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Sample records for medullary thymic epithelium

  1. Medullary thymic epithelium expresses a ligand for CTLA4 in situ and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.J.; Hosier, S.; Farr, A.G. ); Brady, W.; Linsley, P.S. )

    1993-09-01

    A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and an Ig C[gamma]1 chain (CTLA4-Ig) was used to examine the distribution of the ligands for CTLA4 within the murine thymus and to characterize the nature of these ligands. Two-color immunofluorescence of thymus tissue revealed binding of the fusion protein to medullary thymic epithelial cells and dendritic cells within the corticomedullary and medullary areas of the thymus. Medullary cells binding the fusion protein also expressed MHC class II products and ICAM-1. Thymus tissue sections treated with cross-linking fixatives, such as glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde, or 1-ethyl-3(d dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide no longer bound the CTLA4 fusion protein, indicating that binding was very sensitive to the tertiary structure of the tissue ligand. The ability of thymic tissue to bind the fusion protein was developmentally regulated. At day 14 of gestation, only scattered single cells were labeled. Clusters of labeled cells, which were detected by day 16 of gestation, increased in frequency with advancing gestational age. Consistent with the in situ labeling studies. CTLA4-lg also labeled several thymic epithelial cell lines previously shown to have a medullary phenotype. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of mRNA extracted from these cells indicated they contained mRNA for B7, a known counter receptor for CTLA4 and CD28. Immunoprecipitation of [sup 125]I-labeled thymic epithelial cells with the CTLA4-Ig detected a M[sub r] 65,000 to 70,000 species under reducing conditions, consistent with previous studies of B7. These data suggest that the ligand for CTLA4 expressed by thymic epithelial cells in vitro is B7 and that the expression of this ligand in situ is largely restricted to the medullary compartment and is associated with epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

  2. Adult Thymic Medullary Epithelium Is Maintained and Regenerated by Lineage-Restricted Cells Rather Than Bipotent Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Izumi; Zuklys, Saulius; Sakata, Mie; Mayer, Carlos E; Hamazaki, Yoko; Minato, Nagahiro; Hollander, Georg A; Takahama, Yousuke

    2015-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) play an essential role in establishing self-tolerance in T cells. mTECs originate from bipotent TEC progenitors that generate both mTECs and cortical TECs (cTECs), although mTEC-restricted progenitors also have been reported. Here, we report in vivo fate-mapping analysis of cells that transcribe β5t, a cTEC trait expressed in bipotent progenitors, during a given period in mice. We show that, in adult mice, most mTECs are derived from progenitors that transcribe β5t during embryogenesis and the neonatal period up to 1 week of age. The contribution of adult β5t(+) progenitors was minor even during injury-triggered regeneration. Our results further demonstrate that adult mTEC-restricted progenitors are derived from perinatal β5t(+) progenitors. These results indicate that the adult thymic medullary epithelium is maintained and regenerated by mTEC-lineage cells that pass beyond the bipotent stage during early ontogeny. PMID:26549457

  3. Thymic medullary epithelium and thymocyte self tolerance require cooperation between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Jeon, Hyein; Nitta, Takeshi; Ohigashi, Izumi; Klug, David; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Choudhury, Baishakhi; Sharrow, Susan O.; Granger, Larry; Adams, Anthony; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Jenkinson, S. Rhiannon; Richie, Ellen R.; Gress, Ronald E.; Takahama, Yousuke; Hodes, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A critical process during thymic development of the T cell repertoire is the induction of self-tolerance. Tolerance in developing T cells is highly dependent on medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and mTEC development in turn requires signals from mature single positive (SP) thymocytes, a bidirectional relationship termed thymus crosstalk. We show that CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory interactions, which mediate negative selection and self-tolerance, upregulate expression of LTα, LTβ and RANK in the thymus and are necessary for medullary development. Combined absence of CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L results in profound deficiency in mTEC development comparable to that observed in the absence of SP thymocytes. This requirement for costimulatory signaling is maintained even in a TCR transgenic model of high affinity TCR-ligand interactions. CD4 thymocytes maturing in the altered thymic epithelial environment of CD40/CD80/86 KO mice are highly autoreactive in vitro and are lethal in congenic adoptive transfer in vivo, demonstrating a critical role for these costimulatory pathways in self-tolerance as well as thymic epithelial development. These findings demonstrate that cooperativity between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L pathways is required for normal medullary epithelium and for maintenance of self-tolerance in thymocyte development. PMID:24337745

  4. CD4 T Cell Tolerance to Human C-reactive Protein, an Inducible Serum Protein, Is Mediated by Medullary Thymic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ludger; Klein, Thomas; Rüther, Ulrich; Kyewski, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    Inducible serum proteins whose concentrations oscillate between nontolerogenic and tolerogenic levels pose a particular challenge to the maintenance of self-tolerance. Temporal restrictions of intrathymic antigen supply should prevent continuous central tolerization of T cells, in analogy to the spatial limitation imposed by tissue-restricted antigen expression. Major acute-phase proteins such as human C-reactive protein (hCRP) are typical examples for such inducible self-antigens. The circulating concentration of hCRP, which is secreted by hepatocytes, is induced up to 1,000-fold during an acute-phase reaction. We have analyzed tolerance to hCRP expressed in transgenic mice under its autologous regulatory regions. Physiological regulation of basal levels (<10−9 M) and inducibility (>500-fold) are preserved in female transgenics, whereas male transgenics constitutively display induced levels. Surprisingly, crossing of hCRP transgenic mice to two lines of T cell receptor transgenic mice (specific for either a dominant or a subdominant epitope) showed that tolerance is mediated by intrathymic deletion of immature thymocytes, irrespective of widely differing serum levels. In the absence of induction, hCRP expressed by thymic medullary epithelial cells rather than liver-derived hCRP is necessary and sufficient to induce tolerance. Importantly, medullary epithelial cells also express two homologous mouse acute-phase proteins. These results support a physiological role of “ectopic” thymic expression in tolerance induction to acute-phase proteins and possibly other inducible self-antigens and have implications for delineating the relative contributions of central versus peripheral tolerance. PMID:9653079

  5. Medullary thymic epithelial stem cells: role in thymic epithelial cell maintenance and thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Yoko; Sekai, Miho; Minato, Nagahiro

    2016-05-01

    The thymus consists of two distinct anatomical regions, the cortex and the medulla; medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) play a crucial role in establishing central T-cell tolerance for self-antigens. Although the understanding of mTEC development in thymic organogenesis as well as the regulation of their differentiation and maturation has improved, the mechanisms of postnatal maintenance remain poorly understood. This issue has a central importance in immune homeostasis and physiological thymic involution as well as autoimmune disorders in various clinicopathological settings. Recently, several reports have demonstrated the existence of TEC stem or progenitor cells in the postnatal thymus, which are either bipotent or unipotent. We identified stem cells specified for mTEC-lineage that are generated in the thymic ontogeny and may sustain mTEC regeneration and lifelong central T-cell self-tolerance. This finding suggested that the thymic medulla is maintained autonomously by its own stem cells. Although several issues, including the relationship with other putative TEC stem/progenitors, remain unclear, further examination of mTEC stem cells (mTECSCs) and their regulatory mechanisms may contribute to the understanding of postnatal immune homeostasis. Possible relationships between decline of mTECSC activity and early thymic involution as well as various autoimmune disorders are discussed. PMID:27088906

  6. FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation is essential for the maintenance and regeneration of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lina; Sun, Chenming; Liang, Zhanfeng; Li, Hongran; Chen, Lin; Luo, Haiying; Zhang, Hongmei; Ding, Pengbo; Sun, Xiaoning; Qin, Zhihai; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) form a 3-dimentional network supporting thymocyte development and maturation. Besides epithelium and thymocytes, heterogeneous fibroblasts are essential components in maintaining thymic microenvironments. However, thymic fibroblast characteristics, development and function remain to be determined. We herein found that thymic non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ cells represent a unique Fibroblast specific protein 1 (FSP1)—fibroblast-derived cell subset. Deletion of these cells in FSP1-TK transgenic mice caused thymus atrophy due to the loss of TECs, especially mature medullary TECs (MHCIIhigh, CD80+ and Aire+). In a cyclophosphamide-induced thymus injury and regeneration model, lack of non-hematopoietic CD45-FSP1+ fibroblast subpopulation significantly delayed thymus regeneration. In fact, thymic FSP1+ fibroblasts released more IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1 in the culture medium than their FSP1- counterparts. Further experiments showed that the FSP1 protein could directly enhance the proliferation and maturation of TECs in the in vitro culture systems. FSP1 knockout mice had significantly smaller thymus size and less TECs than their control. Collectively, our studies reveal that thymic CD45-FSP1+ cells are a subpopulation of fibroblasts, which is crucial for the maintenance and regeneration of TECs especially medullary TECs through providing IL-6, FGF7 and FSP1. PMID:26445893

  7. Requirement of Stat3 Signaling in the Postnatal Development of Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Rumi; Kakugawa, Kiyokazu; Yasuda, Takuwa; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Sibilia, Maria; Katsura, Yoshimoto; Levi, Ben; Abramson, Jakub; Koseki, Yoko; Koseki, Haruhiko; van Ewijk, Willem; Hollander, Georg A; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Thymic medullary regions are formed in neonatal mice as islet-like structures, which increase in size over time and eventually fuse a few weeks after birth into a continuous structure. The development of medullary thymic epithelial cells (TEC) is dependent on NF-κB associated signaling though other signaling pathways may contribute. Here, we demonstrate that Stat3-mediated signals determine medullary TEC cellularity, architectural organization and hence the size of the medulla. Deleting Stat3 expression selectively in thymic epithelia precludes the postnatal enlargement of the medulla retaining a neonatal architecture of small separate medullary islets. In contrast, loss of Stat3 expression in cortical TEC neither affects the cellularity or organization of the epithelia. Activation of Stat3 is mainly positioned downstream of EGF-R as its ablation in TEC phenocopies the loss of Stat3 expression in these cells. These results indicate that Stat3 meditated signal via EGF-R is required for the postnatal development of thymic medullary regions. PMID:26789017

  8. Requirement of Stat3 Signaling in the Postnatal Development of Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Rumi; Kakugawa, Kiyokazu; Yasuda, Takuwa; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Sibilia, Maria; Katsura, Yoshimoto; Levi, Ben; Abramson, Jakub; Koseki, Yoko; Koseki, Haruhiko; van Ewijk, Willem; Hollander, Georg A.; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Thymic medullary regions are formed in neonatal mice as islet-like structures, which increase in size over time and eventually fuse a few weeks after birth into a continuous structure. The development of medullary thymic epithelial cells (TEC) is dependent on NF-κB associated signaling though other signaling pathways may contribute. Here, we demonstrate that Stat3-mediated signals determine medullary TEC cellularity, architectural organization and hence the size of the medulla. Deleting Stat3 expression selectively in thymic epithelia precludes the postnatal enlargement of the medulla retaining a neonatal architecture of small separate medullary islets. In contrast, loss of Stat3 expression in cortical TEC neither affects the cellularity or organization of the epithelia. Activation of Stat3 is mainly positioned downstream of EGF-R as its ablation in TEC phenocopies the loss of Stat3 expression in these cells. These results indicate that Stat3 meditated signal via EGF-R is required for the postnatal development of thymic medullary regions. PMID:26789017

  9. Natural Th17 cells are critically regulated by functional medullary thymic microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, William E.; McCarthy, Nicholas I.; Dutton, Emma E.; Cowan, Jennifer E.; Parnell, Sonia M.; White, Andrea J.; Anderson, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The thymic medulla is critical for the enforcement of central tolerance. In addition to deletion of auto-reactive T-cells, the thymic medulla supports the maturation of heterogeneous natural αβT-cells linked to tolerance mechanisms. Natural IL-17-secreting CD4+αβT-cells (nTh17) represent recently described natural αβT-cells that mature and undergo functional priming intrathymically. Despite a proposed potential to impact upon either protective or pathological inflammatory responses, the intrathymic mechanisms regulating the balance of nTh17 development are unclear. Here we compare the development of distinct natural αβT-cells in the thymus. We reveal that thymic stromal MHC class II expression and RelB-dependent medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC), including Aire+ mTEC, are an essential requirement for nTh17 development. nTh17 demonstrate a partial, non-redundant requirement for both ICOS-ligand and CD80/86 costimulation, with a dispensable role for CD80/86 expression by thymic epithelial cells. Although mTEC constitutively expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a critical negative regulator of conventional Th17 differentiation, iNOS was not essential to constrain thymic nTh17. These findings highlight the critical role of the thymic medulla in the differential regulation of novel natural αβT-cell subsets, and reveal additional layers of thymic medullary regulation of T-cell driven autoimmunity and inflammation. PMID:26143957

  10. Loss of Pten Disrupts the Thymic Epithelium and Alters Thymic Function

    PubMed Central

    Garfin, Phillip M.; Nguyen, Thuyen; Sage, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is the site of T cell development and selection. In addition to lymphocytes, the thymus is composed of several types of stromal cells that are exquisitely organized to create the appropriate environment and microenvironment to support the development and selection of maturing T cells. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are one of the more important cell types in the thymic stroma, and they play a critical role in selecting functional T cell clones and supporting their development. In this study, we used a mouse genetics approach to investigate the consequences of deleting the Pten tumor suppressor gene in the TEC compartment of the developing thymus. We found that PTEN deficiency in TECs results in a smaller thymus with significantly disordered architecture and histology. Accordingly, loss of PTEN function also results in decreased T cells with a shift in the distribution of T cell subtypes towards CD8+ T cells. These experiments demonstrate that PTEN is critically required for the development of a functional thymic epithelium in mice. This work may help better understand the effects that certain medical conditions or clinical interventions have upon the thymus and immune function. PMID:26914657

  11. Loss of Pten Disrupts the Thymic Epithelium and Alters Thymic Function.

    PubMed

    Garfin, Phillip M; Nguyen, Thuyen; Sage, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is the site of T cell development and selection. In addition to lymphocytes, the thymus is composed of several types of stromal cells that are exquisitely organized to create the appropriate environment and microenvironment to support the development and selection of maturing T cells. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are one of the more important cell types in the thymic stroma, and they play a critical role in selecting functional T cell clones and supporting their development. In this study, we used a mouse genetics approach to investigate the consequences of deleting the Pten tumor suppressor gene in the TEC compartment of the developing thymus. We found that PTEN deficiency in TECs results in a smaller thymus with significantly disordered architecture and histology. Accordingly, loss of PTEN function also results in decreased T cells with a shift in the distribution of T cell subtypes towards CD8+ T cells. These experiments demonstrate that PTEN is critically required for the development of a functional thymic epithelium in mice. This work may help better understand the effects that certain medical conditions or clinical interventions have upon the thymus and immune function. PMID:26914657

  12. Expression of LIF in transgenic mice results in altered thymic epithelium and apparent interconversion of thymic and lymph node morphologies.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, M M; Skoda, R C; Cardiff, R D; Campos-Torres, J; Leder, P; Ornitz, D M

    1994-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine involved in embryonic and hematopoietic development. To investigate the effects of LIF on the lymphoid system, we generated a line of transgenic mice that expresses diffusible LIF protein specifically in T cells. These mice display two categories of phenotype that were not previously attributed to LIF overexpression. First, they display B cell hyperplasia, polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis, defects similar to those described for transgenic mice overexpressing the functionally related cytokine, interleukin-6. Secondly, the LIF transgenic mice display novel thymic and lymph node abnormalities. In the thymus, cortical CD4+CD8+ lymphocytes are lost, while numerous B cell follicles develop. Peripheral lymph nodes contain a vastly expanded CD4+CD8+ lymphocyte population. Furthermore, the thymic epithelium is profoundly disorganized, suggesting that disruption of stroma-lymphocyte interactions is responsible for many observed defects. Transplantation of transgenic bone marrow into wild type recipients transfers both the thymic and lymph node defects. However, transplantation of wild type marrow into transgenic recipients rescues the lymph node abnormality, but not the thymic defect, indicating the thymic epithelium is irreversibly altered. Our observations are consistent with a role for LIF in maintaining a functional thymic epithelium that will support proper T cell maturation. Images PMID:8137821

  13. Total lymphoid irradiation leads to transient depletion of the mouse thymic medulla and persistent abnormalities among medullary stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.; Gandour, D.; Strober, S.; Weissman, I.

    1988-05-15

    Mice given multiple doses of sublethal irradiation to both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid tissues showed major transient, and some persistent disruptions in general thymic architecture and in thymic stromal components. At 2 wk after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), the thymus lacked identifiable medullary regions by immunohistochemical analyses. Medullary stromal cells expression MHC Ag or a medullary epithelial cell Ag, as well as medullary macrophages, were undetectable. Instead, the processes of cortical epithelial cells were observed throughout the entire thymus. Strikingly, thymocyte subsets with mature phenotypes (CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+) were present in the apparent absence of a medulla. This early, gross effect was rapidly reversed such that by 1 to 2 mo after TLI, medullary areas with MHC Ag-positive cells were evident. However, abnormalities in a subset of medullary stromal cells appeared to be more persistent. Medullary epithelial cells, identified by the MD1 mAb, were greatly reduced in number and abnormally organized for at least 4 mo after TLI. In addition, macrophages containing endogenous peroxidase activity, normally abundant in medullary regions, were undetectable at all times examined after TLI. Therefore, this irradiation regimen induced both transient and long term effects in the thymus, primarily in medullary regions. These results suggest that TLI may be used as an experimental tool for studying the impact of selective depletion of medullary stromal cells on the development of specific T cell functions.

  14. Stat3 Signaling Promotes Survival And Maintenance Of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolner, Michelle; Reeh, Kaitlin A. G.; Kang, Rhea; Reddy, Madhava C.; DiGiovanni, John; Richie, Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are essential for establishing central tolerance by expressing a diverse array of self-peptides that delete autoreactive thymocytes and/or divert thymocytes into the regulatory T cell lineage. Activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mTEC precursors is indispensable for mTEC maturation and proliferation resulting in proper medullary region formation. Here we show that the Stat3-mediated signaling pathway also plays a key role in mTEC development and homeostasis. Expression of a constitutively active Stat3 transgene targeted to the mTEC compartment increases mTEC cellularity and bypasses the requirement for signals from positively selected thymocytes to drive medullary region formation. Conversely, conditional deletion of Stat3 disrupts medullary region architecture and reduces the number of mTECs. Stat3 signaling does not affect mTEC proliferation, but rather promotes survival of immature MHCIIloCD80lo mTEC precursors. In contrast to striking alterations in the mTEC compartment, neither enforced expression nor deletion of Stat3 affects cTEC cellularity or organization. These results demonstrate that in addition to the NFkB pathway, Stat3-mediated signals play an essential role in regulating mTEC cellularity and medullary region homeostasis. PMID:26789196

  15. Stat3 Signaling Promotes Survival And Maintenance Of Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lomada, Dakshayani; Jain, Manju; Bolner, Michelle; Reeh, Kaitlin A G; Kang, Rhea; Reddy, Madhava C; DiGiovanni, John; Richie, Ellen R

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are essential for establishing central tolerance by expressing a diverse array of self-peptides that delete autoreactive thymocytes and/or divert thymocytes into the regulatory T cell lineage. Activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mTEC precursors is indispensable for mTEC maturation and proliferation resulting in proper medullary region formation. Here we show that the Stat3-mediated signaling pathway also plays a key role in mTEC development and homeostasis. Expression of a constitutively active Stat3 transgene targeted to the mTEC compartment increases mTEC cellularity and bypasses the requirement for signals from positively selected thymocytes to drive medullary region formation. Conversely, conditional deletion of Stat3 disrupts medullary region architecture and reduces the number of mTECs. Stat3 signaling does not affect mTEC proliferation, but rather promotes survival of immature MHCIIloCD80lo mTEC precursors. In contrast to striking alterations in the mTEC compartment, neither enforced expression nor deletion of Stat3 affects cTEC cellularity or organization. These results demonstrate that in addition to the NFkB pathway, Stat3-mediated signals play an essential role in regulating mTEC cellularity and medullary region homeostasis. PMID:26789196

  16. Relb acts downstream of medullary thymic epithelial stem cells and is essential for the emergence of RANK(+) medullary epithelial progenitors.

    PubMed

    Baik, Song; Sekai, Miho; Hamazaki, Yoko; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) provide essential signals for αβT-cell development, and medullary TECs (mTECs) control T-cell tolerance through both negative selection and Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell development. Although heterogeneity within the mTEC compartment is well studied, the molecular regulators of specific stages of mTEC development are still poorly understood. Given the importance of the RANK-RANKL axis in thymus medulla formation, we have used RANK Venus reporter mice to analyze the ontogeny of RANK(+) TECs during development and correlated RANK expression with mTEC stem cells defined by SSEA-1. In addition, we have investigated how requirements for the key regulators Foxn1 and Relb map to specific stages of mTEC development. Here, we show SSEA-1(+) mTEC stem cells emerge prior to RANK expression and are present in both nude and Relb(-/-) mice, providing direct evidence that mTEC lineage specification occurs independently of Foxn1 and Relb. In contrast, we show that Relb is necessary for the effective production of downstream RANK(+) mTEC progenitors. Collectively, our work defines stage-specific requirements for critical TEC regulators during medulla development, including the timing of Relb dependency, and provides new information on mechanisms controlling mTEC specification. PMID:26806881

  17. Single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals coordinated ectopic gene expression patterns in medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Philip; Reyes, Alejandro; Pinto, Sheena; Rattay, Kristin; Nguyen, Michelle; Küchler, Rita; Huber, Wolfgang; Kyewski, Bruno; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is essential for self-tolerance induction and prevents autoimmunity, with each TRA being expressed in only a few mTECs. How this process is regulated in single mTECs and coordinated at the population level, such that the varied single-cell patterns add up to faithfully represent TRAs, is poorly understood. Here we used single-cell RNA-sequencing and provide evidence for numerous recurring TRA co-expression patterns, each present in only a subset of mTECs. Co-expressed genes clustered in the genome and showed enhanced chromatin accessibility. Our findings characterize TRA expression in mTECs as a coordinated process, which might involve local re-modeling of chromatin and thus ensures a comprehensive representation of the immunological self. PMID:26237553

  18. TNF receptor family signaling in the development and functions of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Taishin; Shinzawa, Miho; Akiyama, Nobuko

    2012-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) provide the microenvironment required for the development of T cells in the thymus. A unique property of medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is their expression of a wide range of tissue-restricted self-antigens, critically regulated by the nuclear protein AIRE, which contributes to the selection of the self-tolerant T cell repertoire, thereby suppressing the onset of autoimmune diseases. The TNF receptor family (TNFRF) protein receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), CD40 and lymphotoxin β receptor (LtβR) regulate the development and functions of mTECs. The engagement of these receptors with their specific ligands results in the activation of the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Two NF-κB activation pathways, the classical and non-classical pathways, promote the development of mature mTECs induced by these receptors. Consistently, TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF6), the signal transducer of the classical pathway, and NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK), the signal transducer of the non-classical pathway, are essential for the development of mature mTECs. This review summarizes the current understanding of how the signaling by the TNF receptor family controls the development and functions of mTEC. PMID:22969770

  19. DNA methylation profile of Aire-deficient mouse medullary thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) are characterized by ectopic expression of self-antigens during the establishment of central tolerance. The autoimmune regulator (Aire), which is specifically expressed in mTECs, is responsible for the expression of a large repertoire of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) and plays a role in the development of mTECs. However, Aire-deficient mTECs still express TRAs. Moreover, a subset of mTECs, which are considered to be at a stage of terminal differentiation, exists in the Aire-deficient thymus. The phenotype of a specific cell type in a multicellular organism is governed by the epigenetic regulation system. DNA methylation modification is an important component of this system. Every cell or tissue type displays a DNA methylation profile, consisting of tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs), and this profile is involved in cell-type-specific genome usage. The aim of this study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of mTECs by using Aire-deficient mTECs as a model. Results We identified the T-DMRs of mTECs (mTEC-T-DMRs) via genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Aire−/− mTECs by comparison with the liver, brain, thymus, and embryonic stem cells. The hypomethylated mTEC-T-DMRs in Aire−/− mTECs were associated with mTEC-specific genes, including Aire, CD80, and Trp63, as well as other genes involved in the RANK signaling pathway. While these mTEC-T-DMRs were also hypomethylated in Aire+/+ mTECs, they were hypermethylated in control thymic stromal cells. We compared the pattern of DNA methylation levels at a total of 55 mTEC-T-DMRs and adjacent regions and found that the DNA methylation status was similar for Aire+/+ and Aire−/− mTECs but distinct from that of athymic cells and tissues. Conclusions These results indicate a unique DNA methylation profile that is independent of Aire in mTECs. This profile is distinct from other cell types in the thymic microenvironment and is

  20. Aire Expression Is Inherent to Most Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells during Their Differentiation Program.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroshi; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Morimoto, Junko; Hirota, Fumiko; Morita, Ryoko; Mouri, Yasuhiro; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Aire in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) plays an important role in the establishment of self-tolerance. Because Aire(+) mTECs appear to be a limited subset, they may constitute a unique lineage(s) among mTECs. An alternative possibility is that all mTECs are committed to express Aire in principle, but Aire expression by individual mTECs is conditional. To investigate this issue, we established a novel Aire reporter strain in which endogenous Aire is replaced by the human AIRE-GFP-Flag tag (Aire/hAGF-knockin) fusion gene. The hAGF reporter protein was produced and retained very efficiently within mTECs as authentic Aire nuclear dot protein. Remarkably, snapshot analysis revealed that mTECs expressing hAGF accounted for >95% of mature mTECs, suggesting that Aire expression does not represent a particular mTEC lineage(s). We confirmed this by generating Aire/diphtheria toxin receptor-knockin mice in which long-term ablation of Aire(+) mTECs by diphtheria toxin treatment resulted in the loss of most mature mTECs beyond the proportion of those apparently expressing Aire. These results suggest that Aire expression is inherent to all mTECs but may occur at particular stage(s) and/or cellular states during their differentiation, thus accounting for the broad impact of Aire on the promiscuous gene expression of mTECs. PMID:26503950

  1. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  2. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  3. Adult thymus contains FoxN1(-) epithelial stem cells that are bipotent for medullary and cortical thymic epithelial lineages.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Ahmet; Ucar, Olga; Klug, Paula; Matt, Sonja; Brunk, Fabian; Hofmann, Thomas G; Kyewski, Bruno

    2014-08-21

    Within the thymus, two major thymic epithelial cell (TEC) subsets-cortical and medullary TECs-provide unique structural and functional niches for T cell development and establishment of central tolerance. Both lineages are believed to originate from a common progenitor cell, yet the cellular and molecular identity of these bipotent TEC progenitors/stem cells remains ill defined. Here we identify rare stromal cells in the murine adult thymus, which under low-attachment conditions formed spheres (termed "thymospheres"). These thymosphere-forming cells (TSFCs) displayed the stemness features of being slow cycling, self-renewing, and bipotent. TSFCs could be significantly enriched based on their distinct surface antigen phenotype. The FoxN1 transcription factor was dispensable for TSFCs maintenance in situ and for commitment to the medullary and cortical TEC lineages. In summary, this study presents the characterization of the adult thymic epithelial stem cells and demonstrates the dispensability of FoxN1 function for their stemness. PMID:25148026

  4. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire’s specificity, we performed single-cell RNAseq and DNA methylation analysis in Aire-sufficient and -deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire’s target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clusters activated in concert in a proportion of mTECs. These microclusters differed between individual mice, and thus suggest an organization of the DNA or of the epigenome that results from stochastic determinism, but is bookmarked and stable through mTEC divisions, ensuring more effective presentation of self-antigens, and favoring diversity of self-tolerance between individuals. PMID:26237550

  5. Thymic epithelium determines a spontaneous chronic neuritis in Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer zu Horste, Gerd; Mausberg, Anne K; Cordes, Steffen; El-Haddad, Houda; Partke, Hans-Joachim; Leussink, Verena I; Roden, Michael; Martin, Stephan; Steinman, Lawrence; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2014-09-15

    The NOD mouse strain spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes. A deficiency in costimulatory molecules, such as B7-2, on the NOD genetic background prevents diabetes but instead triggers an inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. This constitutes a shift in the target of autoimmunity, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that NOD mice deficient for isoforms of ICAM-1, which comediate costimulatory functions, spontaneously develop a chronic autoimmune peripheral neuritis instead of diabetes. The disease is transferred by CD4(+) T cells, which infiltrate peripheral nerves together with macrophages and B cells and are autoreactive against peripheral myelin protein zero. These Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit unaltered numbers of regulatory T cells, but increased IL-17-producing T cells, which determine the severity, but not the target specificity, of autoimmunity. Ab-mediated ICAM-1 blockade triggers neuritis only in young NOD mice. Thymic epithelium from Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice features an altered expression of costimulatory molecules and induces neuritis and myelin autoreactivity after transplantation into nude mice in vivo. Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit a specifically altered TCR repertoire. Our findings introduce a novel animal model of chronic inflammatory neuropathies and indicate that altered expression of ICAM-1 on thymic epithelium shifts autoimmunity specifically toward peripheral nerves. This improves our understanding of autoimmunity in the peripheral nervous system with potential relevance for human diseases. PMID:25108020

  6. 3D Organotypic Co-culture Model Supporting Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cell Proliferation, Differentiation and Promiscuous Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sheena; Stark, Hans-Jürgen; Martin, Iris; Boukamp, Petra; Kyewski, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intra-thymic T cell development requires an intricate three-dimensional meshwork composed of various stromal cells, i.e., non-T cells. Thymocytes traverse this scaffold in a highly coordinated temporal and spatial order while sequentially passing obligatory check points, i.e., T cell lineage commitment, followed by T cell receptor repertoire generation and selection prior to their export into the periphery. The two major resident cell types forming this scaffold are cortical (cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). A key feature of mTECs is the so-called promiscuous expression of numerous tissue-restricted antigens. These tissue-restricted antigens are presented to immature thymocytes directly or indirectly by mTECs or thymic dendritic cells, respectively resulting in self-tolerance. Suitable in vitro models emulating the developmental pathways and functions of cTECs and mTECs are currently lacking. This lack of adequate experimental models has for instance hampered the analysis of promiscuous gene expression, which is still poorly understood at the cellular and molecular level. We adapted a 3D organotypic co-culture model to culture ex vivo isolated mTECs. This model was originally devised to cultivate keratinocytes in such a way as to generate a skin equivalent in vitro. The 3D model preserved key functional features of mTEC biology: (i) proliferation and terminal differentiation of CD80(lo), Aire-negative into CD80(hi), Aire-positive mTECs, (ii) responsiveness to RANKL, and (iii) sustained expression of FoxN1, Aire and tissue-restricted genes in CD80(hi) mTECs. PMID:26275017

  7. UEA-I-binding to thymic medullary epithelial cells selectively reduces numbers of cortical TCRalphabeta+ thymocytes in FTOCs.

    PubMed

    Graziano, M; St-Pierre, Y; Potworowski, E F

    2001-07-01

    Thymic medullary epithelial cells (TMECs) constitute a major stromal cell type, the function of which is incompletely understood. Some TMECs express L-fucose-glycosylated proteins on their plasma membrane; these have been shown to specifically bind the lectin UEA-I. We exploited this observation to investigate the consequences of in situ blockage of TMECs in FTOCs by UEA-I. In UEA-I-treated FTOCs, we noted a decreased cellularity among TCRalphabeta+ but not TCRgammadelta+ cells. In fact, CD3- and CD3lo cortical cells were markedly depleted, while CD3hi cells were unaffected. Since the affected cell subsets are in a different compartment from that where UEA-I binding occurs, it is likely that the effect is mediated through a soluble factor. Two possible mechanisms are proposed: a reduced activation of either TMECs or of medullary thymocytes which normally bind to them, results in lowered production of soluble factors responsible for cortical thymocyte proliferation. Alternately, the binding of UEA-I to TMECs could activate the latter to produce signals inhibitory to cortical thymocytes. PMID:11410246

  8. Post-Aire Maturation of Thymic Medullary Epithelial Cells Involves Selective Expression of Keratinocyte-Specific Autoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Laan, Martti; Bichele, Rudolf; Kisand, Kai; Scott, Hamish S.; Peterson, Pärt

    2012-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire)-directed ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) by mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) has been viewed as an essential mechanism in the induction of central tolerance. Recent data suggest that the survival of mTECs extends beyond the Aire+ cell population to form the post-Aire mTEC population and Hassall’s corpuscles (HCs). The nature and function of these post-Aire epithelial cells and structures, however, have remained unidentified. In this study, we characterized in detail the end-stage development of mTECs and HCs in both Aire-sufficient and Aire-deficient mice. In addition, using a transgenic mouse model in which the LacZ reporter gene is under the control of the endogenous Aire promoter, we purified and analyzed the post-Aire mTECs to characterize their function. We showed that the end-stage maturation of mTECs closely resembles that of keratinocytes and that the lack of Aire results in a marked block of mTEC differentiation, which is partially overcome by ligands for RANK and CD40. We also provide evidence that, during mTEC development, Aire is expressed only once and during a limited 1–2 day period. The following loss of Aire expression is accompanied by a quick downregulation of MHC class II and CD80, and of most of the Aire-dependent and Aire-independent TSAs, with the exception of keratinocyte-specific genes. In the final stage of maturation, the mTECs lose their nuclei to become HCs and specifically express desmogleins (DGs) 1 and 3, which, via cross-presentation by APCs, may contribute to tolerance against these pemphigus vulgaris-related TSAs. PMID:22448160

  9. Adult Thymus Contains FoxN1− Epithelial Stem Cells that Are Bipotent for Medullary and Cortical Thymic Epithelial Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Ahmet; Ucar, Olga; Klug, Paula; Matt, Sonja; Brunk, Fabian; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Kyewski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Summary Within the thymus, two major thymic epithelial cell (TEC) subsets—cortical and medullary TECs—provide unique structural and functional niches for T cell development and establishment of central tolerance. Both lineages are believed to originate from a common progenitor cell, yet the cellular and molecular identity of these bipotent TEC progenitors/stem cells remains ill defined. Here we identify rare stromal cells in the murine adult thymus, which under low-attachment conditions formed spheres (termed “thymospheres”). These thymosphere-forming cells (TSFCs) displayed the stemness features of being slow cycling, self-renewing, and bipotent. TSFCs could be significantly enriched based on their distinct surface antigen phenotype. The FoxN1 transcription factor was dispensable for TSFCs maintenance in situ and for commitment to the medullary and cortical TEC lineages. In summary, this study presents the characterization of the adult thymic epithelial stem cells and demonstrates the dispensability of FoxN1 function for their stemness. PMID:25148026

  10. Hypergravity Provokes a Temporary Reduction in CD4+CD8+ Thymocyte Number and a Persistent Decrease in Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cell Frequency in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Nobuko; Miyauchi, Maki; Yoshinaga, Riko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Kudo, Takashi; Shimbo, Miki; Shinohara, Masahiro; Obata, Koji; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Shirakawa, Masaki; Shiba, Dai; Asahara, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Satoru; Morita, Hironobu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2015-01-01

    Gravity change affects many immunological systems. We investigated the effects of hypergravity (2G) on murine thymic cells. Exposure of mice to 2G for three days reduced the frequency of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes (DP) and mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), accompanied by an increment of keratin-5 and keratin-8 double-positive (K5+K8+) TECs that reportedly contain TEC progenitors. Whereas the reduction of DP was recovered by a 14-day exposure to 2G, the reduction of mature mTECs and the increment of K5+K8+ TEC persisted. Interestingly, a surgical lesion of the inner ear's vestibular apparatus inhibited these hypergravity effects. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the gene expression of Aire and RANK that are critical for mTEC function and development were up-regulated by the 3-day exposure and subsequently down-regulated by the 14-day exposure to 2G. Unexpectedly, this dynamic change in mTEC gene expression was independent of the vestibular apparatus. Overall, data suggest that 2G causes a temporary reduction of DP and a persistent reduction of mature mTECs in a vestibular system-dependent manner, and also dysregulates mTEC gene expression without involving the vestibular system. These data might provide insight on the impact of gravity change on thymic functions during spaceflight and living. PMID:26513242

  11. Hypergravity Provokes a Temporary Reduction in CD4+CD8+ Thymocyte Number and a Persistent Decrease in Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cell Frequency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Maki; Yoshinaga, Riko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Kudo, Takashi; Shimbo, Miki; Shinohara, Masahiro; Obata, Koji; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Shirakawa, Masaki; Shiba, Dai; Asahara, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Satoru; Morita, Hironobu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2015-01-01

    Gravity change affects many immunological systems. We investigated the effects of hypergravity (2G) on murine thymic cells. Exposure of mice to 2G for three days reduced the frequency of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes (DP) and mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), accompanied by an increment of keratin-5 and keratin-8 double-positive (K5+K8+) TECs that reportedly contain TEC progenitors. Whereas the reduction of DP was recovered by a 14-day exposure to 2G, the reduction of mature mTECs and the increment of K5+K8+ TEC persisted. Interestingly, a surgical lesion of the inner ear’s vestibular apparatus inhibited these hypergravity effects. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the gene expression of Aire and RANK that are critical for mTEC function and development were up-regulated by the 3-day exposure and subsequently down-regulated by the 14-day exposure to 2G. Unexpectedly, this dynamic change in mTEC gene expression was independent of the vestibular apparatus. Overall, data suggest that 2G causes a temporary reduction of DP and a persistent reduction of mature mTECs in a vestibular system-dependent manner, and also dysregulates mTEC gene expression without involving the vestibular system. These data might provide insight on the impact of gravity change on thymic functions during spaceflight and living. PMID:26513242

  12. Developmental kinetics, turnover, and stimulatory capacity of thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Daniel H D; Seach, Natalie; Ueno, Tomoo; Milton, Morag K; Liston, Adrian; Lew, Andrew M; Goodnow, Christopher C; Boyd, Richard L

    2006-12-01

    Despite the importance of thymic stromal cells to T-cell development, relatively little is known about their biology. Here, we use single-cell analysis of stromal cells to analyze extensive changes in the number and composition of thymic stroma throughout life, revealing a surprisingly dynamic population. Phenotypic progression of thymic epithelial subsets was assessed at high resolution in young mice to provide a developmental framework. The cellular and molecular requirements of adult epithelium were studied, using various mutant mice to demonstrate new cross talk checkpoints dependent on RelB in the cortex and CD40 in the medulla. With the use of Ki67 and BrdU labeling, the turnover of thymic epithelium was found to be rapid, but then diminished on thymic involution. The various defects in stromal turnover and composition that accompanied involution were rapidly reversed following sex steroid ablation. Unexpectedly, mature cortical and medullary epithelium showed a potent capacity to stimulate naive T cells, comparable to that of thymic dendritic cells. Overall, these studies show that the thymic stroma is a surprisingly dynamic population and may have a more direct role in negative selection than previously thought. PMID:16896157

  13. Generation of Functional Thymic Epithelium from Human Embryonic Stem Cells that Supports Host T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Audrey V.; Russ, Holger A.; Khan, Imran S.; LaFlam, Taylor N.; Metzger, Todd C.; Anderson, Mark S.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Inducing immune tolerance to prevent rejection is a key step toward successful engraftment of stem-cell-derived tissue in a clinical setting. Using human pluripotent stem cells to generate thymic epithelial cells (TECs) capable of supporting T cell development represents a promising approach to reach this goal; however, progress toward generating functional TECs has been limited. Here, we describe a robust in vitro method to direct differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) by precise regulation of TGFβ, BMP4, RA, Wnt, Shh, and FGF signaling. The hESC-derived TEPs further mature into functional TECs that support T cell development upon transplantation into thymus-deficient mice. Importantly, the engrafted TEPs produce T cells capable of in vitro proliferation as well as in vivo immune responses. Thus, hESC-derived TEP grafts may have broad applications for enhancing engraftment in cell-based therapies as well as restoring age-and stress-related thymic decline. PMID:23684540

  14. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2, a novel autoimmune regulator interaction partner, modulates promiscuous gene expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rattay, Kristin; Claude, Janine; Rezavandy, Esmail; Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G; Kyewski, Bruno; Derbinski, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Promiscuous expression of a plethora of tissue-restricted Ags (TRAs) by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) plays an essential role in T cell tolerance. Although the cellular mechanisms by which promiscuous gene expression (pGE) imposes T cell tolerance have been well characterized, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is to date the only validated molecule known to regulate pGE. AIRE is part of higher-order multiprotein complexes, which promote transcription, elongation, and splicing of a wide range of target genes. How AIRE and its partners mediate these various effects at the molecular level is still largely unclear. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we searched for novel AIRE-interacting proteins and identified the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a novel partner. HIPK2 partially colocalized with AIRE in nuclear bodies upon cotransfection and in human mTECs in situ. Moreover, HIPK2 phosphorylated AIRE in vitro and suppressed the coactivator activity of AIRE in a kinase-dependent manner. To evaluate the role of Hipk2 in modulating the function of AIRE in vivo, we compared whole-genome gene signatures of purified mTEC subsets from TEC-specific Hipk2 knockout mice with control mice and identified a small set of differentially expressed genes. Unexpectedly, most differentially expressed genes were confined to the CD80(lo) mTEC subset and preferentially included AIRE-independent TRAs. Thus, although it modulates gene expression in mTECs and in addition affects the size of the medullary compartment, TEC-specific HIPK2 deletion only mildly affects AIRE-directed pGE in vivo. PMID:25552543

  15. Foxn1 Is Dynamically Regulated in Thymic Epithelial Cells during Embryogenesis and at the Onset of Thymic Involution

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Kathy E.; Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Tischner, Christin; Vaidya, Harsh J.; Stenhouse, Frances H.; Peddie, C. Diana; Nowell, Craig S.; Gaskell, Terri; Blackburn, C. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Thymus function requires extensive cross-talk between developing T-cells and the thymic epithelium, which consists of cortical and medullary TEC. The transcription factor FOXN1 is the master regulator of TEC differentiation and function, and declining Foxn1 expression with age results in stereotypical thymic involution. Understanding of the dynamics of Foxn1 expression is, however, limited by a lack of single cell resolution data. We have generated a novel reporter of Foxn1 expression, Foxn1G, to monitor changes in Foxn1 expression during embryogenesis and involution. Our data reveal that early differentiation and maturation of cortical and medullary TEC coincides with precise sub-lineage-specific regulation of Foxn1 expression levels. We further show that initiation of thymic involution is associated with reduced cTEC functionality, and proportional expansion of FOXN1-negative TEC in both cortical and medullary sub-lineages. Cortex-specific down-regulation of Foxn1 between 1 and 3 months of age may therefore be a key driver of the early stages of age-related thymic involution. PMID:26983083

  16. Foxn1 Is Dynamically Regulated in Thymic Epithelial Cells during Embryogenesis and at the Onset of Thymic Involution.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Kathy E; Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Tischner, Christin; Vaidya, Harsh J; Stenhouse, Frances H; Peddie, C Diana; Nowell, Craig S; Gaskell, Terri; Blackburn, C Clare

    2016-01-01

    Thymus function requires extensive cross-talk between developing T-cells and the thymic epithelium, which consists of cortical and medullary TEC. The transcription factor FOXN1 is the master regulator of TEC differentiation and function, and declining Foxn1 expression with age results in stereotypical thymic involution. Understanding of the dynamics of Foxn1 expression is, however, limited by a lack of single cell resolution data. We have generated a novel reporter of Foxn1 expression, Foxn1G, to monitor changes in Foxn1 expression during embryogenesis and involution. Our data reveal that early differentiation and maturation of cortical and medullary TEC coincides with precise sub-lineage-specific regulation of Foxn1 expression levels. We further show that initiation of thymic involution is associated with reduced cTEC functionality, and proportional expansion of FOXN1-negative TEC in both cortical and medullary sub-lineages. Cortex-specific down-regulation of Foxn1 between 1 and 3 months of age may therefore be a key driver of the early stages of age-related thymic involution. PMID:26983083

  17. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Bonito, Anthony J.; Weinstein, Erica G.; Herbin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease. PMID:25603179

  18. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make ... Epithelium. In: Kierszenbaum AL, Tres LL. Histology and Cell Biology - An Introduction to Pathology , 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. The thymic cortical epithelium determines the TCR repertoire of IL-17-producing γδT cells

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Takeshi; Muro, Ryunosuke; Shimizu, Yukiko; Nitta, Sachiko; Oda, Hiroyo; Ohte, Yuki; Goto, Motohito; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Narita, Tomoya; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Hisataka; Okamura, Tadashi; Murata, Shigeo; Suzuki, Harumi

    2015-01-01

    The thymus provides a specialized microenvironment in which distinct subsets of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) support T-cell development. Here, we describe the significance of cortical TECs (cTECs) in T-cell development, using a newly established mouse model of cTEC deficiency. The deficiency of mature cTECs caused a massive loss of thymic cellularity and impaired the development of αβT cells and invariant natural killer T cells. Unexpectedly, the differentiation of certain γδT-cell subpopulations—interleukin-17-producing Vγ4 and Vγ6 cells—was strongly dysregulated, resulting in the perturbation of γδT-mediated inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues. These findings show that cTECs contribute to the shaping of the TCR repertoire, not only of “conventional” αβT cells but also of inflammatory “innate” γδT cells. PMID:25770130

  20. Primary polyoma virus-induced murine thymic epithelial tumors. A tumor model of thymus physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, G. P.; Kettman, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Thymic tumors were induced in C3'/Bittner mice by neonatal inoculation with polyoma virus. The objective of this study was to identify the phenotypes of the cells within the tumors and to attempt to determine the origin of the neoplastic cell population(s). At the ultrastructural level, the neoplastic cells resembled normal thymic epithelium with tonofilaments and desmosomes. Immunoperoxidase staining demonstrated the presence of cytokeratin, Iak, -beta 2-microglobulin, -asialo-GM1, the thymic cortical epithelial marker ER-TR4, and the medullary epithelial marker ER-TR5. Islands of normal cortical thymocytes supported by residual normal cortical epithelium and acid phosphatase-positive cortical macrophages were interspersed in the tumors. Residual islands of normal medullary architecture with nonspecific esterase-positive IDCs were rarely identified in tumors. Most lymphocytes in the tumors were normal immature cortical thymocytes with the phenotype Tdt+, PNA+, Thy 1.2bright, Ly-1dull, H-2Kkdull, ThB+, J11d+, and Lyt-2+L3T4+. Lymphocytes in the tumors were steroid-sensitive like normal thymocytes. The proportions of Lyt-2+L3T4- and Lyt-2-L3T4+ cells were generally larger in the tumors than in normal thymus and reflected the higher frequency of lymphocytes in the tumors capable of proliferating in vitro in response to Con A plus IL-2. The data were consistent with the hypothesis that the neoplasia originates from thymic epithelium that is interspersed with normal, developing thymic lymphocytes. Images Figure 4 p[688]-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p687-a Figure 7 PMID:2552813

  1. Improved method for freeze-fracture radioautography of tissues and cells, as applied to duodenal epithelium and thymic lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, F.W.; Kopriwa, B.M.; Leblond, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    An improved method has been devised for the localization of radioactive substances to either one of the leaflets of cellular membranes. After tissue specimens are freeze-fractured and covered with a platinum-carbon replica, they are freeze-dried to allow coating with radioautographic emulsion at room temperature. After exposure at 4 degrees C and development, the emulsion is protected by layers of carbon and grease before the tissue underlying the replica is dissolved in sodium hypochlorite. The grease is removed in Freon 14 and the replica with its emulsion cover is mounted on a specimen grid for electron microscopic examination. The accuracy of radioactivity localization was demonstrated using /sup 3/H-thymidine-labeled liver by finding silver grains over the same sites after freeze-fracture as after thin section radioautography. Tests with /sup 3/H-methacrylate revealed that the interposition of a platinum-carbon replica decreased the radioautographic reaction by over 80%; hence, the need for long exposure. Only 67% of the silver grains came from radiation sources located beyond the upper 0.05 micron of the specimen and, therefore, the emulsion could be affected by radiation sources located not only within membrane leaflets but also in nearby cytoplasm. Thus, when /sup 3/H-fucose was injected into rats to locate newly formed glycoproteins within intestinal epithelium membranes, some of the silver grains found over E and P faces might be produced by radiation coming from the adjacent cytoplasm. To localize label within membrane leaflets in the absence of radiation sources in the cytoplasm, lymphocyte suspensions were incubated with /sup 3/H-concanavalin A at 0 degrees C. The plasmalemma radioactivity was then restricted to the two membrane leaflets, with 87-93% of the silver grains on the E leaflet and 7-13% on the P leaflet.

  2. Thymic adenocarcinoma associated with thymic cyst: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leiming; Wang, Dandan; Qian, Kun; Lu, Dehong; Chen, Li; Zhao, Lan; Teng, Lianghong

    2015-01-01

    Thymic adenocarcinoma of the mediastinum is extremely rare. Only 12 cases adenocarcinoma associated with a thymic cyst have been reported in the literature. In this report, we describe a case of a thymic adenocarcinoma associated with thymic cyst. A 70-year-old man, presented with two months of chest tightness, breath shortness and chest pain. The contrast enhanced CT scan of chest revealed a round, cystic mass in right anterior mediastinum. Microscopic examination revealed that the lining consisted of flat to cuboidal and columnar epithelium and adenocarcinoma infiltrated into the thymic tissue and the soft tissue around the wall of cyst. Based on clinical history, imaging studies, pathological findings and absence of extramediastinal tumor, a diagnosis of thymic adenocarcinoma associated with thymic cyst was established. The patient was alive without any sign of recurrence 7 months after the operation. PMID:26191314

  3. [Thymic carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Ströbel, P; Weis, C-A; Marx, A

    2016-09-01

    Thymic carcinomas (TC) are approximately 10 times less prevalent than thymomas but of high clinical relevance because they are more aggressive, less frequently resectable than thymomas and usually refractory to classical and targeted long-term treatment approaches. Furthermore, in children and adolescents TC are more frequent than thymomas and particularly in this age group, germ cell tumors need to be a differential diagnostic consideration. In diagnostic terms pathologists face two challenges: a), the distinction between thymic carcinomas and thymomas with a similar appearance and b), the distinction between TC and histologically similar metastases and tumor extensions from other primary tumors. Overcoming these diagnostic challenges is the focus of the new WHO classification of thymic epithelial tumors. The objectives of this review are to highlight novel aspects of the WHO classification of thymic carcinomas and to address therapeutically relevant diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:27538748

  4. FOXN1: A Master Regulator Gene of Thymic Epithelial Development Program

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Fusco, Anna; Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Pignata, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    T cell ontogeny is a sophisticated process, which takes place within the thymus through a series of well-defined discrete stages. The process requires a proper lympho-stromal interaction. In particular, cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs, mTECs) drive T cell differentiation, education, and selection processes, while the thymocyte-dependent signals allow thymic epithelial cells (TECs) to maturate and provide an appropriate thymic microenvironment. Alterations in genes implicated in thymus organogenesis, including Tbx1, Pax1, Pax3, Pax9, Hoxa3, Eya1, and Six1, affect this well-orchestrated process, leading to disruption of thymic architecture. Of note, in both human and mice, the primordial TECs are yet unable to fully support T cell development and only after the transcriptional activation of the Forkhead-box n1 (FOXN1) gene in the thymic epithelium this essential function is acquired. FOXN1 is a master regulator in the TEC lineage specification in that it down-stream promotes transcription of genes, which, in turn, regulate TECs differentiation. In particular, FOXN1 mainly regulates TEC patterning in the fetal stage and TEC homeostasis in the post-natal thymus. An inborn null mutation in FOXN1 leads to Nude/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) phenotype in mouse, rat, and humans. In Foxn1−/− nude animals, initial formation of the primordial organ is arrested and the primordium is not colonized by hematopoietic precursors, causing a severe primary T cell immunodeficiency. In humans, the Nude/SCID phenotype is characterized by congenital alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes, nail dystrophy, and a severe T cell immunodeficiency, inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder. Aim of this review is to summarize all the scientific information so far available to better characterize the pivotal role of the master regulator FOXN1 transcription factor in the TEC lineage specifications and functionality. PMID:23874334

  5. Preparation and Applications of Organotypic Thymic Slice Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sood, Aditi; Dong, Mengqi; Melichar, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Thymic selection proceeds in a unique and highly organized thymic microenvironment resulting in the generation of a functional, self-tolerant T cell repertoire. In vitro models to study T lineage commitment and development have provided valuable insights into this process. However, these systems lack the complete three-dimensional thymic milieu necessary for T cell development and, therefore, are incomplete approximations of in vivo thymic selection. Some of the challenges related to modeling T cell development can be overcome by using in situ models that provide an intact thymic microenvironment that fully supports thymic selection of developing T cells. Thymic slice organotypic cultures complement existing in situ techniques. Thymic slices preserve the integrity of the thymic cortical and medullary regions and provide a platform to study development of overlaid thymocytes of a defined developmental stage or of endogenous T cells within a mature thymic microenvironment. Given the ability to generate ~20 slices per mouse, thymic slices present a unique advantage in terms of scalability for high throughput experiments. Further, the relative ease in generating thymic slices and potential to overlay different thymic subsets or other cell populations from diverse genetic backgrounds enhances the versatility of this method. Here we describe a protocol for the preparation of thymic slices, isolation and overlay of thymocytes, and dissociation of thymic slices for flow cytometric analysis. This system can also be adapted to study non-conventional T cell development as well as visualize thymocyte migration, thymocyte-stromal cell interactions, and TCR signals associated with thymic selection by two-photon microscopy. PMID:27585240

  6. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CD49e (α5 integrin chain) in human thymic epithelial cells modulates the expression of multiple genes and decreases thymocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The thymus is a central lymphoid organ, in which bone marrow-derived T cell precursors undergo a complex process of maturation. Developing thymocytes interact with thymic microenvironment in a defined spatial order. A component of thymic microenvironment, the thymic epithelial cells, is crucial for the maturation of T-lymphocytes through cell-cell contact, cell matrix interactions and secretory of cytokines/chemokines. There is evidence that extracellular matrix molecules play a fundamental role in guiding differentiating thymocytes in both cortical and medullary regions of the thymic lobules. The interaction between the integrin α5β1 (CD49e/CD29; VLA-5) and fibronectin is relevant for thymocyte adhesion and migration within the thymic tissue. Our previous results have shown that adhesion of thymocytes to cultured TEC line is enhanced in the presence of fibronectin, and can be blocked with anti-VLA-5 antibody. Results Herein, we studied the role of CD49e expressed by the human thymic epithelium. For this purpose we knocked down the CD49e by means of RNA interference. This procedure resulted in the modulation of more than 100 genes, some of them coding for other proteins also involved in adhesion of thymocytes; others related to signaling pathways triggered after integrin activation, or even involved in the control of F-actin stress fiber formation. Functionally, we demonstrated that disruption of VLA-5 in human TEC by CD49e-siRNA-induced gene knockdown decreased the ability of TEC to promote thymocyte adhesion. Such a decrease comprised all CD4/CD8-defined thymocyte subsets. Conclusion Conceptually, our findings unravel the complexity of gene regulation, as regards key genes involved in the heterocellular cell adhesion between developing thymocytes and the major component of the thymic microenvironment, an interaction that is a mandatory event for proper intrathymic T cell differentiation. PMID:21210968

  7. [Thymic tumors].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Mahé, M; Bretel, J-J; Roberti, E; Ruffié, P

    2005-11-01

    Thymomas and thymic carcinomas are rare and slow-growing tumors, which develop within the anterior mediastinum. Thymomas are often associated with autoimmune disorders and most particularly myasthenia gravis. The treatment of choice remains a complete surgical resection. Postoperative radiotherapy is often combined in case of invasive thymoma invading into adjacent organs. Postoperative radiotherapy in stage II with invasion into capsule has been more controversial lately. In inoperable locally advanced, or metastatic thymic tumors, neoadjuvant cisplatin-based followed by surgery and radiotherapy has given interesting results in the past years. PMID:16168694

  8. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. ... and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less ...

  9. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  10. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  11. Thymic B Cells and Central T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Steinert, Madlen; Klein, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Central T cell tolerance is believed to be mainly induced by thymic dendritic cells and medullary thymic epithelial cells. The thymus also harbors substantial numbers of B cells. These may arise though intrathymic B lymphopoiesis or immigration from the bloodstream. Importantly, and in contrast to resting “mainstream” B cells in the periphery, thymic B cells display elevated levels of MHC class II and constitutively express CD80. Arguably, their most unexpected feature is the expression of autoimmune regulator. These unique features of thymic B cells result from a licensing process that involves cross-talk with CD4 single-positive T cells and CD40 signaling. Together, these recent findings suggest that B cells play a more prominent role as thymic APCs than previously appreciated. PMID:26257742

  12. Medullary carcinoma of thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by radiation therapy to the neck given ...

  13. A novel T-lymphocyte molecule that may function in the induction of self-tolerance and MHC-restriction within the human thymic microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Larché, M; Lamb, J R; Ritter, M A

    1988-01-01

    T-cell differentiation is known to take place in the thymus, but the precise mechanisms involved remain unresolved. In order to analyse the role of the thymic microenvironment in thymocyte maturation and generation of the T-cell repertoire, we have raised monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to thymic stromal cells, and with these can recognize, in the non-lymphoid component of the thymus, several antigenically distinct compartments. One mAb, MR6, binds to both the cortical epithelium and medullary macrophages/dendritic (M phi/DC) cells in sections of the human thymus. Recently, the molecule detected by MR6 has also been detected at low levels on the surface of T lymphocytes. We now report that this molecule has a relative molecular mass of 145,000 (p145-MR6) and that this appears to be the same for both thymic lymphocytes and stromal cells. Functional studies show that mAb MR6 inhibits both the antigen-specific and the IL-2-induced proliferative response of MHC class II-restricted cloned helper T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These results suggest that the molecule to which mAb MR6 binds could be responsible for the inhibition of T-cell proliferation to self-antigens, and hence may be involved in tolerance induction and MHC restriction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2968304

  14. Interferons Mediate Terminal Differentiation of Human Cortical Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Laine, David; Zaffran, Yona; Azocar, Olga; Servet-Delprat, Christine; Wild, T. Fabian; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Valentin, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    In the thymus, epithelial cells comprise a heterogeneous population required for the generation of functional T lymphocytes, suggesting that thymic epithelium disruption by viruses may compromise T-cell lymphopoiesis in this organ. In a previous report, we demonstrated that in vitro, measles virus induced differentiation of cortical thymic epithelial cells as characterized by (i) cell growth arrest, (ii) morphological and phenotypic changes, and (iii) apoptotis as a final step of this process. In the present report, we have analyzed the mechanisms involved. First, measles virus-induced differentiation of thymic epithelial cells is shown to be strictly dependent on beta interferon (IFN-β) secretion. In addition, transfection with double-stranded RNA, a common intermediate of replication for a broad spectrum of viruses, is reported to similarly mediate thymic epithelial cell differentiation through IFN-β induction. Finally, we demonstrated that recombinant IFN-α, IFN-β, or IFN-γ was sufficient to induce differentiation and apoptosis of uninfected thymic epithelial cells. These observations suggested that interferon secretion by either infected cells or activated leukocytes, such as plasmacytoid dendritic cells or lymphocytes, may induce thymic epithelium disruption in a pathological context. Thus, we have identified a new mechanism that may contribute to thymic atrophy and altered T-cell lymphopoiesis associated with many infections. PMID:12050353

  15. Flow Cytometry Analysis of Thymic Epithelial Cells and Their Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Izumi; Takahama, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    The parenchyma of the thymus is compartmentalized into the cortex and the medulla, which are constructed by cortical thymic epithelial cells (cortical TECs, cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), respectively. cTECs and mTECs essentially and differentially regulate the development and repertoire selection of T cells. Consequently, the biology of T cell development and selection includes the study of TECs in addition to the study of developing T cells and other hematopoietic cells including dendritic cells. In this chapter, we describe the methods for flow cytometric analysis and sorting of TECs and their subpopulations, including cTECs and mTECs. PMID:26294398

  16. Activation of cortical and inhibited differentiation of medullary epithelial cells in the thymus of lymphotoxin-beta receptor-deficient mice: an ultrastructural study

    PubMed Central

    Milićević, N M; Nohroudi, K; Milićević, Ž; Westermann, J

    2008-01-01

    The reciprocal influences of thymic lymphocyte and nonlymphocyte populations, i.e. thymic cross-talk, are necessary for the proper maturation of thymocytes and the development/maintenance of thymic stromal microenvironments. Although the molecular influences exerted by thymic stromal cells on maturing thymocytes have been extensively studied, the identity of signalling molecules used by thymocytes to influence the thymic stromal cells is still largely unknown. Our study provides the first ultrastructural evidence that the functional lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LTβR) signalling pathway is engaged in the cross-talk between thymocytes and the thymic stromal cell population. We show that LTβR signalling is of the utmost significance for the preservation of the subcellular integrity of all thymic epithelial cells. In the absence of LTβR there is (1) hypertrophy and activation of cortical thymic epithelial cells, (2) the complete loss of fully differentiated medullary thymic epithelial cells, and (3) the inhibited differentiation of remaining medullary thymic epithelial cells with the appearance of prominent intercellular cysts in the thymic medulla. PMID:18194204

  17. Thymic gallium-67 localization in pediatric patients on chemotherapy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, D.M.; Leonard, J.C.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Nitschke, R.M.; Hinkle, G.H.; Ice, R.D.; Wilson, D.A.; Tunell, W.P.

    1981-12-01

    Localization of Ga-67 in the thymus has been reported to occur in children. In our control group of 87 patients, 15% of children under 5 yr and 11% of children over 5 hr demonstrated thymic localization. In contrast, in our study group of seven children with acute lymphocytic leukemia or malignant lymphoma, lymphocytic diffuse, treated on a modified non-Hodgkin's lymphoma protocol, Sloan-Kettering LSA/sub 2/-L/sub 2/, thymic localization occurred during treatment in five of the seven. We conclude that increased thymic gallium localization in children under chemotherapy for a known malignancy may reflect increased activity of thymic medullary epithelial cells and regeneration of thymic lymphocytes during recovery from involution induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Thymic gallium-67 localization in pediatric patients on chemotherapy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, D.M.; Leonard, J.C.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Nitschke, R.M.; Hinkle, G.H.; Ice, R.D.; Wilson, D.A.; Tunell, W.P.

    1981-12-01

    Localization of 67Ga in the thymus has been reported to occur in children. In our control group of 87 patients, 15% of children under 5 yr and 11% of children over 5 yr demonstrated thymic localization. In contrast, in our study group of seven children with acute lymphocytic leukemia or malignant lymphoma, lymphocytic diffuse, treated on a modified non-Hodgkin's lymphoma protocol, Sloan-Kettering LSA2-L2, thymic localization occurred during treatment in five of the seven. We conclude that increased thymic gallium localization in children under chemotherapy for a known malignancy may reflect increased activity of thymic medullary epithelial cells and regeneration of thymic lymphocytes during recovery from involution induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. Medullary Sponge Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association of Kidney Patients National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Medullary Sponge Kidney Page Content On this page: What is Medullary ...

  20. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis. PMID:1852667

  1. Thymic Crosstalk Coordinates Medulla Organization and T-Cell Tolerance Induction

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Noëlla; Sergé, Arnauld; Ferrier, Pierre; Irla, Magali

    2015-01-01

    The thymus ensures the generation of a functional and highly diverse T-cell repertoire. The thymic medulla, which is mainly composed of medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and dendritic cells (DCs), provides a specialized microenvironment dedicated to the establishment of T-cell tolerance. mTECs play a privileged role in this pivotal process by their unique capacity to express a broad range of peripheral self-antigens that are presented to developing T cells. Reciprocally, developing T cells control mTEC differentiation and organization. These bidirectional interactions are commonly referred to as thymic crosstalk. This review focuses on the relative contributions of mTEC and DC subsets to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and the generation of natural regulatory T cells. We also summarize current knowledge regarding how hematopoietic cells conversely control the composition and complex three-dimensional organization of the thymic medulla. PMID:26257733

  2. Thymic involution: implications for self-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Frances T; Gress, Ronald E

    2007-01-01

    The thymus contributes to the regulation of tolerance and the prevention of autoimmunity at many levels. First, auto-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clonally deleted during negative selection in the thymus, establishing central tolerance. The unique expression of the AIRE (autoimmune regulator) gene in medullary thymic epithelial cells results in expression of a broad array of tissue-specific antigens. Thymocytes bearing T-cell receptors that bind to these tissue-specific antigens are clonally deleted. This process removes self-reactive T cells from the repertoire before T cells are exported to the periphery. Second, CD4+CD25 bright regulatory T cells (Treg) develop in parallel with CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells in the thymus. Unlike T effector cells, Treg fail to be deleted by exposure to tissue antigens during thymic maturation. After export to the periphery, Treg cells play a critical role in the prevention of autoimmunity, suppression of inflammatory responses, and the modulation of T-cell homeostasis. Finally, productive thymopoiesis, in and of itself, may be a factor deterring autoimmunity, The thymus continuously generates stable, resting populations of naive T cells that maintain the numbers and the diversity of the T-cell repertoire. Under conditions of lymphopenia prolonged by inadequate thymopoiesis, compensatory peripheral expansion of T cells occurs to maintain stable T-cell levels. Under circumstances in which the repertoire is limited, Homeostatic proliferation may increase the opportunity for T-cells reactive with self antigens to expand, leading to autoimmune disorders. In all of these respects, the thymus maintains immunologic tolerance to self. Given the importance of the thymus in control of autoimmunity, the gradual age-dependent decline in thymic cytoarchitecture and thymopoietic productivity may, therefore, contribute to the development of auto-reactivity and loss of self-tolerance. PMID:17876107

  3. CCR4 promotes medullary entry and thymocyte-dendritic cell interactions required for central tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zicheng; Lancaster, Jessica N; Sasiponganan, Chayanit; Ehrlich, Lauren I R

    2015-10-19

    Autoimmunity results from a breakdown in central or peripheral tolerance. To establish central tolerance, developing T cells must enter the thymic medulla, where they scan antigen-presenting cells (APCs) displaying a diverse array of autoantigens. If a thymocyte is activated by a self-antigen, the cell undergoes either deletion or diversion into the regulatory T cell (T reg) lineage, thus maintaining self-tolerance. Mechanisms promoting thymocyte medullary entry and interactions with APCs are incompletely understood. CCR4 is poised to contribute to central tolerance due to its expression by post-positive selection thymocytes, and expression of its ligands by medullary thymic dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we use two-photon time-lapse microscopy to demonstrate that CCR4 promotes medullary entry of the earliest post-positive selection thymocytes, as well as efficient interactions between medullary thymocytes and DCs. In keeping with the contribution of thymic DCs to central tolerance, CCR4 is involved in regulating negative selection of polyclonal and T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic thymocytes. In the absence of CCR4, autoreactive T cells accumulate in secondary lymphoid organs and autoimmunity ensues. These studies reveal a previously unappreciated role for CCR4 in the establishment of central tolerance. PMID:26417005

  4. CCR4 promotes medullary entry and thymocyte–dendritic cell interactions required for central tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zicheng; Lancaster, Jessica N.; Sasiponganan, Chayanit

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity results from a breakdown in central or peripheral tolerance. To establish central tolerance, developing T cells must enter the thymic medulla, where they scan antigen-presenting cells (APCs) displaying a diverse array of autoantigens. If a thymocyte is activated by a self-antigen, the cell undergoes either deletion or diversion into the regulatory T cell (T reg) lineage, thus maintaining self-tolerance. Mechanisms promoting thymocyte medullary entry and interactions with APCs are incompletely understood. CCR4 is poised to contribute to central tolerance due to its expression by post-positive selection thymocytes, and expression of its ligands by medullary thymic dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we use two-photon time-lapse microscopy to demonstrate that CCR4 promotes medullary entry of the earliest post-positive selection thymocytes, as well as efficient interactions between medullary thymocytes and DCs. In keeping with the contribution of thymic DCs to central tolerance, CCR4 is involved in regulating negative selection of polyclonal and T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic thymocytes. In the absence of CCR4, autoreactive T cells accumulate in secondary lymphoid organs and autoimmunity ensues. These studies reveal a previously unappreciated role for CCR4 in the establishment of central tolerance. PMID:26417005

  5. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  6. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  7. Single Cell Analysis of Complex Thymus Stromal Cell Populations: Rapid Thymic Epithelia Preparation Characterizes Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten M.; Mella, Heather; Lucas, Philip J.; Williams, Joy A.; Telford, William; Gress, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and dendritic cells are essential for the maintenance of thymopoiesis. Because these stromal elements define the progenitor niche, provide critical survival signals and growth factors, and direct positive and negative selection, detailed study of these populations is necessary to understand important elements for thymic renewal after cytotoxic injury. Study of TEC is currently hindered by lengthy enzymatic separation techniques with decreased viability. We present a new rapid separation technique that yields consistent viable TEC numbers in a quarter of the prior preparation time. Using this new procedure, we identify changes in stroma populations following total body irradiation (TBI). By flow cytometry, we show that TBI significantly depletes UEA+ medullary TEC, while sparing Ly51+ CD45− cells. Further characterization of the Ly51+ subset reveals enrichment of fibroblasts (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII−), while cortical TECs (CD45− Ly51+ MHCII+) were markedly reduced. Dendritic cells (CD11lc+ CD45+) were also decreased following TBI. These data suggest that cytotoxic preparative regimens may impair thymic renewal by reducing critical populations of cortical and medullary TEC, and that such thymic damage can be assessed by this new rapid separation technique, thereby providing a means of assessing optimal conditioning pretransplantfor enhancing thymic-dependent immune reconstitution posttranspiant. PMID:19750208

  8. Thymic lymphosarcoma in three heifers.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, C E; Rebhun, W C; Dill, S G

    1986-12-15

    Three heifers with the thymic form of lymphosarcoma were examined. In each of the 3 cases, fever, bloat, and jugular venous distention had developed. Detectable antibody to bovine leukosis virus was not found on agar gel immunodiffusion testing in any of the cases. Thymic lymphosarcoma was confirmed by necropsy and histologic examination. Thymic lymphosarcoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis in heifers with fever, bloat, and jugular venous distention. PMID:3793601

  9. Thymic hormones in thymus recovery from radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Neta; Schwartz, G.N.; MacVittie, T.J.; Douches, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a thymic hormone, thymosin fraction 5 (TF5), in restoring immunocompetence in the thymus of gamma-irradiated mice was examined. Three different mouse strains were used in this study, since previous work has established that the response to TF5 varies in different strains. To measure the rate of recovery of immunocompetent cells in the thymus, the responsiveness to comitogenic effect of interleukn-1 (IL-1) was used. This assay was chosen since it has been established that only more mature PNA, Lytl(+2-) medullary cells respond to this monokine. Contrary to several earlier reports that radio-resistant cells repopulating the thymus within the first 10 days after irradiation are mature, corticosteriod-resistant, immunocompetent cells, the thymic cells from irradiated mice in all strains used had greatly reduced responses to IL-1. Daily intraperitoneal injections of TF5 increased significantly the responses of thymic cells to IL-1 in 10-13 weeks old C57B1/KsJ, C3H/HeJ, and DBA/1 mice. Older mice, 5 months or more in age, of DBA/1 strain did not respond to treatment with TF5. However, C3H/HeJ mice of the same age were highly responsive. In conclusion, (a) cells repopulating the thymus within 12 days after irradiation contain lower than normal fraction of mature IL-1 responsive cells, (b) thymic hormones increase the rate of recovery of immunocompetent cells in the thymus, and (c) the effect of thymic hormones is strain and age dependent.

  10. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  11. Thymic stromal cell subsets for T cell development.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takeshi; Suzuki, Harumi

    2016-03-01

    The thymus provides a specialized microenvironment in which a variety of stromal cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin regulate development and repertoire selection of T cells. Recent studies have been unraveling the inter- and intracellular signals and transcriptional networks for spatiotemporal regulation of development of thymic stromal cells, mainly thymic epithelial cells (TECs), and the molecular mechanisms of how different TEC subsets control T cell development and selection. TECs are classified into two functionally different subsets: cortical TECs (cTECs) and medullary TECs (mTECs). cTECs induce positive selection of diverse and functionally distinct T cells by virtue of unique antigen-processing systems, while mTECs are essential for establishing T cell tolerance via ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens and cooperation with dendritic cells. In addition to reviewing the role of the thymic stroma in conventional T cell development, we will discuss recently discovered novel functions of TECs in the development of unconventional T cells, such as natural killer T cells and γδT cells. PMID:26825337

  12. Quantitative analysis of cultured thymic reticulo-epithelial cells labelled by different antibodies: a flow cytometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Fabien, N; Auger, C; Bonnard, M; Andreoni, C; Rigal, D; Monier, J C

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of cultured human and murine thymic, and human thymoma reticuloepithelial cells (REC), immunolabeled by different antibodies (Ab) (TE3, TE4, anti-HTLV p19(p19), lu5, K11 and Aks) and by thymic hormones (thymulin and thymosin alpha 1 (Ta1)) within these cells, were performed using a flow cytometric technique. The anti-keratin polyclonal Ab labeled nearly the whole human or murine population. The p19 monoclonal Ab (MoAb), specific for the subcortical/medullary thymic regions, labelled 37-77% of the human REC. The TE3 MoAb, specific for the cortical region, labelled 54-83% of the REC. These percentages suggest that the cultured thymic REC (TREC) had markers of both regions together and therefore that these markers are not absolutely specific to determine their subcortical/medullary or cortical thymic origin. For the three populations there were more cells containing Ta1 than thymulin. The overlap of the percentage of labelled cells suggests that the same cell could synthesize the two hormones and that these hormones could be localized within the TE3 positive cells. PMID:2649289

  13. Regenerative capacity of adult cortical thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rode, Immanuel; Boehm, Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Involution of the thymus is accompanied by a decline in the number of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and a severely restricted peripheral repertoire of T-cell specificities. TECs are essential for T-cell differentiation; they originate from a bipotent progenitor that gives rise to cells of cortical (cTEC) and medullary (mTEC) phenotypes, via compartment-specific progenitors. Upon acute selective near-total ablation during embryogenesis, regeneration of TECs fails, suggesting that losses from the pool of TEC progenitors are not compensated. However, it is unclear whether this is also true for the compartment-specific progenitors. The decline of cTECs is a prominent feature of thymic involution. Because cTECs support early stages of T-cell development and hence determine the overall lymphopoietic capacity of the thymus, it is possible that the lack of sustained regenerative capacity of cTEC progenitor cells underlies the process of thymic involution. Here, we examine this hypothesis by cell-type-specific conditional ablation of cTECs. Expression of the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) gene under the regulatory influence of the chemokine receptor Ccx-ckr1 gene renders cTECs sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of diphtheria toxin (DT). As expected, DT treatment of preadolescent and adult mice led to a dramatic loss of cTECs, accompanied by a rapid demise of immature thymocytes. Unexpectedly, however, the cTEC compartment regenerated after cessation of treatment, accompanied by the restoration of T-cell development. These findings provide the basis for the development of targeted interventions unlocking the latent regenerative potential of cTECs to counter thymic involution. PMID:22331880

  14. Expression of early activation antigen (CD69) during human thymic development.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, L K; Haynes, B F; Nakamura, S; Pahwa, S; Fu, S M

    1990-01-01

    The novel early activation antigen, EA1, has been shown to be induced by mitogens, antigens and the tumour promoter, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), on human lymphocytes. This antigen has been designated to be CD69. EA1 has also been shown to be expressed on thymocytes without exogenous activation stimuli. In order to characterize further the expression of EA1 on thymocytes, the ontogeny of its expression was studied. EA1 appeared between 7 and 9.5 weeks of gestation, after colonization of the thymic rudiment with CD7+ T cell precursors, but before the onset of compartmentalization of the thymus into cortical and medullary zones. After cortico-medullary differentiation, the majority of medullary thymocytes expressed EA1 while only a fraction of the cortical thymocytes expressed this antigen. In the fetal and post-natal cortex, EA1 expression appeared to cluster in the subcapsular cortex. EA1+ cells were also scattered throughout the inner cortex. By two-colour fluorocytometric analysis of post-natal thymocytes, it was shown that EA1 was expressed on 30 to 65% of thymocytes. EA1 was expressed on CD4+ CD8+ as well as on the more immature CD4- CD8- thymocytes. In contrast to circulating T cells, thymocytes were much less responsive to PMA stimulation for the expression of EA1. Molecular characterization showed that EA1 on thymocytes had the same structure as that of activated peripheral T cells. In addition, thymic EA1 was constitutively phosphorylated. Thus, EA1 expression is acquired early during thymic development after colonization of the thymic rudiment by CD7+ T cell precursors. However, the specific role that EA1 may play in the activation and function of developing thymocytes remains to be determined. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2204504

  15. Progenitor Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell–cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing β cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which β cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to β cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  16. Treatment Options for Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of thymoma and thymic carcinoma include a cough and chest pain. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma may ... if you have any of the following: A cough that doesn't go away. Chest pain. Trouble ...

  17. Stages of Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of thymoma and thymic carcinoma include a cough and chest pain. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma may ... if you have any of the following: A cough that doesn't go away. Chest pain. Trouble ...

  18. General Information about Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Thymic Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  20. Homeostasis, thymic hormones and aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The thymic-pituitary axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is, first, to introduce the idea of an immune-neuroendocrine homeostatic network in higher animals. Next, the relevance of the thymus in this network and the possible role of this gland in the neuroendocrine imbalances associated with aging are discussed. A number of studies are next reviewed which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction five, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 on beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, glucocorticoids, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone and thymus factor are also summarized, and the impact of aging on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones is discussed. As a conclusion, it is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might, therefore, act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes the aging process. PMID:10202264

  1. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Imaging.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Stefan; Raue, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in early detection and staging of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) as well as in follow-up to localize early recurrence. MTC is a rare, calcitonin-secreting thyroid malignancy often diagnosed by ultrasound and calcitonin screening as part of the routine workup for any thyroid nodule. If calcitonin is elevated, imaging studies are needed for preoperative staging, which dictates surgical management. This can be done by ultrasound of the neck and abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies for more distant disease are done preoperatively if calcitonin levels are higher than 500 pg/ml. Neither FDG-PET/CT nor F-DOPA-PET/CT are used routinely for preoperative staging but may contribute in doubtful individual cases. Postoperative elevated calcitonin is related to persistence or recurrence of MTC. Imaging studies to localize tumor tissue during postoperative follow-up include ultrasound, CT, MRI as well as PET studies. They should be used wisely, however, since treatment consequences are often limited, and even patients with persistent disease may survive long enough to accumulate significant radiation doses. Imaging studies are also useful for diagnosis of associated components of the hereditary MTC such as pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). PMID:26494385

  2. Pediatric Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which originates from thyroid parafollicular C cells, accounts for 3 to 5% of thyroid malignancies. MTC occurs either sporadically or in an inherited autosomal dominant manner. Hereditary MTC occurs as a familial MTC or as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A and B syndromes. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed between hereditary MTC and germ-line “gain of function” mutations of the RET proto-oncogene. Most cases of pediatric MTC are hereditary whereas sporadic MTC is rare in children and is usually diagnosed in adults. Therefore, MTC in children is most often diagnosed in the course of a familial genetic investigation. The standard treatment of MTC mainly requires surgery involving total thyroidectomy and central neck node dissection before extrathyroidal extension occurs. To prevent MTC development in hereditary syndromes, prophylactic thyroidectomy is performed in presymptomatic patients. An appropriate age at which the surgery should take place is determined based upon the data from genotyping, serum calcitonin measurements, and ultrasonography. For the treatment of advanced MTC cases, the broad spectrum receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors vandetanib and cabozantinib, which also inhibit RET, are used although they are not always effective. PMID:27014708

  3. Medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Clayman, Gary L; el-Baradie, Tarek S

    2003-02-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is a rare neoplasm that arises from the parafollicular C cells. It occurs in a sporadic form, or less commonly as a hereditary form, as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes types 2A and 2B. The RET proto-oncogene is currently the primary factor that is implicated in the hereditary forms of this neoplasm. The knowledge about the genetic makeup of the neoplasm impacts upon management as it allows for screening, early detection, and prophylactic treatment. Surgery is the main modality that offers a cure. This entails a total thyroidectomy and vigilant management and surveillance of the neck. Prognosis of patients with MTC is variable, but the more constant factors that affect it are the stage of disease and the age of the patient. The emerging molecular genetic understanding of this malignancy will provide the foundation for prognostic and therapeutic decision-making in the future. Interdisciplinary management by surgeons, endocrinologists, pathologists, radiotherapists, radiologists, and medical oncologists should be sought. PMID:12803011

  4. [Medullary thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Niccoli-Sire, P; Conte-Devolx, B

    2007-10-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is developed from thyroid C cells that secrete calcitonin (CT). MTC represents 5-10% of thyroid cancers with a 1-2% incidence in nodular thyroid diseases. Diagnosis is usually made by a solitary nodule often associated to nodal metastasis and confirmed by a high basal CT level which represents its biological marker. MTC may present as a sporadic form and in about 30% of case as a familial form as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, an hereditary dominant inherited disease related to germline mutation of the proto-oncogene RET. Both biological (CT) and genetic (RET) markers allows the optimal diagnosis and treatment of MTC; the former allows screening and early diagnosis of MTC by routinely CT measurements in nodular thyroid diseases that make the adequate and complete surgery required to be performed. The former leads to diagnose familial MTC and to identify at risk subjects in whom early or prophylactic surgery may be performed. Treatment of MTC is based on the complete surgical resection: total thyroidectomy associated to central and laterocervical nodal dissection. For locally advanced or metastatic MTC, complete cervical surgery is required and needs to be associated to other systemic treatments: as chemotherapy is not very efficient, radioimmunotherapy and RET target gene therapy (mainly tyrosine kinase inhibitors) appears as possible valuable therapeutic options for the future. Prognosis of MTC is mainly related to both the stage of the disease and the extend of the initial surgery. Ten-year survival is about 80% when the patients are not surgically cured and reaches 95% when the biological marker CT is normalized after surgery. PMID:17572372

  5. Abnormalities of Thymic Stroma may Contribute to Immune Dysregulation in Murine Models of Leaky Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Caraffi, Stefano; Paganini, Tiziana; Fontana, Elena; Giliani, Silvia; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Lymphostromal cross-talk in the thymus is essential to allow generation of a diversified repertoire of T lymphocytes and to prevent autoimmunity by self-reactive T cells. Hypomorphic mutations in genes that control T cell development have been associated with immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation both in humans and in mice. We have studied T cell development and thymic stroma architecture and maturation in two mouse models of leaky severe combined immune deficiency, carrying hypomorphic mutations in rag1 and lig4 genes. Defective T cell development was associated with abnormalities of thymic architecture that predominantly affect the thymic medulla, with reduction of the pool of mature medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the ability of mTECs to express autoimmune regulator (Aire) is preserved in mutant mice, the frequency of mature mTECs expressing Aire and tissue-specific antigens is severely reduced. Similarly, the ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells is preserved in rag1 and lig4 mutant mice, but their number is greatly reduced. These data indicate that hypomorphic defects in T cell development may cause defective lymphostromal cross-talk and impinge on thymic stromal cells maturation, and thus favor immune dysregulation. PMID:21822418

  6. Differential Expression of microRNAs in Thymic Epithelial Cells from Trypanosoma cruzi Acutely Infected Mice: Putative Role in Thymic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Palu, Cintia Cristina; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Morrot, Alexandre; Garcia-Silva, Maria Rosa; Cayota, Alfonso; Savino, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    A common feature seen in acute infections is a severe atrophy of the thymus. This occurs in the murine model of acute Chagas disease. Moreover, in thymuses from Trypanosoma cruzi acutely infected mice, thymocytes exhibit an increase in the density of fibronectin and laminin integrin-type receptors, with an increase in migratory response ex vivo. Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) play a major role in the intrathymic T cell differentiation. To date, the consequences of molecular changes promoted by parasite infection upon thymus have not been elucidated. Considering the importance of microRNA for gene expression regulation, 85 microRNAs (mRNAs) were analyzed in TEC from T. cruzi acutely infected mice. The infection significantly modulated 29 miRNAs and modulation of 9 was also dependent whether TEC sorted out from the thymus exhibited cortical or medullary phenotype. In silico analysis revealed that these miRNAs may control target mRNAs known to be responsible for chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and cell death. Considering that we sorted TEC in the initial phase of thymocyte loss, it is conceivable that changes in TEC miRNA expression profile are functionally related to thymic atrophy, providing new clues to better understanding the mechanisms of the thymic involution seen in experimental Chagas disease. PMID:26347748

  7. [Clinical evaluation of thymic function].

    PubMed

    Castermans, E; Morrhaye, G; Marchand, S; Martens, H; Moutschen, M; Baron, F; Beguin, Y; Geenen, V

    2007-11-01

    The essential role of the thymus is to install an extremely diverse repertoire of T lymphocytes that are self-tolerant and competent against non-self, as well as to generate self-antigen specific regulatory T cells (Treg) able to inactivate in periphery self-reactive T cells having escaped the thymic censorship. Although indirect, techniques of medical imaging and phenotyping of peripheral T cells may help in the investigation of thymic function. Nowadays however, thymopoiesis is better evaluated through quantification by PCR of T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) generated by intrathymic random recombination of the gene segments coding for the variable parts of the T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR). The TREC methodology is very valuable in the circumstances not associated with intense proliferation or apoptosis of peripheral T lymphocytes. PMID:18217644

  8. Studying T Cell Development in Thymic Slices.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jenny O; Melichar, Heather J; Halkias, Joanna; Robey, Ellen A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, tissue slices have been adapted to study both mouse and human T cell development. Thymic slices combine and complement the strengths of existing organotypic culture systems to study thymocyte differentiation. Specifically, the thymic slice system allows for high throughput experiments and the ability to introduce homogenous developmental intermediate populations into an environment with a well-established cortex and medulla. These qualities make thymic slices a highly versatile and technically accessible model to study thymocyte development. Here we describe methods to prepare, embed, and slice thymic lobes to study T cell development in situ. PMID:26294404

  9. Morphological imaging of thymic disorders.

    PubMed

    Camera, L; Brunetti, A; Romano, M; Larobina, M; Marano, I; Salvatore, M

    1999-10-01

    The thymus is a bilobed lymphoid organ the morphology of which varies considerably with age as a result of a process of fatty infiltration occurring after puberty. Although several diseases can arise in the thymic parenchyma, including germ cell and neuroendocrine tumours, primitive epithelial neoplasms (thymomas) are the most common neoplasms and account for almost 10% of mediastinal masses. Thymomas are usually benign but can be locally invasive. Up to 30% of patients with a thymoma have myasthenia gravis, which is more commonly associated with thymic hyperplasia. The latter results in a symmetric diffuse enlargement of the thymus. However, thymic hyperplasia can be histologically found in up to 50% of normal-sized thymuses on computed tomography (CT). CT is much more accurate in detecting thymomas than it is in detecting thymic hyperplasia, although CT findings may be unspecific. CT can be exhaustive in the case of an encapsulated thymoma (65% of all thymomas), which appear as a solid homogeneous mass with a slight contrast enhancement and a well-defined surrounding fat plane. These tumours rarely recur after surgery. CT can also accurately detect a spread through the capsule into the adjacent mediastinal fat, which characterizes invasive thymomas (35%). These, however, are best evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). On T1-weighted MR scans the thymus is well delineated against the mediastinal fat, whereas marked inhomogeneity of the signal may appear on T2-weighted images as a result of areas of cystic degeneration in the tumour mass. The superior contrast resolution of MRI and the multiplanar images that can be produced with it are well suited for documenting the mediastinal spread of invasive thymomas. MRI depicts accurately pleural and/or pericardial implants as well as the involvement of great vessels, offering considerable aid in the planning of surgery. PMID:10574157

  10. Extended resections for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cameron D

    2010-10-01

    Almost all series reporting on the results of resection in thymic tumors indicate that the performance of a complete resection is probably the most important prognostic factor. This issue is not a factor in Masaoka stage I and II tumors that are almost always easily completely resected and have an excellent prognosis. Masaoka stage III tumors that invade the pericardium, lungs, or great vessels have relatively higher incomplete resection rates, significantly higher recurrence rates, and thus a worse prognosis. There are several small reports on the efficacy of resection of the great veins when involved by a thymic malignancy with low morbidity and meaningful long-term survival. Superior vena cava reconstruction is commonly performed by a polytetrafluroethylene, venous, or pericardial graft. These cases can usually be identified preoperatively and, thus, considered for induction therapy. Because these types of cases are almost always of marginal respectability in terms of obtaining a true en bloc resection, there is an increasing enthusiasm for offering induction therapy in an effort to enhance resectability. Preliminary results suggest increased R0 resection rates and improved survival with induction therapy for locally advanced tumors. The optimal induction treatment is unknown. The ultimate extended surgery for advanced thymic tumors is an extrapleural pneumonectomy performed for extensive pleural disease (Masaoka stage IVA). These rarely performed operations are done for IVA disease found at initial presentation and for recurrent disease as a salvage procedure. Again these advanced patients are probably best managed by induction chemotherapy followed by resection. PMID:20859130

  11. The ureteric bud epithelium: Morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components –the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium– that differentiate from two different tissues –the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively– of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is also physiologically divided along the cortico-medullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortical-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney. PMID:25783232

  12. Novel primary thymic defect with T lymphocytes expressing gamma delta T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Geisler, C; Pallesen, G; Platz, P; Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Ryder, L P; Svejgaard, A; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K; Koch, C

    1989-07-01

    Flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a six year old girl with a primary cellular immune deficiency showed a normal fraction of CD3 positive T cells. Most (70%) of the CD3 positive cells, however, expressed the gamma delta and not the alpha beta T cell receptor. Immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that most of the gamma delta T cell receptors existed as disulphide-linked heterodimers. Proliferative responses to mitogens were severely reduced, but specific antibody responses after vaccination could be detected. A thymic biopsy specimen showed severe abnormalities of both the thymic lymphoid and epithelial component with abortive medullary differentiation and almost an entire lack of Hassall's corpuscles. This patient represents a case of primary immune deficiency syndrome not previously described. Thymic deficiency associated with a high proportion of T cells expressing the gamma delta T cell receptor has been described in nude mice, and it is suggested that the immune deficiency of this patient may represent a human analogue. PMID:2527256

  13. mTORC1 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Thymopoiesis, T-Cell Generation, and Temporal Control of γδT17 Development and TCRγ/δ Recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Shin, Jinwook; Wang, Shang; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lin, Xingguang; Gao, Jimin; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Thymus is crucial for generation of a diverse repertoire of T cells essential for adaptive immunity. Although thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are crucial for thymopoiesis and T cell generation, how TEC development and function are controlled is poorly understood. We report here that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in TECs plays critical roles in thymopoiesis and thymus function. Acute deletion of mTORC1 in adult mice caused severe thymic involution. TEC-specific deficiency of mTORC1 (mTORC1KO) impaired TEC maturation and function such as decreased expression of thymotropic chemokines, decreased medullary TEC to cortical TEC ratios, and altered thymic architecture, leading to severe thymic atrophy, reduced recruitment of early thymic progenitors, and impaired development of virtually all T-cell lineages. Strikingly, temporal control of IL-17-producing γδT (γδT17) cell differentiation and TCRVγ/δ recombination in fetal thymus is lost in mTORC1KO thymus, leading to elevated γδT17 differentiation and rearranging of fetal specific TCRVγ/δ in adulthood. Thus, mTORC1 is central for TEC development/function and establishment of thymic environment for proper T cell development, and modulating mTORC1 activity can be a strategy for preventing thymic involution/atrophy. PMID:26889835

  14. mTORC1 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Thymopoiesis, T-Cell Generation, and Temporal Control of γδT17 Development and TCRγ/δ Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Shin, Jinwook; Wang, Shang; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lin, Xingguang; Gao, Jimin; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Thymus is crucial for generation of a diverse repertoire of T cells essential for adaptive immunity. Although thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are crucial for thymopoiesis and T cell generation, how TEC development and function are controlled is poorly understood. We report here that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in TECs plays critical roles in thymopoiesis and thymus function. Acute deletion of mTORC1 in adult mice caused severe thymic involution. TEC-specific deficiency of mTORC1 (mTORC1KO) impaired TEC maturation and function such as decreased expression of thymotropic chemokines, decreased medullary TEC to cortical TEC ratios, and altered thymic architecture, leading to severe thymic atrophy, reduced recruitment of early thymic progenitors, and impaired development of virtually all T-cell lineages. Strikingly, temporal control of IL-17-producing γδT (γδT17) cell differentiation and TCRVγ/δ recombination in fetal thymus is lost in mTORC1KO thymus, leading to elevated γδT17 differentiation and rearranging of fetal specific TCRVγ/δ in adulthood. Thus, mTORC1 is central for TEC development/function and establishment of thymic environment for proper T cell development, and modulating mTORC1 activity can be a strategy for preventing thymic involution/atrophy. PMID:26889835

  15. A highly conserved NF-κB-responsive enhancer is critical for thymic expression of Aire in mice.

    PubMed

    Haljasorg, Uku; Bichele, Rudolf; Saare, Mario; Guha, Mithu; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kõnd, Karin; Remm, Anu; Pihlap, Maire; Tomson, Laura; Kisand, Kai; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) has a unique expression pattern in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), in which it plays a critical role in the activation of tissue-specific antigens. The expression of Aire in mTECs is activated by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) signaling; however, the molecular mechanism behind this activation is unknown. Here, we characterize a conserved noncoding sequence 1 (CNS1) containing two NF-κB binding sites upstream of the Aire coding region. We show that CNS1-deficient mice lack thymic expression of Aire and share several features of Aire-knockout mice, including downregulation of Aire-dependent genes, impaired terminal differentiation of the mTEC population, and reduced production of thymic Treg cells. In addition, we show that CNS1 is indispensable for RANK-induced Aire expression and that CNS1 is activated by NF-κB pathway complexes containing RelA. Together, our results indicate that CNS1 is a critical link between RANK signaling, NF-κB activation, and thymic expression of Aire. PMID:26364592

  16. SHP1-ing thymic selection.

    PubMed

    Gascoigne, Nicholas R J; Brzostek, Joanna; Mehta, Monika; Acuto, Oreste

    2016-09-01

    Thymocyte development and maintenance of peripheral T-cell numbers and functions are critically dependent on T-cell receptor (TCR) signal strength. SHP1 (Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1), a tyrosine phosphatase, acts as a negative regulator of TCR signal strength. Moreover, germline SHP1 knockout mice have shown impaired thymic development. However, this has been recently questioned by an analysis of SHP1 conditional knockout mice, which reported normal thymic development of SHP1 deficient thymocytes. Using this SHP1 conditional knockout mice, in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Martinez et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 2103-2110] show that SHP1 indeed does have a role in the negative regulation of TCR signal strength in positively selected thymocytes, and in the final maturation of single positive thymocytes. They report that thymocyte development in such mice shows loss of mature, post-selection cells. This is due to increased TCR signal transduction in thymocytes immediately post positive-selection, and increased cell death in response to weak TCR ligands. Thus, SHP1-deficiency shows strong similarities to deficiency in the T-cell specific SHP1-associated protein Themis. PMID:27600672

  17. Available evidence and new biological perspectives on medical treatment of advanced thymic epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Serpico, D; Trama, A; Haspinger, E R; Agustoni, F; Botta, L; Berardi, R; Palmieri, G; Zucali, P; Gallucci, R; Broggini, M; Gatta, G; Pastorino, U; Pelosi, G; de Braud, F; Garassino, M C

    2015-05-01

    Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare primary mediastinal tumors arising from thymic epithelium. Their rarity and complexity hinder investigations of their causes and therapy development. Here, we summarize the existing knowledge regarding medical treatment of these tumors, and thoroughly review the known genetic aberrations associated with TETs and the present status of potential biological treatments. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), stem-cell factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and VEGF-2) are overexpressed in TETs. EGFR overexpression in TETs is associated with higher stage, and IGF1R overexpression has poor prognostic value. Data indicate that anti-IGF1R monoclonal antibodies, and inhibitors of angiogenesis, somatostatin receptors, histone deacetylase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and cyclin-dependent kinases may be active against TETs. Continued investigations in this field could lead to advancement of targeted and biological therapies for TETs. PMID:25411417

  18. Chemotherapy and targeted agents for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Thymic malignancies are rare epithelial tumors that may be aggressive and difficult to treat. Thymomas are usually localized to the anterior mediastinum and are frequently eligible for upfront surgical resection. However, nearly 30% of patients present with locally advanced tumors at time of diagnosis, and chemotherapy is then used to reduce the tumor burden, possibly allowing subsequent surgery and/or radiotherapy. Metastatic and recurrent thymic malignancies may similarly be treated with chemotherapy. More recently, the molecular characterization of thymoma and thymic carcinoma led to the identification of potentially druggable targets, laying the foundations to implement personalized medicine for patients. PMID:22594902

  19. Sex hormones have pervasive effects on thymic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dumont-Lagacé, Maude; St-Pierre, Charles; Perreault, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The goal of our study was to evaluate at the systems-level, the effect of sex hormones on thymic epithelial cells (TECs). To this end, we sequenced the transcriptome of cortical and medullary TECs (cTECs and mTECs) from three groups of 6 month-old mice: males, females and males castrated at four weeks of age. In parallel, we analyzed variations in the size of TEC subsets in those three groups between 1 and 12 months of age. We report that sex hormones have pervasive effects on the transcriptome of TECs. These effects were exquisitely TEC-subset specific. Sexual dimorphism was particularly conspicuous in cTECs. Male cTECs displayed low proliferation rates that correlated with low expression of Foxn1 and its main targets. Furthermore, male cTECs expressed relatively low levels of genes instrumental in thymocyte expansion (e.g., Dll4) and positive selection (Psmb11 and Ctsl). Nevertheless, cTECs were more abundant in males than females. Accumulation of cTECs in males correlated with differential expression of genes regulating cell survival in cTECs and cell differentiation in mTECs. The sexual dimorphism of TECs highlighted here may be mechanistically linked to the well-recognized sex differences in susceptibility to infections and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26250469

  20. Differential O-glycosylation in cortical and medullary thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Georgina; Lascurain, Ricardo; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Tetaert, Daniel; Degand, Pierre; Gorocica, Patricia; Espinosa, Blanca; Zenteno, Edgar; Chávez, Raúl

    2006-08-01

    Differentiation of T lymphocytes is characterized by variable expression of CD8/CD4 co-receptor molecules and changes in the glycosylation pattern. In this work, O-glycosylation was analyzed in microsomes from murine thymocytes purified with the PNA and Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) lectins, specific for the T antigen (Gal beta1,3GalNAc1,0 Ser/Thr) in cortical and medullary thymocytes, respectively. Three peptides were used as acceptors for UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase (GalNAc transferase); the peptide motif TTSAPTTS was the best glycosylated one. Cortical ALL-PNA+ thymocytes showed two-fold higher GalNAc transferase activity than ALL+PNA- thymocytes; however, capillary electrophoresis showed a higher proportion of di- versus mono-glycosylated peptides for ALL+PNA- than for ALL-PNA+. We compared the GalNAc transferase activity of thymocytes from dexamethasone-treated mice versus control mice. GalNAc transferase activity was six-fold higher in thymocytes from control mice than from dexamethasone-treated mice; the rate of di-glycosylated peptides for dexamethosone-resistant ALL+ was two-fold higher than for ALL- thymocytes. Our results confirm an upregulated biosynthesis of O-glycosidically linked glycans on T cell surface glycoproteins, and suggest that the modification of GalNAc transferase activity plays a relevant role during the maturation process of thymic cells. PMID:16762509

  1. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  2. Remodeling of the Fetal Collecting Duct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Michael J.; Ivanova, Larissa; Toran, Nuria; Tarantal, Alice F.; Matsell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital urinary tract obstruction induces changes to the renal collecting duct epithelium, including alteration and depletion of intercalated cells. To study the effects of obstruction on the ontogeny of intercalated cell development, we examined normal and obstructed human fetal and postnatal kidneys. In the normal human fetal kidney, intercalated cells originated in the medullary collecting duct at 8 weeks gestation and remained most abundant in the inner medulla throughout gestation. In the cortex, intercalated cells were rare at 18 and 26 weeks gestation and observed at low abundance at 36 weeks gestation. Although early intercalated cells exhibit an immature phenotype, Type A intercalated cells predominated in the inner and outer medullae at 26 and 36 weeks gestation with other intercalated cell subtypes observed rarely. Postnatally, the collecting duct epithelium underwent a remodeling whereby intercalated cells become abundant in the cortex yet absent from the inner medulla. In 18-week obstructed kidneys with mild to moderate injury, the intercalated cells became more abundant and differentiated than the equivalent age-matched normal kidney. In contrast, more severely injured ducts of the late obstructed kidney exhibited a significant reduction in intercalated cells. These studies characterize the normal ontogeny of human intercalated cell development and suggest that obstruction induces premature remodeling and differentiation of the fetal collecting duct epithelium. PMID:20035053

  3. B cell infiltration of the thymic medulla in New Zealand black, New Zealand white, and (New Zealand black x New Zealand white)F1 mice. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farinas, M.C.; Adkins, B.; Stall, A.M.; Weissman, I.; Strober, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Thymuses from female (New Zealand black x New Zealand white)F1 (( NZB x NZW)F1), New Zealand black, and New Zealand white mice of different ages were examined by immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis. Two-and-a-half-month-old (NZB x NZW)F1 mice showed infiltration of the thymus with B cells, and by 6-8 months of age, showed a disruption of the entire medullary area. More than 80% of the thymic B cells had the phenotypic characteristics of conventional B cells (IgM+, IgD+, Ly-1-). Total lymphoid irradiation induced a marked depletion of medullary B cells and a restoration of the thymic architecture.

  4. A unilocular thymic cyst associated with true thymic hyperplasia: a challenging diagnosis especially in a child

    PubMed Central

    Mlika, Mona; Gattoufi, Walid; Zribi, Hazem; Braham, Emna; Marghli, Adel; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of a mediastinal mass in a 19-year-old patient corresponding microscopically to an association of unilocular thymic cyst and true thymic hyperplasia. Our aim is to highlight the absence of specificity of clinical and radiological findings and the necessity of a thorough sampling of the tumor in order to establish the diagnosis. PMID:26445562

  5. Analysis of APC types involved in CD4 tolerance and regulatory T cell generation using reaggregated thymic organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Guerri, Lucia; Peguillet, Isabelle; Geraldo, Yvette; Nabti, Sabrina; Premel, Virginie; Lantz, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Tolerance to self-Ags is generated in the thymus. Both epithelial and hematopoietic thymic stromal cells play an active and essential role in this process. However, the role of each of the various stromal cell types remains unresolved. To our knowledge, we describe the first comparative analysis of several types of thymic hematopoietic stromal cells (THSCs) for their ability to induce CD4 tolerance to self, in parallel with the thymic epithelium. The THSCs--two types of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages (MΦs), B lymphocytes, and eosinophils--were first characterized and quantified in adult mouse thymus. They were then examined in reaggregated thymic organ cultures containing mixtures of monoclonal and polyclonal thymocytes. This thymocyte mixture allows for the analysis of Ag-specific events while avoiding the extreme skewing frequently seen in purely monoclonal systems. Our data indicate that thymic epithelium alone is capable of promoting self-tolerance by eliminating autoreactive CD4 single-positive thymocytes and by supporting regulatory T cell (Treg) development. We also show that both non-Treg CD4 single-positive thymocytes and Tregs are efficiently deleted by the two populations of cDCs present in the thymus, as well as to a lesser extent by MΦs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and eosinophils were not able to do so. Finally, cDCs were also the most efficient THSCs at supporting Treg development in the thymus, suggesting that although they may share some characteristics required for negative selection with MΦs, they do not share those required for the support of Treg development, making cDCs a unique cell subset in the thymus. PMID:23365074

  6. Interleukin-22 drives endogenous thymic regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Young, Lauren F.; Ghosh, Arnab; Singer, Natalie V.; West, Mallory L.; Smith, Odette M.; Holland, Amanda M.; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Boyd, Richard L.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous thymic regeneration is a crucial function that allows for renewal of immune competence after stress, infection or immunodepletion. The mechanisms governing this regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here we detail a framework of thymic regeneration centred on IL-22 and triggered by depletion of CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. Intrathymic levels of IL-22 were increased following thymic insult, and thymic recovery was impaired in IL-22-deficient mice. IL-22, which signalled through thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and promoted their proliferation and survival, was upregulated by radio-resistant RORγ(t)+CCR6+NKp46− lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) after thymic injury in an IL-23 dependent manner. Importantly, administration of IL-22 enhanced thymic recovery following total body irradiation (TBI). These studies reveal mechanisms of endogenous thymic repair and offer innovative regenerative strategies for improving immune competence. PMID:22383805

  7. Cholinergic chemosensory cells of the thymic medulla express the bitter receptor Tas2r131.

    PubMed

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Voigt, Anja; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Boehm, Ulrich; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The thymus is the site of T cell maturation which includes positive selection in the cortex and negative selection in the medulla. Acetylcholine is locally produced in the thymus and cholinergic signaling influences the T cell development. We recently described a distinct subset of medullary epithelial cells in the murine thymus which express the acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and components of the canonical taste transduction cascade, i.e. transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), phospholipase Cβ(2), and Gα-gustducin. Such a chemical phenotype is characteristic for chemosensory cells of mucosal surfaces which utilize bitter receptors for detection of potentially hazardous compounds and cholinergic signaling to initiate avoidance reflexes. We here demonstrate mRNA expression of bitter receptors Tas2r105, Tas2r108, and Tas2r131 in the murine thymus. Using a Tas2r131-tauGFP reporter mouse we localized the expression of this receptor to cholinergic cells expressing the downstream elements of the taste transduction pathway. These cells are distinct from the medullary thymic epithelial cells which promiscuously express tissue-restricted self-antigens during the process of negative selection, since double-labeling immunofluorescence showed no colocalization of autoimmune regulator (AIRE), the key mediator of negative selection, and TRPM5. These data demonstrate the presence of bitter taste-sensing signaling in cholinergic epithelial cells in the thymic medulla and opens a discussion as to what is the physiological role of this pathway. PMID:26102274

  8. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma: therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Anupama; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2004-07-01

    Thymomas and thymic carcinomas, which are rare epithelial tumors arising from the thymus gland, are the most common tumors of the anterior mediastinum. Thymomas are generally encapsulated, slow-growing tumors that have a "bland" histologic appearance. Thymic carcinomas possess more overtly malignant histologic features than thymomas and are more likely to present as invasive or disseminated disease. Surgery is the treatment of choice for localized thymic tumors, with complete resection being the most important prognostic factor. Complete resection also improves survival in locally invasive thymic tumors. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy may improve the outcome in patients with invasive disease, although the data are conflicting. Multimodal regimens, including neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy, surgery, and/or postoperative radiation therapy, are recommended for patients with advanced thymomas and thymic carcinomas. Use of octreotide plus prednisone has produced responses in thymomas, but the dosing and schedule have not been clearly defined. Prospective studies have been limited, and, as such, enrollment in clinical trials is encouraged. PMID:15310414

  9. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yagi, Shintaro; Wu, Guoying; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Penninger, Josef M; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Akiyama, Taishin

    2016-07-25

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire(+) mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire(+) mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire(+) mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire(+) mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire(+) mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire(+) mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire(+) mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire(+) mTECs. PMID:27401343

  10. Doxycycline enhances the Ras-MAPK signaling and proliferation of mouse thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Xia, Sheng; Li, Rong; Liu, Hui; Huang, Ying; Qian, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xueyuan; Xu, Xun; Lin, Xin; Tian, Yuxiang; Zong, Yangyong; He, Dacheng; Chen, Weifeng; Zhang, Yu; Shao, Qixiang

    2009-06-01

    Depletion of T-cell-dependent immunity is a major consideration for patients suffering from infections of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), those undergoing organ transplantation, and those receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. In general, T-cell regeneration occurs in the thymus through thymopoiesis. We have found that doxycycline (Dox), a tetracycline derivative, enhances the proliferation of mouse thymic epithelial cells, which are unique in their capacity to support positive selection and are essential throughout the development of thymocytes. Cell cycle analysis indicates that the increased cell proliferation is due to a shortened G(0)/G(1) phase. To reveal the underlying mechanisms, we examined the expression of an array of molecules that regulate the cell cycle. The results show that in mouse thymic medullary-type epithelial cell line 1 (MTEC1) Dox leads to elevated levels of H-Ras, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2), cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 4/2 (CDK4/CDK2), E2F3, and c-myc. These data, and the observation that the proliferation-enhancing effect is largely abolished following treatment with an ERK inhibitor support an active role of the Ras-ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study reveals a new activity of an old family of antibiotics. The in vivo effect of Dox on immune reconstitution warrants further exploration. PMID:19330805

  11. Thymic involution in pregnancy: a universal finding?

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Sunil; Tong, Iris; Bilodeau, Courtney Clark; Bourjeily, Ghada

    2012-01-01

    The thymus is a lymphatic organ that plays a vital role in the development of immunity in childhood. The thymus involutes during periods of stress and may acutely decrease in size but usually recovers to its normal size. The thymus also involutes during pregnancy, a process that is possibly hormonally mediated and thought to be necessary for fetal survival. This report describes two pregnant patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism who were incidentally found to have thymic enlargement on computed tomography. Follow-up imaging postpartum in both cases demonstrates a significant reduction in thymus size, suggesting thymic hyperplasia. Both patients delivered healthy babies at term. Thymic involution does not universally occur in pregnancy, challenging the theory of its necessity to fetal survival.

  12. Studies on thymus products. IV. Absence of serum `thymic activity' in adult NZB and (NZB × NZW) F1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Bach, J. -F.; Dardenne, Mireille; Salomon, J. -C.

    1973-01-01

    New Zealand Black (NZB) mice and (B/W) F1 hybrids have a normal level of serum `thymic activity' (TA) at birth but this level decreases prematurely between the third and sixth weeks of life. At 2 months, NZB and NZ (B/W) F1 mice have no significant TA, whereas TA is still at birth's level in six control mouse strains and remains at this level until the fourth to the sixth month. Six weeks after the decline of serum TA, NZB mice show disappearance of theta-positive lymph node rosette-forming cells (RFC) and 2 weeks later, progressive decrease in spleen RFC sensitivity to anti-theta serum (AΘS) and azathioprine (AZ) as in neonatally thymectomized CBA mice. Normal AZ and AΘS sensitivity of spleen and lymph node RFC is reconstituted by in vitro or in vivo treatment by thymic extracts. The early thymic abnormalities found in NZB mice are in keeping with the thymic medullar epithelium atrophy reported in newborn NZB mice. PMID:4541554

  13. Syntaxin specificity of aquaporins in the inner medullary collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Abinash C; Mallick, Rickta; Klein, Janet D; Weimbs, Thomas; Sands, Jeff M; Fröhlich, Otto

    2009-08-01

    Proper targeting of the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel to the collecting duct apical plasma membrane is critical for the urine concentrating mechanism and body water homeostasis. However, the trafficking mechanisms that recruit AQP2 to the plasma membrane are still unclear. Snapin is emerging as an important mediator in the initial interaction of trafficked proteins with target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (t-SNARE) proteins, and this interaction is functionally important for AQP2 regulation. We show that in AQP2-Madin-Darby canine kidney cells subjected to adenoviral-mediated expression of both snapin and syntaxins, the association of AQP2 with both syntaxin-3 and syntaxin-4 is highly enhanced by the presence of snapin. In pull-down studies, snapin detected AQP2, syntaxin-3, syntaxin-4, and SNAP23 from the inner medullary collecting duct. AQP2 transport activity, as probed by AQP2's urea permeability, was greatly enhanced in oocytes that were coinjected with cRNAs of SNARE components (snapin+syntaxin-3+SNAP23) over those injected with AQP2 cRNA alone. It was not enhanced when syntaxin-3 was replaced by syntaxin-4 (snapin+syntaxin-4+SNAP23). On the other hand, the latter combination significantly enhanced the transport activity of the related AQP3 water channel while the presence of syntaxin-3 did not. This AQP-syntaxin interaction agrees with the polarity of these proteins' expression in the inner medullary collecting duct epithelium. Thus our findings suggest a selectivity of interactions between different aquaporin and syntaxin isoforms, and thus in the regulation of AQP2 and AQP3 activities in the plasma membrane. Snapin plays an important role as a linker between the water channel and the t-SNARE complex, leading to the fusion event, and the pairing with specific t-SNAREs is essential for the specificity of membrane recognition and fusion. PMID:19515809

  14. Thymic irradiation inhibits the rapid recovery of TH1 but not TH2-like functions of CD4+ T cells after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.; Adkins, B.; Strober, S. )

    1991-10-15

    Four to six weeks after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), there is a selective deficit in the CD4+ T cells which secrete IL-2, proliferate in the MLR, and induce GVHD (Th1-like functions). A similar deficit in CD4+ T cells which secrete IL-4 and help antibody responses (Th2-like functions) is not observed. In the present study, shielding of the thymus with lead during TLI increased the Th1-like functions of CD4+ cells. Mice without thymus shields showed a marked selective reduction in the medullary stromal cells identified with the monoclonal antibody, MD1, and the severe reduction was prevented with thymus shields. Thus, shielding the thymus prevents the depletion of thymic medullary stromal cells and allows for a rapid recovery of Th1-like functions in the mouse spleen after TLI. Th2-like functions recover rapidly after TLI whether or not the thymus is irradiated.

  15. Treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    Although thymic epithelial tumors are rare, they are relatively common among neoplasms of the anterior superior mediastinum. They usually exhibit indolent behavior, but do have the capacity to invade surrounding structures and metastasize to distant sites. Thymic carcinomas are rare, but are highly aggressive tumors that are associated with a poor prognosis. The mainstay of therapy is complete surgical resection. Locally advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma require a multimodality treatment approach with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy to decrease the chances of recurrence and improve survival. The risk of disease recurrence lasts for a number of years after completion of primary therapy. A majority of cases of recurrent disease present as pleural recurrences. Once again, surgical resection of recurrent disease represents the cornerstone of successful therapy and is critical to long-term survival. In recent years, a better understanding of the biologic basis of thymic epithelial tumors has led to the emergence of targeted therapy directed against this malignancy. PMID:19381821

  16. [Progresses in therapeutic strategies for thymic rejuvenation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Ya-Jun; Zhu, Xi-Ke

    2016-02-25

    The thymus is a vital primary lymphoid organ that provides unique microenvironments for the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of T cells. With advancing age, however, the thymus gradually undergoes age-related involution and reduction in immune function, which are characterized by decreases in tissue size, cellularity, and naïve T cell output. This dynamic process leads to the reduced efficacy of the immune system with age and contributes to the increased susceptibility to infection, autoimmune disease, and cancer. In addition, bone marrow transplantation, radio-chemotherapy and virus infection also impair the thymus and give rise to the decline in immune function. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in age-related thymic involution and development of novel therapeutic strategies for thymic rejuvenation have gained considerable interests in recent years. This review emphasizes thymic microenvironments and thymocyte-stromal cell interactions and summarizes our current knowledge about thymic rejuvenation in terms of sex steroid, cytokines, growth factors, hormones, transcription factors, cell graft, and microRNAs. At the end of each discussion, we also highlight unanswered issues and describe possible future research directions. PMID:26915325

  17. Vanadium toxicity in the thymic development

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hengmin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the toxic effects of vanadium on thymic development in broilers fed on diets supplemented with 0, 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 mg/kg of vanadium for 42 days. We examined the changes of relative weight, cell cycle phase, apoptotic cells, and protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in the thymus by the methods of flow cytometry, TUNEL (terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling) and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that dietary high vanadium (30mg/kg, 45mg/kg and 60mg/kg) caused the toxic effects on thymic development, which was characterized by decreasing relative weight, increasing G0/G1 phase (a prolonged nondividing state), reducing S phase (DNA replication) and proliferating index (PI), and increasing percentages of apoptotic thymocytes. Concurrently, the protein expression levels of Bax and caspase-3 were increased, and protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased. The thymic development suppression caused by dietary high vanadium further leads to inhibitive effects on T lymphocyte maturity and activity, and cellular immune function. The above-mentioned results provide new evidences for further understanding the vanadium immunotoxicity. In contrast, dietary 5 mg/kg vanadium promoted the thymic development by increasing relative weight, decreasing G0/G1 phase, increasing S phase and PI, and reducing percentages of apoptotic thymocytes when compared to the control group and high vanadium groups. PMID:26416460

  18. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease type 1 medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1) is an inherited condition that affects the ...

  19. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function. PMID:25045555

  20. The Autoimmunity-Associated Gene CLEC16A Modulates Thymic Epithelial Cell Autophagy and Alters T Cell Selection.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Cornelia; Gerold, Kay D; Schober, Kilian; Probst, Lilli; Boerner, Kevin; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Ruckdeschel, Anna; Serwold, Thomas; Kissler, Stephan

    2015-05-19

    CLEC16A variation has been associated with multiple immune-mediated diseases, including type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Addison's disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and alopecia areata. Despite strong genetic evidence implicating CLEC16A in autoimmunity, this gene's broad association with disease remains unexplained. We generated Clec16a knock-down (KD) mice in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) model for type 1 diabetes and found that Clec16a silencing protected against autoimmunity. Disease protection was attributable to T cell hyporeactivity, which was secondary to changes in thymic epithelial cell (TEC) stimuli that drive thymocyte selection. Our data indicate that T cell selection and reactivity were impacted by Clec16a variation in thymic epithelium owing to Clec16a's role in TEC autophagy. These findings provide a functional link between human CLEC16A variation and the immune dysregulation that underlies the risk of autoimmunity. PMID:25979422

  1. Dietary modulation of thymic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Susana, Feliu María; Paula, Perris; Slobodianik, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complex syndrome caused by an inadequate intake of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins which affects the immune system. Nutritional imbalances, present in children with energy-protein malnutrition and infections, make defining the specific effects of each of them on the thymus difficult. For this reason, it is necessary to design an experimental model in animals that could define a single variable. As the thymus atrophy described in humans is similar to that observed in murines, a rat experimental model makes the extrapolation to man possible. Some authors suggest that the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)--involved in purine metabolism--have an influence on T lymphocyte development and the immune system, due to intracellular accumulation of toxic levels of deoxynucleotides. Studies in our group, performed in an experimental model on Wistar growing rats, have demonstrated that protein deficiency or imbalance in the profile of essential amino acids in the diet, produce loss of thymus weight, reduction in the number of thymocytes, a diminished proportion of T cells presenting the W3/13 antigenic determinant and DNA content with concomitant increase in cell size, and the proportion of immature T cells and activity of ADA and PNP, without modifying the activity of 5´Nucleotidase in the thymus. It is important to point out that there were neither differences in energy intake between experimental groups and their controls, nor clinical symptoms of deficiency of other nutrients. The increase in these thymic enzyme activities was an alternative mechanism to avoid the accumulation of high levels of deoxynucleotides, which would be toxic for T lymphocytes. On the other hand, the administration of a recovery diet, with a high amount of high quality protein, was able to reverse the mentioned effects. The quick reply of Adenosine Deaminase to nutritional disorders and the following nutritional recovery, points

  2. Thymic function in HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Lilian

    2013-04-01

    This thesis is based on seven previously published articles. The work was performed during my employment at The Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, as a scholarship student from 2000-2001 and as a research assistant in the period 2004-2010. HIV-infection is characterized by CD4+ cell depletion. The differences between patients in the degree of CD4+ cell recovery upon treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may in part be due to differences in the supply of naïve CD4+ cells from the thymus. The thymus atrophies with increasing age for which reason the adult thymus was previously assumed to be without function. The aim of these investigations was to examine the role of the thymus in different aspects of HIV-infection: In adult HIV-infected patients, during HIV-positive pregnancy, and in HIV-exposed uninfected (HIV-EU) children born to HIV-infected mothers. Thymic size and output were determined in 25 adult HIV-infected patients receiving HAART and in 10 controls. Larger thymic size was associated with higher CD4 counts and higher thymic output. Furthermore, patients with abundant thymic tissue seemed to have broader immunological repertoires, compared with patients with minimal thymic tissue. The study supports the mounting evidence of a contribution by the adult thymus to immune reconstitution in HIV-infection. In a follow-up study conducted till 5 years of HAART, the importance of the thymus to the rate of cellular restoration was found to primarily lie within the first two years of HAART. The effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was then investigated in a randomized, double-blinded placebo controlled trial in 46 adult HIV-infected patients on HAART. Daily treatment with a low dose of rhGH of 0.7mg for 40 weeks stimulated thymopoiesis as expressed by thymic size, density, and output strongly supporting the assumption that rhGH possesses the potential to stimulate the ageing thymus, holding

  3. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group thymic initiative: a state-of-the-art study of thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Detterbeck, Frank; Korst, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Thymic malignancies are relatively rare tumors. A general lack of knowledge, misconceptions about benignancy, confusion about the definition of terms, and variability in reporting of outcomes have further hampered progress in these diseases. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group has emerged to counter these challenges and has brought together a worldwide multidisciplinary community determined to improve outcomes for these patients. Although the organization is young (initiated in 2010), major early accomplishments have created a foundation and infrastructure for scientific research. These include consensus definitions of terms, an unprecedented global database, development of practical clinical resources and, together with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, development of proposals for the first formal stage classification of these malignant tumors. Many articles have been published or are under way, and a second phase of projects building on the early success is proceeding. The greatest accomplishment of the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group lies in the establishment of an open culture of collaboration and the engagement of a broad group of individuals united by a common mission. It is a testament to what can be achieved, despite ongoing and inherent challenges, by determination and a collective effort. PMID:25837546

  4. Graves' Patient with Thymic Expression of Thyrotropin Receptors and Dynamic Changes in Thymic Hyperplasia Proportional to Graves' Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Shin; Won, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Mi Jeong; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Chung, June-Key; Park, Do Joon

    2016-01-01

    Thymic hyperplasia is frequently observed in Graves' disease. However, detectable massive enlargement of the thymus is rare, and the mechanism of its formation has remained elusive. This case showed dynamic changes in thymic hyperplasia on serial computed tomography images consistent with changes in serum thyrotropin receptor (TSH-R) antibodies and thyroid hormone levels. Furthermore, the patient's thymic tissues underwent immunohistochemical staining for TSH-R, which demonstrated the presence of thymic TSH-R. The correlation between serum TSH-R antibody levels and thymic hyperplasia sizes and the presence of TSH-R in her thymus suggest that TSH-R antibodies could have a pathogenic role in thymic hyperplasia. PMID:26996584

  5. Huge cervico-thoracic thymic cyst.

    PubMed

    Sameh, Ibrahim Sersar; Ismaeil, Mohammed Fouad; Nasser, Mohammed Abdelhameed Fouda; Awadalla, Mohammed Mounir el-Saeid

    2003-09-01

    We present a case of a 6 year-old boy who presented with a huge mass in the right side of the neck and changes its size with respiration and with straining. Computed tomography of the chest and neck showed a huge mass that was thought to be cystic hygroma. It was excised by both median sternotomy and a right cervical incision. Pathology revealed a thymic cyst. PMID:17670062

  6. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis Associated With Thymic Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kristin O; Beneck, Debra M; Dinkin, Marc J

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old woman with ptosis and diplopia was found to have myasthenia gravis (MG) associated with amyloidosis of the thymus gland. Systemic MG is frequently associated with thymomas or thymic hyperplasia but has only once previously been reported in association with amyloidosis of the thymus. This case demonstrates that isolated ocular MG rarely may also be associated with amyloidosis of the thymus. PMID:25822660

  7. [New TNM Staging System for Thymic Malignancies].

    PubMed

    Fukui, Takayuki; Yokoi, Kohei

    2016-05-01

    In patients with malignant tumors, the TNM classification has been widely used by clinicians as a guide for estimating prognosis, and is the basis for treatment decisions. Recently, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee and the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group have proposed a new classification for thymic malignancies to be included in the next official staging system of the forthcoming 8th edition of the TNM classification. In this study, we reviewed 154 consecutive patients with thymic epithelial tumors who underwent complete resection at our institution, and compared their characteristics and outcomes when classified according to the proposed system with those when classified under the current Masaoka-Koga system. The proportion of patients with stage I disease increased markedly to 77.3%under the proposed system because a certain number of patients with Masaoka-Koga stages II and III diseases were downstaged to the new stage I. Regarding histology, among 69 patients with type A, AB, or B1 thymoma, 68 tumors(99%)were diagnosed as new stage I disease. When using the proposed system, the recurrence-free survival rates showed significant deterioration with increasing stage, while the overall survival rates did not. Although the new TNM classification does not serve as an effective prognostic prediction model for overall survival, it appears to offer some benefit, especially in the analysis of recurrence-free survival. PMID:27210081

  8. Morphometric analysis of peritumoral lymph nodes in patients operated on for uterine cancer, locally treated with a thymic extract.

    PubMed

    Corradi, G; Cappellari, A; Pomari, R; Cappello, F

    1989-01-01

    By means of a morphometric analysis, the authors have evaluated the structure and dimensions of the lymph node functional areas (cortical, medullary, paracortical, histiocytosis of the sinuses, germinal centres) in regional nodes of women with carcinoma of the uterus in the 1st and 2nd stages. Twenty patients were treated 8 days before surgery with a dose of 1.5 mg kg-1 body weight of thymic hormone directly into the uterine portio. Ten patients, on the other hand, were injected with physiological saline solution. The quantitative and qualitative results show that in peritumoral lymph nodes of women treated with thymostimolin there is a marked increase, statistically significant (P less than 0.001), of the paracortical zone and of the number of germinal centres. PMID:2615531

  9. Clinicopathological significance of gastric poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hideaki; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Morohashi, Satoko; Haga, Toshihiro; Wu, Yunyan; Ota, Rie; Takatsuna, Masafumi; Akasaka, Harue; Hakamada, Kenichi; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma of solid type is known to show a clinicopathological diversity, but its morphological characteristics have rarely been investigated. In this study, we defined poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma indicating the following three characteristics: (i) more than 90% of the entire tumor were composed of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in a medullary growth, (ii) the tumor exhibited an expansive growth at the tumor margin, and (iii) special types such as an α-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, and carcinoma with lymphoid stroma were excluded. Based on the definition, we subclassified the poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma of solid type into the two groups: medullary carcinoma and non-medullary carcinoma, and clinicopathologically analyzed 23 cases of medullary carcinomas and 38 cases of non-medullary carcinomas. The medullary carcinomas less frequently displayed lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and lymph node metastasis, compared with the non-medullary carcinoma (P < 0.001, P = 0.002, and P < 0.001, respectively). The patients with medullary carcinomas significantly showed better disease-free survival (P = 0.017). This is the first study to demonstrate that poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of solid type can be subclassified into tumors with low and high malignant potentials. Gastric poorly differentiated medullary carcinoma is considered to be a novel histological type predicting good patients' prognosis. PMID:27108877

  10. Treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Smit, Johannes

    2013-03-14

    Therapy decisions in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma should be guided by a critical appraisal of the natural disease course (slowly progressive vs. aggressive) and benefits and side effects of therapy. Therapy goals should be distinguished between curative and palliative. Local treatments are mainly palliative and may add to quality of life. The advent of novel systemic therapies opens promising perspectives but its place in the therapeutic arsenal must be further determined. PMID:23514632

  11. Management of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hadoux, Julien; Pacini, Furio; Tuttle, R Michael; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer arises from calcitonin-producing C-cells and accounts for 3-5% of all thyroid cancers. The discovery of a locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer that is not amenable to surgery or of distant metastases needs careful work-up, including measurement of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (and their doubling times), in addition to comprehensive imaging to determine the extent of the disease, its aggressiveness, and the need for any treatment. In the past, cytotoxic chemotherapy was used for treatment but produced little benefit. For the past 10 years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and RET (rearranged during transfection) have been used when a systemic therapy is indicated for large tumour burden and documented disease progression. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have shown benefits on progression-free survival compared with placebo in this setting, but their toxic effect profiles need thorough clinical management in specialised centres. This Review describes the management and treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer with emphasis on current targeted therapies and perspectives to improve patient care. Most treatment responses are transient, emphasising that mechanisms of resistance need to be better understood and that the efficacy of treatment approaches should be improved with combination therapies or other drugs that might be more potent or target other pathways, including immunotherapy. PMID:26608066

  12. Adult thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitors and TEC stem cells: Models and mechanisms for TEC development and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Yoko

    2015-11-01

    The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ for generating self-restricted and self-tolerant functional T cells. Its two distinct anatomical regions, the cortex and the medulla, are involved in positive and negative selection, respectively. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) constitute the framework of this tissue and function as major stromal components. Extensive studies for more than a decade have revealed how TECs are generated during organogenesis; progenitors specific for medullary TECs (mTECs) and cortical TECs (cTECs) as well as bipotent progenitors for both lineages have been identified, and the signaling pathways required for the development and maturation of mTECs have been elucidated. However, little is known about the initial commitment of mTECs and cTECs during ontogeny, and how regeneration of both lineages is sustained in the postnatal/adult thymus. Recently, stem cell activities in TECs have been demonstrated, and TEC progenitors have been identified in the postnatal thymus. In this review, recent advances in studying the development and maintenance of TECs are summarized, and the possible mechanisms of thymic regeneration and involution are discussed. PMID:26362014

  13. Ectopic Aire Expression in the Thymic Cortex Reveals Inherent Properties of Aire as a Tolerogenic Factor within the Medulla.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Hitoshi; Kitano, Satsuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Morimoto, Junko; Kawano, Hiroshi; Hirota, Fumiko; Morita, Ryoko; Mouri, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Ikuta, Koichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuru

    2015-11-15

    Cortical thymic epithelial cells (cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) play essential roles in the positive and negative selection of developing thymocytes, respectively. Aire in mTECs plays an essential role in the latter process through expression of broad arrays of tissue-restricted Ags. To determine whether the location of Aire within the medulla is absolutely essential or whether Aire could also function within the cortex for establishment of self-tolerance, we used bacterial artificial chromosome technology to establish a semiknockin strain of NOD-background (β5t/Aire-transgenic) mice expressing Aire under control of the promoter of β5t, a thymoproteasome expressed exclusively in the cortex. Although Aire was expressed in cTECs as typical nuclear dot protein in β5t/Aire-Tg mice, cTECs expressing Aire ectopically did not confer transcriptional expression of either Aire-dependent or Aire-independent tissue-restricted Ag genes. We then crossed β5t/Aire-Tg mice with Aire-deficient NOD mice, generating a strain in which Aire expression was confined to cTECs. Despite the presence of Aire(+) cTECs, these mice succumbed to autoimmunity, as did Aire-deficient NOD mice. The thymic microenvironment harboring Aire(+) cTECs, within which many Aire-activated genes were present, also showed no obvious alteration of positive selection, suggesting that Aire's unique property of generating a self-tolerant T cell repertoire is functional only in mTECs. PMID:26453754

  14. Engineering the Human Thymic Microenvironment to Support Thymopoiesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Brile; Montel-Hagen, Amélie; Ge, Shundi; Blumberg, Garrett; Kim, Kenneth; Klein, Sam; Zhu, Yuhua; Parekh, Chintan; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Yang, Otto O.; Crooks, Gay M.

    2014-01-01

    A system that allows manipulation of the human thymic microenvironment is needed both to elucidate the extrinsic mechanisms that control human thymopoiesis, and to develop potential cell therapies for thymic insufficiency. In this report, we developed an implantable thymic microenvironment composed of two human thymic stroma populations critical for thymopoiesis; thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and thymic mesenchyme (TM). TECs and TM from postnatal human thymi were cultured in specific conditions, allowing cell expansion and manipulation of gene expression, prior to re-aggregation into a functional thymic unit. Human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) differentiated into T cells in the aggregates in vitro and in vivo following inguinal implantation of aggregates in immune deficient mice. Cord blood HSPC previously engrafted into murine bone marrow, migrated to implants and differentiated into human T cells with a broad T cell receptor repertoire. Furthermore, lentiviral-mediated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in TM enhanced implant size and function, and significantly increased thymocyte production. These results demonstrate an in vivo system for the generation of T cells from human HSPC, and represent the first model to allow manipulation of gene expression and cell composition in the microenvironment of the human thymus. PMID:24801626

  15. Pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    DU, YANG; WANG, YING; TANG, JIE; GE, JUN; QIN, QING; JIANG, LI; LIU, XIAOKE; ZHU, XIANGLAN; WANG, YONGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is a rare type of cancer. Unlike other thymic epithelial tumors and carcinoids originating in other locations, thymic NEC possesses a more aggressive biological behavior, including invasion to proximal structures, local recurrence and distant hematogenous metastasis. Distant metastasis is often observed in the bones, lungs, spleen, liver and adrenal glands. However, pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC is extremely uncommon, and only a few cases of patients with this disease have been reported. The current study presents the case of a patient with pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC. The patient was admitted to hospital with an anterior mediastinal neoplasm, which was identified using chest enhanced computed tomography. The patient underwent a monobloc excision of the tumor with resection of involved structures. Subsequently, a pathological diagnosis of atypical thymic carcinoid was provided, according to the morphological characteristics observed and the expression of neuroendocrine markers, as identified by immunohistochemistry. Following surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, ~2 years after surgery, metastasis at the pancreatic head was identified. The patient underwent a total pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and did not receive any post-operative therapies; however, the patient succumbed to the disease 9 months following surgery. Overall, the results from the present study demonstrate the clinical features of thymic NEC, which may aid with the diagnosis of this rare disease in other patients. PMID:26998098

  16. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Nova, Jose Luis; Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  17. Esophageal recurrence of medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dworzynska, Agnieszka; Lorente-Poch, Leyre; Sancho, Juan Jose; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) metastasizes to the regional lymph nodes and to the lungs, liver and bones. Only one case of recurrence of MTC involving the upper gastrointestinal tract has been reported so far. We describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with MTC, who developed an upper esophageal submucosal recurrence after two previous local recurrences treated surgically and one ethanol injection. After resection of the right lateral esophageal wall, calcitonin dropped by 60% and showed a doubling time >1 year. We cannot rule out the role of deep ethanol injection in the involvement of the cervical esophagus wall. PMID:26645011

  18. Fezf2 Orchestrates a Thymic Program of Self-Antigen Expression for Immune Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Tomofuji, Yoshihiko; Danks, Lynett; Nitta, Takeshi; Komatsu, Noriko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Self-tolerance to immune reactions is established via promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), leading to the elimination of T cells that respond to self-antigens. The transcriptional regulator Aire has been thought to be sufficient for the induction of TRAs, despite some indications that other factors may promote TRA expression in the thymus. Here, we show that the transcription factor Fezf2 directly regulates various TRA genes in mTECs independently of Aire. Mice lacking Fezf2 in mTECs displayed severe autoimmune symptoms, including the production of autoantibodies and inflammatory cell infiltration targeted to peripheral organs. These responses differed from those detected in Aire-deficient mice. Furthermore, Fezf2 expression and Aire expression are regulated by distinct signaling pathways and promote the expression of different classes of proteins. Thus, two independent factors, Fezf2 and Aire, permit the expression of TRAs in the thymus to ensure immune tolerance. PMID:26544942

  19. Radionuclide bone scanning of medullary chondrosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.; Chew, F.S.; Manaster, B.J.

    1982-12-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans of 18 medullary chondrosarcomas of bone were correlated with pathologic macrosections of the resected tumors. There was increased scan uptake by all 18 tumors, and the uptake in 15 scans corresponded accurately to the anatomic extent of the tumors. Only three scans displayed increased uptake beyond the true tumor margins; thus, the extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor extent is much less common in medullary chondrosarcomas than in many other primary bone tumors. Therefore, increased uptake beyond the apparent radiographic margin of the tumor suggests possible occult tumor spread. Pathologically, there was intense reactive new bone formation and hyperemia around the periphery of all 18 tumors, and there were foci of enchondral ossification, hyperemia, or calcification within the tumor itself in nearly every tumor. Three scans displayed less uptake in the center of the tumors than around their peripheries. One of these tumors was necrotic in the center, but the other two were pathologically no different from tumors that displayed homogeneous uptake on the scan.

  20. [Thymic carcinoid associated with ectopic ACTH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Inoue, C; Sasaki, H; Satou, K; Kimura, N

    1996-04-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to Sendai Red Cross Hospital complaining of chest and back pain associated with Cushing's syndrome. Based on the abnormally high levels of ACTH, cortisol, and CRH in plasma the patient was suspected of having ectopic ACTH syndrome. Histological examination of an extirpated rib and pleural tumor led to the diagnosis of atypical carcinoid tumor, with ribbon and festoon formation, immunoreactivity to ACTH, NSE, Chg-A, and argyrophilia in the tumor cells. Anti-cancer chemotherapy was not effective, and the patient died within a year after the onset of Cushing's syndrome. An autopsy revealed that the patient had an ACTH- and CRH-producing thymic carcinoid with metastases to many organs. The pituitary was atrophic with Crooke's hyaline change. There were many CRH-positive cells in the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, where no remarkable pathologic changes were seen. PMID:8691671

  1. Thymic teratoma masquerading as a thyroid lump.

    PubMed

    Cho, W S; Sahota, R; Tanweer, F; Conboy, P

    2014-05-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumours commonly found in the sacrococcygeal region, ovary, testicle or, infrequently, the mediastinum. In very rare circumstances, these tumours are found in the neck. This case represents a thymic teratoma presenting as what appeared to be an intrathyroid lesion. This has not been described previously and demonstrates an unusual presentation of a neck lump necessitating two operations and a multidisciplinary approach for management. We would also like to highlight that while patients undergo imaging to guide surgery, the surgeon must always be prepared for the unexpected and recognise situations where the operation should be converted to an exploratory procedure instead of full resection. Often, combined surgical care is the best option for difficult congenital cases. PMID:24780013

  2. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2 cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  3. Thymic carcinoma in myasthenia gravis developing years after thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D; Miller, Robert G; Katz, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    We report two patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) who underwent thymectomy but developed thymic carcinoma years after the initial surgery. In one patient, the initial thymic pathology was normal, whereas the other had an encapsulated benign thymoma that was found only on pathological assessment. These cases demonstrate that MG may occur as part of a "new" paraneoplastic syndrome even after thymectomy. The late appearance of metastatic thymoma raises questions about monitoring for these patients. PMID:19533649

  4. T cell-B cell thymic cross-talk: Maintenance and function of thymic B cells requires cognate CD40-CD40L interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Chiharu; Williams, Joy A.; Watanabe, Masashi; Jeon, Hyein; Sharrow, Susan O.; Hodes, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic development requires bidirectional interaction or cross-talk between developing T cells and thymic stromal cells, a relationship that has been best characterized for the interaction between thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs). We have characterized here the requirement for similar cross-talk in the maintenance and function of thymic B cells, another population that plays a role in selection of developing thymic T cells. We found that maintenance of thymic B cells is strongly dependent upon the presence of mature single positive (SP) thymocytes and on the interactions of these T cells with specific antigen ligand. Maintenance of thymic B cell number is strongly dependent upon B cell-autonomous expression of CD40, but not MHCII, indicating that direct engagement of CD40 on thymic B cells is necessary to support their maintenance and proliferation. Thymic B cells can mediate negative selection of superantigen-specific self-reactive SP thymocytes, and we show that CD40 expression on B cells is critical for this negative selection. Cross-talk with thymic T cells is thus required to support the thymic B cell population through a pathway that requires cell-autonomous expression of CD40, and that reciprocally functions in negative selection of autoreactive T cells. PMID:25344473

  5. NMR study of thymulin, a lymphocyte differentiating thymic nonapeptide. Conformational states of free peptide in solution.

    PubMed

    Laussac, J P; Cung, M T; Pasdeloup, M; Haran, R; Marraud, M; Lefrancier, P; Dardenne, M; Bach, J F

    1986-06-15

    The nonapeptide less than Glu-Ala-Lys-Ser-Gln-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn (formerly called serum thymic factor) is a factor produced by the thymic epithelium, which needs a zinc ion to express its immunoregulatory properties. We report here on 1H and 13C NMR investigation of the conformational properties of the free peptide in aqueous medium and in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 solution by a combination of homo- and heteronuclear one- and two-dimensional experiments. The various resonances have been assigned in a straightforward manner on the basis of 1H,1H COSY spectroscopy for the recognition of the proton spin systems; two-dimensional NOESY spectra with the correlation peaks across amide bonds and for the amino acid sequence assignment; amide bonds and for the amino acid sequence assignment; 13C,1H COSY experiments using selective polarization transfer from 1H- to 13C-nucleus via the 13C,1H long-range couplings for the attribution of the carboxyl and carbonyl groups; and 13C,1H COSY experiments with selective polarization transfer via the 13C,1H direct couplings for the assignment of all the aliphatic carbons. Other experiments such as pH-dependent chemical shifts, combined use of multiple and selective proton-decoupled 1H and 13C NMR spectra, the temperature and the concentration dependence of the proton shifts of the amide resonances, the solvent dependences of peptide carbonyl carbon resonances, and comparison of the spectra with three different analogues were performed. In aqueous solution, the data are compatible with the assumption of a highly mobile dynamic equilibrium among different conformations, whereas in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6, a more rigid structure is found involving three internal hydrogen bonds. These observations provide an insight into the conformational tendencies of this peptidic hormone in two different media. PMID:3711109

  6. Identification of Plet-1 as a specific marker of early thymic epithelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Depreter, Marianne G L; Blair, Natalie F; Gaskell, Terri L; Nowell, Craig S; Davern, Kathleen; Pagliocca, Adelina; Stenhouse, Frances H; Farley, Alison M; Fraser, Adrian; Vrana, Jan; Robertson, Kevin; Morahan, Grant; Tomlinson, Simon R; Blackburn, C Clare

    2008-01-22

    The thymus is essential for a functional immune system, because the thymic stroma uniquely supports T lymphocyte development. We have previously identified the epithelial progenitor population from which the thymus arises and demonstrated its ability to generate an organized functional thymus upon transplantation. These thymic epithelial progenitor cells (TEPC) are defined by surface determinants recognized by the mAbs MTS20 and MTS24, which were also recently shown to identify keratinocyte progenitor cells in the skin. However, the biochemical nature of the MTS20 and MTS24 determinants has remained unknown. Here we show, via expression profiling of fetal mouse TEPC and their differentiated progeny and subsequent analyses, that both MTS20 and MTS24 specifically bind an orphan protein of unknown function, Placenta-expressed transcript (Plet)-1. In the postgastrulation embryo, Plet-1 expression is highly restricted to the developing pharyngeal endoderm and mesonephros until day 11.5 of embryogenesis, consistent with the MTS20 and MTS24 staining pattern; both MTS20 and MTS24 specifically bind cell lines transfected with Plet-1; and antibodies to Plet-1 recapitulate MTS20/24 staining. In adult tissues, we demonstrate expression in a number of sites, including mammary and prostate epithelia and in the pancreas, where Plet-1 is specifically expressed by the major duct epithelium, providing a specific cell surface marker for this putative reservoir of pancreatic progenitor/stem cells. Plet-1 will thus provide an invaluable tool for genetic analysis of the lineage relationships and molecular mechanisms operating in the development, homeostasis, and injury in several organ/tissue systems. PMID:18195351

  7. Medullary Epithelial Cells of the Human Thymus Express a Highly Diverse Selection of Tissue-specific Genes Colocalized in Chromosomal Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Gotter, Jörn; Brors, Benedikt; Hergenhahn, Manfred; Kyewski, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue-specific self-antigens in the thymus imposes T cell tolerance and protects from autoimmune diseases, as shown in animal studies. Analysis of promiscuous gene expression in purified stromal cells of the human thymus at the single and global gene level documents the species conservation of this phenomenon. Medullary thymic epithelial cells overexpress a highly diverse set of genes (>400) including many tissue-specific antigens, disease-associated autoantigens, and cancer-germline genes. Although there are no apparent structural or functional commonalities among these genes and their products, they cluster along chromosomes. These findings have implications for human autoimmune diseases, immuno-therapy of tumors, and the understanding of the nature of this unorthodox regulation of gene expression. PMID:14734521

  8. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  9. Imaging diagnosis--Medullary tibial infarction in a horse.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesus; Gonzalo-Orden, José M; Ginja, Mário M D; Oliveira, Paula A; Reyes, Luis E; Serantes, Alicia E; Orden, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    An Andalusian Stallion with left hind limb lameness had a radiolucent lesion in the medullary cavity of distal tibial metaphysis. After euthanasia for other disease, the tibia was examined with magnetic resonance (MR). The MR imaging sequences were characterized by a double line sign, although showing quite different lesion area intensities. Histologically, the lesion was compatible with medullary infarction being characterized by normal spongy bone, areas of abundant fibrous tissue and numerous necrotic adipocytes in various stages of destruction. PMID:20402402

  10. Hypercalcitoninemia is not Pathognomonic of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Sergio PA; Lourenço, Delmar M; Santos, Marcelo Augusto; Tavares, Marcos R; Toledo, Rodrigo A; de Menezes Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie

    2009-01-01

    Hypercalcitoninemia has frequently been reported as a marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma. Currently, calcitonin measurements are mostly useful in the evaluation of tumor size and progression, and as an index of biochemical improvement of medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although measurement of calcitonin is a highly sensitive method for the detection of medullary thyroid carcinoma, it presents a low specificity for this tumor. Several physiologic and pathologic conditions other than medullary thyroid carcinoma have been associated with increased levels of calcitonin. Several cases of thyroid nodules associated with increased values of calcitonin are not medullary thyroid carcinomas, but rather are related to other conditions, such as hypercalcemias, hypergastrinemias, neuroendocrine tumors, renal insufficiency, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas, and goiter. Furthermore, prolonged treatment with omeprazole (> 2–4 months), beta-blockers, glucocorticoids and potential secretagogues, have been associated with hypercalcitoninemia. An association between calcitonin levels and chronic auto-immune thyroiditis remains controversial. Patients with calcitonin levels >100 pg/mL have a high risk for medullary thyroid carcinoma (~90%–100%), whereas patients with values from 10 to 100 pg/mL (normal values: <8.5 pg/mL for men, < 5.0 pg/mL for women; immunochemiluminometric assay) have a <25% risk for medullary thyroid carcinoma. In multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), RET mutation analysis is the gold-standard for the recommendation of total preventive thyroidectomy to relatives at risk of harboring a germline RET mutation (50%). False-positive calcitonin results within MEN2 families have led to incorrect indications of preventive total thyroidectomy to RET mutation negative relatives. In this review, we focus on the differential diagnosis of hypercalcitoninemia, underlining its importance for the avoidance of misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma and

  11. Development of prelymphoma cells committed to thymic lymphomas during radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis in B10 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, M.; Kubo, E.; Sado, T.

    1987-07-01

    Intrathymic (i.t.) as well as i.p. injection of thymus cells from B10.Thy-1.1 mice manifesting overt thymic lymphomas, 4 months after split-dose irradiation, into B10.Thy-1.2 recipient mice resulted in the development of donor-type T-cell lymphomas, indicating that they contained autonomous lymphoma cells. In contrast, injection of thymus cells from apparently nonleukemic mice 1 month after split-dose irradiation resulted in the development of donor-type tumors only when they were injected i.t., suggesting that thymus cells from these mice contained preneoplastic cells that will eventually develop into thymic lymphomas under the influence of thymic microenvironment. These thymus-dependent preneoplastic cells were termed thymic prelymphoma cells. With the use of i.t. injection assay, it was shown that these thymic prelymphoma cells were detected in 26.1% (6 of 23) of the test donor thymuses when examined at 14 days and in more than 63% (15 of 24 and 14 of 22) when examined at 21 and 31 days after irradiation. To examine the possibility that thymic prelymphoma cells might appear first in the bone marrow before they become detectable within the thymuses of the split-dose-irradiated mice, bone marrow cells from B10.Thy-1.1 donors recovered at 8, 14, 21, and 33 days after split-dose irradiation were also injected i.t. into B10.Thy-1.2-recipient mice. The results indicated that none of these recipients developed donor-type T-cell lymphomas, suggesting that bone marrow is not the first site of the appearance of thymic prelymphoma cells.

  12. Myf5 and Myogenin in the development of thymic myoid cells - Implications for a murine in vivo model of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Simon-Keller, Katja; Küffer, Stefan; Ströbel, Philipp; Braun, Thomas; Marx, Alexander; Porubsky, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by autoantibodies against the neuromuscular junction of striated muscle. Most MG patients have autoreactive T- and B-cells directed to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). To achieve immunologic tolerance, developing thymocytes are normally eliminated after recognition of self-antigen-derived peptides. Presentation of muscle-specific antigens is likely achieved through two pathways: on medullary thymic epithelial cells and on medullary dendritic cells cross-presenting peptides derived from a unique population of thymic myoid cells (TMC). Decades ago, it has been hypothesized that TMC play a key role in the induction of immunological tolerance towards skeletal muscle antigens. However, an experimental model to address this postulate has not been available. To generate such a model, we tested the hypothesis that the development of TMC depends on myogenic regulatory factors. To this end, we utilized Myf5-deficient mice, which lack the first wave of muscle cells but form normal skeletal muscles later during development, and Myogenin-deficient mice, which fail to form differentiated myofibers. We demonstrate for the first time that Myf5- and Myogenin-deficient mice showed a partial or complete, respectively, loss of TMC in an otherwise regularly structured thymus. To overcome early postnatal lethality of muscle-deficient, Myogenin-knockout mice we transplanted Myogenin-deficient fetal thymuses into Foxn1(nu/nu) mice that lack their own thymus anlage. We found that the transplants are functional but lack TMC. In combination with established immunization strategies (utilizing AChR or Titin), this model should enable us in the future testing the hypothesis that TMC play an indispensable role in the development of central tolerance towards striated muscle antigens. PMID:26708556

  13. The evolution of thymic lymphomas in p53 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, Crissy; Chan, Chang; Kang, Wenfeng; Sun, Yvonne; Emerson, Ryan; Robins, Harlan; Levine, Arnold J

    2014-12-01

    Germline deletion of the p53 gene in mice gives rise to spontaneous thymic (T-cell) lymphomas. In this study, the p53 knockout mouse was employed as a model to study the mutational evolution of tumorigenesis. The clonality of the T-cell repertoire from p53 knockout and wild-type thymic cells was analyzed at various ages employing TCRβ sequencing. These data demonstrate that p53 knockout thymic lymphomas arose in an oligoclonal fashion, with tumors evolving dominant clones over time. Exon sequencing of tumor DNA revealed that all of the independently derived oligoclonal mouse tumors had a deletion in the Pten gene prior to the formation of the TCRβ rearrangement, produced early in development. This was followed in each independent clone of the thymic lymphoma by the amplification or overexpression of cyclin Ds and Cdk6. Alterations in the expression of Ikaros were common and blocked further development of CD-4/CD-8 T cells. While the frequency of point mutations in the genome of these lymphomas was one per megabase, there were a tremendous number of copy number variations producing the tumors' driver mutations. The initial inherited loss of p53 functions appeared to delineate an order of genetic alterations selected for during the evolution of these thymic lymphomas. PMID:25452272

  14. Thymic Mesenchymal Cells Have a Distinct Transcriptomic Profile.

    PubMed

    Patenaude, Julien; Perreault, Claude

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the role of mesenchymal cells (MCs) in the adult thymus, we performed whole transcriptome analyses of primary thymic, bone, and skin MCs. These three MC populations shared expression of 2850 core MC genes involved in generic processes including interactions with tissue-resident macrophages. Moreover, we discovered that 2036 genes were differentially expressed, by at least 5-fold, in the three MC populations. Genes preferentially expressed in thymic MCs are instrumental in clearance of apoptotic thymocytes by macrophages, maintenance of a noninflammatory milieu, and attraction-expansion of thymocyte progenitors. Thymic and bone MCs share other sets of differentially expressed genes implicated in resolution of inflammation and expansion of hematolymphoid progenitors. Consistent with the fact that thymic and skin MCs have to support epithelial cells, they express at higher levels genes mediating epithelial cell adhesion to basement membrane and mesenchymal-epithelial cross-talk. Differentially expressed genes preferentially expressed by bone MCs are connected to formation and remodeling of bone, whereas those preferentially expressed in skin MCs are involved in skin and hair follicle homeostasis. We conclude that MCs from different organs display substantial heterogeneity and that the transcriptome of thymic MCs is exquisitely suited for interactions with epithelial and hematolymphoid cells in an environment with a high apoptosis rate. PMID:27183606

  15. Thymic function is maintained during Salmonella-induced atrophy and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ewan A.; Coughlan, Ruth E.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Lax, Sian; Nicholson, Julia; Desanti, Guillaume E.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Bobat, Saeeda; Hitchcock, Jessica; White, Andrea; Jenkinson, William E.; Khan, Mahmood; Henderson, Ian R.; Lavery, Gareth G.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Anderson, Graham; Cunningham, Adam F.

    2014-01-01

    Thymic atrophy is a frequent consequence of infection with bacteria, viruses and parasites and is considered a common virulence trait between pathogens. Multiple reasons have been proposed to explain this atrophy, including premature egress of immature thymocytes, increased apoptosis or thymic shutdown to prevent tolerance to the pathogen from developing. The severe loss in thymic cell number can reflect an equally dramatic reduction in thymic output, potentially reducing peripheral T cell numbers. Here we examine the relationship between systemic Salmonella infection and thymic function. During infection, naive T cell numbers in peripheral lymphoid organs increase. Nevertheless, this occurs despite a pronounced thymic atrophy caused by viable bacteria, with a peak 50-fold reduction in thymocyte numbers. Thymic atrophy is not dependent upon homeostatic feedback from peripheral T cells or on regulation of endogenous glucocorticoids, as demonstrated by infection of genetically-altered mice. Once bacterial numbers fall, thymocyte numbers recover and this is associated with increases in the proportion and proliferation of early thymic progenitors. During atrophy, thymic T cell maturation is maintained and sjTREC analysis reveals there is only a modest fall in recent CD4+ thymic emigrants in secondary lymphoid tissues. Thus thymic atrophy does not necessarily result in a matching dysfunctional T cell output and thymic homeostasis can constantly adjust to systemic infection to ensure that naive T cell output is maintained. PMID:22993205

  16. Thymic neoplasm: a rare disease with a complex clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Omar M.; Cassano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic neoplasms constitute a broad category of rare lesions with a wide spectrum of pathologic characteristics and clinical presentations which therefore require a high index of suspicion to diagnose. The natural history of the disease is seldom predictable, anywhere from an indolent to an aggressively malignant course. Although the classification and staging of these lesions are complex and controversial, complete radical surgical resection remains the gold standard of therapy. Radiation and chemotherapy are important elements of the multimodality approach to treating these patients and it is important for thoracic surgeons to work closely with their colleagues in other disciplines in the management of and future research endeavors in thymic neoplasm. In this review, we discuss the evaluation of the patient with an anterior mediastinal mass, the classification and staging of thymic neoplasms, the role of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy in treating this disease, as well as future directions in research for novel targeted therapies. PMID:23585946

  17. Plasma thymic hormone activity in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, C. H.; Greenberg, Lynn E.; Chapman, S. W.; Goldstein, G.; Lewis, Verna M.; Twomey, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    To further characterize the immunological abnormalities in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, the thymic hormone activity in their plasma was measured. Of the sixteen patients in the study, seven had chronic diffuse candidiasis, five had candidiasis with endocrinopathies and four had candidiasis with thymoma. Only one patient, an anergic child with chronic diffuse candidiasis had severe deficiency of plasma thymic hormone activity. Two patients, a woman with candidiasis and multiple endocrinopathies and an elderly man with metastatic epithelial thymoma had supranormal values. These studies indicate that the immunological deficit in most patients with these forms of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is not due to deficiency of a thymic inductive activity and suggest that an intrinsic defect exists in the maturation of antigen-responsive lymphoid cells. PMID:743805

  18. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  19. Renal pericytes: regulators of medullary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of medullary blood flow (MBF) is essential in maintaining normal kidney function. Blood flow to the medulla is supplied by the descending vasa recta (DVR), which arise from the efferent arterioles of juxtamedullary glomeruli. DVR are composed of a continuous endothelium, intercalated with smooth muscle-like cells called pericytes. Pericytes have been shown to alter the diameter of isolated and in situ DVR in response to vasoactive stimuli that are transmitted via a network of autocrine and paracrine signalling pathways. Vasoactive stimuli can be released by neighbouring tubular epithelial, endothelial, red blood cells and neuronal cells in response to changes in NaCl transport and oxygen tension. The experimentally described sensitivity of pericytes to these stimuli strongly suggests their leading role in the phenomenon of MBF autoregulation. Because the debate on autoregulation of MBF fervently continues, we discuss the evidence favouring a physiological role for pericytes in the regulation of MBF and describe their potential role in tubulo-vascular cross-talk in this region of the kidney. Our review also considers current methods used to explore pericyte activity and function in the renal medulla. PMID:23126245

  20. Management of hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Theodora; Alevizaki, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) represents up to one-third of MTC cases and includes multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2A (and its variant familial MTC) and 2B. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the disease focusing on the management of hereditary MTC patients, who have already developed tumor, as well as discuss the recommended approach for asymptomatic family members carrying the same mutation. A PubMed search was performed to review recent literature on diagnosis, genetic testing, and surgical and medical management of hereditary MTC. The wide use of genetic testing for RET mutations has markedly influenced the course of hereditary MTC. Prophylactic thyroidectomy of RET carriers at an early age eliminates the risk of developing MTC later in life. Pre-operative staging is a strong prognostic factor in patients, who have developed MTC. The use of recently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors (vandetanib, cabozantinib) holds promising results for the treatment of unresectable, locally advanced, and progressive metastatic MTC. Genetic testing of the RET gene is a powerful tool in the diagnosis and prognosis of MTC. Ongoing research is expected to add novel treatment options for patients with advanced, progressive disease. PMID:26839093

  1. Unclassified Renal Cell Carcinoma With Medullary Phenotype Versus Renal Medullary Carcinoma: Lessons From Diagnosis in an Italian Man Found to Harbor Sickle Cell Trait

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Smith, Steven C.; Massa, Simona; Renne, Salvatore L.; Brambilla, Simona; Peschechera, Roberto; Graziotti, Pierpaolo; Roncalli, Massimo; Amin, Mahul B.

    2015-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor of the kidney. It affects individuals of African descent and all cases reported show evidence of sickle cell trait. We reviewed an unusual carcinoma arising in a white man, the ninth in the literature. The tumor demonstrated features associated with renal medullary carcinoma, or unclassified renal cell carcinoma, medullary phenotype as recently described; the presence of sickle cell trait confirmed the diagnosis of medullary carcinoma. This case is helpful in the differential diagnosis with non-sickle cell associated “renal cell carcinoma, unclassified with medullary phenotype,” and study of this spectrum of tumors is ongoing. PMID:26793557

  2. Bioprocessing feasibility analysis. [thymic hormone bioassay and electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The biology and pathophysiology of the thymus gland is discussed and a clinical procedure for thymic hormone assay is described. The separation of null lymphocytes from mice spleens and the functional characteristics of the cells after storage and transportation were investigated to develop a clinical procedure for thymic hormone assay, and to determine whether a ground-based approach will provide the desired end-product in sufficient quantities, or whether the microgravity of space should be exploited for more economical preparation of the hormone.

  3. Conus Medullaris Teratoma with Utilization of Fiber Tractography: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alkherayf, Fahad; Arab, Abdullah Faisal; Tsai, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conus medullaris teratomas are very rare tumors. Traditional preoperative diagnosis depended on the findings from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tractography is a novel technique that has recently been utilized to diagnose spinal cord lesions. This case report shows that fiber tractography has great potential in preoperative diagnosis and postoperative follow-up of teratomas of the conus medullaris. Methods A 50-year-old man with a conus medullaris teratoma underwent tractography with the aim of visualizing the tumor in relation to the white matter tracts. The patient underwent a T12–L2 laminectomy, and the lesion was resected. The histopathology diagnosis was of a mature teratoma. Study Design Case report. Results Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography provide more details about the white matter tracts in relation to space-occupying lesions that may be more sensitive than conventional MRI and have recently been utilized in spinal cord lesions. Fiber tracking has the ability to visualize the integrity of the white matter tracts at the level of the conus medullaris in relation to the lesion. The tracts appeared to be displaced by the lesion at the conus medullaris. Tractography also showed no white matter tracts within the lesion. Such findings are consistent with the characteristics of a benign lesion. Exploiting tractography in this case was helpful in predicting the nature of the lesion preoperatively and in planning the surgical intervention. Conclusions Conus medullaris teratomas mostly affect adults. Patients generally present with a long history of clinical symptoms prior to diagnosis. Surgery is required for diagnosis, and the goal should be complete tumor excision without sacrificing any neurologic functions. The use of DTI and tractography, in addition to conventional MRI, has the potential to be very valuable for the diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up of patients with conus medullaris teratomas. PMID:26251802

  4. Uptake of I-131 MIBG by medullary thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Sakahara, H.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Kasagi, K.; Konishi, J.; Miyauchi, A.; Kuma, K.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-05-01

    I-131 MIBG scans are useful for the localization of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma with high catecholamine levels. Recently the authors have found that medullary thyroid cancer also showed an uptake of I-131 MIBG in both primary neck tumors and metastatic sites. Up to now scintigraphic studies were performed in 5 patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Scintigraphy was done at 24 and 48 hours after the administration of 0.5 mCi of I-131 MIBG, thyroid uptake of dissociated I-131 being prevented by Lugol's solution. Four out of 5 cases were familial type and uptake of I-131 MIBG was similarly observed in medullary thyroid cancer as well as in pheochromocytoma. Bone metastasis of medullary thyroid cancer was also detected with I-131 MIBG. However, one case of sporadic form was negative with I-131 MIBG, whereas there was a high uptake of Tc(V)-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid: a newly developed radiopharmaceutical for medullary thyroid cancer, visualizing a different uptake mechanism of both reagents (J Nucl Med 25: 323-325, 1984). After adrenalectomy high uptake of I-131 MIBG was still observed in medullary thyroid cancer, in spite of normal catecholamine levels. The tumor to blood ratio was estimated in vivo to be about several hundreds at 24 hours after the administration. These cells are of neural crest origin and the mechanism of uptake of I-131 MIBG may not be related to the catechamine uptake mechanism. This paper concludes that I-131 MIBG is useful not only for the localization but also for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer, as preliminary performed in pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma.

  5. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  6. Sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Clinical Data From A University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Correia-Deur, Joya Emilie M.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Imazawa, Alice T.; Lourenço, Delmar M.; Ezabella, Marilza C. L.; Tavares, Marcos R.; Toledo, Sergio P. A.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medullary thyroid carcinoma may occur in a sporadic (s-medullary thyroid carcinoma, 75%) or in a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 form (MEN2, 25%). These clinical forms differ in many ways, as s-medullary thyroid carcinoma cases are RET-negative in the germline and are typically diagnosed later than medullary thyroid carcinoma in MEN2 patients. In this study, a set of cases with s-medullary thyroid carcinoma are documented and explored. PURPOSE: To document the phenotypes observed in s-medullary thyroid carcinoma cases from a university group and to attempt to improve earlier diagnosis of s-medullary thyroid carcinoma. Some procedures for diagnostics are also recommended. METHOD: Patients (n=26) with apparent s-medullary thyroid carcinoma were studied. Their clinical data were reviewed and peripheral blood was collected and screened for RET germline mutations. RESULTS: The average age at diagnosis was 43.9 years (± 10.82 SD) and did not differ between males and females. Calcitonin levels were increased in all cases. Three patients presented values that were 100-fold greater than the normal upper limit. Most (61.54%) had values that were 20-fold below this limit. Carcinoembryonic antigen levels were high in 70.6% of cases. There was no significant association between age at diagnosis, basal calcitonin levels or time of disease onset with thyroid tumor size (0.6–15 cm). Routine thyroid cytology yielded disappointing diagnostic accuracy (46.7%) in this set of cases. After total thyroidectomy associated with extensive cervical lymph node resection, calcitonin values remained lower than 5 pg/mL for at least 12 months in eight of the cases (30.8%). Immunocyto- and histochemistry for calcitonin were positive in all analyzed cases. None of the 26 cases presented germline mutations in the classical hotspots of the RET proto-oncogene. CONCLUSION: Our cases were identified late. The basal calcitonin measurements and immunostaining for calcitonin were

  7. Thymic B cells promote thymus-derived regulatory T cell development and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang-Ting; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yin-Hu; Ma, Hong-Di; Tang, Wei; Yang, Jing-Bo; Li, Liang; Ansari, Aftab A; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Thymic CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are critical for the development of immunological tolerance and immune homeostasis and requires contributions of both thymic dendritic and epithelial cells. Although B cells have been reported to be present within the thymus, there has not hitherto been a definition of their role in immune cell development and, in particular, whether or how they contribute to the Treg cellular thymic compartment. Herein, using both phenotypic and functional approaches, we demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the maintenance of thymic Treg cells and, using an in vitro culture system, demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the size of the thymic Treg compartment via cell-cell MHC II contact and the involvement of two independent co-stimulatory pathways that include interactions between the CD40/CD80/CD86 co-stimulatory molecules. Our data also suggest that thymic B cells promote the generation of thymic Treg cell precursors (pre-Treg cells), but not the conversion of FoxP3(+) Treg cells from pre-Treg cells. In addition, thymic B cells directly promote the proliferation of thymic Treg cells that is MHC II contact dependent with a minimal if any role for co-stimulatory molecules including CD40/CD80/CD86. Both pathways are independent of TGFβ. In conclusion, we rigorously define the critical role of thymic B cells in the development of thymic Treg cells from non-Treg to precursor stage and in the proliferation of mature thymic Treg cells. PMID:26071985

  8. Role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced thymic tumors.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tracey L; Lynch, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy has an important role in the treatment of advanced thymic tumors. Early stage tumors are successfully treated with surgery. Locally advanced tumors (Masaoka stage III and IVA) are often treated with combined modality treatment including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. For patients with curable thymic tumors, the ability to attain a complete resection is a critical prognostic factor. Locally advanced tumors have a relatively high risk of recurrence and decreased rates of long-term survival. A multimodality approach including induction chemotherapy and postoperative radiation therapy can improve complete resection rates and long-term outcomes. Thymic tumors are chemoresponsive with optimal responses achieved with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Chemotherapy with radiation can result in long-term progression-free survival for patients with locally advanced disease who remain inoperable following induction therapy. Patients with disseminated (stage IVB) thymic tumors can also have significant disease response and palliation of symptoms when treated with chemotherapy. Octreotide and corticosteroids also have shown efficacy. For best results, it is important that thoracic surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists work together to obtain the best local control of tumor and optimal treatment of metastases. PMID:16104360

  9. Heterogeneity in Thymic Emigrants: Implications for Thymectomy and Immunosenescence

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Iren; Yates, Andrew J.; Callard, Robin E.

    2013-01-01

    The development of mature, antigen-inexperienced (naive) T cells begins in the thymus and continues after export into the periphery. Post-thymic maturation of naive T cells, in humans, coincides with the progressive loss of markers such as protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7) and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD31). As a consequence, subpopulations of naive T cells can be recognised raising questions about the processes that give rise to the loss of these markers and their exact relationship to recent thymic emigrants (RTE). Here, we combine a mathematical survival analysis approach and data from healthy and thymectomised humans to understand the apparent persistence of populations of ‘veteran’ PTK7+T cells in thymectomised individuals. We show that a model of heterogeneity in rates of maturation, possibly linked to natural variation in TCR signalling thresholds or affinity for self-antigens, can explain the data. This model of maturation predicts that the average post-thymic age of PTK7+T cells will increase linearly with the age of the host suggesting that, despite the immature phenotype, PTK7+cells do not necessarily represent a population of RTE. Further, the model predicts an accelerated increase in the average post-thymic age of residual PTK7+T cells following thymectomy and may also explain in part the prematurely aged phenotype of the naive T cell pool in individuals thymectomised early in life. PMID:23468830

  10. Chemotherapy and prognosis in advanced thymic carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhengbo; Yu, Xinmin; Zhang, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of chemotherapy in treating advanced thymic carcinoma is unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognostic factors for patients with advanced thymic carcinoma. METHODS: A retrospective review of the medical records of 86 patients treated with chemotherapy for advanced thymic carcinoma was conducted between 2000 and 2012 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, chemotherapy regimens and prognostic factors were analyzed. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Of the 86 patients, 56 were male and 30 were female. The median survival time was 24.5 months. For the first-line chemotherapy treatment, the objective response rate was 47.7% and the disease control rate was 80.2%. The median progression-free survival for all patients was 6.5 months for first-line chemotherapy. No significant differences in progression-free survival were observed among the different chemotherapy regimens. Multivariate analyses revealed that the prognostic factors for overall survival included performance status (p=0.043), histology grade (p=0.048), and liver metastasis (p=0.047). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that there is no difference in efficacy between multiagent and doublet regimens. The prognosis of patients with advanced thymic carcinoma can be predicted based on histological grade, liver metastasis and performance status. PMID:26735216

  11. An Association of Chronic Hyperaldosteronism with Medullary Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kartik; Anandpara, Karan; Dey, Amit K.; Sharma, Rajaram; Thakkar, Hemangini; Hira, Priya; Deshmukh, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background An association between chronic hyperaldosteronism and medullary nephrocalcinosis has rarely been made, with only a handful of cases described in literature. Case Report We describe five cases of hyperaldosteronism with a long- standing history in whom associated medullary nephrocalcinosis was established. Conclusions We infer that a chronic hyperaldosteronic status, whether primary or secondary, is a causal factor in the etiopathogenesis of medullary nephrocalcinosis. This article illustrates and summarizes various postulated theories that support our proposed association between hyperaldosteronism and nephrocalcinosis. We conclude that chronic hyperaldosteronism should be included as one of the causes of nephrocalcinosis and that our case series emphasizes the need of a well-organized retrospective study to prove it further. PMID:26413177

  12. Identification of a human recent thymic emigrant phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Richard D.; Douek, Daniel C.; Koup, Richard A.; Picker, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to measure human thymic output would be an invaluable tool for the study of the development of the naïve T cell repertoire, as well as naïve T cell regeneration after intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy or effective antiretroviral therapy of progressive HIV infection. We and others have demonstrated previously that quantification of T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (TREC) within peripheral T cell populations provides insight into the frequency of recent thymic emigrants (RTE) and, therefore, into thymic function. However, measurement of RTE by this approach is complicated by the fact that TREC levels also are determined by turnover within the naïve T cell compartment. Here, we report a phenotypic approach to RTE measurement. We demonstrate that αE integrin (CD103) expression is up-regulated very late in thymic development on a subset of CD8+/CD4− thymocytes and also defines a distinct subset of naïve CD8+ T cells in the periphery. The latter subset is differentiated from circulating CD103+ mucosa-associated memory T cells by its naïve T cell phenotype (CD45RO−, CD62Lbright, CD27bright, CD11adim, CD95dim) and its high concentration of TREC. Indeed, sorted CD103+ naïve CD8+ cells display higher levels of TREC than their CD103− naïve counterparts, and these cells demonstrate an age-related decline in frequency that is enhanced significantly by thymectomy. The thymic dependence of this subset and the cells' relatively evanescent presence in the periphery suggest that these cells are a population of RTE and that quantification of their frequency in peripheral blood provides an estimate of the level of ongoing thymopoiesis. PMID:10737767

  13. Prolongevity hormone FGF21 protects against immune senescence by delaying age-related thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Youm, Yun-Hee; Horvath, Tamas L; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A; Dixit, Vishwa Deep

    2016-01-26

    Age-related thymic degeneration is associated with loss of naïve T cells, restriction of peripheral T-cell diversity, and reduced healthspan due to lower immune competence. The mechanistic basis of age-related thymic demise is unclear, but prior evidence suggests that caloric restriction (CR) can slow thymic aging by maintaining thymic epithelial cell integrity and reducing the generation of intrathymic lipid. Here we show that the prolongevity ketogenic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a member of the endocrine FGF subfamily, is expressed in thymic stromal cells along with FGF receptors and its obligate coreceptor, βKlotho. We found that FGF21 expression in thymus declines with age and is induced by CR. Genetic gain of FGF21 function in mice protects against age-related thymic involution with an increase in earliest thymocyte progenitors and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Importantly, FGF21 overexpression reduced intrathymic lipid, increased perithymic brown adipose tissue, and elevated thymic T-cell export and naïve T-cell frequencies in old mice. Conversely, loss of FGF21 function in middle-aged mice accelerated thymic aging, increased lethality, and delayed T-cell reconstitution postirradiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Collectively, FGF21 integrates metabolic and immune systems to prevent thymic injury and may aid in the reestablishment of a diverse T-cell repertoire in cancer patients following HSCT. PMID:26755598

  14. Thymic involution in the suspended rat - Adrenal hypertrophy and glucocorticoid receptor content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy is studied. The thymus, adrenal glands, and tissue water content are evaluated in male Sprague rats suspended in antiorthostatic (AO) or orthostatic (O) positions. A 50 percent decrease in the wet weight of the thymus and hypertrophy of the adrenal glands are observed during the seven days of AO suspension. After seven days of recovery the thymus weight is increased to control level; however, the hypertrophy of the adrenal glands remains unchanged. Thymic and renal responses in O postioned rats are similar to AO reactions. Thymic glucocorticoid (GC) receptor concentrations in the rats are analyzed; a 20 percent decrease in GC receptor site concentration, which is related to thymic involution, is detected in both AO and O rats. It is concluded that there is a temporal correlation between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy, which is not affected by AO positioning, and thymic involution is not associated with an increased sensitivity to GC.

  15. Expression of cell cycle and apoptosis regulators in thymus and thymic epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Papoudou-Bai, Alexandra; Barbouti, Alexandra; Galani, Vassiliki; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Rontogianni, Dimitra; Kanavaros, Panagiotis

    2016-05-01

    The human thymus supports the production of self-tolerant T cells with competent and regulatory functions. Various cellular components of the thymic microenvironment such as thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and dendritic cells play essential roles in thymic T cell differentiation. The multiple cellular events occurring during thymic T cell and TEC differentiation involve proteins regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Dysregulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis networks is involved in the pathogenesis of thymic epithelial tumors (TET) which are divided into two broad categories, thymomas and thymic carcinomas. The present review focuses on the usefulness of the analysis of the expression patterns of major cell cycle and apoptosis regulators in order to gain insight in the histophysiology of thymus and the histopathology, the clinical behavior and the biology of TET. PMID:25794494

  16. Pathophysiology of radiocontrast nephropathy: a role for medullary hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Heyman, S N; Reichman, J; Brezis, M

    1999-11-01

    Recent experimental data underlies the role of hypoxic tubular injury in the pathophysiology of radiocontrast nephropathy. Although systemic transient hypoxemia, increased blood viscosity, and a leftward shift of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve may all contribute to intrarenal hypoxia, imbalance between oxygen demand and supply plays a major role in radiocontrast-induced outer medullary hypoxic damage. Low oxygen tension normally exists in this renal region, reflecting the precarious regional oxygen supply and a high local metabolic rate and oxygen requirement, resulting from active salt reabsorption by medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop. Radiologic contrast agents markedly aggravate outer medullary physiologic hypoxia. This results from enhanced metabolic activity and oxygen consumption (as a result of osmotic diuresis and increased salt delivery to the distal nephron) because the regional blood flow and the oxygen supply actually increase. The latter effect may result in part from the activation of various regulatory mediators of outer medullary blood flow to ensure maximal regional oxygen supply. Low-osmolar radiocontrast agents may be less nephrotoxic because of the smaller osmotic load and vasomotor alterations. Experimental radiocontrast-induced renal failure requires preconditioning of animals with various insults (for example, congestive heart failure, reduced renal mass, salt depletion, or inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis). In all these perturbations, which resemble clinical conditions that predispose to contrast nephropathy, outer medullary hypoxic injury results from insufficiency or inactivation of mechanisms designed to preserve regional oxygen balance. This underlines the importance of identifying and ameliorating predisposing factors in the prevention of this iatrogenic disease. PMID:10548380

  17. Ectopic thymic carcinoma presenting as an intrathoracic mass.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Katsunari; Murata, Yoshitake; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    An asymptomatic 83-year-old man was found to have a right intrathoracic tumor. Computed tomography demonstrated a soft-tissue density mass measuring 55 × 25 × 22 mm adjacent to the right anterior chest wall. At surgery, the tumor was found to adhere to the diaphragm and right lung, contiguous with the mediastinal fat tissue. Histology of the resected specimen demonstrated proliferation of spindle and sarcomatous cells with multinucleated giant cells. Thus the tumor was diagnosed as undifferentiated thymic carcinoma and was considered to have arisen from ectopic thymic tissue. At 2 years postoperatively, the patient had no evidence of recurrence. PMID:27072863

  18. Clinical and immunohistochemical characterization of thymic lymphosarcoma in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, A N; Constable, P D; Meier, W A; French, R A; Morin, D E; Lowry, J E; Hoffman, W E

    1996-01-01

    A 2-year-old Holstein heifer with a swollen brisket, jugular vein distention, muffled heart sounds, tachycardia, and free gas bloat was examined. Thymic lymphosarcoma was suspected based on a negative agar gel immunodiffusion test for bovine leukemia virus, presence of atypical lymphocytes in pleural fluid, and detection of a mass in the thoracic inlet. Right-sided cardiac catheterization was performed, and markedly increased jugular venous pressures (41 mm Hg) with a pressure gradient of 29 mm Hg immediately cranial to the heart indicated constriction of the cranial vena cava. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of the tumor using a rabbit antihuman T cell, CD3 polyclonal antibody confirmed that the neoplastic lymphocytes were of thymic origin. PMID:8819055

  19. Estimation of stress in child neglect from thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, A; Yamamoto, H; Yada, I; Fukunaga, T

    1999-04-12

    It is difficult to evaluate the extent of stress in cases of suspected child abuse/neglect in a medico-legal autopsy. We have previously reported that stress due to abuse/neglect was found to have led to thymic involution. To elucidate the influence upon thymocytes differentiation, we compared the proportion of the thymocyte subpopulation in the thymus of a neglected child with one in an age-matched control obtained from cardiac surgery. We found that the relative number of CD4+ CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes decreased in the neglected child. It was presumed that the selective decrease in the number of the immature DP thymocytes with CD3- to low bcl-2low caused the thymic involution in the neglected child. It was suggested that an alteration in the proportion of thymocytes subpopulation might be used as an index of stress in cases of child abuse/neglect. PMID:10376338

  20. Chronic shoulder pain referred from thymic carcinoma: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dee, Shu-Wei; Kao, Mu-Jung; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei; Lew, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of thymic carcinoma presenting as unilateral shoulder pain for 13 months. Before an accurate diagnosis was made, the patient received conservative treatment, cervical discectomies, and myofascial trigger point injection, none of which relieved his pain. When thymic carcinoma was eventually diagnosed, he received total resection of the tumor and the shoulder pain subsided completely. Thymic carcinoma is a rare carcinoma, and our review of the literature did not show shoulder pain as its initial presentation except for one case report. The purpose of this report is to document our clinical experience so that other physiatrists can include thymic carcinoma in their differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. PMID:22969299

  1. Young, proliferative thymic epithelial cells engraft and function in aging thymuses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Miller, Christine M.; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Wagers, Amy J.; Serwold, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The thymus reaches its maximum size early in life and then begins to shrink, producing fewer T cells with increasing age. This thymic decline is thought to contribute to age-related T cell lymphopenias and hinder T cell recovery following bone marrow transplantation. While several cellular and molecular processes have been implicated in age-related thymic involution, their relative contributions are not known. Using heterochronic parabiosis, we observe that young circulating factors are not sufficient to drive regeneration of the aged thymus. In contrast, we find that resupplying young, engraftable thymic epithelial cells to a middle-aged or defective thymus leads to thymic growth and increased T cell production. Intrathymic transplantation and in vitro colony forming assays reveal that the engraftment and proliferative capacities of thymic epithelial cells diminish early in life, whereas the receptivity of the thymus to thymic epithelial cell engraftment remains relatively constant with age. These results support a model in which thymic growth and subsequent involution are driven by cell intrinsic changes in the proliferative capacity of thymic epithelial cells, and further show that young thymic epithelial cells can engraft and directly drive the growth of involuted thymuses. PMID:25870244

  2. Peripubertal ovariectomy influences thymic adrenergic network plasticity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Kosec, Duško; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-08-15

    The study investigated the influence of peripubertal ovariectomy on the thymic noradrenaline (NA) concentration, and the thymocyte NA content and β2- and α1-adrenoceptor (AR) expression in adult 2- and 11-month-old rats. In control rats, the thymic NA concentration increased with age. This increase reflected rise in the density of catecholamine (CA)-containing fluorescent nerve fibers and cells and their CA content. Additionally, the average β2- and α1-AR thymocyte surface density changed in the opposite direction with age; the density of β2-AR decreased, whereas that of α1-AR increased. Ovariectomy diminished the thymic NA concentration in 2-month-old rats. This reflected the decrease in the density of fluorescent nerve fibers, and CA content in fluorescent nerve fibers and non-lymphoid cells, since the thymocyte NA content was increased in ovariectomized (Ox) rats. Estrogen supplementation prevented the ovariectomy-induced changes. In Ox rats, the density of CA-synthesizing nerve fibers and non-lymphoid cells diminished with age. To the contrary, NA content in thymocytes increased with age, but it did not exceed that in 11-month-old controls. Additionally, ovariectomy diminished the average thymocyte surface density of β2-ARs, but it increased that of α1-ARs in 2-month-old-rats (due to estrogen, and estrogen and progesterone deficiency, respectively). These changes, despite of the rise in circulating estrogen level post-ovariectomy, remained stable with age. This most likely reflected a decreased sensitivity to estrogen action, as a consequence of the hormone misprinting in peripubertal age. The analysis of thymocyte proliferation in culture suggested that age- and ovariectomy-induced alterations in thymocyte NA synthesis and AR expression altered NA autocrine/paracrine action on thymocytes. In conclusion, the study indicates that the ovarian hormone deficiency in peripubertal age affects ovarian steroid-dependent remodeling of thymic adrenergic

  3. Ectopic congenital thymic cyst in the right pleural cavity.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Vito D; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Franzi, Francesca; Miceli, Antonio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Sala, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    A 37-year-old man with a huge pleural cyst, presented with symptoms of right heart compression. The mass on the right side of the chest seemed initially to be in connection with the mediastinum. Computed tomography failed to define its relationship with the pericardium, and echocardiography excluded any involvement of the mediastinal structures. The final diagnosis was a congenital thymic cyst exclusively located in the pleural cavity. PMID:20947607

  4. Microsurgical anatomy of the arterial basket of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Kalani, M Yashar S; Lemole, G Michael; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C; Theodore, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT The arterial basket of the conus medullaris (ABCM) consists of 1 or 2 arteries arising from the anterior spinal artery (ASA) and circumferentially connecting the ASA and the posterior spinal arteries (PSAs). The arterial basket can be involved in arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous malformations of the conus. In this article, the authors describe the microsurgical anatomy of the ABCM with emphasis on its morphometric parameters and important role in the intrinsic blood supply of the conus medullaris. METHODS The authors performed microsurgical dissections on 16 formalin-fixed human spinal cords harvested within 24 hours of death. The course, diameter, and branching angles of the arteries comprising the ABCM were then identified and measured. In addition, histological sections were obtained to identify perforating vessels arising from the ABCM. RESULTS The ASA tapers as it nears the conus medullaris (mean preconus diameter 0.7 ± 0.12 mm vs mean conus diameter 0.38 ± 0.08 mm). The ASA forms an anastomotic basket with the posterior spinal artery (PSA) via anastomotic branches. In most of the specimens (n= 13, 81.3%), bilateral arteries formed connections between the ASA and PSA. However, in the remaining specimens (n= 3, 18.7%), a unilateral right-sided anastomotic artery was identified. The mean diameter of the right ABCM branch was 0.49 ± 0.13 mm, and the mean diameter of the left branch was 0.53 ± 0.14 mm. The mean branching angles of the arteries forming the anastomotic basket were 95.9° ± 36.6° and 90° ± 34.3° for the right- and left-sided arteries, respectively. In cases of bilateral arterial anastomoses between the ASA and PSA, the mean distance between the origins of the arteries was 4.5 ± 3.3 mm. Histological analysis revealed numerous perforating vessels supplying tissue of the conus medullaris. CONCLUSIONS The ABCM is a critical anastomotic connection between the ASA and PSA, which play an important role in the intrinsic blood supply

  5. HSP27 and 70 expression in thymic epithelial tumors and benign thymic alterations: diagnostic, prognostic and physiologic implications

    PubMed Central

    Janik, S.; Schiefer, A. I.; Bekos, C.; Hacker, P.; Haider, T.; Moser, J.; Klepetko, W.; Müllauer, L.; Ankersmit, H. J.; Moser, B.

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TETs), the most common tumors in the anterior mediastinum in adults, show a unique association with autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and represent a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Neither risk factors nor established biomarkers for TETs exist. Predictive and diagnostic markers are urgently needed. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated in several malignancies promoting tumor cell survival and metastases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of HSP27 and 70 in patients with TETs (n = 101) and patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 24). Further, serum HSP27 and 70 concentrations were determined in patients with TETs (n = 46), patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 33) and volunteers (n = 49) by using ELISA. HSPs were differentially expressed in histologic types and pathological tumor stages of TETs. Weak HSP tumor expression correlated with worse freedom from recurrence. Serum HSP concentrations were elevated in TETs and MG, correlated with clinical tumor stage and histologic subtype and decreased significantly after complete tumor resection. To conclude, we found HSP expression in the vast majority of TETs, in physiologic thymus and staining intensities in patients with TETs have been associated with prognosis. However, although interesting and promising the role of HSPs in TETs as diagnostic and prognostic or even therapeutic markers need to be further evaluated. PMID:27097982

  6. HSP27 and 70 expression in thymic epithelial tumors and benign thymic alterations: diagnostic, prognostic and physiologic implications.

    PubMed

    Janik, S; Schiefer, A I; Bekos, C; Hacker, P; Haider, T; Moser, J; Klepetko, W; Müllauer, L; Ankersmit, H J; Moser, B

    2016-01-01

    Thymic Epithelial Tumors (TETs), the most common tumors in the anterior mediastinum in adults, show a unique association with autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and represent a multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Neither risk factors nor established biomarkers for TETs exist. Predictive and diagnostic markers are urgently needed. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated in several malignancies promoting tumor cell survival and metastases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of HSP27 and 70 in patients with TETs (n = 101) and patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 24). Further, serum HSP27 and 70 concentrations were determined in patients with TETs (n = 46), patients with benign thymic alterations (n = 33) and volunteers (n = 49) by using ELISA. HSPs were differentially expressed in histologic types and pathological tumor stages of TETs. Weak HSP tumor expression correlated with worse freedom from recurrence. Serum HSP concentrations were elevated in TETs and MG, correlated with clinical tumor stage and histologic subtype and decreased significantly after complete tumor resection. To conclude, we found HSP expression in the vast majority of TETs, in physiologic thymus and staining intensities in patients with TETs have been associated with prognosis. However, although interesting and promising the role of HSPs in TETs as diagnostic and prognostic or even therapeutic markers need to be further evaluated. PMID:27097982

  7. Imaging of rare medullary adrenal tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Maciel, C A; Tang, Y Z; Coniglio, G; Sahdev, A

    2016-05-01

    Although adrenal medullary tumours are rare, they have important clinical implications. They form a heterogeneous group of tumours, ranging from benign, non-secretory, incidental masses to hormonally active tumours presenting acutely, or malignant tumours with disseminated disease and a poor prognosis. Increasingly, benign masses are incidentally detected due to the widespread use of imaging and routine medical check-ups. This review aims to illustrate the multimodality imaging appearances of rare adrenal medullary tumours, excluding the more common phaeochromocytomas, with clues to the diagnosis and to summarise relevant epidemiological and clinical data. Careful correlation of clinical presentation, hormone profile, and various imaging techniques narrow the differential diagnosis. Image-guided percutaneous adrenal biopsy can provide a definitive diagnosis, allowing for conservative management in selected cases. A close collaboration between the radiologist, endocrinologist, and surgeon is of the utmost importance in the management of these tumours. PMID:26944698

  8. Effect of Space Flight on Adrenal Medullary Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelkes, Peter I.

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity conditions during space flight alter the expression and specific activities of the adrenal medullary CA synthesizing enzymes (CASE). Previously, we examined adrenals from six rats flown for six days aboard STS 54 and reported that microgravity induced a decrease in the expression and specific activity of rat adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of CA synthesis, without affecting the expression of other CASE. In the past, we analyzed some of the > 300 adrenals from two previous Space Shuttle missions (PARE 03 and SLS 2). The preliminary results (a) attest to the good state of tissue preservation, thus proving the feasibility of subsequent large-scale evaluation, and (b) confirm and extend our previous findings. With this grant we will be able to expeditiously analyze all our specimens and to complete our studies in a timely fashion.

  9. Discharge properties of dorsal medullary inspiratory neurons in newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Sica, A L; Donnelly, D F; Steele, A M; Gandhi, M R

    1987-04-01

    The discharges of medullary inspiratory neurons were recorded in newborn pigs. They were classified by discharge pattern; response to lung inflation; synaptic relation to phrenic motoneurons. Our results showed: these neurons have similar discharge patterns and responses to lung inflation as adult cats; most neurons do not project to phrenic motoneurons. It is suggested that our sampled population of neurons is involved in integrating pulmonary afferent inputs. PMID:3594209

  10. Neurobrucellosis presenting as an intra-medullary spinal cord abscess

    PubMed Central

    Vajramani, Girish V; Nagmoti, Mahantesh B; Patil, Chidanand S

    2005-01-01

    Background Of the diverse presentation of neurobrucellosis, intra-medullary spinal cord abscess is extremely rare. Only four other cases have been reported so far. We present a case of spinal cord intra-medullary abscess due to Brucella melitensis. Case presentation A forty-year-old female presented with progressive weakness of both lower limb with urinary incontinence of 6 months duration. She was febrile. Neurological examination revealed flaccid areflexic paraplegia with T10 below sensory impairment including perianal region. An intramedullary mass was diagnosed on Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) scan extending from T12 to L2. At surgery, a large abscess was encountered at the conus medullaris, from which Brucella melitensis was grown on culture. She was started on streptomycin and doxycycline for 1 month, followed by rifampicin and doxycycline for 1 month. At 2-year follow-up, she had recovered only partially and continued to have impaired bladder function. Conclusion Neurobrucellosis, if not treated early, can result in severe neurological morbidity and sequale, which may be irreversible. Hence it is important to consider the possibility of neurobrucellosis in endemic region and treat aggressively. PMID:16168059

  11. Malignant melanoma arising in melanin-producing medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Miyauchi, Akira; Otsuru, Minoru; Daa, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We report a case of malignant melanoma arising in medullary thyroid carcinoma that has not yet been described. Presentation of case A 66-year-old woman presented with a mass in her thyroid. The resected mass was black in color, and was composed of a mixture of classic medullary thyroid carcinoma and pleomorphic atypical cells containing melanin pigments. The pleomorphic atypical cells were morphologically consistent with malignant melanoma, and expressed Melan-A, HMB-45, and S-100 protein as determined by immunohistochemistry. Some of these cells were also positive for calcitonin and chromogranin A. Although the malignant melanoma metastasized to the lymph nodes, the patient remained free from local recurrence and distant metastasis and the primary malignant melanoma lesion was not identified for up to 11 years after the thyroidectomy. Discussion 11 melanin-producing MTC cases have been reported to date. In the reported cases, the term “malignant melanoma” was not used, likely because the melanin-containing carcinoma cells were not morphologically consistent with malignant melanoma, but with medullary carcinoma. Conclusion Malignant melanoma arising in MTC may have a favorable prognosis. PMID:26852361

  12. Imaging medullary cystic kidney disease with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Farres, Maria Teresa; Mougenot, Béatrice; Jacob, Laurent; Le Goas, Françoise; Antignac, Corinne; Ronco, Pierre

    2003-07-01

    Medullary cystic kidney disease is characterized by multiple renal cysts at the corticomedullary boundary area, by autosomal dominant inheritance, and by onset of chronic renal failure in the third decade of life. Its clinical manifestations are often insignificant and nonspecific. Furthermore, its diagnosis may be difficult in sporadic forms where genetic linkage analysis cannot be performed. The authors report the case of a patient presenting with a sporadic form of medullary cystic kidney disease whose diagnosis was confirmed using computerized tomography with 3-dimensional reconstruction at the nephrography-excretion time and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance angiography and urography after the injection of gadolinium, a nonnephrotoxic compound. Both imaging techniques showed normal-sized, normal-shaped kidneys containing multiple cysts from 1 to 30 mm in diameter in the medulla and at the corticomedullary junction. A characteristic medullary nephrogram appeared after injection of iodinated contrast medium or gadolinium corresponding to contrast-filled dilated collecting ducts. This report shows that MRI with gadolinium injection can substitute for computerized tomography in azotemic patients. MRI seems particularly promising for the diagnosis of cystic diseases of the kidney and must also be considered when investigating a patient with chronic renal failure of unknown origin. PMID:12830488

  13. A medullary inhibitory region for trigeminal motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Castillo, P; Pedroarena, C; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1991-05-24

    The present report describes the effects on trigeminal motoneurons of stimulation of a circumscribed site within the parvocellular region of the medullary reticular formation. This medullary site was selected because anatomical studies have shown that premotor interneurons project from this site to the trigeminal motorpool. Electrical stimulation of this site induced IPSPs (PcRF-IPSPs) in jaw-closer motoneurons. A population of these IPSPs, recorded contralateral to the site of stimulation, exhibited latencies shorter than 1.5 ms (mean 1.16 +/- 0.08 SD). Their mean amplitude was 1.72 mV +/- 1.13 SD and their mean duration was 3.52 ms +/- 2.15 SD. We believe that these PcRF-IPSPs arose as the result of activation of a monosynaptic pathway. A comparable inhibitory input from this site to ipsilateral jaw-closer motoneurons and to both contra and ipsilateral digastric motoneurons was also observed. We therefore conclude that this medullary PcRF site contains premotor interneurons that are capable of postsynaptically inhibiting motoneurons that innervate antagonistic jaw muscles. PMID:1884229

  14. Somatostatin receptors and somatostatin content in medullary thyroid carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Reubi, J.C.; Chayvialle, J.A.; Franc, B.; Cohen, R.; Calmettes, C.; Modigliani, E. )

    1991-04-01

    Human medullary thyroid carcinomas from 19 patients were analyzed for their content in somatostatin (SRIF) receptors using receptor autoradiography with a SRIF-28 analogue and the SRIF octapeptide (Tyr3)-SMS 201-995 as iodinated radioligands. Four out of 19 cases were SRIF receptor positive with the SRIF octapeptide radioligand. These cases as well as four additional tumors were also positive with the SRIF-28 radioligand 125I-(Leu8, D-Trp22, Tyr25)-SRIF-28. High affinity binding sites pharmacologically specific for bioactive SRIF analogues, specifically located on tumor tissue, were identified. In some cases the SRIF receptors were distributed in a non-homogeneous pattern, with labelling occurring preferentially in highly differentiated tumor regions. Numerous cases were shown to have a high tumoral SRIF content measured by radioimmunoassay or immunohistochemical technique. However, there was no correlation between SRIF receptor status and tumor levels of endogenous SRIF. No correlation was seen between the clinical outcome or the survival of the patients and their tumoral SRIF receptor content. Whereas some medullary thyroid carcinomas seem to be a target for SRIF, the SRIF function in these tumors remains unclear. SRIF receptors in a group of medullary thyroid carcinomas may be useful morphological marker of these tumors and of potential interest for their in vivo localization.

  15. Coexisiting adenoma and granuloma involving the right inferior parathyroid gland with adjacent ectopic thymic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mayank; Kandasamy, Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions, particularly granulomas, involving adenoma of the parathyroid gland are rare. Ectopic thymic tissue is commonly associated with the thyroid and/or parathyroid gland due to their close embryonic relationship. We report a rare case of coexisting adenoma and granuloma of the parathyroid gland with adjacent ectopic thymic tissue. PMID:24957592

  16. Salvage chemotherapy with amrubicin and platinum for relapsed thymic carcinoma: experience in six cases.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Agatsuma, Toshihiko; Ichiyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Ushiki, Atsuhito; Komatsu, Yoshimichi; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yasuo, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kubo, Keishi; Hachiya, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows beneficial effects in certain patients with advanced thymic carcinoma. However, the usefulness of salvage therapy has not been reported. We focused on a new anthracycline agent, amrubicin, combined with platinum compounds as salvage chemotherapy in patients with thymic carcinoma. Six cases of unresectable and locally advanced thymic carcinoma relapsed from prior cisplatin-containing chemotherapy were treated with amrubicin (30-40 mg/m(2) day 1-3) plus platinum compounds (cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) day 1 or nedaplatin 70 mg/m(2) day 1) chemotherapy as salvage chemotherapy. Two patients showed a partial response. However, Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in all and two of the patients, respectively. We conclude that thymic carcinoma is sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy and that amrubicin appears to have significant activity against thymic carcinoma. The major toxicity is hematological toxicities. PMID:19415537

  17. Identifying the Spatial Relationships of Thymic Stromal and Thymocyte Subsets by Immunofluorescence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bain, Virginia; Richie, Ellen R

    2016-01-01

    Immunofluorescence analysis of thymic tissue sections is an indispensable technique for visualizing spatial relationships among thymocyte and stromal cell subsets. The thymus is organized into distinct microenvironmental zones in which particular thymic epithelial cell (TEC) subsets support specific stages of thymocyte maturation. Conversely, thymocytes and lymphoid tissue inducer cells support functional maturation of TECs. The composition and organization of TECs change during ontogeny to generate a maximally functional organ in the young adult. Deterioration of thymic architecture and stromal organization occurs with age as the thymus undergoes involution. Such changes can be monitored by immunofluorescent staining of thymic sections obtained at different ages throughout the life-span. Here we describe methods to generate frozen or paraffin-embedded thymic tissue sections for multicolor immunofluorescence staining using antibodies to surface and/or cytoplasmic antigens. PMID:26294399

  18. Outcome of nonsurgical treatment for locally advanced thymic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Lu; Gao, Lan-Ting; Lv, Chang-Xing; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment for patients with early-staged thymic tumors, while chemotherapy is most commonly used in stage IV cases. As for locally advanced thymic tumors, especially those unsuitable for surgery, the optimal therapy is still controversial. Thus, we conducted this retrospective study by comparing three nonsurgical treatment modalities to find some clues. Methods Three treatment modalities were used in 42 patients from October 2000 to December 2010, including radiotherapy (RT) alone, sequential chemoradiation (SCRT) and concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT). Objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and toxicity of the three regimens were compared accordingly. Results The ORR in all 42 patients was 61.9%, and 5-year OS was 46%. The ORR of RT, SCRT and CCRT were 43.8%, 50% and 87.5%, respectively (RT vs. SCRT, P=0.692; RT vs. CCRT, P=0.009; SCRT vs. CCRT, P=0.051). The 5-year OS of RT, SCRT and CCRT were 30%, 50% and 61.9%, respectively. (RT vs. SCRT, P=0.230; RT vs. CCRT, P=0.011; SCRT vs. CCRT, P=0.282). Eleven patients developed neutropenia of grade 3–4, with 7 in CCRT group and 4 in SCRT, respectively. Nine patients experienced esophagitis of grade 3 with 2 in RT, 3 in SCRT and 4 in CCRT. There were also two cases of grade 3 radiation induced pneumonitis in CCRT group. No life-threatening side effects were noted. Conclusions When used to treat locally advanced thymic tumors unsuitable for surgery, CCRT performed more favorably than RT alone or SCRT in both tumor response and long time survival, but probably with the increasing risk of pulmonary damage. CCRT may offer the best chance of disease control in the management of locally advanced disease. PMID:27114838

  19. Detection of Human Polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rennspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Keijzers, Marlies; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Haugg, Anke; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; De Baets, Marc H.; zur Hausen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the molecular genetics possibly underlying the pathogenesis of human thymoma have been extensively studied, its etiology remains poorly understood. Since murine polyomavirus consistently induces thymomas in mice, we assessed the presence of the novel human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors. Methods HPyV7-DNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA-PCR and immuno-histochemistry (IHC) were performed in 37 thymomas. Of these, 26 were previously diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). In addition, 20 thymic hyperplasias and 20 fetal thymic tissues were tested. Results HPyV7-FISH revealed specific nuclear hybridization signals within the neoplastic epithelial cells of 23 thymomas (62.2%). With some exceptions, the HPyV7-FISH data correlated with the HPyV7-DNA PCR. By IHC large T antigen (LTAg) expression of HPyV7 was detected, and double staining confirmed its expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells. Eighteen of the 26 MG-positive and 7 of the 11 MG-negative thymomas were HPyV7-positive. 40% of the 20 hyperplastic thymi were HPyV7-positive by PCR as confirmed by FISH and IHC in the follicular lymphocytes. All 20 fetal thymi tested HPyV7-negative. Conclusions The presence of HPyV7-DNA and LTAg expression in the majority of thymomas possibly link HPyV7 to human thymomagenesis. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the possible associations of HPyV7 and MG. PMID:25526237

  20. Direct analysis of thymic function in children with Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Nicole; Nasi, Milena; Troiano, Leonarda; Roat, Erika; Pinti, Marcello; Nemes, Elisa; Lugli, Enrico; Ferraresi, Roberta; Ciacci, Luigi; Bertoni, Davide; Biagioni, Ornella; Gibertoni, Milena; Cornia, Cristina; Meschiari, Liviana; Gramazio, Elisabetta; Mariotti, Mauro; Consolo, Ugo; Balli, Fiorella; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Background Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by several immunological defects, especially regarding T cell compartment. DS is considered the best example of accelerated ageing in humans. Direct observations of the thymus have shown that in DS this organ undergoes severe histological and morphological changes. However, no data on its capacity to generate T cells are present in the literature. Here, using a new technology based upon real time PCR, we have investigated the capacity of the thymus to produce and release newly generated T lymphocytes (the so called "recent thymic emigrants", RTE) in children with DS. Methods We studied 8 children affected by DS, aged 2–7 years, compared with 8 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used to determine different lymphocytes subsets. Real time PCR with the Taqman system was used to quantify the amount of RTE, i.e. peripheral blood lymphocytes that express the T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (TREC). Results In comparison with control children, those with DS had a significant lower number of TREC+ peripheral blood cells. Moreover, in DS children but not in controls, a strong negative correlation between age and the levels of TREC+ cells was found. Conclusions The direct measure of thymic output indicates that the impairment of the organ results in a reduced production of newly generated T cells. This observation could suggest that cytokines able to modulate thymic function, such as interleukins, could be useful to improve the functionality of the organ and to treat the immunodeficiency present in DS subjects. PMID:15715912

  1. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin: master switch for allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an interleukin (IL) 7–like cytokine that triggers dendritic cell–mediated T helper (Th)2 inflammatory responses. TSLP is highly expressed by keratinocytes in skin lesions of patients with atopic dermatitis and is associated with dendritic cell activation in situ, suggesting that TSLP might be a master switch for allergic inflammation at the epithelial cell–dendritic cell interface. New reports now establish a direct link between TSLP expression and the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and asthma in vivo, and begin to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying TSLP-induced allergic inflammation. PMID:16432252

  2. Examination of Thymic Positive and Negative Selection by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Troy A.

    2012-01-01

    A healthy immune system requires that T cells respond to foreign antigens while remaining tolerant to self-antigens. Random rearrangement of the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β loci generates a T cell repertoire with vast diversity in antigen specificity, both to self and foreign. Selection of the repertoire during development in the thymus is critical for generating safe and useful T cells. Defects in thymic selection contribute to the development of autoimmune and immunodeficiency disorders1-4. T cell progenitors enter the thymus as double negative (DN) thymocytes that do not express CD4 or CD8 co-receptors. Expression of the αβTCR and both co-receptors occurs at the double positive (DP) stage. Interaction of the αβTCR with self-peptide-MHC (pMHC) presented by thymic cells determines the fate of the DP thymocyte. High affinity interactions lead to negative selection and elimination of self-reactive thymocytes. Low affinity interactions result in positive selection and development of CD4 or CD8 single positive (SP) T cells capable of recognizing foreign antigens presented by self-MHC5. Positive selection can be studied in mice with a polyclonal (wildtype) TCR repertoire by observing the generation of mature T cells. However, they are not ideal for the study of negative selection, which involves deletion of small antigen-specific populations. Many model systems have been used to study negative selection but vary in their ability to recapitulate physiological events6. For example, in vitro stimulation of thymocytes lacks the thymic environment that is intimately involved in selection, while administration of exogenous antigen can lead to non-specific deletion of thymocytes7-9. Currently, the best tools for studying in vivo negative selection are mice that express a transgenic TCR specific for endogenous self-antigen. However, many classical TCR transgenic models are characterized by premature expression of the transgenic TCRα chain at the DN stage, resulting in

  3. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    SciTech Connect

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-(32P)-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-(32P)cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-(32P)cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP.

  4. Resveratrol ameliorates 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like lesions through effects on the epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Meral; Cilaker Micili, Serap; Isik, Sakine; Arikan Ayyildiz, Zeynep; Bagriyanik, Alper; Uzuner, Nevin; Karaman, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol that exhibits anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol treatment on epithelium-derived cytokines and epithelial apoptosis in a murine model of atopic dermatitis-like lesions. Material and Methods. Atopic dermatitis-like lesions were induced in BALB/c mice by repeated application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene to shaved dorsal skin. Twenty-one BALB/c mice were divided into three groups: group I (control), group II (vehicle control), and group III (resveratrol). Systemic resveratrol (30 mg/kg/day) was administered repeatedly during the 6th week of the experiment. After the mice had been sacrificed, skin tissues were examined histologically for epithelial thickness. Epithelial apoptosis (caspase-3) and epithelium-derived cytokines [interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)] were evaluated immunohistochemically. Results. Epithelial thickness and the numbers of IL-25, IL-33, TSLP and caspase-3-positive cells were significantly higher in group II compared to group I mice. There was significant improvement in epithelial thickness in group III compared with group II mice (p < 0.05). The numbers of IL-25, IL-33, and TSLP-positive cells in the epithelium were lower in group III than in group II mice (p < 0.05). The number of caspase-3-positive cells, as an indicator of apoptosis, in the epithelium was significantly lower in group III than in group II mice (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Treatment with resveratrol was effective at ameliorating histological changes and inflammation by acting on epithelium-derived cytokines and epithelial apoptosis. PMID:27069818

  5. Population Distributions of Thymic Function in Adults: Variation by Sociodemographic Characteristics and Health Status.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Lydia; Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Leal, Manuel; Zhou, Xuan; Sempowski, Gregory D; Wildman, Derek E; Uddin, Monica; Aiello, Allison E

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is critical for mounting an effective immune response and maintaining health. However, epidemiologic studies characterizing thymic function in the population setting are lacking. Using data from 263 adults in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study, we examined thymic function as measured by the number of signal joint T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTREC) and assessed associations with established indicators of physiological health. Overall, increasing age and male gender were significantly associated with reduced thymic function. Adjusting for covariates, individuals with elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein (β: -0.50 [95% CI: -0.82, -0.18] for moderate elevation, β: -0.29 [95% CI: -0.59, 0.00] for high elevation) and interleukin-6 (β: -0.60 [95% CI: -0.92, -0.28] for moderate elevation, β: -0.43 [95% CI: -0.77, -0.08] for severe elevation) also had lower thymic function. Compared to individuals with a BMI < 25, individuals who were overweight (β: 0.36 [95% CI: 0.07, 0.64]) or obese (β: 0.27 [95% CI: -0.03, 0.56]) had higher thymic function. Differences by self-rated health were not statistically significant. Our findings underscore demographic- and health-related gradients in thymic function among adult residents of Detroit, suggesting thymic function may be an important biomarker of health status in adults at the population level. PMID:27337555

  6. Bilateral medial medullary syndrome secondary to Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anirudda; Chandran, Vijay; Pai, Aparna; Rao, Suryanarayana; Shetty, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Medial medullary syndrome (MMS) is a rare type of stroke which results due to occlusion of the anterior spinal artery or vertebral artery or its branches. In this case report we present a patient who developed MMS secondary to Takayasu arteritis (TA). TA is a chronic inflammatory arteritis primarily involving the arch of aorta and its branches, which in our patient resulted in occlusion of subclavian arteries as well as infarction of the medial medulla bilaterally. To our knowledge this is the first time that MMS has been found to occur secondary to TA. PMID:23943806

  7. Secondary SUNCT syndrome caused by dorsolateral medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di; Lian, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headaches with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) is a rare headache syndrome which belongs to trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Though the majority of SUNCT syndrome is idiopathic, more and more cases of secondary SUNCT syndrome have been reported recently. In this study, we present a case of symptomatic SUNCT syndrome caused by acute dorsolateral medullary infarction which was verified by brain MRI(magnetic resonance imaging). Up to now, there is not absolutely effective treatment for SUNCT syndrome. However, in our case, SUNCT was completely resolved after conventional treatment for cerebral infarction without specific drug intervention. PMID:26885826

  8. Adrenal imaging (Part 2): Medullary and secondary adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal malignancies can be either primary adrenal tumors or secondary metastases, with metastases representing the most common malignant adrenal lesion. While imaging cannot always clearly differentiate between various adrenal malignancies, presence of certain imaging features, in conjunction with appropriate clinical background and hormonal profile, can suggest the appropriate diagnosis. The second part of the article on adrenal imaging describes adrenal medullary tumors, secondary adrenal lesions, bilateral adrenal lesions, adrenal incidentalomas and provides an algorithmic approach to adrenal lesions based on current imaging recommendations. PMID:25593821

  9. Iodine 131 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Skowsky, W.R.; Wilf, L.H. )

    1991-05-01

    We have presented a case of sporadic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid with documentation of localization of tracer {sup 131}I-MIBG within the primary neoplasm. A review of the nuclear medicine literature of localization techniques for MCT demonstrates that {sup 131}I-MIBG, while an excellent choice for diagnosis of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, produces low yield and unpredictable concentration in other neural crest apudomas, including MCT. A low incidence of true-positive results with {sup 131}I-MIBG uptake and a high incidence of false-negative results make this radiopharmaceutical a suboptimal choice for diagnostic studies, but a potentially promising one as a therapeutic agent.33 references.

  10. Investigating links between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure and thymic involution and thymic cysts in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Yap, Xinli; Deaville, Rob; Perkins, Matthew W; Penrose, Rod; Law, Robin J; Jepson, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    The associations between polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposure and involution of lymphoid tissue and development of epithelial-lined cysts in the thymus of UK-stranded harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) (n=170) were tested. Percentage of thymic lymphoid tissue (%TLT) was histologically quantified. Multiple regression analyses (n=169) demonstrated significant positive correlation between %TLT and nutritional status (p<0.001) and significant negative association between %TLT and onset of sexual maturity (p<0.001). However, in a subgroup of porpoises with total PCB levels above a proposed threshold of toxicity (>17mg/kg lipid weight) (n=109), the negative association between %TLT (as dependent variable) and summed blubber concentrations of 25 chlorobiphenyl congeners (∑25CBs) remained significant (p<0.01) along with nutritional status (p<0.001) and onset of sexual maturity (p<0.001). These results suggest PCB-induced immuno suppression may be occurring in harbour porpoises in UK waters but only at concentrations that exceed proposed toxicity thresholds for marine mammals. In contrast, development of thymic cysts appears predominantly age-related. PMID:22917837

  11. Effect of thymic hormones on induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in old mice.

    PubMed

    Endoh, M; Tabira, T

    1990-08-01

    This study was aimed at restoring decreased T-cell functions and reduced susceptibility to proteolipid apoprotein (PLP) induced-experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in old mice with thymic hormones. Thymosin fraction 5 (TF-5) and serum thymic factor (FTS) had no significant in vitro and in vivo effect on proliferative responses to PLP and concanavalin A (Con A), and on EAE induction in young and old mice. These results suggest that decreased T-cell functions cannot be restored by these thymic hormones tested. PMID:2256103

  12. FNAC diagnosis of medullary carcinoma thyroid: A report of three cases with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Maheshwari, Veena; Ansari, Hena A; Sadaf, Lubna; Khan, Mohammad Amanullah

    2010-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid is an unusual neoplasm, which is associated with specific supportive diagnostic markers. Despite this, its cytological diagnosis is often difficult. We report herewith three cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma. The diagnosis was established on fine-needle aspiration cytology. Plasmacytoid cell pattern was observed in two cases and spindle cell pattern in the third case. PMID:21157553

  13. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth

    PubMed Central

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period. PMID:24785116

  14. LTβR controls thymic portal endothelial cells for haematopoietic progenitor cell homing and T-cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaoyao; Wu, Weiwei; Chai, Qian; Li, Qingqing; Hou, Yu; Xia, Huan; Ren, Boyang; Xu, Hairong; Guo, Xiaohuan; Jin, Caiwei; Lv, Mengjie; Wang, Zhongnan; Fu, Yang-Xin; Zhu, Mingzhao

    2016-01-01

    Continuous thymic homing of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) via the blood is critical for normal T-cell development. However, the nature and the differentiation programme of specialized thymic endothelial cells (ECs) controlling this process remain poorly understood. Here using conditional gene-deficient mice, we find that lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTβR) directly controls thymic ECs to guide HPC homing. Interestingly, T-cell deficiency or conditional ablation of T-cell-engaged LTβR signalling results in a defect in thymic HPC homing, suggesting the feedback regulation of thymic progenitor homing by thymic products. Furthermore, we identify and characterize a special thymic portal EC population with features that guide HPC homing. LTβR is essential for the differentiation and homeostasis of these thymic portal ECs. Finally, we show that LTβR is required for T-cell regeneration on irradiation-induced thymic injury. Together, these results uncover a cellular and molecular pathway that governs thymic EC differentiation for HPC homing. PMID:27493002

  15. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M.; Walker, Blair A.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Marra, Marco A.; Jones, Steven J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  16. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M; Walker, Blair A; Schein, Jacqueline E; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M

    2016-03-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  17. Characterisation of thyroid medullary carcinoma TT cell line.

    PubMed

    Zabel, M; Grzeszkowiak, J

    1997-01-01

    TT cell line is the best known stabilized cell line derived from the human medullary thyroid carcinoma. The ultrastructural characteristics of these cells include well developed rough endoplasmic reticulum, a prominent Golgi apparatus and a considerable number of secretory granules. Numerous hormones were immunocytochemically demonstrated in TT cells of which calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are the products of the same gene but an alternative RNA processing. TT cells were found to produce some other hormones as well, namely ACTH, neurotensin, enkephalin, PTHrP, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), serotonin but also functional proteins of the chromogranin group, synaptophysin, NSE, calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. Some marker proteins have been detected in the cytosol (CEA) and in the cytoskeleton (alpha-tubulin, cytokeratin). The influence of numerous factors on the secretory activity of these cells has been demonstrated so far, including effects of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, glucocorticoids, sex steroids, cAMP, gastrin-releasing peptide, sodium butyrate, phorbol esters, ionomycin and forskolin. The investigators performed on the TT cell line demonstrate that this is the most reliable model system for the human parafollicular cells developed so far, in comparison to other cell lines derived from the medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. PMID:9046062

  18. Renal medullary changes in renal allograft recipients with raised serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Sis, B; Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Kasap, B; Yildiz, S; Kavukcu, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the renal medulla may reflect rejection related changes and thus have a predictive value in the assessment of acute renal allograft rejection or chronic graft damage. Methods 75 post‐transplant biopsies from 57 patients were scored according to the Banff 1997 scheme. The biopsies with adequate cortical and medullary tissue (n = 23) were selected and medullary tissues were reviewed for rejection related lesions except intimal arteritis. Chronic damage was determined by image analysis depending on periodic acid‐methenamine silver (PAMS)‐Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Medullary and cortical changes were compared. Results Interstitial inflammation and tubulitis were more frequent and severe in the cortex (p<0.001). Medullary tubulitis was associated with intimal arteritis (p = 0.003, r = 0.598). Medullary interstitial inflammation (n = 8) and tubulitis (n = 4) were associated with cortical borderline changes (n = 5) or allograft rejection (n = 3). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of medullary inflammatory changes in predicting cortical allograft rejection were 43%, 69%, 37%, and 73%, respectively. A significant association was observed between medullary MT‐SAP and cortical PAMS‐SAP values (p = 0.02, R2 = 0.23). Conclusions Acute rejection related lesions are more common and severe in the cortex, and the renal medulla does not sufficiently reflect cortical rejection. The positive and negative predictive values of medullary changes for allograft rejection are low, and medullary inflammation is not a reliable indicator of allograft rejection. Increased medullary fibrosis is correlated with chronic cortical damage. PMID:16461569

  19. Pathology of the thymus after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man. A histologic immunohistochemical study of 36 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Hermelink, H. K.; Sale, G. E.; Borisch, B.; Storb, R.

    1987-01-01

    A major hypothesis to explain the immunodeficiency associated with bone marrow transplantation states that thymic epithelial damage due to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) abrogates or delays the recovery of normal immunologic function. This study evaluated the thymus glands of 36 human bone marrow transplant recipients dying between 4 and 1742 days after transplant using histology, histochemistry, and immunohistology. The observations lead to a model of thymic damage by irradiation, chemotherapy, and GVHD in which early injury by all three of these agents results in profound thymic atrophy followed by long-delayed restitution. Patients undergoing total body irradiation showed more severe damage to thymic cortical and medullary epithelium than did patients undergoing chemotherapy alone as preparation for transplantation. Patients with GVHD showed additional damage in the form of individual thymic epithelial cell death and showed HLA-DR surface protein expression on thymic epithelium during GVHD. Longer-term survivors showed a profoundly delayed restitution of normal thymic epithelium and delayed evidence of restored lymphopoiesis. A few patients dying late after transplant showed evidence of reconstitution of normal thymic structure or nodules of lymphopoiesis in focal areas of epithelial-cell reconstitution. Evidence of such lymphopoiesis was seen at times ranging between 90 and 1742 days after grafting. The data are consistent with a model of long-standing thymic damage caused by GVHD which is reversible after the development of tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3314529

  20. A Rare Case of Multilocular Thymic Cyst with Follicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia: Radiologic and Histopathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Suk; Cha, Eun Jung

    2016-06-01

    Multilocular thymic cysts are rare and acquired lesions induced by an inflammatory arising within the thymus. We report a rare case of multilocular thymic cyst with follicular lymphoid hyperplasia in a 59-year-old female. Chest CT and MRI revealed a large multilocular cystic mass, which contains thick septa and nodules in the thymus. F-18 FDG PET/CT showed almost no FDG uptake of the multilocular cystic mass but moderate FDG uptake of the solid nodules. Extended total thymectomy was performed. Histopathological findings revealed follicular lymphoid hyperplasia of thymic tissue but no neoplastic lesion. Based on these findings, diagnosis of multilocular thymic cyst with follicular lymphoid hyperplasia was made. This is a rare case that preoperatively was difficult to diagnose. PMID:27275366

  1. TNF superfamily members play distinct roles in shaping the thymic stromal microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bichele, Rudolf; Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt; Laan, Martti

    2016-04-01

    The differentiation and proper function of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) depend on various tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) signals that are needed to maintain the thymic stromal microenvironment. Nevertheless, the direct transcriptional effects of these signals on TECs remain unclear. To address this issue, we stimulated murine embryonic thymus tissue with selected TNFSF ligands and performed a gene expression profiling study. We show that Aire expression is a direct and specific effect of RANKL stimulation, whereas LTβ and TNFα are major inducers of chemokines in the thymic stroma and we propose differential NF-κB binding as one possible cause of these gene expression patterns. Our work provides further insight into the complex molecular pathways that shape the thymic microenvironment and maintain central tolerance. PMID:27011037

  2. Circulating thymic hormone activity in young cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Consolini, R; Cei, B; Cini, P; Bottone, E; Casarosa, L

    1986-01-01

    We measured serum levels of Facteur Thymique Sérique (FTS) in 56 young cancer patients compared to normal controls. All patients who received immunosuppressive therapy had low age-corrected titres of FTS. Low levels were also found at diagnosis and off therapy. Plasma from 22 patients contained factors capable of inhibiting biological activity of FTS in vitro. The nature of this inhibitor has not been elucidated. No zinc deficiency was found in the patients studied, suggesting that FTS is secreted in its active form. Our study points out the importance of monitoring FTS activity in young cancer patients for its implications on immunological surveillance. The practical applications of thymic hormone therapy in cancer patients are discussed. PMID:3802571

  3. Thymic Involution in Ontogenesis: Role in Aging Program.

    PubMed

    Shilovsky, G A; Feniouk, B A; Skulachev, V P

    2015-12-01

    In most mammals, involution of the thymus occurs with aging. In this issue of Biochemistry (Moscow) devoted to phenoptosis, A. V. Khalyavkin considered involution of a thymus as an example of the program of development and further--of proliferation control and prevention of tumor growth. However, in animals devoid of a thymus (e.g. naked mice), stimulation of carcinogenesis, but not its prevention was observed. In this report, we focus on the involution of the thymus as a manifestation of the aging program (slow phenoptosis). We also consider methods of reversal/arrest of this program at different levels of organization of life (cell, tissue, and organism) including surgical manipulations, hormonal effects, genetic techniques, as well as the use of conventional and mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. We conclude that programmed aging (at least on the model of age-dependent thymic atrophy) can be inhibited. PMID:26638690

  4. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M.; Shen, Dawen; Lee, Anna J.; Benitez, Alain; Dods, Kara; Gambanga, Fiona; Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Merves, Jamie; Noah, Yuliana; Toltzis, Sarit; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Malefyt, Rene deWaal; Muir, Amanda B.; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP), an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf) and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C). To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA), wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg) and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the barrier surface

  5. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE).

    PubMed

    Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Shen, Dawen; Lee, Anna J; Benitez, Alain; Dods, Kara; Gambanga, Fiona; Wilkins, Benjamin J; Merves, Jamie; Noah, Yuliana; Toltzis, Sarit; Yearley, Jennifer H; Spergel, Jonathan M; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Malefyt, Rene deWaal; Muir, Amanda B; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP), an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf) and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C). To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA), wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg) and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the barrier surface

  6. Asymptomatic thymic cyst appearing in the neck on valsalva: unusual presentation of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Kishor V; Suneetha, P; Pradeep, P V; Kumar, Panil

    2012-01-01

    Thymic cysts are usually diagnosed accidentally during radiological evaluation of the chest for unrelated conditions. Symptoms appear late when the mass compresses on adjoining tissues. We report an unusual case of asymptomatic mediastinal thymic cyst which was seen in the neck whenever the patient was asked to perform Valsalva maneuver. This case is being reported for the unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease. The role of imaging in the diagnosis and common differential diagnoses are also discussed. PMID:22779063

  7. Comparative anatomical studies on the thyroid and thymic arteries. VI. Diprotodont marsupials.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    The thyroid and thymic arteries in 44 specimens from 18 species belonging to the diprotodont marsupials were investigated. The results were compared with those of polyprotodont marsupials, suncuses, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and man. The superior thyroid artery was constant in three superfamily groups. The inferior thyroid artery was extremely rare. The superior thymic artery arising from the thyrocervical trunk was observed in 1 phalangeroid and 2 macropodoids, and that arising from the vertebral artery occurred in 1 macropodoid. The middle thymic artery occurred in 1 phalangeroid, but was abundant in macropodoids. The inferior thymic artery was constant in koalas and phalangeroids, but was absent in half of the macropodoids. The thyroid ima, middle thymothyroid, and the supreme thymic arteries were absent in all diprotodonts. In addition to the usual thymus, diprotodonts have the superficial cervical thymus, which is only shared with guinea pigs. The superior superficial cervical thymic artery was absent in koalas and in half of the macropodoids, but was abundant in the phalangeroids. Conversely, the inferior superficial cervical thymic artery was constant in koalas and was dominant in the macropodoids. These results show that variations in the arterial patterns for both organs were much more prevalent in macropodoids than in phalangeroids, while the arterial patterns in koalas were characteristic. As a whole, the arteries for both organs were more complex in diprotodonts than in polyprotodonts or rats, but more simple than those in rabbits or man. The superior superficial cervical thymic arteries, which showed various patterns, were compared with those in guinea pigs. PMID:26472114

  8. Acute Endotoxin-Induced Thymic Atrophy Is Characterized By Intrathymic Inflammatory and Wound Healing Responses

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J.; Gruver, Amanda L.; Sempowski, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Productive thymopoiesis is essential for a robust and healthy immune system. Thymus unfortunately is acutely sensitive to stress resulting in involution and decreased T cell production. Thymic involution is a complication of many clinical settings, including infection, malnutrition, starvation, and irradiation or immunosuppressive therapies. Systemic rises in glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines are known to contribute to thymic atrophy. Little is known, however, about intrathymic mechanisms that may actively contribute to thymus atrophy or initiate thymic recovery following stress events. Methodology/Principal Findings Phenotypic, histologic and transcriptome/pathway analysis of murine thymic tissue during the early stages of endotoxemia-induced thymic involution was performed to identify putative mechanisms that drive thymic involution during stress. Thymus atrophy in this murine model was confirmed by down-regulation of genes involved in T cell development, cell activation, and cell cycle progression, correlating with observed phenotypic and histologic thymus involution. Significant gene changes support the hypothesis that multiple key intrathymic pathways are differentially activated during stress-induced thymic involution. These included direct activation of thymus tissue by LPS through TLR signaling, local expression of inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of T cell signaling, and induction of wound healing/tissue remodeling. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these observations demonstrated that in addition to the classic systemic response, a direct intrathymic response to endotoxin challenge concurrently contributes to thymic involution during endotoxemia. These findings are a substantial advancement over current understanding of thymus response to stress and may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to ameliorate immune deficiency associated with stress events. PMID:21437240

  9. Phase II Study of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Advanced Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Girum L.; Lee, Ju-Whei; Aisner, Seena C.; Langer, Corey J.; Tester, William J.; Johnson, David H.; Loehrer, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced previously untreated thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective multicenter study in patients with unresectable thymoma (n = 21) or thymic carcinoma (n = 23). Patients were treated with carboplatin (area under the curve, 6) plus paclitaxel (225 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles. The primary end point of this trial was to evaluate the objective response rate. Results From February 2001 through January 2008, 46 patients were enrolled. Thirteen patients had grade 4 or greater toxicity, mostly neutropenia. Using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) 1.0 criteria, three complete responses (CRs) and six partial responses (PRs; objective response rate [ORR], 42.9%; 90% CI, 24.5% to 62.8%) were observed in the thymoma cohort; 10 patients had stable disease. For patients with thymic carcinoma, no CRs and five PRs (ORR, 21.7%; 90% CI, 9.0% to 40.4%) were observed; 12 patients had stable disease. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 16.7 (95% CI, 7.2 to 19.8) and 5.0 (95% CI, 3.0 to 8.3) months for thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts, respectively. To date, only seven patients (33.3%) with thymoma have died, compared with 16 patients (69.6%) with thymic carcinoma. Median survival time was 20.0 months (95% CI, 5.0 to 43.6 months) for patients with thymic carcinoma, but it has not been reached for patients with thymoma. Conclusion Carboplatin plus paclitaxel has moderate clinical activity for patients with thymic malignancies, but this seems less than expected with anthracycline-based therapy. Patients with thymic carcinoma have poorer PFS and overall survival than patients with thymoma. PMID:21502559

  10. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  11. Rhythm generation in organotypic medullary cultures of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Baker, R E; Ballantyne, D; Bingmann, D; Jones, D; Widman, G

    1995-12-01

    Organotypic transverse medullary slices (obex level) from six-day-old rats, cultured for two to four weeks in chemically defined medium contained rhythmically discharging neurones which were activated by CO2 and H+. The mechanisms underlying this rhythmicity and the spread of excitation and synaptic transmission within this organotypic tissue were examined by modifying the composition of the external solution. Our findings showed that (1) Exposure to tetrodotoxin (0.2 microM) or to high magnesium (6 mM) and low calcium (0.2 mM) concentrations abolished periodic activity. (2) Neither the blockade of GABAergic potentials with bicuculline methiodide (200 microM) and/or hydroxysaclofen (200 microM) nor the blockade of glycinergic potentials with strychnine hydrochloride (100 microM) abolished rhythmicity. (3) While atropine sulphate (5 microM) was ineffective in modulating periodic discharges nicotine (100 microM) - like CO2-shortened the intervals between the periodic events; hexamethonium (50-100 microM) reduced both periodic and aperiodic activity. (4) Exposure to the NMDA antagonist 2-aminophosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) suppressed periodic events only transiently. In the presence of 2-aminophosphonovaleric acid rhythmicity recovered. However, the AMPA-antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (10-50 microM), abolished periodic activity reversibly within less than 5 min. When 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione and nicotine were administered simultaneously periodic events persisted for up to 10 min. These findings indicate that synaptic excitatory drive is a prerequisite for the generation of rhythmic discharges of medullary neurones in this preparation. This drive may activate voltage-dependent channels or it may facilitate endogenous cellular mechanisms which initiate oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration. To test the latter possibility (5) calcium antagonists were added to the bath saline. The organic calcium antagonists verapamil and

  12. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  13. Medullary Sponge Kidney and Urinary Calculi Aeromedical Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Cherian, Sebastian F.; Barr, Yael R.; Stocco, Amber

    2008-01-01

    Medullary Sponge Kidney (MSK) is a benign disorder associated with renal stones in 60% of patients. Patients frequently have episodic painless hematuria but are otherwise asymptomatic unless renal calculi or infections complicate the disease. Nephrolithiasis is a relative, but frequently enforced, contraindication to space or other high performance flight. Two case reports of asymptomatic NASA flight crew with MSK and three cases of military aviators diagnosed with MSK are reviewed, all cases resulted in waiver and return to flight status after treatment and a vigorous follow up and prophylaxis protocol. MSK in aviation and space flight necessitates a highly case-by-case dependent evaluation and treatment process to rule out other potential confounding factors that might also contribute to stone formation and in order to re-qualify the aviator for flight duties.

  14. Detrusor function with lesions of the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Beric, A; Light, J K

    1992-07-01

    Conventional urodynamic evaluation is unable to distinguish between a pure conus lesion and one with concomitant cauda equina involvement. Lumbosacral evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation assesses the sensory root and dorsal horn interneurons of the L5 to S2 spinal cord segments. This allows for the diagnosis of a pure lesion of the conus medullaris with preservation of the sensory root response (R wave) with absence of the dorsal horn gray matter response (S wave). Urodynamic evaluation in 5 patients with a conus lesion showed a variety of detrusor responses ranging from hyperreflexia through areflexia with decreased compliance to areflexia with normal compliance. The ability to diagnose a pure conus lesion may have prognostic significance as newer modalities of treatment emerge, all of which require intact gray matter of the spinal cord. PMID:1613846

  15. Lateral medullary stroke in patient with granulomatous polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Taraschenko, Olga D; Amory, Colum F; Waldman, Jonathan; Hanspal, Era K; Bernardini, Gary L

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous polyangiitis (GPA), also known as Wegener granulomatosis, is a systemic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis that infrequently affects the central nervous system. We report a 41-year-old man with lateral medullary infarction who developed rapidly progressive renal failure. He was diagnosed with GPA based on positive serum c-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies and demonstration of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis on kidney biopsy. He was treated with Coumadin, pulse steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. He had resolution of his neurologic deficits and improvement in renal function. This case report highlights the importance to consider GPA vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of stroke in patients with development of acute kidney injury. PMID:24128976

  16. Letrozole inhibits the osteogenesis of medullary bone in prelay pullets.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y-F; Chen, X-X; Zhou, Z-L; Hou, J-F

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, on osteogenesis of medullary bone in prelay pullets. Three hundred fifteen 95-d-old ISA prelay pullets were used. After 10 d of adaptation in the cages, 15 pullets were selected randomly to collect the serum and bone samples and the rest were randomly assigned to 2 groups with 3 replicates each. One group was control and the other was letrozole-treated, fed 0.5 mg of letrozole per prelay pullet per day for 18 d. The serum and bone samples from these birds were collected during the experiment. Estradiol and testosterone in serum were assayed using commercial RIA kits. The serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), Ca, and inorganic P were measured by an automatic biochemistry analyzer with commercial kits. The periosteum perimeter, endosteum perimeter, cortical bone index, cortical width, cortical bone area, and cortical area ratios of tibia were measured by transmitted scanner and a computer-assisted image analyzer. Our results showed that relative to the control-fed pullet, letrozole-fed pullets had reduced serum estrogen (57.5%), Ca (33.2%), ALP (33.6%), and TRAP (24.2%) and that values of serum estrogen, Ca, estrogen receptor expression, tibia radiographic density, serum ALP, and TRAP were all reduced (P < 0.05) and the serum P had a degressive trend in letrozole-treated groups. By contrast, the serum androgen and the tibia cortical bone index values were higher in the letrozole-treated group (P < 0.05). No differences were observed in the periosteum perimeter, endosteum perimeter, cortical width, and cortical area ratios of tibia between the 2 groups. The results showed that letrozole can inhibit the development of bone and medullary osteogenesis by inhibiting the synthesis of estrogen and its receptor in prelay pullets. PMID:20371843

  17. Diarrhoea associated with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid 1

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, J. J.; Rambaud, J. C.; Cattan, D.; Prost, A.

    1969-01-01

    Diarrhoea, which is present in roughly one third of cases of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, was investigated in five cases. Excessive loss of water and electrolytes in the stools was the major factor. Steatorrhoea was mild or absent, and intestinal absorption of glucose and vitamin B12 was normal; the histological appearance of the small intestinal mucosa was normal or subnormal. Water and sodium diarrhoea seems to be linked to a sometimes considerable increase in the rate of transit through the small intestine and colon, and may be relieved by codeine or codethyline. The frequent increase in the maximum blood sugar level during an oral tolerance test should not be interpreted as evidence of a paradiabetic condition. In fact, the intravenous glucose tolerance test is usually normal and the excessive rise in blood sugar after oral administration seems to be the consequence of the increased rate of transit through the small intestine. The link between the tumour and the disordered motility seems definite in view of certain cases in which removal of the tumour caused the diarrhoea to disappear immediately. Production by the tumour of serotonin or other derivatives of tryptophan or of kallikrein, which activates bradykinin, is rare. With regard to prostaglandins, high concentrations have been observed in the tumours and in the venous blood draining the tumours, but their presence in systemic blood is inconstant. The only hormonal substance, concentration of which seems to be definitely increased in the systemic blood of patients with a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, is thyrocalcitonin but this hormone does not seem to have any effect on the motor activity of the digestive tract. PMID:5366278

  18. Adjuvant Therapy for Thymic Carcinoma – A Decade of Experience in a Taiwan National Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yen-Han; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Lee, Yu-Chin; Wu, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Yen, Sang-Hue; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Thymic carcinomas are rare tumors for which surgical resection is the first treatment of choice. The role of adjuvant treatment after surgery is unknown because of limited available data. The present study evaluated the efficacy of post-surgery adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy in patients with thymic carcinoma. Methods To evaluate the role of adjuvant therapy in patients with thymic carcinoma, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with thymic carcinoma who were diagnosed and treated between 2004 and 2014. Results Among 78 patients with thymic carcinoma, 30 patients received surgical resection. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly longer among these patients than among patients who received other treatments (PFS: 88.4 months vs 9.1 months, p<0.001; OS: 134.9 months vs 60.9 months; p = 0.003). Patients with stage III thymic carcinoma who received surgery had a longer OS than patients who did not receive surgery (70.1 months vs 23.9 months; p = 0.017, n = 11). Among 47 patients with stage IV carcinoma, 12 patients who received an extended thymothymectomy had a longer PFS than 35 patients who did not receive surgery (18.9 months vs 8.7 months; p = 0.029). Among 30 patients (with stage I- IV carcinoma) who received primary lesion surgery, 19 patients received an R0 resection and 9 patients of the 19 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. These patients had longer PFS (50.3 months) than 2 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy (5.9 months) or 4 patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (7.5 months) after surgery (p = 0.003). Conclusions Surgical resection should be considered for patients with thymic carcinoma, even for patients with locally advanced or stage IV carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in a better PFS after R0 resection. PMID:26757052

  19. Thymic involution, a co-morbidity factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seksenyan, Akop; Ron-Harel, Noga; Azoulay, David; Cahalon, Liora; Cardon, Michal; Rogeri, Patricia; Ko, Minhee K; Weil, Miguel; Bulvik, Shlomo; Rechavi, Gideon; Amariglio, Ninette; Konen, Eli; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya; Somech, Raz; Schwartz, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease, characterized by extremely rapid loss of motor neurons. Our studies over the last decade have established CD4+ T cells as important players in central nervous system maintenance and repair. Those results, together with recent findings that CD4+ T cells play a protective role in mouse models of ALS, led us to the current hypothesis that in ALS, a rapid T-cell malfunction may develop in parallel to the motor neuron dysfunction. Here, we tested this hypothesis by assessing thymic function, which serves as a measure of peripheral T-cell availability, in an animal model of ALS (mSOD1 [superoxide dismutase] mice; G93A) and in human patients. We found a significant reduction in thymic progenitor-cell content, and abnormal thymic histology in 3–4-month-old mSOD1 mice. In ALS patients, we found a decline in thymic output, manifested in the reduction in blood levels of T-cell receptor rearrangement excision circles, a non-invasive measure of thymic function, and demonstrated a restricted T-cell repertoire. The morbidity of the peripheral immune cells was also manifested in the increase of pro-apoptotic BAX/BCXL2 expression ratio in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of these patients. In addition, gene expression screening in the same PBMCs, revealed in the ALS patients a reduction in key genes known to be associated with T-cell activity, including: CD80, CD86, IFNG and IL18. In light of the reported beneficial role of T cells in animal models of ALS, the present observation of thymic dysfunction, both in human patients and in an animal model, might be a co-pathological factor in ALS, regardless of the disease aetiology. These findings may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches directed at overcoming the thymic defect and T-cell deficiency. PMID:19650830

  20. Increased Thymic B Cells but Maintenance of Thymic Structure, T Cell Differentiation and Negative Selection in Lymphotoxin-α and TNF Gene-Targeted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grech, Adrian P.; Riminton, D. Sean; Gabor, Melinda J.; Hardy, Charles L.; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.

    2000-01-01

    TNF, lymphotoxin (LT) and their receptors are expressed constitutively in the thymus. It remains unclear whether these cytokines play a role in normal thymic structure or function. We have investigated thymocyte differentiation, selection and thymic organogenesis in gene targeted mice lacking LTα, TNF, or both (TNF/LTα-/-). The thymus was normal in TNF/LTα-/- mice with regard to cell yields and stromal architecture. Detailed analysis of αβ and γδ T cell-lineage thymocyte subsets revealed no abnormalities, implying that neither TNF nor LT play an essential role in T cell differentiation or positive selection. The number and distribution of thymic CD11c+ dendritic cells was also normal in the absence of both TNF and LTα. A three-fold increase in B cell numbers was observed consistently in the TNF/LTα-/- thymus. This phenotype was due entirely to the LTα deficiency and associated with changes in the hemopoietic compartment, rather than the thymic stromal compartment of LTα-/- mice. Finally, specific Vβ8+ T cell deletion within the thymus following intrathymic injection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was TNF/LT independent. Thus, despite the presence of these cytokines and their receptors in the normal thymus, there appears no essential role for either TNF or LT in development of organ structure or for those processes associated with T cell repertoire selection. PMID:11293812

  1. Fatal pulmonary embolization after reaming of the femoral medullary cavity in sclerosing osteomyelitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pape, H C; Krettek, C; Maschek, H; Regel, G; Tscherne, H

    1996-01-01

    Reaming of the medullary may be used in cases of sclerosing osteomyelitis (type Garré), refractory to other methods. We report a case of fatal intraoperative complication related to this procedure. An otherwise healthy young patient died during reaming using a machine-driven reamer of the femoral medullary canal due to pulmonary bone embolism. The technique and the indication for this procedure as well as the intraoperative monitoring options are discussed. PMID:8854322

  2. 18F-DOPA PET/CT in Orbital Metastasis From Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jean-Baptiste; Orré, Mathieu; Cazeau, Anne-Laure; Henriques de Figueiredo, Bénédicte; Godbert, Yann

    2016-06-01

    A 53-year-old-woman is being followed up for a sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma that was initially treated surgically. Nine years later, a progressive increase in calcitonin levels along with headaches was observed. An orbital metastasis from medullary thyroid carcinoma was diagnosed by performing an F-DOPA PET/CT. The orbital lesion was treated by an external beam radiation. Four months later, an MRI revealed a global morphological stability and a reduction in calcitonin levels. PMID:27055131

  3. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin blocks early stages of breast carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, Shadmehr; Cunningham, Trevor J.; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Ngo, Kenneth H.; Reddy, Rasika; Meyers, Melissa A.; DeNardo, David G.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the field of cancer immunology, including studies on tumor-infiltrating CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), have led to new immunotherapeutics with proven efficacy against late-stage cancers. However, the antitumor potential of the immune system in targeting early-stage cancers remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrated that both genetic and chemical induction of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) at a distant site leads to robust antitumor immunity against spontaneous breast carcinogenesis in mice. Breast tumors exposed to high circulating levels of TSLP were arrested at an early adenoma-like stage and were prevented from advancing to late carcinoma and metastasis. Additionally, CD4+ Th2 cells mediated the antitumor effects of TSLP, challenging the notion that Th2 cells only promote cancer. We also discovered that TSLP is expressed by the breast tumor cells themselves and acts to block breast cancer promotion. Moreover, TSLP-induced immunity also blocked early stages of pancreatic cancer development. Together, our findings demonstrate that TSLP potently induces immunity directed against early stages of breast cancer development without causing inflammation in the normal breast tissue. Moreover, our results highlight a previously unappreciated function of the immune system in controlling the early development of cancer and establish a fundamental role for TSLP and Th2 cells in tumor immunity against early-stage cancers. PMID:26927668

  4. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Improves Survival and Reduces Inflammation in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Piliponsky, Adrian M; Lahiri, Asha; Truong, Phuong; Clauson, Morgan; Shubin, Nicholas J; Han, Hongwei; Ziegler, Steven F

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to homeostasis of the immune system in sepsis are largely unknown. One study suggests a potential detrimental role for thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in sepsis; however, the immune-regulatory effects of TSLP on myeloid cells within the intestinal microenvironment suggest the contrary. Our objective was to clarify TSLP's role in sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture was performed in mice with total or myeloid-specific deficiency in the TSLP receptor (TSLPR). Survival was monitored closely, peritoneal fluids and plasma were analyzed for markers of inflammation, and myeloid cell numbers and their ability to produce inflammatory mediators was determined. The interaction of TSLP with TSLPR in myeloid cells contributed to mouse survival after septic peritonitis. Mice with TSLPR deficiency in myeloid cells displayed excessive local and systemic inflammation levels (e.g., increased inflammatory cell and cytokine levels) relative to control mice. Moreover, hepatic injury was exacerbated in mice with TSLPR deficiency in their myeloid cells. However, the enhanced inflammatory response did not affect the ability of these mice to clear bacteria. Resident neutrophils and macrophages from septic mice with TSLPR deficiency exhibited an increased ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our findings suggest that the effects of TSLP on myeloid cells are crucial in reducing the multiple organ failure that is associated with systemic inflammation, which highlights the significance of this cytokine in modulating the host response to infection and in reducing the risks of sepsis development. PMID:26934097

  5. Recent thymic emigrants are tolerized in the absence of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Travis J; Ji, Qingyong; Fink, Pamela J

    2016-05-30

    T cell development requires a period of postthymic maturation. Why this is the case has remained a mystery, particularly given the rigors of intrathymic developmental checkpoints, successfully traversed by only ∼5% of thymocytes. We now show that the first few weeks of T cell residence in the lymphoid periphery define a period of heightened susceptibility to tolerance induction to tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), the outcome of which depends on the context in which recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) encounter antigen. After encounter with TRAs in the absence of inflammation, RTEs exhibited defects in proliferation, diminished cytokine production, elevated expression of anergy-associated genes, and diminished diabetogenicity. These properties were mirrored in vitro by enhanced RTE susceptibility to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. In the presence of inflammation, RTEs and mature T cells were, in contrast, equally capable of inducing diabetes, proliferating, and producing cytokines. Thus, recirculating RTEs encounter TRAs during a transitional developmental stage that facilitates tolerance induction, but inflammation converts antigen-exposed, tolerance-prone RTEs into competent effector cells. PMID:27139493

  6. [Lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (LESA)-like Thymic hyperplasia: A case report].

    PubMed

    Arndt, Börge; Gaiser, Timo; Marx, Alexander; Rieger, Christina

    2016-07-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to this hospital because of shortness of breath and chest pain. The patient had a history of cardiac surgery at the age of seven (due to a congenital heart defect), and of intracerebral bleeding which had occurred at the age of 23. There was no history of autoimmune disorders. Computed tomography revealed a well-circumscribed anterior mediastinal mass, measuring 4 × 3 × 3 cm with calcification and cystic components. Therefore a malignant tumor was suspected for which a thymectomy was performed. Histopathological evaluation revealed an unusual type of thymic hyperplasia strongly resembling lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (LESA) of the salivary glands. A CT scan of the neck, thorax and abdomen for staging did not display lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly. The laboratory tests revealed no abnormality. Clinical, there were no signs of lymphoma. Actually, the patient is in our aftercare. Taken together, lymphoepithelial sialadentis of the thymus is a very rare disorder and was first described in 2012. This disorder seems to be benigne and no other treatment is needed after thymectomy. PMID:27404934

  7. Rare cause of atrial fibrillation: a thymic mass.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Swati; Tayshetye, Pritam; Bilimoria, Farshaad; Finley, Gene

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old African-American man admitted to the emergency room with chest pain and exertional dyspnoea. He was found to be in rapid atrial fibrillation with pulmonary oedema. A transoesophageal echocardiogram performed prior to cardioversion showed a depressed left ventricular function (ejection fraction 30%) and an extracardiac heterogeneous echodensity compressing the right atrium and the superior vena cava. CT of the chest confirmed an anterior mediastinal mass measuring 13.5×6.6×10.1 cm, exerting a mass effect on the right atrium with mediastinal and right hilar adenopathy. CT-guided biopsy of the mediastinal mass revealed thymic carcinoma (squamous cell subtype). The metastatic workup was negative. The mass was deemed surgically unresectable due to its proximity to the heart. Chemotherapy was initiated with carboplatin/paclitaxel every 3 weeks with plans for intensity modulated radiotherapy after one to two cycles of chemotherapy. The patient recently had a repeat CT scan of the chest showing regression of the tumour. PMID:27417995

  8. Thymic Selection of T Cells as Diffusion with Intermittent Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej

    2011-04-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses by recognizing short peptides derived from pathogens, and by distinguishing them from self-peptides. To ensure the latter, immature T cells (thymocytes) diffuse within the thymus gland, where they encounter an ensemble of self-peptides presented on (immobile) antigen presenting cells. Potentially autoimmune T cells are eliminated if the thymocyte binds sufficiently strongly with any such antigen presenting cell. We model thymic selection of T cells as a random walker diffusing in a field of immobile traps that intermittently turn "on" and "off". The escape probability of potentially autoimmune T cells is equivalent to the survival probability of such a random walker. In this paper we describe the survival probability of a random walker on a d-dimensional cubic lattice with randomly placed immobile intermittent traps, and relate it to the result of a well-studied problem where traps are always "on". Additionally, when switching between the trap states is slow, we find a peculiar caging effect for the survival probability.

  9. Functions of thymic stromal lymphopoietin in immunity and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlu; Zhou, Baohua

    2012-06-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an interleukin 7-like cytokine expressed mainly by epithelial cells. Current studies provide compelling evidence that TSLP is capable of activating dendritic cells to promote T helper (Th) 2 immune responses. TSLP has also been shown to directly promote Th2 differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cell and activate natural killer T cells, basophils and other innate immune cells at the initial stage of inflammation. In addition, TSLP affects B cell maturation and activation and can also influence regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation and development. TSLP-induced Th2 responses are associated with the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory diseases, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, and rhinitis. Based on recent findings in humans and mouse models, TSLP might also be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and progression of cancer. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the biology of TSLP and highlight the important issues for future investigations. PMID:22274860

  10. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin blocks early stages of breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Demehri, Shadmehr; Cunningham, Trevor J; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Ngo, Kenneth H; Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Reddy, Rasika; Meyers, Melissa A; DeNardo, David G; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2016-04-01

    Advances in the field of cancer immunology, including studies on tumor-infiltrating CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), have led to new immunotherapeutics with proven efficacy against late-stage cancers. However, the antitumor potential of the immune system in targeting early-stage cancers remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrated that both genetic and chemical induction of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) at a distant site leads to robust antitumor immunity against spontaneous breast carcinogenesis in mice. Breast tumors exposed to high circulating levels of TSLP were arrested at an early adenoma-like stage and were prevented from advancing to late carcinoma and metastasis. Additionally, CD4+ Th2 cells mediated the antitumor effects of TSLP, challenging the notion that Th2 cells only promote cancer. We also discovered that TSLP is expressed by the breast tumor cells themselves and acts to block breast cancer promotion. Moreover, TSLP-induced immunity also blocked early stages of pancreatic cancer development. Together, our findings demonstrate that TSLP potently induces immunity directed against early stages of breast cancer development without causing inflammation in the normal breast tissue. Moreover, our results highlight a previously unappreciated function of the immune system in controlling the early development of cancer and establish a fundamental role for TSLP and Th2 cells in tumor immunity against early-stage cancers. PMID:26927668

  11. Immature recent thymic emigrants are eliminated by complement1

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fan-Chi; Shapiro, Michael J.; Chen, Meibo W.; McWilliams, Douglas C.; Seaburg, Lauren M.; Tangen, Sarah N.; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2014-01-01

    Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) must undergo phenotypic and functional maturation to become long-lived mature naïve T cells. In CD4-cre NKAP conditional knockout mice, NKAP-deficient RTEs fail to complete T cell maturation. Here, we demonstrate that NKAP-deficient immature RTEs do not undergo apoptosis, but are eliminated by complement. C3, C4 and C1q are bound to NKAP-deficient peripheral T cells, demonstrating activation of the classical arm of the complement pathway. As thymocytes mature and exit to the periphery, they increase sialic acid incorporation into cell surface glycans. This is essential to peripheral lymphocyte survival, as stripping sialic acid with neuraminidase leads to the binding of natural IgM and complement fixation. NKAP-deficient T cells have a defect in sialylation on cell surface glycans, leading to IgM recruitment. We demonstrate that the defect in sialylation is due to aberrant α2,8-linked sialylation, and the expression of three genes (ST8sia1, ST8sia4 and ST8sia6) that mediate α2,8 sialylation are down regulated in NKAP-defcient RTEs. The maturation of peripheral NKAP-deficient T cells is partially rescued in a C3-deficient environment. Thus, sialylation during T cell maturation is critical to protect immature RTEs from complement in the periphery. PMID:25367120

  12. Reactive oxygen species as important determinants of medullary flow, sodium excretion, and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Michiaki; Mori, Takefumi; O'Connor, Paul M.; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Zheleznova, Nadezhda N.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological evidence linking the production of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide in the renal medullary thick ascending limb of Henle (mTAL) to regulation of medullary blood flow, sodium homeostasis, and long-term control of blood pressure is summarized in this review. Data obtained largely from rats indicate that experimentally induced elevations of either superoxide or hydrogen peroxide in the renal medulla result in reduction of medullary blood flow, enhanced Na+ reabsorption, and hypertension. A shift in the redox balance between nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) is found to occur naturally in the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat model, where selective reduction of ROS production in the renal medulla reduces salt-induced hypertension. Excess medullary production of ROS in SS rats emanates from the medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle [from both the mitochondria and membrane NAD(P)H oxidases] in response to increased delivery and reabsorption of excess sodium and water. There is evidence that ROS and perhaps other mediators such as ATP diffuse from the mTAL to surrounding vasa recta capillaries, resulting in medullary ischemia, which thereby contributes to hypertension. PMID:25354941

  13. Thymic influence on the T-lymphocyte self MHC repertoire. II. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Jenski, L J; Miller, B A

    1988-01-01

    We measured the frequency and specificity of thymic alloantigen-reactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors in spleens of allogeneic thymus-grafted nude mice tolerant to thymic alloantigens. Under our conditions of limiting dilution analysis we found no selective loss of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursors in allogeneic thymus-grafted mice. Upon analysis of individual cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones, we found that lysis of specific and third party targets was mediated by distinct clones specific for H-2 antigens. Precursors from allogeneic thymus-grafted nudes stimulated at limiting dilutions with thymic alloantigens tended to lyse fewer targets than were lysed by normal cytotoxic T-lymphocytes or allogeneic thymus-grafted nude precursors stimulated with third party alloantigens, but the reduction in lytic activity was not statistically significant. Specific suppression was not demonstrated, but could not be ruled out unequivocally. We conclude that intrathymic deletion of thymic alloantigen-reactive pCTL is not necessary to achieve specific tolerance to thymic alloantigens. PMID:3259029

  14. Thymic influence on the T-lymphocyte self MHC repertoire. I. Helper T-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Jenski, L J; Belloni, M L; Miller, B A

    1988-01-01

    We measured the frequencies of helper T-cell precursors in spleens of allogeneic thymus-grafted nude mice to determine whether allogeneic thymus engraftment resulted in clonal deletion of helper T-cells reactive to thymic major histocompatibility complex alloantigens, thereby producing tolerance to the thymic alloantigens. C3H thymus-grafted nudes had nearly normal numbers of C3H-reactive helper T-cell precursors, whereas C57BL/6 thymus-grafted nudes had significantly reduced numbers of C57BL/6-reactive helper T-cell precursors. Additional evidence suggested that tolerance was not due to a paucity of helper T-cell precursors: a) there was no correlation between the helper T-cell precursor frequency and the ability to mount cytotoxic responses against the thymic alloantigens, and b) exogenous helper factors did not break cytotoxic T-lymphocyte tolerance to thymic alloantigens. Thus, we conclude that immune tolerance resulting from engraftment of allogeneic thymic tissue is not necessarily due to clonal deletion of specific helper T-cell precursors. PMID:2966463

  15. In vivo administration of IL-1 induces thymic hypoplasia and increased levels of serum corticosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, P.J.; Charrier, K.; Alpert, A.; Bressler, L.

    1988-09-01

    Administration of IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta to normal mice induces a decrease in thymic cellularity, the magnitude of which depends on the number of injections and dose of IL-1. Twice daily injections of 200 ng of IL-1 alpha or -beta for 4 days results in a 90% decrease in thymic cellularity, which regenerated after cessation of treatment. Study of thymocyte subpopulations revealed that the number of CD4+/CD8+ thymocytes was dramatically decreased in IL-1-treated mice. Functional assessment of the CD4-/CD8- population from treated animals showed that these cells had adequate mitogenic responses in vitro and that the proportion of these cells in cycle was not different from control CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-1 treatment also prevented the regeneration of thymic cellularity after irradiation. The use of strains of mice differing genetically at the Ly 1 locus to construct radiation bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that bone marrow-derived thymocyte precursors were able to seed the thymus in the IL-1-treated animals. Again, however, the CD4+/CD8+ thymocyte population was significantly decreased. Thymic repopulation occurred upon cessation of IL-1 therapy. Finally, we determined that a single i.p. injection of IL-1 caused a three-fold increase in serum corticosterone levels, which peaked approximately 3 h after IL-1 administration. Thus, an IL-1-dependent increase in serum corticosterone levels may be responsible for the observed thymic hypoplasia.

  16. Cementless porous-coated anatomic medullary locking total hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Kim, V E

    1994-06-01

    The authors studied 50 consecutive and nonselected patients (52 hips) who were followed for a minimum of 7 years (range, 84-89 months) after they had a primary total hip arthroplasty with an uncemented Anatomic Medullary Locking (DePuy, Warsaw, IN) hip system. The average age of the patients at operation was 47.6 years (range, 19-88 years). The operative diagnoses were: avascular necrosis of the femoral head in 18 hips (34%), osteoarthritis in 16 (31%), fracture of the femoral neck in 14 (27%), and miscellaneous in 4 (8%). The average preoperative Harris hip score was 59 points (range, 6-67 points) that improved to 91 points (range, 69-100 points) at the 7-year follow-up examination. To assess the adequacy of intramedullary fit, the fit of the stem at the proximal canal and isthmus level was evaluated. Forty-one hips (79%) had a good press-fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level, five hips (10%) had a good press-fit at the proximal canal only, and the remaining six hips (11%) had a poor fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level. Of the 46 hips that had a good press-fit at the proximal canal and/or isthmus level or proximal canal only, 32 (70%) had bone ingrowth and 14 (30%) had stable fibrous tissue ingrowth. Of the remaining six hips with a poor press-fit at both the proximal canal and isthmus level, three (6%) had stable fibrous tissue ingrowth and another three (6%) were unstable. Of the three hips (6%) with femoral component loosening, one was revised and the other two were asymptomatic. There was an alarmingly high incidence of perioprosthetic osteolysis in our series: 16 hips (31%) had acetabular and femoral osteolysis and 13 hips (25%) had femoral osteolysis only. Also, there was a strikingly high incidence of polyethylene-liner wear (12 hips or 23%). Although the incidence of component loosening was low, a high incidence of periprosthetic osteolysis and excessive wear in the polyethylene linear remain challenging problems after insertion of

  17. Effect of Bcl11b genotypes and {gamma}-radiation on the development of mouse thymic lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikai, Yoshihiro; Sato, Toshihiro; Morita, Shinichi; Kohara, Yuki; Takagi, Ritsuo; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2008-08-22

    Bcl11b is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene and expressed in many tissues such as thymus, brain and skin. Irradiated Bcl11b{sup +/-} heterozygous mice mostly develop thymic lymphomas, but the preference of Bcl11b inactivation for thymic lymphomas remains to be addressed. We produced Bcl11b{sup +/-} heterozygous and Bcl11b wild-type mice of p53{sup +/-} background and compared their incidence of {gamma}-ray induced thymic lymphomas. Majority of the tumors in p53{sup +/-} mice were skin tumors, and only 5 (36%) of the 14 tumors were thymic lymphomas. In contrast, Bcl11b{sup +/-}p53{sup +/-} doubly heterozygous mice developed thymic lymphomas at the frequency of 27 (79%) of the 34 tumors developed (P = 0.008). This indicates the preference of Bcl11b impairment for thymic lymphoma development. We also analyzed loss of the wild-type alleles in the 27 lymphomas, a predicted consequence given by {gamma}-irradiation. However, the loss frequency was low, only six (22%) for Bcl11b and five (19%) for p53. The frequencies did not differ from those of spontaneously developed thymic lymphomas in the doubly heterozygous mice, though the latency of lymphoma development markedly differed between them. This suggests that the main contribution of irradiation at least in those mice is not for the tumor initiation by inducing allelic losses but probably for the promotion of thymic lymphoma development.

  18. Diesel Exhaust Particle-Exposed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Induce Dendritic Cell Maturation and Polarization via Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Bertram; Tse, Doris B.; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.; Zhang, Feijie

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to air pollutants, including ambient particulate matter, has been proposed as a mechanism for the rise in allergic disorders. Diesel exhaust particles, a major component of ambient particulate matter, induce sensitization to neoallergens, but the mechanisms by which sensitization occur remain unclear. We show that diesel exhaust particles upregulate thymic stromal lymphopoietin in human bronchial epithelial cells in an oxidant-dependent manner. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin induced by diesel exhaust particles was associated with maturation of myeloid dendritic cells, which was blocked by anti-thymic stromal lymphopoietin antibodies or silencing epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Dendritic cells exposed to diesel exhaust particle-treated human bronchial epithelial cells induced Th2 polarization in a thymic stromal lymphopoietin-dependent manner. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms by which diesel exhaust particles modify human lung mucosal immunity. PMID:18049884

  19. Medullary carcinoma of the colon: a distinct morphology reveals a distinctive immunoregulatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Kenneth; Brodsky, Alexander S; Lu, Shaolei; Wood, Stephanie; Gill, Anthony J; Lombardo, Kara; Yang, Dongfang; Resnick, Murray B

    2016-05-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the colon is a unique histologic subtype of microsatellite unstable colorectal carcinoma but little is known regarding its tumor-immunoregulatory microenvironment. The aims of this study were to characterize the immune environment of medullary carcinoma and compare it with other microsatellite unstable and microsatellite stable colorectal carcinomas. An initial gene expression microarray analysis of six cases of medullary carcinoma was used to detect potentially differentially expressed genes. We extended this analysis utilizing genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas to compare eight cases of medullary carcinoma with other microsatellite unstable and stable carcinomas. Finally, we evaluated expression of key immune pathway proteins and lymphocyte subsets via immunohistochemistry of a large group of medullary carcinomas (n=105) and compared these findings with three other groups: poorly differentiated, microsatellite unstable well-differentiated and microsatellite stable well-differentiated carcinomas. Microarray and the Cancer Genome Atlas data analysis identified significant upregulation of several immunoregulatory genes induced by IFNγ including IDO-1, WARS (tRNA(trp)), GBP1, GBP4, GBP5, PDCD1 (PD-1), and CD274 (PD-L1) in medullary carcinoma compared with other microsatellite unstable and microsatellite stable tumors. By immunohistochemistry, IDO-1 was expressed in 64% of medullary carcinomas compared with 19% (9/47) of poorly differentiated carcinomas, 14% (3/22) of microsatellite unstable, and 7% (2/30) of the microsatellite stable well-differentiated carcinomas (P<0.0001). tRNA(trp) was overexpressed in 81% (84/104) of medullary carcinomas, 19% (9/47) of poorly differentiated, 32% (7/22) of microsatellite unstable, and 3% (1/30) of microsatellite stable well-differentiated carcinomas (P<0.0001). Medullary carcinoma had higher mean CD8+ and PD-L1+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with all other groups (P<0.0001). This study

  20. Paclitaxel and cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy followed by surgery in locally advanced thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Minoru; Obase, Yasushi; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Keiji; Ueno, Shiro; Hayama, Makio; Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Nishimura, Hironori; Nakata, Masao; Oka, Mikio

    2007-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm with a poor prognosis. We report the clinical course of a patient who received complete surgical resection after effective induction treatment. A 72-year-old woman with advanced thymic carcinoma (squamous cell carcinoma, stage IVb) was considered as nonresectable due to invasion of neighboring organs and mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Two cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of paclitaxel (180 mg/m2) plus cisplatin (80 mg/m2), combined with thoracic radiotherapy (total 54 Gy) were performed concurrently and complete radical resection could then be performed. She is currently alive and ambulatory and has remained disease-free for two years. This multimodal treatment may be a good treatment option for locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:17595782

  1. Trimodality Therapy for an Advanced Thymic Carcinoma With Both Aorta and Vena Cava Invasion.

    PubMed

    Momozane, Tohru; Inoue, Masayoshi; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Minami, Masato; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2016-08-01

    A case of locally advanced thymic carcinoma that was successfully resected with the great vessels after chemoradiation therapy is reported. A 57-year-old man with Masaoka stage III thymic carcinoma received two cycles of cisplatin/docetaxel and 60 Gy irradiation. The response was stable disease with 19% size reduction, and a radical resection with the ascending aorta and superior vena cava with the patient under circulatory arrest with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been free of disease for 28 months. Trimodality therapy with use of a cardiovascular surgical procedure might be a valuable option in locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:27449450

  2. Concurrent thymoma, thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma in an anterior mediastinal mass.

    PubMed

    Ito, Junko; Yoshida, Akihiko; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Fukuhara, Suguru; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of a 62-year-old man with concurrent thymoma, thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Computed tomography revealed a 5.5-cm anterior mediastinal mass, and surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the mass showed concurrent thymoma (type AB), thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Lymphoma cells infiltrated in the left lung, pulmonary hilar lymph nodes, and involved bone marrow. The patient underwent chemotherapy for T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma and achieved remission. One year after surgery, he remains free of both thymoma and thymic carcinoma, and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma remains complete remission under maintenance therapy. Thymoma and T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma can combine in the same mass, although this is quite rare. At the time of the diagnosis of thymoma, additional attention should be directed toward lymphocytes in the background. PMID:26150396

  3. Histologic and immunohistochemical characterization of thymic epithelial tumours in the dog.

    PubMed

    Burgess, K E; DeRegis, C J; Brown, F S; Keating, J H

    2016-06-01

    Thymic epithelial tumour (TET) histologic subclassification has not been well described in the veterinary literature as it has in humans. The objective of this study was to identify and describe TET subtypes in dogs and to determine the utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differentiating these subtypes. Samples were reviewed and classified according to a modified World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for human tumours of thymic origin. Signallment, presenting signs, treatment and survival data was collected from medical records. Histologic review confirmed the same subtypes as described in humans. Presence of high stage disease, pleomorphism, mitotic figures and capsular invasion was more common in atypical thymomas and thymic carcinomas than in thymomas. IHC was performed for GLUT-1, CD5, CD117 and CK8/18; however, this was not useful in classifying the tumours. PMID:27144380

  4. The syncytial nature of epithelial cells in the thymic cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, M D

    1986-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the cortex of human and rodent thymus glands were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the intracellular membrane potentials measured from the subcapsular, cortical and medullary regions. In the human thymus cortex, there is a highly correlated age-independent relationship (r = 0.78) between the distance in micron from one adjacent Type 2/3 epithelial nucleus to another, and the number of thymocytes between them. In rodent glands that had undergone some degree of involution due to hypoxia simulating an altitude of 17 000 feet or following the injection of phenylhydrazine, Type 2/3 epithelial cells were often found to be bi- or multinucleated. Electrophysiological studies of 10 mouse thymus lobes using 0.2 micron tipped electrodes showed that there were highly significant differences (P less than 0.0001) between the intracellular membrane potentials of the subcapsular zone, the cortex and the medulla. When dyes were injected intracellularly (through 0.5 micron tipped electrodes) into individual epithelial cells, methylene blue remained within the cytoplasm, but procion yellow passed in 30 minutes into the nuclei of all the epithelial cells of the cortex but not those of the subcapsular zone, nor the medulla. This indicates that the cortex must be a functional syncytium and it differs in this respect from the rest of the gland. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:3319999

  5. Negative predictive value of procalcitonin in medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo Kyung; Guéchot, Jérôme; Vaubourdolle, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin (CT), the major biochemical marker in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is prone to in vitro instability and suffers from scarcity of clinical laboratory platforms. Procalcitonin (PCT), the precursor of CT, free of these shortcomings, has been reported as a potential MTC marker. The aim of this study was to assess the negative predictive value (NPV) of PCT as a first-line marker in MTC. 476 serum samples referred to our laboratory for CT measurements were analyzed for PCT. NPVs of PCT were assessed at 3 cut-offs (0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 ng/mL) and the diagnosis of MTC was based on CT levels. PCT and CT levels were correlated (r=0.7554 for CT levels above 10 pg/mL, n=66). Accepting the CT cut-off based on the upper reference limit the NPV of PCT were 98.1% (0.05 ng/mL), 96.3% (0.10 ng/mL) and 95.4% (0.15 ng/mL) respectively. For a CT cut-off of 100 pg/mL the NPVs of PCT were 100% for all PCT thresholds. Serum PCT has a strong NPV and could be a good candidate for a first-line screening test to exclude MTC in patients with suspicious thyroid nodules or suggestive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:26806393

  6. Primary thyroid paraganglioma mimicking medullary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XING; WANG, YONG; WANG, PING; JI, CAI-HONG; MIAO, CHUN-DI; ZHENG, SHU

    2015-01-01

    Primary thyroid paraganglioma (TP) is an uncommon tumor, and in rare cases, this disease tends to mimic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The present study reports a rare case of primary TP mimicking thyroid carcinoma, accompanied by hyperthyroidism. A 30-year-old female presented with an anterior cervical mass. Pre-operative radiological studies and operative frozen section analysis indicated an atypical MTC. Primary TP was finally diagnosed by pathology and immunohistochemical staining. Laboratory examinations (thyroid hormones tests) and Tc99m emission computed tomography revealed hyperthyroidism. Gene analysis of TP-associated gene mutations was negative. Surgical resection was performed as a curative approach and there is currently no metastasis after 36 months of follow-up. Surgeons must be aware of this disease in order to ensure a correct diagnosis and to prevent them from performing unnecessary procedures. The current study presents a case of primary TP mimicking MTC, discusses the radiographic results and histological characteristics, and provides a review of the associated literature. PMID:26622613

  7. Hormonal regulation of medullary bone metabolism in the laying hen

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new organ culture system for the study of bone formation has been developed using medullary bone, a non-structural, metabolically active form of bone which is found in the marrow cavities of egg-laying birds. In the presence of fetal calf serum, bone explants were viable in culture by morphological criteria, and retained large numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-proline into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and non-collagen protein (NCP) was determined using purified bacterial collagenase. Collagen accounted for over 10% of the total protein labeled. The calcium-regulating hormones, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into CDP. The effective dose range of 1,25(OH)2D3 was 0.1 nM to 100 nM, while that of PTH was 1.0 nM to 100 nM. The effect of both hormones was specific for collagen, since /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into NCP was unaffected. Hydroxyproline analysis of bone explants and culture medium revealed that both hormones decreased the total hydroxyroline content of the cultures, suggesting that the inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into DCP is due to inhibition of collagen synthesis.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of thymic prelymphoma cells of B10 mice treated with split-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, M.; Kubo, E.; Kamisaku, H.; Sado, T. )

    1990-02-01

    Using an intrathymic injection assay on B10 Thy-1 congenic mice, it was demonstrated that thymic prelymphoma cells first developed within the thymuses from 4 to 8 days after split-dose irradiation and were detected in more than 63% of the test donor thymuses when examined at 21 and 31 days after irradiation. Moreover, some mice (25%) at 2 mo after split-dose irradiation had already developed thymic lymphomas in their thymuses. To characterize these thymic prelymphoma cells, the thymocytes from B10 Thy-1.1 mice 1 mo after irradiation were stained with anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 mAb and were sorted into four subpopulations. These fractionated cells were injected into the recipient thymuses to examine which subpopulation contained thymic prelymphoma cells. The results indicated that thymic prelymphoma cells existed mainly in CD4- CD8- and CD4- CD8+ thymocyte subpopulations and also in CD4+ CD8+ subpopulation. T cell lymphomas derived from CD4- CD8- prelymphoma cells had mainly CD4- CD8- or CD4- CD8+ phenotypes. T cell lymphomas developed from CD4- CD8+ prelymphoma cells mainly expressed CD4- CD8+ or CD4+ CD8+ phenotype. T cell lymphomas originating from CD4+ CD8+ prelymphoma cells were mainly CD4+ CD8+ but some CD4- CD8+ or CD4+ CD8- cells were also present. These thymic prelymphoma cells were further characterized phenotypically in relation to their expression of the marker defined by the mAb against J11d marker and TL-2 (thymus-leukemia) Ag, which is not expressed on normal thymocytes of B10.Thy-1.2 or B10.Thy-1.1 strain, but appears on the thymocytes of lymphomagenic irradiated mice. The results indicated that the prelymphoma cells existed in J11d+, TL-2+ cells.

  9. Adipocyte and leptin accumulation in tumor-induced thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Alejandro; Lopez, Elena; Carrio, Roberto; Lopez, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is an important defense mechanism against pathogens and developing tumor cells. The thymus is the main lymphoid organ involved in the formation of the cell-mediated immune response by the maturation and differentiation of lymphocytes that travel from the bone marrow, through the lymphatic ducts, to become T lymphocytes. Thymic involution has been associated with aging; however, other factors such as obesity, viral infection and tumor development have been shown to increase the rate of shrinkage of this organ. The heavy infiltration of adipocyte fat cells has been reported in the involuted thymuses of aged mice. In the present study, the possible accumulation of such cells in the thymus during tumorigenesis was examined by immunohistochemistry. A significant number of adipocytes around and infiltrating the thymuses of tumor-bearing mice was observed. Leptin is a pro-inflammatory adipocytokine that enhances thymopoiesis and modulates T cell immune responses. The levels of leptin and adiponectin, another adipocytokine that has anti-inflammatory properties, were examined by western blot analysis. While no changes were observed in the amounts of adiponectin present in the thymuses of the normal and tumor-bearing mice, significantly higher levels of leptin were detected in the thymocytes of the tumor-bearing mice. This correlated with an increase in the expression of certain cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The co-culture of thymocytes isolated from normal mice with ex vivo isolated adipocytes from tumor-bearing mice yielded similar results. Our findings suggest that the infiltration and accumulation of adipocytes in the thymuses of tumor-bearing mice play an important role in their altered morphology and functions. PMID:26530443

  10. Coeliac disease-associated polymorphisms influence thymic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, S S; Viken, M K; Sollid, L M; Lie, B A

    2014-09-01

    Significant associations between coeliac disease (CD) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed over 40 genetic regions have been established. The majority of these SNPs are non-coding and 20 SNPs were, by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis, found to harbour cis regulatory potential in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Almost all regions contain genes with an immunological relevant function, of which many act in the same biological pathways. One such pathway is T-cell development in the thymus, a pathway previously not explored in CD pathogenesis. The aim of our study was to explore the regulatory potential of the CD-associated SNPs (n=50) by eQTL analysis in thymic tissue from 42 subjects. In total, 43 nominal significant (P<0.05) eQTLs were found within 24 CD-associated chromosomal regions, corresponding to 27 expression-altering SNPs (eSNPs) and 40 probes (eProbes) that represents 39 unique genes (eGenes). Nine significant probe-SNP pairs (corresponding to 8 eSNPs and 7 eGenes) overlapped with previous findings in PBMC (rs12727642-PARK7, rs296547-DDX59, rs917997-IL18RAP, rs842647-AHSA2, rs13003464-AHSA2, rs6974491-ELMO1, rs2074404-NSF (two independent probes) and rs2298428-UBE2L3). When compared across more tissues, we found that 14 eQTLs could represent potentially novel thymus-specific eQTLs. This implies that CD risk polymorphisms could affect gene regulation in thymus. PMID:24871462

  11. Physiology and therapeutic potential of the thymic peptide thymulin.

    PubMed

    Reggiani, Paula C; Schwerdt, Jose I; Console, Gloria M; Roggero, Eduardo A; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2014-01-01

    Thymulin is a thymic hormone exclusively produced by the epithelial cells of the thymus. After its discovery and initial characterization in the '70s, it was demonstrated that the production and secretion of thymulin are strongly influenced by the neuro-endocrine system. Conversely, a growing body of evidence, to be reviewed here, suggests that thymulin is a hypophysiotropic peptide. Additionally, a substantial body of information pointing to thymulin and a synthetic analog as anti-inflammatory and analgesic peptides in the central nervous system brain and other organs will be also reviewed. In recent years, a synthetic DNA sequence encoding a biologically active analog of thymulin, metFTS, was constructed and cloned in a number of adenovectors. These include bidirectional regulatable Tet-Off vector systems that simultaneously express metFTS and green fluorescent protein and that can be down-regulated reversibly by the addition of the antibiotic doxycycline. A number of recent studies indicate that gene therapy for thymulin may be an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent some of the hormonal and reproductive abnormalities that typically appear in congenitally athymic (nude) mice, used as a suitable model of neuroendocrine and reproductive aging. Summing up, this article briefly reviews the publications on the physiology of the thymulin-neuroendocrine axis and the anti-inflammatory properties of the molecule and its analog. The availability of novel biotechnological tools should boost basic studies on the molecular biology of thymulin and should also allow an assessment of the potential of gene therapy to restore circulating thymulin levels in thymodeficient animal models and eventually, in humans. PMID:24588820

  12. Ontogeny of rat thymic macrophages. Phenotypic characterization and possible relationships between different cell subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, A; Varas, A; Moreno, J; Sacedón, R; Jiménez, E; Zapata, A G

    1995-01-01

    In the present study we combined electron microscopy, immunohistology and primary stromal cell cultures to analyse the ontogeny of rat thymic macrophages (M phi) in an attempt to clarify the relationships between the different macrophage cell subsets described in adult rat thymus. Although phagocytic cells were observed in 15-day-old fetal thymus, monoclonal antibodies (mAb) which recognize different adult macrophage types were unable to identify positive cells until the end of embryonic life. However, our in vitro results from primary thymic stromal cell cultures of 16-day-old fetal rats, and the phenotyping of enriched thymic CD2- cell suspensions, demonstrated that monocyte-like cells which strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules colonized the embryonic thymus early, giving rise later to distinct macrophage subsets. During the process of maturation, macrophage precursors gradually lost their MHC class II expression, acquired other surface markers (CD45, Thy-1, CD25, CD4, etc.) and increased the acid phosphatase activity. In this respect, ED1+ macrophages, which appeared for the first time in the last stages of embryonic life, consisted of a MHC class II molecule-expressing phagocytic cell population, presumably involved in the elimination of non-selected cortical thymocytes, and of non-phagocytic cells which, in the thymic cortex, might differentiate to ED2+ macrophages throughout ED1+ED2lo/med and ED1+ ED2high intermediate cell stages, observed in vitro in 16-day-old fetal thymic stromal cell cultures. At the end of embryonic life and during the postnatal period the numbers of thymic macrophages increased, particularly in the medulla and corticomedullary border (CMZ), and more slowly in the thymic cortex. This increase was presumably due to the arrival, through perivascular spaces, of new macrophage progenitors, rather than in situ proliferation of pre-existent mature macrophages. The possible function of different thymic

  13. Bladder urine oxygen tension for assessing renal medullary oxygenation in rabbits: experimental and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Sgouralis, Ioannis; Kett, Michelle M; Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Layton, Anita T; Gardiner, Bruce S; Smith, David W; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Evans, Roger G

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen tension (Po2) of urine in the bladder could be used to monitor risk of acute kidney injury if it varies with medullary Po2 Therefore, we examined this relationship and characterized oxygen diffusion across walls of the ureter and bladder in anesthetized rabbits. A computational model was then developed to predict medullary Po2 from bladder urine Po2 Both intravenous infusion of [Phe(2),Ile(3),Orn(8)]-vasopressin and infusion of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine reduced urinary Po2 and medullary Po2 (8-17%), yet had opposite effects on renal blood flow and urine flow. Changes in bladder urine Po2 during these stimuli correlated strongly with changes in medullary Po2 (within-rabbit r(2) = 0.87-0.90). Differences in the Po2 of saline infused into the ureter close to the kidney could be detected in the bladder, although this was diminished at lesser ureteric flow. Diffusion of oxygen across the wall of the bladder was very slow, so it was not considered in the computational model. The model predicts Po2 in the pelvic ureter (presumed to reflect medullary Po2) from known values of bladder urine Po2, urine flow, and arterial Po2 Simulations suggest that, across a physiological range of urine flow in anesthetized rabbits (0.1-0.5 ml/min for a single kidney), a change in bladder urine Po2 explains 10-50% of the change in pelvic urine/medullary Po2 Thus, it is possible to infer changes in medullary Po2 from changes in urinary Po2, so urinary Po2 may have utility as a real-time biomarker of risk of acute kidney injury. PMID:27385734

  14. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  15. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  16. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  17. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  18. Development of the ovarian follicular epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Lavranos, T C; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F

    1999-05-25

    A lot is known about the endocrine control of the development of ovarian follicles, but a key question now facing researchers is which molecular and cellular processes take part in control of follicular growth and development. The growth and development of ovarian follicles occurs postnatally and throughout adult life. In this review, we focus on the follicular epithelium (membrana granulosa) and its basal lamina. We discuss a model of how granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells and then enter different lineages before differentiation. The structure of the epithelium at the antral stage of development is presented, and the effects that follicle growth has on the behavior of the granulosa cells are discussed. Finally, we discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition. This would be expected if the behavior of the granulosa cells changes, or if the permeability of the basal lamina changes. It will be evident that the follicular epithelium has similarities to other epithelia in the body, but that it is more dynamic, as gross changes occur during the course of follicle development. This basic information will be important for the development of future reproductive technologies in both humans and animals, and possibly for understanding polycystic ovarian syndrome in women. PMID:10411332

  19. Confocal fluorescence microendoscopy of bronchial epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Leriche, Jean C.; Anderson, Marshall W.; Macaulay, Calum E.

    2009-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy permits the acquisition of high-resolution real-time confocal images of bronchial mucosa via the instrument channel of an endoscope. We report here on the construction and validation of a confocal fluorescence microendoscope and its use to acquire images of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Our objective is to develop an imaging method that can distinguish preneoplastic lesions from normal epithelium to enable us to study the natural history of these lesions and the efficacy of chemopreventive agents without biopsy removal of the lesion that can introduce a spontaneous regression bias. The instrument employs a laser-scanning engine and bronchoscope-compatible confocal probe consisting of a fiber-optic image guide and a graded-index objective lens. We assessed the potential of topical application of physiological pH cresyl violet (CV) as a fluorescence contrast-enhancing agent for the visualization of tissue morphology. Images acquired ex vivo with the confocal microendoscope were first compared with a bench-top confocal fluorescence microscope and conventional histology. Confocal images from five sites topically stained with CV were then acquired in vivo from high-risk smokers and compared to hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of biopsies taken from the same site. Sufficient contrast in the confocal imagery was obtained to identify cells in the bronchial epithelium. However, further improvements in the miniature objective lens are required to provide sufficient axial resolution for accurate classification of preneoplastic lesions.

  20. Neural control of adrenal medullary and cortical blood flow during hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, M.J.; Jordan, D.A.; Thellman, S.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension produces an increase in adrenal medullary blood flow and a decrease in adrenal cortical blood flow. To determine whether changes in adrenal blood flow during hemorrhage are neurally mediated, the authors compared blood flow responses following adrenal denervation (splanchnic nerve section) with changes in the contralateral, neurally intact adrenal. Carbonized microspheres labeled with /sup 153/Gd, /sup 114/In, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 95/Nb or /sup 46/Se were used. Blood pressure was reduced and maintained at 60 mmHg for 25 min by hemorrhage into a pressurized bottle system. Adrenal cortical blood flow decreased to 50% of control with hemorrhage in both the intact and denervated adrenal. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased to four times control levels at 15 and 25 min posthemorrhage in the intact adrenal, but was reduced to 50% of control at 3, 5, and 10 min posthemorrhage in the denervated adrenal. In a separate group of dogs, the greater splanchnic nerve on one side was electrically stimulated at 2, 5, or 15 Hz for 40 min. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased 5- to 10-fold in the stimulated adrenal but was unchanged in the contralateral, nonstimulated adrenal. Adrenal cortical blood flow was not affected by nerve stimulation. They conclude that activity of the splanchnic nerve profoundly affects adrenal medullary vessels but not adrenal cortical vessels and mediates the observed increase in adrenal medullary blood flow during hemorrhagic hypotension.

  1. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  2. RET mutation and increased angiogenesis in medullary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Verrienti, Antonella; Tallini, Giovanni; Colato, Chiara; Boichard, Amélie; Checquolo, Saula; Pecce, Valeria; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Rosignolo, Francesca; de Biase, Dario; Rhoden, Kerry; Casadei, Gian Piero; Russo, Diego; Visani, Michela; Acquaviva, Giorgia; Ferdeghini, Marco; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo

    2016-08-01

    Advanced medullary thyroid cancers (MTCs) are now being treated with drugs that inhibit receptor tyrosine kinases, many of which involved in angiogenesis. Response rates vary widely, and toxic effects are common, so treatment should be reserved for MTCs likely to be responsive to these drugs. RET mutations are common in MTCs, but it is unclear how they influence the microvascularization of these tumors. We examined 45 MTCs with germ-line or somatic RET mutations (RETmut group) and 34 with wild-type RET (RETwt). Taqman Low-Density Arrays were used to assess proangiogenic gene expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess intratumoral, peritumoral and nontumoral expression levels of VEGFR1, R2, R3, PDGFRa, PDGFB and NOTCH3. We also assessed microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density (LVD) based on CD31-positive and podoplanin-positive vessel counts, respectively, and vascular pericyte density based on staining for a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA), a pericyte marker. Compared with RETwt tumors, RETmut tumors exhibited upregulated expression of proangiogenic genes (mRNA and protein), especially VEGFR1, PDGFB and NOTCH3. MVDs and LVDs were similar in the two groups. However, microvessels in RETmut tumors were more likely to be a-SMA positive, indicating enhanced coverage by pericytes, which play key roles in vessel sprouting, maturation and stabilization. These data suggest that angiogenesis in RETmut MTCs may be more intense and complete than that found in RETwt tumors, a feature that might increase their susceptibility to antiangiogenic therapy. Given their increased vascular pericyte density, RETmut MTCs might also benefit from combined or preliminary treatment with PDGF inhibitors. PMID:27402614

  3. Results of Surgical Therapy in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Mihaela; Zosin, Ioana; Timar, Bogdan; Lazar, Fulger; Vlad, Adrian; Timar, Romulus; Cornianu, Marioara

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare form of malignancy, having an intermediate prognosis. Controversies exist regarding the best surgical approach. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome in a group of patients with MTC, diagnosed and followed up in a single care center. We performed a retrospective analysis of all the patients diagnosed with MTC in the Department of Endocrinology from the County Emergency Hospital Timisoara between 1992 and 2012. The study group included 19 patients, 6 men (31.6 %), mean age 41.2 ± 12.5 years (20-72 years). The preoperative diagnosis was based on the protocol for nodular thyroid disease. Total or near-total thyroidectomy was performed in 10 out of 16 patients who could be operated. Postoperative follow-up included repeated measurements of serum calcitonin and imaging investigations. Nine out of the total of 19 (47.3 %) patients had hereditary forms of MTC. Most of the cases (84.2 %) were submitted to surgery. The median duration of follow-up was 84 months. The pTNM staging indicated that the majority of the patients with hereditary MTC were diagnosed in an earlier stage. Disease remission was achieved in 7 cases (43.8 %). Four patients, all with sporadic forms, died. Survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were significantly higher (p = 0.048) in patients with hereditary MTC. An early diagnosis of MTC allows a better surgical approach and an improved survival rate. We support the general recommendation that modified radical neck dissection is not necessary for all the patients with MTC. PMID:27574350

  4. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  5. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives. PMID:27185870

  6. c-kit mutation-positive advanced thymic carcinoma successfully treated as a mediastinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HIRAI, FUMIHIKO; EDAGAWA, MAKOTO; SHIMAMATSU, SHINICHIRO; TOYOZAWA, RYO; TOYOKAWA, GOUJI; NOSAKI, KANAME; YAMAGUCHI, MASAFUMI; SETO, TAKASHI; TWAKENOYAMA, MITSUHIRO; ICHINOSE, YUKITO

    2016-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is an exceptionally rare tumor, which has a very poor prognosis, differing from thymoma. Although cytotoxic chemotherapy is commonly used to treat advanced thymic carcinoma, its effectiveness has not been found to be sufficient. There are several reports that thymic carcinoma also harbors an oncogenic driver mutation, similar to lung cancer. A patient with a c-kit mutation-positive thymic carcinoma received imatinib followed by sunitinib consecutively, which are both c-Kit inhibitors. Although the patient had achieved long-term disease control for 21 months, the primary lesion and pulmonary metastases had increased in size by November, 2014. Following failure of imatinib treatment, the patient received sunitinib, a multiple kinase inhibitor, initiated in December, 2014. Following administration of sunitinib, a computed tomography scan revealed a partial response and the disease was effectively controlled with continued sunitinib treatment for 6 months, up to June, 2015. The patient achieved long-term disease control (~27 months) with imatinib followed by sunitinib. The efficacy of consecutive molecular-targeted therapy for thymic carcinoma was demonstrated in this case. Therefore, thymic carcinoma with oncogenic driver mutations should be treated with molecular-targeted agents rather than with cytotoxic drugs, and it may be suitable to treat c-kit mutation-positive thymic carcinoma as a mediastinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:27073655

  7. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is involved in thymic lymphoma development in Atm-/- mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Xianghong; Shen, Jianjun; Wong, Paul K.Y.; Yan, Mingshan

    2009-06-05

    Abnormal thymocyte development with thymic lymphomagenesis inevitably occurs in Atm-/- mice, indicating that ATM plays a pivotal role in regulating postnatal thymocyte development and preventing thymic lymphomagenesis. The mechanism for ATM controls these processes is unclear. We have shown previously that c-Myc, an oncoprotein regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is overexpressed in Atm-/- thymocytes. Here, we show that inhibition of mTOR signaling with its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses normal thymocyte DNA synthesis by downregulating 4EBP1, but not S6K, and that 4EBP1 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression are coordinately increased in Atm-/- thymocytes. Administration of rapamycin to Atm-/- mice attenuates elevated phospho-4EBP1, c-Myc and cyclin D1 in their thymocytes, and delays thymic lymphoma development. These results indicate that mTOR downstream effector 4EBP1 is essential for normal thymocyte proliferation, but deregulation of 4EBP1 in Atm deficiency is a major factor driving thymic lymphomagenesis in the animals.

  8. Meis1 Is Required for the Maintenance of Postnatal Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Takehiro; Asano, Yusuke; Iida, Hajime; Watanabe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takuro; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Most epithelial tissues retain stem/progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis of the adult tissues; however, the existence of a thymic epithelial cell (TEC) progenitor capable of maintaining homeostasis of the postnatal thymus remains unclear. Here, we show that a cell population expressing high levels of Meis1, a homeodomain transcription factor, is enriched in TECs with an immature cellular phenotype. These TECs selectively express genes involved in embryonic thymic organogenesis and epithelial stem cell maintenance, and also have the potential to proliferate and differentiate into mature TEC populations. Furthermore, postnatal inactivation of Meis1 in TECs caused disorganization of the thymic architecture, which ultimately leads to premature disappearance of the thymus. There was an age-associated reduction in the proportion of the TEC population expressing high levels of Meis1, which may also be related to thymic involution. These findings indicate that Meis1 is potentially involved in the maintenance of postnatal TECs with progenitor activity that is required for homeostasis of the postnatal thymus. PMID:24594519

  9. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy with CyberKnife for advanced thymic carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fan, C.Y.; Huang, W.Y.; Jen, Y.M.; Lin, M.J.; Lin, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare but lethal mediastinal cancer. The optimal treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma is not yet established. This report is the first known of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (sabr) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, U.S.A.) as definitive therapy for thymic carcinoma. The patient, a 70-year-old woman with thymic carcinoma, invasion into neighboring organs, and pleural metastases—underwent CyberKnife sabr at 40 Gy in 5 fractions for two lesions, one in the thymus and one in the right paraspinal pleura. After 61 months of observation, a partial response was observed in the irradiated fields. However, disease progression in the non-irradiated pleura was noted. The patient underwent salvage CyberKnife sabr for the four initially nonirradiated pleural lesions. Computed tomography images obtained 10 months after the salvage therapy revealed a partial response. The patient is living, with progression-free irradiated lesions and no radiation-related toxicity. CyberKnife sabr is feasible for patients who are unable to undergo either surgery or conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. PMID:26628883

  10. Treatment and prognosis of Masaoka stage 3 thymic carcinoma: a retrospective study of 32 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Jinshi; Yu, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment and prognostic factors in patients with Masaoka stage 3 thymic carcinoma. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of the medical records of patients with Masaoka stage 3 thymic carcinoma between 2000 and 2012 in our institution. Clinical characteristics and prognostic factors were analyzed. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan–Meier method. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Results Thirty-two patients with Masaoka stage 3 thymic carcinoma, operated on in Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, were identified between 2000 and 2012. Among 32 patients, 24 achieved R0 resection. The most common histological subtypes were squamous cell carcinoma (n=15, 46.8%), followed by undifferentiated carcinoma (n=12, 37.5%), and other tumors (n=5, 15.7%). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 56.8% and 61.5%, respectively. Patients with incomplete resection had a significantly worse disease-free survival and overall survival as compared to complete resection with univariate analyses (P-value 0.006 and 0.034, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that complete resection was statistically associated with disease-free survival but not overall survival (P-value 0.025 and 0.076, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicated that complete resection could impact the disease-free survival of patients with stage 3 thymic carcinoma. PMID:25897244

  11. Sporadic juvenile thymic lymphoma in a 6-month-old Holstein heifer

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A 6-month-old Holstein heifer was presented for recurrent bloat and a firm, primarily left-sided mass in the caudoventral cervical region. Surgical exploration revealed a vascularized, encapsulated mass extending from the submandibular region to the thoracic inlet. Postmortem gross and histopathologic examination and the history enabled a diagnosis of sporadic thymic lymphoma. PMID:16231655

  12. Characterization of the human thymic microenvironment: lymphoepithelial interaction in normal thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hermelink, H K; Wilisch, A; Schultz, A; Marx, A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances in tissue culture technology and molecular biology have extended our understanding of the functional morphology of the thymus. The importance of a crosstalk between lymphoid cells and stroma has been appreciated as a prerequisite for the normal development of both. The network of direct cellular interactions and soluble factors comprising part of the microenvironment is far from being elucidated but the highly ordered thymic architecture clearly plays a pivotal role in normal thymic function. Insight into the genetic control of stroma development is only emerging while knowledge on the genetic control of the various steps in T cell development is already advanced and rapidly expanding. The present paper gives an overview on the cellular components and matrix molecules of the human thymic microenvironment and their development during ontogeny. The intrathymic cytokine network is shortly reviewed. Special emphasis is put on molecules mediating lymphoepithelial interactions that are necessary for the expansion and early selection of immature thymocytes from precursor cells and for the generation of an MHC restricted and self tolerant T cell repertoire by positive and negative selection. Considering these physiological mechanisms we summarize the molecular pathology of the microenvironment and lymphocyte/stroma interactions in thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas). Finally, a pathogenetic model for paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis is given. We suggest abnormal auto-antigen-specific positive selection of naive T cells as the essential molecular mechanism by which thymomas contribute to the autoimmunization against the acetylcholine receptor and other muscle proteins. PMID:9161686

  13. Sporadic juvenile thymic lymphoma in a 6-month-old Holstein heifer.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Karen S

    2005-09-01

    A 6-month-old Holstein heifer was presented for recurrent bloat and a firm, primarily left-sided mass in the caudoventral cervical region. Surgical exploration revealed a vascularized, encapsulated mass extending from the submandibular region to the thoracic inlet. Postmortem gross and histopathologic examination and the history enabled a diagnosis of sporadic thymic lymphoma. PMID:16231655

  14. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  15. Malignant astrocytoma of the cervico-medullary junction masquerading as Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Robertson, L J; Jackson, A; Lipman, J

    1994-07-01

    Brainstem gliomas are rare primary brain tumours which most commonly occur in the midbrain and pons. Malignant gliomas and tumours at the cervico-medullary junction are particularly unusual. The diagnosis of tumours at this site is particularly difficult using computed tomographic (CT) scanning owing to artifacts around the base of the skull. Intrinsic tumours of the cervico-medullary junction may lead to a dissociated motor deficit and the onset of symptoms can be rapid. We describe a patient in whom an isolated ascending motor deficit in association with a raised cerebrospinal fluid protein and a normal CT scan led to an erroneous diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The patient was treated on the intensive care unit for an 8-week period before further investigation demonstrated a malignant glioma of the cervico-medullary junction. We recommend confirmation of the diagnosis of polyradiculopathy by nerve conduction studies wherever possible. PMID:7937428

  16. Effect of medullary cavity in cancellous bone on two-wave phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiken, Takuma; Nakanishi, Shoko; Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic patients have a larger medullary cavity in their cancellous bone than healthy people. In this study, the effect of the medullary cavity on the two-wave phenomenon was experimentally investigated using a cancellous bone model and a radius bone model. In the cancellous bone model, with the increase in hole (medullary cavity) diameter, the amplitudes of the fast waves became smaller, whereas the amplitudes of the slow waves became larger. In the radius bone model, the fast wave overlapped with the circumferential wave. The slow wave became larger with increasing hole diameter. The analysis of the slow wave thus seems to be useful for the in vivo diagnosis of the degree of osteoporosis.

  17. Systemic Pregabalin Attenuates Sensorimotor Responses and Medullary Glutamate Release in Inflammatory Tooth Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Noriyuki; Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Coderre, Terence J.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application to the tooth pulp of the inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0~1.2 %), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (ANOVA, p<0.05). These results suggest that pregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial inflammatory pain states

  18. Systemic pregabalin attenuates sensorimotor responses and medullary glutamate release in inflammatory tooth pain model.

    PubMed

    Narita, N; Kumar, N; Cherkas, P S; Chiang, C Y; Dostrovsky, J O; Coderre, T J; Sessle, B J

    2012-08-30

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application of inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) to the tooth pulp induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0-1.2%), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p<0.05). These results suggest that pregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial

  19. Do egg-laying crocodilian (Alligator mississippiensis) archosaurs form medullary bone?

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M H; Elsey, R M; Dacke, C G; Horner, J R; Lamm, E-T

    2007-04-01

    It is beyond question that Mesozoic dinosaurs, like Aves and Crocodylia, are archosaurs. However, within the archosaurian clade, the origin and distribution of some major features are less clear, particularly with respect to reproductive physiology. Medullary bone, a highly mineralized, bony reproductive tissue present in the endosteal cavities of all extant egg-laying birds thus far examined, has recently been reported in Tyrannosaurus rex. Its presence or absence in extant crocodilians, therefore, may shed light on the timing of its evolutionary appearance. If medullary bone is present in all three taxa, it arose before the three lineages diverged. However, if medullary bone arose after this divergence, it may be present in both extinct dinosaurs and birds, or in birds only. If present in extinct dinosaurs and birds, but not crocodilians, it would indicate that it arose in the common ancestor of this clade, thus adding support to the closer phylogenetic relationship of dinosaurs and birds relative to crocodilians. Thus, the question of whether the crocodilian Alligator mississippiensis forms medullary bone during the production of eggs has important evolutionary significance. Our examination of long bones from several alligators (two alligators with eggs in the oviducts, one that had produced eggs in the past but was not currently in reproductive phase, an immature female and an adult male) shows no differences on the endosteal surfaces of the long bones, and no evidence of medullary bone, supporting the hypothesis that medullary bone first evolved in the dinosaur-bird line, after the divergence of crocodilians from this lineage. PMID:17223615

  20. Rapid alterations of avian medullary bone material during the daily egg-laying cycle.

    PubMed

    Kerschnitzki, Michael; Zander, Thomas; Zaslansky, Paul; Fratzl, Peter; Shahar, Ron; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue which is continuously adapting not only to external mechanical stimuli but also to internal metabolic calcium demands. During normal bone remodeling, bone-resorbing osteoclasts release calcium from the bone and digest the collagenous bone matrix, after which bone-depositing osteoblasts form unmineralized collagen matrix, which subsequently mineralizes. The detailed mechanism by which calcium is deposited at the site of mineralization and removed from it during bone resorption is largely unknown. Experimental studies are difficult to conduct because in adult bone only a small fraction of bone tissue is remodeled at any moment in time. Thus, one promising approach is to study mineral deposition and resorption in model systems in which a large fraction of the bone mineral is mobilized in a relatively short period of time. We investigated the microscopic and nanoscopic alterations of avian medullary bone architecture during the egg-laying (oviposition) cycle of hens. Medullary bone forms a labile calcium reservoir for eggshell production and is characterized by an extremely rapid and high-flux calcium metabolism. It thus, provides the unique opportunity to study processes of bone remodeling in their most intensive form. We used a combination of synchrotron X-ray tomography together with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to correlate microscopic medullary bone attributes such as the mineral content, medullary bone volume fraction and medullary bone trabecular thickness with nanoscopic alterations in the mineral particle size (thickness parameter T and length parameter L) during the oviposition cycle. To identify the timing of the different stages of the cycle, ionic calcium, phosphorus and PTH concentrations in the blood of the layers were monitored. We found that the microscopic and nanoscopic architecture of avian medullary bone material changes rapidly during the oviposition

  1. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) of Medullary and Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer Using Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Salavati, Ali; Puranik, Ameya; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Budiawan, Hendra; Baum, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    As therapeutic options in advanced medullary and non-iodine avid differentiated (nonmedullary) thyroid cancers are limited and associated with significant toxicity, targeting of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) for internal radiation therapy provides a promising option. Theranostics (therapy and diagnosis) using radiolabeled somatostatin analogues has proved to be a milestone in the management of SSTR-expressing tumors. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using (177)Lu-labeled or (90)Y-labeled somatostatin analogues may have a significant role in the management of medullary and nonmedullary thyroid cancers in those patients where PET/CT with (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues demonstrates significant SSTR expression. PMID:27067502

  2. Defective Barrier Function in Neosquamous Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jovov, Biljana; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Geraldine S.; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common strategy for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). After RFA, the ablated esophagus heals on acid suppressive therapy, and is re-populated with a stratified squamous epithelium, referred to as ‘neosquamous epithelium (NSE).’ Because the ability of the NSE to protect the underlying tissue from recurrent insult by reflux is unclear, we assessed the barrier function of NSE by comparing it to that of the native upper squamous epithelium (USE) in subjects having undergone RFA. METHODS At varying intervals following RFA, the barrier function of NSE and USE were assessed in endoscopic biopsies by light and electron microscopy, and by measurement of electrical resistance (RT) and fluorescein flux in mini-Ussing chambers. Chamber results were further compared with results from control biopsies (healthy distal esophagus). A claudin expression profile in the tight junctions (TJ) of NSE and USE was determined using qRT-PCR. Differential expression of claudin 4 between NSE and USE was assayed by immunoblots. RESULTS USE was histologically normal while NSE showed dilated intercellular spaces and marked eosinophilia. NSE was also more permeable than USE and healthy controls, having lower mean RT and higher fluorescein fluxes. Abnormally low RT values for NSE were unrelated to the time period following RFA (or number of prior RFA sessions), being abnormal even 26 months after RFA. Abnormal permeability in NSE was associated with significantly lower values for claudin-4 and claudin-10 than in USE. CONCLUSIONS NSE commonly exhibits defective barrier function. Since this defect will make it vulnerable to injury, inflammation and destruction by acidic and weakly acidic refluxates, it may in part explain incidences of recurrence of BE following ablation. PMID:23318477

  3. Hereditary Medullary Thyroid Cancer Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Frank-Raue, Karin; Raue, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, there has been a marked expansion of our knowledge of both the basic and clinical aspects of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2). There are two clinically distinct types of MEN2 syndrome, termed MEN2A and MEN2B. Within MEN2A, there are four variants: (i) classical MEN2A, represented by the uniform presence of MTC and the less frequent occurrence of pheochromocytoma, or primary hyperparathyroidism, or both; (ii) MEN2A with cutaneous lichen amyloidosis; (iii) MEN2A with Hirschsprung's disease; and (iv) familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC), i.e., families or individuals with only MTC. MEN2B is associated with MTC, pheochromocytoma, and mucosal neuromas. Hereditary MTC is caused by autosomal dominant gain of function mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. Specific RET mutations may suggest a predilection toward a particular phenotype and clinical course with a strong genotype-phenotype correlation. Based upon these genotype-phenotype correlations, RET mutations are now stratified into three risk levels, i.e., highest, high, and moderate risk, based on the penetrance and aggressiveness of the MTC. Children in the highest risk category should undergo thyroidectomy in their first year of life, and perhaps even in their first months of life. Children in the high-risk category should have ultrasound of the neck and calcitonin (CTN) measurement performed prior to thyroidectomy. Thyroidectomy should typically be performed at the age of 5 or earlier, depending on the presence of elevated serum CTN levels. However, heterogeneity in disease expression and progression within these groups varies considerably. To personalize disease management, the decision regarding the age of prophylactic thyroidectomy is no longer based upon genotype alone but is currently driven by additional clinical data, the most important being serum CTN levels; specifically, the decision to perform thyroidectomy should err on the safe side if the CTN level is

  4. Long-Term Follow-up in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Raue, Friedhelm; Frank-Raue, Karin

    2015-01-01

    After surgery, patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) should be assessed regarding the presence of residual disease, the localization of metastases, and the identification of progressive disease. Postoperatively, patients with MTC are staged to separate those at low risk from those at high risk of recurrence. The TNM staging system is based on tumor size, extra-thyroidal invasion, nodal metastasis, and distant spread of cancer. In addition, the number of lymph-node metastases, the number of compartments involved, and the postoperative calcitonin (CTN) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels should be documented. The postoperative normalization of the serum CTN level is associated with a favorable outcome. When patients have basal serum CTN levels less than 150 pg/ml after a thyroidectomy, any persistent or recurrent disease is nearly always confined to lymph nodes in the neck. When the postoperative serum CTN level exceeds 150 pg/ml, patients should be evaluated with imaging procedures, including computed tomography (CT) of the neck and chest, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) of the liver, bone scintigraphy, MRI of the bone, and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. One can estimate the growth rate of MTC metastases by quantifying increases in tumor size over time from sequential imaging studies analyzed with response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), and by determining the tumor marker doubling time from sequential measures of serum CTN or CEA levels over multiple time points. One of the main challenges remains to find effective adjuvant and palliative options for patients with metastatic disease. Patients with persistent or recurrent MTC localized to the neck following thyroidectomy are candidates for neck operations, depending on the tumor extension. Once metastases appear, the clinician must decide which patients require therapy. This requires a balance between the (often) slow rate of tumor

  5. Thymic epithelial cell expansion through matricellular protein CYR61 boosts progenitor homing and T-cell output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre, Yalin; Irla, Magali; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Ballet, Romain; Meguenani, Mehdi; Jemelin, Stephane; Vesin, Christian; Reith, Walter; Imhof, Beat A.

    2013-11-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) are heterogeneous stromal cells that generate microenvironments required for the formation of T cells within the thymus. Defects in TEC lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. Here we identify TEC as the major source of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), a matricellular protein implicated in cell proliferation and migration. Binding of CYR61 to LFA-1, ICAM-1 and integrin α6 supports the adhesion of TEC and thymocytes as well as their interaction. Treatment of thymic lobes with recombinant CYR61 expands the stromal compartment by inducing the proliferation of TEC and activates Akt signalling. Engraftment of CYR61-overexpressing thymic lobes into athymic nude mice drastically boosts the yield of thymic output via expansion of TEC. This increases the space for the recruitment of circulating hematopoietic progenitors and the development of T cells. Our discovery paves the way for therapeutic interventions designed to restore thymus stroma and T-cell generation.

  6. Histatin-1 Expression in Human Lacrimal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Zeeshan; Jaboori, Assraa Jassim; Jassim, Sarmad H.; Jain, Sandeep; Aakalu, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Study of human lacrimal cell biology is limited by poor access to tissue samples, heterogeneous cell composition of tissue and a lack of established lacrimal epithelial markers. In order to further our understanding of lacrimal cell biology, we sought to find a better marker for human lacrimal epithelial cells, compared to what has been reported in the literature. Methods We utilized human Muller’s muscle conjunctival resection (MMCR) specimens containing accessory lacrimal gland (ALG) and cadaveric main lacrimal gland (MLG) as sources of lacrimal tissue. Candidate markers were sought using human ALG tissue from MMCR specimens, isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM). Affymetrix® analysis was performed on total RNA isolated from FFPE samples to profile transcription in ALG. MMCR tissue sections were assessed by immunofluorescence using antibodies for histatin-1, lactoferrin, E-cadherin (E-cad) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to analyze the expression of histatin-1, E-cad and lactoferrin from cadaveric MLG. Results Histatin-1 is expressed in ALG and MLG, localizes to lacrimal epithelium, and to a greater degree than do other putative lacrimal epithelial markers. Conclusions Histatin-1 is a good marker for human lacrimal epithelium in ALG and MLG and can be used to identify lacrimal cells in future studies. PMID:26824896

  7. Malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis) with spindle cell differentiation and tumour formation.

    PubMed Central

    Macgillivray, J B; Duthie, J S

    1977-01-01

    Malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis) in a 45-year-old white man is described. Unusual features were presentation as a surgical emergency with signs of obstruction and peritonitis due to an ileal tumour and extensive spindle cell differentiation. Problems in the differential diagnosis of malignant histiocytosis are briefly discussed. Images PMID:845260

  8. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  9. Adenocarcinoma of the thymus, enteric type: report of 2 cases, and proposal for a novel subtype of thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moser, Bernhard; Schiefer, Ana Iris; Janik, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Prosch, Helmut; Pohl, Wolfgang; Neudert, Barbara; Scharrer, Anke; Klepetko, Walter; Müllauer, Leonhard

    2015-04-01

    We report 2 cases of primary thymic adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation. One carcinoma occurred in a 41-year-old man as a 7-cm-diameter cystic tumor and the other one in a 39-year-old woman as a 6-cm-diameter solid mass. Both tumors were located in the anterior mediastinum. Clinical staging did not reveal any extrathymic tumor. Histologically, the tumors were classified as adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified, and a mucinous (colloid) carcinoma, respectively. Immunohistochemically, both tumors were positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20), CDX2, and carcinoembryonic antigen, reflecting enteric differentiation. A review of the literature on 43 other cases of primary thymic adenocarcinomas suggested 11 further cases with enteric differentiation, as assessed by CK20 and/or CDX2 expression. We propose that thymic adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation represents a novel subtype of thymic carcinoma. It is mostly of mucinous morphology and frequently associated with thymic cysts. The clinical outcome is variable. Recognition of primary thymic adenocarcinoma with enteric differentiation is helpful for the differentiation from metastatic disease, mainly from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25517960

  10. Medullary raphe neurones and baroreceptor modulation of the respiratory motor pattern in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, B G; Arata, A; Morris, K F; Hernandez, Y M; Shannon, R

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of arterial blood pressure change medullary raphe neurone activity and the respiratory motor pattern. This study sought evidence for actions of baroresponsive raphe neurones on the medullary respiratory network.Blood pressure was perturbed by intravenous injection of an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, unilateral pressure changes in the carotid sinus, or occlusion of the descending aorta in thirty-six Dial-urethane-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. Neurones were monitored with microelectrode arrays in two or three of the following domains: nucleus raphe obscurus-nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla. Data were analysed with cycle-triggered histograms, peristimulus time and cumulative sum histograms, cross-correlograms and spike-triggered averages of efferent phrenic nerve activity.Prolongation of the expiratory phase and decreased peak integrated phrenic amplitude were most frequently observed. Of 707 neurones studied, 310 had altered firing rates during stimulation; changes in opposite directions were monitored simultaneously in fifty-six of eighty-seven data sets with at least two baroresponsive neurones.Short time scale correlations were detected between neurones in 347 of 3388 pairs. Seventeen pairs of baroresponsive raphe neurones exhibited significant offset correlogram features indicative of paucisynaptic interactions. In correlated raphe-ventrolateral medullary neurone pairs with at least one baroresponsive neurone, six of seven ventrolateral medullary decrementing expiratory (E-Decr) neurones increased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation. Thirteen of fifteen ventrolateral medullary inspiratory neurones correlated with raphe cells decreased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation.The results support the hypothesis that raphe neuronal assemblies transform and transmit information from baroreceptors to neurones in the ventral

  11. Neuropilins: expression and roles in the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jonathan R L; Staton, Carolyn A; Chapple, Keith; Corfe, Bernard M

    2012-04-01

    Initially found expressed in neuronal and then later in endothelial cells, it is well established that the transmembrane glycoproteins neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and neuropilin-2 (NRP2) play essential roles in axonal growth and guidance and in physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Neuropilin expression and function in epithelial cells has received little attention when compared with neuronal and endothelial cells. Overexpression of NRPs is shown to enhance growth, correlate with invasion and is associated with poor prognosis in various tumour types, especially those of epithelial origin. The contribution of NRP and its ligands to tumour growth and metastasis has spurred a strong interest in NRPs as novel chemotherapy drug targets. Given NRP's role as a multifunctional co-receptor with an ability to bind with disparate ligand families, this has sparked new areas of research implicating NRPs in diverse biological functions. Here, we review the growing body of research demonstrating NRP expression and role in the normal and neoplastic epithelium. PMID:22414290

  12. Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Aoi; Mori, Taisuke; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium is an exceptionally rare eye tumour, with only a few cases reported to date. We encountered such a case in a 50-year-old woman who reported seeing floaters in her right eye. Fundus examination and MRI revealed an elevated lesion located in the ciliary body compressing the lens. The ciliary body was resected under the diagnosis of ciliary adenoma. On histological examination, the tumour exhibited epithelial features with glandular formation and moderate nuclear pleomorphism. The tumour invaded the subepithelial stroma of the ciliary body. Immunohistochemical findings were positive for cytokeratin OSCAR, AE1/AE3, CK7, EMA, S100, Melan A, HMB45, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. PMID:25015166

  13. Ultrastructure of gingival epithelium in chronic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Oskolsky, G I; Jurkevich, N V

    2012-03-01

    We studied ultrastructural reorganization of the gingival mucosa in chronic gingivitis. It was found that chronic inflammation leads to significant intracellular reorganization of epitheliocytes in the basal and prickle cell layers of gingival epithelium and their pronounced structural and functional heterogeneity. The main ultrastructural alterations of epitheliocytes in the basal and prickle cell layers include pronounced vacuolization of the perinuclear zone (partial necrosis), formation of thick tonofilament bundles, focal lysis and sequestration of glycogen, and destruction and reduction of intracellular junctions in some cases accompanied by acantholytic alterations. Chronic inflammation in the gingival mucosa induced extensive remodeling of the lamina propria manifested in multiplication of the basement membrane and obturation of blood vessels with collagen fibrils. PMID:22803154

  14. Bioengineering mini functional thymic units with EAK16-II/EAKIIH6 self-assembling hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Asako; Liu, Wen; Pradhan, Isha; Bertera, Suzanne; Bagia, Christina; Trucco, Massimo; Meng, Wilson S; Fan, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we highlight the technical feasibility of generating a functional mini thymus with a novel hydrogel system, based on a peptide-based self-assembly platform that can induce the formation of 3-D thymic epithelial cell (TEC) clusters. Amphiphilic peptide EAK16-II co-assembled with its histidinylated analogue EAKIIH6 into beta-sheet fibrils. When adaptor complexes (recombinant protein A/G molecules loaded with both anti-His and anti-EpCAM IgGs) were added to the mix, TECs were tethered to the hydrogel and formed 3-D mini clusters. TECs bound to the hydrogel composites retained their molecular properties; and when transplanted into athymic nude mice, they supported the development of functional T-cells. These mini thymic units of TECs can be useful in clinical applications to reconstitute T-cell adaptive immunity. PMID:25805654

  15. Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Elizabeth; Hunter-Behrend, Michelle; Leroux, Eric; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2016-01-01

    We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient’s known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting.

  16. Apoptosis-promoted tumorigenesis: gamma-irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis requires Puma-driven leukocyte death.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Ewa M; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Delbridge, Alex R D; Wu, Li; Scott, Clare L; Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Although tumor development requires impaired apoptosis, we describe a novel paradigm of apoptosis-dependent tumorigenesis. Because DNA damage triggers apoptosis through p53-mediated induction of BH3-only proteins Puma and Noxa, we explored their roles in gamma-radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis. Surprisingly, whereas Noxa loss accelerated it, Puma loss ablated tumorigenesis. Tumor suppression by Puma deficiency reflected its protection of leukocytes from gamma-irradiation-induced death, because their glucocorticoid-mediated decimation in Puma-deficient mice activated cycling of stem/progenitor cells and restored thymic lymphomagenesis. Our demonstration that cycles of cell attrition and repopulation by stem/progenitor cells can drive tumorigenesis has parallels in human cancers, such as therapy-induced malignancies. PMID:20679396

  17. Genetic background influences loss of heterozygosity patterns in radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Michael; Huang, Yurong; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that p53 heterozygous (p53+/−) mice are extremely susceptible to radiation-induced tumorigenesis. To investigate whether genetic background influences radiation induced tumor susceptibility, we crossed p53+/− 129/Sv mice with genetically diverse strains to generate p53+/− F1 hybrids. The results showed that genetic background had a profound impact on tumor latency after exposure to gamma radiation, while the tumor spectrum did not change. We further characterized the thymic lymphomas that arose in the p53+/− mice by genome-wide loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses and found that genetic background strongly influenced the frequency of LOH and the loss of which parental allele on different chromosomes. Further research is needed to identify which genetic variations control the LOH patterns in radiation-induced thymic lymphomas and to evaluate its relevance to human cancers. PMID:25932465

  18. Thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pragnesh; Guider, Julie; Rahimi, Erik; Guha, Sushovan; Zhang, Songlin; Thosani, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluating superior mediastinal structures, especially the thymus gland. We report a case of thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using EUS elastography with strain ratio and fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 64-year-old woman presented with altered mental status and was diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis. Further work-up suggested a superior mediastinal mass, for which she underwent EUS. A hypoechoic mass was found in the superior mediastinum at the level of the aortic arch. Real-time EUS elastography showed a predominantly blue hue to the mass concerning for malignancy. FNA of the mass was performed, which revealed numerous large neoplastic cells under a background of a small lymphoid infiltrate. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for PAX8, pancytokeratin, and CAM5.2. The pathologic and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with thymic carcinoma. PMID:27386480

  19. Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Elizabeth; Hunter-Behrend, Michelle; Leroux, Eric; Gharahbaghian, Laleh; Lobo, Viveta

    2016-01-01

    We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient's known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting. PMID:27625910

  20. mTORC2 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Controls Thymopoiesis and T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Cheng, Joyce S; Chu, Shuai; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) play important roles in T cell generation. Mechanisms that control TEC development and function are still not well defined. The mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)2 signals to regulate cell survival, nutrient uptake, and metabolism. We report in the present study that mice with TEC-specific ablation of Rictor, a critical and unique adaptor molecule in mTORC2, display thymic atrophy, which accompanies decreased TEC numbers in the medulla. Moreover, generation of multiple T cell lineages, including conventional TCRαβ T cells, regulatory T cells, invariant NKT cells, and TCRγδ T cells, was reduced in TEC-specific Rictor-deficient mice. Our data demonstrate that mTORC2 in TECs is important for normal thymopoiesis and efficient T cell generation. PMID:27233961

  1. Thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pragnesh; Guider, Julie; Rahimi, Erik; Guha, Sushovan; Zhang, Songlin; Thosani, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluating superior mediastinal structures, especially the thymus gland. We report a case of thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using EUS elastography with strain ratio and fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 64-year-old woman presented with altered mental status and was diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis. Further work-up suggested a superior mediastinal mass, for which she underwent EUS. A hypoechoic mass was found in the superior mediastinum at the level of the aortic arch. Real-time EUS elastography showed a predominantly blue hue to the mass concerning for malignancy. FNA of the mass was performed, which revealed numerous large neoplastic cells under a background of a small lymphoid infiltrate. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for PAX8, pancytokeratin, and CAM5.2. The pathologic and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with thymic carcinoma. PMID:27386480

  2. Brief Report: Role of Thymic Reconstitution in the Outcome of AIDS-Related PML.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Spyridon G; Gheuens, Sarah; Bord, Evelyn; Batson, Stephanie; Koralnik, Igor J

    2015-12-01

    Implications of thymopoiesis in AIDS-related opportunistic infections remain unexplored. We used progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), caused by JC virus (JCV), as an opportunistic infection model, and we simultaneously investigated thymic output and T-cell responses against JCV in 22 patients with PML treated with combined antiretroviral therapy. Thymic output was significantly associated with JCV-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell responses and improved survival. Our data suggest that patients with AIDS-related PML and impaired thymopoiesis are less likely to develop a robust JCV-specific cellular immune response and consequently are at an increased risk for a poor clinical outcome. PMID:26181821

  3. Velocity fields in a collectively migrating epithelium.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, L; Reffay, M; Grasland-Mongrain, E; Poujade, M; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Silberzan, P

    2010-05-19

    We report quantitative measurements of the velocity field of collectively migrating cells in a motile epithelium. The migration is triggered by presenting free surface to an initially confluent monolayer by using a microstencil technique that does not damage the cells. To avoid the technical difficulties inherent in the tracking of single cells, the field is mapped using the technique of particle image velocimetry. The main relevant parameters, such as the velocity module, the order parameter, and the velocity correlation function, are then extracted from this cartography. These quantities are dynamically measured on two types of cells (collectively migrating Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and fibroblastlike normal rat kidney (NRK) cells), first as they approach confluence, and then when the geometrical constraints are released. In particular, for MDCK cells filling up the patterns, we observe a sharp decrease in the average velocity after the point of confluence, whereas the densification of the monolayer is much more regular. After the peeling off of the stencil, a velocity correlation length of approximately 200 microm is measured for MDCK cells versus only approximately 40 microm for the more independent NRK cells. Our conclusions are supported by parallel single-cell tracking experiments. By using the biorthogonal decomposition of the velocity field, we conclude that the velocity field of MDCK cells is very coherent in contrast with the NRK cells. The displacements in the fingers arising from the border of MDCK epithelia are very oriented along their main direction. They influence the velocity field in the epithelium over a distance of approximately 200 microm. PMID:20441742

  4. Potential Role of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Cervical Thymic Neoplasm Involving Thyroid Gland or Neck

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Ha, Sang Yun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul; Seol, Seung Won; Oh, Young Lyun; Han, Joungho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the clinicopathologic features, treatment outcomes, and role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in cervical thymic neoplasm involving the thyroid gland or neck. Materials and Methods The medical and pathologic records of eight patients with cervical thymic neoplasm were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent surgical resection, including thyroidectomy or mass excision. Adjuvant RT was added in five patients with adverse clinicopathologic features. The radiation doses ranged from 54 Gy/27 fractions to 66 Gy/30 fractions delivered to the primary tumor bed and pathologically involved regional lymphatics using a 3-dimensional conformal technique. Results Eight cases of cervical thymic neoplasm included three patients with carcinoma showing thymus-like differentiation (CASTLE) and five with ectopic cervical thymoma. The histologic subtypes of ectopic cervical thymoma patients were World Health Organization (WHO) type B3 thymoma in one, WHO type B1 thymoma in two, WHO type AB thymoma in one, and metaplastic thymoma in one, respectively. The median age was 57 years (range, 40 to 76 years). Five patients received adjuvant RT: three with CASTLE; one with WHO type B3; and one with WHO type AB with local invasiveness. After a median follow-up period of 49 months (range, 11 to 203 months), no recurrence had been observed, regardless of adjuvant RT. Conclusion Adjuvant RT after surgical resection might be worthwhile in patients with CASTLE and ectopic cervical thymoma with WHO type B2-C and/or extraparenchymal extension, as similarly indicated for primary thymic epithelial tumors. A longer follow-up period may be needed in order to validate this strategy. PMID:25648096

  5. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes for Patients with Thymic Carcinoma: Evaluation of Masaoka Staging

    PubMed Central

    Litvak, Anya M.; Woo, Kaitlin; Hayes, Sara; Huang, James; Rimner, Andreas; Sima, Camelia S.; Moreira, Andre L.; Tsukazan, Maria; Riely, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic carcinomas are rare cancers with limited data regarding outcomes, particularly for those patients with advanced disease. Methods We identified patients with thymic carcinomas diagnosed between 1993 and 2012. Patient characteristics, recurrence free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results One hundred twenty-one patients with thymic carcinomas were identified. Higher Masaoka stage was associated with worse OS and RFS (5-yr OS of 100%, 81%, 51%, 24%, and 17% for stage I, II, III, IVa and IVb respectively, p<0.001 and 5-yr RFS of 80%, 28%, and 7% for stage I/II, III, and IV respectively, p<0.001). Patients with stage IVb lymph node (LN) only disease had a better 5-year OS as compared to patients with distant metastasis (24% vs. 7%, p=0.025). Of the 61 patients with stage IVb disease, 22/29 patients (76%) with LN-only disease underwent curative intent resection vs. 3/32 patients (9%) with distant metastasis. Twenty-two patients with LN involvement were treated with multi-modality therapy. Three (14%) remain free of disease with long-term follow-up (range: 3.4+ years to 6.8+ years). Conclusions We describe the clinical features of a large series of patients with thymic carcinoma in North America. The Masaoka staging system effectively prognosticated OS and RFS. Patients with stage IVb LN-only disease had significantly better OS as compared to patients with distant metastasis with a subset of patients sustaining long term RFS with multi-modality therapy. If validated, these data would support a revised staging system with sub-classification of stage IVb disease into two groups. PMID:25393794

  6. Spinal Metastasis of Thymic Carcinoma as a Rare Manifestation: A Summary of 7 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Tae Keun; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Thymic carcinomas are very rare tumors that are often associated with extrathoracic metastasis to other organs. However, it is well known that thymic carcinomas rarely metastasize to the spine, and the prognosis, treatment, and natural course of this disease are not yet standardized. Methods We describe seven thymic carcinoma patients with spinal metastasis who were diagnosed and treated in our institute from January 2006 to December 2011. We performed surgical treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, in consideration of each individual disease's course, and we regularly followed up the patients. Results Of the seven patients, five were male and two were female. Six had metastases in the thoracic spine, and one had metastases in the lumbar spine. An extradural lesion was found in five patients, and two patients had both extradural and intradural lesions. The period from the primary diagnosis to spinal metastases varied widely (range, 1.23-14 years). After surgery, all patients showed an improvement of back pain and radicular pain. Two patients were lost to follow-up, but the other five maintained ambulatory function until their final follow-up. Four patients died because of pulmonary complications accompanied with the disease's progression. One patient died from uncontrolled brain metastases. After surgery, the median survival was 204±111.43 days. Conclusion Because metastasis to the spine from thymic carcinoma is very rare, there are no treatment guidelines. Nevertheless, we suggest that appropriate surgical management of the metastatic lesion is necessary for the preservation of the patient's quality of life during survival. PMID:25346762

  7. Unusual diagnosis of a solitary thyroid nodule in the paediatric population: cervical thymic cyst.

    PubMed

    Sadacharan, Dhalapathy; Sathya, Anjali; Ravikumar, Divya; Nallapa, Deepakala

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 8-year-old girl with a painless swelling in her neck. An ultrasonogram revealed a cystic nodule with internal echoes, lying posterior to right lobe of thyroid, and MRI confirmed it. Thyroid scintigraphy did not show any uptake in the swelling. Intraoperatively, the lesion was densely adherent to the thyroid gland, hence a hemithyroidectomy was performed. Histopathology showed it to be an ectopic cervical thymic cyst with parathyroid tissue. PMID:26420701

  8. P12: Somatostatin analogs as maintenance therapy in heavily pretreated thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giovannella; Ottaviano, Margaret; Nappi, Lucia; Rescigno, Pasquale; Tucci, Irene; Marino, Mirella; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Damiano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare neoplasms with a particular biological behavior, treated with a combination of therapeutic strategies such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and target agents. No continuation maintenance therapy exists for these rare tumors. A high uptake of indium-labeled octreotide (111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide) and curative application of somatostatin analogs in thymic tumors have been widely demonstrated. Methods Eighteen patients (nine women and nine men, median age 54.5 years; range, 32–78 years) with advanced thymic tumors (seven patients with stage III; seven with IVa; four with IVb according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system), histotype sec. WHO revised by central review (three AB, two B1, three B2, five B3, three B2/B3, two thymic carcinoma) with a partial response or stable disease to conventional chemotherapeutic regimens platinum or not platinum-based, after performed OctreoScan, were enrolled in this monocentric referral center study. The schedule includes administration of long-acting analog octreotide (30 mg/every 28 days intramuscularly), until progression of disease was documented. Median time to progression and toxicity were evaluated. Results Median follow-up was of 43 months with a median time to progression of 14.5 months (range, 2–77 months). Treatment was generally well tolerated with acceptable toxicity: grade 1 diarrhea (five patients), grade 2 hyperglycemia (four patients). No patients interrupted treatment because of toxicity. Conclusions The current study indicates that single-agent somatostatin analogs maintenance therapy is a potential treatment strategy for advanced TETs OctreoScan positive which respond to previous conventional chemotherapy. In particular, somatostatin analogs may provide effective maintenance treatment duration regardless of histotype and stage of disease with an acceptable toxicity and an improved patients’ compliance.

  9. Reversal of Age-related Thymic Involution by an LHRH Agonist in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Hirakata, Atsushi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Griesemer, Adam D.; Shimizu, Akira; Nobori, Shuji; Tena, Aseda; Moran, Shannon; Arn, Scott; Boyd, Richard L; Sachs, David H; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims of study We have previously demonstrated a requirement for the presence of a juvenile thymus for the induction of transplantation tolerance to renal allografts by a short-course of calcineurin inhibition in miniature swine. We have also shown that aged, involuted thymi can be rejuvenated when transplanted as vascularized thymic lobes into juvenile swine recipients. The present studies were aimed at elucidating the extrinsic factors facilitating this restoration of function in the aged thymus. In particular, we tested the impact of sex steroid blockade by Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH). Materials and Methods 30 naive animals (25 males and 5 females) were used for measurement of serum testosterone levels. 3 mature male pigs (aged at 22, 22 and 29 months old) were used to test the effects of Lupron (LHRH analog) injection at 45 mg (per 70–80kg body weight) as a 3-month depot on testosterone levels and thymic rejuvenation. Thymic rejuvenation was assessed by histology, flow cytometric analysis, morphometric analysis and TREC assays. Results Hormonal alterations were induced by Lupron and resulted in macroscopic and histologic regeneration of the thymus of aged animals within 2 months, as evidenced by restoration of juvenile thymus architecture and increased cellularity. Two animals that were evaluated for TREC both showed increased levels in the periphery following Lupron treatment. Conclusion Treatment of aged animals with Lupron leads to thymic rejuventaion in adult miniature swine. This result could expanding the applicability of thymus-dependent tolerance-inducing regimens to adult recipients. PMID:20692342

  10. Pretransplant thymic function predicts acute rejection in antithymocyte globulin-treated renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bamoulid, Jamal; Courivaud, Cécile; Crepin, Thomas; Carron, Clémence; Gaiffe, Emilie; Roubiou, Caroline; Laheurte, Caroline; Moulin, Bruno; Frimat, Luc; Rieu, Philippe; Mousson, Christiane; Durrbach, Antoine; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Saas, Philippe; Ducloux, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Lack of clear identification of patients at high risk of acute rejection hampers the ability to individualize immunosuppressive therapy. Here we studied whether thymic function may predict acute rejection in antithymocyte globulin (ATG)-treated renal transplant recipients in 482 patients prospectively studied during the first year post-transplant of which 86 patients experienced acute rejection. Only CD45RA(+)CD31(+)CD4(+) T cell (recent thymic emigrant [RTE]) frequency (RTE%) was marginally associated with acute rejection in the whole population. This T-cell subset accounts for 26% of CD4(+) T cells. Pretransplant RTE% was significantly associated with acute rejection in ATG-treated patients (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08) for each increased percent in RTE/CD4(+) T cells), but not in anti-CD25 monoclonal (αCD25 mAb)-treated patients. Acute rejection was significantly more frequent in ATG-treated patients with high pretransplant RTE% (31.2% vs. 16.4%) or absolute number of RTE/mm(3) (31.7 vs. 16.1). This difference was not found in αCD25 monclonal antibody-treated patients. Highest values of both RTE% (>31%, hazard ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.74) and RTE/mm(3) (>200/mm(3), hazard ratio, 3.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-8.70) were predictive of acute rejection in ATG-treated patients but not in patients having received αCD25 monoclonal antibody). Results were confirmed in a retrospective cohort using T-cell receptor excision circle levels as a marker of thymic function. Thus, pretransplant thymic function predicts acute rejection in ATG-treated patients. PMID:27083287

  11. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Tim I. M.; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J.; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C. Elizabeth; Burke, G. A. Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM–ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  12. Evaluation of bovine thymic function by measurement of signal joint T-cell receptor excision circles.

    PubMed

    Hisazumi, Rinnosuke; Kayumi, Miya; Zhang, Weidong; Kikukawa, Ryuji; Nasu, Tetuo; Yasuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A signal joint T-cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) is a circular DNA produced by T-cell receptor α gene rearrangement in the thymus. Measurements of sjTREC values have been used to evaluate thymic function. We recently established a quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay of bovine sjTREC. In the present study, we used this QPCR assay to measure the sjTREC value in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and we then evaluated the relationships between sjTREC values and peripheral blood T-cell number, growth stage, gender, and meteorological season. The sjTREC value was highest at the neonatal stage, and its value subsequently decreased with age. On the other hand, the peripheral T-cell number increased with age. The sjTREC value in calves up to 50-days old was significantly higher for males than for females, suggesting that thymic function might differ by gender. In addition, the sjTREC value and the peripheral T-cell number were significantly higher in calves in the summer season than in calves in the winter season. These data suggest that bovine thymic function is highly variable and varies according to the growth stage, gender, and environmental factors such as air temperature or the UV index. PMID:26827842

  13. Thymic Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Positive Eosinophils in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Tulic, Meri K.; Sly, Peter D.; Andrews, David; Crook, Maxine; Davoine, Francis; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O.; Charles, Adrian; Hodder, Megan L.; Prescott, Susan L.; Holt, Patrick G.; Moqbel, Redwan

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils expressing indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) may contribute to T-helper cell (Th)2 predominance. To characterize human thymus IDO+ eosinophil ontogeny relative to Th2 regulatory gene expression, we processed surgically obtained thymi from 22 children (age: 7 days to 12 years) for immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis, and measured cytokine and kynurenine levels in tissue homogenates. Luna+ eosinophils (∼2% of total thymic cells) decreased in number with age (P = 0.02) and were IDO+. Thymic IDO immunoreactivity (P = 0.01) and kynurenine concentration (P = 0.01) decreased with age as well. In addition, constitutively-expressed interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 in thymus supernatants was highest in youngest children. Eosinophil numbers correlated positively with expression of the Th2 cytokines IL-5, IL-13 (r = 0.44, P = 0.002), and IL-4 (r = 0.46, P = 0.005), transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (r = 0.68, P = 0.001), and the chemokine receptor, CCR3 (r = 0.17, P = 0.04), but negatively with IL-17 mRNA (r = −0.57, P = 0.02) and toll-like receptor 4 expression (r = −0.74, P = 0.002). Taken together, these results suggest that functional thymic IDO+ eosinophils during human infant life may have an immunomodulatory role in Th2 immune responses. PMID:19815714

  14. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arises in thymocytes and requires transient TCR expression for thymic egress.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tim I M; Villarese, Patrick; Fairbairn, Camilla J; Lamant, Laurence; Trinquand, Amélie; Hook, C Elizabeth; Burke, G A Amos; Brugières, Laurence; Hughes, Katherine; Payet, Dominique; Merkel, Olaf; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Ashankyty, Ibraheem; Mian, Shahid; Wasik, Mariusz; Turner, Martin; Kenner, Lukas; Asnafi, Vahid; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Turner, Suzanne D

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting mostly in children and young adults. The natural progression of this disease is largely unknown as is the identity of its true cell of origin. Here we present a model of peripheral ALCL pathogenesis where the malignancy is initiated in early thymocytes, before T-cell receptor (TCR) β-rearrangement, which is bypassed in CD4/NPM-ALK transgenic mice following Notch1 expression. However, we find that a TCR is required for thymic egress and development of peripheral murine tumours, yet this TCR must be downregulated for T-cell lymphomagenesis. In keeping with this, clonal TCR rearrangements in human ALCL are predominantly in-frame, but often aberrant, with clonal TCRα but no comparable clonal TCRβ rearrangement, yielding events that would not normally be permissive for survival during thymic development. Children affected by ALCL may thus harbour thymic lymphoma-initiating cells capable of seeding relapse after chemotherapy. PMID:26753883

  15. Thymic involution in the suspended rat model for weightlessness - Decreased glucocorticoid receptor concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb muscle atrophy, thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy in rats during spaceflight can be simulated using suspension models. Skeletal muscle and thymus are sensitive to gluco-corticoids (GC), and previous studies have demonstrated that muscle atrophy in suspended rats is associated with increased GC receptor concentration. The objectives were to confirm thymic involution during suspension, and determine if involution correlated with increased GC receptor concentration. Seven days of antiorthostatic (AO) suspension of rats produced a significant (P less than 0.001) reduction in thymic wet weight not associated with an alteration of percent water content. GC receptor concentration (pmol/mg protein) decreased 20 percent (P less than 0.025) in thymus glands from 7 day AO suspended rats. Suspension, therefore, is associated with involution of the thymus, but this is not dependent upon AO positioning. Thymus GC receptor concentrations were depressed in 7-day suspended rats, in contrast with previous observations on skeletal muscle, suggesting that different mechanisms may underlie these responses.

  16. CCX-CKR deficiency alters thymic stroma impairing thymocyte development and promoting autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Mark D; Comerford, Iain; Seach, Natalie; Hammett, Maree V; Asquith, Darren L; Körner, Heinrich; Boyd, Richard L; Nibbs, Robert J B; McColl, Shaun R

    2013-01-01

    The atypical chemokine receptor CCX-CKR regulates bioavailability of CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25, homeostatic chemokines that play crucial roles in thymic lymphopoiesis. Deletion of CCX-CKR results in accelerated experimental autoimmunity induced by immunization. Here we show that CCX-CKR deletion also increases incidence of a spontaneous Sjögren's syndrome-like pathology, characterized by lymphocytic infiltrates in salivary glands and liver of CCX-CKR(-/-) mice, suggestive of a defect in self-tolerance when CCX-CKR is deleted. This prompted detailed examination of the thymus in CCX-CKR(-/-) mice. Negatively selected mature SP cells were less abundant in CCX-CKR(-/-) thymi, yet expansion of both DP and immature SP cells was apparent. Deletion of CCX-CKR also profoundly reduced proportions of DN3 thymocyte precursors and caused DN2 cells to accumulate within the medulla. These effects are likely driven by alterations in thymic stroma as CCX-CKR(-/-) mice have fewer cTECs per thymocyte, and cTECs express the highest level of CCX-CKR in the thymus. A profound decrease in CCL25 within the thymic cortex was observed in CCX-CKR(-/-) thymi, likely accounting for their defects in thymocyte distribution and frequency. These findings identify a novel role for CCX-CKR in regulating cTEC biology, which promotes optimal thymocyte development and selection important for self-tolerant adaptive immunity. PMID:23152546

  17. Lineage-instructive function of C/EBPα in multipotent hematopoietic cells and early thymic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wölfler, Albert; Danen-van Oorschot, Astrid A; Haanstra, Jurgen R; Valkhof, Marijke; Bodner, Claudia; Vroegindeweij, Eric; van Strien, Paulette; Novak, Alexandra; Cupedo, Tom; Touw, Ivo P

    2010-11-18

    Hematopoiesis is tightly controlled by transcription regulatory networks, but how and when specific transcription factors control lineage commitment are still largely unknown. Within the hematopoietic stem cell (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) compartment these lineage-specific transcription factors are expressed at low levels but are up-regulated with the process of lineage specification. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) represents one of these factors and is involved in myeloid development and indispensable for formation of granulocytes. To track the cellular fate of stem and progenitor cells, which express C/EBPα, we developed a mouse model expressing Cre recombinase from the Cebpa promoter and a conditional EYFP allele. We show that Cebpa/EYFP(+) cells represent a significant subset of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which predominantly give rise to myeloid cells in steady-state hematopoiesis. C/EBPα induced a strong myeloid gene expression signature and down-regulated E2A-induced regulators of early lymphoid development. In addition, Cebpa/EYFP(+) cells compose a fraction of early thymic progenitors with robust myeloid potential. However, Cebpa/EYFP(+) multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and early thymic progenitors retained the ability to develop into erythroid and T-lymphoid lineages, respectively. These findings support an instructive but argue against a lineage-restrictive role of C/EBPα in multipotent hematopoietic and thymic progenitors. PMID:20807890

  18. Expression of the TrkB neurotrophin receptor by thymic macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    García-Suárez, O; Hannestad, J; Esteban, I; Sainz, R; Naves, F J; Vega, J A

    1998-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that some members of the neurotrophic factor family of neurotrophins could be implicated in the regulation of immune responses. Neurotrophins, as well as their tyrosine kinase signal-transducing receptors (the so-called Trk neurotrophin receptors), have been detected in different lymphoid tissues, although their cellular localization is not well known. In this study we used single and double immunohistochemistry to localize TrkB in situ in the rat thymus (in animals from 0 days to 2 years of age), in cytospin preparations of rat thymic cells, and in two mouse monocyte-macrophage cell lines (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1). We found TrkB protein expression in a subpopulation of cells in the corticomedullary junction, which simultaneously expressed the rat macrophage marker ED1. The density of TrkB-expressing cells increased with age, reaching maximal values at 2 years. Conversely, no evidence of TrkB protein expression could be found in dendritic cells, epithelial cells or thymocytes. Thymic macrophages in cytospin preparations, as well as in the mouse monocyte macrophage cell lines, also expressed TrkB protein. Although the possible function of TrkB in the thymic macrophage remains to be clarified, present findings add further evidence to the proposed role of neurotrophins in the immune system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:9741346

  19. P08: Somatostatin analogs plus prednisone in aggressive histotype and advanced stage of thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviano, Margaret; Damiano, Vincenzo; Nappi, Lucia; Rescigno, Pasquale; Marino, Mirella; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) are rare neoplasms characterized by histological variability and different expression at the molecular level. Several biological agents have been evaluated in TETs in small phase II trials. Efficacy of octreotide/lanreotide with or without prednisone in TETs OctreoScan positive has been widely demonstrated in thymoma, but no clearly in thymic carcinoma. Methods Twelve patients (five men, seven women; median age 47 years; range, 27–70 years) with advanced stage disease according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system (seven with IVa stage; five with IVb stage), and aggressive histotype according to WHO classification, revised by central review (two B2/B3; five B3; one B3/thymic carcinoma; four thymic carcinoma) were enrolled in this monocentric referral study. All the patients showed a progressive disease according to RECIST 1.1 criteria to previous conventional chemotherapeutic regimens platinum or not platinum-based. All the patients performed OctreoScan. The schedule includes administration of long-acting analog octreotide (30 mg/every 28 days intramuscularly) plus prednisone 0.2 mg/kg/day until progression of disease was documented. Overall response rate and toxicity were evaluated. Results The median time to progression was 6 months (range, 3–24 months), the overall response rate was 74.9%, particularly three patients (25%) obtained stable disease; four patients (33.3%) partial response; two patients (16.6%) complete response; three patients (25%) progression disease. One patient with Good Syndrome interrupted treatment after 6 months for infection disease. One patient has been lost to follow-up after 24 months of treatment. One patient died after progression disease for PRCA. Treatment was generally well tolerated with acceptable toxicity: no symptomatic cholelithiasis (one patient), grade 1 diarrhea (two patients) hyperglycemia (one patient). One patient with thymic carcinoma and IVB stage had PS improvement from 2

  20. Cytolethal Distending Toxin Damages the Oral Epithelium of Gingival Explants

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, M.; Haris, M.; Volgina, A.; Korostoff, J.; DiRienzo, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), expressed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, inhibits the proliferation of cultured epithelial cells by arresting the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect infiltrating inflammatory cells, leading to the destruction of the attachment apparatus. Histological evaluation of rat and healthy human gingival tissue exposed ex vivo to the Cdt for 36 and 18 hours, respectively, revealed extensive detachment of the keratinized outer layer and distention of spinous and basal cells in the oral epithelium. Treated human tissue also exhibited disruption of rete pegs and dissolution of cell junctions. Cells in the connective tissue appeared unaffected. Primary gingival epithelial cells, but not gingival fibroblasts, isolated from the same healthy human tissue were cell-cycle-arrested when treated with the toxin. These findings provide new evidence that the Cdt severely damages the oral epithelium, ex vivo, by specifically targeting epithelial cells, in situ. The Cdt shows preferential targeting of the epithelium as opposed to connective tissue in animal and human gingival explant models. Abbreviations: cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), connective tissue (CT), 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC), human gingival explants (HGX), human gingival fibroblasts (HGF), junctional epithelium (JE), oral epithelium (OE), rete pegs (RP), sulcular epithelium (SE) PMID:21471326

  1. Spastic Quadriparesis Caused by Anomalous Vertebral Artery Compression of Spinal Cord at the Cervico-Medullary Junction

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Adkatalwar, Vijayendra; Shiva, Meyyappan; Agrawal, Nitesh; Ramakrishnan, K G

    2015-01-01

    Vascular compression of medulla or spinal cord at the cervico-medullary junction has been commonly described in the literature and is often attributed to dolichoectasia of the vertebrobasilar arteries. We describe a case of anomalous course of the cervical segments of the bilateral vertebral arteries which were seen entering the spinal canal directly after exiting the transverse foramen of axis and causing significant cord compression at the cervico-medullary region leading to spastic quadriparesis. PMID:25924176

  2. Impact of nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilation and oxidative stress on renal medullary oxygenation: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brendan C; Edwards, Aurélie; Layton, Anita T

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation in preventing medullary hypoxia, as well as the likely pathways by which superoxide (O2(-)) conversely enhances medullary hypoxia. To do so, we expanded a previously developed mathematical model of solute transport in the renal medulla that accounts for the reciprocal interactions among oxygen (O2), NO, and O2(-) to include the vasoactive effects of NO on medullary descending vasa recta. The model represents the radial organization of the vessels and tubules, centered around vascular bundles in the outer medulla and collecting ducts in the inner medulla. Model simulations suggest that NO helps to prevent medullary hypoxia both by inducing vasodilation of the descending vasa recta (thus increasing O2 supply) and by reducing the active sodium transport rate (thus reducing O2 consumption). That is, the vasodilative properties of NO significantly contribute to maintaining sufficient medullary oxygenation. The model further predicts that a reduction in tubular transport efficiency (i.e., the ratio of active sodium transport per O2 consumption) is the main factor by which increased O2(-) levels lead to hypoxia, whereas hyperfiltration is not a likely pathway to medullary hypoxia due to oxidative stress. Finally, our results suggest that further increasing the radial separation between vessels and tubules would reduce the diffusion of NO towards descending vasa recta in the inner medulla, thereby diminishing its vasoactive effects therein and reducing O2 delivery to the papillary tip. PMID:26831340

  3. Bone sialoprotein keratan sulfate proteoglycan (BSP-KSPG) and FGF-23 are important physiological components of medullary bone.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Jill A; Horvat-Gordon, Maria; Kim, Woo-Kyun; Praul, Craig A; Burns, Dennis; Leach, Roland M

    2016-04-01

    Medullary bone is a specialized bone found in the marrow cavity of laying birds. It provides a significant contribution to the calcium supply for egg shell formation. Medullary bone is distinguished from cortical bone by the presence of large amounts of a keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG). The aims of the present experiment are to confirm the identity of the core protein of KSPG, identify a marker of medullary bone metabolism, and determine whether changes in keratan sulfate (KS) concentration in blood are associated with the egg-laying cycle. Using two different isolation techniques- one specific for bone and another for blood- we have identified bone sialoprotein (BSP) to be the core protein of this KSPG. We also determined that the amount of keratan sulfate (KS) in laying hen blood fluctuates in synchrony with the egg-laying cycle, and thus can serve as a specific marker for medullary bone metabolism. During the course of this investigation, we also found FGF-23 (phosphatonin) to be expressed in medullary bone, in synchrony with the egg-laying cycle. Western blotting was used to demonstrate the presence of this peptide in both laying hen blood and medullary bone extracts. The importance of FGF-23 (phosphatonin) and parathyroid hormone in normalizing the dramatic changes in plasma calcium and phosphorus during the 24h egg-laying cycle is discussed. PMID:26773479

  4. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  5. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  6. Stroma–epithelium crosstalk in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yi-Nong; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2009-01-01

    The critical role played by stroma–epithelium crosstalk in carcinogenesis and progression of prostate cancer has been increasingly recognized. These interactions are mediated by a variety of paracrine factors secreted by cancer cells and/or stromal cells. In human prostate cancer, reactive stroma is characterized by an increase in myofibroblasts and a corresponding amplification of extracellular matrix production and angiogenesis. Permanent genetic mutations have been reported in stromal cells as well as in tumour cells. Transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor signalling pathways are involved in the process of angiogenesis, whereas hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, CXC12 and Interleukin-6 play active roles in the progression, androgen-independent conversion and distal metastasis of prostate cancer. Some soluble factors have reciprocal interactions with androgens and the androgen receptor (AR), and can even activate AR in the absence of the androgen ligand. In this article, we review the complex interactions between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment, and discuss the potential therapeutic targets in the stromal compartment of prostate cancer. PMID:19098934

  7. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Human vomeronasal epithelium development: An immunohistochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Lóránd; Pap, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, Annamária; Gergely, István; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-06-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor structure of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in vertebrates. It is found bilaterally in the submucosa of the inferior part of the nasal septum. There are ongoing controversies regarding the functionality of this organ in humans. In this study we propose the immunohistochemical evaluation of changes in components of the human vomeronasal epithelium during foetal development. We used 45 foetuses of different age, which were included in three age groups. After VNO identification immunohistochemical reactions were performed using primary antibodies against the following: neuron specific enolase, calretinin, neurofilament, chromogranin, synaptophysin, cytokeratin 7, pan-cytokeratin and S100 protein. Digital slides were obtained and following colorimetric segmentation, surface area measurements were performed. The VNO was found in less than half of the studied specimens (42.2%). Neuron specific enolase and calretinin immunoexpression showed a decreasing trend with foetal age, while the other neural/neuroendocrine markers were negative in all specimens. Cytokeratin 7 expression increased with age, while Pan-Ctk had no significant variations. S100 protein immunoexpression also decreased around the VNO. The results of the present work uphold the theory of regression of the neuroepithelium that is present during initial stages of foetal development. PMID:26132837

  9. Methodology and dosimetry in adrenal medullary imaging with iodine-131 MIBG

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S.; Fjaelling, M.J.; Jacobsson, L.; Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.

    1988-10-01

    Iodine-131 MIBG scans were performed in 59 patients in order to localize intra- or extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas (pheos), or to visualize hyperplastic adrenal medulla. Images were obtained from the pelvis to the base of the skull on Days 1, 4, and 7 after tracer injection. The 15 patients with histopathologic confirmation of adrenal medullary disease had positive scans. In three of these, the pheos were visible only on images obtained on Day 7. One scan was false negative. After excluding patients with a predisposition to adrenal medullary disease, nine subjects (28%) without verification of pheo displayed adrenal uptake of the radionuclide. Late images produce a low rate of false-negative scans; the background activity diminishes and even small pheos can be detected. In order to increase the quality of late images, 40 MBq (/sup 131/I)MIBG was used instead of 20 MBq. The dosimetric considerations are discussed.

  10. [Sliding centro-medullary nailing. Application to the treatment of severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta].

    PubMed

    Metaizeau, J P

    1987-01-01

    In osteogenesis Imperfecta, the bowing of bones concures to increase their fragility. In order to avoid bowing of bones, Sofield, followed by Bailey have proposed centro medullary nailing. The pins used by Sofield do not expand and repeated changes are necessary. The expanding rods used by Bailey are to large and they can't be used in neonates. The author describe a new technique of bipolar centro medullary pinning. Two bowed K. Wires are introduced in the centromedullary canal, the first one through the proximal epiphysis, the second one through the distal epiphysis. During growth, each pin migrates distally and the osteosynthesis expand regularly. The technique can be used in the neonates and protects their bone from progressive bowing. PMID:3442930

  11. Revised American Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asa, Sylvia L.; Dralle, Henning; Elisei, Rossella; Evans, Douglas B.; Gagel, Robert F.; Lee, Nancy; Machens, Andreas; Moley, Jeffrey F.; Pacini, Furio; Raue, Friedhelm; Frank-Raue, Karin; Robinson, Bruce; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Santoro, Massimo; Schlumberger, Martin; Shah, Manisha; Waguespack, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The American Thyroid Association appointed a Task Force of experts to revise the original Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: Management Guidelines of the American Thyroid Association. Methods: The Task Force identified relevant articles using a systematic PubMed search, supplemented with additional published materials, and then created evidence-based recommendations, which were set in categories using criteria adapted from the United States Preventive Services Task Force Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The original guidelines provided abundant source material and an excellent organizational structure that served as the basis for the current revised document. Results: The revised guidelines are focused primarily on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and hereditary MTC. Conclusions: The Task Force developed 67 evidence-based recommendations to assist clinicians in the care of patients with MTC. The Task Force considers the recommendations to represent current, rational, and optimal medical practice. PMID:25810047

  12. Changes in the adult vertebrate auditory sensory epithelium after trauma.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Elizabeth C

    2013-03-01

    Auditory hair cells transduce sound vibrations into membrane potential changes, ultimately leading to changes in neuronal firing and sound perception. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and repair capabilities of traumatized auditory sensory epithelium in the adult vertebrate ear. Injured mammalian auditory epithelium repairs itself by forming permanent scars but is unable to regenerate replacement hair cells. In contrast, injured non-mammalian vertebrate ear generates replacement hair cells to restore hearing functions. Non-sensory support cells within the auditory epithelium play key roles in the repair processes. PMID:23178236

  13. Quantitative approach to lectin-based glycoprofiling of thymic tissues in the control- and the dexamethasone-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Balcan, Erdal

    2016-06-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the most commonly used synthetic glucocorticoid in treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Here we focused on evaluating the effect of DEX on apoptosis and glycan profile in the mouse thymic tissues. Histological examinations revealed that the DEX treatment cause severe alterations in thymus, such as disruption of thymic capsule, impaired epithelial cell-thymocyte contacts, cellular loss and increased apoptosis. The identification of thymic glycans in the control- and the DEX-treated mice was carried out by using a panel of five plant lectins, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Concanavalin A (ConA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). Lectin histochemistry results showed that glycosylation pattern of thymus changes upon DEX treatment. For further detailed quantitative analyses of the binding intensities for each lectin, histochemical data were scored as high positive (HP), mild positive (MP) and low positive (LP) and differences among signaling densities were investigated. The staining patterns of thymic regions observed with lectin histochemistry suggest that DEX can affect the thymic glycan profile as well as thymocyte apoptosis. These results are consistent with the opinion that not only sialic acid, but also other sugar motifs may be responsible for thymocyte development. PMID:27067421

  14. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of primary and metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma in a young dog

    PubMed Central

    Vieson, Miranda D.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Moon-Larson, Martha; Saunders, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the gross, histological, and immunohistochemical features of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with pulmonary metastases in a young dog. Sheets of pleomorphic cells supported by fibrous stroma characterized the primary mass, while metastatic nodules had a neuroendocrine pattern. Despite differing histologic features, all masses showed marked immunoreactivity against calcitonin and multiple neuroendocrine markers consistent with MTC. Although MTC is a well-recognized entity, it may be difficult to distinguish this mass from other thyroid neoplasms, necessitating immunohistochemical characterization. PMID:24690600

  15. Impact of renal medullary three-dimensional architecture on oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brendan C; Edwards, Aurélie; Sgouralis, Ioannis; Layton, Anita T

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a highly detailed mathematical model of solute transport in the renal medulla of the rat kidney to study the impact of the structured organization of nephrons and vessels revealed in anatomic studies. The model represents the arrangement of tubules around a vascular bundle in the outer medulla and around a collecting duct cluster in the upper inner medulla. Model simulations yield marked gradients in intrabundle and interbundle interstitial fluid oxygen tension (PO2), NaCl concentration, and osmolality in the outer medulla, owing to the vigorous active reabsorption of NaCl by the thick ascending limbs. In the inner medulla, where the thin ascending limbs do not mediate significant active NaCl transport, interstitial fluid composition becomes much more homogeneous with respect to NaCl, urea, and osmolality. Nonetheless, a substantial PO2 gradient remains, owing to the relatively high oxygen demand of the inner medullary collecting ducts. Perhaps more importantly, the model predicts that in the absence of the three-dimensional medullary architecture, oxygen delivery to the inner medulla would drastically decrease, with the terminal inner medulla nearly completely deprived of oxygen. Thus model results suggest that the functional role of the three-dimensional medullary architecture may be to preserve oxygen delivery to the papilla. Additionally, a simulation that represents low medullary blood flow suggests that the separation of thick limbs from the vascular bundles substantially increases the risk of the segments to hypoxic injury. When nephrons and vessels are more homogeneously distributed, luminal PO2 in the thick ascending limb of superficial nephrons increases by 66% in the inner stripe. Furthermore, simulations predict that owing to the Bohr effect, the presumed greater acidity of blood in the interbundle regions, where thick ascending limbs are located, relative to that in the vascular bundles, facilitates the delivery of O2 to support the

  16. [Medullary layer activity of the rat adrenals after a flight on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Blazicek, P; Tigranian, R A

    1982-01-01

    After a 18.5-day space flight on Cosmos-1129 rat adrenals were investigated for the concentration of catecholamines and activity of enzymes involved in their synthesis, i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, and phenyl ethanol amine-N-methyl transferase. It was found that inflight the sympatho-adreno-medullary system of rats was not exposed to a prolonged or strong stressogenic effect. Postflight the rats showed an increased reactivity to the immobilization stress. PMID:7120908

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor enhances locomotion and medullary neuronal firing in an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Lowry, C A; Rose, J D; Moore, F L

    1996-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) administration has been shown to act centrally to enhance locomotion in rats and amphibians. In the present study we used an amphibian, the roughskin newt (Taricha granulosa), to characterize changes in medullary neuronal activity associated with CRF-induced walking and swimming in animals chronically implanted with fine-wire microelectrodes. Neuronal activity was recorded from the raphe and adjacent reticular region of the rostral medulla. Under baseline conditions most of the recorded neurons showed low to moderate amounts of neuronal activity during periods of immobility and pronounced increases in firing that were time-locked with episodes of walking. These neurons sometimes showed further increases in discharge during swimming. Injections of CRF but not saline into the lateral ventricle produced a rapidly appearing increase in walking and pronounced changes (mostly increases) in firing rates of the medullary neurons. CRF produced diverse changes in patterns of firing in different neurons, but for these neurons as a group, the effects of CRF showed a close temporal association with the onset and expression of the peptide's effect on locomotion. In neurons that were active exclusively during movement prior to CRF treatment, the post-CRF increase in firing was evident during episodes of walking; in other neurons that also were spontaneously active during immobility prior to CRF infusion, post-CRF activity changes were evident during immobility as well as during episodes of locomotion. Thus, a principal effect of CRF was to potentiate the level of neuronal firing in a population of medullary neurons with locomotor-related properties. Due to the route of administration CRF may have acted on multiple central nervous system sites to enhance locomotion, but the results are consistent with neurophysiological effects involving medullary locomotion-regulating neurons. PMID:8724179

  18. T cell dysfunction in the diabetes-prone BB rat. A role for thymic migrants that are not T cell precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiou, H.M.; Lagarde, A.C.; Bellgrau, D.

    1988-01-01

    Diabetes-prone BB (BB-DP) rats express several T cell dysfunctions which include poor proliferative and cytotoxic responses to alloantigen. The goal of this study was to determine the origin of these T cell dysfunctions. When BB-DP rats were thymectomized, T cell depleted, and transplanted with neonatal thymus tissue from diabetes-resistant and otherwise normal DA/BB F1 rats, the early restoration of T cell function proceeded normally on a cell-for-cell basis; i.e., peripheral T cells functioned like those from the thymus donor. Because the thymus in these experiments was subjected to gamma irradiation before transplantation and there was no evidence of F1 chimerism in the transplanted BB-DP rats, it appeared that the BB-DP T cell precursors could mature into normally functioning T cells if the maturation process occurred in a normal thymus. If the F1 thymus tissue was treated with dGua before transplantation, the T cells of these animals functioned poorly like those from untreated BB-DP rats. dGua poisons bone marrow-derived cells, including gamma radiation-resistant cells of the macrophage/dendritic cell lineages, while sparing the thymic epithelium. Therefore, the reversal of the T cell dysfunction depends on the presence in the F1 thymus of gamma radiation-resistant, dGua-sensitive F1 cells. Conversely, thymectomized and T cell-depleted F1 rats expressed T cell dysfunction when transplanted with gamma-irradiated BB thymus grafts. T cell responses were normal in animals transplanted with dGua-treated BB thymus grafts. With increasing time after thymus transplantation, T cells from all animals gradually expressed the functional phenotype of the bone marrow donor. Taken together these results suggest that BB-DP bone marrow-derived cells that are not T cell precursors influence the maturation environment in the thymus of otherwise normal BB-DP T cell precursors.

  19. Conus medullaris ganglioneuroma with syringomyelia radiologically mimicking ependymoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, KAI; DAI, JIANPING

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas are rare, benign, well-differentiated tumors of the conus medullaris. Approximately 20 cases of spinal cord ganglioneuroma, and only 1 case of mixed chemodectoma-ganglioneuroma of the conus medullaris have been previously reported. The present study presents the case of a 38-year-old man with a histopathological diagnosis of conus medullaris ganglioneuroma. The patient presented with hypoesthesia in the lower limbs, muscle atrophy of the right lower limb and dysuria. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis led to a diagnosis of ependymoma. Histopathological analysis of the excised mass revealed typical, well-differentiated ganglion cells, consistent with a ganglioneuroma. The mass was associated with a neighboring syringomyelia. At an 18 month follow-up the patient had recovered, although some remaining difficulty in walking and urinating remained. The aim of the present report was to raise awareness that when ganglioneuromas present in unusual locations, analogous radiological findings may mislead investigators to consider more common pathologies and thus result in misdiagnosis. The present case demonstrates the importance of considering the potential differential diagnoses for neural tissue neoplasms. PMID:26788212

  20. Medullary nephrocalcinosis, distal renal tubular acidosis and polycythaemia in a patient with nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medullary nephrocalcinosis and distal renal tubular acidosis are closely associated and each can lead to the other. These clinical entities are rare in patients with nephrotic syndrome and polycythaemia is an unusual finding in such patients. We describe the presence of medullary nephrocalcinosis, distal renal tubular acidosis and polycythaemia in a patient with nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change disease. Proposed mechanisms of polycythaemia in patients with nephrotic syndrome and distal renal tubular acidosis include, increased erythropoietin production and secretion of interleukin 8 which in turn stimulate erythropoiesis. Case presentation A 22 year old Sri Lankan Sinhala male with nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change disease was investigated for incidentally detected polycythaemia. Investigations revealed the presence of renal tubular acidosis type I and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Despite extensive investigation, a definite cause for polycythaemia was not found in this patient. Treatment with potassium and bicarbonate supplementation with potassium citrate led to correction of acidosis thereby avoiding the progression of nephrocalcinosis and harmful effects of chronic acidosis. Conclusion The constellation of clinical and biochemical findings in this patient is unique but the pathogenesis of erythrocytosis is not clearly explained. The proposed mechanisms for erythrocytosis in other patients with proteinuria include increased erythropoietin secretion due to renal hypoxia and increased secretion of interleukin 8 from the kidney. This case illustrates that there may exist hitherto unknown connections between tubular and glomerular dysfunction in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:22834973

  1. Medullary raphe midline is involved in production of expulsive expirations in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Poliacek, I; Jakus, J; Knocikova, J; Barani, H; Halasova, E; Visnovcova, N

    2008-12-01

    Effects of kainic acid lesions in the medullary raphe midline on reflex expirations induced mechanically from the trachea were examined. Spontaneously breathing rabbits were anesthetized by ketamine and xylazine i.m., followed by pentobarbitone i.v. Excitatory neurotoxin kainic acid (2 mg/ml in artificial CSF, total volume of 55-100 nl) was pressure microinjected into the medullary midline, rostral to the obex (2 microinjections at 2 different depths). The lesion (mostly affected the obscurus and magnus raphe nuclei) reduced the number of reflex expirations by 80% and expiratory amplitudes of esophageal pressure, abdominal EMG moving averages, and abdominal EMG powers by 71%, 62%, and 57%, respectively (in all cases P<0.05). The duration of abdominal activity in post-lesion responses was not altered. Control microinjections of artificial CSF had no effect on the reflex responses. We conclude that in rabbits, the medullary raphe nuclei participate in the control of expiratory expulsions originating from the trachea. PMID:19218686

  2. Fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy (sf) mouse requires T cells that mature in a sf thymic environment: Potential model for thymic education

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.; Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1991-07-01

    Characteristic lesions in mice hemi- or homozygous for the X-linked mutation scurfy (sf) include lymphohistiocytic proliferation in the skin and lymphoid organs, Coombs' test-positive anemia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and death by 24 days of age. The role of the thymus in the development of fatal lymphoreticular disease in the scurfy mouse was investigated. Neonatal thymectomy doubles the life span of scurfy mice, moderates the histologic lesions, and prevents anemia, despite the continued presence of high levels of serum IgG. Animals bred to be nude and scurfy (nu/nu;sf/Y) are viable, fertile, and free of scurfy lesions. Bone marrow from scurfy mice can reconstitute lethally irradiated, H-2-compatible animals but does not transmit scurfy disease. The authors conclude, from these data, that scurfy lesions are mediated by T lymphocytes that mature in an abnormal (sf) thymic environment.

  3. Clinicopathologic features and long-term outcome of patients with medullary breast carcinoma managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Vu-Nishino; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.; Ahrens, Willam A.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical characteristics and outcome of medullary carcinoma to infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast in a large cohort of conservatively managed patients with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Chart records of patients with invasive breast cancer managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at the therapeutic radiology facilities of Yale University School of Medicine before 2001 were reviewed. Forty-six cases (1971-2001) were identified with medullary histology; 1,444 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma served as a control group. Results: The medullary cohort presented at a younger age with a higher percentage of patients in the 35 years or younger age group (26.1% vs. 6.6%, p < 0.00001). Twelve patients with medullary histology underwent genetic screening, and 6 patients were identified with deleterious mutations. This group showed greater association with BRCA1/2 mutations compared with screened patients in the control group (50.0% vs. 15.8%, p 0.0035). The medullary cohort was also significantly associated with greater T stage and tumor size (37.0% vs. 17.2% T2, mean size 3.2 vs. 2.5 cm, p 0.00097) as well as negative ER (84.9% vs. 37.6%, p < 0.00001) and PR (87.5% vs. 48.1%, p = 0.00001) status. As of February 2003, median follow-up times for the medullary and control groups were 13.9 and 14.0 years, respectively. Although breast relapse-free rates were not significantly different (76.7% vs. 85.2%), 10-year distant relapse-free survival in the medullary cohort was significantly better than in the control group (94.9% vs. 77.5%, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Despite poor clinicopathologic features, patients with medullary histology demonstrate favorable long-term distant relapse-free survival. Local control rates of patients with medullary and infiltrating ductal carcinoma are comparable. These findings suggest that patients diagnosed with medullary carcinoma are appropriate candidates for

  4. Diagnostic Utility of PET CT in Thymic Tumours with Emphasis on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET CT in Thymic Neuroendocrine Tumour - Experience at a Tertiary Level Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Shanthly, Nylla; Oommen, Regi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:18 Fluorine-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emis–sion tomography/computed tomography (18F- FDG-PET/CT) is of importance in assessing high-risk thymoma and thymic carcinomas. Detection of advanced thymoma versus thymic carcinoma by routine cross sectional anatomical imaging such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often poses a diagnostic dilemma. In this case series we observed the utility of FDG uptake to predict advanced thymoma and distinguish thymoma from thymic cancer. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 18F- FDG-PET/CT scans of 12 patients (8 males, 4 females); age 24-60yrs with thymic epithelial malignancy from January 2011 to May 2013. FDG activity in lesions was quantified using maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and correlated with Masaoka staging and WHO classification. All patients fasted 4 hr prior to 18F-FDG PET/CT. Images from vertex to mid-thigh were acquired 60min post injection of 3.7 -4.7 MBq/kg (Mega Becquerel)/kilogram of18F-FDG and SUV max of each tumour was measured. One patient underwent DOTATATE scan, received 138MBq of 68Gallium (68Ga)-DOTATATE injection IV and imaging was done after 60 min. Results: Higher FDG uptake of SUVmax 7.35 was seen in type B3 thymoma. FDG uptake was higher in thymic carcinoma (20.45 in primary and 17.46 in the node) or neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) than in patients with thymomas (ranged 7.35 - 3.02). No significant association was observed between higher focal FDG uptake and advanced-stage disease in thymoma. In NED 68Ga - DOTATATE imaging identified more lesions than in FDG. Conclusion: PET CT is a valuable diagnostic tool in evaluation of thymic tumours, to assess in initial workup, for treatment response and for prognostication. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is beneficial in assessing neuroendocrine thymic tumours. Focal FDG uptake cannot predict advanced thymoma but is helpful in distinguishing thymoma from thymic carcinoma, or the more aggressive thymoma B3. PMID

  5. Response to nab-paclitaxel and nedaplatin in a heavily-metastatic thymic carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHAN, PING; XIE, HAIYAN; YU, LI-KE

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic thymic carcinoma is an aggressive cancer that usually responds poorly to multimodal therapies. Although surgical resection is the preferred treatment for patients with advanced or metastatic disease, the clinical prognosis is typically poor. The present study describes a 63-year-old patient with thymic carcinoma who underwent a range of antitumor treatments, including surgical resection, post-operative radiotherapy and post-operative chemotherapy with several drugs, but ultimately responded to treatment with nab-paclitaxel (nab-P) and nedaplatin. Subsequent to six cycles of nab-P and nedaplatin, the lung and peritoneal metastases decreased in size and the pleural effusion was reduced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to describe the response of an advanced thymic carcinoma to nab-P chemotherapy. PMID:25789028

  6. THE ROLE OF EPITHELIUM IN EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNIZATION.

    PubMed

    Sewall, H

    1925-10-01

    When a small amount of blood serum is dropped into the nose of a guinea pig the serum is absorbed by the mucous membrane and, after a definite period of incubation, the animal can be shown to have become profoundly changed. Depending upon the number of instillations, the interval between them and, especially, the quantity of serum instilled, the animal becomes either highly hypersensitive or strongly resistant to a toxic injection given by the vein. This resistance withstands a considerable series of increasing toxic injections and is strengthened with lapse of time,-contrary to the state of tolerance produced by traumatic methods. It is inferred that the absorption of foreign protein by the nose causes the formation of two different antibodies. One of these is allergic and excites to anaphylaxis; the other is protective and leads to true immuuity. The relative amount of either antibody can be regulated by modifying the amount of serum instilled. Added to a state of general allergy it is easy to produce, in the guinea pig, a special sensitization of the respiratory apparatus which leads, under appropriate stimulation, to attacks resembling those of bronchial asthma in man. No conclusion can be drawn at present concerning the nature or mode of action of the protective or immunizing antibody; but the indications are that its relations to the circulation and to tissue fixation resemble those which have been developed by other investigators in regard to the anaphylactic antibody. Evidence has been submitted that the living epithelium mediates between foreign protein and the organism in a way to favor specifically the elaboration of true immunity. PMID:17748743

  7. Chemical activation of caudal medullary expiratory neurones alters the pattern of breathing in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bongianni, F; Corda, M; Fontana, G A; Pantaleo, T

    1994-02-01

    1. The purpose of this work was to ascertain whether the activation of caudal expiratory neurones located in the caudal part of the ventral respiratory group (VRG) may affect the pattern of breathing via medullary axon collaterals. 2. We used microinjections of DL-homocysteic acid (DLH) to activate this population of neurones in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats. Both phrenic and abdominal nerve activities were monitored; extracellular recordings from medullary and upper cervical cord respiratory neurones were performed. 3. DLH (160 mM) microinjected (10-30 nl for a total of 1.6-4.8 nmol) into the caudal VRG, into sites where expiratory activity was encountered, provoked an intense and sustained activation of the expiratory motor output associated with a corresponding period of silence in phrenic nerve activity. During the progressive decline of the activation of abdominal motoneurones, rhythmic inspiratory activity resumed, displaying a decrease in frequency and a marked reduction or the complete suppression of postinspiratory activity as its most consistent features. 4. Medullary and upper cervical cord inspiratory neurones exhibited inhibitory responses consistent with those observed in phrenic nerve activity, while expiratory neurones in the caudal VRG on the side contralateral to the injection showed excitation patterns similar to those of abdominal motoneurones. On the other hand, in correspondence to expiratory motor output activation, expiratory neurones of the Bötzinger complex displayed tonic discharges whose intensity was markedly lower than the peak level of control breaths. 5. Bilateral lignocaine blockades of neural transmission at C2-C3 affecting the expiratory and, to a varying extent, the inspiratory bulbospinal pathways as well as spinal cord transections at C2-C3 or C1-C2, did not suppress the inhibitory effect on inspiratory neurones of either the ipsi- or contralateral VRG in response to DLH

  8. The role of the epithelium in airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Davies, Donna E

    2009-12-01

    The bronchial epithelium is the barrier to the external environment and plays a vital role in protection of the internal milieu of the lung. It functions within the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit to control the local microenvironment and help maintain tissue homeostasis. However, in asthma, chronic perturbation of these homeostatic mechanisms leads to alterations in the structure of the airways, termed remodeling. Damage to the epithelium is now recognized to play a key role in driving airway remodeling. We have postulated that epithelial susceptibility to environmental stress and injury together with impaired repair responses results in generation of signals that act on the underlying mesenchyme to propagate and amplify inflammatory and remodeling responses in the submucosa. Many types of challenges to the epithelium, including pathogens, allergens, environmental pollutants, cigarette smoke, and even mechanical forces, can elicit production of mediators by the epithelium, which can be translated into remodeling responses by the mesenchyme. Several important mediators of remodeling have been identified, most notably transforming growth factor-beta, which is released from damaged/repairing epithelium or in response to inflammatory mediators, such as IL-13. The cross talk between the epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to drive remodeling responses is considered in the context of subepithelial fibrosis and potential pathogenetic mechanisms linked to the asthma susceptibility gene, a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)33. PMID:20008875

  9. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farah, G; Stokes, V J; Wang, L M; Grossman, A B

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking. Learning points Ectopic corticotrophin (ACTH) secretion should always be considered in the diagnostic workup of young patients with Cushing’s syndrome There is a small but growing body of literature describing the correlation between ectopic ACTH secretion and thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) The possibility of a MEN-1 syndrome should be considered in all patients with thymic NETs, and we note the observational association with male gender and cigarette smoking in this cohort An exception to these associations is the finding of relatively high incidence of thymic NETs among female non-smoking MEN-1 patients in the Japanese compared with Western populations The relapsing and remitting course of our patient’s symptoms is noteworthy, given the paucity of this finding among other published cases PMID:27252866

  10. Long-Term Follow-Up and Prognostic Factors for Advanced Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-xin; Chen, Hui-qin; Shao, Ling-dong; Qiu, Su-fang; Ni, Qian-yu; Zheng, Bu-hong; Wang, Jie-zhong; Pan, Jian-ji; Li, Jin-luan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term survival outcomes in patients with advanced thymic carcinoma and identify prognostic factors influencing the survival. We retrospectively analyzed 90 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed advanced thymic carcinoma (Masaoka III and IV) in our institute, from December 2000 to 2012. Age, sex, clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, Masaoka and tumor node metastasis staging, pathologic grade, and treatment modalities were analyzed to identify prognostic factors associated with the progress-free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) rates. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS, version 19.0 (SPSS, Inc, Chicago, IL). A total of 73 (81.1%) male and 17 (18.9%) female patients participated in the study. The median follow-up time was 75 months (range, 20–158 months). The 5-year PFS and OS rates were 23.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.6%–33.8%) and 35.7% (95% CI, 25.1%–46.4%), respectively. The multivariate Cox regression model analysis showed that factors improving the PFS were the normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level (P < 0.001), Masaoka III stage (P = 0.028), and radiotherapy (RT) (P < 0.001). The LDH (P < 0.001), T stage (P < 0.001), and the pathologic grade (P = 0.047) were independently prognostic of OS. Long-term follow-up of the advanced thymic carcinoma showed poor outcomes of PFS and OS. LDH, Masaoka stage, and RT affected the PFS, and LDH, T stage, and pathologic grade seemed to affect the OS. Establishing a better staging system for predicting outcomes would be warranted. PMID:25526488

  11. Elevated proportions of recent thymic emigrants in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Johannes; Hofer, Sabine; Zlamy, Manuela; Jeller, Verena; Koppelstaetter, Christian; Brandstätter, Anita; Kern, Hannelore; Köhle, Julia; Zimmerhackl, Lothar Bernd; Prelog, Martina

    2009-10-01

    It is unclear, whether pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) show immunological alterations typically found in autoimmune conditions resembling immune dysfunction of the thymus, such as decrease of naïve T cells, lower T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) numbers, telomeric erosion, and diminished interleukin-7 (IL-7) levels. Furthermore, it is unknown, whether long-term therapy with insulin, a thymic growth factor, interferes with these changes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the quantity of the naïve T cell subset and its TREC content, relative telomere length (RTL) of naïve T cells, and peripheral IL-7 levels in patients with recent-onset T1DM (n = 5), long-standing T1DM (n = 33), and age-matched healthy donors (HD) (n = 37). In long-standing T1DM, TREC numbers/CD8+CD45RA+ T cells were enhanced (p < 0.01) compared to HD and correlated with disease duration (p < 0.02), an independent factor for increased thymic output (p < 0.01), and insulin dosage at blood withdrawal (p < 0.05). IL-7 serum levels were elevated in long-standing T1DM (p < 0.001) and positively correlated with TREC numbers (p < 0.01) and disease duration (p < 0.0001). RTLs in CD8+CD45RA+ T cells were significantly increased compared to HD (p < 0.02). Our data suggest that longterm insulin therapy may serve as a driving factor for thymic function and rejuvenation of the naïve T cell compartment. The ability of the immune system to reconstitute the naïve T cell compartment under well-adjusted insulin therapy may be of major importance for recognition of new antigens, response to vaccinations, and defense of infectious complications. PMID:19725773

  12. Large thymic carcinoma presenting with right ventricular failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saleem, T; Fatimi, S H; Khalid, U

    2011-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is an overall rare tumour with variable clinical manifestations. Right ventricular failure remains an uncommon occurrence and has not been reported in literature so far. A 40-year-old lady presented with the complaints of progressively worsening retrosternal chest pain, shortness of breath, easy fatigability and cough since 1 year. Computed tomography scan of the thorax revealed a mass measuring 12 x 10 cm in the anterior mediastinum. This mass appeared to be adherent to both lungs and pericardium and was impinging on the right atrium and right ventricle. It appeared to be infiltrating the ascending aorta, pulmonary arteries and superior vena cava. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed hepatomegaly and moderate ascites. Echocardiography showed evidence of right ventricular dysfunction as well as elevated right ventricular systolic pressures secondary to extrinsic compression. Percutaneous biopsy of the thymus was performed showing a malignant thymoma. Radical thymectomy with resection of pericardium was planned. Intra-operatively, the tumour was separated from the right and left lungs, pulmonary artery and aortic arch. Morphologically, immunochemically and clinically, the features were consistent with those seen in Masoka stage III thymic carcinoma. She also received six cycles of chemotherapy (PAC regimen) including cisplatin (50 mg/m2), doxorubicin (50 mg/m2) and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m2). Radiation therapy in the adjuvant setting was planned but the patient was lost to follow-up after 4 months. Although right ventricular failure is a very rare presentation of thymic carcinoma, clinicians should be aware of this presentation to appreciate the complete clinical spectrum of presentation of this neoplasm. PMID:21938989

  13. Expression of acetylcholine receptor genes in human thymic epithelial cells: implications for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Wakkach, A; Guyon, T; Bruand, C; Tzartos, S; Cohen-Kaminsky, S; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1996-10-15

    The intrathymic presence of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is controversial, and the nature of the cell(s) expressing it is unclear. We thus analyzed the molecular expression of muscle AChR in human thymi. mRNA studies indicated that the two isoforms (P3A+ and P3A-) of the alpha-subunit were present in thymic extracts and in cultured thymic epithelial cells (TEC), while expression in thymocytes was low and not consistently detectable. The amount of mRNA coding for the alpha-subunit, evaluated by means of quantitative PCR, was about 20 times less in TEC than in muscle, and was similar in TEC from normal subjects and from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). The beta- and epsilon-subunits present in adult AChR were also expressed in TEC (but not in thymocytes), while the embryonic subunit (gamma) was absent. In TEC cultures, the AChR alpha- and epsilon-subunit mRNA levels were down-regulated by forskolin, as also observed in the TE671 rhabdomyosarcoma cell line, suggesting similar regulation of AChR subunits in thymus and muscle. Protein expression was evidenced on TEC (but not on thymocytes), by Western blotting as well as by immunofluorescence, thus demonstrating AChR expression on human thymic epithelial cells. There was no difference in the expression of AChR between TEC from MG patients and controls, meaning that the expression of AChR subunits alone is not sufficient to explain the onset of MG. PMID:8871679

  14. Thymic depletion of lymphocytes is associated with the virulence of PRRSV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Amarilla, Shyrley Paola; Gómez-Laguna, Jaime; Carrasco, Librado; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M; Caridad Y Ocerín, José M; Graham, Simon P; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Steinbach, Falko; Salguero, Francisco J

    2016-05-30

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) exists as two distinct viruses, type 1 (PRRSV-1) and type 2 (PRRSV-2). Atrophy of the thymus in PRRSV-2 infected piglets has been associated with a loss of thymocytes. The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of PRRSV-1 strains of differing virulence on the thymus of infected piglets by analysing the histomorphometry, the presence of apoptotic cells and cells producing cytokines. Thymic samples were taken from animals experimentally infected (with LV, SU1-bel, and 215-06 strains) or mock inoculated animals at 3, 7 and 35days post-infection (dpi) and processed for histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. PRRSV antigen was detected in the thymus from 3dpi until the end of the study in all virus-infected animals with the highest numbers of infected cells detected in SU1-bel group. The histomorphometry analysis and counts of CD3(+) thymocytes in the thymic cortex displayed significant differences between strains at different time-points (p≤0.011), with SU1-bel group showing the most severe changes at 7dpi. Cell death displayed statistically significant increase in the cortex of all infected animals, with SU1-bel group showing the highest rate at 3 and 7dpi. The number of cells immunostained against IL-1α, TNF-α and IL-10 were predominantly detected in the medulla (p≤0.01). An increase in the number of TNF-α and IL-10 positive cells was observed in LV and SU-1bel groups. Our results demonstrate that different PRRSV-1 strains induced depletion of the thymic cortex due to apoptosis of thymocytes and that the most severe depletion was associated with the highly virulent SU1-bel strain. PMID:27139029

  15. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  16. The application of postoperative chemotherapy in thymic tumors and its prognostic effect

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To study the role of postoperative chemotherapy and its prognostic effect in Masaoka-Koga stage III and IV thymic tumors. Methods Between 1994 and 2012, 1,700 patients with thymic tumors who underwent surgery without neoadjuvant therapy were enrolled for the study. Among them, 665 patients in Masaoka-Koga stage III and IV were further analyzed to evaluate the clinical value of postoperative chemotherapy. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain the survival curve of the patients divided into different subgroups, and the Cox regression analysis was used to make multivariate analysis on the factors affecting prognosis. A Propensity-Matched Study was used to evaluate the clinical value of chemotherapy. Results Two-hundred and twenty-one patients were treated with postoperative chemotherapy, while the rest 444 cases were not. The two groups showed significant differences (P<0.05) regarding the incidence of myasthenia gravis, World Health Organization (WHO) histological subtypes, pathological staging, resection status and the use of postoperative radiotherapy. WHO type C tumors, incomplete resection, and postoperative radiotherapy were significantly related to increased recurrence and worse survival (P<0.05). Five-year and 10-year disease free survivals (DFS) and recurrence rates in patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative chemotherapy were 51% and 30%, 46% and 68%, comparing with 73% and 58%, 26% and 40% in patients who had no adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery (P=0.001, P=0.001, respectively). In propensity-matched study, 158 pairs of patients with or without postoperative chemotherapy (316 patients in total) were selected and compared accordingly. Similar 5-year survival rates were detected between the two groups (P=0.332). Conclusions Pathologically higher grade histology, incomplete resection, and postoperative radiotherapy were found to be associated with worse outcomes in advanced stage thymic tumors. At present, there is no evidence

  17. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin as a novel mediator amplifying immunopathology in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Maarten R; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Hack, Cornelis E; van Roon, Joel A G

    2015-10-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an IL-7-related cytokine that has been studied extensively in atopic diseases and more recently in various rheumatic disorders. It is involved in T cell development in the thymus and promotes homeostatic T cell expansion by classical dendritic cells. However, deregulated TSLP expression in various rheumatic diseases has implicated this cytokine as a strong mediator in immunopathology. Overexpressed TSLP induces strong T cell activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human cells and animal models for RA, SSc and LN, underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeting the TSLP-TSLP receptor axis. PMID:26163286

  18. Morvan Syndrome Secondary to Thymic Carcinoma in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Koussa, Salam

    2016-01-01

    Morvan syndrome (MoS) is a rare paraneoplastic autoimmune disorder characterized by peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders. Systemic lupus erythmatosus (SLE) cooccurs in 6–10% of patients with thymoma. It may occur before, concurrently with, or after thymoma diagnosis. This paper reports the first case of cooccurrence of SLE, thymic carcinoma, and MoS. The cooccurrence of SLE, thymoma, and MoS delineates the generalized autoimmunity process. Symptoms of both MoS and SLE abated upon tumor resection. PMID:27247812

  19. Thymic fat pad flap to cover the left internal thoracic artery graft.

    PubMed

    Jelenc, Matija; Kneževič, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    With a skeletonized harvesting technique of the left internal thoracic artery (LITA), opening of the pleural space during dissection can usually be avoided. However, due to the bulging of the ventilated lungs, the LITA graft comes to lie immediately below the sternum at the end of the procedure, which makes it vulnerable to injury in case of a reoperation. The authors present a simple technique to move the skeletonized LITA graft away from the undersurface of the sternum, by using a thymic fat pad flap (TFP). PMID:23837883

  20. Thymic and mammary lymphosarcoma in a three-year-old heifer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, H K; Hunt, E; Duncan, D E

    1992-03-01

    Ventral edema, dyspnea, fever, tachycardia, bloat and muffled heart sounds were identified in a 3-year-old heifer. Attempts to relieve the bloat by passing an orogastric tube were unsuccessful. The heifer was bovine leukemia virus-negative by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, and had normocytic, normochromic anemia, mature neutrophilia, and hyperproteinemia. Pleural effusion was identified by thoracic ultrasonography. Cytologic examination of pleural fluid revealed an increased number of atypical lymphocytes. The heifer died, and at necropsy, thymic and metastatic mammary lymphosarcoma was confirmed. PMID:1568914

  1. The enlightenments from ITMIG Consensus on WHO histological classification of thymoma and thymic carcinoma: refined definitions, histological criteria, and reporting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Fang, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) histological classification of the thymoma and thymic carcinoma (TC) has been criticized for poor interobserver reproducibility or inconsistencies in the routine pathological diagnosis. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group (ITMIG) panel achieved an agreement to maintain the widely accepted WHO framework but to refine historic definitions and histological criteria, and further introduce some new terms with the aim to improve interobserver reproducibility. This review addresses the enlightenments we can get from the ITMIG consensus on the WHO histological classification of the thymoma and TC, which may be helpful for most pathologists. PMID:27114842

  2. Sunitinib in patients with chemotherapy-refractory thymoma and thymic carcinoma: an open-label phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Berman, Arlene; Tomita, Yusuke; Brzezniak, Christina; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Ling, Alexander; Spittler, Aaron J; Carter, Corey A; Guha, Udayan; Wang, Yisong; Szabo, Eva; Meltzer, Paul; Steinberg, Seth M; Trepel, Jane B; Loehrer, Patrick J; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background No standard treatments are available for advanced thymic epithelial tumours after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. We investigated the activity of sunitinib, an orally administered tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Methods Between May 15, 2012, and Oct 2, 2013, we did an open-label phase 2 trial in patients with histologically confirmed chemotherapy-refractory thymic epithelial tumours. Patients were eligible if they had disease progression after at least one previous regimen of platinum-containing chemotherapy, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of two or lower, measurable disease, and adequate organ function. Patients received 50 mg of sunitinib orally once a day, in 6-week cycles (ie, 4 weeks of treatment followed by 2 weeks without treatment), until tumour progression or unacceptable toxic effects arose. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed best tumour response at any point, which we analysed separately in thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts. Patients who had received at least one cycle of treatment and had their disease reassessed were included in the analyses of response. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621568. Findings 41 patients were enrolled, 25 with thymic carcinoma and 16 with thymoma. One patient with thymic carcinoma was deemed ineligible after enrolment and did not receive protocol treatment. Of patients who received treatment, one individual with thymic carcinoma was not assessable because she died. Median follow-up on trial was 17 months (IQR 14·0–18·4). Of 23 assessable patients with thymic carcinoma, six (26%, 90% CI 12·1–45·3, 95% CI 10·2–48·4) had partial responses, 15 (65%, 95% CI 42·7–83·6) achieved stable disease, and two (9%, 1·1–28·0) had progressive disease. Of 16 patients with thymoma, one (6%, 95% CI 0·2–30·2) had a partial response, 12 (75%, 47·6–92·7) had stable disease, and three (19%, 4·1–45·7) had progressive disease

  3. Characterization of side population cells from human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V; Jacoby, David B; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M; Knight, Darryl A

    2008-10-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45(-) SP, CD45(+) SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45(-) SP cells made up 0.12% +/- 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% +/- 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45(-) SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45(-) SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45(-) SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and long-term proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18653771

  4. Thymic tuberculosis preoperatively evaluated with thallium-201 SPECT: two resected cases.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takashi; Inoue, Kiyotoshi; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Morita, Ryuhei; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-02-01

    We present 2 resected cases of thymic tuberculosis, which had been preoperatively diagnosed as invasive thymoma, using a thallium-201 ((201)Tl) single photon emission computed tomography ((201)Tl SPECT). [Patient 1] A 74-old-male with a 32-year history of steroid therapy for rheumatic arthritis was diagnosed with an anterior mediastinal tumor by routine chest CT scans after onset of myocardial infarction. [Patient 2] A 56-old-female with a 28-year history of diabetes mellitus presented with a dry cough. A chest CT demonstrated an anterior mediastinal tumor. Neither patient showed pulmonary infiltrations on chest x-ray. (201)Tl SPECT was undertaken for each patient. Abnormal findings could not be detected on a planar image of the scintigraphy; however, on SPECT images accumulations of (201)Tl were clearly detected in the anterior mediastinal mass and a thymoma was thus suspected in each case. Total thymectomy was carried out in each case and the mass then diagnosed as caseous granuloma in the thymus. Both patients are well without recurrence after operation. In patients with a (201)Tl SPECT positive anterior mediastinal tumor associated with an immunologically deficient status, and with negative findings in planar images on thallium scintigraphy, the possibility of thymic tuberculosis should be considered. PMID:17392671

  5. Human thymocytes bind to autologous and allogeneic thymic epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, K H; Wolf, L S; Lobach, D F; Denning, S M; Tuck, D T; Robertson, A L; Haynes, B F

    1986-01-01

    The thymus plays a critical role in the generation of immunocompetent T lymphocytes. In the thymus, lymphocytes are in close contact with epithelial cells, and this contact is necessary for T-cell maturation. Using cultured human thymic epithelial (TE) cells, we have found that human thymocytes bind to human TE cells in vitro. Thymocytes bound to both allogeneic and autologous TE cells and to the epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431 but did not bind to epidermal keratinocytes or to thymic fibroblasts. Thymocyte binding to TE cells was trypsin- and cytochalasin B-sensitive. Indirect immunofluorescence assays showed that both mature (T6-, T3+) and immature (T6+, T3-) thymocytes bound TE cells. In our system, TE-thymocyte binding was not inhibited by antibodies to class I or class II major histocompatibility antigens. In vitro binding of thymocytes to TE cells may represent a correlate of in vivo TE-thymocyte interactions and provides a model system for the study of human intrathymic T-lymphocyte maturation and activation. Images PMID:3092215

  6. Inhibins Tune the Thymocyte Selection Process by Regulating Thymic Stromal Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carbajal-Franco, Ebzadrel; de la Fuente-Granada, Marisol; Alemán-Muench, Germán R.; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A.; Soldevila, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Inhibins and Activins are members of the TGF-β superfamily that regulate the differentiation of several cell types. These ligands were initially identified as hormones that regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis; however, increasing evidence has demonstrated that they are key regulators in the immune system. We have previously demonstrated that Inhibins are the main Activin ligands expressed in the murine thymus and that they regulate thymocyte differentiation, promoting the DN3-DN4 transition and the selection of SP thymocytes. As Inhibins are mainly produced by thymic stromal cells, which also express Activin receptors and Smad proteins, we hypothesized that Inhibins might play a role in stromal cell differentiation and function. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of Inhibins, thymic conventional dendritic cells display reduced levels of MHC Class II (MHCII) and CD86. In addition, the ratio between cTECs and mTECs was affected, indicating that mTEC differentiation was favoured and cTEC diminished in the absence of Inhibins. These changes appeared to impact thymocyte selection leading to a decreased selection of CD4SP thymocytes and increased generation of natural regulatory T cells. These findings demonstrate that Inhibins tune the T cell selection process by regulating both thymocyte and stromal cell differentiation. PMID:25973437

  7. Thymic localization of gallium-67 in pediatric patients with lymphoid and nonlymphoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hibi, S.; Todo, S.; Imashuku, S.

    1987-03-01

    To determine the significance of /sup 67/Ga localization in the thymus of children, 142 /sup 67/Ga photoscans from 45 children with various tumors were studied. Sixty-nine photoscans were taken for 17 cases of lymphoma, 73 photoscans were made for 28 cases of nonlymphoid tumors. Thymic localization of /sup 67/Ga was positive in 16 (36%) of the 45 patients and in 30 (21%) of the 142 photoscans. Positive thymus scans were seen in five (29%) of the 17 cases of lymphoma and 11 (39%) of the 28 solid tumors. The positive incidence was highest (90%) in ages 1-2 yr old. Of the eight grade 2 (strong positive) patients, the thymus in one case of Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed as malignant and the other seven solid tumor cases were nonmalignant. Most of the latter seven cases became positive after beginning of treatment (surgery and/or chemotherapy). Although the precise mechanism is not well understood, thymic localization of /sup 67/Ga may represent immunologic response to tumors, especially in infants with nonlymphoid neoplasms.

  8. Thyroid Carcinoma Showing Thymic-Like Differentiation Causing Fracture of the Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Aikaterini; Kanakis, Meletios; Valakis, Konstantinos; Laschos, Nikolaos; Chorti, Maria; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma showing thymic-like differentiation (CASTLE) comprises a rare neoplasm of the thyroid gland which arises from ectopic thymic tissue or remnants of brachial pouches. CASTLE is regarded as an indolent neoplasm with a favorable prognosis, irrespective of its metastatic potential. Diagnosis is difficult as clinicopathological features have not been yet well-defined. Radiological findings are not specific and only immunohistochemical positivity for CD5 and CD117 staining is highly suggestive of CASTLE. Despite lack of universally accepted treatment recommendations, the mainstay treatment includes thyroidectomy and systematic lymph node dissection. We report a case of CASTLE tumour with very uncommon characteristics developed in a 76-year-old man, who presented with rapidly deteriorating dyspnea and severe cough, resulting in respiratory failure. At surgery, a suspicious looking tumour arising from the upper pole of the right lobe of the thyroid gland, surrounding the trachea and displacing the right common carotid artery, was identified. The patient underwent en bloc resection of the tumour with the thyroid gland and regional lymph node dissection. This is the first reported case of CASTLE causing tracheal ring fracture. PMID:27110248

  9. Thymic abnormalities: antigen or antibody? Response to thymectomy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Penn, A S; Jaretzki, A; Wolff, M; Chang, H W; Tennyson, V

    1981-01-01

    The therapeutic value of thymectomy for myasthenia is still questioned although it retains an important place among management modalities that strive for sustained remission. Questions derive from uncertainty as to appropriate timing, variable extent of resection and quantitation of response. Forty-seven patients, followed one to seven years, underwent an extended transsternal or combined transcervical-transsternal procedure with anterior mediastinal exenteration. Sixteen have been in complete remission from six months to six years, four are asymptomatic on occasional pyridostigmine and eight are significantly improved. Evaluation of thymic pathology (hyperplasic, involuted areas, and thymoma) included a search for thymic myoid cells by fluorescence cytochemistry. Antibodies to acetylcholine receptor present in 38 of 43, decreased post-operatively to normal in four, by 50% to 80% in 14, by 20 to 50% in three and were unchanged in 14. Most remissions occurred in young women with noninvoluted hyperplastic glands and variably high anti-AChR titers which dropped toward normal in seven of 15. These results encourage us to utilize this procedure routinely. PMID:6951500

  10. Thymic Epithelial Cells Are a Nonredundant Source of Wnt Ligands for Thymus Development.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Fabian; Augustin, Iris; Meister, Michael; Boutros, Michael; Kyewski, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in T cell development. However, it remained unclear which cell type is the major source of Wnt ligands and to what extent thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development is dependent on Wnt signaling. In this study, we analyzed the role of Wnt ligands provided by TECs for the development of T cells and TECs without manipulating the intracellular Wnt signaling machinery in either cell type. To this end, we used conditional knockout mice (FoxN1-Gpr177) in which TECs are unable to secrete Wnt ligands. Gpr177 (Evi/Wls) is a Wnt-specific cargo receptor that is required for the secretion of Wnt ligands. We found that TECs are the main source of Wnt ligands in the thymus, which serves a nonredundant role, and lack of TEC-provided Wnt ligands led to thymic hypotrophy, as well as a reduced peripheral T cell pool. Despite being reduced in numbers, T cells that developed in the absence of TEC-secreted Wnt ligands were functionally competent, and the subset composition of the peripheral T cell pool was not affected. Thus, our data suggest that T cell development is not directly dependent on TEC-provided Wnt ligands. Rather, TEC-secreted Wnt ligands are essential for normal thymus development and normal peripheral T cell frequencies but are dispensable for T cell function in the periphery. PMID:26512137

  11. RET/GFRα Signals Are Dispensable for Thymic T Cell Development In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Afonso Rocha Martins; Arroz-Madeira, Sílvia; Fonseca-Pereira, Diogo; Ribeiro, Hélder; Lasrado, Reena; Pachnis, Vassilis; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Identification of thymocyte regulators is a central issue in T cell biology. Interestingly, growing evidence indicates that common key molecules control neuronal and immune cell functions. The neurotrophic factor receptor RET mediates critical functions in foetal hematopoietic subsets, thus raising the possibility that RET-related molecules may also control T cell development. We show that Ret, Gfra1 and Gfra2 are abundantly expressed by foetal and adult immature DN thymocytes. Despite the developmentally regulated expression of these genes, analysis of foetal thymi from Gfra1, Gfra2 or Ret deficient embryos revealed that these molecules are dispensable for foetal T cell development. Furthermore, analysis of RET gain of function and Ret conditional knockout mice showed that RET is also unnecessary for adult thymopoiesis. Finally, competitive thymic reconstitution assays indicated that Ret deficient thymocytes maintained their differentiation fitness even in stringent developmental conditions. Thus, our data demonstrate that RET/GFRα signals are dispensable for thymic T cell development in vivo, indicating that pharmacological targeting of RET signalling in tumours is not likely to result in T cell production failure. PMID:23300832

  12. Olfactory Epithelium Grafts in the Cerebral Cortex: An Immunohistochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Eric H.; DiNardo, Laurence J.; Costanzo, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop an alternative model for studying the regenerative capacity of olfactory neurons. Study Design An immunohistochemical analysis of mouse olfactory epithelium transplanted to the cerebral cortex. Methods Strips of olfactory epithelium removed from donor mice at postnatal day 5 to day 20 were inserted into the parietal cortex of adult mice. Recipient animals were allowed to survive for 25 to 120 days and then perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde 1 hour after bromodeoxyuridine injection. The brains were processed, and frozen sections were obtained. Sections through transplant tissue were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and compared with normal olfactory epithelium. Results Graft survival approached 85% with mature olfactory neurons detected in 35% of the transplants stained for olfactory marker protein. Transplant epithelium resembled normal olfactory epithelium containing mature olfactory neurons and axon bundles. Conclusions Studies of olfactory neuron regeneration have been limited by the inability to produce cultures with long-term viability. Olfactory epithelial grafts to the cerebral cortex provide an alternative approach to the study of olfactory neuron regeneration. PMID:11801979

  13. Meckel's diverticulum and ectopic epithelium: Evaluation of a complex relationship

    PubMed Central

    Burjonrappa, Sathyaprasad; Khaing, Phue

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, for any incidentally discovered Meckel's diverticulum, the management approach is based on weighing the statistical odds of future complications against the risks of a diverticulectomy. Materials and Methods: The temporal relationship between age at Meckel's diverticulectomy and the presence of ectopic epithelium was evaluated in our series. A meta-analysis of all reported recent literature on this condition was subsequently performed to evaluate the strength of the relationship between ectopic epithelium and symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum. Results: There was a paucity of ectopic epithelium in Meckel's diverticulectomy specimens in infants operated on at less than 1 year of age. Having two or more ectopic epithelia in a diverticulum does not appear to carry an additive risk for complications. The meta-analysis confirmed that ectopic epithelium was the most significant factor that influenced surgical intervention in all series of Meckel's diverticulum. Conclusion: The relationship between ectopic epithelium and the development of symptomatic Meckel's diverticulum is complex. Further understanding of the development of ectopic rests in the diverticulum will facilitate elucidating the pathophysiology in symptomatic cases. PMID:24741211

  14. Histopathological study on changes of bronchial epithelium among chromate workers

    SciTech Connect

    Mikami, H.

    1982-09-01

    There have been many reports on lung cancer among chromate workers. Chromate compounds are thought to be a carcinogen and lung cancer among chromate workers is considered one of the occupational lung cancers. Recently, it is debated that metaplastic and hyperplastic changes of bronchial epithelium are revealed or not to the development of bronchogenic carcinoma. Histopathological study on changes of bronchial epithelium among chromate workers was performed in order to clarify the effect of chromate compounds to bronchial epithelium. The subjects were 14 cases of lung cancer among chromate workers. As a control, 18 cases of non cancer among chromate workers. Lung tissue which was obtained at necropsy or surgery was fixed by formalin and was produced cross-sections and was stained on Haematoxylin-Eosin. The results were as follows. 1. Of examined 235 cross-sections, basal cell hyperplasia of bronchial epithelium was found in 13 per cent. Squamous metaplasia was found in 29 per cent, on the contrary, atypical metaplastic changes were observed in 34 per cent. 2. Of four cases of carcinoma in situ and two cases of small invasive carcinoma, four cases revealed development from atypical squamous metaplasia to precancerous changes. 3. These cases developed invasive carcinoma from atypical squamous metaplasia for a long period, of which were found by successive exfoliative cytology of sputum. From these findings, it was concluded that inhalation of chromate dust affected bronchial epithelium and caused highly atypical squamous metaplasia which developed to carcinoma in situ and finally to invasive carcinoma.

  15. Transport of sodium and urea in outer medullary descending vasa recta.

    PubMed Central

    Pallone, T L; Work, J; Myers, R L; Jamison, R L

    1994-01-01

    We dissected and perfused outer medullary vasa recta (OMVR) from vascular bundles in the rat. Permeabilities of sodium (PNa) and urea (Pu) were simultaneously determined from the lumen-to-bath efflux of 22Na and [14C]urea. PNa and Pu were also measured by in vivo microperfusion of descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR) at the papillary tip of Munich-Wistar rats. In some OMVR PNa was indistinguishable from zero. The mean +/- SE of PNa (x 10(-5), cm/s) in OMVR was 76 +/- 9. Pu in OMVR was always very high (x 10(-5), cm/s), 360 +/- 14. There was no correlation between OMVR PNa and Pu. Inner medullary AVR and DVR had PNa of 115 +/- 10 and 75 +/- 10, respectively, and Pu of 121 +/- 10 and 76 +/- 11, respectively. PNa and Pu in papillary vasa recta were always nearly identical and highly correlated. Transport of [14C] urea in OMVR was reversibly inhibited by addition of unlabeled urea or phloretin to the bath and lumen, providing evidence for carrier-mediated transport. These data suggest that sodium and urea might traverse the wall of inner medullary vasa recta by a paracellular pathway while urea also crosses by a transcellular route in OMVR. Electron microscopic examination of seven in vitro perfused OMVR revealed no fenestrations and exposure of these vessels to 10 microM calcium ionophore A23187 or 1 nM angiotensin II resulted in reversible contraction, suggesting that in vitro perfused OMVR are DVR only. Images PMID:8282790

  16. Intrathymic radioresistant stem cells follow an IL-2/IL-2R pathway during thymic regeneration after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Pfluecker, J.C.K.; Kruisbeek, A.M. )

    1990-05-15

    Sublethally irradiated mice undergo thymic regeneration which follows a phenotypic pattern of events similar to that observed during normal fetal development. Thymic regeneration after irradiation is the product of a limited pool of intrathymic radioresistant stem cells undergoing simultaneous differentiation. We show that in this model of T cell development, thymic regeneration follows a pathway in which the IL-2R is transiently expressed on CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-2R expression occurred during the exponential growth period of thymic regeneration, and IL-2R blocking prevented this explosive growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the IL-2R blockade affected primarily the development of the immature CD3-/CD4-/CD8- (triple negative) cells and their ability to generate CD3+/CD4+/CD8+ or CD3+/CD4+/CD8- and CD3+/CD4-/CD8+ thymocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that blocking of the IL-2R resulted in an arrest in proliferation and differentiation by intrathymic radioresistant stem cells, indicating that the IL-2/IL-2R pathway is necessary for the expansion of immature triple negative T cells.

  17. Evidence of enhanced recombinant interleukin-2 sensitivity in thymic lymphocytes from patients with myasthenia gravis: possible role in autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kaminsky, S; Levasseur, P; Binet, J P; Berrih-Aknin, S

    1989-09-01

    We evaluated the activation state of thymic lymphocytes in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) by cytofluorographic analysis of CD25 expression and by testing their sensitivity to recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) in the absence of any known previous stimulation. We detected no phenotypic signs of activation in fresh MG thymic lymphocyte suspensions, while functional signs of activation were reflected in a significantly higher sensitivity to rIL-2 in MG patients than in controls. The responses to rIL-2 were time- and dose-dependent, were inhibited by a blocking anti-IL-2 receptor antibody, and were associated with an increase in CD25+ T cells in both patients and controls. The T cells with functional signs of previous activation may represent autoreactive cells involved in the autoimmune process and confirm thymus gland hyperactivity in MG. These cells could result from primary autosensitization against the thymic acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-like molecule or from altered migration of peripheral activated cells into an abnormal thymic environment. Our results also provide a clue for understanding the effect of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis. PMID:2808688

  18. Horner's Syndrome Incidental to Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Excision: Case Report and Brief Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mastronikolis, Nicholas S.; Spiliopoulou, Sofia P.; Zolota, Vassiliki; Papadas, Theodoros A.

    2016-01-01

    Horner's syndrome is characterized by a combination of ipsilateral miosis, blepharoptosis, enophthalmos, facial anhidrosis, and iris heterochromia in existence of congenital lesions. The syndrome results from a disruption of the ipsilateral sympathetic innervation of the eye and ocular adnexa at different levels. Though rare, thyroid and neck surgery could be considered as possible causes of this clinical entity. We present a case of Horner's syndrome in a patient after total thyroidectomy and neck dissection for medullary thyroid cancer with neck nodal disease and attempt a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:27200201

  19. Recognition of a CD4+ mouse medullary thymocyte subpopulation by Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin.

    PubMed

    Lascurain, R; Chávez, R; Gorocica, P; Pérez, A; Montaño, L F; Zenteno, E

    1994-11-01

    We have used the Gal beta(1-->3)GalNAc-specific Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin to isolate a thymus cell subpopulation which is different from that sorted with Arachis hypogaea lectin. The cells recognized by A. leucocarpus lectin were predominantly CD4+, whereas a minor proportion of CD8+ cells (approximately 11%) were also identified. The A. leucocarpus-positive cells were located in the thymus medulla and the cortico-medullary junction. The cortex was negative for A. leucocarpus cells. PMID:7835965

  20. Poorly differentiated colonic adenocarcinoma, medullary type: clinical, phenotypic, and molecular characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Rüschoff, J.; Dietmaier, W.; Lüttges, J.; Seitz, G.; Bocker, T.; Zirngibl, H.; Schlegel, J.; Schackert, H. K.; Jauch, K. W.; Hofstaedter, F.

    1997-01-01

    Clinicopathological evidence has accumulated that colorectal adenocarcinoma with minimal or no glandular differentiation constitutes two entities with different prognosis. In a series of 20 predominantly nonglandular, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, histological features, DNA content, p53 protein expression, Ki-ras mutation, and microsatellite instability were analyzed and correlated to the biology of the tumors. In addition, the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transcripts was tested by RNA in situ hybridization and EBV DNA was demonstrated by nested polymerase chain reaction. Histologically, 13 tumors showed small uniform cells and 7 tumors showed large pleomorphic cells. Tumors with uniform cells exhibited more commonly an expansive growth pattern (69.2% versus 0%; P < 0.025) and a dense peritumor lymphoid infiltrate (84.6% versus 14.3%; P < 0.01) resembling their gastric counterpart, solid or medullary carcinoma. These tumors showed less frequent lymph node as well as hematogeneous metastases than pleomorphic carcinomas. In addition, they were usually diploid (84.6% versus 28.6%; P < 0.05) and lacked stabilization of the p53 protein (0% versus 42.9%; P < 0.05). No significant difference between the medullary and the pleomorphic tumor type was found with respect to bcl2 expression and the occurrence of Ki-ras mutations at codon 12. In contrast, microsatellite instability was almost totally restricted to poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the medullary type (100% versus 14.3%; P < 0.001). Finally, polymerase chain reaction revealed EBV DNA in 5 tumor specimens, which was, however, restricted to the peritumor lymphoid infiltrate as shown by in situ hybridization. Correlation with the biology of the tumors revealed that only one patient with the uniform cell type died due to metastastic disease during the follow-up period (median, 31 months), which was the case in five of the seven patients with the pleomorphic-type carcinoma (P < 0.025). Our

  1. Horner's Syndrome Incidental to Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Excision: Case Report and Brief Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Spiliopoulou, Sofia P; Zolota, Vassiliki; Papadas, Theodoros A

    2016-01-01

    Horner's syndrome is characterized by a combination of ipsilateral miosis, blepharoptosis, enophthalmos, facial anhidrosis, and iris heterochromia in existence of congenital lesions. The syndrome results from a disruption of the ipsilateral sympathetic innervation of the eye and ocular adnexa at different levels. Though rare, thyroid and neck surgery could be considered as possible causes of this clinical entity. We present a case of Horner's syndrome in a patient after total thyroidectomy and neck dissection for medullary thyroid cancer with neck nodal disease and attempt a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:27200201

  2. Charting a course through the CEAs: diagnosis and management of medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher W; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun

    2016-09-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an uncommon thyroid cancer that requires a high index of suspicion to facilitate diagnosis of early-stage disease amenable to surgical cure. The challenges of diagnosis, as well as management in the setting of persistent disease, are explored in the context of a case presenting with the incidental finding of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and an (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET)-positive thyroid incidentaloma detected following treatment of colorectal cancer. Strategies to individualize prognosis, and emerging PET-based imaging modalities, particularly the potential role of (18) F-DOPA-PET in staging, are reviewed. PMID:27230389

  3. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-05-01

    Two patients diagnosed with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) were referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with Lu-[DOTA,Tyr]octreotate (DOTATATE). Each patient was treated with 4 doses of Lu-DOTATATE given 2 months apart. One patient achieved stable disease for 10 months then chose to pursue surgery, and the other achieved stable disease for 9 months on imaging; however, calcitonin continued to rise. The use of Lu-DOTATATE PRRT therapy in the management of MTC warrants further research. PMID:25674858

  4. Medullary thyroid carcinoma with a paraganglioma-like pattern and melanin production: a case report with ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, T; Satoh, M; Azuma, K; Sawada, N; Mori, M

    1998-06-01

    We report a case of medullary thyroid carcinoma with a paraganglioma-like pattern and melanin production. Macroscopically, a rectangular black area within a gray-white background was seen on the cut surface of the tumor. Histologically, the tumor was found to have a trabecular or nestlike architecture with many pigmented dendritic cells, resembling the "sustentacular cells" of paraganglioma, scattered among nonpigmented polygonal tumor cells. Fontana-Masson staining and bleaching with potassium permanganate and oxalic acid revealed that this pigment was melanin, which was also confirmed by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemically, pigmented dendritic cells were positive for calcitonin, as were the surrounding typical medullary thyroid carcinoma cells. These cells were also positive for S100 protein but not for HMB-45, compatible with sustentacular cells. These findings suggest that this tumor could be considered to bridge the gap between two variants of medullary thyroid carcinoma, the melanin-producing (pigmented) type and the paraganglioma-like type. PMID:9625426

  5. Subjective Visual Vertical and Horizontal Abnormalities in a Patient with Lateral Medullary Syndrome-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Ashish, Gaurav; Lepcha, Anjali; Balraj, Achamma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of persistent vertigo in post infarct patients is very important as the management depends on whether the cause is purely of central origin or due to associated vestibular affliction. Case Report: A patient with left sided dorsolateral medullary syndrome and persistent vestibular symptoms was evaluated. Vestibular test battery showed abnormal smooth pursuit, bilateral hyperactive caloric responses, and abnormal dynamic subjective visual vertical and dynamic subjective visual horizontal tests. Conclusion: Dorsolateral medullary infarctions (Wallenberg’s syndrome) typically cause a central vestibular tonus imbalance in the roll plane with ipsilateral deviations of perceived vertical orientation. The SVV and SVH tests may have a role in localizing the pathology in a patient with lateral medullary syndrome. PMID:25745615

  6. Properties of odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, E E; Novoselov, V I; Bystrova, M F

    1988-01-22

    The specific membrane glycoproteins with high affinity for camphor and decanal were isolated from rat olfactory epithelium. Antibodies to these glycoproteins inhibited both the electroolfactogram and the binding of odorants. The enzyme immunoassay has shown these glycoproteins to be present in the olfactory epithelium of rat, mouse, guinea-pig and hamster but not in that of frog and carp. The molecular mass of the odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium solubilized by Triton X-100 was approx. 140 kDa. They consisted of two subunits (88 and 55 kDa). The 88 kDa subunit was capable of binding odorants. The data obtained suggest that the glycoproteins isolated have some properties that make them plausible candidates for olfactory receptor molecules. PMID:3337807

  7. In vivo survival and stratification of cultured limbal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Anees; Vemuganti, Geeta K; Iftekhar, Ghazala; Rao, Gullapalli N; Sangwan, Virender S

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old Bangladeshi girl presented with total limbal stem cell deficiency in the left eye, secondary to a 6-month-old chemical injury. The patient had also previously undergone two limbal transplantation surgeries. At the authors' centre the child underwent autologous cultured limbal epithelium transplantation, on human amniotic membrane, without the use of air-lift technique. Symptomatic relief, re-epithelialization of the ocular surface, regression of corneal pannus and slight improvement in vision were all noted. The corneal button obtained at the time of keratoplasty (performed 4 months later) revealed stratified epithelium with basement membrane. Thirty-seven months post keratoplasty, the best-corrected visual acuity was 6/15 with clear graft and stable ocular surface. Herein, a case of limbal stem cell deficiency successfully managed by monolayer of cultured limbal epithelium is presented. PMID:17300583

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging investigations of position of conus medullaris in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis as a peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hesarikia, Hamid; Azma, Kamran; Kousari, Aliasghar; Nikouei, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a structural 3-dimensional deformity the spine, which is occurring between 10 years of age and skeletal maturity and it mostly affects prepuberbal girls. The etiology of AIS remains unknown and seems should be multifactorial. According to the theories, there could be a shorter spinal cord or a higher location of the conus medullaris and disproportionate growth in neuro-osseous system. This study wants to investigate the position of the conus medullaris in AIS patients with a large curve magnitude in comparison with healthy adolescents. 94 AIS patients consisting of 25 males and 69 females between 11 and 25 years old, based on physical examination and standing posteroanterior roentgenography of the total spine with a Cobb angle more than 40 degrees was chosen. The main curve magnitude of every AIS patient was measured by the Cobb method. Apex of deformity was determined based on SRS definition. Patients' deformity were calcified based on Lenke classification. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the total spine were performed in the AIS group, by means of a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging system. The position of conus medullaris was defined according to the method by saffiudin et al and was assessed based on the age, sex, type of deformity, severity of deformity, kyphosis, lordosis, flexibility, apical vertebra, stable vertebra. The mean age of patients were 16.34 with 6.77 of conus medullaris position in mean, which was lower one-third of L1. Our study showed no significant correlation between the position of conus medullaris with age, weight, preoperative curve, flexibility, types of deformity based on Lenke classification and degree of kyphosis and lordisis. In conclusion, there is the same mean and the distribution of the conus medullaris locations for AIS patients and normal populations. PMID:26131185

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Myasthenia Gravis with Thymoma and Thymic Hyperplasia Undergoing Extended Transsternal Thymectomy: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nazarbaghi, Surena; Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Mahmodlou, Rahim; Arjmand, Nasim; Rezaei, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the widespread use of thymectomy in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients, it has remained controversial as to whether this procedure is of a similar efficacy and clinical outcome among MG patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Aim: We sought to determine the long-term clinical outcomes of MG patients who received extended transsternal thymectomy associated with pyridostigmine and prednisolone postoperatively. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective study from January 1999 to December 2013, MG patients who underwent thymectomy were followed up. Out of 41 MG patients admitted in our center, 25 patients had undergone thymectomy adjunctive to pyridostigmine and prednisolone therapy postoperatively. The primary endpoints included improvement in individual diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, dysarthria, dyspnea, and limb weakness. In addition, according to the MG Foundation of America (MGFA) criteria, response to therapy was defined as complete stable remission (CSR), pharmacologic remission (PR), and minimal manifestation (MM) as secondary endpoints. Results: Majority of the patients were male (60%) and the mean age of the patients was 32.2 ± 13.9 years. Fifteen (60%) and 10 patients (40%) had thymoma and thymic hyperplasia, respectively. All the patients were followed up during a mean period of of 86.9 ± 50.3 months (minimum 10 months and maximum 168 months). The rates of CSR, PR, and MM were comparable between the thymoma and thymic hyperplasia groups (P = 0.584). Based on the Kaplan Meier analysis, the probabilities of CSR, PR, and MM were not significantly different between patients with thymoma and thymic hyperplasia. Conclusion: The extended transsternal thymectomy, along with the postoperative regimen of pyridostigmine and prednisolone was associated with a high rate of clinical improvement among MG patients with thymoma or thymic hyperplasia. PMID:26713298

  10. AND-34, a novel p130Cas-binding thymic stromal cell protein regulated by adhesion and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Clayton, L K; Smolyar, A; Lerner, A

    1999-08-15

    We have characterized a novel cDNA whose steady state mRNA levels rise in the thymus 2 to 6 h following the induction of CD4+CD8+ thymocyte apoptosis by in vivo cross-linking of CD3 epsilon. This cDNA, AND-34-1, contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with an amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a carboxyl-terminal domain homologous to GDP-exchange factors (GEFs). Northern analysis demonstrates widespread expression of the AND-34 gene. Anti-CD3 epsilon treatment induces up-regulation of the AND-34 mRNA levels in total thymic RNA but not in RNA from purified thymocytes, suggesting that this transcript is derived from a thymic stromal cell population. IL-1 and TNF increase AND-34 transcript levels in thymic cortical reticular, thymic nurse, and fibroblast cell lines. In the thymic cortical reticular cell line, IL-1 and TNF induce a protein of the predicted 93-kDa size reactive with anti-AND-34 peptide antisera. Fifteen minutes of serum stimulation of vanadate-pretreated AND-34-1-transfected NIH3T3 fibroblasts induces tyrosine phosphorylation of AND-34 as well as coprecipitating 95-, 125-, and 130-kDa proteins. One of these tyrosine phosphorylated proteins is identified as p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate), a signaling molecule previously known to bind to a GDP-exchange factor (C3G) and inducibly associate with the focal adhesion complex. Consistent with such an association, AND-34 tyrosine phosphorylation is induced following adherence of trypsinized fibroblasts to fibronectin or poly-L -lysine-coated surfaces. PMID:10438950

  11. Abnormal Ion Permeation through Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Spock, A.; Fischer, N.; Gatzy, J. T.; Boucher, R. C.

    1983-09-01

    The epithelium of nasal tissue excised from subjects with cystic fibrosis exhibited higher voltage and lower conductance than tissue from control subjects. Basal sodium ion absorption by cystic fibrosis and normal nasal epithelia equaled the short-circuit current and was amiloride-sensitive. Amiloride induced chloride ion secretion in normal but not cystic fibrosis tissue and consequently was more effective in inhibiting the short-circuit current in cystic fibrosis epithelia. Chloride ion-free solution induced a smaller hyperpolarization of cystic fibrosis tissue. The increased voltage and amiloride efficacy in cystic fibrosis reflect absorption of sodium ions across an epithelium that is relatively impermeable to chloride ions.

  12. Use of Vandetanib in Metastatic Medullary Carcinoma of Thyroid in a Pediatric Patient With Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia 2B.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vidya K; Ronghe, Milind; MacGregor, Fiona B; Bradshaw, Nicola; Davidson, Rosemarie; Welbury, Richard; Reed, Nicholas; Shaikh, Mohamad G

    2016-03-01

    We describe a child with advanced, metastatic, inoperable medullary carcinoma of thyroid associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B and rearranged during transfection mutation with a positive response to vandetanib treatment. He responded well with a fall in calcitonin levels and a reduction in size of the thyroid malignancy, lymph nodes, and pulmonary metastases. He has been on vandetanib for 4 years with good clinical and biochemical response. Vandetanib has a role in the treatment of patients including children with inoperable locally advanced and metastatic medullary carcinoma of thyroid. More information is needed on its use in children and long-term outcome. PMID:26479990

  13. Medullary lateral line units of rudd, Scardinius erythrophthalmus, are sensitive to Kármán vortex streets.

    PubMed

    Klein, Adrian; Winkelnkemper, Jan; Dylda, Evelyn; Bleckmann, Horst

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the responses of medullary lateral line units of the rudd, Scardinius erythrophthalmus, to bulk water flow (7 cm s(-1)) and to water flow that contained vortices shed by an upstream half cylinder (diameter 1, 2, and 3 cm). Thirty-five percent of the medullary units either increased or decreased their discharge rate with the increasing cylinder diameter. In some units, the spike patterns revealed the vortex shedding frequency, i.e., in these units the amplitude of spike train frequency spectra was similar or identical to the vortex shedding frequency. PMID:26018072

  14. Pretreatment biopsy for histological diagnosis and induction therapy in thymic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jie; Gu, Zhitao; Zhang, Hongdian; Ma, Zhao; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to investigate the value of pretreatment biopsy for histological diagnosis and induction therapies in the management of locally advanced thymic malignancies. Methods The clinical pathological data of patients with thymic tumors in the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) who underwent biopsy before treatment from 1994 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The application trend of preoperative histological diagnosis and its influence on treatment outcome were analyzed. Results Of 1,902 cases of thymic tumors, 336 (17.1%) had undergone biopsy for histological diagnosis before therapeutic decision was decided. In recent years, percentage of pretreatment histological diagnosis significantly increased in the later ten years than the former during the study period (P=0.008). There was also a significant increase in thoracoscopy/mediastinoscopy/E-BUS biopsy as compared to open biopsy (P=0.029). Survival in Patients with preoperative biopsy for histology had significantly higher stage lesions (P=0.000) and higher grade malignancy (P=0.000), thus a significantly lower complete resection rate (P=0.000) and therefore a significantly worse survival than those without preoperative biopsy (P=0.000). In the biopsied 336 patients, those who received upfront surgery had significantly better survival than those received surgery after induction therapy (P=0.000). In stage III and IVa diseases, the R0 resection rate after induction therapies increased significantly as compared to the surgery upfront cases (65.5% vs. 46.2%, P=0.025). Tumors downstaged after induction had similar outcomes as those having upfront surgery (92.3% vs. 84.2%, P=0.51). However, tumors not downstaged by induction had significantly worse prognosis than those downstaged (P=0.004), and fared even worse than those having definitive chemoradiation without surgery (37.2% vs. 62.4%, P=0.216). Conclusions It is crucial to get histological diagnosis for thymoma before

  15. Two gut intraepithelial CD8+ lymphocyte populations with different T cell receptors: A role for the gut epithelium in T cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guy-Grand, D.; Cerf-Bensussan, N.; Malissen, B.; Malassis-Seris, M.; Briottet, C.; Vassalli, P. )

    1991-02-01

    Mouse gut intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) consist mainly (90%) of two populations of CD8+ T cells. One bears heterodimeric alpha/beta CD8 chains (Lyt-2+, Lyt-3+), a T cell receptor (TCR) made of alpha/beta chains, and is Thy-1+; it represents the progeny of T blasts elicited in Peyer's patches by antigenic stimulation. The other bears homodimeric alpha/alpha CD8+ chains, contains no beta chain mRNA, and is mostly Thy-1- and TCR-gamma/delta + or -alpha/beta +; it is thymo-independent and does not require antigenic stimulation, as shown by its presence: (a) in nude and scid mice; (b) in irradiated and thymectomized mice repopulated by T-depleted bone marrow cells bearing an identifiable marker; (c) in thymectomized mice treated by injections of monoclonal anti-CD8 antibody, which lead to total depletion of peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes; and (d) in germ-free mice and in suckling mice. In young nude mice, alpha/alpha CD8 chains, CD3-TCR complexes, and TCR mRNAs (first gamma/delta) are found on IEL, while they are not detectable on or in peripheral or circulating lymphocytes or bone marrow cells. IEL, in contrast to mature T cells, contain mRNA for the RAG protein, which is required for the rearrangement of TCR and Ig genes. We propose that the gut epithelium (an endoderm derivative, as the thymic epithelium) has an inductive property, attracting progenitors of bone marrow origin, and triggering their TCR rearrangement and alpha/alpha CD8 chains expression, thus giving rise to a T cell population that appears to belong to the same lineage as gamma/delta thymocytes and to recognize an antigenic repertoire different from that of alpha/beta CD8+ IEL.

  16. Clinical management and outcomes of papillary, follicular and medullary thyroid cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Nasrin; Abbas Hashemi, Seyyed; Fazli, Mehran; Raisian, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    The clinical characteristics, pathological subtypes and patients' survival in 40 patients with thyroid carcinoma between March 2007 and March 2012 were evaluated. This study included 33 (82.5 %) females and seven (17.5%) males (female to male ratio of 4.7:1). The median age of patients was 47.5 (range; 24-64). Papillary carcinoma was the commonest pathological subtype (23 patients, 57.5%), followed by follicular carcinoma (14 patients, 35%) and medullary carcinoma (3 cases, 7.5%). Total thryoidectomy was performed in 30 (75%), lobectomy in six (15%), subtotal and multifocal thryoidectomy in two (5%) patients. The median time of follow up was 3 years with range of 1-5 years. After ive years 34 (85%) patients were alive and six (15%) were dead. The overall 5-year actuarial survival was 85%, for papillary carcinoma 91.3%, for follicular carcinoma 85.7% and for medullary carcinoma it was 33.3%. The results suggest that total thryoidectomy had better outcome in comparison with other surgeries. PMID:23348184

  17. Renal outer medullary potassium channel knockout models reveal thick ascending limb function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong

    2012-02-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK) is an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive inward-rectifier potassium channel (Kir1.1 or KCNJ1) highly expressed in the cortical and medullary thick ascending limbs (TAL), connecting segment (CNT) and cortical collecting duct (CCD) in the mammalian kidney, where it serves to recycle potassium (K(+)) across the apical membrane in TAL and to secrete K(+) in the CNT and CCD. ROMK channel mutations cause type II Bartter's syndrome with salt wasting and dehydration, and ROMK knockout mice display a similar phenotype of Bartter's syndrome in humans. Studies from ROMK null mice indicate that ROMK is required to form both the small-conductance (30pS, SK) K channels and the 70pS (IK) K channels in the TAL. The availability of ROMK(-/-) mice has made it possible to study electrolyte transport along the nephron in order to understand the TAL function under physiological conditions and the compensatory mechanisms of salt and water transport under the conditions of TAL dysfunction. This review summarizes previous progress in the study of K(+) channel activity in the TAL and CCD, ion transporter expression and activities along the nephron, and renal functions under physiological and pathophysiological conditions using ROMK(-/-) mice. PMID:22038261

  18. Ectopic ACTH Production Leading to Diagnosis of Underlying Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Leslee N.; Wilson, Jessica R.; Baum, Howard B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has been described as a source of ectopic ACTH secretion in patients with Cushing’s syndrome. This is an infrequent association, occurring in less than 1% of MTC cases. Among these, it is even more unusual for an initial diagnosis of hypercortisolism to lead to the discovery of underlying MTC. Here we present a case of a patient with weakness, diarrhea, and hypokalemia who was found first to have Cushing’s syndrome and later diagnosed with metastatic MTC. The patient was treated initially with oral agents to control his hypercortisolism, then with an etomidate infusion after experiencing intestinal perforation. He also received vandetanib therapy targeting his underlying malignancy, as this has been shown to reverse clinical signs of Cushing’s syndrome in patients with MTC and subsequent ectopic ACTH secretion. Bilateral adrenalectomy was ultimately required. Medullary thyroid carcinoma should be considered in patients presenting with Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, and a multimodality treatment approach is often required. PMID:27141514

  19. Molecular mechanisms of medullary thyroid carcinoma: current approaches in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Boikos, S A; Stratakis, C A

    2008-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the most common cause of death among patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2. Dominant-activating mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have been shown to have a central role in the development of MEN 2 and sporadic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC): about half of sporadic MTCs are caused by somatic genetic changes of the RET oncogene. Inactivating mutations of the same gene lead to Hirschprung disease and other developmental defects. Thus, RET genetic changes lead to phenotypes that largely depend on their location in the gene and the function and timing of developmental expression of the RET protein. The reproducibility of the phenotype caused by each RET genotype led to MEN 2/MTC being among the first conditions in Medicine where a drastic measure is applied to prevent cancer, following genetic testing: thyroidectomy is currently routinely done in young children that are carriers of MTC-predisposing RET mutations. RET inhibitors have been also developed recently and are used in various types of thyroid and other cancers. This report reviews the RET involvement in the etiology of MEN 2 and MTC and updates the therapeutic approach in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:17952863

  20. Direct effects of endogenous pyrogen on medullary temperature-responsive neurons in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Y; Morimoto, A; Takase, Y; Murakami, N

    1981-01-01

    The effect of endogenous pyrogen (E.P.) injected directly into the tissue near the recording site were examined on the activities of the medullary temperature-responsive (TR) neurons in rabbits anesthetized with urethane. Endogenous pyrogen prepared from rabbit's whole blood was administered by a fine glass cannula (100-200 micrometer in diameter) in a fluid volume of 1 to 4 microliter. The cannula was fixed to the manipulator in parallel with a microelectrode and their tips were less than 0.05 mm apart. In rabbits with the intact preoptic/anterior hypothalamic (PO/AH) region, 4 warm-responsive neurons out of 7 were inhibited and 6 cold-responsive neuron out of 7 were excited by the direct administration of the E.P. In rabbits with lesions of the PO/AH, 5 warm-responsive neurons out of 9 were inhibited and 6 cold-responsive neurons out of 8 were facilitated by E.P. Antipyretics administered locally after the E.P. antagonized the pyretic effect, causing a return of the discharge of TR neuron to the control rate within 2.4 +/- 1.2 (mean +/- S.D.) min. The medullary TR neuron itself has the ability to respond to the E.P. and contributes to the development of fever. PMID:7289227

  1. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation.

  2. cabozantinib (COMETRIQ⁰). In medullary thyroid cancer: more harmful than beneficial, as is vandetanib.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for medullary thyroid cancer. Cytotoxic chemotherapy is generally ineffective in patients with progressive, inoperable, advanced-stage or metastatic tumours. Vandetanib is also authorised in this setting, but it has more harms than benefits. Cabozantinib, like vandetanib, inhibits several tyrosine kinases involved in angiogenesis. Cabozantinib has been authorised in the European Union for use in this setting. In a randomised, placebo-controlled trial in 330 patients, adding cabozantinib to tailored symptomatic treatment did not prolong survival or improve symptoms, despite a favourable effect on tumour imaging and certain laboratory parameters. On the contrary, cabozantinib appeared to undermine quality of life and aggravate diarrhoea. The known adverse effects of cabozantinib are numerous and often severe: diarrhoea, hand-foot syndrome, hypertension, venous and arterial thrombosis, bleeding and fistulae. Deaths unrelated to tumour progression were more frequent with cabozantinib than with placebo. Cabozantinib carries a risk of multiple pharmacokinetic interactions by interfering with cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein. In animals, cabozantinib is teratogenic and also impairs male and female fertility. Contraception is required for women, and also for the partners of treated men, who must use condoms. These precautions must be maintained for at least 4 months after the end of treatment. In practice, in mid-2015, cabozantinib, like vandetanib, has an unfavourable harm-benefit balance in medullary thyroid cancer. The focus should remain on tailored symptomatic care. PMID:26942253

  3. Iodixanol, Constriction of Medullary Descending Vasa Recta, and Risk for Contrast Medium–induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sendeski, Mauricio; Patzak, Andreas; Pallone, Thomas L.; Cao, Chunhua; Persson, A. Erik; Persson, Pontus B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a type of contrast medium (CM), iodixanol, modifies outer medullary descending vasa recta (DVR) vasoreactivity and nitric oxide (NO) production in isolated microperfused DVR. Materials and Methods: Animal handling conformed to the Animal Care Committee Guidelines of all participating institutions. Single specimens of DVR were isolated from rats and perfused with a buffered solution containing iodixanol. A concentration of 23 mg of iodine per milliliter was chosen to mimic that expected to be used in usual examinations in humans. Luminal diameter was determined by using video microscopy, and NO was measured by using fluorescent techniques. Results: Iodixanol led to 52% reduction of DVR luminal diameter, a narrowing that might interfere with passage of erythrocytes in vivo. Vasoconstriction induced by angiotensin II was enhanced by iodixanol. Moreover, iodixanol decreased NO bioavailability by more than 82%. Use of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) prevented both vasoconstriction with iodixanol alone and increased constriction with angiotensin II caused by CM. Conclusion: Iodixanol in doses typically used for coronary interventions constricts DVR, intensifies angiotensin II–induced constriction, and reduces bioavailability of NO. CM-induced nephropathy may be related to these events and scavenging of reactive oxygen species might exert a therapeutic benefit by preventing the adverse effects that a CM has on medullary perfusion. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19366904

  4. Interferon alpha and rapamycin inhibit the growth of carcinoid and medullary thyroid cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Motylewska, Ewelina; Lawnicka, Hanna; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Sicinska, Paulina; Niedziela, Agata; Melen-Mucha, Gabriela; Stepien, Henryk

    2014-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascularized neoplasms characterized by rising incidence. Moreover, the neuroendocrine cells were shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors. Therefore, angiomodulators could be potentially a new group of drugs enhancing still unsatisfactory effectiveness of NET therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the direct influence of angiomodulators: VEGF and five endogenous and exogenous antiangiogenic compounds (endostatin, interferon alpha [IFNα], rapamycin, JV1-36, semaxinib [SU5416]) on the growth of two NET cell lines: lung carcinoid H727 cell line and medullary thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro. IFNα and rapamycin induced the inhibitory effect on H727 and TT cell viability and proliferation, increasing apoptosis and arresting the cell cycle. Also semaxinib (10(-5)M) inhibited proliferation of both cell lines. VEGF and endostatin did not influence the growth of H727 and TT cells. The inhibitory effect of IFNα, rapamycin and semaxinib on carcinoid and medullary thyroid cancer growth was revealed in our in vitro study, although some other antiangiogenic agents did not directly influence H727 and TT cell growth. Thus, IFNα and mTOR inhibitors as multidirectionally acting drugs with antiangiogenic effect could be potentially efficient in treatment of neuroendocrine tumors and are worth further studies. PMID:24948064

  5. Targeting mTOR in RET mutant medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gild, Matti L; Landa, Iñigo; Ryder, Mabel; Ghossein, Ronald A; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by a gene that is frequently mutated in medullary thyroid cancer, have emerged as promising novel therapies for the disease. Rapalogs and other mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are effective agents in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which share lineage properties with medullary thyroid carcinomas. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of mTOR activity to RET-induced signaling and cell growth and to establish whether growth suppression is enhanced by co-targeting RET and mTOR kinase activities. Treatment of the RET mutant cell lines TT, TPC-1, and MZ-CRC-1 with AST487, a RET kinase inhibitor, suppressed growth and showed profound and sustained inhibition of mTOR signaling, which was recapitulated by siRNA-mediated RET knockdown. Inhibition of mTOR with INK128, a dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase inhibitor, also resulted in marked growth suppression to levels similar to those seen with RET blockade. Moreover, combined treatment with AST487 and INK128 at low concentrations suppressed growth and induced apoptosis. These data establish mTOR as a key mediator of RET-mediated cell growth in thyroid cancer cells and provide a rationale for combinatorial treatments in thyroid cancers with oncogenic RET mutations. PMID:23828865

  6. Induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and inhibition on adipogenesis: Two different sides of the same coin? Feasible roles and mechanisms of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in age-related thymic involution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianxin; Wang, Yajun; Zhang, Nannan; Zhu, Xike

    2016-08-01

    Age-related thymic involution is characterized by a loss of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and a concomitant increase in adipocytes, but the mechanisms involved in thymic adipogenesis are still not clear. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has been reported to be up-regulated with age in thymic stromal cells in both human and mouse. However, the exact role of TGF-β1 in age-related thymic involution remains to be further elucidated. On the basis of previous findings, we propose a novel hypothesis that TGF-β1 functions a dual role in age-related thymic involution. On one hand, up-regulation of TGF-β1 promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in TECs via activating forkhead box protein C2 (FoxC2). On the other hand, TGF-β1 inhibits the transdifferentiation of EMT-derived mesenchymal cells to adipocytes in the thymus. If confirmed, our hypothesis will not only provide further evidence supporting that the transdifferentiation of TECs into pre-adipocytes represents a source of thymic adiposity during age-related thymic involution, but also uncover a unique role of TGF-β1 in the transdifferentiation of TECs into pre-adipocytes. Collectively, the inhibition of TGF-β1 may serve as a strategy to hinder age-related thymic involution or even to restore thymic function in the elderly. PMID:27189906

  7. A case of successful preoperative chemotherapy with cisplatin and irinotecan followed by curative-intent surgery for locally advanced thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeki; Horio, Hirotoshi; Hato, Tai; Harada, Masahiko; Okuma, Yusuke; Hishima, Tsunekazu

    2013-03-01

    The optimal chemotherapy for thymic carcinoma has yet to be determined based on clinical evidence because of the rarity of this pathological entity. We report the case of a patient with locally advanced thymic carcinoma in whom radical excision was achieved with intensive preoperative chemotherapy followed by curative-intent surgery. A 59-year-old woman was diagnosed with Masaoka-Koga stage III thymic cancer showing squamous cell carcinoma histology. Invasion to the ascending aorta and left brachiocephalic vein was suspected from imaging, so preoperative chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin and irinotecan was administered. Partial response to chemotherapy was achieved and the residual tumor was completely resected with subsequent surgery. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen demonstrated stage II thymic carcinoma. The patient has shown no evidence of recurrence or surgical complications as of 46 months after completing preoperative chemotherapy. PMID:22760255

  8. Effects of steroids on the secretion of immunoregulatory factors by thymic epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Stimson, W H; Crilly, P J

    1981-01-01

    Rat thymic epithelial cells were cultured for 39 days in the presence of various concentrations of oestradiol, testosterone, progesterone and corticosterone and the supernatants assessed for effects on the stimulation of cells from the thymus, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen, with several agents. All the steroids, except progesterone, were found to significantly regulate the secretion of immunoregulatory factors by the epithelial cells at physiological levels but the effects were dose dependent. Fractionation of active supernatants indicated that the capacity to enhance or depress cellular proliferation was mainly associated with substances having molecular weights greater than 30,000 or less than 1000, respectively. This study supports the idea that certain steroids can influence the immune response indirectly through the thymus. PMID:7298074

  9. Thymic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Komaki, R; Putnam, J B; Shin, D M; Cox, J D

    1997-03-01

    Thymomas are infrequent and relatively indolent mediastinal tumors. They are usually encapsulated and readily removed. Invasive tumors, even if completely resected, require additional therapy. Although efforts have been made to relate histopathologic characteristics to outcome, the most important prognostic factors are stage and ability to achieve complete resection. The responsiveness of these tumors to chemotherapy and radiation therapy has led to combining all three modalities in a consistent sequence to derive maximal benefit from each to outcome in patients with locally advanced stage tumors. PMID:9161794

  10. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  11. Examination of the reticular epithelium of the bovine pharyngeal tonsil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nasopharyngeal tonsil (adenoid), located at the posterior of the nasopharynx is ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular composition of this important epithe...

  12. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  13. Coelomic epithelium-derived cells in visceral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Laura; Carmona, Rita; Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón

    2016-03-01

    Coelomic cavities of vertebrates are lined by a mesothelium which develops from the lateral plate mesoderm. During development, the coelomic epithelium is a highly active cell layer, which locally is able to supply mesenchymal cells that contribute to the mesodermal elements of many organs and provide signals which are necessary for their development. The relevance of this process of mesenchymal cell supply to the developing organs is becoming clearer because genetic lineage tracing techniques have been developed in recent years. Body wall, heart, liver, lungs, gonads, and gastrointestinal tract are populated by cells derived from the coelomic epithelium which contribute to their connective and vascular tissues, and sometimes to specialized cell types such as the stellate cells of the liver, the Cajal interstitial cells of the gut or the Sertoli cells of the testicle. In this review we collect information about the contribution of coelomic epithelium derived cells to visceral development, their developmental fates and signaling functions. The common features displayed by all these processes suggest that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the embryonic coelomic epithelium is an underestimated but key event of vertebrate development, and probably it is shared by all the coelomate metazoans. PMID:26638186

  14. Thymic education curtailed: defective immune responses in nude rats reconstituted with immature thymocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Yang, C P; Bell, E B

    1994-04-01

    We have studied the ability of thymocyte subsets from allotype marked donors to populate athymic nude rats with T cells and to restore immune responsiveness. Following adoptive transfer, CD4-CD8- double-negative (DN) thymocytes (lymphoid precursor cells) or the CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) subset (intermediate thymocytes) or CD4+CD8- single-positive (CD4 SP) cells (mature thymocytes) each generated a permanent population of CD4+ progeny in syngeneic nude recipients. DN and DP thymocytes also produced small numbers of CD8+ cells; there was no evidence of a CD4-CD8- or CD4+CD8+ donor cell population. CD4 SP thymocytes conferred T cell functions [graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, allograft rejection and thymus-dependent antibody responses] on nude rats that were almost indistinguishable from those conferred by mature peripheral recirculating CD4 T cells. Transfer of DP thymocytes extended the life-span of the immunoincompetent nudes and produced CD4+ progeny with near normal GVH responsiveness. However, DP-derived CD4+ cells were deficient at inducing allograft rejection and provided little or no help for antibody synthesis. The CD4+ progeny of DN thymocytes did not prolong the survival of nude recipients, gave reduced GVH reactivity, showed almost no capacity to initiate skin allograft rejection and failed to help B cells produce antibody. The results suggest that intrathymic development proceeds stepwise; each stage is accompanied by acquisition of additional properties that are reflected by T cell responses in the periphery. Thymic education does not become complete until the SP stage is reached when thymocytes become fully independent of the thymic microenvironment. PMID:8018597

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Infection Impacts on the Thymic Regulatory T Cell Compartment.

    PubMed

    González, Florencia Belén; Calmon-Hamaty, Flavia; Nô Seara Cordeiro, Synara; Fernández Bussy, Rodrigo; Spinelli, Silvana Virginia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Villar, Silvina Raquel; Pérez, Ana Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of regulatory T cells in the course of Trypanosoma cruzi infection is still debated. We previously demonstrated that acute murine T. cruzi infection results in an impaired peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cell differentiation due to the acquisition of an abnormal Th1-like phenotype and altered functional features, negatively impacting on the course of infection. Moreover, T. cruzi infection induces an intense thymic atrophy. As known, the thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which thymic-derived regulatory T cells, known as tTregs, differentiate. Considering the lack of available data about the effect of T. cruzi infection upon tTregs, we examined tTreg dynamics during the course of disease. We confirmed that T. cruzi infection induces a marked loss of tTreg cell number associated to cell precursor exhaustion, partially avoided by glucocorticoid ablation- and IL-2 survival factor depletion. At the same time, tTregs accumulate within the CD4 single-positive compartment, exhibiting an increased Ki-67/Annexin V ratio compared to controls. Moreover, tTregs enhance after the infection the expression of signature markers (CD25, CD62L and GITR) and they also display alterations in the expression of migration-associated molecules (α chains of VLAs and chemokine receptors) such as functional fibronectin-driven migratory disturbance. Taken together, we provide data demonstrating profound alterations in tTreg compartment during acute murine T. cruzi infection, denoting that their homeostasis is significantly affected. The evident loss of tTreg cell number may compromise the composition of tTreg peripheral pool, and such sustained alteration over time may be partially related to the immune dysregulation observed in the chronic phase of the disease. PMID:26745276

  16. Influence of age on the proliferation and peripheralization of thymic T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirokawa, K.; Utsuyama, M.; Katsura, Y.; Sado, T.

    1988-01-01

    Bone marrow cells obtained from B10.Thy-1.1 mice (H-2b, Thy-1.1) were injected directly into the thymus of C57BL/6 mice (H-2b,Thy 1.2) of various ages. Thymocyte precursors in the injected donor-bone marrow cells could proliferate in the thymic microenvironment in the following manner: first, preferentially proliferating into the subcapsular cortex; and second, spreading to the whole layer of the cortex, a portion of them gradually moving into the medulla. The proliferation of donor-type thymocytes was most pronounced when intrathymic injection of bone marrow cells (ITB) was performed in newborn mice and especially prominent in week-old mice; it took approximately ten weeks for donor-type thymocytes to finish the whole course of proliferation, differentiation, and emigration to the periphery. When ITB was performed in mice 4 weeks of age and older, the proliferation of donor-type thymocytes was retarded at onset, less pronounced in magnitude, and disappeared earlier. Emigration of donor-type T cells from the thymus to the peripheral lymphoid tissues occurred most rapidly when ITB was performed in newborn mice, and these T cells continued to reside thereafter in the peripheral lymphoid tissues. However, when ITB was performed in mice 4 weeks of age and older, the number of emigrated T cells in the spleen decreased (about a tenth of that in newborn mice) and, moreover, these T cells resided only transiently in the spleen. It was suggested that T cells emigrating from the thymus of mice from newborn to 2 weeks of age are long-lived, whereas those from the thymus in mice 4 weeks of age and older are short-lived. However, when 4-week-old young adult mice were treated by irradiation or hydrocortisone, the thymic capacity was enhanced in terms of proliferation and peripheralization of thymocytes, and emigrated T cells became long-lived.

  17. A signal integration model of thymic selection and natural regulatory T cell commitment.

    PubMed

    Khailaie, Sahamoddin; Robert, Philippe A; Toker, Aras; Huehn, Jochen; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2014-12-15

    The extent of TCR self-reactivity is the basis for selection of a functional and self-tolerant T cell repertoire and is quantified by repeated engagement of TCRs with a diverse pool of self-peptides complexed with self-MHC molecules. The strength of a TCR signal depends on the binding properties of a TCR to the peptide and the MHC, but it is not clear how the specificity to both components drives fate decisions. In this study, we propose a TCR signal-integration model of thymic selection that describes how thymocytes decide among distinct fates, not only based on a single TCR-ligand interaction, but taking into account the TCR stimulation history. These fates are separated based on sustained accumulated signals for positive selection and transient peak signals for negative selection. This spans up the cells into a two-dimensional space where they are either neglected, positively selected, negatively selected, or selected as natural regulatory T cells (nTregs). We show that the dynamics of the integrated signal can serve as a successful basis for extracting specificity of thymocytes to MHC and detecting the existence of cognate self-peptide-MHC. It allows to select a self-MHC-biased and self-peptide-tolerant T cell repertoire. Furthermore, nTregs in the model are enriched with MHC-specific TCRs. This allows nTregs to be more sensitive to activation and more cross-reactive than conventional T cells. This study provides a mechanistic model showing that time integration of TCR-mediated signals, as opposed to single-cell interaction events, is needed to gain a full view on the properties emerging from thymic selection. PMID:25392533

  18. IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin mediate immune pathology in response to chronic airborne allergen exposure.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Koji; Kobayashi, Takao; Hara, Kenichiro; Kephart, Gail M; Ziegler, Steven F; McKenzie, Andrew N; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-08-15

    Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens in the atmospheric environment. These allergens may trigger a complex network of immune responses in the airways, resulting in asthma and other chronic airway diseases. In this study, we investigated the immunological mechanisms involved in the pathological changes induced by chronic exposure to multiple airborne allergens. Naive mice were exposed intranasally to a combination of common airborne allergens, including the house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus, for up to 8 wk. These allergens acted synergistically and induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, specific IgE Ab production, type 2 cytokine response, and airway hyperresponsiveness in 4 wk, followed by airway remodeling in 8 wk. Increased lung infiltration of T cells, B cells, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells was observed. CD4(+) T cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells contributed to the sources of IL-5 and IL-13, suggesting involvement of both innate and adaptive immunity in this model. The lung levels of IL-33 increased quickly within several hours after allergen exposure and continued to rise throughout the chronic phase of inflammation. Mice deficient in IL-33R (Il1rl1(-/-)) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor (Tslpr(-/-)) showed significant reduction in airway inflammation, IgE Ab levels, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, mice deficient in IL-25R or IL-1R showed minimal differences as compared with wild-type animals. Thus, chronic exposure to natural airborne allergens triggers a network of innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses and airway pathology, and IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin most likely play key roles in this process. PMID:25015831

  19. Stature estimation based on measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography images of Japanese cadavers.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-09-01

    Stature estimation using a skeleton is important for the medicolegal investigation of unidentified human remains. The aims of this study were to identify a correlation between stature and measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and derive regression equations for stature estimation in the Japanese population. Measurements were conducted on 215 Japanese subjects (107 males, 108 females) who underwent postmortem computed tomography with subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2012 and January 2014. For assessment, MDCT cross-sections through the mid-point of the first costal facets were chosen. The length of a rising diagonal stroke from the bottom left to the top right of the sternal medullary cavity (RS) and the length of a falling diagonal stroke from top left to bottom right of the sternal medullary cavity (FS) were measured. Statistical analyses indicated that both RS and FS were positively correlated with stature regardless of sex. The correlations were stronger for males than for females. The correlation coefficients for RS were higher than those for FS, and standard errors of estimation calculated by regression analysis using RS were lower than those using FS regardless of sex. Measurement of the sternal medullary cavity using MDCT images may be a potentially useful tool for stature estimation, particularly in cases where better predictors such as long bones are not available. PMID:25082372

  20. [Reduction and fixation of fractures of the neck of the radious be centro-medullary pinning. Original technic].

    PubMed

    Métaizeau, J P; Prévot, J; Schmitt, M

    1980-01-01

    Fractures of the neck of the radius may cause considerable permanent limitation of elbow and forearm movement. This complications resulted from failure to achieve adequate reduction or from vascular disturbance. The authors make use of a Kirschner wire introduced in the medullary canal by its lower end. It is possible to reduce and stabilise the head of the radius without open reduction. PMID:6447340

  1. Association of urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis with papillary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. A new sporadic neoplastic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Chablé-Montero, Fredy; Córdova-Ramón, Juan Carlos; Henson, Donald E

    2014-10-01

    We describe 2 adult women (72 and 54 years), 1 with a low-grade noninvasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis, who 14 years later developed a papillary carcinoma in 1 thyroid lobe and a medullary carcinoma in the contralateral lobe. Both neoplasms were similar in size and appeared symmetrical. Despite its small size, the medullary carcinoma metastasized in multiple cervical lymph nodes. The second patient had a high-grade invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis that infiltrated the renal parenchyma and metastasized in one of the lungs. Five months later, a papillary carcinoma was discovered in the thyroid gland. The 2 papillary thyroid carcinomas were of the follicular variant. Adjacent to 1 papillary carcinoma, there was a dominant nodule of a colloid and adenomatous goiter. The medullary carcinoma contained stromal amyloid and was immunoreactive for calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen. There was no C-cell hyperplasia (medullary carcinoma in situ). The 2 patients are alive, 1 is living with pulmonary metastasis from the high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Twelve cases of this neoplastic association were registered in the Survey, Epidemiology, and End Results Program from 1980 to 2009. We believe that the combination of these unusual neoplasms in the same patient may represent a new sporadic neoplastic syndrome. PMID:25175810

  2. The Immunophenotype of Nodular Variant of Medullary Carcinoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carolina; Nadji, Mehrdad

    2015-10-01

    The histologic and immunohistochemical profile of typical medullary carcinomas (TMC) of the breast are well established. Among the strict histologic criteria for the diagnosis of TMC is complete circumscription of tumor with pushing borders. Those tumors that do not fulfill all morphologic requirements of TMC are designated as atypical medullary carcinomas (AMC). We herewith describe the histology and immunophenotype of a heretofore undescribed variant of TMC composed of multiple distinctly separate nodules that otherwise meet all other histologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes of TMC. Among 2952 cases of infiltrating mammary carcinomas, 111 (3.8%) met the strict criteria for TMC, including positivity for HLA-DR. Nine of these tumors were composed of multiple separate noncoalescing nodules. Immunohistochemical stains for ER, PR, HER2, and HLA-DR, as well as for p53 and Ki-67 were repeated on these nodular forms. Staining for p63 was used to identify possible intraductal components of these tumors. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 53 years. All 9 patients had negative sentinel lymph nodes. Tumors ranged in the overall size from 2.2 to 3.9 cm and were composed of 3 to 6 distinct nodules ranging in size from 0.2 to 1.1 cm surrounding a larger main tumor nodule. The nodules were composed of syncytial groups of large cells with atypical nuclei and prominent nucleoli. A lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was present within and around each satellite nodule. Serial sections did not show coalescing of the nodules into a single tumor mass. Similarly, staining for p63 failed to support the possibility of nodules representing intraductal components of main tumor. All tumors were negative for ER, PR, and HER2, but positive for HLA-DR. Eight of 9 tumors were diffusely positive for p53 and all 9 showed a high proliferation index in >70% of tumor cells with Ki-67. We conclude that the nodular variants of medullary carcinomas (nTMC) of the breast are uncommon forms of TMC. They

  3. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. III. Growth conditions of human thymic epithelial cells and immunomodulatory activities in their culture supernatant.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, L; Eshel, I; Meilin, A; Sharabi, Y; Shoham, J

    1991-01-01

    We report here on a new approach to the cultivation of human thymic epithelial (HTE) cells, which apparently allows more faithful preservation of cell function. This approach, previously developed by us for mouse thymic epithelial (MTE) cells, is based on the use of culture plates coated with extracellular matrix (ECM), and on the use of serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium. The nutritional requirements of HTE and MTE are somewhat different. Although both are critically dependent on ECM and insulin, they differ in their dependency on other growth factors: selenium and transferrin are much more important for HTE cells, whereas epidermal growth factor and hydrocortisone play a more essential role in MTE cultures. The epithelial nature of the cultured cells is indicated by positive staining with anti-keratin antibodies and by the presence of desmosomes and tonofilaments. The ultrastructural appearance of the cells further suggests high metabolic and secretory activities, not usually found in corresponding cell lines. The culture supernatant (CS) of HTE cells exhibited a strong enhancing effect on thymocyte response to Con A stimulation, as measured by cell proliferation and lymphokine production. The effect was observed on both human and mouse thymocytes, but was much stronger in the homologous combination. Thymic factors tested in parallel did not have such a differential effect. The dose-effect relationships were in the form of a bell-shaped curve, with fivefold enhancement of response at the peak and a measurable effect even with 1:1000 dilution, when human thymocytes were used. The responding thymocytes were those which do not bind peanut agglutinin and are resistant to hydrocortisone. The culture system described here may have advantages for the in vitro study of thymic stromal cell function. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1783421

  4. Osseous oligometastases from thymic carcinoma: a case report suggesting the effectiveness of palliative-intent radiotherapy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Jumpei; Horio, Hirotoshi; Okuma, Yusuke; Hosomi, Yukio; Hishima, Tsunekazu

    2016-01-01

    Background Oligometastasis, a recently proposed concept, is defined as an intermediate state of cancer, between localized and systemic disease, that may be well controlled by local ablative treatment. Thymic carcinoma is a rare cancer with a poor prognosis. A definitive management approach has yet to be confirmed by a high level of evidence. Case presentation We present the case of a 41-year-old female who underwent curative-intent surgery for a stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the thymus. Bone metastases were detected 1 year later by magnetic resonance imaging. These were treated with palliative-intent radiotherapy. Disease progression has not been observed in more than 15 years since the achievement of complete radiological remission. Conclusion The treatment outcomes in this and other reported cases suggest that some patients with oligometastatic thymic carcinoma may achieve prolonged survival or even cure with low-dose radiotherapy delivered to the metastases. PMID:27013896

  5. Pathological crying and emotional vasovagal syncope as symptoms of a dorsally exophytic medullary tumor.

    PubMed

    Yuge, Kotaro; Ohya, Takashi; Shibuya, Ikuhiko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro

    2016-06-01

    A 3-year-old boy with a dorsally exophytic tumor arising from the rostral medulla presented with a chief complaint of a change in his emotional behavior, most notably anxiety and paroxysmal crying often followed by syncope. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tumor pushed on the dorsal surface of the medulla and displaced the medulla anteriorly, and also displaced the cerebellar vermis upward and slightly posteriorly. Tissue from a partial resection was diagnosed as a pilocytic astrocytoma. The symptoms did not improved after surgery, but did improve clinically after chemotherapy with vincristine and carboplatin, at which time MR showed a reduction in tumor size. We diagnosed the paroxysmal crying as 'pathological crying' and the syncope with increased anxiety as 'emotional vasovagal syncope'. This case stresses the importance of recognition of this rare presentation as an indication of a medullary tumor. PMID:26740075

  6. Pediatric spinal glioblastoma of the conus medullaris: a case report of long survival.

    PubMed

    Cacchione, Antonella; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Cefalo, Maria Giuseppina; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Rizzi, Michele; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Carai, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    High-grade gliomas of the spinal cord represent a rare entity in children. Their biology, behavior, and controversial treatment options have been discussed in a few pediatric cases. These tumors are associated with severe disability and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 4-year-old child diagnosed with an isolated glioblastoma multiforme of the conus medullaris. The patient underwent subtotal surgical excision, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and oral chemotherapy. He is alive with mild neurologic deficits at 52 months after diagnosis. We describe the peculiar characteristics of this rare condition in pediatric oncology. We also provide an overview of current multidisciplinary therapeutic approaches and prognostic factors for this disease. PMID:27160742

  7. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    With the advent of genomics-based treatment in recent years, the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of various malignancies has increased exponentially. Though much data is available regarding the efficacy of targeted therapies for common malignancies, genetic cancer syndromes remain a somewhat unexplored topic with comparatively less published literature. This review seeks to characterize targeted therapy options for the following genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, inherited medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies. By understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as available molecularly targeted therapies, oncologists, in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counsellors, can begin to develop effective clinical management options and therapy regimens for the patients with these genetic syndromes that they may encounter in their practice. PMID:25725224

  8. Isolated Hemiataxia and Cerebellar Diaschisis after a Small Dorsolateral Medullary Infarct

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Masahiko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Nagao, Takeki; Terada, Hitoshi; Ogawa, Emina

    2009-01-01

    Isolated hemiataxia after a medullary infarct is rare. We describe a case of isolated hemiataxia after a small infarct localized at the ipsilateral dorsolateral medulla. An 83-year-old man developed acute onset of ataxia in the left arm and in both legs. Speech and extraocular movement were normal, and he did not have any other neurological manifestations. Brain MRI showed a small infarct localized at the left dorsolateral medulla, which involved the inferior cerebellar peduncle. 123ECD-SPECT showed hypoperfusion in the left cerebellar hemisphere without clear vascular territory. Neuroimaging findings for our patient suggested the involvement of the inferior cerebellar peduncle that projects to the cerebellum in our patient. PMID:20847835

  9. Co-existence of L5-S1 disc herniation and conus medullaris ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Minoğlu, Mustafa; Akkol, İsmail; Özdemir, Nail; Yıldırım, Levent

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The lumbar disc herniations are seen very common than spinal ependymomas in the neurosurgery polyclinic routine. PRESENTATION OF CASE In our case, both pathologies were seen at the most frequently located levels compatible with the literature. Aim of this case report is, to remind once more that, different pathologies can be found at the same time in a single patient; differential diagnosis must be done very carefully. DISCUSSION The routine Computed Tomography (CT) imaging for low back pain can not show the conus medullaris pathology. Spinal tumors or other similar pathologies should be kept in mind for differential diagnosis. A good medical history and a good physical examination must be completed before the final diagnosis. CONCLUSION Viewing of spinal canal with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will be useful for the patients who we intend to do disc surgery. PMID:25460457

  10. Increased incidence of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in rural regions in Greece.

    PubMed

    Alevizaki, M; Papapetrou, P; Georgouli, P; Alevizaki, C C; Papadodima, H; Souvatzoglou, A; Koutras, D

    1995-03-01

    A role of environmental factors for the development of Medullary Carcinoma of the Thyroid (MTC) has been shown for animals, but has only been speculated for humans. In the present study we analyzed our registry of 58 sporadic MTCs for the place of origin and place of residence and compared these with 408 other thyroid carcinomas of different histology who are attending the same Endocrine Clinics in the Athens area. Clustering of sporadic MTCs was observed in the Ionian islands, where an increased incidence of familial cases has previously been observed. Patients with sporadic MTCs originated more frequently from rural areas (p = 0.0006), where the main occupation is agriculture. No important differences were observed concerning the place of residence. We speculate that exposure to sunshine, which is greater in rural areas, may be one factor which, through vitamin D, could be involved in the development of C-cell tumors in predisposed individuals. PMID:7615908

  11. A Shunt Model of the Inner Medullary Nephron with Pre-Bend Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, M. T.; Hegarty, A. F.; Thomas, S. R.

    2009-09-01

    Mathematical models of the renal medulla face the problem of representing water and solute transfer among tens of thousands of nephrons and blood vessels of various lengths, arranged in countercurrent fashion. Published models fall into two broad categories with respect to this issue: multi-nephron models, which explicitly represent a large number of individual nephrons, or lumped models with virtual shunts that represent the turning back of nephrons and vessels at varying depths. Shunt models have the advantage of a compact description and relatively rapid execution time but are ill-suited to faithfully represent features such as prebend transitions of epithelial permeabilities in nephrons of different lengths. A new shunt model approach that can accommodate pre-bend transitions of nephrons at all medullary depths is presented in this work together with the results of simulation of predicted flows and concentrations.

  12. Surgery for lymph node metastases of medullary thyroid carcinoma: A review.

    PubMed

    Jin, Linda X; Moley, Jeffrey F

    2016-02-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine malignancy of the thyroid C cells that occurs in hereditary and sporadic clinical settings. Metastatic spread commonly occurs to cervical and mediastinal lymph nodes. MTC cells do not concentrate radioactive iodine and are not sensitive to hormonal manipulation, and therefore surgery is the most effective option for curative therapy, reduction in tumor burden, or effective palliation. In patients undergoing preventative surgery for hereditary MTC, central lymph node dissection should be considered if the calcitonin level is elevated. Preservation of parathyroid function in these young patients is of paramount importance. In patients with established primary tumors, systematic surgical removal of lymph node basins (compartmental dissection) should be guided by ultrasound mapping of lymph node metastases and level of serum calcitonin. A "berry-picking" approach is discouraged. Newly approved targeted molecular therapies offer wider treatment options for patients with progressive or metastatic disease. PMID:26539937

  13. Renal Medullary Carcinoma Response to Chemotherapy: a Referral Center Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Maroja Silvino, Marina Cavalcanti; Venchiarutti Moniz, Camila Motta; Munhoz Piotto, Gustavo Henrique; Siqueira, Sheila; Galapo Kann, Ariel; Dzik, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all renal neoplasms. Case reports suggest RMC is highly aggressive, poorly responsive to chemotherapy, often metastatic at diagnosis, affects young men with sickle cell trait, and median overall survival (mOS) is less than 12 months. We report the epidemiological characteristics, treatments performed, response rate to each treatment and mOS of five patients with RMC. All patients had sickle cell trait, four were male, three had metastatic disease at diagnosis and mean age at diagnosis was 25 years. Non-metastatic patients were submitted to nephrectomy. Two patients had partial response to first line chemotherapy including cisplatin and gemcitabine. There was no response to sunitinib or second line chemo - therapy; mOS was 6 months. Due to its rarity, case series are the only evidence available to discuss the treatment for RMC. In our experience, only cisplatin and gemcitabine based regimen offered response. PMID:24179656

  14. Serum calcitonin negative medullary thyroid carcinoma: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Giovanella, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Generally, calcitonin (CT) values below the upper reference limit rule-out medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with very high accuracy. However, sparse cases of serum-calcitonin-negative MTC (CT-NEG-MTC) have been reported. Here we reviewed CT-NEG-MTC reported in literature, discussed the potential causes and proposed a practical laboratory and clinical approach. A comprehensive literature search was conducted by using the terms "medullary thyroid carcinoma" AND "non-secreting calcitonin" OR "undetectable calcitonin". The search was updated until December 2014. Original articles that described CT-NEG-MTC were eligible for inclusion. Only MTC cases with preoperative CT below the upper reference limit were included in the present review. Eleven papers with 18 CT-NEG-MTC cases (age 50 years, size 26 mm) were retrieved. Four patients with poorly differentiated MTC died within 3 years. Different CT assays were employed and different reference values were adopted. Preoperative serum CT values were below the institution cut-off levels in all cases, and undetectable in four patients. In some papers negative CT results were confirmed by additional tests. Further laboratory investigations were performed in some of the included studies. In patients with well founded suspicious of MTC and within the reference limits/undetectable CT other laboratory investigations [carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), procalcitonin, CT stimulation, CT in washout of nodule's aspiration] have to be performed. Surgical approach to CT-NEG-MTC does not differ from those secreting CT. Postoperative follow-up of these rare cases should include periodical imaging and measurement of all potential markers. Patients with poorly differentiated MTC are at higher risk of disease-related death, and require more aggressive follow-up strategy. PMID:25781697

  15. Terminal field specificity of forebrain efferent axons to the pontine parabrachial nucleus and medullary reticular formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Kang, Yi; Lundy, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    The pontine parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and medullary reticular formation (RF) are hindbrain regions that, respectively, process sensory input and coordinate motor output related to ingestive behavior. Neural processing in each hindbrain site is subject to modulation originating from several forebrain structures including the insular gustatory cortex (IC), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), and lateral hypothalamus (LH). The present study combined electrophysiology and retrograde tracing techniques to determine the extent of overlap between neurons within the IC, BNST, CeA and LH that target both the PBN and RF. One fluorescent retrograde tracer, red (RFB) or green (GFB) latex microbeads, was injected into the gustatory PBN under electrophysiological guidance and a different retrograde tracer, GFB or fluorogold (FG), into the ipsilateral RF using the location of gustatory NST as a point of reference. Brain tissue containing each forebrain region was sectioned, scanned using a confocal microscope, and scored for the number of single and double labeled neurons. Neurons innervating the RF only, the PBN only, or both the medullary RF and PBN were observed, largely intermingled, in each forebrain region. The CeA contained the largest number of cells retrogradely labeled after tracer injection into either hindbrain region. For each forebrain area except the IC, the origin of descending input to the RF and PBN was almost entirely ipsilateral. Axons from a small percentage of hindbrain projecting forebrain neurons targeted both the PBN and RF. Target specific and non specific inputs from a variety of forebrain nuclei to the hindbrain likely reflect functional specialization in the control of ingestive behaviors. PMID:21040715

  16. [Medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Kobayashi, S; Sigemori, M; Watanabe, M; Kuramoto, S

    1987-03-01

    A case of medullary venous malformation with azygos anterior cerebral artery aneurysm is reported, which was associated with the leptomenigeal angiomatosis on the cortex of the right frontal lobe. A 62-year-old female was admitted to the Kurume University Hospital on June 21, 1985, because of a convulsive seizure. On admission, neurological and general examinations, except for slightly liver function disorder, was no abnormality. Plain CT scan showed the cortical atrophy and two small high-density areas in the right frontal lobe. Enhanced CT scan showed a high-density area in the genu of the corpus callosum. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), on T2 weighted image, showed a high signal intensity area in the right paraventricular deep white matter and the right frontal region. A right internal carotid angiogram in the venous phase showed numerous enlarged medullary veins in the deep frontal region, converging into a single large draining vein that empties into the basal vein of Rosenthal. An azygos anterior cerebral artery was visualized on the right and left carotid angiograms. The aneurysm was situated at the distal end of the azygos artery. Twenty eight days after admission, a right frontal cranioplastic craniotomy was performed. During operation, the surface of the right frontal lobe was covered by fine, vascular networks, which was reddish brown. A right frontal lobectomy, including venous malformation and vascular networks, was performed. The aneurysm was clipped via an interhemispheric approach. Histologically, the malformation vessels had spread into the subarachnoid space.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3600991

  17. Variable Clinical Presentation of an MUC1 Mutation Causing Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, Stanislav; Antignac, Corinne; Robins, Vicki; Kidd, Kendrah; Kelsoe, John R.; Hladik, Gerald; Klemmer, Philip; Knohl, Stephen J.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Vo, Nam; Santi, Ann; Harris, Alese; Canaday, Omar; Weller, Nelson; Hulick, Peter J.; Vogel, Kristen; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederick F.; Tuazon, Jennifer; Deltas, Constantinos; Somers, Douglas; Megarbane, Andre; Kimmel, Paul L.; Sperati, C. John; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Waugh, David A.; McGinn, Stella; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vylet'al, Petr; Živná, Martina; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The genetic cause of medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 was recently identified as a cytosine insertion in the variable number of tandem repeat region of MUC1 encoding mucoprotein-1 (MUC1), a protein that is present in skin, breast, and lung tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the distal tubules of the kidney. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the clinical characteristics of families and individuals with this mutation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Families with autosomal dominant interstitial kidney disease were referred for genetic analysis over a 14-year period. Families without UMOD or REN mutations prospectively underwent genotyping for the presence of the MUC1 mutation. Clinical characteristics were retrospectively evaluated in individuals with the MUC1 mutation and historically affected individuals (persons who were both related to genetically affected individuals in such a way that ensured that they could be genetically affected and had a history of CKD stage IV or kidney failure resulting in death, dialysis, or transplantation). Results Twenty-four families were identified with the MUC1 mutation. Of 186 family members undergoing MUC1 mutational analysis, the mutation was identified in 95 individuals, 91 individuals did not have the mutation, and111 individuals were identified as historically affected. Individuals with the MUC1 mutation suffered from chronic kidney failure with a widely variable age of onset of end stage kidney disease ranging from 16 to >80 years. Urinalyses revealed minimal protein and no blood. Ultrasounds of 35 individuals showed no medullary cysts. There were no clinical manifestations of the MUC1 mutation detected in the breasts, skin, respiratory system, or gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion MUC1 mutation results in progressive chronic kidney failure with a bland urinary sediment. The age of onset of end stage kidney disease is highly variable, suggesting that gene

  18. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: a review on ethical considerations in treatment of children.

    PubMed

    Nozhat, Zahra; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system and it accounts approximately 1%-3% of all human cancers. Among the three subtypes of thyroid cancers, medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is the most common cause of death in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A (MEN2A), MEN type 2B (MEN2B) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Generally, MTC accounts for up to 10% of all types of thyroid cancers. It is one of the aggressive forms of thyroid carcinoma which is manifested in childhood ages more than adults, and it comprises about 17% of all pediatric thyroid cancer. Like the other cancers, prevention of MTC is easier than its cure. In the recent decades (from 1993) the diagnosis of asymptomatic child carrying RET mutations in the affected families by MTC, has been provided by genetic screening, and prophylactic thyroidectomy is an efficacy therapeutic procedure. On the one hand, according to near the complete penetrance of the disease and its onset in the early years of life, it is required to accelerate the protection of at-risk children with relative affected by MTC and on the other hand, there are several obstructions to MTC treatment including: 1) the proband's refusal to disclose the RET mutation genetic testing results, 2) children's vulnerability because of their inability to participate in the informed consent, and 3) the existence of conflict between physicians and children's guardian. In this review article, the recommendations and ethical issues of MTC treatment in asymptomatic and at-risk children have been summarized. PMID:26974132

  19. Treatment Modalities and Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Invasive Thymoma or Thymic Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas; Allen, Pamela K.; Greenfield, Brad; Marom, Edith M.; Rice, David; Huang, James; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated relationships between treatment characteristics and long-term outcomes in patients with locally advanced thymoma or thymic carcinoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 146 patients treated in 1980–2011 at two tertiary cancer care centers, 110 with Masaoka-Koga stage III–IVa invasive thymoma and 36 with stage I–IVa thymic carcinoma. Survival probabilities were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors related to survival were identified by univariate and multivariate competing risk analysis, with overall survival (OS) as the competing risk. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for OS. Results Median follow-up time for all patients was 64 months. At 5/10 years, rates of OS and freedom from recurrence (FFR) were 81/58% and 81/65%, respectively. Of patients who underwent surgery, trimodality treatment produced better survival compared to less aggressive treatment among patients with stage III disease (p=0.03). Among patients who underwent trimodality treatment, patients with stage III disease had better OS (p=0.03) and FFR (p<0.001) than those with stage IVA disease. On Cox regression analysis, decreased OS was associated with thymic carcinoma (hazard ratio [HR]=7.36, 95% CI=2.38–22.77, p=0.001), R2/unresectable disease (HR=8.45, 95% CI=1.44–49.42, p=0.02) and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 1 (HR=8.14, 95% CI=1.55–42.75, p=0.01) or 2–3 (HR=29.60, 95% CI=4.0–218.98, p=0.001) versus 0. Conclusion Aggressive treatment with chemotherapy, surgical resection, and postoperative radiation therapy can produce long-term survival for patients with invasive thymic malignanices. PMID:24390276

  20. Development of combined thymic carcinoma and thymoma in an extrathymic lesion during long follow-up for recurrent thymoma

    PubMed Central

    OHUE, YASUHIRO; MATSUOKA, SHUNICHIRO; KUMEDA, HIROTAKA; AGATSUMA, HIROYUKI; HYOUGOTANI, AKIRA; TOISHI, MASAYUKI; SHIINA, TAKAYUKI; YOSHIDA, KAZUO; SHINGU, KUNIHIKO; FUKUSHIMA, TOSHIROU; KOIZUMI, TOMONOBU

    2016-01-01

    The present study reported a rare case of combined thymic squamous cell carcinoma and thymoma exhibiting a mass on the left chest wall. The patient underwent thoracotomy for invasive thymoma 15 years previously, however, suffered a relapse in the left intrathoracic space. Radiotherapy, chemotherapy and partial resection, as secondary surgery for the intrathoracic mass, were performed. The histological findings in the resected specimens revealed type B3 thymoma. As the patient developed a left chest wall mass and pain in 2013, the mass was resected. The histological findings indicated two separate components composed of type B3 thymoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistological findings revealed that the thymoma cells were positive for CD5, while the thymic carcinoma cells were negative for CD5. Several reports have demonstrated the coexistence of thymic carcinoma and thymoma in the primary thymus, however, the development of a combined tumor in an extrathymic lesion is extremely rare. The present case had a long follow-up for recurrent thymoma. The present case indicated that the development and/or coexistence of malignant components in the thymoma must be taken into consideration for the treatment and/or management of patients with thymoma and that a pre-existence of CD5 expression in thymoma and the lost change may be associated with the process of malignant transformation. PMID:26893849

  1. Thymic output, T-cell diversity, and T-cell function in long-term human SCID chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Win, Chan M.; Parrott, Roberta E.; Cooney, Myriah; Moser, Barry K.; Roberts, Joseph L.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2009-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome of diverse genetic cause characterized by profound deficiencies of T, B, and sometimes NK-cell function. Nonablative human leukocyte antigen–identical or rigorously T cell–depleted haploidentical parental bone marrow transplantation (BMT) results in thymus-dependent genetically donor T-cell development in the recipients, leading to long-term survival. We reported previously that normal T-cell numbers, function, and repertoire developed by 3 to 4 months after transplantation in SCID patients, and the repertoire remained highly diverse for the first 10 years after BMT. The T-cell receptor diversity positively correlated with T-cell receptor excision circle levels, a reflection of thymic output. However, the fate of thymic function in SCID patients beyond 10 to 12 years after BMT remained to be determined. In this greater than 25-year follow-up study of 128 patients with 11 different molecular types of SCID after nonconditioned BMT, we provide evidence that T-cell function, thymic output, and T-cell clonal diversity are maintained long-term. PMID:19433858

  2. Activity of neutral endopeptidase and aminopeptidase N in mouse thymic stromal cells which bind double-positive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Small, M; Kaiser, M; Tse, W; Heimfeld, S; Blumberg, S

    1996-04-01

    The activity of two peptidases was determined in immortalized lines of thymic stromal cells. A line of total stromal cells (T-TG-St) was grown from transgenic mouse expressing temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen under the control of the regulatory elements of the mouse major histocompatibility complex class I gene. From these cells we isolated a subset (DP-TG-St) that binds thymocytes which are mainly CD4+8+. We also assayed a clone of fetal thymic epithelial cells (BA/10) that binds CD4+8+ thymocytes. Both lines of double -positive cell-binding stroma exhibited strong activity of two peptidases, neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11) and aminopeptidase N (APN; EC 3.4.11.2). In contrast, the activity of both enzymes was very low in the total thymic stromal line. Use of the specific inhibitors confirmed that these two enzymes were responsible for the activity observed but also suggested the presence of additional unidentified aminopeptidase(s) in the same stromal cells. The high activity of the two peptidases on stromal cells that bind thymocytes at the double-positive stage raises the possibility that they might contribute to the microenvironment of the developing thymocytes. PMID:8625997

  3. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary vasa recta diameter via pericyte cells: a role for regulating medullary blood flow?

    PubMed

    Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Kelly, M C; Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta (DVR), and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF). Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial, and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesize that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine) evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is important

  4. [Hormone-mediated reactions in the endosalpinx epithelium].

    PubMed

    Glukhovets, B I; Ukhov, Iu I; Lebedev, S S; Plastun, G A; Bulaeva, V P

    1983-07-01

    The epithelium of normal uterine tubes resected in 38 young women of the child-bearing age during the periods of the maximal physiological fluctuations of the ovarian steroid hormones levels has been studied. The correlative dependence between the morphometrical data and the results of quanitative biochemical analysis of the estrogen excretion has been investigated. The morphometric method reliably reflects the hormone-dependent variabilities of the oviduct epithelium and makes it possible to perform an objective morphological evaluation of the ovarian functional activity. The height and specific density of cells in the epithelial layer, portion of the aciliary cells and nuclear volume of the ciliary cells are the most important for diagnosis as compared to the excretory level of the estrogenic hormones. PMID:6625907

  5. Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium to retronasal air flow.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Acevedo, Humberto P; Sherrill, Lisa; Phan, Maggie

    2007-03-01

    Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium were assessed with the electroolfactogram while odorants were presented to the external nares with an artificial sniff or to the internal nares by positive pressure. A series of seven odorants that varied from very polar, hydrophilic odorants to very nonpolar, hydrophobic odorants were used. Although the polar odorants activated the dorsal olfactory epithelium when presented by the external nares (orthonasal presentation), they were not effective when forced through the nasal cavity from the internal nares (retronasal presentation). However, the nonpolar odorants were effective in both stimulus modes. These results were independent of stimulus concentration or of humidity of the carrier air. Similar results were obtained with multiunit recordings from olfactory bulb. These results help to explain why human investigations often report differences in the sensation or ability to discriminate odorants presented orthonasally versus retronasally. The results also strongly support the importance of odorant sorption in normal olfactory processes. PMID:17215498

  6. Odorant-evoked potassium changes in the frog olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Khayari, A; Math, F; Trotier, D

    1991-01-18

    Electroolfactogram (EOG) and extracellular potassium activity (aK) measurements were carried out in frog olfactory epithelia in vivo. Odorant-evoked changes in aK were characterized on the basis of depth profile analysis. Following an olfactory stimulation with butanol vapours, an increase in aK was measured in the mucus and the proximal part of the epithelium; this response started after the beginning of the EOG and was proportional to the amplitude of the latter. In the deeper part of the epithelium, the aK response had complex waveforms showing an initial K decrease which was suppressed by local application of ouabain, suggesting the existence of a pumping mechanism at this level. The results are discussed in terms of extracellular accumulation of K ions following neuroreceptor activation with respect to EOG generation theories. PMID:2015495

  7. Responses of the Rat Olfactory Epithelium to Retronasal Air Flow

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Acevedo, Humberto P.; Sherrill, Lisa; Phan, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium were assessed with the electroolfactogram while odorants were presented to the external nares with an artificial sniff or to the internal nares by positive pressure. A series of seven odorants that varied from very polar, hydrophilic odorants to very non-polar, hydrophobic odorants were used. While the polar odorants activated the dorsal olfactory epithelium when presented by the external nares (orthonasal presentation), they were not effective when forced through the nasal cavity from the internal nares (retronasal presentation). However, the non-polar odorants were effective in both stimulus modes. These results were independent of stimulus concentration or of humidity of the carrier air. Similar results were obtained with multiunit recording from olfactory bulb. These results help to explain why human investigations often report differences in the sensation or ability to discriminate odorants presented orthonasally vs. retronasally. The results also strongly support the importance of odorant sorption in normal olfactory processes. PMID:17215498

  8. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  9. Morphological study of fetal nasopharyngeal epithelium in man.

    PubMed

    Gulisano, M; Montella, A; Orlandini, S Z; Pacini, P

    1992-01-01

    In 30 human fetuses between 8 and 13 weeks of intrauterine life the lateral wall of the nasopharynx was examined by light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. In the subjects between 8 and 9 weeks in utero the mucosa displays still an immature appearance, being mono- or bistratified and lacking the characteristic structures of the respiratory epithelium. Nevertheless, signs of differentiation are to be noticed, with the presence of two distinct cellular types that, in the later periods, will give rise to ciliated cells and microvillus-provided cells. An almost complete differentiation will be reached at 12-13 weeks in utero, even if goblet cells are still lacking in the examined zone during the considered period. Nonrespiratory types of epithelium, such as transitional or squamous, were never found in the studied subjects. PMID:1514372

  10. Nested expression domains for odorant receptors in zebrafish olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weth, F; Nadler, W; Korsching, S

    1996-11-12

    The mapping of high-dimensional olfactory stimuli onto the two-dimensional surface of the nasal sensory epithelium constitutes the first step in the neuronal encoding of olfactory input. We have used zebrafish as a model system to analyze the spatial distribution of odorant receptor molecules in the olfactory epithelium by quantitative in situ hybridization. To this end, we have cloned 10 very divergent zebrafish odorant receptor molecules by PCR. Individual genes are expressed in sparse olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of the position of labeled cells in a simplified coordinate system revealed three concentric, albeit overlapping, expression domains for the four odorant receptors analyzed in detail. Such regionalized expression should result in a corresponding segregation of functional response properties. This might represent the first step of spatial encoding of olfactory input or be essential for the development of the olfactory system. PMID:8917589

  11. Liquid Movement Across the Surface Epithelium of Large Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Lucy A.; Rollins, Brett M.; Tarran, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis conductance regulator CFTR gene is found on chromosome 7 (Kerem et al., 1989; Riordan et al., 1989) and encodes for a 1,480 amino acid protein which is present in the plasma membrane of epithelial cells (Anderson et al., 1992). This protein appears to have many functions, but a unifying theme is that it acts as a protein kinase C- and cyclic AMP-regulated Cl- channel (Winpenny et al., 1995; Jia et al., 1997). In the superficial epithelium of the conducting airways, CFTR is involved in Cl- secretion (Boucher, 2003) and also acts as a regulator of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and hence Na+ absorption (Boucher et al., 1986; Stutts et al., 1995). In this chapter, we will discuss the regulation of these two ion channels, and how they can influence liquid movement across the superficial airway epithelium. PMID:17692578

  12. Cell proliferation in the human gallbladder epithelium: effect of distension.

    PubMed Central

    Putz, P; Willems, G

    1979-01-01

    DNA synthesis activity in the epithelium of the human gallbladder was studied through in vitro labelling of mucosal specimens with 3H-thymidine and autoradiography. The specimens were taken at the time of a surgical operation. Eight 'normal' gallbladders and six distended gallbladders from patients with carcinomatous obstruction of the common bile duct were examined. Proliferative activity was very low in the normal and significantly higher in the distended gallbladders. Images Figure PMID:437558

  13. Intraocular involvement with subretinal pigment epithelium infiltrates by mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, B. C.; Egbert, P. R.; Peat, I. M.; Shorrock, K.; Rosenthal, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular mycosis fungoides in a 48-year-old man. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity, white subretinal lesions, and vitritis. Post-mortem histopathology revealed malignant T cell infiltrates consistent with mycosis fungoides in the retina, vitreous, and between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane Focal atrophy of the RPE, along with the sub-RPE infiltrates, correlated with the clinically visible fundus lesions. Images PMID:1751471

  14. Primary adenocarcinoma of pigmented ciliary epithelium in a phthisical eye.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya B; Proia, Alan D; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Sharma, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium arising in a phthisical eye. A 92-year-old man who initially presented with severe ocular pain had calcification extending from the posterior pole to ciliary body on B-scan ultrasonography to a degree not previously reported. We highlight the importance of screening for intraocular neoplasms in adults with a long-standing phthisical eye. PMID:26597037

  15. Candida albicans Ultrastructure: Colonization and Invasion of Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Julie A.; Squier, Christopher A.

    1980-01-01

    The colonization and invasion of various animal oral mucosae by Candida albicans were examined in an organ culture model. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the oral epithelium between 12 and 30 h after inoculation with the fungus revealed the morphological relationships between host and parasite. Examination of the fungi in thin sections showed five distinct layers in the cell wall of C. albicans within the epithelium, but changes were evident in the organization and definition of the outer cell wall layers in budding hyphae and in hyphae participating in colonization and invasion of the epithelial cells. Adherence of the fungus to the superficial cells of the oral mucosa appeared to involve intimate contact between the epithelial cell surface and the deeper layers of the fungal cell wall. During invasion a close seal was maintained between the invading hyphae and the surrounding epithelial cell envelope, there being no other evidence of damage to the host cell surface except at the site of entry. Within the epithelial cells there was only occasional loss of cytoplasmic components in the vicinity of the invading hyphae. These findings would suggest that enzymatic lysis associated with the invasive process is localized and that the mechanical support provided by surface adherence and the intimate association between the fungus and the epithelial cell envelope may permit growth of Candida on through the epithelium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6995338

  16. Zinc uptake in vitro by human retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.A.; Rothman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, is present in unusually high concentrations in the chorioretinal complex relative to most other tissues. Because little has been known about the interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium and free or protein-associated zinc, we studied /sup 65/Zn uptake by human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro. When monolayers were exposed to differing concentrations from 0 to 30 microM /sup 65/Zn in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 5.4 gm/l glucose at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, we observed a temperature-dependent saturable accumulation of the radiolabel. With 15 microM /sup 65/Zn, we saw a biphasic pattern of uptake with a rapid first phase and a slower second phase over 120 min. Uptake of /sup 65/Zn was inhibited by iodacetate and cold, and reduced approximately 50% by the addition of 2% albumin to the labelling medium. Neither ouabain nor 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake. Cells previously exposed to /sup 65/Zn retained approximately 70% of accumulated /sup 65/Zn 60 min after being changed to radiolabel-free medium. Following removal of cells from the extracellular matrix adherent to the dish bottom, a variable amount of nonspecific binding of /sup 65/Zn to the residual matrix was demonstrated. These observations are consistent with a facilitated type of transport and demonstrate the ability of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro to accumulate and retain zinc.

  17. Expression of cytokeratins in the epithelium of canine odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Nemec, A; Vapniarsky, N; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2011-11-01

    Odontogenic tumours are considered to be relatively rare; however, several histologically distinct types have been identified in dogs. The more common canine odontogenic tumours are peripheral odontogenic fibroma and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) has been established for the human dental germ and odontogenic tumours. The aim of the present study was to describe the immunohistochemical expression of a panel of CKs in the epithelium of the canine dental germ, normal gingiva and odontogenic tumours arising in this species. Samples from 20 odontogenic tumours, 12 tooth germs and three normal gingival tissues were obtained. Each sample was stained with haematoxylin and eosin and subjected to immunohistochemistry for CK expression. The typical expression pattern of CKs in the odontogenic epithelium and gingiva of dogs was CK14 and CK5/6. CKs 7, 8, 18 and 20 were generally absent from the canine dental germ, gingiva and odontogenic tumours. Dogs and man therefore exhibit similar CK expression in the odontogenic epithelium. PMID:21511272

  18. Biomechanics of liquid-epithelium interactions in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Ghadiali, Samir N; Gaver, Donald P

    2008-11-30

    The delicate structure of the lung epithelium makes it susceptible to surface tension induced injury. For example, the cyclic reopening of collapsed and/or fluid-filled airways during the ventilation of injured lungs generates hydrodynamic forces that further damage the epithelium and exacerbate lung injury. The interactions responsible for epithelial injury during airway reopening are fundamentally multiscale, since air-liquid interfacial dynamics affect global lung mechanics, while surface tension forces operate at the molecular and cellular scales. This article will review the current state-of-knowledge regarding the effect of surface tension forces on (a) the mechanics of airway reopening and (b) epithelial cell injury. Due to the complex nature of the liquid-epithelium system, a combination of computational and experimental techniques are being used to elucidate the mechanisms of surface-tension induced lung injury. Continued research is leading to an integrated understanding of the biomechanical and biological interactions responsible for cellular injury during airway reopening. This information may lead to novel therapies that minimize ventilation induced lung injury. PMID:18511356

  19. Pathohistological changes of tracheal epithelium in laryngectomized patients.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marinela; Prgomet, Drago; Marjanović, Ksenija; Pušeljić, Silvija; Kraljik, Nikola

    2015-11-01

    Total laryngectomy results in a permanent disconnection of the upper and lower airways. Thus, the upper airways are bypassed and can no longer condition, humidify, and filter the inhaled air, leading to damage of the tracheobronchial epithelium. There is little scientific information available about the effects of tracheostoma breathing and the degree of mucosal damage in laryngectomized patients. The aims of this study were to determine the histopathologic findings and investigate the potential impact of using a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) on the tracheal epithelium in long-term tracheostomy patients. Tracheal mucosal biopsies were taken from a total of 70 patients. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined by a light microscope. Normal pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium was found in only 9 (12.9%) cases; while, 17 (24.3%) cases had some degree of basal cell hyperplasia. Squamous metaplasia was the most common finding (50%). Pre-invasive lesions (mild and moderate squamous dysplasia) were found in only one patient who used an HME, and in eight (11.4%) non-users. Although the HME cannot completely restore the physiological functions of the upper respiratory track, it delivers a better quality of air to the lower airways and has a positive effect on tracheal mucosa. PMID:25399353

  20. Regeneration of tracheal epithelium using mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Otsuki, Koshi; Miyake, Masao; Hazama, Akihiro; Wada, Ikuo; Omori, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion The findings demonstrated the potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells for regeneration of tracheal epithelium. Objective Autologous tissue implantation techniques using skin or cartilage are often applied in cases of tracheal defects with laryngeal inflammatory lesions and malignant tumor invasion. However, these techniques are invasive with an unstable clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate regeneration in a tracheal defect site of nude rats after implantation of ciliated epithelium that was differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells. Method Embryoid bodies were formed from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. They were cultured with growth factors for 5 days, and then cultured at the air-liquid interface. The degree of differentiation achieved prior to implantation was determined by histological findings and the results of real-time polymerase chain reaction. Embryoid bodies including ciliated epithelium were embedded into collagen gel that served as an artificial scaffold, and then implanted into nude rats, creating an 'air-liquid interface model'. Histological evaluation was performed 7 days after implantation. Results The ciliated epithelial structure survived on the lumen side of regenerated tissue. It was demonstrated histologically that the structure was composed of ciliated epithelial cells. PMID:26755348

  1. Cultured lung epithelium: A cellular model for lung preservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Matsumoto-Pon, J; Widdicombe, J H

    1997-11-01

    Cellular models have helped with the development of conditions needed for hypothermic preservation of kidney, liver, and heart. Recently, highly differentiated cultured lung epithelial cell lines grown with basolateral side feeding technique have become available that can mimic airspace, epithelium, and interstitium of lung parenchyma. Cultured lung epithelium coupled with Ussing's short-circuit current technique was used as a cellular model system for lung preservation. A parametric study was conducted to correlate the effects of luminal fluid composition (University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and phosphate-buffered saline) and storage gas (air vs nitrogen) at 4 degrees C for 24 h on postischemic electrogenic properties (transepithelial ion transport and resistance). The results showed that cells were better preserved with the UW solution on both sides as measured by their transepithelial resistance, an indicator of tight junction integrity (Rte approximately 65% of control values approximately 135 Omega cm2). In addition, they responded better to mediators that stimulate chloride secretion than cells preserved with other conditions. Cells preserved with no additional fluid on the apical side had substantially lowered Rte (<20%) than those preserved with an additional thin layer of fluid ( approximately 35-65%). This cellular model system is a realistic representation of lung epithelium and can provide an accurate assessment of preservation quality through the measurements of tight junction integrity and active ion transport. PMID:9367609

  2. In vitro biology of corneal epithelium and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Yanoff, M

    1975-01-01

    Four main areas are explored: (1) the proper culture medium for corneal tissue; (2) the effect of serum on in vitro tissue growth; (3) the in vitro interrelationships between corneal epithelium and endothelium; and (4) the biology of cultures of whole corneas (organ cultures). Modified Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) proved to be an excellent culture fluid. Corneal tissue could be grown in MEM without serum or clot, thus providing a defined culture medium. The in vitro biology of outgrowths of multilayered corneal epithelium and monolayered corneal endothelium are discussed. Contact inhibition between epithelium and endothelium is demonstrated in whole corneal (organ) cultures. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 A FIGURE 14 B FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 16 A FIGURE 16 B FIGURE 17 A FIGURE 17 B FIGURE 17 C FIGURE 18 A FIGURE 18 B PMID:1246815

  3. Diffuse High Intensity PD-L1 Staining in Thymic Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Sukhmani K.; Riess, Jonathan W.; Schwartz, Erich J.; Lu, Tian; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Neal, Joel W.; West, Robert B.; Wakelee, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blockade of the immune checkpoint programmed death receptor ligand-1 (PD-L1)/PD-1 pathway has well-established clinical activity across many tumor types. PD-L1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is emerging as a predictive biomarker of response to these therapies. Here, we examine PD-L1 expression in a thymic epithelial tumor (TET) tissue microarray (TMA). Methods The TMA contained 69 TETs and 17 thymic controls, with each case represented by triplicate cores. The TMA was stained with rabbit monoclonal antibody (clone 15, Sino Biological) to human PD-L1. PD-L1 staining was scored based on intensity as follows: 0=none, 1=equivocal/uninterpretable, 2=weak, and 3=intermediate-strong. Those cases with all cores scoring 3 in the epithelial component were categorized as PD-L1high and the remaining as PD-L1low. Results PD-L1high scores were more frequent in TETs than controls (68.1% vs. 17.6%, p=0.0036). PD-L1 scores and histology were significantly correlated, with higher intensity staining in WHO B2/B3/C TETs. Only 14.8% of TETs had PD-L1 staining of associated lymphocytes. In an adjusted analysis (age/gender), PD-L1high TETs had a significantly worse overall survival (HR 5.40, 95% CI 1.13-25.89, p=0.035) and a trend for worse event-free survival (HR 2.94, 95% CI 0.94-9.24, p=0.064). Conclusions PD-L1 expression was present in all cases of TETs within the epithelial component but only in a minority in the lymphocytic component. TETs stained more intensely for PD-L1 than controls, and PD-L1high TETs were associated with more aggressive histology and worse prognosis. This study lends rationale to a clinical trial with anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy in this rare tumor type. PMID:25402569

  4. Sunitinib in metastatic thymic carcinomas: Laboratory findings and initial clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Ströbel, P; Bargou, R; Wolff, A; Spitzer, D; Manegold, C; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A; Strauss, L; Sauer, C; Mayer, F; Hohenberger, P; Marx, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Thymic carcinoma (TC) is a rare aggressive tumour. Median survival with current treatments is only 2 years. Sunitinib is a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has shown benefit in various other cancers. Methods: Laboratory analyses of snap-frozen tumour tissues were performed to detect activation and genetic mutations of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in TC samples. On the basis of molecular analyses showing activation of multiple RTKs in their tumour, four patients with metastatic TCs refractory to conventional therapies were treated with sunitinib according to standard protocols. Results: RTK analysis in three of the patients showed activation of multiple RTKs, including platelet-derived growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor 3. Mutations of EGFR, c-KIT, KRAS, and BRAF genes were not found. Administration of sunitinib yielded a partial remission (lasting 2 to 18+ months) according to the RECIST criteria in three patients and stable disease with excellent metabolic response in 18F-FDG-PET in another one. The overall survival with sunitinib treatment ranges from 4 to 40+ months. Withdrawal of the drug in one patient prompted rapid tumour progression that could be controlled by re-administration of sunitinib. Conclusions: Sunitinib is an active treatment for metastatic TC. A panel of molecular analyses may be warranted for optimal patient selection. PMID:20571495

  5. TCR signal strength controls thymic differentiation of discrete proinflammatory γδ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Ruiz, Miguel; Ribot, Julie C; Grosso, Ana R; Gonçalves-Sousa, Natacha; Pamplona, Ana; Pennington, Daniel J; Regueiro, José R; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Silva-Santos, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    The mouse thymus produces discrete γδ T cell subsets that make either interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or interleukin 17 (IL-17), but the role of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) in this developmental process remains controversial. Here we show that Cd3g(+/-) Cd3d(+/-) (CD3 double-haploinsufficient (CD3DH)) mice have reduced TCR expression and signaling strength on γδ T cells. CD3DH mice had normal numbers and phenotypes of αβ thymocyte subsets, but impaired differentiation of fetal Vγ6(+) (but not Vγ4(+)) IL-17-producing γδ T cells and a marked depletion of IFN-γ-producing CD122(+) NK1.1(+) γδ T cells throughout ontogeny. Adult CD3DH mice showed reduced peripheral IFN-γ(+) γδ T cells and were resistant to experimental cerebral malaria. Thus, TCR signal strength within specific thymic developmental windows is a major determinant of the generation of proinflammatory γδ T cell subsets and their impact on pathophysiology. PMID:27043412

  6. Hyperoside regulates the level of thymic stromal lymphopoietin through intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Go, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Hyperoside (HYP) is the principle active component of Crataegus pinnatifida. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions. Here, we investigated how HYP regulates the levels of TSLP in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. We analyzed the levels of TSLP by treatment with HYP in phorbol myristate acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells with ELISA and a polymerase chain reaction analysis. We also analyzed the pathway that HYP regulates TSLP by measuring the level of fluorescent intracellular calcium and using a Western blot analysis. HYP decreased the level of intracellular calcium in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It also significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of TSLP in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It significantly decreased the levels of receptor-interacting protein 2 and active caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. HYP significantly decreased the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus and degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, it significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our findings establish HYP as a potential agent for the treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:24338918

  7. Risk of extrathyroid tumors following radiation treatment in infancy for thymic enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Hildreth, N.G.; Shore, R.E.; Hempelmann, L.M.; Rosenstein, M.

    1985-06-01

    Two thousand eight hundred and fifty-six individuals who received X-ray treatments in infancy for an enlarged thymus gland and their 5053 nonirradiated siblings have been followed prospectively since 1953 to evaluate the risk of radiation-induced neoplastic disease. Based on the cumulative experience of five surveys of this cohort, the irradiated group has a statistically significant increased risk for both benign and malignant extrathyroid tumors, the age-adjusted relative risks being 2.0 and 2.2, respectively. Benign tumors of the bone, nervous system, salivary gland, skin, and breast (females only) and malignant tumors of the skin and breast (females only) account for the excess incidence of extrathyroid tumors among the thymic-irradiated individuals. Although a radiation-induced excess of extrathyroid tumors was suggested in an earlier survey of this cohort, small numbers restricted attribution of this excess to specific sites. The implications of these findings are discussed. Thyroid tumors are addressed in a separate paper.

  8. Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in rat thymic lymphocytes: activation by concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Mahaut-Smith, M P; Mason, M J

    1991-08-01

    1. The role of ion channels in the mitogenic response of rat thymic lymphocytes to concanavalin A (ConA) was studied using single-channel patch-clamp recordings and measurements of membrane potential with the fluorescent probe bis-oxonol. 2. ConA (20 micrograms ml-1) evoked a rapid membrane hyperpolarization; Indo-1 measurements indicated a concurrent increase in [Ca2+]i. The hyperpolarization was blocked by cytoplasmic loading with the Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (bis(O-amino-phenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid), or charybdotoxin, a component of scorpion venom known to block K+ channels in lymphocytes. 3. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings showed that both ConA and the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin activated channels with high selectivity for K+. Two conductance levels were observed -6-7 pS and 17-18 pS-measured as inward chord conductance at 60 mV from reversal potential (Erev) with 140 mM-KCl in the pipette. The current-voltage relationship for the larger channel displayed inward rectification and channel open probability was weakly dependent upon membrane potential. 4. These experiments provide the first direct evidence for mitogen-activated Ca(2+)-gated K+ channels (IK(Ca)) in lymphocytes. This conductance is relatively inactive in unstimulated rat thymocytes but following the intracellular Ca2+ rises induced by ConA, IK(Ca) channels are activated and produce a significant hyperpolarization of the cell potential. PMID:1716678

  9. Thymic repopulation following intrathymic injection of mouse bone marrow cells in MHC matched and mismatched recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Chervenak, R.

    1986-03-01

    T cell precursors (pre-T cells) have traditionally been detected by their ability to repopulate the thymus of heavily irradiated mice following intravenous injection. Recently, Goldschneider et. al. developed an assay system which involves the direct injection of pre-T cells into the thymus. The authors used this technique to evaluate the ability of bone marrow cells to repopulate thymuses in various donor-host strain combinations. Sub-lethally irradiated (600R) mice were injected intrathymically with 2 x 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells which differed from the recipient with respect to their Thy 1 allotype. The percentage of thymus cells expressing either the donor or recipient type Thy 1 marker was determined 14 to 21 days after injection. These experiments showed that in MHC matched donor-host combinations (AKR/cum ..-->.. AKR/J and CBA/J ..-->.. AKR/J), cells derived from the donor inoculum accounted for 40% to 75% of the total thymus population. MHC mismatched donor-host combinations (C57BL/6J ..-->.. AKR/J and Balb/c ..-->.. AKR/J) resulted in significantly less donor-type repopulation of the thymus. In these cases, donor repopulation typically ranged from 0% to 4%. The ability of the pre-T cells detected by intrathymic injection to proliferate in the thymic environment, therefore, appears to be influenced by the MHC. This may reflect commitment of pre-T cells to MHC haplotype recognition prior to their migration to the thymus.

  10. Multiple Functions of the New Cytokine-Based Antimicrobial Peptide Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP).

    PubMed

    Bjerkan, Louise; Sonesson, Andreas; Schenck, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a pleiotropic cytokine, hitherto mostly known to be involved in inflammatory responses and immunoregulation. The human tslp gene gives rise to two transcription and translation variants: a long form (lfTSLP) that is induced by inflammation, and a short, constitutively-expressed form (sfTSLP), that appears to be downregulated by inflammation. The TSLP forms can be produced by a number of cell types, including epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs). lfTSLP can activate mast cells, DCs, and T cells through binding to the lfTSLP receptor (TSLPR) and has a pro-inflammatory function. In contrast, sfTSLP inhibits cytokine secretion of DCs, but the receptor mediating this effect is unknown. Our recent studies have demonstrated that both forms of TSLP display potent antimicrobial activity, exceeding that of many other known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), with sfTSLP having the strongest effect. The AMP activity is primarily mediated by the C-terminal region of the protein and is localized within a 34-mer peptide (MKK34) that spans the C-terminal α-helical region in TSLP. Fluorescent studies of peptide-treated bacteria, electron microscopy, and liposome leakage models showed that MKK34 exerted membrane-disrupting effects comparable to those of LL-37. Expression of TSLP in skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, and intestine is part of the defense barrier that aids in the control of both commensal and pathogenic microbes. PMID:27399723

  11. Dramatic Response of S-1 Administration to Chemorefractory Advanced Thymic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaira, Kyoichi; Naruse, Ichiro; Imai, Hisao; Sunaga, Noriaki; Hisada, Takeshi; Motegi, Masahiko; Asao, Takayuki; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Thymic cancer (TC) is a rare malignancy in thoracic tumors, and there has been no standard therapeutics for advanced or relapsed patients. The clinical significance of second-line or beyond chemotherapy for platinum refractory advanced TC remains unclear. Here, we present the experience of a patient with TC showing a complete response to S-1 as third-line chemotherapy. A 54-year-old female with TC was treated with carboplatin plus paclitaxel and thoracic radiotherapy as first-line chemoradiotherapy and amrubicin as second-line chemotherapy. After 3 cycles of amrubicin administration, the metastatic hepatic lesions revealed a markedly progressive disease. A single agent of S-1 was administered as sequencing chemotherapy. After 2 cycles of S-1, the patient achieved a complete remission of multiple metastatic sites. There was evidence of immunohistochemical staining of a low thymidylate synthase (TS) expression. The expression of TS may be closely associated with the efficacy of S-1 in patients with TC. PMID:26389778

  12. IL-13 induces skin fibrosis in atopic dermatitis by thymic stromal lymphopoietin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min-Hee; Oh, Sun Young; Yu, Jinho; Myers, Allen C; Leonard, Warren J; Liu, Yong Jun; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2011-06-15

    Skin fibrotic remodeling is a major feature in human atopic dermatitis (AD). Inflammation and tissue fibrosis are common consequences of Th2 responses. Elevated IL-13 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) have been found in the AD skin lesions. Fibrocytes can be recruited to inflamed tissues to promote wound healing and fibrosis. Dermal transgenic expression of IL-13 causes an AD-like phenotype with fibrosis and increased TSLP. However, the role of TSLP in fibrotic remodeling is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of TSLP and fibrocytes in the generation of IL-13-induced skin fibrosis. In AD lesion, cessation of IL-13 transgene expression resulted in reduced skin inflammation but with no effect on further progression of fibrosis. This was accompanied by markedly increased CD34(+)/procollagen 1(+) fibrocytes. Furthermore, fibrocytes express TSLP receptor (TSLPR), and TSLP directly promotes PBMC-derived fibrocytes to produce collagen. Neutralization of TSLP or genetic deletion of TSLPR in IL-13 transgenic mice resulted in a significant reduction in fibrocytes and in skin fibrosis. Furthermore, reduction of fibrosis by depletion of TSLP was independent of IL-13. Interestingly, the number of fibrocytes was highly increased in the skin samples of AD patients. These data indicate that the progression of skin fibrosis in IL-13-induced AD occurs via TSLP/TSLPR-dependent but IL-13-independent novel mechanisms by promoting fibrocyte functions. PMID:21576506

  13. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  14. Hydrolysis of thymic humoral factor gamma 2 by neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11).

    PubMed Central

    Indig, F E; Pecht, M; Trainin, N; Burstein, Y; Blumberg, S

    1991-01-01

    A search for the natural substrates for neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11) in the immune system led to investigation of the enzyme's action on thymic humoral factor gamma 2 (THF). The ectoenzyme rapidly and efficiently hydrolyses the Lys6-Phe7 bond of the octapeptide. The site of cleavage was confirmed by h.p.l.c. analysis, amino acid analysis and sequence determination of the products. Phosphoramidon (3.6 microM), a potent inhibitor of the enzyme, prevents this cleavage even during prolonged incubation. The high efficiency of hydrolysis of THF by NEP is similar to that reported for [Leu5]enkephalin, and the dipeptide Phe-Leu is the C-terminal product in the hydrolysis of both peptides. The presence of NEP, reportedly identified as the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CALLA), in bone-marrow cells and other cells of the immune system raises the possibility that it may play a role in modulating the activity of peptides such as THF. PMID:1898375

  15. Role of renal medullary oxidative and/or carbonyl stress in salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takefumi; Ogawa, Susumu; Cowely, Allen W; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    1. Salt-sensitive hypertension is commonly associated with diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. The present review focuses on renal mechanisms involved in the development of this type of hypertension. 2. The renal medullary circulation plays an important role in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. In vivo animal studies have demonstrated that the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the renal medulla is an important element of salt-sensitive hypertension. The medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) in the outer medulla is an important source of NO and ROS production and we have explored the mechanisms that stimulate their production, as well as the effects of NO superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on mTAL tubular sodium reabsorption and the regulation of medullary blood flow. 3. Angiotensin II-stimulated NO produced in the mTAL is able to diffuse from the renal mTAL to the surrounding vasa recta capillaries, providing a mechanism by which to increase medullary blood flow and counteract the direct vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II. Enhanced oxidative stress attenuates NO diffusion in this region. 4. Carbonyl stress, like oxidative stress, can also play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease, such as insulin resistance, salt-sensitive hypertension and renal vascular complications. 5. Despite the large number of studies undertaken in this area, there is as yet no drug available that directly targets renal ROS. Oxidative and/or carbonyl stress may be the next target of drug discovery to protect against salt-sensitive hypertension and associated end-organ damage. PMID:22150746

  16. Epithelial cells prime the immune response to an array of gut-derived commensals towards a tolerogenic phenotype through distinct actions of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and transforming growth factor-β

    PubMed Central

    Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Frokiaer, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Humans and other mammals coexist with a diverse array of microbes colonizing the intestine, termed the microflora. The relationship is symbiotic, with the microbes benefiting from a stable environment and nutrient supply, and the host gaining competitive exclusion of pathogens and continuously maintenance of the gut immune homeostasis. Here we report novel crosstalk mechanisms between the human enterocyte cell line, Caco2, and underlying human monocyte-derived DC in a transwell model where Gram-positive (G+) commensals prevent Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-dependent Escherichia coli-induced semimaturation in a TLR2-dependent fashion. These findings add to our understanding of the hypo-responsiveness of the gut epithelium towards the microflora. Gut DC posses a more tolerogenic phenotype than conventional DC. Here we show that Caco2 spent medium (SM) induces tolerogenic DC with lower expression of maturation markers, interleukin (IL)-12p70, and tumour necrosis factor-α when matured with G+ and Gram-negative (G–) commensals, while IL-10 production is enhanced in DC upon encountering G+ commensals and reduced upon encountering G– bacteria. The Caco2 SM-induced tolerogenic phenotype is also seen in DC priming of naive T cells with elevated levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and markedly reduced levels of bacteria-induced interferon-γ production. Caco2 cell production of IL-8, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and TGF-β increases upon microbial stimulation in a strain dependent manner. TSLP and TGF-β co-operate in inducing the tolerogenic DC phenotype but other mediators might be involved. PMID:17655740

  17. Decreased adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene)-induced mammary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, O.R.; Badary, O.A.; Abou El-Ela, S.; Hartle, D.K. )

    1991-03-15

    Adrenal cortical hormones suppress initiation and promotion of DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis. The authors found a positive correlation between presence of DMBA-induced adrenal cortical necrosis and mammary tumor incidence. Because they find adrenal medullary as well as cortical lesions in tumor bearing (TB) DMBA-treated rats, they evaluated medullary function by quantitating hybridized cDNA- TH-S{sup 35} with in situ TH-mRNA u sing computer assisted quantitative autoradiographic technique. Virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a 10 mg i.g. dose of DMBA. Three wks later, rats were placed on 20% polyunsaturated (PUFA) fat diets containing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. All were killed 15 wks post-DMBA. TH-mRNA levels in adrenal medullae of TB animals were decreased compared to non-TB rats. Histopathology indicated a high incidence of medullary necrosis in TB rats, whereas, adrenal necrosis did not occur in non-TB animals. Adrenal necrosis correlated positively with tumor burden, but no correlation was found between incidence of adrenal lesions and type of PUFA in the diet. The authors suggest that DMBA adrenal necrosis may reduce TH-mRNA in the medulla, compromise its catecholamine synthetic capability, and thereby contribute to the overall metabolic stress condition of TB rats.

  18. Chronic diaphyseal osteomyelitis of long bones refractory to conventional therapy - Benefits and risks of reaming of the femoral medullary cavity.

    PubMed

    Pape, H C; Zwipp, H; Regel, G; Maschek, H; Tscherne, H

    1995-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of long bones represents a severe complication during fracture healing. If ongoing infection occurs despite reoperation and if antibiotic treatment is of no benefit, reaming of the medullary canal may be beneficial. We investigated the long term follow up (minimum 2 years) of patients submitted to reaming of the medullary canal to evaluate the efficacy of this method. Criteria for successful procedure: no further operative procedure/ antibiotic treatment. 32 patients out of 37 were followed over a 9 year period. Mean incidence of surgical treatment for osteomyelitis prior to reaming: 3.2 operations. Mean duration until reexamination after reaming: 3.7 years. 89% of patients had a full range of motion upon reexamination, in the others further articular injuries were present. 84.3% of patients were working in the same profession as prior to the fracture, 72% were active in sports again, 97% of patients were pain free. One otherwise healthy patient suffering from sclerosing osteitis (Garré) died during reaming of the femur due to bone marrow embolism to the lung. Reaming of the medullary canal has a high rate of curing osteomyelitis even after several previous attempts of surgical revisions and/or antibiotic treatment. The most likely mechanism is based on improvement of local perfusion. During surgery care must be taken not to provoke pulmonary embolization. Intraoperative monitoring by pulmonary artery catheter should performed; reaming should be immediately discontinued, if a rise in pulmonary artery pressure occurs. PMID:24193276

  19. In vitro reconstruction of human junctional and sulcular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Dabija-Wolter, G; Bakken, V; Cimpan, M R; Johannessen, A C; Costea, D E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to develop and characterize standardized in vitro three-dimensional organotypic models of human junctional epithelium (JE) and sulcular epithelium (SE). METHODS Organotypic models were constructed by growing human normal gingival keratinocytes on top of collagen matrices populated with gingival fibroblasts (GF) or periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PLF). Tissues obtained were harvested at different time points and assessed for epithelial morphology, proliferation (Ki67), expression of JE-specific markers (ODAM and FDC-SP), cytokeratins (CK), transglutaminase, filaggrin, and basement membrane proteins (collagen IV and laminin1). RESULTS The epithelial component in 3- and 5-day organotypics showed limited differentiation and expressed Ki-67, ODAM, FDC-SP, CK 8, 13, 16, 19, and transglutaminase in a similar fashion to control JE samples. PLF supported better than GF expression of CK19 and suprabasal proliferation, although statistically significant only at day 5. Basement membrane proteins started to be deposited only from day 5. The rate of proliferating cells as well as the percentage of CK19-expressing cells decreased significantly in 7- and 9-day cultures. Day 7 organotypics presented higher number of epithelial cell layers, proliferating cells in suprabasal layers, and CK expression pattern similar to SE. CONCLUSION Both time in culture and fibroblast type had impact on epithelial phenotype. Five-day cultures with PLF are suggested as JE models, 7-day cultures with PLF or GF as SE models, while 9-day cultures with GF as gingival epithelium (GE) models. Such standard, reproducible models represent useful tools to study periodontal bacteria–host interactions in vitro. PMID:22947066

  20. Expression of Signaling Components in Embryonic Eyelid Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the “eyelid closure pathways”. However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms. PMID:24498290