current observation in quantitatively. PMID:26367645

  11. Surface morphology study of Zr-based amorphous alloys after immersion in boiling nitric acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Poonam; Dhawan, Anil; Sharma, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Weight loss studies have been performed to determine the corrosion resistance of amorphous Zr60Nb2Al10Ni8Cu20 and Zr59Nb3Al10Ni8Cu20 alloys in aqueous HNO3 media at boiling temperature. The FESEM micrographs has been obtained to know the surface morphology of specimens after immersion in 11.5M boiling aqueous HNO3 media. Zr59Nb3Al10Ni8Cu20 alloy shows better corrosion resistance in nitric acid media than Zr60Nb2Al10Ni8Cu20 alloy.

  12. The influence of surface adsorption on microbubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stride, E

    2008-06-28

    In a pure liquid, the behaviour of a gas or vapour microbubble is determined primarily by its size, the ambient pressure and the properties of the surrounding liquid. In practice, however, adsorption of a dissolved substance from the surrounding liquid onto the microbubble surface will often take place, producing a thin coating which can significantly affect both the microbubble's stability and its dynamic response. This can have important implications in a wide range of applications, including underwater acoustics, cavitation detection, medical imaging and drug delivery. The aim of this paper is to review the existing theoretical treatments of coated microbubbles and to present and discuss some recent developments. It will be shown that the presence of the coating can substantially modify the amplitude of microbubble volumetric oscillation, resonance characteristics and relative amplitude in tension and compression. Finally, the need for improved understanding of the dynamic behaviour of surface coatings at high frequencies will be discussed. PMID:18348975

  13. Dynamics of the contact between a ruthenium surface with a single nanoasperity and a flat ruthenium surface: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Alan Barros; Fortini, Andrea; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Srolovitz, David

    2011-04-01

    We study the dynamics of the contact between a pair of surfaces (with properties designed to mimic ruthenium) via molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the contact between a ruthenium surface with a single nanoasperity and a flat ruthenium surface. The results of such simulations suggest that contact behavior is highly variable. The goal of this study is to investigate the source and degree of this variability. We find that during compression, the behavior of the contact force displacement curves is reproducible, while during contact separation, the behavior is highly variable. Examination of the contact surfaces suggests that two separation mechanisms are in operation and give rise to this variability. One mechanism corresponds to the formation of a bridge between the two surfaces that plastically stretches as the surfaces are drawn apart and eventually separate in shear. This leads to a morphology after separation in which there are opposing asperities on the two surfaces. This plastic separation/bridge formation mechanism leads to a large work of separation. The other mechanism is a more brittle-like mode in which a crack propagates across the base of the asperity (slightly below the asperity/substrate junction) leading to most of the asperity on one surface or the other after separation and a slight depression facing this asperity on the opposing surface. This failure mode corresponds to a smaller work of separation. This failure mode corresponds to a smaller work of separation. Furthermore, contacts made from materials that exhibit predominantly brittle-like behavior will tend to require lower work of separation than those made from ductile-like contact materials.

  14. Binaries Traveling through a Gaseous Medium: Dynamical Drag Forces and Internal Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Chametla, Raul O.

    2014-10-01

    Using time-dependent linear theory, we investigate the morphology of the gravitational wake induced by a binary, whose center of mass moves at velocity {\\boldsymbol {V}}_cm against a uniform background of gas. For simplicity, we assume that the components of the binary are on circular orbits about their common center of mass. The consequences of dynamical friction is twofold. First, gas dynamical friction may drag the center of mass of the binary and cause the binary to migrate. Second, drag forces also induce a braking torque, which causes the orbits of the components of the binary to shrink. We compute the drag forces acting on one component of the binary due to the gravitational interaction with its own wake. We show that the dynamical friction force responsible for decelerating the center of mass of the binary is smaller than it is in the point-mass case because of the loss of gravitational focusing. We show that the braking internal torque depends on the Mach numbers of each binary component about their center of mass, and also on the Mach number of the center of mass of the binary. In general, the internal torque decreases with increasing the velocity of the binary relative to the ambient gas cloud. However, this is not always the case. We also mention the relevance of our results to the period distribution of binaries.

  15. Binaries traveling through a gaseous medium: dynamical drag forces and internal torques

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Chametla, Raul O.

    2014-10-20

    Using time-dependent linear theory, we investigate the morphology of the gravitational wake induced by a binary, whose center of mass moves at velocity V{sub cm} against a uniform background of gas. For simplicity, we assume that the components of the binary are on circular orbits about their common center of mass. The consequences of dynamical friction is twofold. First, gas dynamical friction may drag the center of mass of the binary and cause the binary to migrate. Second, drag forces also induce a braking torque, which causes the orbits of the components of the binary to shrink. We compute the drag forces acting on one component of the binary due to the gravitational interaction with its own wake. We show that the dynamical friction force responsible for decelerating the center of mass of the binary is smaller than it is in the point-mass case because of the loss of gravitational focusing. We show that the braking internal torque depends on the Mach numbers of each binary component about their center of mass, and also on the Mach number of the center of mass of the binary. In general, the internal torque decreases with increasing the velocity of the binary relative to the ambient gas cloud. However, this is not always the case. We also mention the relevance of our results to the period distribution of binaries.

  16. Theoretical microbubble dynamics in a viscoelastic medium at capillary breaching thresholds.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brandon; Miller, Douglas L; Johnsen, Eric

    2012-12-01

    In order to predict bioeffects in contrast-enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound procedures, the dynamics of cavitation microbubbles in viscoelastic media must be determined. For this theoretical study, measured 1.5 to 7.5 MHz pulse pressure waveforms, which were used in experimental determinations of capillary breaching thresholds for contrast-enhanced diagnostic ultrasound in a rat kidney, were used to calculate cavitation nucleated from contrast agent microbubbles. A numerical model for cavitation in tissue was developed based on the Keller-Miksis equation (a compressible extension of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for spherical bubble dynamics), with a Kelvin-Voigt constitutive relation. From this model, the bubble dynamics corresponding to the experimentally obtained capillary breaching thresholds were determined. Values of the maximum radius and temperature corresponding to previously determined bioeffect thresholds were computed for a range of ultrasound pulses and bubble sizes for comparison to inertial cavitation threshold criteria. The results were dependent on frequency, the gas contents, and the tissue elastic properties. The bioeffects thresholds were above previously determined inertial cavitation thresholds, even for the tissue models, suggesting the possibility of a more complex dosimetry for capillary injury in tissue. PMID:23231107

  17. Helium atom surface scattering apparatus for studies of crystalline surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safron, S. A.; Skofronick, J. G.

    The primary goal of this grant was the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom-surface spectroscopy (HASS) scattering instrument capable of determining both structure and dynamics of metal, insulator and semiconductor surfaces. The method measures the elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms from the crystal surface as a function of angle and energy gains or losses. The project was begun on May 1, 1985, and this report covers the progress from inception to present. The nozzle beam has been characterized, both before and after scattering from a LiF crystal surface, and angular distributions from this surface have also been taken. In addition to the specular and Bragg peaks, fine structure between the peaks is shown to be due to various inelastic collision processes reported previously. Current efforts are to measure the inelastic processes by time-of-flight methods so as to repeat the previous surface dispersion measurements.

  18. BDNF contributes to both rapid and homeostatic alterations in AMPA receptor surface expression in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeremy M.; Loweth, Jessica A.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in plasticity at glutamate synapses and the effects of repeated cocaine exposure. We recently showed that intracranial injection of BDNF into the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key region for cocaine addiction, rapidly increases AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. To further characterize BDNF’s role in both rapid AMPAR trafficking and slower, homeostatic changes in AMPAR surface expression, we investigated the effects of acute (30 min) and long-term (24 h) treatment with BDNF on AMPAR distribution in NAc medium spiny neurons from postnatal rats co-cultured with mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons to restore excitatory inputs. Immunocytochemical studies showed that acute BDNF treatment increased cell surface GluA1 and GluA2 levels, as well as their co-localization, on NAc neurons. This effect of BDNF, confirmed using a protein crosslinking assay, was dependent on ERK but not AKT signaling. In contrast, long-term BDNF treatment decreased AMPAR surface expression on NAc neurons. Based on this latter result, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF plays a role in AMPAR “scaling down” in response to a prolonged increase in neuronal activity produced by bicuculline (24 h). Supporting this hypothesis, decreasing BDNF signaling with the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented the scaling down of GluA1 and GluA2 surface levels in NAc neurons normally produced by bicuculline. In conclusion, BDNF exerts bidirectional effects on NAc AMPAR surface expression, depending on duration of exposure. Furthermore, BDNF’s involvement in synaptic scaling in the NAc differs from its previously described role in the visual cortex. PMID:24712995

  19. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution. PMID:25982895

  20. Sodium diffusion through amorphous silica surfaces: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Rarivomanantsoa, Michaël; Jund, Philippe; Jullien, Rémi

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the diffusion inside the silica network of sodium atoms initially located outside the surfaces of an amorphous silica film. We have focused our attention on structural and dynamical quantities, and we have found that the local environment of the sodium atoms is close to the local environment of the sodium atoms inside bulk sodo-silicate glasses obtained by quench. This is in agreement with recent experimental results. PMID:15267353

  1. Dynamic optometer. [for electronic recording of human lens anterior surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    A dynamic optometer that electronically records the position of the anterior surface of the human lens is described. The geometrical optics of the eye and optometer, and the scattering of light from the lens, are closely examined to determine the optimum conditions for adjustment of the instrument. The light detector and associated electronics are also considered, and the operating conditions for obtaining the best signal-to-noise ratio are determined.

  2. Characterizing the spatial dynamics of land surface temperature-impervious surface fraction relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiong; Qingming, Zhan; Guo, Huagui; Jin, Zhicheng

    2016-03-01

    The land surface temperature (LST) pattern is treated as one of the primary indications of environmental impacts of land cover change. Researchers continue to explore the potential contribution of land surface to temperature rising. The LST-land surface relationship is dynamic and varies spatially. Based upon the previous studies, this research assumes that such dynamics is manifested at two levels: (1) the phenomenon level, and (2) its formation mechanism level. The research presents a workflow of exploring such dynamics at both levels. The variogram of the phenomenon and multi-scale analysis of the LST-land surface relationship are mutually interpreted. In the case study of Wuhan, China, the variogram of the LST indicates that the operational scale of the phenomenon is 500-650 m. It suggests the optimal scale to inspect the LST and its cause in the study area. This finding is verified and further inspected through multi-scale analysis of the LST-Impervious Surface Fraction (ISF) relationship at the formation mechanism level. The research also employs the Spatial Autocorrelation model to show how the ISF impacts the LST through scales. A flexible autocorrelation weight matrix is proposed and implemented in the model. The parameters of the model exhibit the thermal sensitivity of land surface and again represent the scale features. The Ordinary Least Square regression is used as the benchmark. Several implications are discussed.

  3. Improvement of xylanase production by Aspergillus niger XY-1 using response surface methodology for optimizing the medium composition*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yao-xing; Li, Yan-li; Xu, Shao-chun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Xin; Tang, Jiang-wu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the optimal medium composition for xylanase production by Aspergillus niger XY-1 in solid-state fermentation (SSF). Methods: Statistical methodology including the Plackett-Burman design (PBD) and the central composite design (CCD) was employed to investigate the individual crucial component of the medium that significantly affected the enzyme yield. Results: Firstly, NaNO3, yeast extract, urea, Na2CO3, MgSO4, peptone and (NH4)2SO4 were screened as the significant factors positively affecting the xylanase production by PBD. Secondly, by valuating the nitrogen sources effect, urea was proved to be the most effective and economic nitrogen source for xylanase production and used for further optimization. Finally, the CCD and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied to determine the optimal concentration of each significant variable, which included urea, Na2CO3 and MgSO4. Subsequently a second-order polynomial was determined by multiple regression analysis. The optimum values of the critical components for maximum xylanase production were obtained as follows: x 1 (urea)=0.163 (41.63 g/L), x 2 (Na2CO3)=−1.68 (2.64 g/L), x 3 (MgSO4)=1.338 (10.68 g/L) and the predicted xylanase value was 14374.6 U/g dry substrate. Using the optimized condition, xylanase production by Aspergillus niger XY-1 after 48 h fermentation reached 14637 U/g dry substrate with wheat bran in the shake flask. Conclusion: By using PBD and CCD, we obtained the optimal composition for xylanase production by Aspergillus niger XY-1 in SSF, and the results of no additional expensive medium and shortened fermentation time for higher xylanase production show the potential for industrial utilization. PMID:18600786

  4. 3D precision surface measurement by dynamic structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Ernest A.; Magee, Michael J.; Mitchell, Joseph N.; Rigney, Michael P.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes a 3-D imaging technique developed as an internal research project at Southwest Research Institute. The technique is based on an extension of structured light methods in which a projected pattern of parallel lines is rotated over the surface to be measured. A sequence of images is captured and the surface elevation at any location can then be determined from measurements of the temporal pattern, at any point, without considering any other points on the surface. The paper describes techniques for system calibration and surface measurement based on the method of projected quadric shells. Algorithms were developed for image and signal analysis and computer programs were written to calibrate the system and to calculate 3-D coordinates of points on a measured surface. A prototype of the Dynamic Structured Light (DSL) 3-D imaging system was assembled and typical parts were measured. The design procedure was verified and used to implement several different configurations with different measurement volumes and measurement accuracy. A small-parts measurement accuracy of 32 micrometers (.0012") RMS was verified by measuring the surface of a precision-machined plane. Large aircraft control surfaces were measured with a prototype setup that provided .02" depth resolution over a 4" by 8" field of view. Measurement times are typically less than three minutes for 300,000 points. A patent application has been filed.

  5. Planation surfaces as a record of medium to large wavelength deformation: the example of the Lake Albert Rift (Uganda) on the East African Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendan, Simon; François, Guillocheau; Cécile, Robin; Jean, Braun; Olivier, Dauteuil; Massimo, Dall'Asta

    2016-04-01

    African relief is characterized by planation surfaces, some of them of continental scale. These surfaces are slightly deformed according to different wavelengths (x10 km; x100 km, x1000 km) which record both mantle dynamics (very long wavelength, x 1000 km) and lithosphere deformation (long wavelength deformation, x 100 km). Different types of these planation surfaces are recognized: - Etchplains capped by iron-duricrust which correspond to erosional nearly flat weathered surfaces resulting from the growth of laterites under warm and humid conditions. - Pediments which define mechanical erosional surfaces with concave or rectilinear profiles delimited by upslope scarps connected upstream with the upper landforms. We here focused on the Lake Albert Rift at the northern termination of the western branch of the East African Rift System of which the two branches are surimposed on the East-African Dome. Different wavelengths of deformation were characterized based on the 3D mapping of stepped planation surfaces: (1) very long wavelength deformations resulting from the uplift of the East African Dome; (2) long wavelength deformations resulting from the opening of the eastern branch and (3) medium wavelength deformations represented by the uplift of rift shoulders like the Rwenzori Mountains. The paleo-landscape reconstruction of Uganda shows the existence of four generations of landforms dated according to their geometrical relationships with volcanic rocks. A four stepped evolution of the Ugandan landforms is proposed: • 70 - 22 Ma: generation of two weathered planation surfaces (etchplain Uw and Iw). The upper one (Uw) records a very humid period culminating at time of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (70-45 Ma). It corresponds to the African Surface. A first uplift of the East African Dome generates a second lower planation surface (Iw) connected to the Atlantic Ocean base level; • 17-2.7 Ma: planation of large pediplains connected to the local base level induced

  6. A Method for Molecular Dynamics on Curved Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paquay, Stefan; Kusters, Remy

    2016-03-29

    Dynamics simulations of constrained particles can greatly aid in understanding the temporal and spatial evolution of biological processes such as lateral transport along membranes and self-assembly of viruses. Most theoretical efforts in the field of diffusive transport have focused on solving the diffusion equation on curved surfaces, for which it is not tractable to incorporate particle interactions even though these play a crucial role in crowded systems. We show here that it is possible to take such interactions into account by combining standard constraint algorithms with the classical velocity Verlet scheme to perform molecular dynamics simulations of particles constrained to an arbitrarily curved surface. Furthermore, unlike Brownian dynamics schemes in local coordinates, our method is based on Cartesian coordinates, allowing for the reuse of many other standard tools without modifications, including parallelization through domain decomposition. We show that by applying the schemes to the Langevin equation for various surfaces, we obtain confined Brownian motion, which has direct applications to many biological and physical problems. Finally we present two practical examples that highlight the applicability of the method: 1) the influence of crowding and shape on the lateral diffusion of proteins in curved membranes; and 2) the self-assembly of a coarse-grained virus capsid protein model. PMID:27028633

  7. Structure, dynamics, and surface reactions of bioactive glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Todd R.

    Three bioactive glasses (45S5, 55S4.3, and 60S3.8) have been investigated using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations in attempt to explain differences in observed macroscopic bioactivity. Bulk and surface structures and bulk dynamics have been characterized. Ion exchange and hydrolysis reactions, the first two stages in Hench's model describing the reactions of bioactive glass surfaces in vivo, have been investigated in detail. The 45S5 composition shows a much greater network fragmentation: it is suggested that this fragmentation can play a role in at least the first two stages of Hench's model for HCA formation on the surfaces of bioactive glasses. In terms of dynamic behavior, long-range diffusion was only observed for sodium. Calcium showed only jumps between adjacent sites, while phosphorus showed only local vibrations. Surface simulations show the distinct accumulation of sodium at the immediate surface for each composition. Surface channels are also shown to exist and are most evident for 45S5 glass. Results for a single ion exchange showed that the ion-exchange reaction is preferred (more exothermic) for Na+ ions near Si, rather than P. A range of reaction energies were found, due to a range of local environments, as expected for a glass surface. The average reaction energies are not significantly different among the three glass compositions. The results for bond hydrolysis on as-created surfaces show no significant differences among the three compositions for simulations involving Si-O-Si or Si-O-P. All average values are greater than zero, indicating endothermic reactions that are not favorable by themselves. However, it is shown that the hydrolysis reactions became more favorable (in fact, exothermic for 45S5 and 55S4.3) when simulated on surfaces that had already been ion-exchanged. This is significant because it gives evidence supporting Hench's proposed reaction sequence. Perhaps even more significantly, the reaction energies for hydrolysis

  8. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaokang Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12 μm{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  9. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  10. Rigorous theoretical analysis of a surface-plasmon nanolaser with monolayer MoS2 gain medium.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiang; Grote, Richard R; Jin, Wencan; Dadap, Jerry I; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Osgood, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    Lasers based on monolayer (ML) transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductor crystals have the potential for low threshold operation and a small device footprint; however, nanophotonic engineering is required to maximize the interaction between the optical fields and the three-atom-thick gain medium. Here, we develop a theoretical model to design a direct bandgap optically pumped nanophotonic integrated laser. Our device utilizes a gap-surface-plasmon optical mode to achieve subwavelength optical confinement and consists of a high-index GaP nanowire atop an ML MoS2 film on an Ag substrate. The optical field and material medium are analyzed using a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain method and a first-principles calculation based on the density functional theory, respectively. The nanolaser is designed to have a threshold of ∼0.6  μW under quasi-continuous wave operation on an excitonic transition at room temperature. PMID:27244433

  11. Electric field-mediated growth of osteoblasts - the significant impact of dynamic flow of medium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Nune, K C; Misra, R D K

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous electric field plays an important role in accomplishing various functions including communication with the brain and with different parts of the physiological system, wound healing, and cellular functions. Furthermore, the endogenous electric field can be modified using the external electric field to induce changes in cell functionality. Given that the cells grow in contact with the dynamic flow of blood and nutrients, the objective of the study is to elucidate the effect of media flow (dynamic conditions) on osteoblast functions at a pulsed DC (direct current) electric field of strength of 0.5-1 V cm(-1) and compared with the static conditions (no flow of media and in the presence of an electric field). The electric field provided a guiding cue to cells to move towards the cathode. An interesting aspect of the electric field was the migration of cells towards the cathode with the axis parallel to the direction of the electric field such that the lamellipodia was aligned. Furthermore, there was an absence of membrane blebbing or necrosis at the cathode. However, cell growth and expression of proteins (actin and vinculin) were higher than the anode. In contrast, at the anode, while the cells were healthy, the cell growth was less such that the expression of vinculin was relatively low together with less densely packed actin stress fibers. It is underscored that the biological functionality is favorably altered in the presence of an electrical field under dynamic conditions with a consequent effect on cell proliferation, growth, and expression level of prominent proteins, actin and vinculin. PMID:26465881

  12. Interactions between surface roughness and airflow turbulence affecting drying dynamics of rough porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Evaporative drying of porous surfaces interacting with turbulent airflows is common in various industrial and natural applications. The intrinsic relief and roughness of natural porous surfaces are likely to influence the structure of interacting turbulent airflow boundary layers, and thus affect rates and patterns of heat and vapor fluxes from the surface. These links have been formalized in new mechanistic models that consider intermittent and localized turbulence-induced boundary layers, resulting in rich surface evaporation and energy exchange dynamics. The models were evaluated experimentally by systematically varying surface roughness elements in drying experiments of wavy and bluff-body covered sand surfaces in a wind tunnel. Thermal infrared signatures of localized evaporative fluxes as well as mean evaporative mass losses were recorded. The resulting patterns were in good agreement with model predictions for local and surface averaged turbulent exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that evaporative water losses from wavy sand surfaces can be either enhanced or suppressed (relative to a flat surface), due to the complex interplay between the local boundary layer thickness and internal limitations on water flow to the evaporating surface. For sand surfaces covered by isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies), model predictions and measurements show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces compared to a flat surface under similar conditions. This enhancement is attributed to the formation of vortices that thin the boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. The implications of this study for interpreting and upscaling evapotranspiration rates from terrestrial surfaces will be discussed.

  13. Dynamics of a liquid drop in porous medium saturated by another liquid under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, A. O.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    The work deals with numerical simulations of settling or ascension process of a liquid drop in porous media saturated by another liquid. The calculations were carried out using the Darcy model by Level set method with adaptive mesh refinement algorithm that dynamically refines computational mesh near interface. It is shown that the drop is unstable and the finger instability develops at the forefront of moving drop for any ratio of the viscosities of liquids. Under modulated pressure gradient small-scale perturbations of interface are suppressed and in the case of modulation with large enough intensity drop becomes stable.

  14. Microscopic analysis of non-equilibrium dynamics in the semiconductor-laser gain medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2014-04-14

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to analyze the carrier dynamics in situations where a strong sub-picosecond pulse interacts with an inverted semiconductor quantum well. Electron-electron and electron-phonon scatterings are calculated on a second Born-Markov level. Intra-subband scatterings on a scale of tens of femtoseconds are shown to quickly re-fill the kinetic holes created in the carrier distributions during the pulse amplification. Even for sub-100 fs pulses, this significantly influences the pulse amplification as well as its spectral dependence. Interband scatterings on a few picosecond timescale limit the possibly achievable repetition rate in pulsed semiconductor lasers.

  15. Comparison of meteor and medium frequency radar kilometer scale MLT dynamics at 70°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. M.; Aso, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Nozawa, S.; Meek, C. E.; Manson, A. H.

    2006-02-01

    Kinetic energy dissipation rates for the auroral MLT have been obtained from the Tromsø middle frequency radar (MFR) and compared with simultaneous measurements of neutral wind-shears obtained from the Nippon/Norway Tromsø meteor radar (NTMR). Since wind-shears can drive dynamic instabilities which in turn result in turbulent dissipation of kinetic energy, we would expect these parameters to be correlated, and this is indeed the case. Having established this correlation we quantitatively combine the results from each radar to estimate the turbulent diffusion coefficient for momentum; considering the tentative nature of this approach, we find the agreement with previous estimates to be surprisingly good.

  16. Multi-Scale Dynamics From Earth's Surface into the Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, David

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric structures ranging from very small scales near Earth's surface to much larger scales in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) appear to exhibit common features and underlying dynamics. Above the turbopause at ~110 km, kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity largely suppress flow instabilities leading to turbulence. Below the turbopause, however, multi-scale dynamics appear to drive systematic transfers of energy both among quasi-two-dimensional (2D) motions at larger scales and to three-dimensional (3D) instabilities and turbulence at smaller scales. Such multi-scale dynamics arise due to superposed GWs and background wind shears and readily drive local layered structures comprising thinner, strongly stratified and sheared "sheets" and thicker, weakly stratified and sheared "layers". These environments initiate various types of instabilities that yield local turbulence and mixing that contribute to maintenance of the "sheet and layer" (S&L) structures. Idealized modeling of these dynamics describe many S&L flow, instability, and turbulence features that are confirmed by observations from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere. Similar dynamics accompany larger-scale gravity waves that encounter variable stratification and shear, and that induce strong local body forces, throughout the atmosphere.

  17. Dynamics of the correlation between polar cap radio absorption and solar energetic proton fluxes in the interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Knudsen, D. J.; Donovan, E. F.; Spanswick, E.

    2014-03-01

    During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, large fluxes of energetic particles spreading throughout the interplanetary medium (IPM) have access to the upper polar atmosphere where they play important roles in physical and chemical processes. We examine the dynamics of the relation between solar energetic proton (SEP) fluxes detected outside the magnetosphere by SOHO, at geosynchronous orbit by GOES 8, and in low earth orbit by NOAA 15 (POES) satellites on one hand, and ionospheric absorption measured by a NORSTAR riometer in the polar cap on the other. We attempt to isolate SEP-related signals by rejecting periods influenced by electron precipitation and solar radio bursts. Under these conditions we find R2of up to 0.9 between the logarithms of SEP flux and absorption for all satellites, but with the additional restriction to periods beginning 10 h after event onsets and within tens of hours following times of maximum flux. We find that the flux-absorption correlation is poor during the first few hours of an event, which we attribute to the fact that SEP angular distributions are often highly peaked along the interplanetary magnetic field during the early stages of an event. Such highly anisotropic distributions map to small regions inside the polar caps, making it unlikely that the corresponding absorption signal will be detected by a single riometer. These observations suggest that riometers in combination with a suitable numerical tool can be used as a diagnostic of properties of energetic proton populations in the interplanetary medium.

  18. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam {sup 7}Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzocco, M. Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Lay, J. A.; Molini, P.; Soramel, F.; Boiano, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Di Meo, P.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Silvestri, R.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Acosta, L.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam {sup 7}Be (S{sub α} = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass ({sup 58}Ni) and heavy ({sup 208}Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×10{sup 5} pps {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  19. Waves on the surface of a boiling liquid at various medium stratifications

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkevich, O. A.

    2015-08-15

    The stability of relatively small perturbations of the stationary state consisting of a plane liquid layer and a vapor film is studied when no liquid evaporation or vapor condensation occurs in the stationary state. In this case, heat from a hot to cold wall is removed through a vapor–liquid layer via heat conduction. The boundary conditions that take into account liquid evaporation (appearance of a mass flux) at the vapor–liquid phase surface and the temperature dependence of the saturation pressure are derived. Dispersion equations are obtained. The wave processes for the stable (light vapor under a liquid layer) and unstable stratifications of the phases at rest and during their relative motion are studied. The deformation of the phase boundary results in liquid evaporation, changes in the boiling temperature and the saturation pressure, and generation of weakly damped low-amplitude waves of a new type. These waves ensure the stability of a vapor film under a liquid layer at rest or a liquid layer moving at a constant velocity in the gravity field. The velocities of these waves are much higher than the gravity wave velocities. The critical heat flows and wavelengths at which wave boiling regimes at normal pressure can exist are determined, and the calculated and experimental data are compared.

  20. Waves on the surface of a boiling liquid at various medium stratifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkevich, O. A.

    2015-08-01

    The stability of relatively small perturbations of the stationary state consisting of a plane liquid layer and a vapor film is studied when no liquid evaporation or vapor condensation occurs in the stationary state. In this case, heat from a hot to cold wall is removed through a vapor-liquid layer via heat conduction. The boundary conditions that take into account liquid evaporation (appearance of a mass flux) at the vapor-liquid phase surface and the temperature dependence of the saturation pressure are derived. Dispersion equations are obtained. The wave processes for the stable (light vapor under a liquid layer) and unstable stratifications of the phases at rest and during their relative motion are studied. The deformation of the phase boundary results in liquid evaporation, changes in the boiling temperature and the saturation pressure, and generation of weakly damped low-amplitude waves of a new type. These waves ensure the stability of a vapor film under a liquid layer at rest or a liquid layer moving at a constant velocity in the gravity field. The velocities of these waves are much higher than the gravity wave velocities. The critical heat flows and wavelengths at which wave boiling regimes at normal pressure can exist are determined, and the calculated and experimental data are compared.

  1. Effects of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Growth Medium on Lipid Composition and on Physicochemical Surface Properties of Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kankaanpää, P.; Yang, B.; Kallio, H.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Most probiotic lactobacilli adhere to intestinal surfaces, a phenomenon influenced by free polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The present study investigated whether free linoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, α-linolenic acid, or docosahexaenoic acid in the growth medium alters the fatty acid composition of lactobacilli and their physical characteristics. The most abundant bacterial fatty acids identified were oleic, vaccenic, and dihydrosterculic acids. PUFA, especially conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers and γ-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and α-linolenic acids, also were identified in lactobacilli. When lactobacilli were cultured in MRS broth supplemented with various free PUFA, the incorporation of a given PUFA into bacterial fatty acids was clearly observed. Moreover, PUFA supplementation also resulted in PUFA-dependent changes in the proportions of other fatty acids; major interconversions were seen in octadecanoic acids (18:1), their methylenated derivatives (19:cyc), and CLA. Intermittent changes in eicosapentaenoic acid proportions also were noted. These results were paralleled by minor changes in the hydrophilic or hydrophobic characteristics of lactobacilli, suggesting that PUFA interfere with microbial adhesion to intestinal surfaces through other mechanisms. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that free PUFA in the growth medium induce changes in bacterial fatty acids in relation to the regulation of the degree of fatty acid unsaturation, cyclization, and proportions of CLA and PUFA containing 20 to 22 carbons. The potential role of lactobacilli as regulators of PUFA absorption may represent another means by which probiotics could redirect the delicate balance of inflammatory mediators derived from PUFA within the inflamed intestine. PMID:14711634

  2. Viscoplasticity with dynamic yield surface coupled to damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Runesson, K.

    1997-07-01

    A formulation of viscoplasticity theory, with kinetic coupling to damage, is presented. The main purpose is to describe rate-dependent material behavior and failure processes, including creep-rupture (for constant load) and creep-fatigue (for cyclic load). The Duvaut-Lions' formulation of viscoplasticity is adopted with quite general hardening of the quasistatic yield surface. The formulation is thermodynamically consistent, i.e. the dissipation inequality is satisfied. Like in the classical viscoplasticity formulations, the rate-independent response is activated at a very small loading rate. In addition, an (unconventional) dynamic yield surface is introduced, and this is approached asymptotically at infinite loading rate. Explicit constitutive relations are established for a quasistatic yield surface of von Mises type with nonlinear hardening. The resulting model is assessed for a variety of loading situations.

  3. Surface nanobubble nucleation dynamics during water-ethanol exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Water-ethanol exchange has been a promising nucleation method for surface attached nanobubbles since their discovery. In this process, water and ethanol displace each other sequentially on a substrate. As the gas solubility is 36 times higher in ethanol than water, it was suggested that the exchange process leads to transient supersaturation and is responsible for the nanobubble nucleation. In this work, we visualize the nucleation dynamics by controllably mixing water and ethanol. It depicts the temporal evolution of the conventional exchange in a single field of view, detailing the conditions for surface nanobubble nucleation and the flow field that influences their spatial organization. This technique can also pattern surface nanobubbles with variable size distribution.

  4. Apparatus and Method for Focusing a Light Beam in a Three-Dimensional Recording Medium by a Dynamic Holographic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for reading and/or writing information or to from an optical recording medium having a plurality of information storage layers. The apparatus includes a dynamic holographic optical element configured to focus light on the optical recording medium. a control circuit arranged to supply a drive signal to the holographic optical element, and a storage device in communication with the control circuit and storing at least a first drive signal and a second drive signal. The holographic optical element focusses light on a first one of the plurality of information storage layers when driven by the first drive signal on a second one of the plurality of information storage layers when driven by the second drive signal. An optical switch is also disclosed for connecting at least one light source in a source array to at least one light receiver in a receiver array. The switch includes a dynamic holographic optical element configured to receive light from the source array and to transmit light to the receiver array, a control circuit arranged to supply a drive signal to the holographic optical element, and a storage device in communication with the control circuit and storing at least a first drive signal and a second drive signal. The holographic optical element connects a first light source in the source array to a first light receiver in the receiver array when driven by the first drive signal and the holographic optical element connects the first light source with the first light receiver and a second light receiver when driven by the second drive signal.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Glycerol Monooleate Confined between Mica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Shaw, Joshua L; Camp, Philip J; Dowding, Peter J; Lewtas, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The structure and frictional properties of glycerol monooleate (GMO) in organic solvents, with and without water impurity, confined and sheared between two mica surfaces are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of the fluid is characterized in various ways, and the differences between systems with nonaggregated GMO and with preformed GMO reverse micelles are examined. Preformed reverse micelles are metastable under static conditions in all systems. In n-heptane under shear conditions, with or without water, preformed GMO reverse micelles remain intact and adsorb onto one surface or another, becoming surface micelles. In dry toluene, preformed reverse micelles break apart under shear, while in the presence of water, the reverse micelles survive and become surface micelles. In all systems under static and shear conditions, nonaggregated GMO adsorbs onto both surfaces with roughly equal probability. Added water is strongly associated with the GMO, irrespective of shear or the form of the added GMO. In all cases, with increasing shear rate, the GMO molecules flatten on the surface, and the kinetic friction coefficient increases. Under low-shear conditions, the friction is insensitive to the form of the GMO added, whereas the presence of water is found to lead to a small reduction in friction. Under high-shear conditions, the presence of reverse micelles leads to a significant reduction in friction, whereas the presence of water increases the friction in n-heptane and decreases the friction in toluene. PMID:27429247

  6. Spreading dynamics of droplet on an inclined surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chaoqun; Yu, Cheng; Chen, Yongping

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady theoretical model of droplet spreading process on an inclined surface is developed and numerically analyzed to investigate the droplet spreading dynamics via the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The contact line motion and morphology evolution for the droplet spreading on an inclined surface, which are, respectively, represented by the advancing/receding spreading factor and droplet wetted length, are evaluated and analyzed. The effects of surface wettability and inclination on the droplet spreading behaviors are examined. The results indicate that, dominated by gravity and capillarity, the droplet experiences a complex asymmetric deformation and sliding motion after the droplet comes into contact with the inclined surfaces. The droplet firstly deforms near the solid surface and mainly exhibits a radial expansion flow in the start-up stage. An evident sliding-down motion along the inclination is observed in the middle stage. And the surface-tension-driven retraction occurs during the retract stage. Increases in inclination angle and equilibrium contact angle lead to a faster droplet motion and a smaller wetted area. In addition, increases in equilibrium contact angle lead to a shorter duration time of the middle stage and an earlier entry into the retract stage.

  7. An On-the-Fly Surface-Hopping Program JADE for Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics of Polyatomic Systems: Implementation and Applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Likai; Lan, Zhenggang

    2015-04-14

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations have rapidly become an indispensable tool for understanding ultrafast photochemical processes in complex systems. Here, we present our recently developed on-the-fly nonadiabatic dynamics package, JADE, which allows researchers to perform nonadiabatic excited-state dynamics simulations of polyatomic systems at an all-atomic level. The nonadiabatic dynamics is based on Tully's surface-hopping approach. Currently, several electronic structure methods (CIS, TDHF, TDDFT(RPA/TDA), and ADC(2)) are supported, especially TDDFT, aiming at performing nonadiabatic dynamics on medium- to large-sized molecules. The JADE package has been interfaced with several quantum chemistry codes, including Turbomole, Gaussian, and Gamess (US). To consider environmental effects, the Langevin dynamics was introduced as an easy-to-use scheme into the standard surface-hopping dynamics. The JADE package is mainly written in Fortran for greater numerical performance and Python for flexible interface construction, with the intent of providing open-source, easy-to-use, well-modularized, and intuitive software in the field of simulations of photochemical and photophysical processes. To illustrate the possible applications of the JADE package, we present a few applications of excited-state dynamics for various polyatomic systems, such as the methaniminium cation, fullerene (C20), p-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) and its primary amino derivative aminobenzonitrile (ABN), and 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (10-HBQ). PMID:26574348

  8. Spatial patterns of sediment dynamics within a medium-sized watershed over an extreme storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Zhirou

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we quantified spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in a watershed of 311 km2 over an extreme storm event using watershed modeling and statistical analyses. First, we calibrated a watershed model, Dynamic Watershed Simulation Model (DWSM) by comparing the predicted with calculated hydrograph and sedigraph at the outlet for this event. Then we predicted values of event runoff volume (V), peak flow (Qpeak), and two types of event sediment yields for lumped morphological units that contain 42 overland elements and 21 channel segments within the study watershed. Two overland elements and the connected channel segment form a first-order subwatershed, several of which constitute a larger nested subwatershed. Next we examined (i) the relationships between these variables and area (A), precipitation (P), mean slope (S), soil erodibility factor, and percent of crop and pasture lands for all overland elements (i.e., the small spatial scale, SSS), and (ii) those between sediment yield, Qpeak, A, P, and event runoff depth (h) for the first-order and nested subwatersheds along two main creeks of the study watershed (i.e., the larger spatial scales, LSS). We found that at the SSS, sediment yield was nonlinearly well related to A and P, but not Qpeak and h; whereas at the LSS, linear relationships between sediment yield and Qpeak existed, so did the Qpeak-A, and Qpeak-P relationships. This linearity suggests the increased connectivity from the SSS to LSS, which was caused by ignorance of channel processes within overland elements. It also implies that sediment was transported at capacity during the extreme event. So controlling sediment supply from the most erodible overland elements may not efficiently reduce the downstream sediment load.

  9. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL FRICTION OF A CIRCULAR-ORBIT PERTURBER IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2010-12-10

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag forces on, very massive perturbers moving in circular orbits. This work extends our previous studies that explored the cases of low-mass perturbers in circular orbits and massive perturbers on straight-line trajectories. The background medium is assumed to be non-rotating, adiabatic with index 5/3, and uniform with density {rho}{sub 0} and sound speed a{sub 0}. We model the gravitating perturber using a Plummer sphere with mass M{sub p} and softening radius r{sub s} in a uniform circular motion at speed V{sub p} and orbital radius R{sub p} , and run various models with differing R{identical_to}r{sub s}/R{sub p}, M{identical_to}V{sub p}/a{sub 0}, and B{identical_to}GM{sub p}/(a{sub 0}{sup 2}R{sub p}). A quasi-steady density wake of a supersonic model consists of a hydrostatic envelope surrounding the perturber, an upstream bow shock, and a trailing low-density region. The continuous change in the direction of the perturber motion reduces the detached shock distance compared to the linear-trajectory cases, while the orbit-averaged gravity of the perturber gathers the gas toward the center of the orbit, modifying the background preshock density to {rho}{sub 1}{approx}(1+0.46B{sup 1.1}){rho}{sub 0} depending weakly on M. For sufficiently massive perturbers, the presence of a hydrostatic envelope makes the drag force smaller than the prediction of the linear perturbation theory, resulting in F=4{pi}{rho}{sub 1}(GM{sub p})?2/V{sub p}?2 x (0.7{eta}{sub B}?-?1) for {eta}{sub B{identical_to}}B/(M?2-1)>0.1; the drag force for low-mass perturbers with {eta}{sub B}<0.1 agrees well with the linear prediction. The nonlinear drag force becomes independent of R as long as R<{eta}{sub B}/2, which places an upper limit on the perturber size for accurate evaluation of the drag force in numerical simulations.

  10. Dynamical processes of transfer at the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. A.

    This review describes the dynamical processes of transport from, and immediately below, the sea surface, particularly those which involve convergence and the separation of flow, and which result in the renewal of surface water at horizontal scales ranging from millimeters to hundreds of meters. Turbulence at or near the sea surface derives from several processes - breaking waves and the bubbles they may produce, precipitation and spray, Langmuir circulation and thermal convection, and turbulence which is internally generated by shear. Interest in the subject derives from the requirements to predict air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum and gases, to develop climate models, to interpret satellite images of the sea surface, including those of ship wakes, and to predict upper ocean structure, including mixing layer depth, in models of phytoplankton blooms and acoustic propagation. The general effect of subsurface turbulence on the sea surface, and the effects of surfactants, is described, and each process is discussed in turn. Laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have contributed particularly to the understanding of the interaction of vortices and turbulence with the surface and to the consequences of breaking waves. They point to the development of instability in the flow ahead of steep waves carrying parasitic capillary waves, which may contribute to the onset of flow separation on the leading face of the waves and the development of a rotor, or ‘roller’, below the wave crest, shown most clearly in the pattern of streamlines in a frame of reference moving forward with the wave. The conditions near the flow separation line on the wave surface ahead of the rotor may be similar to those produced by vortices approaching a free surface. Detailed observation of breaking waves at sea is lacking, but some progress has been made using acoustics to detect the clouds of subsurface bubbles formed by the larger breakers and the depth to which they penetrate. The

  11. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth differentiate toward neural cells in a medium dynamically cultured with Schwann cells in a series of polydimethylsiloxanes scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wen-Ta; Pan, Yu-Jing

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Schwann cells (SCs) are primary structural and functional cells in the peripheral nervous system. These cells play a crucial role in peripheral nerve regeneration by releasing neurotrophic factors. This study evaluated the neural differentiation potential effects of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in a rat Schwann cell (RSC) culture medium. Approach. SHEDs and RSCs were individually cultured on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold, and the effects of the RSC medium on the SHEDs differentiation between static and dynamic cultures were compared. Main results. Results demonstrated that the SHED cells differentiated by the RSC cultured medium in the static culture formed neurospheres after 7 days at the earliest, and SHED cells formed neurospheres within 3 days in the dynamic culture. These results confirm that the RSC culture medium can induce neurospheres formation, the speed of formation and the number of neurospheres (19.16 folds high) in a dynamic culture was superior to the static culture for 3 days culture. The SHED-derived spheres were further incubated in the RSCs culture medium, these neurospheres continuously differentiated into neurons and neuroglial cells. Immunofluorescent staining and RT-PCR revealed nestin, β-III tubulin, GFAP, and γ-enolase of neural markers on the differentiated cells. Significance. These results indicated that the RSC culture medium can induce the neural differentiation of SHED cells, and can be used as a new therapeutic tool to repair nerve damage.

  12. Evaluation of a coupled model for numerical simulation of a multiphase flow system in a porous medium and a surface fluid.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among atmosphere, water, and groundwater, including saltwater intrusion along coasts. Coupled numerical simulations of such problems must consider both vertical flow between the surface fluid and the porous medium and complicated boundary conditions at their interface. In this study, a numerical simulation method coupling Navier-Stokes equations for surface fluid flow and Darcy equations for flow in a porous medium was developed. Then, the basic ability of the coupled model to reproduce (1) the drawdown of a surface fluid observed in square-pillar experiments, using pillars filled with only fluid or with fluid and a porous medium and (2) the migration of saltwater (salt concentration 0.5%) in the porous medium using the pillar filled with fluid and a porous medium was evaluated. Simulations that assumed slippery walls reproduced well the results with drawdowns of 10-30 cm when the pillars were filled with packed sand, gas, and water. Moreover, in the simulation of saltwater infiltration by the method developed in this study, velocity was precisely reproduced because the experimental salt concentration in the porous medium after saltwater infiltration was similar to that obtained in the simulation. Furthermore, conditions across the boundary between the porous medium and the surface fluid were satisfied in these numerical simulations of square-pillar experiments in which vertical flow predominated. Similarly, the velocity obtained by the simulation for a system coupling flow in surface fluid with that in a porous medium when horizontal flow predominated satisfied the conditions across the boundary. Finally, it was confirmed that the present simulation method was able to simulate a practical-scale surface fluid and porous medium system. All of these numerical simulations, however, required a great deal of

  13. Dynamic Corneal Surface Mapping with Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, S.; Gualini, M. M. S.

    2013-06-01

    In view of the fast advancement in ophthalmic technology and corneal surgery, there is a strong need for the comprehensive mapping and characterization techniques for corneal surface. Optical methods with precision non-contact approaches have been found to be very useful for such bio measurements. Along with the normal mapping approaches, elasticity of corneal surface has an important role in its characterization and needs to be appropriately measured or estimated for broader diagnostics and better prospective surgical results, as it has important role in the post-op corneal surface reconstruction process. Use of normal corneal topographic devices is insufficient for any intricate analysis since these devices operate at relatively moderate resolution. In the given experiment, Pulsed Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry has been utilized along with an excitation mechanism to measure the dynamic response of the sample cornea. A Pulsed ESPI device has been chosen for the study because of its micron-level resolution and other advantages in real-time deformation analysis. A bovine cornea has been used as a sample in the subject experiment. The dynamic response has been taken on a chart recorder and it is observed that it does show a marked deformation at a specific excitation frequency, which may be taken as a characteristic elasticity parameter for the surface of that corneal sample. It was seen that outside resonance conditions the bovine cornea was not that much deformed. Through this study, the resonance frequency and the corresponding corneal deformations are mapped and plotted in real time. In these experiments, data was acquired and processed by FRAMES plus computer analysis system. With some analysis of the results, this technique can help us to refine a more detailed corneal surface mathematical model and some preliminary work was done on this. Such modelling enhancements may be useful for finer ablative surgery planning. After further experimentation

  14. Dynamic response of an array of flexural plates in acoustic medium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Khuri-Yakub, Brutus T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic response of a transducer array made up of circular flexural plates in immersion is analytically calculated. The calculation method includes three steps: (1) the calculation of parallel resonant frequency and the velocity profile of each plate, (2) the calculation of mutual acoustic impedance between the plates, and (3) the calculation of velocity response, including the mechanical and acoustic impedance. The calculation method is validated by both finite element analysis and measurement results of a fabricated capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer. Based on the calculated velocity, the near-field pressure and the near-to-far field radiation patterns are presented. The flexural plate array in immersion displays two modes of operation. At low frequency, the mode shape of the transducer array is similar to that of a suspended plate and, at certain frequencies, two groups of plates move in opposite phase, which results in the cancellation of the average velocity. At high frequency, the mode shape is similar to that of a piston transducer; however, the near-field pressure distribution is similar to that of a resilient disk. PMID:23039426

  15. Dynamic Critical Rainfall-Based Flash Flood Early Warning and Forecasting for Medium-Small Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yang, D.; Hu, J.

    2012-04-01

    China is extremely frequent food disasters hit countries, annual flood season flash floods triggered by rainfall, mudslides, landslides have caused heavy casualties and property losses, not only serious threaten the lives of the masses, but the majority of seriously restricting the mountain hill areas of economic and social development and the people become rich, of building a moderately prosperous society goals. In the next few years, China will focus on prevention and control area in the flash flood disasters initially built "for the surveillance, communications, forecasting, early warning and other non-engineering measure based, non-engineering measures and the combinations of engineering measures," the mitigation system. The latest progresses on global torrential flood early warning and forecasting techniques are reviewed in this paper, and then an early warning and forecasting approach is proposed on the basis of a distributed hydrological model according to dynamic critical rainfall index. This approach has been applied in Suichuanjiang River basin in Jiangxi province, which is expected to provide valuable reference for building a national flash flood early warning and forecasting system as well as control of such flooding.

  16. Rupture of a biomembrane under dynamic surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicout, D. J.; Kats, E.

    2012-03-01

    How long will a fluid membrane vesicle stressed with a steady ramp of micropipette last before rupture? Or conversely, how high should the surface tension be to rupture such a membrane? To answer these challenging questions we developed a theoretical framework that allows for the description and reproduction of dynamic tension spectroscopy (DTS) observations. The kinetics of the membrane rupture under ramps of surface tension is described as a succession of an initial pore formation followed by the Brownian process of the pore radius crossing the time-dependent energy barrier. We present the formalism and a derive (formal) analytical expression of the survival probability describing the fate of the membrane under DTS conditions. Using numerical simulations for the membrane prepared in an initial state with a given distribution of times for pore nucleation, we study the membrane lifetime (or inverse of rupture rate) and distribution of membrane surface tension at rupture as a function of membrane characteristics like pore nucleation rate, the energy barrier to failure, and tension loading rate. It is found that simulations reproduce the main features of DTS experiments, particularly the pore nucleation and pore-size diffusion-controlled limits of membrane rupture dynamics. This approach can be adapted and applied to processes of permeation and pore opening in membranes (electroporation, membrane disruption by antimicrobial peptides, vesicle fusion).

  17. Droplets impact on textured surfaces: Mesoscopic simulation of spreading dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxiang; Chen, Shuo

    2015-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their excellent water-repellent property. In the present study, droplets in the ideal Cassie state were focused on, and a particle-based numerical method, many-body dissipative particle dynamics, was employed to explore the mechanism of droplets impact on textured surfaces. A solid-fluid interaction with three linear weight functions was used to generate different wettability and a simple but efficient method was introduced to compute the contact angle. The simulated results show that the static contact angle is in good agreement with the Cassie-Baxter formula for smaller ∅S and Fa, but more deviation will be produced for larger ∅S and Fa, and it is related to the fact that the Cassie-Baxter theory does not consider the contact angle hysteresis effect in their formula. Furthermore, high impact velocity can induce large contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with larger ∅S and Fa. The typical time-based evolutions of the spreading diameter were simulated, and they were analyzed from an energy transformation viewpoint. These results also show that the dynamical properties of droplet, such as rebounding or pinning, contact time and maximum spreading diameters, largely depend on the comprehensive effects of the material wettability, fraction of the pillars and impact velocities of the droplets.

  18. Sliding bubble dynamics and the effects on surface heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, B.; Robinson, A. J.; Delauré, Y. M. C.; Murray, D. B.

    2012-11-01

    An investigation into the effects of a single sliding air bubble on heat transfer from a submerged, inclined surface has been undertaken. Existing literature has shown that both vapour and gas bubbles can increase heat transfer rates from adjacent heated surfaces. However, the mechanisms involved are complex and dynamic and in some cases poorly understood. The present study utilises high speed, high resolution, infrared thermography and video photography to measure two dimensional surface heat transfer and three dimensional bubble position and shape. This provides a unique insight into the complex interactions at the heated surface. Bubbles of volume 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 ml were released onto a surface inclined at 30 degrees to horizontal. Results confirmed that sliding bubbles can enhance heat transfer rates up to a factor of 9 and further insight was gained about the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. The enhancement effects were observed over large areas and persisted for a long duration with the bubble exhibiting complex shape and path oscillations. It is believed that the periodic wake structure present behind the sliding bubble affects the bubble motion and is responsible for the heat transfer effects observed. The nature of this wake is proposed to be that of a chain of horseshoe vortices.

  19. Unusual wetting dynamics of aqueous surfactant solutions on polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dutschk, Victoria; Sabbatovskiy, Konstantin G; Stolz, Martin; Grundke, Karina; Rudoy, Victor M

    2003-11-15

    Static and dynamic contact angles of aqueous solutions of three surfactants--anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), and nonionic pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C(12)E(5))--were measured in the pre- and micellar concentration ranges on polymer surfaces of different surface free energy. The influence of the degree of substrate hydrophobicity, concentration of the solution, and ionic/nonionic character of surfactant on the drop spreading was investigated. Evaporation losses due to relatively low humidity during measurements were taken into account as well. It was shown that, in contrast to the highly hydrophobic surfaces, contact angles for ionic surfactant solutions on the moderately hydrophobic surfaces strongly depend on time. As far as the nonionic surfactant is considered, it spreads well over all the hydrophobic polymer surfaces used. Moreover, the results obtained indicate that spreading (if it occurs) in the long-time regime is controlled not only by the diffusive transport of surfactant to the expanding liquid-vapor interface. Obviously, another process involving adsorption at the expanding solid-liquid interface (near the three-phase contact line), which goes more slowly than diffusion, has to be active. PMID:14583223

  20. End-to-surface reaction dynamics of a single surface-attached DNA or polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ryan R; Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2010-03-11

    The dynamics of surface-attached polymers play a key role in the operation of a number of biological sensors, yet its current understanding is rather limited. Here we use computer simulations to study the dynamics of a reaction between the free end of a polymer chain and a surface, to which its other end has been attached. We consider two limiting cases, the diffusion-controlled limit, where the reaction is accomplished whenever the free chain end diffuses to within a specified distance from the surface, and the reaction-controlled limit, where slow, intrinsic reaction kinetics rather than diffusion of the chain is rate limiting. In the diffusion-controlled limit, we find that the overall rate scales as N(-b), where N is the number of monomers in the chain and b approximately = 2.2 for excluded volume chains. This value of the scaling exponent b is close to that derived from a simple approximate theory treating the dynamics of the chain end relative to the surface as one-dimensional diffusion in an effective potential. In the reaction-controlled limit, the value of the scaling exponent b is close to 1. We compare our findings with those for the related (and better studied) problem of end-to-end reactions within an unconstrained polymer chain and discuss their implications for electrochemical DNA sensors. PMID:20151703

  1. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  2. Frictional dynamics of viscoelastic solids driven on a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, François P.; Rosso, Alberto; Jagla, E. A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the effect of viscoelastic dynamics on the frictional properties of a (mean-field) spring-block system pulled on a rough surface by an external drive. When the drive moves at constant velocity V , two dynamical regimes are observed: at fast driving, above a critical threshold Vc, the system slides at the drive velocity and displays a friction force with velocity weakening. Below Vc the steady sliding becomes unstable and a stick-slip regime sets in. In the slide-hold-slide driving protocol, a peak of the friction force appears after the hold time and its amplitude increases with the hold duration. These observations are consistent with the frictional force encoded phenomenologically in the rate-and-state equations. Our model gives a microscopical basis for such macroscopic description.

  3. Adaptive integral dynamic surface control of a hypersonic flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam Butt, Waseem; Yan, Lin; Amezquita S., Kendrick

    2015-07-01

    In this article, non-linear adaptive dynamic surface air speed and flight path angle control designs are presented for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible hypersonic flight vehicle. The tracking performance of the control design is enhanced by introducing a novel integral term that caters to avoiding a large initial control signal. To ensure feasibility, the design scheme incorporates magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator commands. The uncertain non-linear functions are approximated by an efficient use of the neural networks to reduce the computational load. A detailed stability analysis shows that all closed-loop signals are uniformly ultimately bounded and the ? tracking performance is guaranteed. The robustness of the design scheme is verified through numerical simulations of the flexible flight vehicle model.

  4. Frictional dynamics of viscoelastic solids driven on a rough surface.

    PubMed

    Landes, François P; Rosso, Alberto; Jagla, E A

    2015-07-01

    We study the effect of viscoelastic dynamics on the frictional properties of a (mean-field) spring-block system pulled on a rough surface by an external drive. When the drive moves at constant velocity V, two dynamical regimes are observed: at fast driving, above a critical threshold V(c), the system slides at the drive velocity and displays a friction force with velocity weakening. Below V(c) the steady sliding becomes unstable and a stick-slip regime sets in. In the slide-hold-slide driving protocol, a peak of the friction force appears after the hold time and its amplitude increases with the hold duration. These observations are consistent with the frictional force encoded phenomenologically in the rate-and-state equations. Our model gives a microscopical basis for such macroscopic description. PMID:26274186

  5. Exo-pectinase production by Bacillus pumilus using different agricultural wastes and optimizing of medium components using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Tepe, Ozlem; Dursun, Arzu Y

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the production of exo-pectinase by Bacillus pumilus using different agricultural wastes was studied. Agricultural wastes containing pectin such as wheat bran, sugar beet pulp, sunflower plate, orange peel, banana peel, apple pomace and grape pomace were tested as substrates, and activity of exo-pectinase was determined only in the mediums containing sugar beet pulp and wheat bran. Then, effects of parameters such as concentrations of solid substrate (wheat bran and sugar beet pulp) (A), ammonium sulphate (B) and yeast extract (C) on the production of exo-pectinase were investigated by response surface methodology. First, wheat bran was used as solid substrate, and it was determined that exo-pectinase activity increased when relatively low concentrations of ammonium sulphate (0.12-0.21% w/v) and yeast extract (0.12-0.3% w/v) and relatively high wheat bran (~5-6% w/v) were used. Then, exo-pectinase production was optimized by response surface methodology using sugar beet pulp as a solid substrate. In comparison to P values of the coefficients, values of not greater than 0.05 of A and B (2) showed that the effect of these process variables in exo-pectinase production was important and that changes done in these variables will alter the enzyme activity. PMID:24819433

  6. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, E.; Wang, J.-C.; Liapis, A. I.

    2010-08-01

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  7. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, E; Wang, J-C; Liapis, A I

    2010-08-28

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  8. Short- and medium-range structure of amorphous zircon from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jincheng; Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Cormack, Alastair N.

    2006-12-18

    We have obtained new insights into the structure of amorphous zircon using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a partial charge model. We present detailed structural characterizations of the simulated high and low density amorphous zircon and compare our results with available neutron diffraction, EXAFS, NMR and other experimental results. The results show that amorphization leads to polymerization of the silicon-oxygen network and the formation of regions rich in zirconium. The average n value of Qn species is 1.6-1.8. A considerable percentage of the oxygen ions (around 20%) have only zirconium in the first coordination shell (free oxygen) in amorphous zircon. The Zr-O bond length (around 2.10?) is shorter and the oxygen coordination number around zirconium smaller (6-7) than those in crystalline zircon, in good agreement with the EXAFS results. The total structure factors of simulated amorphous zircon also agree well with neutron diffraction results. We have examined the effects of the simulation cell size and relative density on the amorphous structure. The general features such as polymerization of silicon-oxygen network and the formation of clustered zirconium rich regions appear to be independent of system size and volume expansion in the range of 11 to 18%. Based on the obtained amorphous zircon structure, experimentally observed lower chemical durability of amorphous zircon compared to its crystalline form can be explained by the existence of the silicon-oxygen networks and zirconium rich regions in amorphous zircon that provides diffusion channels and eases dissolution processes. Battelle operates PNNL for the USDOE

  9. Surface dating of dynamic landforms: young boulders on aging moraines.

    PubMed

    Hallet, B; Putkonen, J

    1994-08-12

    The dating of landforms is crucial to understanding the evolution, history, and stability of landscapes. Cosmogenic isotope analysis has recently been used to determine quantitative exposure ages for previously undatable landform surfaces. A pioneering application of this technique to date moraines illustrated its considerable potential but suggested a chronology partially inconsistent with existing geological data. Consideration of the dynamic nature of landforms and of the ever-present processes of erosion, deposition, and weathering leads to a resolution of this inconsistency and, more generally, offers guidance for realistic interpretation of exposure ages. PMID:17782145

  10. Structure and Dynamics of Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane Confined between Mica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vadhana, V; Ayappa, K G

    2016-03-24

    Using a molecular model for octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to probe the phase state of OMCTS confined between two mica surfaces in equilibrium with a reservoir. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for elevations ranging from 5 to 35 K above the melting point for the OMCTS model used in this study. The Helmholtz free energy is computed for a specific confinement using the two-phase thermodynamic (2PT) method. Analysis of the in-plane pair correlation functions did not reveal signatures of freezing even under an extreme confinement of two layers. OMCTS is found to orient with a wide distribution of orientations with respect to the mica surface, with a distinct preference for the surface parallel configuration in the contact layers. The self-intermediate scattering function is found to decay with increasing relaxation times as the surface separation is decreased, and the two-step relaxation in the scattering function, a signature of glassy dynamics, distinctly evolves as the temperature is lowered. However, even at 5 K above the melting point, we did not observe a freezing transition and the self-intermediate scattering functions relax within 200 ps for the seven-layered confined system. The self-diffusivity and relaxation times obtained from the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts stretched exponential fits to the late α-relaxation exhibit power law scalings with the packing fraction as predicted by mode coupling theory. A distinct discontinuity in the Helmholtz free energy, potential energy, and a sharp change in the local bond order parameter, Q4, was observed at 230 K for a five-layered system upon cooling, indicative of a first-order transition. A freezing point depression of about 30 K was observed for this five-layered confined system, and at the lower temperatures, contact layers were found to be disordered with long-range order present only in the inner layers. These dynamical signatures indicate that

  11. Surface-Specific Laser Matter Interactions and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2010-10-08

    Neutral magnesium atom desorption is induced using infrared and visible femtosecond laser pulses at energies well below the excitation threshold of the bulk material. We find that infrared femtosecond laser excitation of MgO nanocrystalline samples desorbs neutral Mg-atoms with hyperthermal kinetic energies ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 eV, while visible femtosecond excitation desorbs neutral Mg-atoms with thermal kinetic energies ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 eV. The hyperthermal kinetic energy distribution is similar to the distribution observed previously under nanosecond laser excitation in the ultraviolet. The hyperthermal kinetic energy distribution supports the contention that emission is induced predominantly by electron trapping at Mg corner surface sites. The results demonstrate that femtosecond photon pulses can serve as a powerful tool for probing desorption dynamics at surfaces.

  12. Pseudospectral Gaussian quantum dynamics: Efficient sampling of potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, Charles W.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Trajectory-based Gaussian basis sets have been tremendously successful in describing high-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a pseudospectral Gaussian-based method that achieves accurate quantum dynamics using efficient, real-space sampling of the time-dependent basis set. As in other Gaussian basis methods, we begin with a basis set expansion using time-dependent Gaussian basis functions guided by classical mechanics. Unlike other Gaussian methods but characteristic of the pseudospectral and collocation methods, the basis set is tested with N Dirac delta functions, where N is the number of basis functions, rather than using the basis function as test functions. As a result, the integration for matrix elements is reduced to function evaluation. Pseudospectral Gaussian dynamics only requires O ( N ) potential energy calculations, in contrast to O ( N 2 ) evaluations in a variational calculation. The classical trajectories allow small basis sets to sample high-dimensional potentials. Applications are made to diatomic oscillations in a Morse potential and a generalized version of the Henon-Heiles potential in two, four, and six dimensions. Comparisons are drawn to full analytical evaluation of potential energy integrals (variational) and the bra-ket averaged Taylor (BAT) expansion, an O ( N ) approximation used in Gaussian-based dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is competitive with full variational calculations that require a global, analytical, and integrable potential energy surface. Additionally, the BAT breaks down when quantum mechanical coherence is particularly strong (i.e., barrier reflection in the Morse oscillator). The ability to obtain variational accuracy using only the potential energy at discrete points makes the pseudospectral Gaussian method a promising avenue for on-the-fly dynamics, where electronic structure calculations become computationally significant.

  13. Pseudospectral Gaussian quantum dynamics: Efficient sampling of potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heaps, Charles W; Mazziotti, David A

    2016-04-28

    Trajectory-based Gaussian basis sets have been tremendously successful in describing high-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a pseudospectral Gaussian-based method that achieves accurate quantum dynamics using efficient, real-space sampling of the time-dependent basis set. As in other Gaussian basis methods, we begin with a basis set expansion using time-dependent Gaussian basis functions guided by classical mechanics. Unlike other Gaussian methods but characteristic of the pseudospectral and collocation methods, the basis set is tested with N Dirac delta functions, where N is the number of basis functions, rather than using the basis function as test functions. As a result, the integration for matrix elements is reduced to function evaluation. Pseudospectral Gaussian dynamics only requires O(N) potential energy calculations, in contrast to O(N(2)) evaluations in a variational calculation. The classical trajectories allow small basis sets to sample high-dimensional potentials. Applications are made to diatomic oscillations in a Morse potential and a generalized version of the Henon-Heiles potential in two, four, and six dimensions. Comparisons are drawn to full analytical evaluation of potential energy integrals (variational) and the bra-ket averaged Taylor (BAT) expansion, an O(N) approximation used in Gaussian-based dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is competitive with full variational calculations that require a global, analytical, and integrable potential energy surface. Additionally, the BAT breaks down when quantum mechanical coherence is particularly strong (i.e., barrier reflection in the Morse oscillator). The ability to obtain variational accuracy using only the potential energy at discrete points makes the pseudospectral Gaussian method a promising avenue for on-the-fly dynamics, where electronic structure calculations become computationally significant. PMID:27131532

  14. Dynamic growth of slip surfaces in catastrophic landslides

    PubMed Central

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Kim, Sihyun; Puzrin, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    This work considers a landslide caused by the shear band that emerges along the potential slip (rupture) surface. The material above the band slides downwards, causing the band to grow along the slope. This growth may first be stable (progressive), but eventually becomes dynamic (catastrophic). The landslide body acquires a finite velocity before it separates from the substrata. The corresponding initial-boundary value problem for a dynamic shear band is formulated within the framework of Palmer & Rice's (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 332, 527–548. (doi:10.1098/rspa.1973.0040)) approach, which is generalized to the dynamic case. We obtain the exact, closed-form solution for the band velocity and slip rate. This solution assesses when the slope fails owing to a limiting condition near the propagating tip of the shear band. Our results are applicable to both submarine and subaerial landslides of this type. It appears that neglecting dynamic (inertia) effects can lead to a significant underestimation of the slide size, and that the volumes of catastrophic slides can exceed the volumes of progressive slides by nearly a factor of 2. As examples, we consider the Gaviota and Humboldt slides offshore of California, and discuss landslides in normally consolidated sediments and sensitive clays. In particular, it is conceivable that Humboldt slide is unfinished and may still displace a large volume of sediments, which could generate a considerable tsunami. We show that in the case of submarine slides, the effect of water resistance on the shear band dynamics may frequently be limited during the slope failure stage. For a varying slope angle, we formulate a condition of slide cessation. PMID:26997904

  15. PLLA/ZnO nanocomposites: Dynamic surfaces to harness cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Sara; Lizundia, Erlantz; Vilas, José Luis; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the effect of the sequential availability of ZnO nanoparticles, (nanorods of ∼40nm) loaded within a degradable poly(lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix, in cell differentiation. The system constitutes a dynamic surface, in which nanoparticles are exposed as the polymer matrix degrades. ZnO nanoparticles were loaded into PLLA and the system was measured at different time points to characterise the time evolution of the physicochemical properties, including wettability and thermal properties. The micro and nanostructure were also investigated using AFM, SEM and TEM images. Cellular experiments with C2C12 myoblasts show that cell differentiation was significantly enhanced on ZnO nanoparticles-loaded PLLA, as the polymer degrades and the availability of nanoparticles become more apparent, whereas the release of zinc within the culture medium was negligible. Our results suggest PLLA/ZnO nanocomposites can be used as a dynamic system where nanoparticles are exposed during degradation, activating the material surface and driving cell differentiation. PMID:27085047

  16. Dynamical Theory of Charge Transfer Between Complex Atoms and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Basudev; Marston, Brad

    2000-03-01

    An existing dynamical quantum many-body theory of charge transfer(A. V. Onufriev and J. B. Marston, Phys. Rev. B 53), 13340 (1996); J. Merino and J. B. Marston, Phys. Rev. B 58, 6982 (1998). describes atoms with simple s-orbitals, such as alkalis and alkaline-earths, interacting with metal surfaces. The many-body equations of motion (EOM) are developed systematically as an expansion in the number of surface particle-hole excitations. Here we generalize this theory to describe atoms with richer orbital structures, such as atomic oxygen. In the simplest version of the model, only the single-particle p_z-orbitals of the atom, the ones oriented perpendicular to the surface, participate directly in resonant charge transfer as they have the largest overlap with the metallic wavefunctions. However, as the several-electron Russell-Saunders eigenstates, labeled by total angular momenta quantum numbers J, L, and S, are built out of products of single-particle orbitals, non-trivial matrix elements must be incorporated into the many-body EOM's. Comparison to recent experimental results(A. C. Lavery, C. E. Sosolik, and B. H. Cooper, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 157), 42 (1999); A. C. Lavery et al. to appear in Phys. Rev. B. on the scattering of low-energy oxygen ions off Cu(001) surfaces is made.

  17. Dynamic Stereo Display And Interaction With Surfaces Of Medical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Gabor T.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface display is an alternate way of presenting to the physician information that is available in a sequence of two-dimensional CT or MRI scans. The aim is to present organs (or parts of organs) as they would appear if they were removed from the body, possibly cut open, and viewed from user-selected directions. In recent years there have been a number of papers discussing the clinical utility of this approach. In nearly all these papers the presentation of the surface consists of single images of the objects of interest. In these monoscopic images, depth perception is conveyed by the differential shading that is computed as if light were shining on the surface. This is augmented by the silhouette of the external features. Since shading is dependent on the distance from the light source and the angle of the surface to the light rays, these two effects may oppose each other, especially with perception of details in depths of cavities. In addition, the detail inside a cavity cannot be silhouetted at any viewing angle. Since many anatomical surfaces have significant information in the depths of cavities (e.g., orbits, neural foramina, cardiac cavities), the addition of stereoscopic depth perception and motion should be clinically useful. In a recent article, we presented 3D surface displays in stereo, thereby providing an important additional cue for correct 3D depth perception. Here we discuss issues of software and hardware for dynamic stereo display and for 3D interaction with the stereoscopic images.

  18. Effect of Molecular Architecture on Polymer Melt Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Mark

    The dynamics of the thermally stimulated surface height fluctuations in a polymer melt dictate wetting, adhesion, and tribology at that surface. These surface fluctuations can be profoundly altered by tethering of the chains. One type of tethering is the tethering of one part of a molecule to another part of the same molecule. This tethering is found in both long chain branched polymers and in macrocycles. We have studied the surface fluctuations with X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy for melts of well-defined, anionically polymerized polystyrenes of various architectures, including linear, 6 arm star, pom-pom, comb and cyclic architectures. For linear chains, the variation of surface relaxation time with in-plane scattering vector can be fit using a hydrodynamic continuum theory (HCT) of thermally stimulated capillary waves that knows nothing of the chain architecture. Assuming the theory is applicable, apparent viscosities of the films may then be inferred from the XPCS data. For unentangled linear chains, the viscosity inferred from XPCS data in this manner is the same as that measured by conventional bulk rheometry. The HCT does a reasonable job of describing the variation of relaxation time with scattering vector for long branched chains also, but only if a viscosity much larger than that of the bulk is assumed. The discrepancy between the viscosity inferred from surface relaxation times using the HCT and that derived from conventional rheometry grows larger as the bulk Tg is approached and is different for each long chain branched architecture. However, for densely branched combs and cyclic chains different behaviors are found. Acknowledgement: Thanks to NSF (CBET 0730692) and the Advanced Photon Source, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38.

  19. Dynamical Monte Carlo methods for plasma-surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil

    2016-08-01

    Different dynamical Monte Carlo algorithms to investigate molecule formation on surfaces are developed, evaluated and compared with the deterministic approach based on reaction-rate equations. These include a null event algorithm, the n-fold way/BKL algorithm and an ‘hybrid’ variant of the latter. NO2 formation by NO oxidation on Pyrex and O recombination on silica with the formation of O2 are taken as case studies. The influence of the grid size on the CPU calculation time and the accuracy of the results is analysed. The role of Langmuir–Hinsehlwood recombination involving two physisorbed atoms and the effect of back diffusion and its inclusion in a deterministic formulation are investigated and discussed. It is shown that dynamical Monte Carlo schemes are flexible, simple to implement, describe easily elementary processes that are not straightforward to include in deterministic simulations, can run very efficiently if appropriately chosen and give highly reliable results. Moreover, the present approach provides a relatively simple procedure to describe fully coupled surface and gas phase chemistries.

  20. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  1. Deterministic nature of the underlying dynamics of surface wind fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreelekshmi, R. C.; Asokan, K.; Satheesh Kumar, K.

    2012-10-01

    Modelling the fluctuations of the Earth's surface wind has a significant role in understanding the dynamics of atmosphere besides its impact on various fields ranging from agriculture to structural engineering. Most of the studies on the modelling and prediction of wind speed and power reported in the literature are based on statistical methods or the probabilistic distribution of the wind speed data. In this paper we investigate the suitability of a deterministic model to represent the wind speed fluctuations by employing tools of nonlinear dynamics. We have carried out a detailed nonlinear time series analysis of the daily mean wind speed data measured at Thiruvananthapuram (8.483° N,76.950° E) from 2000 to 2010. The results of the analysis strongly suggest that the underlying dynamics is deterministic, low-dimensional and chaotic suggesting the possibility of accurate short-term prediction. As most of the chaotic systems are confined to laboratories, this is another example of a naturally occurring time series showing chaotic behaviour.

  2. Surface Diffusion of Single Polymer Chain Using Molecular Dynamics SIMULATION*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tapan; Keblinski, Pawel; Kumar, Sanat; Granick, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Results of recent experiments on polymer chains adsorbed from dilute solution at solid-liquid interface show the power scaling law dependence of the chain diffusivity, D, as a function of the degree of polymerization, N, D ˜ N^3/2. By contrast, DNA molecules bound to fluid cationic lipid bilayers follows Rouse dynamics with D ˜ N^1. We used molecular dynamics simulations to gain an understanding of these dissimilar scaling behaviors. Our model systems contain chains comprised of N monomers connected by anharmonic springs described by the finite extendible nonlinear elastic, FENE potential, embedded into a solvent of N=1 monomers. Two types of simulations we performed: (i) the chain is confined to two dimensions, (ii) the three dimensional chain in the solvent is confined between two solids plates. With randomly placed impenetrable obstacles on the surface, the diffusion of 2D chains exhibits, D ˜ N^3/2 behavior, when the chain radius of gyration, Rg, is larger than half the distance between obstacles, and D ˜ N^1 for shorter chains. In the presence of an athermal solvent, the scaling exponent is 0.75 due to hydrodynamic forces, for the two-dimensional system. We will also discuss the nature of dynamic adsorption transition and effects of hydrodynamics forces on chain diffusion for the three-dimensional simulations.

  3. Performance of Smagorinsky and dynamic models in near surface turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasseur, James G.; Juneja, Anurag

    1997-11-01

    In LES of high-Reynolds-number wall bounded turbulence such as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), a viscous sublayer either does not exist or is within the first grid cell, and some integral scale motions are necessarily under-resolved at the first few grid locations. Here the subgrid terms dominate the evolution of resolved velocity and the SGS model performance becomes crucial. To develop improved closures for surface layer turbulence (under-resolved and anisotropic), we explore (a) why current SGS closures fail and (b) what needs to be fixed. We evaluate the performance of the Smagorinsky and dynamic models using DNS data from shear- and buoyancy-driven turbulence as a function of filter cutoff location. We find that the underlying assumption of good alignment between the subgrid stress and resolved strain-rate tensors is not correct in general. More importantly, the Smagorinsky model incorrectly predicts a strong preference in the direction of the SGS stress divergence vector, a spurious prediction that is directly related to the anisotropic structure of the resolved turbulence field. This, and its under-estimation of the SGS pressure gradient, are likely sources of the errors observed in LES of the ABL. Whereas the dynamic formulations do a better job predicting some SGS dynamics, the model fails when the filter cutoff is near an integral scale, and predicts unreasonable fluctuation levels-- although performance is sensitive to type of averaging. *supported by ARO grant DAAL03-92-0117.

  4. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  5. Optimization of lipase production on agro-industrial residue medium by Pseudomonas fluorescens (NRLL B-2641) using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Tanyol, Mehtap; Uslu, Gülşad; Yönten, Vahap

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our research was to explore the most cost-efficient and optimal medium composition for the production of lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (NRLL B-2641) culture grown on sunflower oil cake (SuOC) by applying response surface methodology (RSM). The oil cake was used instead of carbon sources. Peptone, ammonium sulphate and the carbon source (SuOC) were the most important factors as it is obligatory for microbial growth. Subsequently, the optimum values for the carbon source, peptone and ammonium sulphate were found to be 11.10% (w/v), 1.18% (w/v) and 0.83% (w/v), respectively. Experiments carried out under optimum conditions revealed a maximum lipase activity of 10.8 U mL−1, which was achieved after 48 h of fermentation. The obtained results were finally verified with batch experiments carried out under the optimum conditions evaluated and it was demonstrated that the SuOC from agro-industrial residue as substrates can be used as an inexpensive base (carbon source) for the production of lipase by P. fluorescens (NRLL B-2641). PMID:26740789

  6. Plankton dynamics in thermally-stratified free-surface turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovecchio, Salvatore; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-11-01

    Thermal stratification induced by solar heating near the ocean-atmosphere interface influences the transfer fluxes of heat, momentum and chemical species across the interface. Due to thermal stratification, a region of large temperature gradients (thermocline) may form with strong consequences for the marine ecosystem. In particular, the thermocline is believed to prevent phytoplankton from reaching the well-lit surface layer, where they can grow through the process of photosynthesis. In this paper, we use a DNS-based Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to examine the role of stratification on phytoplankton dynamics in thermally-stratified free-surface turbulence. We focus on gyrotactic self-propelled phytoplankton cells, considering different stratification levels (quantified by the Richardson number) and different gyro tactic re-orientation times. We show that the modulation of turbulent fluctuations induced by stable stratification has a strong effect on the orientation and distribution of phytoplankton, possibly leading to trapping of some species within the thermocline. Specifically, we observe the appearance of a depletion layer just below the free-surface as stratification increases, accompanied by a reduction in the vertical stability of phytoplankton cells.

  7. A vibrational dynamics of molecule chain on metallic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerirgui, D.; Tigrine, R.; Bourahla, B.; Khater, A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the vibration properties of adsorbed nanostructure on the infinite square crystalline surface. The surface is considered as an infinite slab of one atomic layer, and the nanostructure as an isolated diatomic molecule chain on the surface of a cubic lattice which is parallel to y-axis, and takes three different positions: top, hollow and bridge. The vibrational dynamics of the structure is considered within the harmonic approximation framework. The evanescent and propagating vibrational field of the perfect lattice is determined and discussed. The presence of the molecule chain breaks down the translation symmetry in one direction and gives rise to localized states on its neighborhood. The mathematical framework of the matching method is used to analyze the localization phenomena at the nanostructure boundaries. Typical dispersion curves for modes of energies along the inhomogeneity are given with their polarizations. The fine structure of the spectrum and its origins are clearly identifiable, which gives a new insight into the localization problem. Furthermore, the existence and nature of the localized phonons like modes associated with an isolated defect are derived, and the importance of the contribution of these modes to the spectral and states densities is exhibited clearly.

  8. Aqueous Solutions on Silica Surfaces: Structure and Dynamics from Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striolo, Alberto; Argyris, Dimitrios; Tummala, Naga Rajesh

    2009-03-01

    Our group is interested in understanding the properties of aqueous electrolyte solutions at interfaces. The fundamental questions we seek to answer include: (A) how does a solid structure perturb interfacial water? (B) How far from the solid does this perturbation persist? (C) What is the rate of water reorientation and exchange in the perturbed layer? (D) What happens in the presence of simple electrolytes? To address such topics we implemented atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Recent results for water and simple electrolytes near silicon dioxide surfaces of various degrees of hydroxylation will be presented. The data suggest the formation of a layered aqueous structure near the interface. The density profile of interfacial water seems to dictate the density profiles of aqueous solutions containing NaCl, CaCl2, CsCl, and SrCl2 near the solid surfaces. These results suggest that ion-ion and ion-water correlations are extremely important factors that should be considered when it is desired to predict the distribution of electrolytes near a charged surface. Our results will benefit a number of practical applications including water desalination, exploitation of the oil shale in the Green River Basin, nuclear waste sites remediation, and design of nanofluidic devices.

  9. Topographies and dynamics on multidimensional potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Keith Douglas

    The stochastic master equation is a valuable tool for elucidating potential energy surface (PES) details that govern structural relaxation in clusters, bulk systems, and protein folding. This work develops a comprehensive framework for studying non-equilibrium relaxation dynamics using the master equation. Since our master equations depend upon accurate partition function models for use in Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRK(M) transition state theory, this work introduces several such models employing various harmonic and anharmonic approximations and compares their predicted equilibrium population distributions with those determined from molecular dynamics. This comparison is performed for the fully-delineated surfaces (KCl)5 and Ar9 to evaluate model performance for potential surfaces with long- and short-range interactions, respectively. For each system, several models perform better than a simple harmonic approximation. While no model gives acceptable results for all minima, and optimal modeling strategies differ for (KCl)5 and Ar9, a particular one-parameter model gives the best agreement with simulation for both systems. We then construct master equations from these models and compare their isothermal relaxation predictions for (KCl)5 and Ar9 with molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first comprehensive test of the kinetic performance of partition function models of its kind. Our results show that accurate modeling of transition-state partition functions is more important for (KCl)5 than for Ar9 in reproducing simulation results, due to a marked stiffening anharmonicity in the transition-state normal modes of (KCl)5. For both systems, several models yield qualitative agreement with simulation over a large temperature range. To examine the robustness of the master equation when applied to larger systems, for which full topographical descriptions would be either impossible or infeasible, we compute relaxation predictions for Ar11 using a master equation

  10. Molecular dynamics study of proton binding to silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Wasserman, E.; Felmy, A.R.; Wilke, C.

    1998-02-01

    Molecular statics calculations on gas-phase and solvated clusters and on gas-phase and solvated slabs representing aqueous species and surfaces were applied to investigate acid/base reactions on silica surfaces. The gas-phase approach, which was previously applied to goethite, predicts a surface pK{sub a} of 8.5 for the reaction > SiOH {yields} > SiO{sup {minus}} + H{sup +} which is in good agreement with estimates based on potentiometric titration. However, the model gives an unrealistically large pK{sub a} for the reaction > SiOH{sub 2}{sup +} {yields} > SiOH + H{sup +}. The model dependence of this result was checked by using two different types of interaction potentials, one based on quantum mechanical calculations on H{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} clusters, and another empirical model fitted to the structure and elastic properties of {alpha}-quartz. Because these models gave similar results, the authors hypothesize that the failure of the gas-phase models is due to intrinsic solvation effects not accounted for by previously developed correlations. They tested this idea by carrying out energy minimization calculations on gas-phase clusters with one hydration shell as well as molecular dynamics simulations on fully-solvated H{sub 5}SiO{sub 4}{sup +} and a fully solvated (0001) surface of {beta}-quartz. Though the authors are unable to establish a quantitative measure of the pK{sub a} of SiOH{sub 2} groups, the solvated systems do indicate that SiOH groups do not protonate in any of the solvated models.

  11. Exploring the free energy surface using ab initio molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samanta, Amit; Morales, Miguel A.; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-04-22

    Efficient exploration of the configuration space and identification of metastable structures are challenging from both computational as well as algorithmic perspectives. Here, we extend the recently proposed orderparameter aided temperature accelerated sampling schemes to efficiently and systematically explore free energy surfaces, and search for metastable states and reaction pathways within the framework of density functional theory based molecular dynamics. The sampling method is applied to explore the relevant parts of the configuration space in prototypical materials SiO2 and Ti to identify the different metastable structures corresponding to different phases in these materials. In addition, we use the string method inmore » collective variables to study the melting pathways in the high pressure cotunnite phase of SiO2 and the hcp to fcc phase transition in Ti.« less

  12. A molecular dynamics investigation of surface reconstruction on magnetite (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Wasserman, E.; Felmy, A. R.

    1999-07-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations using analytical potential functions with polarizable oxygen ions have been used to identify a novel mode of reconstruction on the half-occupied tetrahedral layer termination of the magnetite (Fe 3O 4) (001) surface. In the proposed reconstruction, the twofold coordinated iron ion in the top monolayer rotates downward to occupy a vacant half-octahedral site in the plane of the second-layer iron ions. At the same time, half of the tetrahedral iron ions in the third iron layer are pushed upward to occupy an adjacent octahedral vacancy at the level of the second-layer iron ions. The other half of the third-layer iron ions remain roughly in their original positions. The proposed reconstruction is consistent with recent low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. It also provides a compelling interpretation for the arrangement of atoms suggested by high-resolution scanning-tunneling microscopy studies.

  13. Dynamic properties of integrated nanostructure on metallic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerirgui, D.; Tigrine, R.; Bourahla, B.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the vibration properties of integrated nanostructure on crystalline surface. The embedded chain of molecules is parallel to y-axis and takes three different positions: top, hollow, and bridge. The vibrational dynamics of the structure is considered within the harmonic approximation framework. The evanescent and propagating vibrational field of the perfect lattice is determined and interpreted. The presence of the diatomic molecule chain breakdown the translation symmetry in one direction, and gives rise to localized states on its neighborhood. Our study is based on the matching method and the Green functions, the spectral and state densities associated to localized modes are determined and calculated numerically. Our results show that the presence of the inhomogeneity contribute to the creation of new branches of localized vibrational modes, and their number and feature depend strongly on structural parameters of the system and the position of the diatomic chain.

  14. Dynamics of free surface perturbations along an annular viscous film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda B.; North, Justin; Guerra, Bree K.

    2008-03-01

    It is known that the free surface of an axisymmetric viscous film flowing down the outside of a thin vertical fiber under the influence of gravity becomes unstable to interfacial perturbations. We present an experimental study using fluids with different densities, surface tensions, and viscosities to investigate the growth and dynamics of these interfacial perturbations and to test the assumptions made by previous authors. We find that the initial perturbation growth is exponential, followed by a slower phase as the amplitude and wavelength saturate in size. Measurements of the perturbation growth for experiments conducted at low and moderate Reynolds numbers are compared to theoretical predictions developed from linear stability theory. Excellent agreement is found between predictions from a long-wave Stokes flow model [Craster and Matar, J. Fluid Mech. 553, 85 (2006)] and data, while fair to excellent agreement (depending on fiber size) is found between predictions from a moderate-Reynolds-number model [Sisoev , Chem. Eng. Sci. 61, 7279 (2006)] and data. Furthermore, we find that a known transition in the longer-time perturbation dynamics from unsteady to steady behavior at a critical flow rate Qc is correlated with a transition in the rate at which perturbations naturally form along the fiber. For QQc (unsteady case), the rate of perturbation formation is modulated. As a result, the position along the fiber where perturbations form oscillates irregularly, and the initial speed and spacing between perturbations varies, resulting in the coalescence of neighboring perturbations further down the fiber.

  15. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  16. Activated wetting dynamics in the presence of mesoscopic surface disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, Kristina; Pettersen, Michael; Rolley, Etienne

    2012-02-01

    Although disorder is commonly used to explain contact angle hysteresis, it is often neglected when considering wetting dynamics. When viscous forces are negligible, contact-line velocity is modelled by the Molecular Kinetic Theory [1], which predicts an activated motion driven by molecular jumps on preferential adsorption sites. We believe that in the presence of mesoscopic disorder, this model can be reinterpreted and that the activation length is no longer molecular-sized but is related to depinning events on the surface. This hypothesis is supported by a study of the wetting of cesium by liquid hydrogen in which it was shown that the activation length is of the order of the expected roughness [2]. However, no systematic study between the activation area and the length scale of the disorder has previously been made. We study wetting dynamics on metal films evaporated under different conditions, allowing us to obtain films with lateral grain sizes ranging from 10 to 200 nm. We find that the activation area deduced from wetting experiments is coherent with these sizes; however, its precise relation to the scale of disorder is not clear.[1] T.D. Blake and J.M. Haynes, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 30, 421 (1969)[2] E. Rolley and C. Guthmann, PRL 98, 166105 (2007)

  17. Photoinduced surface dynamics of CO adsorbed on a platinum electrode.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hidenori; Okada, Tsubasa; Uosaki, Kohei

    2006-08-10

    The surface dynamics of adsorbed CO molecules formed by dissociative adsorption of HCHO at a polycrystalline Pt electrode/electrolyte solution interface was studied by picosecond time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopy. A SFG peak at 2050-2060 cm(-1) was observed at the Pt electrode in HClO(4) solution containing HCHO at 0-300 mV (vs Ag/AgCl), indicating the formation of adsorbed CO at an atop site of the Pt surface as a result of dissociative adsorption of HCHO. The peak position varied with potential by approximately 33 cm(-1)/V, as previously found in an infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) study. Irradiation of an intense picosecond visible pulse (25 ps, 532 nm) caused an instant intensity decrease and broadening of the CO peak accompanied by the emergence of a new broad peak at approximately 1980 cm(-1) within the time resolution of the system. These results suggest a decrease and increase in the populations of CO adsorbed on atop and bridge sites, respectively, upon visible pump pulse irradiation. PMID:16884215

  18. Surface hopping investigation of benzophenone excited state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Favero, Lucilla; Granucci, Giovanni; Persico, Maurizio

    2016-04-21

    We present a simulation of the photodynamics of benzophenone for the first 20 ps after n →π* excitation, performed by trajectory surface hopping calculations with on-the-fly semiempirical determination of potential energy surfaces and electronic wavefunctions. Both the dynamic and spin-orbit couplings are taken into account, and time-resolved fluorescence emission is also simulated. The computed decay time of the S1 state is in agreement with experimental observations. The direct S1→ T1 intersystem crossing (ISC) accounts for about 2/3 of the S1 decay rate. The remaining 1/3 goes through T2 or higher triplets. The nonadiabatic transitions within the triplet manifold are much faster than ISC and keep the population of T1 at about 3/4 of the total triplet population, and that of the other states (mainly T2) at 1/4. Two internal coordinates are vibrationally active immediately after n →π* excitation: one is the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching and the other one is a combination of the conrotatory torsion of phenyl rings and of bending involving the carbonyl C atom. The period of the torsion-bending mode coincides with oscillations in the time-resolved photoelectron spectra of Spighi et al. and substantially confirms their assignment. PMID:27031566

  19. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Peptide Ions: Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.; Shukla, Anil K.

    2003-12-01

    Kinetics and dynamics studies have been carried out for the surface-induced dissociation (SID) of a set of model peptides utilizing a specially designed electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer in which mass-selected and vibrationally relaxed ions are collided on a orthogonally-mounted fluorinated self-assembled monolayer on Au{l_brace}111{r_brace} crystal. The sampling time in this apparatus can be varied from hundreds of microseconds to tens of seconds, enabling the investigation of kinetics of ion decomposition over an extended range of decomposition rates. RRKM-based modeling of these reactions for a set of polyalanines demonstrates that SID kinetics of these simple peptides is very similar to slow, multiple-collision activation and that the distribution of internal energies following collisional activation is indistinguishable from a thermal distribution. For more complex peptides comprised of several amino acids and with internal degrees of freedom ( DOF) of the order of 350 there is a dramatic change in kinetics in which RRKM kinetics is no longer capable of describing the decomposition of these complex ions. A combination of RRKM kinetics and the sudden death approximation, according to which decomposition occurs instantaneously, is a satisfactory description. This implies that a population of ions-which is dependant on the nature of the peptide, kinetic energy and sampling time-decomposes on or very near the surface. The shattering transition is described quantitatively for the limited set of molecules examined to date

  20. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Peptide Ions: Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2003-12-01

    Kinetics and dynamics studies have been carried out for the surface-induced dissociation (SID) of a set of model peptides utilizing a specially designed electro spray ionization Fourier Transform Ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer in which mass-selected and vibrationally relaxed ions are collided on an orthogonally-mounted fluorinated self-assembled monolayer on Au {111} crystal. The sampling time in this apparatus can be varied from hundreds of microseconds to tens of seconds, enabling the investigation of kinetics of ion decomposition over an extended range of decomposition rates. RRKM-based modeling of these reactions for a set of polyalanines demonstrates that kinetics of these simple peptides is very similar to slow, multiple-collision activation and that the distribution of internal energies following collisional activation is indistinguishable from a thermal distribution. For more complex peptides comprised of several amino acids and with internal degrees of freedom (DOF) of the order of 350 there is a dramatic change in kinetics in which RRKM kinetics is no longer capable of describing the decomposition of these complex ions. A combination of RRKM kinetics and the “sudden death” approximation, according to which decomposition occurs instantaneously, is a satisfactory description. This implies that a population of ions – which is dependant on the nature of the peptide, kinetic energy and sampling time – decomposes on or very near the surface. The shattering transition is described quantitatively for the limited set of molecules examined to date.

  1. Prototropic tautomerism of 4-Methyl 1,2,4-Triazole-3-Thione molecule in solvent water medium: DFT and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bipan; De, Rina; Chowdhury, Joydeep

    2015-12-01

    The ground state prototropic tautomerism of 4-Methyl 1,2,4-Triazole-3-Thione molecule in solvent water medium has been investigated with the aid of DFT and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulation studies. The CPMD simulations envisage the possibility of proton transfer reactions of the molecule through the solvent water medium. Probable proton transfer pathways have been predicted from the DFT calculations which are substantiated by the natural bond orbital analyses. The evolution and breaking of the concerned bonds of the molecule for different proton transfer reaction pathways are also estimated.

  2. On trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics: Bohmian dynamics versus trajectory surface hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a complete derivation of the NonAdiabatic Bohmian DYnamics (NABDY) equations of motion. This approach naturally emerges from a transformation of the molecular time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the adiabatic representation of the electronic states. The numerical implementation of the method is discussed while simple nonadiabatic models are employed to address the accuracy of NABDY and to reveal its ability to capture nuclear quantum effects that are missed in trajectory surface hopping (TSH) due to the independent trajectory approximation. A careful comparison of the correlated, NABDY, and the uncorrelated, TSH, propagation is also given together with a description of the main approximations and assumptions underlying the "derivation" of a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme based on classical trajectories.

  3. Epicardial surface dynamics in the closed-chest normal canine.

    PubMed

    McInerney, J J; Kim, E F; Herr, M D; Copenhaver, G L

    1995-11-01

    Past studies of the changing three-dimensional shape of the heart in the closed chest during the cardiac cycle have been restricted to the measurement of local deformations at a relatively few specific locations, and often have required surgical procedures that alter the measurements obtained. In the study reported here, high precision displacement and velocity measurements were obtained at the epicardial interface using a Compton backscatter imaging technique that does not require a surgical intervention or contrast injections. Displacement and velocity measurements were obtained at more than 200 locations at the epicardial interface at 13 ms intervals throughout the cardiac cycle. Measurements of the changing shape of the heart during the cardiac cycle with this technique are precise to 0.1 mm (S.D.). Displacement and velocity patterns recorded in this study confirm and integrate the studies of many others and also add new information. An unexpected vigorous inward motion of both the LV (39 mm s-1) and RV (26 mm s-1) surfaces during isovolumic relaxation and early rapid refill is demonstrated. Velocities during this period equal or exceed those that occur during ejection. During ejection, inward LV motion at the base of the heart precedes that at the apex by 80-90 ms. Posterior LV displacements and velocities during ejection are 4-6 times greater than those at the anterior and apex. The Compton backscatter imaging technique for obtaining undisturbed measurements of cardiac dynamics in the closed chest has potential as a non-invasive clinical tool for serial studies of cardiac surface motion abnormalities. The data presented can also be used to set surface boundary conditions for biomechanical models of heart deformation. PMID:8522545

  4. Predicting surface dynamic topographies of stagnant lid planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, C.; Čadek, O.; Choblet, G.

    2013-12-01

    Although planetary mantles are viscoelastic media, numerical models of thermal convection in a viscoelastic spherical shell are still very challenging. Here, we examine the validity of simplified mechanical and rheological frameworks classically used to approximate viscoelastic dynamic topography. We compare three simplified approaches to a linear Maxwell viscoelastic shell with a pseudo upper free-surface, considered as the reference model. A viscous model with a free-slip boundary condition at the surface correctly reproduces the final relaxed shape of the viscoelastic body but it cannot reproduce the time evolution of the viscoelastic topography. Nevertheless, characterizing the topography development is important since it can represent a significant fraction of the history for planets having a thick and rigid lithosphere (e.g. Mars). A viscous model with a pseudo free-surface, despite its time-dependency, also systematically fails to describe correctly these transient stages. An elastic filtering of the instantaneous viscous topography is required to capture the essence of the time evolution of the topography. We show that a single effective elastic thickness is needed to correctly reproduce the constant transient viscoelastic topography obtained when the lithosphere corresponds to a step-like viscosity variation, while a time-dependence of the effective elastic thickness must be considered to take account of realistic temperature-dependent viscosity variations in the lithosphere. In this case, the appropriate thickness of the elastic shell can be evaluated, at a given instant, with a simple procedure based on the local Maxwell time. Furthermore, if the elastic filtering is performed using the thin elastic shell formulation, an unrealistic degree-dependence of the thickness of the elastic shell is needed to correctly approximate the viscoelastic topography. We show that a model that fully couples a viscous body to an elastic shell of finite thickness estimated

  5. Applications of granular-dynamics numerical simulations to asteroid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, D. C.; Michel, P.; Schwartz, S. R.; Yu, Y.; Ballouz, R.-L.; Matsumura, S.

    2014-07-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a totally different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). (1) We carried out impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes under Earth's gravity [5] and compared the results to laboratory experiments [6] in support of JAXA's Hayabusa 2 asteroid sample-return mission. We tested different projectile shapes and confirmed that the 90-degree cone was the most efficient at excavating mass when impacting 5-mm-diameter glass beads. Results are sensitive to the normal coefficient of restitution and the coefficient of static friction. Preliminary experiments in micro-gravity for similar impact conditions show both the amount of ejected mass and the timescale of the impact process increase, as expected. (2) It has been found (e.g., [7,8]) that ''fresh'' (unreddened) Q-class asteroids have a high probability of recent planetary encounters (˜1 Myr; also see [9]), suggesting that surface refreshening may have occurred due to tidal effects. As an application of the potential effect of tidal interactions, we carried out simulations of Apophis' predicted 2029 encounter with the Earth to see whether regolith motion might occur, using a range of plausible material parameters

  6. Critical insight into the influence of the potential energy surface on fission dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, K.

    2011-07-15

    The present work is dedicated to a careful investigation of the influence of the potential energy surface on the fission process. The time evolution of nuclei at high excitation energy and angular momentum is studied by means of three-dimensional Langevin calculations performed for two different parametrizations of the macroscopic potential: the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model (FRLDM) and the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) prescription. Depending on the mass of the system, the topology of the potential throughout the deformation space of interest in fission is observed to noticeably differ within these two approaches, due to the treatment of curvature effects. When utilized in the dynamical calculation as the driving potential, the FRLDM and LSD models yield similar results in the heavy-mass region, whereas the predictions can be strongly dependent on the Potential Energy Surface (PES) for medium-mass nuclei. In particular, the mass, charge, and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be narrower with the LSD prescription. The influence of critical model parameters on our findings is carefully investigated. The present study sheds light on the experimental conditions and signatures well suited for constraining the parametrization of the macroscopic potential. Its implication regarding the interpretation of available experimental data is briefly discussed.

  7. Model system for studies of microbial dynamics at exuding surfaces such as the rhizosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odham, G.; Tunlid, A.; Valeur, A.; Sundin, P.; White, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    An autoclavable all-glass system for studying microbial dynamics at permeable surfaces is described. Standard hydrophobic or hydrophilic membranes (46-mm diameter) of various pore sizes were supported on a glass frit through which nutrient solutions were pumped by a peristaltic pump. The pump provided a precisely controlled flow at speeds of 0.5 to 500 ml of defined or natural cell exudates per h, which passed through the membrane into a receiving vessel. The construction allowed a choice of membranes, which could be modified. The system was tested with a bacterium, isolated from rape plant roots (Brassica napus L.), that was inoculated on a hydrophilic membrane filter and allowed to develop into a biofilm. A defined medium with a composition resembling that of natural rape root exudate was pumped through the membrane at 0.5 ml/h. Scanning electron microscopic examinations indicated that the inoculum formed microcolonies embedded in exopolymers evenly distributed over the membrane surface. The lipid composition and content of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate in free-living and adhered cells were determined by gas chromatography. The bacterial consumption of amino acids in the exudate was also studied.

  8. WRF-simulated sensitivity to land surface schemes in short and medium ranges for a high-temperature event in East China: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Min; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yang; Zheng, Yiqun; Zhou, Zugang; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chaohui; Liu, Huaqiang

    2015-09-01

    We designed simulations for the high-temperature event that occurred on 23 July 2003 in East China using a series of forecast lead times, from short-range to medium-range, and four land surface schemes (LSSs) (i.e., SLAB, NOAH, RUC, and PX) in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Version 3. The sensitivities of short and medium-range simulations to the LSSs systematically varied with the lead times. In general, the model reproduced short-range, high-temperature distributions. The simulated weather was sensitive to the LSSs, and the LSS-induced sensitivity was higher in the medium range than in the short-range. Furthermore, the LSS performances were complex, i.e., the PX errors apparently increased in the medium range (longer than 6 days), RUC produced the maximum errors, and SLAB and NOAH had approximately equivalent errors that slightly increased. Additional sensitivity simulations revealed that the WRF modeling system assigns relatively low initial soil moisture for RUC and that soil moisture initialization plays an important role that is comparable to the LSS choice in the simulations. LSS-induced negative feedback between surface air temperature (SAT) and atmospheric circulation in the lower atmosphere was found in the medium range. These sensitivities were mainly caused by the LSS-induced differences in surface sensible heat flux and by errors associated with the lead times. Using the SAT equation, further diagnostic analyses revealed LSS deficiencies in simulating surface fluxes and physical processes that modify the SAT and indicated the main reasons for these deficiencies. These results have implications for model improvement and application.

  9. The estimation of dynamic contact angle of ultra-hydrophobic surfaces using inclined surface and impinging droplet methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Kotek, Michal

    2014-03-01

    The development of industrial technology also brings with optimized surface quality, particularly where there is contact with food. Application ultra-hydrophobic surface significantly reduces the growth of bacteria and facilitates cleaning processes. Testing and evaluation of surface quality are used two methods: impinging droplet and inclined surface method optimized with high speed shadowgraphy, which give information about dynamic contact angle. This article presents the results of research into new methods of measuring ultra-hydrophobic patented technology.

  10. Trajectory surface-hopping study of methane photodissociation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodriguito, Maricris D.; Lendvay, György; Schatz, George C.

    2009-12-01

    We use the fewest switches nonadiabatic trajectory surface hopping approach to study the photodissociation of methane on its lowest singlet excited state potential surface (1 T12) at 122 nm, with emphasis on product state branching and energy partitioning. The trajectories and couplings are based on CASSCF(8,9) calculations with an aug-cc-pvdz basis set. We demonstrate that nonadiabatic dynamics is important to describe the dissociation processes. We find that CH3(X˜ A22″)+H and CH2(ã A11)+H2 are the major dissociation channels, as have been observed experimentally. CH3+H is mostly formed by direct dissociation that is accompanied by hopping to the ground state. CH2+H2 can either be formed by hopping to the ground state to give CH2(ã A11)+H2 or by adiabatic dissociation to CH2(b˜ B11)+H2. In the latter case, the CH2(b˜ B11) can then undergo internal conversion to the ground singlet state by Renner-Teller induced hopping. Less important dissociation mechanisms lead to CH2+H+H and to CH+H2+H. Intersystem crossing effects, which are not included, do not seem essential to describe the experimentally observed branching behavior. About 5% of trajectories involve a roaming atom mechanism which can eventually lead to formation of products in any of the dissociation channels. Branching fractions to give H and H2 are in good agreement with experiment, and the H atom translational energy distribution shows bimodal character which also matches observations.

  11. Ocean Surface Winds Drive Dynamics of Transoceanic Aerial Movements

    PubMed Central

    Felicísimo, Ángel M.; Muñoz, Jesús; González-Solis, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Global wind patterns influence dispersal and migration processes of aerial organisms, propagules and particles, which ultimately could determine the dynamics of colonizations, invasions or spread of pathogens. However, studying how wind-mediated movements actually happen has been hampered so far by the lack of high resolution global wind data as well as the impossibility to track aerial movements. Using concurrent data on winds and actual pathways of a tracked seabird, here we show that oceanic winds define spatiotemporal pathways and barriers for large-scale aerial movements. We obtained wind data from NASA SeaWinds scatterometer to calculate wind cost (impedance) models reflecting the resistance to the aerial movement near the ocean surface. We also tracked the movements of a model organism, the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), a pelagic bird known to perform long distance migrations. Cost models revealed that distant areas can be connected through “wind highways” that do not match the shortest great circle routes. Bird routes closely followed the low-cost “wind-highways” linking breeding and wintering areas. In addition, we found that a potential barrier, the near surface westerlies in the Atlantic sector of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), temporally hindered meridional trans-equatorial movements. Once the westerlies vanished, birds crossed the ITCZ to their winter quarters. This study provides a novel approach to investigate wind-mediated movements in oceanic environments and shows that large-scale migration and dispersal processes over the oceans can be largely driven by spatiotemporal wind patterns. PMID:18698354

  12. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: A biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Muzzio, N. E.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H. Pedro; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α =0.63±0.04,β =0.75±0.05, and z =0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  13. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: a biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality.

    PubMed

    Huergo, M A C; Muzzio, N E; Pasquale, M A; Pedro González, P H; Bolzán, A E; Arvia, A J

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α=0.63±0.04,β=0.75±0.05, and z=0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model. PMID:25215757

  14. He atom surface spectroscopy: Surface lattice dynamics of insulators, metals and metal overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    During the first three years of this grant (1985--1988) the effort was devoted to the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom scattering (HAS) instrument which would be capable of determining the structure and dynamics of metallic, semiconductor or insulator crystal surfaces. The second three year grant period (1988--1991) has been dedicated to measurements. The construction of the instrument went better than proposed; it was within budget, finished in the proposed time and of better sensitivity and resolution than originally planned. The same success has been carried over to the measurement phase where the concentration has been on studies of insulator surfaces, as discussed in this paper. The experiments of the past three years have focused primarily on the alkali halides with a more recent shift to metal oxide crystal surfaces. Both elastic and inelastic scattering experiments were carried out on LiF, NaI, NaCl, RbCl, KBr, RbBr, RbI, CsF, CsI and with some preliminary work on NiO and MgO.

  15. Effect of dynamic diffusion of air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media on the microhardness of ionic crystals with juvenile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The load dependences of the microhardness of surface layers of NaCl and LiF ionic single crystals with juvenile surfaces and surfaces exposed to air for a long time measured in the air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media have been investigated. It has been found that there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness as a function of the load for LiF crystals indented in helium and after their aging in air, as well as a weaker effect of the nitrogen and air gaseous media on the studied dependences as compared to NaCl crystals. It has also been found that, after the aging of the surface of NaCl crystals in air, there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness in the nitrogen and air gaseous media, as well as a pronounced change in the microhardness as a function of the time of aging the samples in air as compared to the weaker effect of the gaseous medium for LiF crystals. The obtained data have been analyzed in terms of the phenomenon of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of particles from the external medium into crystalline materials during their plastic deformation along the nucleating and moving dislocations. It has been shown that this phenomenon affects the microhardness through changes in the intensity of dislocation multiplication upon the formation of indentation rosettes in different gaseous media. The performed investigation of the microhardness of the juvenile surface of NaCl and LiF crystals in different gaseous media has revealed for the first time a different character of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of these media in a "pure" form.

  16. Exploring the free energy surface using ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Amit; Morales, Miguel A; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-04-28

    Efficient exploration of configuration space and identification of metastable structures in condensed phase systems are challenging from both computational and algorithmic perspectives. In this regard, schemes that utilize a set of pre-defined order parameters to sample the relevant parts of the configuration space [L. Maragliano and E. Vanden-Eijnden, Chem. Phys. Lett. 426, 168 (2006); J. B. Abrams and M. E. Tuckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 15742 (2008)] have proved useful. Here, we demonstrate how these order-parameter aided temperature accelerated sampling schemes can be used within the Born-Oppenheimer and the Car-Parrinello frameworks of ab initio molecular dynamics to efficiently and systematically explore free energy surfaces, and search for metastable states and reaction pathways. We have used these methods to identify the metastable structures and reaction pathways in SiO2 and Ti. In addition, we have used the string method [W. E, W. Ren, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, Phys. Rev. B 66, 052301 (2002); L. Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)] within the density functional theory to study the melting pathways in the high pressure cotunnite phase of SiO2 and the hexagonal closed packed to face centered cubic phase transition in Ti. PMID:27131525

  17. Exploring the free energy surface using ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; Morales, Miguel A.; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Efficient exploration of configuration space and identification of metastable structures in condensed phase systems are challenging from both computational and algorithmic perspectives. In this regard, schemes that utilize a set of pre-defined order parameters to sample the relevant parts of the configuration space [L. Maragliano and E. Vanden-Eijnden, Chem. Phys. Lett. 426, 168 (2006); J. B. Abrams and M. E. Tuckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 15742 (2008)] have proved useful. Here, we demonstrate how these order-parameter aided temperature accelerated sampling schemes can be used within the Born-Oppenheimer and the Car-Parrinello frameworks of ab initio molecular dynamics to efficiently and systematically explore free energy surfaces, and search for metastable states and reaction pathways. We have used these methods to identify the metastable structures and reaction pathways in SiO2 and Ti. In addition, we have used the string method [W. E, W. Ren, and E. Vanden-Eijnden, Phys. Rev. B 66, 052301 (2002); L. Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)] within the density functional theory to study the melting pathways in the high pressure cotunnite phase of SiO2 and the hexagonal closed packed to face centered cubic phase transition in Ti.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics and breakup of free-surface flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, J.

    1997-07-01

    Surface-tension-driven flows and, in particular, their tendency to decay spontaneously into drops have long fascinated naturalists, the earliest systematic experiments dating back to the beginning of the 19th century. Linear stability theory governs the onset of breakup and was developed by Rayleigh, Plateau, and Maxwell. However, only recently has attention turned to the nonlinear behavior in the vicinity of the singular point where a drop separates. The increased attention is due to a number of recent and increasingly refined experiments, as well as to a host of technological applications, ranging from printing to mixing and fiber spinning. The description of drop separation becomes possible because jet motion turns out to be effectively governed by one-dimensional equations, which still contain most of the richness of the original dynamics. In addition, an attraction for physicists lies in the fact that the separation singularity is governed by universal scaling laws, which constitute an asymptotic solution of the Navier-Stokes equation before and after breakup. The Navier-Stokes equation is thus continued uniquely through the singularity. At high viscosities, a series of noise-driven instabilities has been observed, which are a nested superposition of singularities of the same universal form. At low viscosities, there is rich scaling behavior in addition to aesthetically pleasing breakup patterns driven by capillary waves. The author reviews the theoretical development of this field alongside recent experimental work, and outlines unsolved problems. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. The Dynamics of Near-Surface Dust on Airless Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, Christine M.

    The behavior of dust particles under the influence of electrostatic forces has been investigated near the surface of asteroids and the Moon. Dust particle motion on airless bodies has important implications for our understanding of the evolution of these bodies as well as the design of future exploration vehicles. Electrostatically-dominated dust motion has been hypothesized to cause the observed Lunar Horizon Glow and dust ponds on the asteroid Eros. The first major contribution of this thesis is the identification of the electric field strength required in order to electrostatically loft dust particles off the surface of the Moon and asteroids Eros and Itokawa, taking into account the gravity of the body (assumed to be spherical) and the cohesion between dust grains (assumed to have the material properties of lunar regolith). In order to solve for the electric field strength required as a function of dust particle size (assumed to be spherical), we assumed that the charge on the dust particle was given by Gauss' law. It can be seen that it is easiest to launch intermediate-sized particles, rather than the submicron-micron sized particles that have been previously considered due to the dominance of cohesion for small particle sizes. Additionally, the electric field strength required to loft particles is orders of magnitude larger than is likely to be present in situ, unless grain charging is amplified beyond the levels predicted by Gauss' law. The significance of cohesion in electrostatic dust lofting has also been demonstrated experimentally. Piles of uniformly sized dust grains are placed on a biased conducting plate in a plasma. We see that the pile of 15 micron dust spreads more than piles of 5, 10, 20, and 25 micron dust grains. This observation confirms our theory-based prediction of the importance of cohesion for small grain sizes. The experimental proof presented also has implications for interpretations of horizon glow observations and

  20. Validation of a Laboratory Method for Evaluating Dynamic Properties of Reconstructed Equine Racetrack Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Setterbo, Jacob J.; Chau, Anh; Fyhrie, Patricia B.; Hubbard, Mont; Upadhyaya, Shrini K.; Symons, Jennifer E.; Stover, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Racetrack surface is a risk factor for racehorse injuries and fatalities. Current research indicates that race surface mechanical properties may be influenced by material composition, moisture content, temperature, and maintenance. Race surface mechanical testing in a controlled laboratory setting would allow for objective evaluation of dynamic properties of surface and factors that affect surface behavior. Objective To develop a method for reconstruction of race surfaces in the laboratory and validate the method by comparison with racetrack measurements of dynamic surface properties. Methods Track-testing device (TTD) impact tests were conducted to simulate equine hoof impact on dirt and synthetic race surfaces; tests were performed both in situ (racetrack) and using laboratory reconstructions of harvested surface materials. Clegg Hammer in situ measurements were used to guide surface reconstruction in the laboratory. Dynamic surface properties were compared between in situ and laboratory settings. Relationships between racetrack TTD and Clegg Hammer measurements were analyzed using stepwise multiple linear regression. Results Most dynamic surface property setting differences (racetrack-laboratory) were small relative to surface material type differences (dirt-synthetic). Clegg Hammer measurements were more strongly correlated with TTD measurements on the synthetic surface than the dirt surface. On the dirt surface, Clegg Hammer decelerations were negatively correlated with TTD forces. Conclusions Laboratory reconstruction of racetrack surfaces guided by Clegg Hammer measurements yielded TTD impact measurements similar to in situ values. The negative correlation between TTD and Clegg Hammer measurements confirms the importance of instrument mass when drawing conclusions from testing results. Lighter impact devices may be less appropriate for assessing dynamic surface properties compared to testing equipment designed to simulate hoof impact (TTD

  1. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF METAL PARTITIONING TO MINERAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conceptual understanding of surface complexation reactions that control trace element partitioning to mineral surfaces is limited by the assumption that the solid reactant possesses a finite, time-invariant population of surface functional groups. This assumption has limited...

  2. Dynamic nanoproteins: self-assembled peptide surfaces on monolayer protected gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garcia Martin, Sergio; Prins, Leonard J

    2016-07-19

    Here, we demonstrate the formation of dynamic peptide surfaces through the self-assembly of small peptides on the surface of monolayer protected gold nanoparticles. The complexity of the peptide surface can be simply tuned by changing the chemical nature of the added peptides and the ratio in which these are added. The dynamic nature of the surface permits adaptation to changes in the environment. PMID:27374419

  3. Bacterial Community Dynamics During the Application of a Myxococcus xanthus-Inoculated Culture Medium Used for Consolidation of Ornamental Limestone

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Sterflinger, Katja; Ettenauer, Jörg; Jroundi, Fadwa; Fernandez-Vivas, Antonia; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated under laboratory conditions the bacterial communities inhabiting quarry and decayed ornamental carbonate stones before and after the application of a Myxococcus xanthus-inoculated culture medium used for consolidation of the stones. The dynamics of the community structure and the prevalence of the inoculated bacterium, M. xanthus, were monitored during the time course of the consolidation treatment (30 days). For this purpose, we selected a molecular strategy combining fingerprinting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with the screening of eubacterial 16S rDNA clone libraries by DGGE and sequencing. Quantification of the inoculated strain was performed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using M. xanthus-specific primers designed in this work. Results derived from DGGE and sequencing analysis showed that, irrespective of the origin of the stone, the same carbonatogenic microorganisms were activated by the application of a M. xanthus culture. Those microorganisms were Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., and Brevibacillus sp. The monitoring of M. xanthus in the culture media of treated stones during the time course experiment showed disparate results depending on the applied technique. By culture-dependent methods, the detection of this bacterium was only possible in the first day of the treatment, showing the limitation of these conventional techniques. By PCR-DGGE analysis, M. xanthus was detected during the first 3–6 days of the experiment. At this time, the population of this bacterium in the culture media varied between 108–106 cells ml−1, as showed by qPCR analyses. Thereafter, DGGE analyses showed to be not suitable for the detection of M. xanthus in a mixed culture. Nevertheless, qPCR analysis using specific primers for M. xanthus showed to be a more sensitive technique for the detection of this bacterium, revealing a population of 104 cells ml−1 in the culture media of both treated stones at the end of

  4. Thermo-electro-mechanical vibration analysis of size-dependent nanobeam resting on elastic medium under axial preload in presence of surface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzbanrad, Javad; Boreiry, Mahya; Shaghaghi, Gholam Reza

    2016-07-01

    In the present manuscript, a nonclassical beam theory is developed to analyze free vibration of piezoelectric nanobeam by considering surface effects resting on Winkler-Pasternak elastic medium and thermal loading with axial preload. The nonclassical Eringen theory is utilized to incorporate the length-scale parameter to account for the small-scale effect, while the Gurtin-Murdoch model is employed to inject the surface effects including surface elasticity, surface stress and surface density. The governing equations are derived using Hamilton's principle in the framework of Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The governing partial differential equations of motions of system are reduced to a set of algebraic equations with the help of differential transformation method as a semi-analytical-numerical. The mathematical derivations and numerical results are presented in detail for various boundary conditions. Some numerical examples are illustrated in order to investigate the effect of several parameters such as the nonlocal parameter, piezoelectric voltage, surface effects, temperature change, axial preload and elastic medium parameters. Moreover, it is also indicated that the numerical results have good agreement with previous studies.

  5. Identifying Differences and Similarities in Static and Dynamic Contact Angles between Nanoscale and Microscale Textured Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Mitchell R; Shirts, Michael R

    2015-07-28

    We quantify some of the effects of patterned nanoscale surface texture on static contact angles, dynamic contact angles, and dynamic contact angle hysteresis using molecular dynamics simulations of a moving Lennard-Jones droplet in contact with a solid surface. We observe static contact angles that change with the introduction of surface texture in a manner consistent with theoretical and experimental expectations. However, we find that the introduction of nanoscale surface texture at the length scale of 5-10 times the fluid particle size does not affect dynamic contact angle hysteresis even though it changes both the advancing and receding contact angles significantly. This result differs significantly from microscale experimental results where dynamic contact angle hysteresis decreases with the addition of surface texture due to an increase in the receding contact angle. Instead, we find that molecular-kinetic theory, previously applied only to nonpatterned surfaces, accurately describes dynamic contact angle and dynamic contact angle hysteresis behavior as a function of terminal fluid velocity. Therefore, at length scales of tens of nanometers, the kinetic phenomena such as contact line pinning observed at larger scales become insignificant in comparison to the effects of molecular fluctuations for moving droplets, even though the static properties are essentially scale-invariant. These findings may have implications for the design of highly hierarchical structures with particular wetting properties. We also find that quantitatively determining the trends observed in this article requires the careful selection of system and analysis parameters in order to achieve sufficient accuracy and precision in calculated contact angles. Therefore, we provide a detailed description of our two-surface, circular-fit approach to calculating static and dynamic contact angles on surfaces with nanoscale texturing. PMID:26110823

  6. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Organic Friction Modifiers Adsorbed on Iron Oxide Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ewen, James P; Gattinoni, Chiara; Morgan, Neal; Spikes, Hugh A; Dini, Daniele

    2016-05-10

    For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of the nanoscale behavior of complex tribological systems is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. In this study, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations to examine the atomistic structure and friction properties of commercially relevant organic friction modifier (OFM) monolayers adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces and lubricated by a thin, separating layer of hexadecane. Specifically, acid, amide, and glyceride OFMs, with saturated and Z-unsaturated hydrocarbon tail groups, are simulated at various surface coverages and sliding velocities. At low and medium coverage, the OFMs form liquidlike and amorphous monolayers, respectively, which are significantly interdigitated with the hexadecane lubricant, resulting in relatively high friction coefficients. At high coverage, solidlike monolayers are formed for all of the OFMs, which, during sliding, results in slip planes between well-defined OFM and hexadecane layers, yielding a marked reduction in the friction coefficient. When present at equal surface coverage, OFMs with saturated and Z-unsaturated tail groups are found to yield similar structure and friction behavior. OFMs with glyceride head groups yield significantly lower friction coefficients than amide and particularly carboxylic acid head groups. For all of the OFMs and coverages simulated, the friction coefficient is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of sliding velocity; however, the gradient of this increase depends on the coverage. The structure and friction details obtained from these simulations agree well with experimental results and also shed light on the relative tribological performance of these OFMs through nanoscale structural variations. This has important implications in terms of the applicability of NEMD to aid the development of new formulations to control friction. PMID:27064962

  7. Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 Fermentation Medium Optimization for the Production of Succinic Acid by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Wan, Duan-Ji; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2012-01-01

    As a potential intermediary feedstock, succinic acid takes an important place in bulk chemical productions. For the first time, a method combining Plackett-Burman design (PBD), steepest ascent method (SA), and Box-Behnken design (BBD) was developed to optimize Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 fermentation medium. First, glucose, yeast extract, and MgCO3 were identified to be key medium components by PBD. Second, preliminary optimization was run by SA method to access the optimal region of the key medium components. Finally, the responses, that is, the production of succinic acid, were optimized simultaneously by using BBD, and the optimal concentration was located to be 84.6 g L−1 of glucose, 14.5 g L−1 of yeast extract, and 64.7 g L−1 of MgCO3. Verification experiment indicated that the maximal succinic acid production of 52.7 ± 0.8 g L−1 was obtained under the identified optimal conditions. The result agreed with the predicted value well. Compared with that of the basic medium, the production of succinic acid and yield of succinic acid against glucose were enhanced by 67.3% and 111.1%, respectively. The results obtained in this study may be useful for the industrial commercial production of succinic acid. PMID:23093852

  8. Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 fermentation medium optimization for the production of succinic acid by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Wan, Duan-Ji; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2012-01-01

    As a potential intermediary feedstock, succinic acid takes an important place in bulk chemical productions. For the first time, a method combining Plackett-Burman design (PBD), steepest ascent method (SA), and Box-Behnken design (BBD) was developed to optimize Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618 fermentation medium. First, glucose, yeast extract, and MgCO(3) were identified to be key medium components by PBD. Second, preliminary optimization was run by SA method to access the optimal region of the key medium components. Finally, the responses, that is, the production of succinic acid, were optimized simultaneously by using BBD, and the optimal concentration was located to be 84.6 g L(-1) of glucose, 14.5 g L(-1) of yeast extract, and 64.7 g L(-1) of MgCO(3). Verification experiment indicated that the maximal succinic acid production of 52.7 ± 0.8 g L(-1) was obtained under the identified optimal conditions. The result agreed with the predicted value well. Compared with that of the basic medium, the production of succinic acid and yield of succinic acid against glucose were enhanced by 67.3% and 111.1%, respectively. The results obtained in this study may be useful for the industrial commercial production of succinic acid. PMID:23093852

  9. Molecular dynamics-based triangulation algorithm of free-form parametric surfaces for computer-aided engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznyakova, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    A new computational approach for automated triangulation of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) surface models, applicable to various CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) problems of practical interest is proposed. The complex shaped product configurations are represented by a set of Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) surface patches. The suggested technique is based on the molecular dynamics method. The main idea of the approach is that the mesh nodes are considered as similarly charged interacting particles which move within the region to be meshed under the influence of internal (such as particle-particle interaction forces) and external forces as well as optional additional forces. Moreover, the particles experience a medium resistance due to which the system comes to equilibrium within a relatively short period of time. The proposed 3D surface mesh generation algorithm uses a parametric NURBS representation as initial definition of the domain boundary. This method first distributes the interacting nodes into optimal locations in the parametric domain of the NURBS surface patch using molecular dynamics simulation. Then, the well-shaped triangles can be created after connecting the nodes by Delaunay triangulation. Finally, the mapping from parametric space to 3D physical space is performed. Since the presented interactive algorithm allows to control the distance between a pair of nodes depending on the curvature of the NURBS surface, the method generates high quality triangular mesh. The algorithm enables to produce uniform mesh, as well as anisotropic adaptive mesh with refinement in the large gradient regions. The mesh generation approach has the abilities to preserve the representation accuracy of the input geometry model, create a close relationship between geometry modeling and grid generation process, be automated to a large degree. Some examples are considered in order to illustrate the method's ability to generate a surface mesh for a complicated CAD model.

  10. Dynamics of groundwater-surface water interactions in urban streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    In industrialized countries the majority of streams and rivers have been subject to changes in the hydrological regime and alteration of the channel morphology. Urban streams are typically characterized by “flashier” hydrographs as a result of more direct runoff from impervious surfaces. Channel structure and complexity are often impaired compared to pristine streams. As a consequence the potential for bedform-driven water flow in the streambed is reduced. The downward transport of oxygen by advective flow in the streambed is known to be of great ecological importance for the hyporheic macro and micro fauna and facilitates nutrient cycling and the degradation of organic pollutants. We studied the dynamics of groundwater-surface water exchange of two anthropogenically impacted streams in urban areas to examine the effects of variable hydrologic boundary conditions on water flux and redox conditions in the streambed. The first stream is fed by groundwater as well as storm-water from a large industrial area. Here, we monitored the variability of vertical hydraulic gradients, streambed temperature and redox conditions in the streambed over the course of 5 months. The second stream is frequently polluted by combined sewer overflows (CSO) from an urban watershed. Here, we measured the vertical hydraulic gradients, streambed temperature and electrical conductivity (EC) in the stream, the streambed and in the adjacent aquifer. Both streams are characterized by strong variations in hydraulic gradients due to the dynamic hydrographs as well as the variations in total head in the shallow aquifer. Therefore, magnitude and direction of water flux through the streambed changed significantly over time. At the first site long-term variations of redox conditions in the shallow streambed (0.1 m) were related to the direction of water fluxes. Downward water flow resulted in increased redox potentials. However, the high short-term variability of redox conditions could not be

  11. Quantifying Seasonal Dynamics of Surface Inundation on the Barrow Peninsula, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. J.; Chen, M.; Rowland, J. C.; Altmann, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands are commonly distributed across the Arctic Coastal Plain of Northern Alaska, a low-gradient region underlain by continuous permafrost. They are important components of the global biogeochemical cycle because of the large carbon stores and potential release of this carbon as CO2 and CH4 due to climate change. These wetlands are recharged seasonally by water from snowmelt and summer rainfall, but their area shrinks significantly during the snow free season every year. While seasonal and long-term thaw lake area change is well documented, the seasonal dynamics of smaller wetland features including polygon ponds is poorly quantified. Understanding and quantifying the factors driving and controlling the spatial redistribution of surface water will help in the parameterization of models and evaluation of predictions of water, energy and carbon budgets for lowland Arctic regions. In this study, we used high spatial resolution images (WorldView 2 and QuickBird) on 9 dates from 2006-2012 to investigate the seasonal change and spatial pattern of surface water area for a 4700 ha wetland near Barrow, AK. We found that the surface water area decreased dramatically throughout the summer each year. For example, it decreased by 782 ha (74%) from June 24 to July 21 and continued to decrease by 153 ha (54%) from July 21 to August 4 in 2010. The correlation between the seasonal change in surface water area and local precipitation minus evapotranspiration was low, indicating that the local water balance had little direct control on the change in surface water area through the Summer. Instead, the post snowmelt change in the area of surface inundation as a function of time was well fit by the equation for hydrograph recession, indicating that drainage of ponded water in July and August may be primarily controlled by shallow subsurface flow rather than through evapotranspiration, even in this very low gradient environment. The rate of drainage of surface water was significantly

  12. Simulation of the interaction of electromagnetic waves with dispersed particles in the propagation of breather in the surface layer of a liquid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zabolotin, V.V.; Uvarova, L.A.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical simulation of the interaction of laser radiation with dispersed particles in the course of propagation of breather in the surface layer of the liquid breather was performed. The shape and amplitude of the acoustic signal formed in this interaction were obtained. Two acoustic signals, before and after the impact of a breather on the process of optical sound generation, were compared. Results of the comparison showed that the breather spreading over the surface of the liquid medium affecst the acoustic signal and its effect must be considered in the measurements.

  13. Microscopic Receding Contact Line Dynamics on Pillar and Irregular Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, Yong Han; Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S.

    2015-01-01

    Receding angles have been shown to have great significance when designing a superhydrophobic surface for applications involving self-cleaning. Although apparent receding angles under dynamic conditions have been well studied, the microscopic receding contact line dynamics are not well understood. Therefore, experiments were performed to measure these dynamics on textured square pillar and irregular superhydrophobic surfaces at micron length scales and at micro-second temporal scales. Results revealed a consistent “slide-snap” motion of the microscopic receding line as compared to the “stick-slip” dynamics reported in previous studies. Interface angles between 40–60° were measured for the pre-snap receding lines on all pillar surfaces. Similar “slide-snap” dynamics were also observed on an irregular nanocomposite surface. However, the sharper features of the surface asperities resulted in a higher pre-snap receding line interface angle (~90°). PMID:25670630

  14. 2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Sitz

    2011-08-12

    The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

  15. Medium Optimization for the Production of Fibrinolytic Enzyme by Paenibacillus sp. IND8 Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Prakash Vincent, Samuel Gnana

    2014-01-01

    Production of fibrinolytic enzyme by a newly isolated Paenibacillus sp. IND8 was optimized using wheat bran in solid state fermentation. A 25 full factorial design (first-order model) was applied to elucidate the key factors as moisture, pH, sucrose, yeast extract, and sodium dihydrogen phosphate. Statistical analysis of the results has shown that moisture, sucrose, and sodium dihydrogen phosphate have the most significant effects on fibrinolytic enzymes production (P < 0.05). Central composite design (CCD) was used to determine the optimal concentrations of these three components and the experimental results were fitted with a second-order polynomial model at 95% level (P < 0.05). Overall, 4.5-fold increase in fibrinolytic enzyme production was achieved in the optimized medium as compared with the unoptimized medium. PMID:24523635

  16. On the dynamical and physical state of the {open_quotes}diffuse ionized medium{close_quotes} in nearby spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Heckman, T.M.; Lehnert, M.D.

    1997-12-01

    We report the initial results from a program to study the morphology, physical state, and kinematics of the {open_quotes}diffuse ionized medium{close_quotes} (DIM) in a sample of the nearest and brightest late-type galaxies. For each of five galaxies (NGC 2403, M81, NGC 4395, M51, and M101), we have analyzed deep narrowband H{alpha} images of the entire star-forming disk and long-slit spectra of the inner ({approximately}10kpc) disk with a resolution of 40{endash}75kms{sup {minus}1}. We find that the DIM covers most of the star-forming disk and is morphologically related to the presence of high surface brightness gas (the giant HII regions). The DIM and the giant HII regions differ systematically in their physical and dynamical state. The DIM is characterized by enhanced emission in the low-ionization forbidden lines ([OI], [NII], and [SII]), and even the high-ionization [OIII] {lambda}5007 line is moderately strong in the DIM in at least three cases. This last result contrasts with upper limits on the [OIII] surface brightness in the local DIM of our own Galaxy (the {open_quotes}Reynolds Layer{close_quotes}). We directly verify the inference made by Lehnert and Heckman that the DIM contributes significantly to the spatially integrated (global) emission-line ratios measured in late-type galaxies. We also find that the DIM is more disturbed kinematically than the gas in the giant HII regions. The deconvolved (intrinsic) widths of the H{alpha} and [NII] {lambda}6584 lines range from 30 to 100kms{sup {minus}1} (FWHM) in the DIM compared to 20{endash}50kms{sup {minus}1} in the giant HII regions. The high-ionization gas in the DIM is more kinematically disturbed than the low-ionization gas: the [OIII] {lambda}5007 lines have intrinsic widths of 70{endash}150kms{sup {minus}1}. The differing kinematics implies that the DIM is not a single monolithic phase of the ISM. Instead, it may consist of a {open_quotes}quiescent{close_quotes} DIM with a low ionization state and

  17. Singularity of influence of stochastic and order phase structures on optical quality of gas-dynamic laser active medium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, Valery O.; Lobachev, Vitaly V.

    2002-02-01

    Detail analysis of active medium flow structure is presented. Schlieren method photography of flow is processed to reconstruct parameters both stochastic and order phase components. Properties of random part including correlation function, spectrum of spatial frequency, scale of turbulence, are determined by digital filtering. It was possible to compare influence of random and regular phase distortions on radiation divergence structure.

  18. The Short- to Medium-Term Predictive Accuracy of Static and Dynamic Risk Assessment Measures in a Secure Forensic Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Chi Meng; Thomas, Stuart D. M.; Ogloff, James R. P.; Daffern, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Although violence risk assessment knowledge and practice has advanced over the past few decades, it remains practically difficult to decide which measures clinicians should use to assess and make decisions about the violence potential of individuals on an ongoing basis, particularly in the short to medium term. Within this context, this study…

  19. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat S; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-03-17

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser's relatively large penetration depth and consequently these techniques record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and subpicosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample's surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystal and its powder film. We also discuss the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces. PMID:26911313

  20. Segmental dynamics simulation of the deformation for polymer adhesive between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Adams, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    The deformation of polymer adhesives between surfaces is investigated using the authors Segmental Dynamics Model. A simple tensile test is simulated by placing an equilibrated polymer adhesive film between two surfaces. The equilibrium structure and dynamics of the adhesive deformation are investigated. The density of anchor segments ({rho}) and the bond strength of the anchor segment to the surface ({phi}) were varied to determine the effects on deformation.

  1. Aggregation behavior of sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate in aqueous ethylene glycol medium. A case of hydrogen bonding between surfactant and solvent and its manifestation in the surface tension isotherm.

    PubMed

    Das, D; Dey, J; Chandra, A K; Thapa, U; Ismail, K

    2012-11-13

    The dependence of critical micelle concentration (cmc) of sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (AOT) on the amount of ethylene glycol (EG) in water + EG medium was reported to be unusual and different from that of other surfactants to the extent that the cmc of AOT in EG is lower than in water. It is yet to be understood why AOT behaves so in water + EG medium, although AOT is known to have some special properties. Hence in the present study cmc of AOT in water + EG medium in the range from 0 to 100% (by weight) EG is measured by using surface tension and fluorescence emission methods. In contrast to what was reported, this study revealed that with respect to EG amount the cmc of AOT follows the general trend and AOT has higher cmc in EG than in water. On the other hand, it was surprisingly found that a break in the surface tension isotherm occurs in the premicellar region when the amount of EG exceeds 50% rendering a bisigmoidal shape to the surface tension isotherm. UV spectral study showed that AOT and EG undergo hydrogen bonding in the premicellar region when the EG amount is ≥50% and this hydrogen bonding becomes less on adding NaCl. The density functional theory calculations also showed formation of hydrogen bonds between EG and AOT through the sulfonate group of AOT providing thereby support to the experimental findings. The calculations predicted a highly stable AOT-EG-H(2)O trimer complex with a binding energy of -37.93 kcal mol(-1). The present system is an example, which is first of its kind, of a case where hydrogen bonding with surfactant and solvent molecules results in a surface tension break. PMID:23072621

  2. Mathematical Analysis of Hall Effect on Transient Hartman Flow about a Rotating Horizontal Permeable Surface in a Porous Medium under Inclined Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, M.; Manglik, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the exact solution for unsteady flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a impulsively started infinite horizontal surface which is rotating with an angular velocity embedded in a saturated porous medium under the influence of strong magnetic field with hall effect. Our study focuses on the change of direction of the external magnetic field on the flow system which leads to change in the flow behavior and skin frictional forces at the boundary. Systems of flow equations are solved using Laplace transform technique. The impacts of control parameters Hartman number, rotation of the system, hall effect, inclination of the magnetic field, and Darcy number on primary and secondary velocities are shown graphically, skin friction at horizontal boundary in tabular form. For validating our results, in the absence of permeability of the porous medium and inclination of the magnetic field the results are in good agreement with the published results.

  3. The shape, stability and dynamics of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2008-03-01

    Bending a thin sheet is easier than stretching it, an observation which has its roots in geometry. We will use this fact to explain some unusual problems in biology, physics and geology. At the everyday scale, I will discuss the morphology of avascular algal blades, the dynamics of defects in an elastic ribbon, and the dynamics of prey capture by certain carnivorous plants. At the geological scale, I will try to explain the shape of island arcs on our planet. Finally, time permitting, I will discuss how we might extend these ideas to the macromolecular scale, to derive a mechanical model for the dynamic instability of a growing microtubule.

  4. Dynamic Analyses of Polymer Surface using Dielectric Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Masashi

    A new dielectric relaxation measurement technique for analyses of polymer surface was developed. In this technique, in order to maintain the original surface, probing electrodes were placed away from the sample, and a liquid to stabilize the surface was filled in the space between the sample and the electrodes. From difference of dielectric relaxation between a bare polyimide and gold-coated polyimide, the surface of polyimide was characterized. The surface dielectric relaxation spectrum at room temperature depended on the liquid species: The Debye relaxation was obtained for ethanol, while multiple-relaxation was observed for ultrapure water. A thermal activation process of the polyimide surface was investigated using temperature-controlled ultrapure water, and it was found that the surface transited from the multiple-relaxation to the Debye relaxation at ∼95°C. In the Debye relaxation condition, the surface can be characterized with a capacitance independent of the liquid species. The capacitance estimated at 110 pF provided a characteristic curve of the polyimide surface. A surface model was proposed to explain the thermal activation process.

  5. Similarity solutions for buoyancy-induced flow of a power-law fluid over a horizontal surface immersed in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Chamkha, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    There has been considerable interest in studying natural or buoyancy-induced flows in fluid-saturated porous media adjacent to surfaces in recent years. This interest stems from numerous possible industrial and technological applications. Examples of some applications include geothermal reservoirs, drying of porous solids, heat exchanger design, petroleum production, filtration, chemical catalytic reactor, nuclear waste repositories, and geophysical flows. Here, continuum equations governing steady, laminar, buoyancy-induced flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid over a horizontal surface immersed in a uniform porosity and permeability porous medium are developed. These partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations by using a general similarity transformation for variable surface temperature and constant heat flux cases. The resulting equations are solved numerically by an implicit finite-difference method. Numerical results for typical velocity and temperature profiles are presented and discussed.

  6. Ion-induced electron emission from surfaces: Dynamical screening effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Berakdar, Jamal

    2003-08-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the description of the single-electron emission from surfaces following the impact of fast ions. The theory describes quantum mechanically the ion reflection at the surface and the excitation of the valence band electrons via an ion-electron interaction renormalized by the dielectric response of the target. Numerical calculations are presented and analyzed for the electron emission from the conduction band of an aluminum surface upon proton impact. Particular attention is devoted to the influence of the dielectric screening on the energy distributions and the angular distributions of the ejected electrons. In addition, the role of the surface electronic structure is studied.

  7. Photochemical dynamics of surface oriented molecules. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.

    1992-09-01

    The period 8/01/91-7/31/92 is the first year of a new project titled ``Photochemical Dynamics of Surface Oriented Molecules``, initiated with DOE Support. The main objective of this project is to understand the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions by studying photochemical dynamics of surface-oriented molecules. In addition, the mechanisms of photon-surface interactions need to be elucidated. The strategy is to carry out experiments to measure the translational energy distribution, as a function of the angle from the surface normal, of the photoproducts by time-of-flight (TOF) technique by varying the photon wavelength, intensity, polarization, and pulse duration. By choosing adsorbates with different bonding configuration, the effects of adsorbate orientation on surface photochemical dynamics can be studied.

  8. Dynamics of changes in the colored form of spiroantrooxazine incorporated into polytetrafluoroethylene F-42 in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, A. S.; Glagolev, N. N.; Timashev, P. S.; Cherkasova, A. V.; Timashev, S. F.; Solov'eva, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    It is shown that the incorporation of spiroantrooxazine (SAO), which has pronounced photochromic properties, into polytetrafluoroethylene F-42 in supercritical carbon dioxide medium leads to the formation of metastable colored photochromic states of different structure. In the subsequent relaxation of the polymer-SAO system, these states give rise to the most thermodynamically stable isomeric form of SAO for the given system. The kinetics of these reactions is analyzed in supercritical CO2 medium and after placing the test sample in air upon the formation of the unstable colored form of the photochromic molecule in the polymeric matrix. It is noted that in these cases, comparison of the rate constants of relaxation transitions allows us to numerically assess how the matrix plasticization by carbon dioxide affects the formation of photochromic colored states and the relaxation reorganization of the photochromic metastable forms.

  9. Dynamical evolution, hadronization and angular de-correlation of heavy flavor in a hot and dense QCD medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2014-12-01

    We study heavy flavor evolution and hadronization in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The in-medium evolution of heavy quarks is described using our modified Langevin framework that incorporates both collisional and radiative energy loss mechanisms. The subsequent hadronization process for heavy quarks is calculated with a fragmentation plus recombination model. We find significant contribution from gluon radiation to heavy quark energy loss at high pT; the recombination mechanism can greatly enhance the D meson production at medium pT. Our calculation provides a good description of the D meson nuclear modification at the LHC. In addition, we explore the angular correlation functions of heavy flavor pairs which may provide us a potential candidate for distinguishing different energy loss mechanisms of heavy quarks inside the QGP.

  10. Constitutional Dynamics of Metal-Organic Motifs on a Au(111) Surface.

    PubMed

    Kong, Huihui; Zhang, Chi; Xie, Lei; Wang, Likun; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-13

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC), including both dynamic covalent chemistry and dynamic noncovalent chemistry, relies on reversible formation and breakage of bonds to achieve continuous changes in constitution by reorganization of components. In this regard, CDC is considered to be an efficient and appealing strategy for selective fabrication of surface nanostructures by virtue of dynamic diversity. Although constitutional dynamics of monolayered structures has been recently demonstrated at liquid/solid interfaces, most of molecular reorganization/reaction processes were thought to be irreversible under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions where CDC is therefore a challenge to be achieved. Here, we have successfully constructed a system that presents constitutional dynamics on a solid surface based on dynamic coordination chemistry, in which selective formation of metal-organic motifs is achieved under UHV conditions. The key to making this reversible switching successful is the molecule-substrate interaction as revealed by DFT calculations. PMID:27144822

  11. Applying Parallel Adaptive Methods with GeoFEST/PYRAMID to Simulate Earth Surface Crustal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Lyzenga, Greg; Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Li, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in simulating the Crustal Dynamics of Earth's Surface. AMR simultaneously improves solution quality, time to solution, and computer memory requirements when compared to generating/running on a globally fine mesh. The use of AMR in simulating the dynamics of the Earth's Surface is spurred by future proposed NASA missions, such as InSAR for Earth surface deformation and other measurements. These missions will require support for large-scale adaptive numerical methods using AMR to model observations. AMR was chosen because it has been successful in computation fluid dynamics for predictive simulation of complex flows around complex structures.

  12. Coupling surface and mantle dynamics: A novel experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca; Sembroni, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Recent modeling shows that surface processes, such as erosion and deposition, may drive the deformation of the Earth's surface, interfering with deeper crustal and mantle signals. To investigate the coupling between the surface and deep process, we designed a three-dimensional laboratory apparatus, to analyze the role of erosion and sedimentation, triggered by deep mantle instability. The setup is constituted and scaled down to natural gravity field using a thin viscous sheet model, with mantle and lithosphere simulated by Newtonian viscous glucose syrup and silicon putty, respectively. The surface process is simulated assuming a simple erosion law producing the downhill flow of a thin viscous material away from high topography. The deep mantle upwelling is triggered by the rise of a buoyant sphere. The results of these models along with the parametric analysis show how surface processes influence uplift velocity and topography signals.

  13. Dynamics of DNA Chains on Flat and Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingquan; Xiaohua, Fang; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan

    2003-03-01

    The electrophoresis of DNA chains on flat silicon and patterned surfaces was studied by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. Solutions of lambda DNA of 48,502 bp and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) of 3 6 Mb were deposited on different surfaces. The surfaces were chemically modified to be hydrophilic or SAM-covered and the patterns were produced over length scales from nano to micro size in the form of gratings or square arrays. The interaction with the surface and mobility of DNA chains depended on the surface chemistry, topography and ion concentration of buffer. The motion of individual chains in the electric field was analyzed both in terms of the dimensions and orientation of the pattern structure. Supported by NSF-MRSEC program (DMR-9632525)

  14. Lyman-α driven molecule formation on SiO2 surfaces-connection to astrochemistry on dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajappan, M.; Yuan, C.; Yates, J. T.

    2011-02-01

    As a model for silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium, we have used high area amorphous SiO2 as a surface on which to carry out Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photodecomposition of adsorbed N2O at 71 K and at a coverage of ~0.3 monolayer. The N2O molecules are adsorbed by hydrogen bonding to surface Si-OH groups. Transmission IR spectroscopy measurements permit the observation of the consumption of adsorbed N2O and the production of various photoproducts. It is observed that in comparison to N2O consumption, the relative rate of formation of the products NO2 and N2O4 made by combination reactions is enhanced significantly on the SiO2 surface. Reactions between photogenerated radicals themselves or between radicals and parent N2O on the SiO2 surface exceed the relative rates observed in the gas phase by factors of up to ~20. As the complexity of the combination product increases, its relative production rate, compared to the gas phase, increases due to the involvement of multiple surface-combination elementary steps. It is proposed that the enhancement of combination reactions on the SiO2 surface is due to the surface's ability to absorb excess energy evolved during the chemical-bond-forming events on the surface. This principle is probably significant on grain surfaces supporting photochemical processes of astrochemical interest, and indeed is expected. The cross section for adsorbed N2O photodecomposition on the porous SiO2 surface is about 7 × 10-20 cm2 and the quantum yield for the adsorbed molecule decomposition is about 0.006, compared to a quantum yield of 1.46 in the gas phase. This decrease in photon efficiency is attributed to absorption and scattering of Lyman-α radiation by the SiO2 particles.

  15. Dynamics of Phenanthrenequinone on Carbon Nano-Onion Surfaces Probed by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Anjos, Daniela M; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Mavila Chathoth, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to study the dynamics of phenanthrenequinone (PQ) on the surface of onion-like carbon (OLC), or so called carbon onions, as a function of surface coverage and temperature. For both the high- and low-coverage samples, we observed two diffusion processes; a faster process and nearly an order of magnitude slower process. On the high-coverage surface, the slow diffusion process is of long-range translational character, whereas the fast diffusion process is spatially localized on the length scale of ~ 4.7 . On the low-coverage surface, both diffusion processes are spatially localized; on the same length scale of ~ 4.7 for the fast diffusion and a somewhat larger length scale for the slow diffusion. Arrhenius temperature dependence is observed except for the long-range diffusion on the high-coverage surface. We attribute the fast diffusion process to the generic localized in-cage dynamics of PQ molecules, and the slow diffusion process to the long-range translational dynamics of PQ molecules, which, depending on the coverage, may be either spatially restricted, or long-range. On the low-coverage surface, uniform surface coverage is not attained, and the PQ molecules experience the effect of spatial constraints on their long-range translational dynamics. Unexpectedly, the dynamics of PQ molecules on OLC as a function of temperature and surface coverage bears qualitative resemblance to the dynamics of water molecules on oxide surfaces, including practically temperature-independent residence times for the low-coverage surface. The dynamics features that we observed may be universal across different classes of surface adsorbates.

  16. Molecular dynamics study on surface structure and surface energy of rutile TiO 2 (1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dai-Ping; Liang, Ying-Chun; Chen, Ming-Jun; Bai, Qing-Shun

    2009-03-01

    The formula for surface energy was modified in accordance with the slab model of molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations, and MD simulations were performed to investigate the relaxed structure and surface energy of perfect and pit rutile TiO 2(1 1 0). Simulation results indicate that the slab with a surface more than four layers away from the fixed layer expresses well the surface characteristics of rutile TiO 2 (1 1 0) surface; and the surface energy of perfect rutile TiO 2 (1 1 0) surface converges to 1.801±0.001 J m -2. The study on perfect and pit slab models proves the effectiveness of the modified formula for surface energy. Moreover, the surface energy of pit surface is higher than that of perfect surface and exhibits an upper-concave parabolic increase and a step-like increase with increasing the number of units deleted along [0 0 1] and [1 1 0], respectively. Therefore, in order to obtain a higher surface energy, the direction along which atoms are cut out should be chosen in accordance with the pit sizes: [ 1¯10] direction for a small pit size and [0 0 1] direction for a big pit size; or alternatively the odd units of atoms along [1 1 0] direction are removed.

  17. Wetting and Interfacial Tension Dynamics of Oil-Nanofluids-Surface Minerals System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, L.; Li, C.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Korte, C.; Ladner, D.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), chemical injection involves the injection of surfactants to increase the oil mobility and decrease the interfacial tension (IFT). With the nanotechnology revolution, the use of nanoparticles has shown unique opportunities in petroleum engineering due to their physico-chemical properties. Our research examines the potential application of nanoparticles as a means of EOR by studying the influence of silicon oxide nanoparticles on the wettability and IFT of oil-nanofluids-surface systems. Batch studies were conducted to assess the stability of the nanoparticle suspensions of different concentrations (0, 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 wt. %) in different reservoir conditions with and without the addition of surfactants (i.e. 5% brine, and Tween 20 at 0.5 and 2 cmc). Testing of oil-nanofluids and oil-nanofluids-minerals interactions was performed using crude oils from West Texas (light, API 40), Prudhoe Bay (medium, API 28), and Lloydminster (heavy, API 20). The dynamic behavior of IFT was measured using a pendant drop method. Results for 5% brine-nanoparticle systems indicated that 0.001 and 0.01 wt.% of nanoparticles contributed to a significant decrease of IFT for West Texas and Prudhoe Bay oils, while the highest decrease of IFT for Lloydminster was reported with 0.1 wt.% nanoparticles. IFT decrease was also enhanced by surfactant, and the addition of nanoparticles at 0.001 wt.% to surfactant resulted in significant decrease of IFT in most of the tested oil-nanofluid systems. The sessile drop method was used to measure the dynamic behavior of the contact angle of these oil droplets on minerals surface made of thin sections from Berea and Boise sandstone cores through a wetting test. Different nanofluid and surfactant concentrations were tested for the optimization of changes in wettability, which is a critical phase in assessing the behavior of nanofluids for optimal EOR with the selected crude oils.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of the Au(111) Surface in an Electrochemical Enviroment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collini, John; Liu, Yihua; McDonough, Bryanne; Pierce, Michael; You, Hoydoo; Komanicky, Vladimir; Barbour, Andi

    The Au(111) surface possesses a well-known herringbone surface reconstruction pattern. However, the character of the reconstruction's response to external variables is not completely understood due to the limited amount of kinetics and dynamics studies of the surface in different environments. Here, we present in-situ x-ray scattering measurements from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory of the Au(111) surface in a controllable electrochemical environment of weak NaF solution. Crystal truncation rod (CTR) measurements were taken to examine how the average surface properties and overall structure change with cell voltage. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) measurements were also taken to examine how the dynamics of the surface change with voltage. The relation between applied potential, average kinetics, and microstate dynamics will be discussed. Funding provided by Research Corporation for Science Advancement. Work done at the Advanced Photon Source supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dyatkin, Boris; Zhang, Yu; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cummings, Peter T.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces andmore » enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.« less

  20. Influence of a corrosive-abrasive medium on the wear resistance of 12Kh18N10T steel with surface hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Golubets, V.M.; Kozub, V.V.; Shchuiko, Ya.V.; Pashechko, M.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors study the wear and corrosion resistance of 12Kh18N10T steel after diffusion boriding, electrospark alloying, and combined hardening in a corrosive abrasive medium consisting of 50 percent sand and 3 percent NaCl with hydrochloric acid added to obtain a pH of 1. Metallographic analysis revealed a 40-micrometer-deep case with a microhardness of 6-8.5 GPa on the surface. X-ray diffraction established that the boride case consists of an FeB phase alloyed with chromium and nickel. Results are graphed.

  1. Droplet-surface Impingement Dynamics for Intelligent Spray Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Kizito, John P.; Tryggvason, Gretar; Berger, Gordon M.; Mozes, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Spray cooling has high potential in thermal management and life support systems by overcoming the deleterious effect of microgravity upon two-phase heat transfer. In particular spray cooling offers several advantages in heat flux removal that include the following: 1. By maintaining a wetted surface, spray droplets impinge upon a thin fluid film rather than a dry solid surface 2. Most heat transfer surfaces will not be smooth but rough. Roughness can enhance conductive cooling, aid liquid removal by flow channeling. 3. Spray momentum can be used to a) substitute for gravity delivering fluid to the surface, b) prevent local dryout and potential thermal runaway and c) facilitate liquid and vapor removal. Yet high momentum results in high We and Re numbers characterizing the individual spray droplets. Beyond an impingement threshold, droplets splash rather than spread. Heat flux declines and spray cooling efficiency can markedly decrease. Accordingly we are investigating droplet impingement upon a) dry solid surfaces, b) fluid films, c) rough surfaces and determining splashing thresholds and relationships for both dry surfaces and those covered by fluid films. We are presently developing engineering correlations delineating the boundary between splashing and non-splashing regions.

  2. Effect of low-concentration rhamnolipid on transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 in an ideal porous medium with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Liu, Guansheng; Jiang, Yongbing; Brusseau, Mark L; Liu, Zhifeng; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-03-01

    The success of effective bioaugmentation processes for remediation of soil and groundwater contamination requires effective transport of the injected microorganisms in the subsurface environment. In this study, the effect of low concentrations of monorhamnolipid biosurfactant solutions on transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ideal porous medium (glass beads) with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces was investigated by conducting miscible-displacement experiments. Transport behavior was examined for both glucose-grown and hexadecane-grown cells, with low and high surface hydrophobicity, respectively. A clean-bed colloid deposition model was used for determination of deposition rate coefficients. Results show that cells with high surface hydrophobicity exhibit greater retention than cells with low surface hydrophobicity. Rhamnolipid affects cell transport primarily by changing cell surface hydrophobicity, with an additional minor effect by increasing solution ionic strength. There is a good linear relation between k and rhamnolipid-regulated cell surface hydrophobicity presented as bacterial-adhesion-to-hydrocarbon (BATH) rate of cells (R(2)=0.71). The results of this study show the importance of hydrophobic interaction for transport of bacterial cells in silica-based porous media, and the potential of using low-concentration rhamnolipid solutions for facilitating bacterial transport in bioaugmentation efforts. PMID:26722821

  3. Carbon monoxide-induced dynamic metal-surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Carenco, Sophie

    2014-08-18

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule in surface science, materials chemistry, catalysis and nanotechnology. Its interaction with a number of metal surfaces is at the heart of major processes, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or fuel-cell optimization. Recent works, coupling structural and nanoscale in situ analytic tools have highlighted the ability of metal surfaces and nanoparticles to undergo restructuring after exposure to CO under fairly mild conditions, generating nanostructures. This Minireview proposes a brief overview of recent examples of such nanostructuring, which leads to a discussion about the driving force in reversible and non-reversible situations. PMID:25044189

  4. Adsorption-Induced Surface Stresses of the Water/Quartz Interface: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-05-31

    Adsorption-induced deformation is expansion or contraction of a solid due to adsorption on its surface. This phenomenon is important for a wide range of applications, from chemomechanical sensors to methane recovery from geological formations. The strain of the solid is driven by the change of the surface stress due to adsorption. Using ab initio molecular dynamics, we calculate the surface stresses for the dry α-quartz surfaces, and investigate how these stresses change when the surfaces are exposed to water. We find that the nonhydroxylated surface shows small and approximately isotropic changes in stress, while the hydroxylated surface, which interacts more strongly with the polar water molecules, shows larger and qualitatively anisotropic (opposite sign in xx and yy) surface stress changes. All of these changes are several times larger than the surface tension of water itself. The anisotropy and possibility of positive surface stress change can explain experimentally observed surface area contraction due to adsorption. PMID:27159032

  5. Surface space-charge dynamics and surface recombination on silicon (111) surfaces measured with combined laser and synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.P.; Sadeghi, H.R.; Rife, J.C.; Kabler, M.N. )

    1990-03-05

    The results of a new experiment, which records transient, pulsed-laser-induced surface photovoltages by following photoemission shifts measured with synchrotron radiation, are reported. Comparison of the surface photovoltage decays with numerical simulations reveals large surface recombination rates for a variety of Si(111) surface preparations. The space-charge layer near the surface is found to govern the surface and bulk carrier concentrations to a remarkable extent, particularly when band bending is large.

  6. Dynamic Moon: New Impacts and Contemporary Surface Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speyerer, E. J.; Povilaitis, R. Z.; Robinson, M. S.; Thomas, P. C.; Wagner, R. V.

    2016-05-01

    Before and after image pairs acquired by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera enable the identification of new impact craters and secondary surface changes revealing new insight into the cratering process and regolith gardening.

  7. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Observation of a dynamic specular weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Song, H. S.; Saeed, G.

    2006-06-01

    Observation and measurement of a weld pool surface is a key towards the development of next generation intelligent welding machines which can mimic a skilled human welder to a certain extent. However, the bright arc radiation and the specular surface complicate the observation and measurement task. This paper proposes a novel method to turn the difficulty of the specular surface into an advantage by exploiting the difference between propagation of an illumination laser and the arc plasma. The governing law is simply the reflection law which can provide the base for the computation of the weld pool surface. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of the proposed method in acquiring clear images in the presence of the bright arc.

  8. Droplet-Surface Impingement Dynamics for Intelligent Spray Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Kizito, John P.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    Spray cooling has high potential in thermal management and life support systems by overcoming the deleterious effect of microgravity upon two-phase heat transfer. In particular spray cooling offers several advantages in heat flux removal that include the following: 1) By maintaining a wetted surface, spray droplets impinge upon a thin fluid film rather than a dry solid surface; 2. Most heat transfer surfaces will not be smooth but rough. Roughness can enhance conductive cooling, aid liquid removal by flow channeling; and 3. Spray momentum can be used to a) substitute for gravity delivering fluid to the surface, b) prevent local dryout and potential thermal runaway and c) facilitate liquid and vapor removal. Yet high momentum results in high We and Re numbers characterizing the individual spray droplets. Beyond an impingement threshold, droplets splash rather than spread. Heat flux declines and spray cooling efficiency can markedly decrease. Accordingly we are investigating droplet impingement upon a) dry solid surfaces, b) fluid films, c) rough surfaces and determining splashing thresholds and relationships for both dry surfaces and those covered by fluid films. We are presently developing engineering correlations delineating the boundary between splashing and non-splashing regions. Determining the splash/non-splash boundary is important for many practical applications. Coating and cooling processes would each benefit from near-term empirical relations and subsequent models. Such demonstrations can guide theoretical development by providing definitive testing of its predictive capabilities. Thus, empirical relations describing the boundary between splash and non-splash are given for drops impinging upon a dry solid surface and upon a thin fluid film covering a similar surface. Analytical simplification of the power laws describing the boundary between the splash and non-splash regions yields insight into the engineering parameters governing the splash and non

  9. Comparison of surface modification of polypropylene film by filamentary DBD at atmospheric pressure and homogeneous DBD at medium pressure in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Xie, X.; Li, J.; Yang, H.; Qiu, Y.; Kuffel, E.

    2009-04-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas generated by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) are of great interest in material surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, polypropylene (PP) films are modified using a non-equilibrium plasma generated by a DBD in air in homogeneous mode and in filamentary mode. The filamentary DBD is generated in ambient air, and the homogeneous DBD is generated at medium pressure with an operating pressure value of 3 kPa. The characteristics of homogeneous DBD are studied and compared with those of filamentary DBD by measuring their electrical discharge parameters and observing their light emission phenomena, and the surface properties of the PP films before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle and surface energy measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the homogeneous DBD is even and stable in the whole gas gap, which differs from the commonly filamentary DBD. The plasma treatments modify the PP surface in both morphology and composition. The PP films modified in both treatments show a remarkable decrease in the water contact angle and a remarkable increase in surface energy due to the introduction of oxygen-containing groups on the surface and the etching of the surface. The homogeneous DBD is more effective in PP surface modification than the filamentary DBD as it can make the contact angle decrease to a lower level by introducing more oxygen-containing groups. This effect could be explained by the evenly distributed plasma at a homogeneous DBD than at a filamentary DBD, and by the more efficient introduction of atomic oxygen to the PP surface in the case of homogeneous DBD.

  10. Dynamic superhydrophobic behavior in scalable random textured polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, David; Park, Sung-hoon; Lee, Sangeui; Verma, Neil; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces, created from hydrophobic materials with micro- or nano- roughness, trap air pockets in the interstices of the roughness, leading, in fluid flow conditions, to shear-free regions with finite interfacial fluid velocity and reduced resistance to flow. Significant attention has been given to SH conditions on ordered, periodic surfaces. However, in practical terms, random surfaces are more applicable due to their relative ease of fabrication. We investigate SH behavior on a novel durable polymeric rough surface created through a scalable roll-coating process with varying micro-scale roughness through velocity and pressure drop measurements. We introduce a new method to construct the velocity profile over SH surfaces with significant roughness in microchannels. Slip length was measured as a function of differing roughness and interstitial air conditions, with roughness and air fraction parameters obtained through direct visualization. The slip length was matched to scaling laws with good agreement. Roughness at high air fractions led to a reduced pressure drop and higher velocities, demonstrating the effectiveness of the considered surface in terms of reduced resistance to flow. We conclude that the observed air fraction under flow conditions is the primary factor determining the response in fluid flow. Such behavior correlated well with the hydrophobic or superhydrophobic response, indicating significant potential for practical use in enhancing fluid flow efficiency.

  11. INTRODUCTION: Surface Dynamics, Phonons, Adsorbate Vibrations and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2004-07-01

    understanding of the underlying factors determining the optical quality of GaInNAs, such as composition, growth and annealing conditions. We are still far from establishing an understanding of the band structure and its dependence on composition. Fundamental electronic interactions such as electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering, dependence of effective mass on composition, strain and orientation, quantum confinement effects, effects of localized nitrogen states on high field transport and on galvanometric properties, and mechanisms for light emission in these materials, are yet to be fully understood. Nature and formation mechanisms of grown-in and processing-induced defects that are important for material quality and device performance are still unknown. Such knowledge is required in order to design strategies to efficiently control and eliminate harmful defects. For many potential applications (such as solar cells, HBTs) it is essential to get more information on the transport properties of dilute nitride materials. The mobility of minority carriers is known to be low in GaInNAs and related material. The experimental values are far from reaching the theoretical ones, due to defects and impurities introduced in the material during the growth. The role of the material inhomogeneities on the lateral carrier transport also needs further investigation. From the device's point of view most attention to date has been focused on the GaInNAs/GaAs system, mainly because of its potential for optoelectronic devices covering the 1.3-1.55 µm data and telecommunications wavelength bands. As is now widely appreciated, these GaAs-compatible structures allow monolithic integration of AlGaAs-based distributed Bragg reflector mirrors (DBRs) for vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers with low temperature sensitivity and compatibility with AlOx-based confinement techniques. In terms of conventional edge-emitting lasers (EELs), the next step is to extend the wavelength range for cw room

  12. Nitrogen dynamics at the groundwater-surface water interface of a degraded urban stream (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization degrades stream ecosystems by altering hydrology and nutrient dynamics, yet relatively little effort has been devoted to understanding biogeochemistry of urban streams at the ground water-surface water interface. This zone may be especially important for nitrogen re...

  13. Surface Restricted Grating Studies of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics at N-Gallium ARSENIDE(100) Liquid Junction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangdong

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous electron transfer involves the coupling of a dense manifold of highly delocalized electronic levels of the solid state to a discrete molecular state as well as an abrupt change in phase in the reaction coordinate. These features make this problem unique relative to homogeneous solution phase or gas phase reaction mechanisms which involve coupling between discrete states within a uniform medium. In this work, the advances in Surface Restricted Transient Grating Spectroscopy (Surface Restricted Transient Grating) are discussed in the context of studying interfacial charge transfer processes at single crystal semiconductor surfaces as a means to probe the primary processes governing heterogeneous electron transfer. In situ grating studies of n-GaAs/(Se ^{-2/-1}) aqueous liquid junction have observed 1 ~ 2 picosecond decay components in the presence of the selenium redox couple. Bias voltage and injection intensity dependencies have shown that field focusing of the hole carrier distribution to the surface reaction plane was achieved. Based on the bias voltage and injection intensity dependence, and known hole scavenging properties of Se^{ -2}, the fast initial decay is assigned to interfacial hole transfer. This time scale is coincident with the highly damped diffusive relaxation components of water under the high ionic concentrations present in the Helmholtz double layer of the GaAs electrode surface. The similarity in time scales between charge transfer and the rate limiting nuclear motion in the barrier crossing dynamics indicates that the electronic coupling at the interface is in the strong coupling regime. This study was the first direct time-resolved measurement of interfacial electron transfer from a single crystal surface. The observation that the dynamics are essentially in the strong coupling limit is contrary to conventional treatments of interfacial transfer processes, which assume weak coupling conditions. This result is important as it

  14. Degradation of the electrospun silica nanofiber in a biological medium for primary hippocampal neuron - effect of surface modification.

    PubMed

    Feng, Z Vivian; Chen, Wen Shuo; Keratithamkul, Khomson; Stoick, Michael; Kapala, Brittany; Johnson, Eryn; Huang, An-Chi; Chin, Ting Yu; Chen-Yang, Yui Whei; Yang, Mong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, silica nanofibers (SNFs) were prepared by an electrospinning method and modified with poly-d-lysine (PDL) or (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTS) making biocompatible and degradable substrates for neuronal growth. The as-prepared SNF, modified SNF-PDL, and SNF-APTS were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle measurements, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Herein, the scanning electron microscopic images revealed that dissolution occurred in a corrosion-like manner by enlarging porous structures, which led to loss of structural integrity. In addition, covalently modified SNF-APTS with more hydrophobic surfaces and smaller surface areas resulted in significantly slower dissolution compared to SNF and physically modified SNF-PDL, revealing that different surface modifications can be used to tune the dissolution rate. Growth of primary hippocampal neuron on all substrates led to a slower dissolution rate. The three-dimensional SNF with larger surface area and higher surface density of the amino group promoted better cell attachment and resulted in an increased neurite density. This is the first known work addressing the degradability of SNF substrate in physiological conditions with neuron growth in vitro, suggesting a strong potential for the applications of the material in controlled drug release. PMID:27013873

  15. Degradation of the electrospun silica nanofiber in a biological medium for primary hippocampal neuron – effect of surface modification

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Z Vivian; Chen, Wen Shuo; Keratithamkul, Khomson; Stoick, Michael; Kapala, Brittany; Johnson, Eryn; Huang, An-Chi; Chin, Ting Yu; Chen-Yang, Yui Whei; Yang, Mong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, silica nanofibers (SNFs) were prepared by an electrospinning method and modified with poly-d-lysine (PDL) or (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTS) making biocompatible and degradable substrates for neuronal growth. The as-prepared SNF, modified SNF-PDL, and SNF-APTS were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle measurements, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Herein, the scanning electron microscopic images revealed that dissolution occurred in a corrosion-like manner by enlarging porous structures, which led to loss of structural integrity. In addition, covalently modified SNF-APTS with more hydrophobic surfaces and smaller surface areas resulted in significantly slower dissolution compared to SNF and physically modified SNF-PDL, revealing that different surface modifications can be used to tune the dissolution rate. Growth of primary hippocampal neuron on all substrates led to a slower dissolution rate. The three-dimensional SNF with larger surface area and higher surface density of the amino group promoted better cell attachment and resulted in an increased neurite density. This is the first known work addressing the degradability of SNF substrate in physiological conditions with neuron growth in vitro, suggesting a strong potential for the applications of the material in controlled drug release. PMID:27013873

  16. Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Jets in a Stratified External Medium: Dynamics, Afterglow Light Curves, Jet Breaks, and Radio Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with ρextvpropr -k for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle θ0 = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor Γ drops below θ-1 0. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when Γ > θ-1 0) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for θobs <= θ0) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 <= k <= 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results in a clear bump-like feature in the light curve. However, for larger k values the jet decelerates more

  17. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model. PMID:21197134

  18. Medium-assisted non-polar solvent dynamic microwave extraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides in cereals using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Xu, Xu; Li, Na; Shao, Mingyuan; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Yu, Cui; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Chunmei; Wang, Ziming

    2014-11-01

    A fast and green pretreatment method, medium-assisted non-polar solvent dynamic microwave extraction, was first applied to extract ten of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from five cereal samples. Without adding any polar solvent, graphite powders (GP) were used as microwave absorption medium to transform microwave energy into heat energy. For recycling GP, an extractor was made by sealing GP inside the exterior tube of a glass sleeve. By dynamic microwave extraction using hexane as extraction solvent, ten OPPs could be extracted completely within 200s, and the extract was directly analysed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The effects of some experimental parameters on extraction efficiency were investigated and optimised. Relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day ranging from 1.02% to 5.32% were obtained. Five real samples were analysed, and the recoveries obtained were in the range of 73.2-99.8%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 6.63%. PMID:24874384

  19. Dynamic surface tension and adsorption kinetics of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianlong; Qu, Wenshan; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant was measured by using the maximum bubble pressure method. By using the classical Ward and Tordai equation, the diffusion coefficient for each bulk surfactant concentration was calculated. The results show that at the initial adsorption stage and at the end of the adsorption process, the dynamic surface tension data were all consistent with this diffusion-controlled mechanism. Their diffusion coefficient was slightly lower than that for conventional hydrocarbon surfactants.

  20. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100 μm iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2 m/s and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

  1. Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ~ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ~ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet. PMID:25623086

  2. Optimization of medium composition for keratinase production on feather by Bacillus licheniformis RG1 using statistical methods involving response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ramnani, Priya; Gupta, Rani

    2004-10-01

    A 3.5-fold increase in keratinase production by Bacillus licheniformis RG1 was achieved by using statistical methods involving Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology. Eight variables were screened using Plackett-Burman design. Of these, glucose, peptone and glutathione were found to affect the response signal positively, whereas CaCl(2) had a negative effect. Further interaction of these factors, along with phosphate and incubation time, was studied using response surface methodology. An optimum keratinase production of 1295 units/mg dry weight was obtained with the following medium composition: 1% glucose, 1% peptone, 1% phosphate, 0.05% glutathione, 0.5% feather and 2% inoculum under shaking at 250 rev./min with an incubation period of 72 h at 37 degrees C. Keratinase production was found to be a function of biomass and maximum production occurred during the stationary phase. PMID:14871173

  3. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface. PMID:21042647

  4. Composition-dependent metallic glass alloys correlate atomic mobility with collective glass surface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Zhu, Zhi-Guang; Pringle, Brian; Lyding, Joseph; Wang, Wei-Hua; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-22

    Glassy metallic alloys are richly tunable model systems for surface glassy dynamics. Here we study the correlation between atomic mobility, and the hopping rate of surface regions (clusters) that rearrange collectively on a minute to hour time scale. Increasing the proportion of low-mobility copper atoms in La-Ni-Al-Cu alloys reduces the cluster hopping rate, thus establishing a microscopic connection between atomic mobility and dynamics of collective rearrangements at a glass surface made from freshly exposed bulk glass. One composition, La60Ni15Al15Cu10, has a surface resistant to re-crystallization after three heating cycles. When thermally cycled, surface clusters grow in size from about 5 glass-forming units to about 8 glass-forming units, evidence of surface aging without crystal formation, although its bulk clearly forms larger crystalline domains. Such kinetically stable glass surfaces may be of use in applications where glassy coatings stable against heating are needed. PMID:27283239

  5. Gas adsorption and accumulation on hydrophobic surfaces: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing-Qun; Yang, Jie-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations show that the gas dissolved in water can be adsorbed at a hydrophobic interface and accumulates thereon. Initially, a water depletion layer appears on the hydrophobic interface. Gas molecules then enter the depletion layer and form a high-density gas-enriched layer. Finally, the gas-enriched layer accumulates to form a nanobubble. The radian of the nanobubble increases with time until equilibrium is reached. The equilibrium state arises through a Brenner-Lohse dynamic equilibrium mechanism, whereby the diffusive outflux is compensated by an influx near the contact line. Additionally, supersaturated gas also accumulates unsteadily in bulk water, since it can diffuse back into the water and is gradually adsorbed by a solid substrate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21376161).

  6. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  7. Direct visualization of photoinduced glassy dynamics on the amorphous silicon carbide surface by STM movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Glassy dynamics can be controlled by light irradiation. Sub- and above-bandgap irradiation cause numerous phenomena in glasses including photorelaxation, photoexpansion, photodarkening and pohtoinduced fluidity. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study surface glassy dynamics of amorphous silicon carbide irradiated with above- bandgap 532 nm light. Surface clusters of ~ 4-5 glass forming unit in diameter hop mostly in a two-state fashion, both without and with irradiation. Upon irradiation, the average surface hopping activity increases by a factor of 3. A very long (~1 day) movie of individual clusters with varying laser power density provides direct evidence for photoinduced enhanced hopping on the glass surfaces. We propose two mechanisms: heating and electronic for the photoenhanced surface dynamics.

  8. Annual dynamics of impervious surface in the Pearl River Delta, China, from 1988 to 2013, using time series Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Weng, Qihao

    2016-03-01

    Information on impervious surface distribution and dynamics is useful for understanding urbanization and its impacts on hydrological cycle, water management, surface energy balances, urban heat island, and biodiversity. Numerous methods have been developed and successfully applied to estimate impervious surfaces. Previous methods of impervious surface estimation mainly focused on the spectral differences between impervious surfaces and other land covers. Moreover, the accuracy of estimation from single or multi-temporal images was often limited by the mixed pixel problem in coarse- or medium-resolution imagery or by the intra-class spectral variability problem in high resolution imagery. Time series satellite imagery provides potential to resolve the above problems as well as the spectral confusion with similar surface characteristics due to phenological change, inter-annual climatic variability, and long-term changes of vegetation. Since Landsat time series has a long record with an effective spatial resolution, this study aimed at estimating and mapping impervious surfaces by analyzing temporal spectral differences between impervious and pervious surfaces that were extracted from dense time series Landsat imagery. Specifically, this study developed an efficient method to extract annual impervious surfaces from time series Landsat data and applied it to the Pearl River Delta, southern China, from 1988 to 2013. The annual classification accuracy yielded from 71% to 91% for all classes, while the mapping accuracy of impervious surfaces ranged from 80.5% to 94.5%. Furthermore, it is found that the use of more than 50% of Scan Line Corrector (SLC)-off images after 2003 did not substantially reduced annual classification accuracy, which ranged from 78% to 91%. It is also worthy to note that more than 80% of classification accuracies were achieved in both 2002 and 2010 despite of more than 40% of cloud cover detected in these two years. These results suggested that the

  9. Aligned magnetic field and cross-diffusion effects of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.; Sugunamma, V.; Rushi Kumar, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of aligned magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption, cross-diffusion, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction on the flow of a nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet in porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to set of ordinary differential equations using self-similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. Finally the effects of various non-dimensional parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are thoroughly investigated and presented through graphs and tables. We observed that an increase in the aligned angle strengthens the applied magnetic field and decreases the velocity profiles of the flow. Soret and Dufour numbers are helpful to enhance the heat transfer rate. An increase in the heat source parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number increases the mass transfer rate. Mixed convection parameter has tendency to enhance the friction factor along with the heat and mass transfer rate.

  10. Aligned magnetic field and cross-diffusion effects of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.; Sugunamma, V.; Rushi Kumar, B.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of aligned magnetic field, thermal radiation, heat generation/absorption, cross-diffusion, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction on the flow of a nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet in porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to set of ordinary differential equations using self-similarity transformation, which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. Finally the effects of various non-dimensional parameters on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are thoroughly investigated and presented through graphs and tables. We observed that an increase in the aligned angle strengthens the applied magnetic field and decreases the velocity profiles of the flow. Soret and Dufour numbers are helpful to enhance the heat transfer rate. An increase in the heat source parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number increases the mass transfer rate. Mixed convection parameter has tendency to enhance the friction factor along with the heat and mass transfer rate.

  11. Runoff and Infiltration Dynamics on Pervious Paver Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When natural or agricultural land is converted for (sub)urban or commercial use, the addition of impervious surfaces becomes a dominating factor in the new urban hydrologic regime. To help minimize the negative hydrologic effects of this land use change, urban best management practices (BMPs) are co...

  12. Control and dynamics study for the satellite power system. Volume 1: MPTS/SPS collector dynamic analysis and surface deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The basic dynamic properties and performance characteristics of the microwave power transmission satellite antenna were analyzed in an effort to develop criteria, requirements, and constraints for the control and structure design. The vibrational properties, the surface deformation, and the corresponding scan loss under the influence of disturbances are considered.

  13. Approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics of VOF Model in Two Phase flow through Porous Medium under Microgravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Raisul

    2016-07-01

    In this research paper firstly theoretical analysis and design of the porous matrix for filtration and selection of associated liquid (highly viscous and low viscous liquid) is carried out. Hence, porosity of the bed has been found out followed by a detailed CFD analysis of the flow to identify displacement structure (fingering: due to the nonlinear interactions among viscous, capillary and gravitational forces). Moreover, an experiment will be with synthetic porous medium consists of a single layer of glass beads which are then positioned homogeneously or non-homogeneously between two Perspex sheets and then fluid displacement structure/fingering will be photographed. Then the effort will be made to validate results with the experiment based photograph and then the CFD model will be extended to microgravity condition KEYWORDS: CFD, Fingering, microgravity, Non-homogeneously, Capillary .

  14. Physical modelling of a surface-wave survey over a laterally varying granular medium with property contrasts and velocity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamo, Paolo; Bodet, Ludovic; Socco, Laura Valentina; Mourgues, Régis; Tournat, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory experiments using laser-based ultrasonic techniques can be used to simulate seismic surveys on highly controlled small-scale physical models of the subsurface. Most of the time, such models consist in assemblies of homogeneous and consolidated materials. To enable the physical modelling of unconsolidated, heterogeneous and porous media, the use of granular materials is suggested here. We describe a simple technique to build a two-layer physical model characterized by lateral variations, strong property contrasts and velocity gradients. We use this model to address the efficiency of an innovative surface-wave processing technique developed to retrieve 2-D structures from a limited number of receivers. A step by step inversion procedure of the extracted dispersion curves yields accurate results so that the 2-D structure of the physical model is satisfactorily reconstructed. The velocity gradients within each layer are accurately retrieved as well, confirming current theoretical and experimental studies regarding guided surface acoustic modes in unconsolidated granular media.

  15. Impact of Hydrophilic Surfaces on Interfacial Water Dynamics Probed with NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hyok; Paranji, Rajan

    2011-01-01

    In suspensions of Nafion beads and of cationic gel beads, NMR spectroscopy showed two water–proton resonances, one representing intimate water layers next to the polymer surface, the other corresponding to water lying beyond. Both resonances show notably shorter spin–lattice relaxation times (T1) and smaller self-diffusion coefficients (D) indicating slower dynamics than bulk water. These findings confirm the existence of highly restricted water layers adsorbed onto hydrophilic surfaces and dynamically stable water beyond the first hydration layers. Thus, aqueous regions on the order of micrometers are dynamically different from bulk water. PMID:22003430

  16. Improvement of Surface Temperature Prediction Using SVR with MOGREPS Data for Short and Medium range over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. J.; Choi, R. K.; Ahn, K. D.; Ha, J. C.; Cho, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    As the Korea Meteorology Administration (KMA) has operated Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS) with introduction of Unified Model (UM), many attempts have been made to improve predictability in temperature forecast in last years. In this study, post-processing method of MOGREPS for surface temperature prediction is developed with machine learning over 52 locations in South Korea. Past 60-day lag time was used as a training phase of Support Vector Regression (SVR) method for surface temperature forecast model. The selected inputs for SVR are followings: date and surface temperatures from Numerical Weather prediction (NWP), such as GDAPS, individual 24 ensemble members, mean and median of ensemble members for every 3hours for 12 days.To verify the reliability of SVR-based ensemble prediction (SVR-EP), 93 days are used (from March 1 to May 31, 2014). The result yielded improvement of SVR-EP by RMSE value of 16 % throughout entire prediction period against conventional ensemble prediction (EP). In particular, short range predictability of SVR-EP resulted in 18.7% better RMSE for 1~3 day forecast. The mean temperature bias between SVR-EP and EP at all test locations showed around 0.36°C and 1.36°C, respectively. SVR-EP is currently extending for more vigorous sensitivity test, such as increasing training phase and optimizing machine learning model.

  17. Model for dynamic self-assembled magnetic surface structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Glatz, A.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-07

    We propose a first-principles model for the dynamic self-assembly of magnetic structures at a water-air interface reported in earlier experiments. The model is based on the Navier-Stokes equation for liquids in shallow water approximation coupled to Newton equations for interacting magnetic particles suspended at a water-air interface. The model reproduces most of the observed phenomenology, including spontaneous formation of magnetic snakelike structures, generation of large-scale vortex flows, complex ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic ordering of the snake, and self-propulsion of bead-snake hybrids.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of bicrystalline metal surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports the molecular dynamics simulation results on the behavior of a copper crystallite in local frictional contact. The crystallite has a perfect defect-free structure and contains a high-angle grain boundary of type Σ5. The influence of the initial structure on the specimen behavior under loading was analyzed. It is shown that nanoblocks are formed in the subsurface layer. The atomic mechanism of nanofragmentation was studied. A detailed analysis of atomic displacements in the blocks showed that the displacements are rotational. Calculations revealed that the misorientation angle of formed nanoblocks along different directions does not exceed 2 degrees.

  19. Dynamical models for sand ripples beneath surface waves.

    PubMed

    Andersen, K H; Chabanol, M L; van Hecke, M

    2001-06-01

    We introduce order parameter models for describing the dynamics of sand ripple patterns under oscillatory flow. A crucial ingredient of these models is the mass transport between adjacent ripples, which we obtain from detailed numerical simulations for a range of ripple sizes. Using this mass transport function, our models predict the existence of a stable band of wave numbers limited by secondary instabilities. Small ripples coarsen in our models and this process leads to a sharply selected final wave number, in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:11415228

  20. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  1. Collective Lipid Bilayer Dynamics Excited by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, T.; Schülein, F. J. R.; Nicolas, J. D.; Osterhoff, M.; Beerlink, A.; Krenner, H. J.; Müller, M.; Wixforth, A.; Salditt, T.

    2014-09-01

    We use standing surface acoustic waves to induce coherent phonons in model lipid multilayers deposited on a piezoelectric surface. Probing the structure by phase-controlled stroboscopic x-ray pulses we find that the internal lipid bilayer electron density profile oscillates in response to the externally driven motion of the lipid film. The structural response to the well-controlled motion is a strong indication that bilayer structure and membrane fluctuations are intrinsically coupled, even though these structural changes are averaged out in equilibrium and time integrating measurements. Here the effects are revealed by a timing scheme with temporal resolution on the picosecond scale in combination with the sub-nm spatial resolution, enabled by high brilliance synchrotron x-ray reflectivity.

  2. Input dynamics of pesticide transformation products into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Susanne; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Schwarzenbach, René P.; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    Some pesticide transformation products have been observed to occur in higher concentrations and more frequently than the parent active pesticide in surface water and groundwater. These products are often more mobile and sometimes more stable than the parent pesticide. If they also represent the major product into which the parent substance is transformed, these transformation products may dominate observed pesticide occurrences in surface water and groundwater. Their potential contribution to the overall risk to the aquatic environment caused by the use of the parent pesticide should therefore not be neglected in chemical risk and water quality assessments. The same is true for transformation products of other compound classes that might reach the soil environment, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals. However, the fate and input pathways of transformation products of soil-applied chemicals into surface water are not yet well understood, which largely prevents their appropriate inclusion into chemical risk and water quality assessments. Here, we studied whether prioritization methods based on available environmental fate data from pesticide registration dossiers in combination with basic fate models could help identify transformation products which can be found in relevant concentrations in surface and groundwater and which should therefore be included into monitoring programs. A three-box steady state model containing air, soil, and surface water compartments was used to predict relative inputs of pesticide transformation products into surface waters based on their physico-chemical and environmental fate properties. The model predictions were compared to monitoring data from a small Swiss river located in an intensely agricultural catchment (90 km2) which was flow-proportionally sampled from May to October 2008 and screened for 74 pesticides as well as 50 corresponding transformation products. Sampling mainly occurred during high discharge, but additional samples

  3. Effect of surface topography upon micro-impact dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Morris, N. J.; Leighton, M.; Rahnejat, H.

    2016-03-01

    Often the effect of interactions at nano-scale determines the tribological performance of load bearing contacts. This is particularly the case for lightly loaded conjunctions where a plethora of short range kinetic interactions occur. It is also true of larger load bearing conjunctions where boundary interactions become dominant. At the diminutive scale of fairly smooth surface topography the cumulative discrete interactions give rise to the dominance of boundary effects rather than the bulk micro-scale phenomena, based on continuum mechanics. The integration of the manifold localized discrete interactions into a continuum is the pre-requisite to the understanding of characteristic boundary effects, which transcend the physical length scales and affect the key observed system attributes. These are energy efficiency and vibration refinement. This paper strives to present such an approach. It is shown that boundary and near boundary interactions can be adequately described by surface topographical measures, as well the thermodynamic conditions.

  4. Electronically non-adiabatic influences in surface chemistry and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wodtke, Alec M

    2016-07-01

    Electronically nonadiabatic interactions between molecules and metal surfaces are now well known. Evidence is particularly clear from studies of diatomic molecules that molecular vibration can be strongly coupled to electrons of the metal leading to efficient energy transfer between these two kinds of motion. Since molecular vibration is the same motion needed for bond breaking, it is logical to postulate that electronically nonadiabatic influences on surface chemical reaction probabilities would be strong. Still there are few if any examples where such influences have been clearly investigated. This review recounts the evidence for and against the aforementioned postulate emphasizing reacting systems that have yet to receive full attention and where electronically nonadiabatic influence of reaction probabilities might be clearly demonstrated. PMID:27152489

  5. Surface effects on dynamic stability and loading during outdoor running using wireless trunk accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Kurt H; Aeles, Jeroen; De Beéck, Tim Op; van der Zwaard, Babette C; Venter, Rachel; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-07-01

    Despite frequently declared benefits of using wireless accelerometers to assess running gait in real-world settings, available research is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate outdoor surface effects on dynamic stability and dynamic loading during running using tri-axial trunk accelerometry. Twenty eight runners (11 highly-trained, 17 recreational) performed outdoor running on three outdoor training surfaces (concrete road, synthetic track and woodchip trail) at self-selected comfortable running speeds. Dynamic postural stability (tri-axial acceleration root mean square (RMS) ratio, step and stride regularity, sample entropy), dynamic loading (impact and breaking peak amplitudes and median frequencies), as well as spatio-temporal running gait measures (step frequency, stance time) were derived from trunk accelerations sampled at 1024Hz. Results from generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis showed that compared to concrete road, woodchip trail had several significant effects on dynamic stability (higher AP ratio of acceleration RMS, lower ML inter-step and inter-stride regularity), on dynamic loading (downward shift in vertical and AP median frequency), and reduced step frequency (p<0.05). Surface effects were unaffected when both running level and running speed were added as potential confounders. Results suggest that woodchip trails disrupt aspects of dynamic stability and loading that are detectable using a single trunk accelerometer. These results provide further insight into how runners adapt their locomotor biomechanics on outdoor surfaces in situ. PMID:27318455

  6. One-step tumor detection from dynamic morphology tracking on aptamer-grafted surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Mohammed Arif I.; Hasan, Mohammad Raziul; Khan, Umair J. M.; Allen, Peter B.; Kim, Young-tae; Ellington, Andrew D.; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report a one-step tumor cell detection approach based on the dynamic morphological behavior tracking of cancer cells on a ligand modified surface. Every cell on the surface was tracked in real time for several minutes immediately after seeding until these were finally attached. Cancer cells were found to be very active in the aptamer microenvironment, changing their shapes rapidly from spherical to semi-elliptical, with much flatter spread and extending pseudopods at regular intervals. When incubated on a functionalized surface, the balancing forces between cell surface molecules and the surface-bound aptamers, together with the flexibility of the membranes, caused cells to show these distinct dynamic activities and variations in their morphologies. On the other hand, healthy cells remained distinguishingly inactive on the surface over the same period. The quantitative image analysis of cell morphologies provided feature vectors that were statistically distinct between normal and cancer cells. PMID:26753172

  7. What can we learn about a dynamical length scale in glasses from measurements of surface mobility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ability of recent measurements on the size of a liquid-like mobile surface region in glasses to provide direct information on the length scale of enhanced surface mobility. While these quantities are strongly related there are important distinctions that limit the ability of measurements to quantify the actual length over which the surface properties change from surface to bulk-like. In particular, we show that for temperatures near the bulk glass transition, measurements of a liquid-like mobile layer may have very limited predictive power when it comes to determining the temperature dependent length scale of enhanced surface mobility near the glass transition temperature. This places important limitations on the ability of measurements of such enhanced surface dynamics to contribute to discussion on the length scale for dynamical correlation in glassy materials.

  8. MO-E-17A-02: Incorporation of Contrast Medium Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms: The Advent of 5D XCAT Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, P; Samei, E; Segars, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a unique method to incorporate the dynamics of contrast-medium propagation into the anthropomorphic phantom, to generate a five-dimensional (5D) patient model for multimodality imaging studies. Methods: A compartmental model of blood circulation network within the body was embodied into an extended cardiac-torso (4D-XCAT) patient model. To do so, a computational physiologic model of the human cardiovascular system was developed which includes a series of compartments representing heart, vessels, and organs. Patient-specific cardiac output and blood volume were used as inputs influenced by the weight, height, age, and gender of the patient's model. For a given injection protocol and given XCAT model, the contrast-medium transmission within the body was described by a series of mass balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast enhancement-time curves for each organ; thereby defining the tissue materials including the contrastmedium within the XCAT model. A library of time-dependent organ materials was then defined. Each organ in each voxelized 4D-XCAT phantom was assigned to a corresponding time-varying material to create the 5D-XCAT phantom in which the fifth dimension is blood/contrast-medium within the temporal domain. Results: The model effectively predicts the time-varying concentration behavior of various contrast-medium administration in each organ for different patient models as function of patient size (weight/height) and different injection protocol factors (injection rate and pattern, iodine concentration or volume). The contrast enhanced XCAT patient models was developed based on the concentration of iodine as a function of time after injection. Conclusion: Majority of medical imaging systems take advantage of contrast-medium administration in terms of better image quality, the effect of which was ignored in previous optimization studies. The study enables a comprehensive optimization of contrast

  9. Analytical simulation and inversion of dynamic urban land surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Rivera, J.; Blum, P.; Schweizer, D.; Rybach, L.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term thermal changes at the land surface can be backtracked from borehole temperature profiles. The main focus so far has been on past climate changes, assuming perfect coupling of surface air and ground temperature. In many urbanized areas, however, temperature profiles are heavily perturbed. We find a characteristic bending of urban profiles towards shallow depth, which indicates strong heating from the ground surface during recent decades. This phenomenon is generally described as subsurface urban heat island (UHI) effect, which exists beneath many cities worldwide. Major drivers are land use changes and urban structures that act as long-term heat sources that artificially load the top 100 m of the ground. While variability in land use and coverage are critical factors for reliable borehole climatology, temperature profiles can also be inverted to trace back the combined effect of past urbanization and climate. We present an analytical framework based on the superposition of specific Green's functions for simulating transient land use changes and their effects on borehole temperature profiles. By inversion in a Bayesian framework, flexible calibration of unknown spatially distributed parameter values and their correlation is feasible. The procedure is applied to four temperature logs which are around 200-400 m deep from the city and suburbs of Zurich, Switzerland. These were recorded recently by a temperature sensor and data logger introduced in closed borehole heat exchangers before the start of geothermal operation. At the sites, long-term land use changes are well documented for more than the last century. This facilitated focusing on a few unknown parameters, and we selected the contribution by asphalt and by basements of buildings. It is revealed that for three of the four sites, these two factors dominate the subsurface UHI evolution. At one site, additional factors such as buried district heating networks may play a role. It is demonstrated that site

  10. Predator-prey dynamics in a uniform medium lead to directed percolation and wave-train propagation.

    PubMed

    Agranovich, Alexandra; Louzoun, Yoram

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of birth-death processes with extinction points that are unstable in the deterministic average description has been extensively studied, mainly in the context of the stochastic transition from the mean-field attracting fixed point to the absorbing state. Here we study the opposite case of a small perturbation from the zero-population absorbing state. We show that such perturbations can grow beyond the mean-field attracting fixed point and then can collapse back into the absorbing state. Such dynamics can represent, for example, the fast growth of a pathogen and then its destruction by the immune system. We show that when the prey perturbation extinction probability is high, the loss of synchronization between the prey densities in different regions in space leads to two possible dynamic regimes: (a) a directed percolation regime based on the balance between regions escaping the absorbing state and regions absorbed into it, and (b) wave trains representing the transition of the entire space to the mean-field stable positive fixed point. PMID:22587127

  11. Novel Gyroscopic Mounting for Crystal Oscillators to Increase Short and Medium Term Stability under Highly Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a gyroscopic mounting method for crystal oscillators to reduce the impact of dynamic loads on their output stability has been proposed. In order to prove the efficiency of this mounting approach, each dynamic load-induced instability has been analyzed in detail. A statistical study has been performed on the elevation angle of the g-sensitivity vector of Stress Compensated-cut (SC-cut) crystals. The analysis results show that the proposed gyroscopic mounting method gives good performance for host vehicle attitude changes. A phase noise improvement of 27 dB maximum and 5.7 dB on average can be achieved in the case of steady state loads, while under sinusoidal vibration conditions, the maximum and average phase noise improvement are as high as 24 dB and 7.5 dB respectively. With this gyroscopic mounting method, random vibration-induced phase noise instability is reduced 30 dB maximum and 8.7 dB on average. Good effects are apparent for crystal g-sensitivity vectors with low elevation angle φ and azimuthal angle β. under highly dynamic conditions, indicating the probability that crystal oscillator instability will be significantly reduced by using the proposed mounting approach. PMID:26091393

  12. Ocean current surface measurement using dynamic elevations obtained by the GEOS-3 radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Remote Sensing of the ocean surface from the GEOS-3 satellite using radar altimeter data has confirmed that the altimeter can detect the dynamic ocean topographic elevations relative to an equipotential surface, thus resulting in a reliable direct measurement of the ocean surface. Maps of the ocean dynamic topography calculated over a one month period and with 20 cm contour interval are prepared for the last half of 1975. The Gulf Stream is observed by the rapid slope change shown by the crowding of contours. Cold eddies associated with the current are seen as roughly circular depressions.

  13. Evolution from surface-influenced to bulk-like dynamics in nanoscopically confined water.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Giovambattista, Nicolás; Aksay, Ilhan A; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2009-06-11

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of confinement on the dynamics of a nanoscopic water film at T = 300 K and rho = 1.0 g cm(-3). We consider two infinite hydrophilic (beta-cristobalite) silica surfaces separated by distances between 0.6 and 5.0 nm. The width of the region characterized by surface-dominated slowing down of water rotational dynamics is approximately 0.5 nm, while the corresponding width for translational dynamics is approximately 1.0 nm. The different extent of perturbation undergone by the in-plane dynamic properties is evidence of rotational-translational decoupling. The local in-plane rotational relaxation time and translational diffusion coefficient collapse onto confinement-independent "master" profiles as long as the separation d >or= 1.0 nm. Long-time tails in the perpendicular component of the dipole moment autocorrelation function are indicative of anisotropic behavior in the rotational relaxation. PMID:19449830

  14. Time-resolved interference unveils nanoscale surface dynamics in evaporating sessile droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2014-06-01

    We report a simple optical technique to measure time-resolved nanoscale surface profile of an evaporating sessile fluid droplet. By analyzing the high contrast Newton-ring like dynamical fringes formed by interfering Fresnel reflections, we demonstrated λ/100 ≈ 5 nm sensitivity in surface height (at 0.01-160 nm/s rate) of an evaporating water drop. The remarkably high sensitivity allowed us to precisely measure its transient surface dynamics during contact-line slips, weak perturbations on the evaporation due to external magnetic field and partial confinement of the drop. Further, we measured evaporation dynamics of a sessile water drop on soft deformable surface to demonstrate wide applicability of this technique.

  15. Surface dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Heine, Martin; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Voigt, Andreas; Heck, Jennifer; Bikbaev, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    Neurons encode information in fast changes of the membrane potential, and thus electrical membrane properties are critically important for the integration and processing of synaptic inputs by a neuron. These electrical properties are largely determined by ion channels embedded in the membrane. The distribution of most ion channels in the membrane is not spatially uniform: they undergo activity-driven changes in the range of minutes to days. Even in the range of milliseconds, the composition and topology of ion channels are not static but engage in highly dynamic processes including stochastic or activity-dependent transient association of the pore-forming and auxiliary subunits, lateral diffusion, as well as clustering of different channels. In this review we briefly discuss the potential impact of mobile sodium, calcium and potassium ion channels and the functional significance of this for individual neurons and neuronal networks. PMID:26891382

  16. CLUMPING AND THE INTERPRETATION OF kpc-SCALE MAPS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: SMOOTH H I AND CLUMPY, VARIABLE H{sub 2} SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Lee, Cheoljong; Schruba, Andreas; Bolatto, Alberto; Hughes, Annie; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian; Pety, Jerome

    2013-05-20

    Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large ({approx}kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds ({approx}pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a ''clumping factor'' that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and H I emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H{sub 2}/H I measured at {approx}kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. H I emission appears very smooth, with a clumping factor of only {approx}1.3. Based on the scarce and heterogeneous high-resolution data available, CO emission is far more clumped with a widely variable clumping factor, median {approx}7 for our heterogeneous data. Our measurements do not provide evidence for a universal mass-weighted surface density of molecular gas, but also cannot conclusively rule out such a scenario. We suggest that a more sophisticated treatment of molecular ISM structure, one informed by high spatial resolution CO maps, is needed to link cloud-scale models to kpc-scale observations of galaxies.

  17. Fluid dynamic effects of grooves on circular cylinder surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takeyoshi; Tsutahara, Michihisa

    1991-12-01

    It is shown that a groove on the surface of a circular cylinder affects movement of the separation point backward and reduces drag even at Reynolds numbers of about a few thousand. Several types of circular-arc cross-section grooves are studied using flow visualizations and numerical simulations. Whether these grooves are effective depends strongly on their positions, and the most effective positions are about 80 deg, measured from the foremost point. When they are effective, cavity flows are developed inside the grooves. This effect corresponds to that of dimples on golf balls and will explain unique characteristics of the drag curve.

  18. Optimization of the Culture Medium Composition to Improve the Production of Hyoscyamine in Elicited Datura stramonium L. Hairy Roots Using the Response Surface Methodology (RSM)

    PubMed Central

    Ryad, Amdoun; Lakhdar, Khelifi; Majda, Khelifi-Slaoui; Samia, Amroune; Mark, Asch; Corinne, Assaf-Ducrocq; Eric, Gontier

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, optimization in biological analyses has been carried out by monitoring the influence of one factor at a time; this technique is called one-variable-at-a-time. The disadvantage of this technique is that it does not include any interactive effects among the variables studied and requires a large number of experiments. Therefore, in recent years, the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has become the most popular optimization method. It is an effective mathematical and statistical technique which has been widely used in optimization studies with minimal experimental trials where interactive factors may be involved. This present study follows on from our previous work, where RSM was used to optimize the B5 medium composition in [NO3−], [Ca2+] and sucrose to attain the best production of hyoscyamine (HS) from the hairy roots (HRs) of Datura stramonium elicited by Jasmonic Acid (JA). The present paper focuses on the use of the RSM in biological studies, such as plant material, to establish a predictive model with the planning of experiments, analysis of the model, diagnostics and adjustment for the accuracy of the model. With the RSM, only 20 experiments were necessary to determine optimal concentrations. The model could be employed to carry out interpolations and predict the response to elicitation. Applying this model, the optimization of the HS level was 212.7% for the elicited HRs of Datura stramonium, cultured in B5-OP medium (optimized), in comparison with elicited HRs cultured in B5 medium (control). The optimal concentrations, under experimental conditions, were determined to be: 79.1 mM [NO3−], 11.4 mM [Ca2+] and 42.9 mg/L of sucrose. PMID:21151467

  19. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, M; Di Tommaso, D; Du, Z; de Leeuw, N H

    2012-11-21

    Calcite-water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Firstly, we employ classical Molecular Dynamics simulations of calcite surfaces containing an etch pit and a growth terrace, to show that the local environment in water around structurally different surface sites is distinct. In addition to observing the expected formation of more calcium-water interactions and hydrogen-bonds at lower-coordinated sites, we also observed subtle differences in hydrogen bonding around acute versus obtuse edges and corners. We subsequently used this information to refine the protonation constants for the calcite surface sites, according to the Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation (CD-MUSIC) approach. The subtle differences in hydrogen bonding translate into markedly different charging behaviour versus pH, in particular for acute versus obtuse corner sites. The results show quantitatively that calcite surface reactivity is directly related to surface topography. The information obtained in this study is not only crucial for the improvement of existing macroscopic surface models of the reactivity of calcite towards contaminants, but also improves our atomic-level understanding of mineral-water interactions. PMID:23042085

  20. The control of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation using dynamically tunable surface microgrooves.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Zhao, Kun; Yang, Guang; Li, Jinrong; Chen, Hongmei; Chen, Yuping; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the potential to modulate stem cell differentiation by using static material substrate surfaces. However, cells actually grow in a dynamically diverse microenvironment in vivo. The regulated signals to the differentiation provided by these materials should not be passive or static but be active and dynamic. To mimic the endogenous cell culture microenvironment, a novel system is designed to realize the dynamic change of the surface geometries as well as a resultant mechanical force using a thermally activated four-stage shape memory polymer. The parallel microgroove surface patterns are fabricated via thermal embossing lithography on the polymer substrate surface. The dynamic microgroove surfaces accompanying with the mechanical force can effectively and significantly regulate the shape and the cytoskeletal arrangement of rBMSC compared with the static patterned and non-patterned surfaces. Cellular and molecular analyses reveal that the spatiotemporally programmed regulation of cell shape is more viable to coax lineage-specific differentiation of stem cell in contrast to the general reports with the static surfaces. Therefore, this study provides a facile strategy in designing and manufacturing an artificial substrate with a mimic natural cellular environment to precisely direct the cell differentiation. PMID:24648133

  1. Surface water sulfate dynamics in the northern Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongqing; Waldon, Michael G; Meselhe, Ehab A; Arceneaux, Jeanne C; Chen, Chunfang; Harwell, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate contamination has been identified as a serious environmental issue in the Everglades ecosystem. However, it has received less attention compared to P enrichment. Sulfate enters the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge), a remnant of the historic Everglades, in pumped stormwater discharges with a mean concentration of approximately 50 mg L(-1), and marsh interior concentrations at times fall below a detection limit of 0.1 mg L(-1). In this research, we developed a sulfate mass balance model to examine the response of surface water sulfate in the Refuge to changes in sulfate loading and hydrological processes. Meanwhile, sulfate removal resulting from microbial sulfate reduction in the underlying sediments of the marsh was estimated from the apparent settling coefficients incorporated in the model. The model has been calibrated and validated using long-term monitoring data (1995-2006). Statistical analysis indicated that our model is capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variations in surface water sulfate concentrations across the Refuge. This modeling work emphasizes the fact that sulfate from canal discharge is impacting even the interior portions of the Refuge, supporting work by other researchers. In addition, model simulations suggest a condition of sulfate in excess of requirement for microbial sulfate reduction in the Refuge. PMID:19244495

  2. The Dynamics of Laurentian Great Lakes Surface Energy Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Blanken, P.; Lenters, J. D.; Gronewold, A.; Kerkez, B.; Xue, P.; Froelich, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes constitute the largest freshwater surface in the world and are a valuable North American natural and socio-economic resource. In response to calls for improved monitoring and research on the energy and water budgets of the lakes, there has been a growing ensemble of in situ measurements - including offshore eddy flux towers, buoy-based sensors, and vessel-based platforms -deployed through an ongoing, bi-national collaboration known as the Great Lakes Evaporation Network (GLEN). The objective of GLEN is to reduce uncertainty in Great Lakes seasonal and 6-month water level forecasts, as well as climate change projections of the surface energy balance and water level fluctuations. Although It remains challenging to quantify and scale energy budgets and fluxes over such large water bodies, this presentation will report on recent successes in three areas: First, in estimating evaporation rates over each of the Great Lakes; Second, defining evaporation variability among the lakes, especially in winter and; Third, explaining the interaction between ice cover, water temperature, and evaporation across a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Research gaps remain, particularly those related to spatial variability and scaling of turbulent fluxes, so the presentation will also describe how this will be addressed with enhanced instrument and platform arrays.

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of water deposition on hematite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Haynes, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decrease in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures which may lead to the formation of hydrate between residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at some condition of temperature and pressure will drop out as liquid droplets or as water adsorbed on the surfaces of the pipeline and then subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work we have used the 6-311G basis set with B3LYP to estimate the charge distribution of different sizes of hematite crystals. The obtained surface charge distribution were kept unchanged while the inner charge distribution where scaled so as to result in an overall neutral crystal. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules were estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for same size water cluster. Estimated values of water chemical potentials indicate that it is thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based this sequence of processes.

  4. Medium- and long-term results of high tibial osteotomy using Garches external fixator and gait analysis for dynamic correction in varus osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    McClelland, D; Barlow, D; Moores, T S; Wynn-Jones, C; Griffiths, D; Ogrodnik, P J; Thomas, P B M

    2016-05-01

    In arthritis of the varus knee, a high tibial osteotomy (HTO) redistributes load from the diseased medial compartment to the unaffected lateral compartment. We report the outcome of 36 patients (33 men and three women) with 42 varus, arthritic knees who underwent HTO and dynamic correction using a Garches external fixator until they felt that normal alignment had been restored. The mean age of the patients was 54.11 years (34 to 68). Normal alignment was achieved at a mean 5.5 weeks (3 to 10) post-operatively. Radiographs, gait analysis and visual analogue scores for pain were measured pre- and post-operatively, at one year and at medium-term follow-up (mean six years; 2 to 10). Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty. Pre-operative gait analysis divided the 42 knees into two equal groups with high (17 patients) or low (19 patients) adductor moments. After correction, a statistically significant (p < 0.001, t-test,) change in adductor moment was achieved and maintained in both groups, with a rate of failure of three knees (7.1%), and 89% (95% confidence interval (CI) 84.9 to 94.7) survivorship at medium-term follow-up. At final follow-up, after a mean of 15.9 years (12 to 20), there was a survivorship of 59% (95% CI 59.6 to 68.9) irrespective of adductor moment group, with a mean time to conversion to knee arthroplasty of 9.5 years (3 to 18; 95% confidence interval ± 2.5). HTO remains a useful option in the medium-term for the treatment of medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee but does not last in the long-term. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:601-7. PMID:27143729

  5. Robust passive dynamics of the musculoskeletal system compensate for unexpected surface changes during human hopping

    PubMed Central

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; de Graaf, Wendy W.; Farley, Claire T.; Moritz, Chet T.; Richard Casius, L. J.; Bobbert, Maarten F.

    2009-01-01

    When human hoppers are surprised by a change in surface stiffness, they adapt almost instantly by changing leg stiffness, implying that neural feedback is not necessary. The goal of this simulation study was first to investigate whether leg stiffness can change without neural control adjustment when landing on an unexpected hard or unexpected compliant (soft) surface, and second to determine what underlying mechanisms are responsible for this change in leg stiffness. The muscle stimulation pattern of a forward dynamic musculoskeletal model was optimized to make the model match experimental hopping kinematics on hard and soft surfaces. Next, only surface stiffness was changed to determine how the mechanical interaction of the musculoskeletal model with the unexpected surface affected leg stiffness. It was found that leg stiffness adapted passively to both unexpected surfaces. On the unexpected hard surface, leg stiffness was lower than on the soft surface, resulting in close-to-normal center of mass displacement. This reduction in leg stiffness was a result of reduced joint stiffness caused by lower effective muscle stiffness. Faster flexion of the joints due to the interaction with the hard surface led to larger changes in muscle length, while the prescribed increase in active state and resulting muscle force remained nearly constant in time. Opposite effects were found on the unexpected soft surface, demonstrating the bidirectional stabilizing properties of passive dynamics. These passive adaptations to unexpected surfaces may be critical when negotiating disturbances during locomotion across variable terrain. PMID:19589956

  6. Dynamics of Protonated Peptide Ion Collisions with Organic Surfaces: Consonance of Simulation and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Subha; Barnes, George L; Laskin, Julia; Hase, William L

    2016-08-18

    In this Perspective, mass spectrometry experiments and chemical dynamics simulations are described that have explored the atomistic dynamics of protonated peptide ions, peptide-H(+), colliding with organic surfaces. These studies have investigated the energy transfer and fragmentation dynamics for peptide-H(+) surface-induced dissociation (SID), peptide-H(+) physisorption on the surface, soft landing (SL), and peptide-H(+) reaction with the surface, reactive landing (RL). SID provides primary structures of biological ions and information regarding their fragmentation pathways and energetics. Two SID mechanisms are found for peptide-H(+) fragmentation. A traditional mechanism in which peptide-H(+) is vibrationally excited by its collision with the surface, rebounds off the surface and then dissociates in accord with the statistical, RRKM unimolecular rate theory. The other, shattering, is a nonstatistical mechanism in which peptide-H(+) fragments as it collides with the surface, dissociating via many pathways and forming many product ions. Shattering is important for collisions with diamond and perfluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surfaces, increasing in importance with the peptide-H(+) collision energy. Chemical dynamics simulations also provide important mechanistic insights on SL and RL of biological ions on surfaces. The simulations indicate that SL occurs via multiple mechanisms consisting of sequences of peptide-H(+) physisorption on and penetration in the surface. SL and RL have a broad range of important applications including preparation of protein or peptide microarrays, development of biocompatible substrates and biosensors, and preparation of novel synthetic materials, including nanomaterials. An important RL mechanism is intact deposition of peptide-H(+) on the surface. PMID:27467857

  7. Sharpening our Understanding but Blurring the Boundaries: Dynamic Observations of Surface Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.

    2003-08-20

    Every now and then, reading a specific paper stimulates--in my mind at least--a variety of associations and connections that highlight advances that have been made and suggests links between areas that I may not have previously connected. The recent series of papers by McCarty and Bartelt (and co-workers) using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to study the dynamics of surface reconstruction of TiO2 , and NiAl sent my thinking in a variety loosely connected directions. Paraphrasing the response of one of my colleagues - the work causes us to think dynamically where we have often thought statically about what happens when surfaces reconstruct. The measurements also highlight the importance of newer techniques to help us visualize and understand phenomena that may have puzzled us for years. The dynamic interactions between surface structure and both the defect structure (and history) of the substrate and the nature of the environment of the specimen highlight an aspect of phenomena that drive surface reconstruction not normally considered and suggests additional and delightful challenges we face in understanding the bulk stability and surface structures of nano-sized objects. Since the physical arrangement of the atoms controls every aspect of the physics and chemistry of a surface or interface, the atomic geometry is a fundamental defining characteristic of a surface. , Details of the structure of a surface, including altered atomic positions, the presence of steps and various types of defects can significantly change the chemistry of a surface and impact processes ranging from the formation of interfaces in electronic components to the efficiency of a catalyst. Because of its importance there has been considerable effort devoted to understanding and predicting surface structures. However, dynamical aspects of surface reconstruction and the significance of material defects in the process have not been part of the standard picture.

  8. Droplet impingement dynamics: effect of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.; Narayanan, Vinod

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates the hydrodynamic characteristics of droplet impingement on heated surfaces and compares the effect of surface temperature when using water and a nanofluid on a polished and nanostructured surface. Results are obtained for an impact Reynolds number and Weber number of approximately 1700 and 25, respectively. Three discs are used: polished silicon, nanostructured porous silicon and gold-coated polished silicon. Seven surface temperatures, including single-phase (non-boiling) and two-phase (boiling) conditions, are included. Droplet impact velocity, transient spreading diameter and dynamic contact angle are measured. Results of water and a water-based single-wall carbon-nanotube nanofluid impinging on a polished silicon surface are compared to determine the effects of nanoparticles on impinging dynamics. The nanofluid results in larger spreading velocities, larger spreading diameters and an increase in early-stage dynamic contact angle. Results of water impinging on both polished silicon and nanostructured silicon show that the nanostructured surface enhances the heat transfer for evaporative cooling at lower surface temperatures, which is indicated by a shorter evaporation time. Using a nanofluid or a nanostructured surface can reduce the total evaporation time up to 20% and 37%, respectively. Experimental data are compared with models that predict dynamic contact angle and non-dimensional maximum spreading diameter. Results show that the molecular-kinetic theory's dynamic contact angle model agrees well with current experimental data for later times, but over-predicts at early times. Predictions of maximum spreading diameter based on surface energy analyses indicate that these models over-predict unless empirical coefficients are adjusted to fit the test conditions. This is a consequence of underestimates of the dissipative energy for the conditions studied.

  9. Dislocation dynamics and surface coarsening of rippled states in the epitaxial growth and erosion on (110) crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Golubović, Leonardo; Levandovsky, Artem

    2008-05-01

    Rippled one-dimensionally periodic structures are commonly seen in the experimental studies of the epitaxial growth and erosion on low symmetry rectangular (110) crystal surfaces. Rippled states period (wavelength) and amplitude grow via a coarsening process that involves motion and annihilations of the dislocations disordering perfect periodicity of these structures. Unlike the ordinary dislocations in equilibrium systems, the dislocations of the growing rippled states are genuinely traveling objects, never at rest. Here, we theoretically elucidate the structure and dynamics of these far-from-equilibrium topological defects. We derive fundamental dislocation dynamics laws that relate the dislocation velocity to the rippled state period. Next, we use our dislocations velocity laws to derive the coarsening laws for the temporal evolution of the rippled state period lambda and the ripple amplitude w (surface roughness). For the simple rippled states on (110) surfaces, we obtain the coarsening law lambda approximately w approximately t{2/7} . Under some circumstances however, we find that these states may exhibit a faster coarsening with lambda approximately w approximately t{1/3} . We also discuss the dislocations in the rectangular rippled surface states for which we derive the coarsening law with lambda approximately w approximately t{1/4} . The coarsening laws that occur at the transition from the rippled to the rhomboidal pyramid state are also discussed, as well as the crossover effects that occur in rippled states in the proximity of this transition on (110) crystal surfaces. PMID:18643078

  10. Investigation of the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets induced by random surface fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.; Bourasseau, E.; Filippini, G.

    2016-07-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the static and dynamic fragmentation of metallic liquid sheets of tin induced by random surface fluctuations. The static regime is analyzed by simulating sheets of different thicknesses, and the dynamic fragmentation is ensured by applying along the longitudinal direction of a sheet an instantaneous expansion velocity per initial unit length (expansion rate) with values ranging from 1 × 109 to 3 × 1010 s-1. The simulations show that the static/dynamic fragmentation becomes possible when the fluctuations of the upper and lower surfaces of the sheets can either overlap or make the local volume density of the system go down below a critical value. These two mechanisms cause locally in the sheet the random nucleation of pores of void, on a timescale that exponentially increases with the sheet thickness. Afterwards, the pores develop following distinct stages of growth, coalescence, and percolation, and later in time aggregates of liquid metal are formed. The simulations also show that the fragmentation of static sheets is characterized by relatively mono-dispersed surface and volume distributions of the pores and aggregates, respectively, whereas in extreme conditions of dynamic fragmentation (expansion rate typically in the range of 1 × 1010 s-1), the distributions are rather poly-dispersed and obey a power law decay with surface (volume). A model derived from the simulations suggests that both dynamic and static regimes of fragmentation are similar for expansion rates below typically 1 × 107 s-1.

  11. Response Surface Analysis of Crowd Dynamics during Tawaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarita, Zainuddin; Lim Eng, Aik

    2012-07-01

    A refined cellular automata model is applied to simulate the crowd movement of Muslim pilgrims performing the Tawaf ritual within the Al-Haram Mosque in Mecca. The results from the simulation are obtained and the influence of the predictor variables of the evacuation process (pedestrian flow and Tawaf duration) on the responses (pedestrian density, average walking speed, and cumulative evacuee) is investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The average results from the experiments with an rms error less than 0.5 are obtained from the RSM. Its performance indicates that the RSM possesses excellent predictive ability for the model evacuation study, because both the experimental and the predicted values agree well with the results obtained in this study.

  12. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors

    PubMed Central

    Khater, M.M.; Issa, Y.M.; Hassib, H.B.; Mohammed, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L−1 for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01–10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes. PMID:26257944

  13. Surface Ozone Dynamics in the Kola Peninsula Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloglazov, M. I.; Karpechko, A. Yu.; Nikulin, G. N.; Roumjantsev, S. A.

    Measurements of surface ozone from the centre of the Murmansk Region (Apatity, Kola peninsula) and its southern part (Kovda, White Sea coast) give a picture of the behaviour of this air component on the Kola peninsula and surrounding vicinity. Simultaneous measurements in Apatity and Kovda have shown that the ozone concentration in Apatity is roughly twice as much as in Kovda. This fact may be explained by the local wind circulation and the presence of bromine near the coast of the Kola Peninsula. An inverse correlation is found between the ozone and nitrogen oxide concentrations from observations near motorways in Apatity. A decrease of nitrogen oxide concentration accompanies the growth of ozone on average. Thus, Apatity is a northern city in which the air pollution by traffic emissions decreases the ozone content.

  14. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors.

    PubMed

    Khater, M M; Issa, Y M; Hassib, H B; Mohammed, S H

    2015-05-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L(-1) for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01-10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes. PMID:26257944

  15. The Dynamics of Flat Surface Internal Geophysical Waves with Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compelli, Alan; Ivanov, Rossen I.

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional water wave system is examined consisting of two discrete incompressible fluid domains separated by a free common interface. In a geophysical context this is a model of an internal wave, formed at a pycnocline or thermocline in the ocean. The system is considered as being bounded at the bottom and top by a flatbed and wave-free surface respectively. A current profile with depth-dependent currents in each domain is considered. The Hamiltonian of the system is determined and expressed in terms of canonical wave-related variables. Limiting behaviour is examined and compared to that of other known models. The linearised equations as well as long-wave approximations are presented.

  16. Splash Dynamics of Watercolors on Dry, Wet, and Cooled Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, David; Vaidya, Ashwin; Su, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    In his classic study in 1908, A.M. Worthington gave a thorough account of splashes and their formation through visualization experiments. In more recent times, there has been renewed interest in this subject, and much of the underlying physics behind Worthington's experiments has now been clarified. One specific set of such recent studies, which motivates this paper, concerns the fluid dynamics behind Jackson Pollock's drip paintings. The physical processes and the mathematical structures hidden in his works have received serious attention and made the scientific pursuit of art a compelling area of exploration. Our work explores the interaction of watercolors with watercolor paper. Specifically, we conduct experiments to analyze the settling patterns of droplets of watercolor paint on wet and frozen paper. Variations in paint viscosity, paper roughness, paper temperature, and the height of a released droplet are examined from time of impact, through its transient stages, until its final, dry state. Observable phenomena such as paint splashing, spreading, fingering, branching, rheological deposition, and fractal patterns are studied in detail and classified in terms of the control parameters.

  17. A medium-bright quasar sample - New quasar surface densities in the magnitude range from 16.4 to 17.65 for B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Warnock, A., III; Usher, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    A new medium-bright quasar sample (MBQS) is constructed from spectroscopic observations of 140 bright objects selected for varying degrees of blue and ultraviolet excess (B-UVX) in five Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt fields. The MBQS contains 32 quasars with B less than 17.65 mag. The new integral surface densities in the B range from 16.45 to 17.65 mag are approximately 40 percent (or more) higher than expected. The MBQS and its redshift distribution increase the area of the Hubble diagram covered by complete samples of quasars. The general spectroscopic results indicate that the three-color classification process used to catalog the spectroscopic candidates (1) has efficiently separated the intrinsically B-UVX stellar objects from the Population II subdwarfs and (2) has produced samples of B-UVX objects which are more complete than samples selected by (U - B) color alone.

  18. Advancements in medium and high resolution Earth observation for land-surface imaging: Evolutions, future trends and contributions to sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouma, Yashon O.

    2016-01-01

    Technologies for imaging the surface of the Earth, through satellite based Earth observations (EO) have enormously evolved over the past 50 years. The trends are likely to evolve further as the user community increases and their awareness and demands for EO data also increases. In this review paper, a development trend on EO imaging systems is presented with the objective of deriving the evolving patterns for the EO user community. From the review and analysis of medium-to-high resolution EO-based land-surface sensor missions, it is observed that there is a predictive pattern in the EO evolution trends such that every 10-15 years, more sophisticated EO imaging systems with application specific capabilities are seen to emerge. Such new systems, as determined in this review, are likely to comprise of agile and small payload-mass EO land surface imaging satellites with the ability for high velocity data transmission and huge volumes of spatial, spectral, temporal and radiometric resolution data. This availability of data will magnify the phenomenon of "Big Data" in Earth observation. Because of the "Big Data" issue, new computing and processing platforms such as telegeoprocessing and grid-computing are expected to be incorporated in EO data processing and distribution networks. In general, it is observed that the demand for EO is growing exponentially as the application and cost-benefits are being recognized in support of resource management.

  19. Atomistic structure of a spinel Li4Ti5O12(111) surface elucidated by scanning tunneling microscopy and medium energy ion scattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitta, Mitsunori; Matsuda, Taishi; Maeda, Yasushi; Akita, Tomoki; Tanaka, Shingo; Kido, Yoshiaki; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Spinel lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO) is one of the promising anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). It is crucial to investigate atomistic structures of LTO surfaces to understand the phenomena at LTO/electrolyte interfaces such as CO2-gas generation which greatly affects the performance and safety of LIBs. By applying scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and medium energy ion scattering spectrometry (MEIS) to a LTO(111) film prepared from a TiO2 wafer, we found that there exist two kinds of Li-terminated (111) terraces bounded by steps with different heights. In the major terraces, the top hexagonal Li layer is stacked above the oxygen layer, while the top Li layer is stacked above the Ti-Li layer in the minor terraces. The relative stability between the two surface structures seems to depend on the atmosphere due to different stoichiometry. For the major terraces, the LTO surface should have electronic holes due to oxygen-rich stoichiometry, which is a possible origin of CO2 generation via redox interaction with electrolyte molecules.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  1. On the sensitivity of some common metallographic reagents to restoring obliterated marks on medium carbon (0.31% C) steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yin, Siaw Hui; Kuppuswamy, R

    2009-01-10

    Chemical etching, which is the most sensitive method to recover obliterated serial numbers on metal surfaces, has been practised quite successfully in forensic science laboratories all over the world. A large number of etchants suitable for particular metal surfaces based on empirical studies is available in the literature. This article reviews the sensitivity and efficacy of some popular etchants for recovering obliterated marks on medium carbon steel (0.31% C with ferrite-pearlite microstructure) used in automobile parts. The experiments involved engraving these carbon steel plates with some alphanumeric characters using a computer controlled machine "Gravograph" and erasing them to several depths below the bottom of their engraving depth. Seven metallographic reagents of which most of them were copper containing compounds were chosen for etching. The erased plates were etched with every one of these etchants using swabbing method. The results have revealed that Fry's reagent comprising cupric chloride 90 g, hydrochloric acid 120 mL and water 100mL provided the necessary contrast and was concluded to be the most sensitive. The same reagent was recommended by earlier workers for revealing strain lines in steel surfaces. Earlier, another reagent containing 5 g copper sulphate, 60 mL water, 30 mL (conc.) ammonium hydroxide, and 60 mL (conc.) hydrochloric acid was proved to be more sensitive to restore erased marks on low carbon steel (0.1% C with ferrite-pearlite structure) [M.A.M. Zaili, R. Kuppuswamy, H. Harun, Restoration of engraved marks on steel surfaces by etching technique, Forensic Sci. Int. 171 (2007) 27-32]. Thus the sensitivity of the etching reagent on steel surfaces appeared to be dependent on the content of carbon in the steel. PMID:19041202

  2. Molecular dynamics description of grafted monolayers: effect of the surface coverage.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2008-11-13

    Molecular dynamics simulations of monolayers of metal-chelating ligands grafted onto a graphite surface in water are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, radius of gyration, and asphericity coefficients), dynamical (diffusion coefficients), and energetical properties as a function of the surface coverage. The purpose is to provide a better understanding of the dependence of various properties of these monolayers on the surface coverage. A critical value of the surface coverage from which all structural properties derive a limiting value has been established. It also appears that the chains rather adopt an elongated conformation along the direction normal to the surface from this critical surface coverage. The hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of water molecules are reported. An ordered structure of water in the region close to the terminal groups of the grafted molecules is shown at a relatively high surface coverage. This ordering is similar to that observed in the case of water in interaction with a solid surface. PMID:18928312

  3. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bietti, Sergio Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Fedorov, Alexey

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D₀=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s⁻¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  4. Preparation of surface coatings on a conductive substrate by controlled motion of graphene nanoflakes in a liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. F.; Qin, R. S.

    2015-02-01

    Controlled motion of graphene and graphene oxide nanoflakes in a thin liquid film on metal surfaces was studied to unravel the significant variations of the electric field effects on the nanoparticles. It was found that graphene oxide flakes were negatively charged and migrated toward anode while the electrically neutral graphene flakes moved toward cathode. Therefore, thin layers of graphene as a protective coating were produced to inhibit corrosion of underlying metals and reduce friction and wear-related mechanical failures in moving mechanical systems. The method does not require an insulated substrate to confine the high electric field to the fluidic layer. The motion of the nano-particles under pulsed electric current was very efficient. The observed effects were interpreted in a possible mechanism associated to the effect of electric field on the mobility of different particles in different conductive media. This significant phenomenon, combined with unique properties of graphene and graphene oxides, represents an exciting platform for enabling diverse applications on the preparation of protective coatings on an arbitrary conductive substrate over large areas.

  5. The HD molecule in small and medium cages of clathrate hydrates: Quantum dynamics studied by neutron scattering measurements and computation

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, Daniele; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Powers, Anna; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko

    2014-10-07

    We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on molecular hydrogen deuteride (HD) trapped in binary cubic (sII) and hexagonal (sH) clathrate hydrates, performed at low temperature using two different neutron spectrometers in order to probe both energy and momentum transfer. The INS spectra of binary clathrate samples exhibit a rich structure containing sharp bands arising from both the rotational transitions and the rattling modes of the guest molecule. For the clathrates with sII structure, there is a very good agreement with the rigorous fully quantum simulations which account for the subtle effects of the anisotropy, angular and radial, of the host cage on the HD microscopic dynamics. The sH clathrate sample presents a much greater challenge, due to the uncertainties regarding the crystal structure, which is known only for similar crystals with different promoter, but nor for HD (or H{sub 2}) plus methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE-d12)

  6. Influence of surface clinker on the crustal structures and dynamics of 'a'ā lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; James, M. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Pinkerton, H.

    2010-07-01

    Surface structures on 'a'ā and blocky lavas reflect the internal flow dynamics during emplacement and also influence the dynamics of developing flows. To investigate the effects of brittle, clinkery 'a'ā flow crusts on flow dynamics and surface structures, we conducted sand and silicone laboratory experiments that simulated the advance of lava into a preexisting channelized flow with a surface crust. Experiments carried out with relatively thin crusts produced apparently ductile surface deformation structures, while thick crusts behaved dominantly in a brittle manner. Increased crustal thickness led to increased strength under compression but favored more disruption under tension, as the flow core welled up through tensile fractures, entraining crustal material. At lava flow fronts, upwelling and entrainment would increase heat losses by radiation and advection, respectively, resulting in a positive-feedback cooling loop. Fracturing caused heterogeneous crustal distribution near the flow front, which resulted in lobate flow advance, despite the absence of the viscoelastic layer that has previously been inferred as the primary control on flow advance and lobe formation. We therefore conclude that the influence of a purely brittle crust on the dynamics and surface morphologies of lava flows is more significant than often thought. All of the surface structures produced in the experiments have been observed on lavas or glaciers and many also on landslides and debris flows, suggesting the results can assist in the understanding of a range of natural flows.

  7. Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser–plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-06-01

    Reduced surface area targets were studied using an ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser in order to determine the effect of electron sheath field confinement on electron dynamics. X-ray emission due to energetic electrons was imaged using a {K}α imaging crystal. Electrons were observed to travel along the surface of wire targets, and were slowed mainly by the induced fields. Targets with reduced surface areas were correlated with increased hot electron densities and proton energies. Hybrid Vlasov–Fokker–Planck simulations demonstrated increased electric sheath field strength in reduced surface area targets.

  8. Vibrational dynamics and surface structure of Bi(111) from helium atom scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, M.; Tamtögl, A.; Kraus, P.; Rieder, K. H.; Ernst, W. E.

    2012-03-01

    The Bi(111) surface was studied by elastic scattering of helium atoms at temperatures between 118 and 423 K. The observed diffraction patterns with clear peaks up to third order were used to model the surface corrugation using the eikonal approximation as well as the GR method. Best fit results were obtained with a rather large corrugation height compared to other surfaces with metallic character. The corrugation shows a slight enhancement of the surface electron density in between the positions of the surface atoms. The vibrational dynamics of Bi(111) were investigated by measurements of the Debye-Waller attenuation of the elastic diffraction peaks and a surface Debye temperature of (84 ± 8) K was determined. A decrease of the surface Debye temperature at higher temperatures that was recently observed on Bi nanofilms could not be confirmed in the case of our single-crystal measurements.

  9. Quantum state resolved gas-surface reaction dynamics experiments: a tutorial review.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Helen; Beck, Rainer D

    2016-07-01

    We present a tutorial review of our quantum state resolved experiments designed to study gas-surface reaction dynamics. The combination of a molecular beam, state specific reactant preparation by infrared laser pumping, and ultrahigh vacuum surface analysis techniques make it possible to study chemical reactivity at the gas-surface interface in unprecedented detail. We describe the experimental techniques used for state specific reactant preparation and for detection of surface bound reaction products developed in our laboratory. Using the example of the reaction of methane on Ni and Pt surfaces, we show how state resolved experiments uncovered clear evidence for vibrational mode specificity and bond selectivity, as well as steric effects in chemisorption reactions. The state resolved experimental data provides valuable benchmarks for comparison with theoretical models for gas-surface reactivity aiding in the development of a detailed microscopic understanding of chemical reactivity at the gas-surface interface. PMID:26235656

  10. Dynamic deflectometry: A novel approach for the on-line reconstruction of specular freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedowski, Raphael D.; Atkinson, Gary A.; Smith, Melvyn L.; Smith, Lyndon N.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic inspection and reverse engineering of specular freeform surfaces is a challenge so far largely unsolved. Products produced in high quantities in industrial environments are still inspected manually which is labour intensive, expensive, monotonous and subjective. We propose a novel deflectometric hardware setup and methodology to overcome this shortfall. The reflection of a line laser from a moving specular surface is captured on a translucent screen. The resulting complex line provides detailed data about the surface gradients at the intersection of the laser light plane and the surface but cannot create correspondence between points of reflections and surface points. The latter is inherent in a traditional active light scanning setup whose data alone will, for specular surfaces, be subject to high levels of noise. We propose a novel method that by simulation of the reflection fuses the two data sets to allow digitalising moving specular surfaces with the high slope sensitivity of deflectometric methods.

  11. Dynamic Range of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers in Multimode Links

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.L.T.; Dalal, R.V.; Ram, R.J.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-07-07

    The authors report spurious free dynamic range measurements of 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers in short multimode links for radio frequency communication. For a 27m fiber link, the dynamic range at optimal bias was greater than 95dB-Hz{sup 2/3} for modulation frequencies between 1 and 5.5 GHz, which exceeds the requirements for antenna remoting in microcellular networks. In a free space link, they have measured the highest dynamic range in an 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser of 113dB-Hz{sup 2/3} at 900MHz. We have also investigated the effects of modal noise and differential mode delay on the dynamic range for longer lengths of fiber.

  12. Dynamical Casimir-Polder interaction between a chiral molecule and a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2016-03-01

    We develop a dynamical approach to study the Casimir-Polder force between an initially bare molecule and a magnetodielectric body at finite temperature, valid for arbitrary magnetodielectric properties and also in the presence of chiral effects. Switching on the interaction between the molecule and the field at a particular time, we study the resulting temporal evolution of the Casimir-Polder interaction. The dynamical self-dressing of the molecule and its population-induced dynamics are accounted for and discussed. In particular, we find that the Casimir-Polder force between a molecule and a surface oscillates in time with a frequency related to the molecular transition frequency. We verify that the dynamical force converges to the static result for time much larger than the inverse of the transition frequency, and it is particularly strong around the back-reaction time t =2 d /c , the time needed for the molecule to emit and reabsorb a photon reflected by the surface.

  13. Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metallic surface: Stark regime and ionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Inarrea, Manuel; Salas, J. Pablo; Lanchares, Victor; Pascual, Ana Isabel; Palacian, Jesus F.; Yanguas, Patricia

    2007-11-15

    We investigate the classical dynamics of a hydrogen atom near a metallic surface in the presence of a uniform electric field. To describe the atom-surface interaction we use a simple electrostatic image model. Owing to the axial symmetry of the system, the z-component of the canonical angular momentum P{sub {phi}} is an integral and the electronic dynamics is modeled by a two degrees of freedom Hamiltonian in cylindrical coordinates. The structure and evolution of the phase space as a function of the electric field strength is explored extensively by means of numerical techniques of continuation of families of periodic orbits and Poincare surfaces of section. We find that, due to the presence of the electric field, the atom is strongly polarized through two consecutive pitchfork bifurcations that strongly change the phase space structure. Finally, by means of the phase space transition state theory and the classical spectral theorem, the ionization dynamics of the atom is studied.

  14. Dynamics of surface screening charges on domains of BiFeO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jun-xing; Jin, Kui-juan; Ge, Chen; Ma, Chao; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of surface screening charges on BiFeO3 films with pre-written stripe domains was studied with surface potential measurements by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. The screening effect decays exponentially over time, and this decay is slower in the arrays with wider domains or larger intervals of domains, indicating that the in-plane diffusion of the surface screening charges plays a major role in the decay dynamics. The good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results based on diffusion-drift model confirms the mechanism of in-plane diffusion of the screening charges in the decay dynamics. Our work could provide a pathway to control the data stability of charge storage by artificially designing the ferroelectric domains.

  15. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-01

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces. PMID:24070378

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of surface segregation, diffusion and reaction phenomena in equiatomic Ni-Al systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evteev, A. V.; Levchenko, E. V.; Belova, I. V.; Murch, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to provide fundamental insights into surface segregation, bulk diffusion and alloying reaction phenomena in equiatomic Ni-Al systems. This knowledge can serve as a guide for the search and development of economic routes for controlling microstructure and properties of the intermetallic compound NiAl. This paper gives an overview of recent molecular dynamics simulations in the area along with other theoretical calculations and experimental measurements.

  17. A new method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of complex-mixture liquid drops

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.

    1994-06-29

    A simple and accurate technique has been developed for measuring dynamic surface tension. The new tech