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Sample records for megacolon

  1. [Megacolon and sigmoid volvulus: incidence and physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Saravia Burgos, Jaime; Acosta Canedo, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of Megacolon is multiple. One of these causes and the most frequent is Chagas disease. Its complication: sigmoid volvulus was de main diagnosis in the admitted patients at the Bolivian and Japanese Gastroenterological Institute of Cochabamba Bolivia. It usually affects people of a low economic income. In this Gastroenterological Hospital a transversal and prospective study has been done, in order to know the real incidence and the physiopathology of this disease. In a six year period, from 2000 to 2006, 8.954 patients were admitted to the Hospital: of these, 814 (9.09%), where diagnosticated as lower intestinal obstruction. In 608 (74.7%) the final diagnosis was sigmoid torsion. Radiological diagnosis was made in 84% of the patients and endoscopic decompression was successful in 88.7%. As reported in the medical literature, the main cause of megacolon in this part of the world is Chagas disease. In our investigation 22% (98 patients), were serology positive to Chagas disease, and another 21.44% (95 patients) were serology negative. They were coca leaf chewers. One of coca leaf compounds is cocaine which blocks the adrenaline and noradrenaline degradation by mean of monoamine oxidase inactivation. These two hormones stay a long term of time in the target organ: the large bowel. By this mean chronic and persistent vessel constriction develops intestinal wall atrophy and lower resistance to the intraintestinal pressure. PMID:25875517

  2. Hirschsprung's disease and idiopathic megacolon in adults and adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, P R; Lennard-Jones, J E; Hawley, P R; Todd, I P

    1986-01-01

    The distinction between Hirschsprung's disease and idiopathic megacolon in childhood dates from the classic clinical, radiological, and histological studies of Bodian, Stephens, and Ward. This article describes clinical experience over 15 years of 94 patients in whom megacolon of these two types was recognised for the first time after the age of 10, to illustrate the problems of diagnosis and treatment in later years. Just as it is now recognised that patients with the clinical characteristics of Hirschsprung's disease may have one of several abnormalities of the myenteric plexus, including not only absence of ganglion cells, but also patchy or zonal loss, abnormal neurones or neuronal dysplasia, so idiopathic megacolon may also be a heterogeneous group of cases. This paper suggests on clinical grounds that those patients with idiopathic megacolon whose symptoms start in childhood differ from those whose symptoms develop in later years. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 PMID:3699562

  3. Myxedema megacolon after external neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Borrie, M.J.; Cape, R.D.; Troster, M.M.; Fung, S.T.

    1983-04-01

    Myxedema megacolon is a rare manifestation of hypothyroidism. It may respond to appropriate treatment but is sometimes irreversible, resulting in fatal complications. Two possible mechanisms to explain the colonic atony include (1) myxomatous infiltration of the submucosa with separation of the muscular fibers from the ganglia of Auerbach's plexus, and (2) severe autonomic neuropathy affecting the extrinsic nerves to the colon and the myenteric plexus. Histology from our case supports the first proposed mechanism. Urecholine challenge and manometric measure response may help predict reversibility of colonic atony. Treatment should be individualized and should include factors such as age, duration of symptoms, and other medical illness. Low-dose oral or intravenous triiodothyronine is effective. Hypothyroidism following external radiation of the neck for lymphoma is not uncommon, and the risk increases following one or more lymphangiograms. Such patients should be followed up with regular TSH estimations for at least three years.

  4. Toxic megacolon complicating a first course of Crohn's disease: about two cases.

    PubMed

    Hefaiedh, Rania; Cheikh, Mariem; Ennaifer, Rym; Gharbi, Lassad; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2013-08-01

    Toxic megacolon is a rare and serious complication of Crohn's disease. Because of the associated high morbidity and mortality, early recognition and management of toxic megacolon is important. Through two cases of toxic megacolon complicating Crohn's disease, we assessed the clinical, radiologic and therapeutic characteristics of this complication. A 35-year-old man presented a first course of Crohn's disease treated with corticosteroid. He exhibited sudden severe abdominal pain and distension with shock. A plain abdominal radiography revealed toxic megacolon. He underwent medical therapy, but symptoms not relieved. The patient underwent subtotal colectomy with ileostomy. The resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed. Endoscopic evaluation six months later did not shown recurrence. A 57-year-old man presented with severe acute colitis inaugurating Crohn's disease, was treated with corticosteroid and antibiotics. He exhibited signs of general peritonitis. Computed tomographic examination revealed toxic megacolon with free perforation, showing prominent dilation of the transverse colon and linear pneumatosis. The patient underwent emergent subtotal colectomy and ileostomy. The final histological patterns were consisting with diagnosis of Crohn's disease associated with cytomegalovirus infection. The patient underwent antiviral therapy during 15 days. Because of the high risk of postoperative recurrence, he underwent immunosuppressive therapy. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed successfully. Toxic megacolon in Crohn's disease is a serious turning of this disease. We underscore the importance of early diagnosis of toxic megacolon and rapid surgical intervention if improvement is not observed on medical therapy. PMID:24765512

  5. Clinical Features and Colonic Motor Disturbances in Chronic Megacolon in Adults

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, Ralph Hurley; Acosta, Andrés; Camilleri, Michael; Burton, Duane; Busciglio, Irene; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic megacolon is a rare disease of the colonic motor function characterized by a permanent increase in colonic diameter. Methods We reviewed electronic medical records of all patients diagnosed with chronic megacolon from 1999 to 2014 at Mayo Clinic. Our aim was to summarize clinical and motility features, including colonic compliance and tone measured by colonic barostat-controlled 10cm long infinitely compliant balloon. Colonic compliance curves were compared to healthy (40) and disease (47) control groups. Results Among 24 identified patients, the mean maximal colonic diameter on abdominal radiograph was 12.7±0.8cm. The cause of megacolon was idiopathic in 16/24, and secondary in 8/24. A relatively high prevalence (10/24) of comorbid pelvic floor dyssynergia was identified. At the time of this report, 16 patients had undergone colectomy. In general, megacolon presented high fasting colonic volume at relatively low pressures (16-20mmHg), suggesting high colonic compliance; similarly, volumes at operating pressures that ensured apposition of the balloon to the colonic wall suggested low colonic tone. Median balloon volume at 44mmHg distension was 584mL (IQR 556.5-600) in patients with megacolon compared to 251mL (212-281) in healthy, 240mL (207-286) in functional constipation and 241mL (210.8-277.5) in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome controls. Colon's tonic response to feeding was generally intact, and there was frequently maintained phasic contractile response to feeding. Conclusions Chronic megacolon is a severe colonic dysmotility, manifesting radiologically with increased colonic diameter; it can be proven by measuring colonic compliance, and typically requires colectomy because of failed medical therapy. PMID:25868630

  6. [Surgical treatment of toxic megacolon complicating pseudomembranous colitis. Apropos of a case, review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Panis, Y; Hautefeuille, P; Hecht, Y; Le Houelleur, J; Gompel, H

    1992-01-01

    Toxic megacolon complicating pseudomembranous colitis has been rarely observed. Only 36 cases have been previously reported. We present herein a new case report in which pseudomembranous colitis was secondary to prophylactic antibiotherapy with pefloxacin for hip prosthesis. Despite specific oral treatment (against Clostridium difficile) by vancomycin, toxic megacolon required urgent subtotal colectomy with ileostomy and sigmoidostomy. Postoperative course was uneventful. Analysis of the reported cases demonstrates the high overall mortality of the series (32%); the procedure of choice seems to be subtotal colectomy, which removes the septic focus, with a 12% operative mortality rate. PMID:1416759

  7. Intestinal microvillous atrophy in a patient with Down syndrome and aganglionic megacolon.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Egea, Anastasio Serrano; López, Javier Manzanares; Benítez, Enrique Medina

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal microvillous disorders are an uncommon cause of severe diarrhea, with very poor prognosis. The authors report the case of a female infant with Down syndrome, aganglionic megacolon, severe diarrhea, and jejunal biopsy with ultrastructural changes consistent with microvillous atrophy. The patient condition improved after a colostomy performed in the setting of the treatment of Hirschprung disease. PMID:12028658

  8. Subtotal colectomy by rectal pull-through for treatment of idiopathic megacolon in 2 cats

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Darren C.

    2012-01-01

    Surgical management of idiopathic megacolon is described in 2 cats by a rectal pull-through with subtotal colectomy performed outside of the abdomen. This newly described technique facilitates access to the rectum for suturing an anastamosis without the need for pubic osteotomy and with minimal risk of abdominal contamination. PMID:23277646

  9. Lower oesophageal sphincter response to pentagastrin in chagasic patients with megaoesophagus and megacolon.

    PubMed Central

    Padovan, W; Godoy, R A; Dantas, R O; Meneghelli, U G; Oliveira, R B; Troncon, L E

    1980-01-01

    Intraluminal manometric studies were performed in 14 chagasic patients with megaoesophagus, 10 chagasic patients with megacolon, and 15 control subjects. Basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was 20.27+/-1.16 mmHg (mean+/-SEM) in controls as compared wtih 15.16+/-1.53 mmHg in chagasics with megaoesophagus and 14.38+/-1.50 mmHg in chagasics with megacolon. Dose-response studies to intravenous pentagastrin showed that the chagasic patients exhibited a lower sensitivity to the stimulant than did the controls, as demonstrated by shifting of the dose-response curve to the right and higher individual values of the dose for half maximal contraction (D50). No difference was noted between the calculated maximal contraction (Vmax) of oesophageal sphincter of controls and chagasics. These data are compatible with the hypothesis of an interaction between pentagastrin and cholinergic nervous excitation on oesophageal sphincteric smooth muscle. PMID:6769753

  10. Viral Spread to Enteric Neurons Links Genital HSV-1 Infection to Toxic Megacolon and Lethality.

    PubMed

    Khoury-Hanold, William; Yordy, Brian; Kong, Philip; Kong, Yong; Ge, William; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a leading cause of genital herpes, infects oral or genital mucosal epithelial cells before infecting the peripheral sensory nervous system. The spread of HSV-1 beyond the sensory nervous system and the resulting broader spectrum of disease are not well understood. Using a mouse model of genital herpes, we found that HSV-1-infection-associated lethality correlated with severe fecal and urinary retention. No inflammation or infection of the brain was evident. Instead, HSV-1 spread via the dorsal root ganglia to the autonomic ganglia of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in the colon. ENS infection led to robust viral gene transcription, pathological inflammatory responses, and neutrophil-mediated destruction of enteric neurons, ultimately resulting in permanent loss of peristalsis and the development of toxic megacolon. Laxative treatment rescued mice from lethality following genital HSV-1 infection. These results reveal an unexpected pathogenesis of HSV associated with ENS infection. PMID:27281569

  11. Toxic megacolon

    MedlinePlus

    ... colon ruptures, symptoms may include Rapid heart rate Shock , when a bodywide infection leads to dangerously low ... A physical exam may reveal signs of septic shock . The health care provider will notice tenderness in ...

  12. Toxic megacolon

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. A physical exam may reveal signs of septic shock . The doctor will notice tenderness in the abdomen ... entire colon). You may receive antibiotics to prevent sepsis (a severe infection).

  13. Induction of potentially lethal hypermagnesemia, ischemic colitis, and toxic megacolon by a preoperative mechanical bowel preparation: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Masahiko; Kusumoto, Eiji; Ota, Mitsuhiko; Kimura, Yasue; Tsutsumi, Norifumi; Oki, Eiji; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Kusumoto, Tetsuya; Ikejiri, Koji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with rectal cancer. The tumor invaded the subserosal layer, but it was not large, and there was no sign of obstruction. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy reduced the size of the tumor. The patient was admitted to our hospital for surgery. For mechanical bowel preparation, he ingested 34 g of magnesium citrate (Magcorol P®), but then developed severe shock, a disturbance of consciousness, and acidemia, and he required catecholamines and mechanical ventilation. X-ray, CT, and laboratory tests revealed ischemic colitis, toxic megacolon, and hypermagnesemia (16.3 mg/dL). After 2 days of temporary hemodialysis and an enema to reduce his blood magnesium concentration, he recovered and left the intensive care unit. However, the left side of his colon had suffered ischemic damage and become irreversibly atrophied. One month later, he underwent laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection and left-side colectomy for the rectal cancer and severe ischemic colitis of the left side of the colon. Histopathology confirmed the rectal cancer with a grade 2 chemotherapeutic effect and severe ischemic colitis of the left side of the colon. Hence, the present case suggests that severe ischemic colitis, toxic megacolon, and hypermagnesemia can occur after taking a magnesium laxative without obstruction of the intestine. PMID:26943694

  14. Morphometric study of the fibrosis and mast cell count in the circular colon musculature of chronic Chagas patients with and without megacolon.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Simone Wanderley; Rua, Adilha Misson de Oliveira; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Cançado, Cristiane Gobbo; Chica, Javier Em lio Lazo; Lopes, Edison Reis; Adad, Sheila Jorge

    2003-01-01

    A morphometric study of the circular colon musculature was performed, in which the mast cell count was determined and the connective fibrous tissue in this layer was measured. The objective was to gain better understanding of Chagas megacolon morphology and contribute towards the knowledge of fibrosis pathogenesis in Chagas megas. An evaluation was made of 15 distal sigmoid rings from Chagas patients with megacolon (MCC), 15 without megacolon (CSMC) and 15 non-Chagas patients (NC). The rings were fixed in formol, embedded in paraffin, and 7mm thick sections were cut and stained using Azan-Heidenhain and Giemsa. The mast cell count and fibrosis were greater in the MCC group than in the CSMC and NC groups (p< 0,05; Kruskal-Wallis test) and there was no significant difference between the latter two. The fibrosis and increased mast cell count in the colon musculature of the MCC group possibly indicates that there is a relationship between mastocytosis and fibrosis, as has already been demonstrated in other pathologies. PMID:12937722

  15. BLOOD VESSELS IN GANGLIA IN HUMAN ESOPHAGUS MIGHT EXPLAIN THE HIGHER FREQUENCY OF MEGAESOPHAGUS COMPARED WITH MEGACOLON

    PubMed Central

    Adad, Sheila Jorge; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Jammal, Alessandro Adad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the existence of blood vessels within ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the human esophagus and colon. At necropsy, 15 stillborns, newborns and children up to two years of age, with no gastrointestinal disorders, were examined. Rings of the esophagus and colon were analyzed and then fixed in formalin and processed for paraffin. Histological sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and immunohistochemistry for the characterization of endothelial cells, using antibodies for anti-factor VIII and CD31. Blood vessels were identified within the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, and no blood vessels were found in any ganglia of the colon. It was concluded that the ganglia of the myenteric plexus of the esophagus are vascularized, while the ganglia of the colon are avascular. Vascularization within the esophageal ganglia could facilitate the entrance of infectious agents, as well as the development of inflammatory responses (ganglionitis) and denervation, as found in Chagas disease and idiopathic achalasia. This could explain the higher frequency of megaesophagus compared with megacolon. PMID:25351549

  16. Male-Biased Aganglionic Megacolon in the TashT Mouse Line Due to Perturbation of Silencer Elements in a Large Gene Desert of Chromosome 10

    PubMed Central

    Touré, Aboubacrine M.; Béland, Mélanie; Raiwet, Diana L.; Silversides, David W.; Pilon, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are a transient migratory cell population that generates diverse cell types such as neurons and glia of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Via an insertional mutation screen for loci affecting NCC development in mice, we identified one line—named TashT—that displays a partially penetrant aganglionic megacolon phenotype in a strong male-biased manner. Interestingly, this phenotype is highly reminiscent of human Hirschsprung’s disease, a neurocristopathy with a still unexplained male sex bias. In contrast to the megacolon phenotype, colonic aganglionosis is almost fully penetrant in homozygous TashT animals. The sex bias in megacolon expressivity can be explained by the fact that the male ENS ends, on average, around a “tipping point” of minimal colonic ganglionosis while the female ENS ends, on average, just beyond it. Detailed analysis of embryonic intestines revealed that aganglionosis in homozygous TashT animals is due to slower migration of enteric NCC. The TashT insertional mutation is localized in a gene desert containing multiple highly conserved elements that exhibit repressive activity in reporter assays. RNAseq analyses and 3C assays revealed that the TashT insertion results, at least in part, in NCC-specific relief of repression of the uncharacterized gene Fam162b; an outcome independently confirmed via transient transgenesis. The transcriptional signature of enteric NCC from homozygous TashT embryos is also characterized by the deregulation of genes encoding members of the most important signaling pathways for ENS formation—Gdnf/Ret and Edn3/Ednrb—and, intriguingly, the downregulation of specific subsets of X-linked genes. In conclusion, this study not only allowed the identification of Fam162b coding and regulatory sequences as novel candidate loci for Hirschsprung’s disease but also provides important new insights into its male sex bias. PMID:25786024

  17. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  18. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos, Camila França; Cangussú, Silvia Dantas; Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  19. [Our experience with the treatment of congenital megacolon using mechanical sutures].

    PubMed

    Vilariño Mosquera, A; Cano Novillo, I; Parise Methol, J; Matute de Cárdenas, J A; Navarro Ahumada, M; Fragela Mariña, J; Berchi, F J

    1990-04-01

    The DUHAMEL operation is widely used for the treatment of HIRSCHSPRUNG disease. Recently, technical modifications using stapled instruments have been introduced. The results of 12 patients treated between 1985 and 1989, performing the DUHAMEL procedure are reviewed. We perform with mechanical sutures, both surgical stages, e.g. abdominal and perineal. The technique for the procedure is described. Since we introduce the technique, we have observed several advantages consisting in a shorter surgical time, earlier normal life pattern, less postoperative complications and better results in clinical evolution. PMID:2147561

  20. [Rectocolonic plasty using mechanical stapler as a surgical solution in complications of megacolon].

    PubMed

    Vilariño, A; Cano, I; Benavent, I; Portela, E; Matute, J A; Delgado, M D; Pertejo, E M; Jiménez, M A; Manzanera, M; Pacheco, J A

    1995-10-01

    Hirschsprung's disease surgically treated with Duhamel's technique in which no mechanical suture has been used, usually presents, as main complication, cronic constipation, due to fecalomas in the rectal pouch. In our experience (30 cases plus four patients sent to our hospital for reintervention), this complication is not present when mechanical suture is introduced to the Duhamel's Technique. This allows us to assure that perineal rectocoloplasty, with auto-suture material is a precise optional treatment, with excellent results and allows the chance of not going through laparotomy in those cases that require reintervention. PMID:8679386

  1. Perianal neuroendocrine tumor with suspected lymph node metastasis causing colonic compression and subsequent megacolon

    PubMed Central

    Joudrey, Scott D.; Robinson, Duane A.; Blair, Robert; McLaughlin, Leslie D.; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    An 8-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was presented with a 4- to 5-month history of a progressively growing mass above her anus and an inability to defecate for 3 to 4 wk. External perianal and internal regional masses were subsequently identified and diagnosed as tumors of neuroendocrine origin through surgical excision and histopathologic evaluation. The cat was treated with 2 courses of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. PMID:25750442

  2. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.J.; Pitman, K.; Starr, G.; Wood, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease. These mice exhibited aganglionosis of the terminal segment of the large intestine. This condition was accompanied by fecal stasis and megacolon. Gastric emptying of saline or milk meals was slower in the mice with aganglionic or induced megacolon than in the normal mice, but the rate of emptying was faster than after administration of morphine (10 mg/kg). In the small intestine, the distribution of the radiolabeled marker and the advancing edge of the marker profile were abnormal in the mice with megacolon. There were small differences between the megacolonic and normal mice in the distance traversed by the advancing edge of the intraluminal profile of the marker. These results are evidence for disturbances of gastric and small intestinal motor function that occur in mice secondary to development of megacolon.

  3. Congenital aganglionosis in a 3-day-old Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Necropsy of a 3-day-old Holstein heifer revealed proximal megacolon and distal colorectal hypoplasia. Histologically, the hypoplastic distal colon and rectum lacked submucosal and myenteric ganglia. Clinical history, physical examination, and pathologic findings were consistent with intestinal aganglionosis, a congenital anomaly well documented in humans and foals but not previously reported in cattle. PMID:15943121

  4. A precordial rub in a boy with a severe attack of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Badina, Laura; Ferrara, Giovanna; Guastalla, Pierpaolo; Barbi, Egidio

    2014-04-01

    A case of a pneumomediastinum mimicking a pericarditis in a boy with an occult perforation due to ulcerative colitis is reported. Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication of severe attacks of ulcerative colitis, with or without the previous development of a toxic megacolon, that should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:24694884

  5. Internal hemipelvectomy for treatment of obstipation secondary to pelvic malunion in 3 cats.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Whitney; Gibson, Thomas W G; Reynolds, Debbie; Murphy, Kim A

    2016-09-01

    Pelvic fractures are a common injury in cats, and both surgical and conservative management approaches have been described. One of the major complications of pelvic fractures managed conservatively is narrowing of the pelvic canal. Severe pelvic canal narrowing can result in constipation and subsequent megacolon. The purpose of this case series is to describe the long-term outcome for 3 cats with obstipation treated with internal hemipelvectomy because of megacolon secondary to pelvic canal narrowing after conservative management. All cats had a good functional outcome of the affected limb. Two cats required ongoing medical management for recurrent constipation. Overall, internal hemipelvectomy offers good long-term limb function; however, its success in relieving clinical signs of constipation requires additional research. PMID:27587887

  6. Pseudo-Hirschsprung's disease with rectal hypoganglionosis: an autopsied case of circulatory failure due to severe constipation.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Akio; Shiotani, Seiji; Hayakawa, Hideyuki; Nishijima, Haruo

    2015-05-01

    We report a 21-year-old female patient who suddenly died of circulatory failure due to pressure from megacolon allied with pseudo-Hirschsprung's disease. Since 3 years before her death, she had exhibited the feeling of abdominal distention, which was diagnosed as constipation. However, her constipation did not respond well to the prescribed oral administration of laxatives and enemas. She was found dead at home in the morning, lying on her back. An autopsy revealed a decreased number of ganglion cells in the rectum, suggesting hypoganglionosis. In cases of intractable chronic constipation, careful investigation of the cause of such symptoms is important. PMID:25497871

  7. A young leukemic patient with unusual catastrophic intestinal complication.

    PubMed

    Vaiphei, Kim; Trehan, Amita; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    A 14-year-old child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had completed induction chemotherapy presented with fever and diffuse musculoskeletal pains which was thought to be a constellation of myositis, arthralgias and arthritis. Investigations revealed initially showed normal peripheral blood counts but had pancytopenia and pre-terminally blasts were seen in the peripheral blood smear. He had bone marrow necrosis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was suspected with a positive fungal serology. At autopsy, he had evidence of disease relapsed in lymph nodes, liver, spleen, testes and kidneys. There was extensive pseudomembranous colitis and appendicitis with changes of toxic megacolon. PMID:25673592

  8. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  9. Fulminant ulcerative colitis in a healthy pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Orabona, Rossana; Valcamonico, Adriana; Salemme, Marianna; Manenti, Stefania; Tiberio, Guido A M; Frusca, Tiziana

    2015-05-21

    This case report concerns a 25-year-old patient with 6-7 bloody stools/d, abdominal pain, tachycardia, and weight loss occurring during the third trimester of pregnancy. Severe ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon and gravidic sepsis was diagnosed by clinical evaluation, colonoscopy, and rectal biopsy that were performed safely without risk for the mother or baby. The patient underwent a cesarean section at 28+6 wk gestation. The baby was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital and survived without complications. Fulminant colitis was managed conservatively by combined colonoscopic decompression and medical treatment. Although current European guidelines describe toxic megacolon as an indication for emergency surgery for both pregnant and non-pregnant women, thanks to careful monitoring, endoscopic decompression, and intensive medical therapy with nutritional support, we prevented the woman from having to undergo emergency pancolectomy. Our report seems to suggest that conservative management may be a helpful tool in preventing pancolectomy if the patient's condition improves quickly. Otherwise, surgery is mandatory. PMID:26019473

  10. Partial requirement of endothelin receptor B in spiral ganglion neurons for postnatal development of hearing.

    PubMed

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Iida, Machiko; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Takaiwa, Kazutaka; Kimitsuki, Takashi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Komune, Shizuo; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Kato, Masashi

    2011-08-26

    Impairments of endothelin receptor B (Ednrb/EDNRB) cause the development of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome with congenital hearing loss, hypopigmentation, and megacolon disease in mice and humans. Hearing loss in Waardenburg-Shah syndrome has been thought to be caused by an Ednrb-mediated congenital defect of melanocytes in the stria vascularis (SV) of inner ears. Here we show that Ednrb expressed in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in inner ears is required for postnatal development of hearing in mice. Ednrb protein was expressed in SGNs from WT mice on postnatal day 19 (P19), whereas it was undetectable in SGNs from WT mice on P3. Correspondingly, Ednrb homozygously deleted mice (Ednrb(-/-) mice) with congenital hearing loss showed degeneration of SGNs on P19 but not on P3. The congenital hearing loss involving neurodegeneration of SGNs as well as megacolon disease in Ednrb(-/-) mice were markedly improved by introducing an Ednrb transgene under control of the dopamine β-hydroxylase promoter (Ednrb(-/-);DBH-Ednrb mice) on P19. Neither defects of melanocytes nor hypopigmentation in the SV and skin in Ednrb(-/-) mice was rescued in the Ednrb(-/-);DBH-Ednrb mice. Thus, the results of this study indicate a novel role of Ednrb expressed in SGNs distinct from that in melanocytes in the SV contributing partially to postnatal hearing development. PMID:21715336

  11. Fulminant ulcerative colitis in a healthy pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Orabona, Rossana; Valcamonico, Adriana; Salemme, Marianna; Manenti, Stefania; Tiberio, Guido AM; Frusca, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    This case report concerns a 25-year-old patient with 6-7 bloody stools/d, abdominal pain, tachycardia, and weight loss occurring during the third trimester of pregnancy. Severe ulcerative colitis complicated by toxic megacolon and gravidic sepsis was diagnosed by clinical evaluation, colonoscopy, and rectal biopsy that were performed safely without risk for the mother or baby. The patient underwent a cesarean section at 28+6 wk gestation. The baby was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit of our hospital and survived without complications. Fulminant colitis was managed conservatively by combined colonoscopic decompression and medical treatment. Although current European guidelines describe toxic megacolon as an indication for emergency surgery for both pregnant and non-pregnant women, thanks to careful monitoring, endoscopic decompression, and intensive medical therapy with nutritional support, we prevented the woman from having to undergo emergency pancolectomy. Our report seems to suggest that conservative management may be a helpful tool in preventing pancolectomy if the patient’s condition improves quickly. Otherwise, surgery is mandatory. PMID:26019473

  12. Antioxidant therapy for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: Does it work?

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Fabiana Andréa; de Andrade, Kívia Queiroz; dos Santos, Juliana Célia Farias; Araújo, Orlando Roberto Pimentel; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is considered as one of the etiologic factors involved in several signals and symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that include diarrhea, toxic megacolon and abdominal pain. This systematic review discusses approaches, challenges and perspectives into the use of nontraditional antioxidant therapy on IBD, including natural and synthetic compounds in both human and animal models. One hundred and thirty four papers were identified, of which only four were evaluated in humans. Some of the challenges identified in this review can shed light on this fact: lack of standardization of OS biomarkers, absence of safety data and clinical trials for the chemicals and biological molecules, as well as the fact that most of the compounds were not repeatedly tested in several situations, including acute and chronic colitis. This review hopes to stimulate researchers to become more involved in this fruitful area, to warrant investigation of novel, alternative and efficacious antioxidant-based therapies. PMID:26520808

  13. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  14. Adult Hirschsprung's disease diagnosed during forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Manaouil, Cécile; Marc, Bernard; Ricard, Jannick; Brevet, Marie; Montpellier, Dominique; Defouilloy, Christian; Jardé, Olivier

    2006-09-01

    We report a case of fatal Hirschsprung's disease (HD) discovered at autopsy. A 20-year-old man collapsed at home. Emergency medical personnel found him in cardiac arrest and all resuscitative efforts failed. He had a past history of chronic constipation since infancy. Forensic autopsy revealed a megacolon full of gas and stools. Microscopic examination showed absence of ganglion cells in a short segment of the rectum and enterocolitis in the left and transverse colon. HD is rarely described in adults. In many cases, patients complained of constipation since infancy but the affection remained misdiagnosed. The relative good tolerance of the disease is usually due to a short aganglionic bowel segment. Enterocolitis is a frequent and severe complication of HD in children but is rarely described in adults. This case suggests the importance of HD diagnosis in childhood in order to avoid fatal complications with forensic consequences. PMID:17018101

  15. [Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in primary health care in a non-endemic areas].

    PubMed

    Roca Saumell, Carme; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Solsona Díaz, Lluís; Gascón Brustenga, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although it is commonly transmitted by an insect vector in continental Latin-America, in recent decades, due migration, has been diagnosed in other countries such Spain, the European country with a largest immigrant population of Latin American. For a long time, the patient remains asymptomatic, but some years after this stage, the symptoms can be serious (dilated cardiomyopathy, megacolon, megaesophagus). In addition, detection in pregnant women has a high priority because of the route of vertical transmission. Several specific guidelines about Chagas disease has been developed on the Banks of blood, maternal hospitals, HIV co-infection, organ transplant. But due to the detection of lack of information to primary care professionals, we consider to will be useful this document written and agreed to by family phisicians, pediatricians and specialists in International Health. PMID:25704793

  16. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  17. Umbilical incision laparoscopic surgery with one assist port for an elderly patient with recurrent sigmoid volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Osawa, Naoshi; Yoh, Taiho; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2012-01-01

    Single-port access laparoscopic surgery has recently emerged as a method to improve morbidity and cosmetic benefit of conventional laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we report the experience of transumbilical incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with one assist port in a 71-year-old man who had developed recurrent sigmoid volvulus in these several years since his first visit to the hospital. The patient presented abdominal distension and severe constipation. A plain x-ray film and CT of the abdomen showed grossly distended sigmoid colon loops and stenosis of recto-sigmoid colon. Sigmoid volvulus associated with megacolon was diagnosed and emergence endoscopic decompression was performed. After his condition improved, transumbilical incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was carried out as the minimally invasive approach, due to the several risk of patient such as aging and pulmonary disorder. Postoperative course was uneventful and on postoperative visit to the hospital he reported resolution of abdominal distension. PMID:23235104

  18. Umbilical incision laparoscopic surgery with one assist port for an elderly patient with recurrent sigmoid volvulus.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Osawa, Naoshi; Yoh, Taiho; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2012-01-01

    Single-port access laparoscopic surgery has recently emerged as a method to improve morbidity and cosmetic benefit of conventional laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we report the experience of transumbilical incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with one assist port in a 71-year-old man who had developed recurrent sigmoid volvulus in these several years since his first visit to the hospital. The patient presented abdominal distension and severe constipation. A plain x-ray film and CT of the abdomen showed grossly distended sigmoid colon loops and stenosis of recto-sigmoid colon. Sigmoid volvulus associated with megacolon was diagnosed and emergence endoscopic decompression was performed. After his condition improved, transumbilical incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was carried out as the minimally invasive approach, due to the several risk of patient such as aging and pulmonary disorder. Postoperative course was uneventful and on postoperative visit to the hospital he reported resolution of abdominal distension. PMID:23235104

  19. Paralytic ileus following "subcutaneous bortezomib" therapy: focus on the clinical emergency-report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mele, Giuseppe; Coppi, Maria Rosaria; Melpignano, Angela; Quarta, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the medical history of 19 elderly myeloma patients treated with the "novel subcutaneous formulation of bortezomib." In our experience, two patients (10 %) discontinued treatment for paralytic ileus. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of toxic megacolon and paralytic ileus due to "novel subcutaneous formulation of bortezomib" are unclear. Probably, it may be related to possible damage of the autonomic nerve fibers that control organ functions. Adequate prevention and management of the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities with the use of fluid intake and prokinetic and laxative drugs (at least two types of agents in a suboptimal dose) especially in patients with risk factors for GI side effects (anti-myeloma novel agents, opioids or antiemetics, iron supplements, spinal and cord compression, immobility, history of constipation) can decrease the possibility of interruption of administration of drug and increase adherence to treatment. Clearly this complication must be borne in mind whenever a patient develops acute abdominal pain and distension. PMID:25600700

  20. KIF26A is an unconventional kinesin and regulates GDNF-Ret signaling in enteric neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruyun; Niwa, Shinsuke; Homma, Noriko; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2009-11-13

    The kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are motor proteins that transport organelles and protein complexes in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner. We identified KIF26A as a new member of the murine KIFs. KIF26A is a rather atypical member as it lacks ATPase activity. Mice with a homozygous deletion of Kif26a developed a megacolon with enteric nerve hyperplasia. Kif26a-/- enteric neurons showed hypersensitivity for GDNF-Ret signaling, and we find that KIF26A suppressed GDNF-Ret signaling by direct binding and inhibition of Grb2, an essential component of GDNF/Akt/ERK signaling. We therefore propose that the unconventional kinesin KIF26A plays a key role in enteric nervous system development by repressing a cell growth signaling pathway. PMID:19914172

  1. Antioxidant therapy for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: Does it work?

    PubMed

    Moura, Fabiana Andréa; de Andrade, Kívia Queiroz; dos Santos, Juliana Célia Farias; Araújo, Orlando Roberto Pimentel; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is considered as one of the etiologic factors involved in several signals and symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that include diarrhea, toxic megacolon and abdominal pain. This systematic review discusses approaches, challenges and perspectives into the use of nontraditional antioxidant therapy on IBD, including natural and synthetic compounds in both human and animal models. One hundred and thirty four papers were identified, of which only four were evaluated in humans. Some of the challenges identified in this review can shed light on this fact: lack of standardization of OS biomarkers, absence of safety data and clinical trials for the chemicals and biological molecules, as well as the fact that most of the compounds were not repeatedly tested in several situations, including acute and chronic colitis. This review hopes to stimulate researchers to become more involved in this fruitful area, to warrant investigation of novel, alternative and efficacious antioxidant-based therapies. PMID:26520808

  2. [Xipho-omphalopagus--Siamese twins with multiple abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Janec, M; Vojtko, M; Kubíková, E

    1989-09-01

    The authors describe a case of xiphoomphalpagus; one infant was dead, the other alive. They had a common umbilical cord and omphalocele, joined liver, only one gallbladder and common duodenum in the shape of a wide sac. From this originated two thin guts, one was wide and belonged to the dead foetus, the gut of the live foetus beneath the duodenum was atretic. Already six hours after delivery the authors separated the infants and in the live infant they not only resected the liver and reinserted the choledochus but also repaired the wide duodenum and atresia. The second infant died on the 4th day after operation from congenital heart disease incompatible with life. The stillborn infant has, as revealed by necropsy and histological examination, a congenital megacolon. The authors analyze the scope of diagnostic and surgical possibilities. PMID:2814704

  3. [Dolichomegacolon of the Andes and intestinal volvulus due to altitude].

    PubMed

    Frisancho, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    Sigmoid volvulus is a frequent cause of emergencies in hospitals in the Andean area, representing more than 50% of all intestinal obstructions. Andean dolichomegacolon (DCMA) and retractile mesocolonitis are the main contributing factors for volvulus. The mesocolonitis nears the proximal and distal segment of the sigmoid handle, favoring its torsion. Copious intake of fermentable food is the precipitating factor for volvulus. The majority of patients are seen during sowing and harvest periods, in which the consumption of this type of food increases. Andean people who live at an altitude of 3,000 m have a larger and thicker colon than coastal residents. We call this acquired characteristic the Andean dolichomegacolon (DCMA). A fiber-rich diet may inhibit the histological phenomenon known as elastogenesis, developing--over the years--the megacolon. Another important factor may be the lower atmospheric pressure in the altitude, and according to Boyle and Mariotte's physical law, the expansion of intraluminal gas may have an influence on intestinal enlargement. DCMA has many special anatomic, clinical, radiological, histological and serological features which make it different from the . chagasic megacolon. Mild emergency procedures may be performed to treat the sigmoid volvulus, such as endoscopic disvolvulation. Changing the colon rotation is helpful in diminishing abdominal pressure and restore complete blood circulation. An emergency surgery treatment must take the patient's general condition and the colon handle condition during surgery as a guiding point. High rates of mortality are found in relation to elderly patients, disease evolution time and stage of intestinal ischemia. Other new therapeutic procedures such as percutaneous sigmoidpexy, laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and mesosigmoplasty are under review, and have precise indications. Wider series are needed to evaluate them better. PMID:18958141

  4. Disrupted SOX10 function causes spongiform neurodegeneration in gray tremor mice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sarah R.; Lee, Inyoul; Ebeling, Christine; Stephenson, Dennis A.; Schweitzer, Kelsey M.; Baxter, David; Moon, Tara M.; LaPierre, Sarah; Jaques, Benjamin; Silvius, Derek; Wegner, Michael; Hood, Leroy E.; Carlson, George; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Mice homozygous for the gray tremor (gt) mutation have a pleiotropic phenotype that includes pigmentation defects, megacolon, whole body tremors, sporadic seizures, hypo- and dysmyelination of the CNS and PNS, vacuolation of the CNS, and early death. Vacuolation similar to that caused by prions was originally reported to be transmissible, but subsequent studies showed the inherited disease was not infectious. The gt mutation mapped to distal mouse chromosome 15, to the same region as Sox10, which encodes a transcription factor with essential roles in neural crest survival and differentiation. As dominant mutations in mouse or human SOX10 cause white spotting and intestinal aganglionosis, we screened the Sox10 coding region for mutations in gt/gt DNA. An adenosine to guanine transversion was identified in exon 2 that changes a highly conserved glutamic acid residue in the SOX10 DNA binding domain to glycine. This mutant allele was not seen in wildtype mice, including the related GT/Le strain, and failed to complement a Sox10 null allele. Gene expression analysis revealed significant down-regulation of genes involved in myelin lipid biosynthesis pathways in gt/gt brains. Knockout mice for some of these genes develop CNS vacuolation and/or myelination defects, suggesting that their down-regulation may contribute to these phenotypes in gt mutants and could underlie the neurological phenotypes associated with Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-Central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung (PCWH) disease, caused by mutations in human SOX10. PMID:25399070

  5. Case Report: Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic, Dino; Blagaic, Ana; Zupan, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS) disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF). Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. By the end of the first week the diagnosis of the typical HUS was established. During the second week the disease progressed into MOF that included ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions. PMID:25075296

  6. Hirschsprung’s disease: Historical notes and pathological diagnosis on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Dr. Harald Hirschsprung’s death

    PubMed Central

    Sergi, Consolato

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) or congenital megacolon is one of the differential diagnoses of chronic constipation mostly in infancy and may indeed represent a challenge for pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, and pediatric pathologists. The diagnosis relies clearly on the identification of the absence of ganglion cells at the plexuses (submucosus and myentericus) of the bowel wall. HSCR is usually located at the terminal (distal) rectum with potential pre-terminal or proximal extension to the less distal large bowel (sigmoid colon). Astonishingly, there is some evidence that Hindu surgeons of prehistoric India may have been exposed and had considerable knowledge about HSCR, but this disease is notoriously and eponymously named to Dr. Harald Hirschsprung (1830-1916), who brilliantly presented two infants with fatal constipation at the Berlin conference of the German Society of Pediatrics more than one century ago. Historical milestones and diagnosis of HSCR (originally called “Die Hirschsprungsche Krankheit”) are reviewed. More than 100 years following his meticulous and broad description, HSCR is still a puzzling disease for both diagnosis and treatment. HSCR remains a critical area of clinical pediatrics and pediatric surgery and an intense area of investigation for both molecular and developmental biologists. PMID:26566484

  7. Paleoparasitology of Chagas disease--a review.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Adauto; Jansen, Ana Maria; Reinhard, Karl; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando

    2009-07-01

    One hundred years since the discovery of Chagas disease associated with Trypanosoma cruzi infection, growing attention has focused on understanding the evolution in parasite-human host interaction. This interest has featured studies and results from paleoparasitology, not only the description of lesions in mummified bodies, but also the recovery of genetic material from the parasite and the possibility of analyzing such material over time. The present study reviews the evidence of Chagas disease in organic remains excavated from archeological sites and discusses two findings in greater detail, both with lesions suggestive of chagasic megacolon and confirmed by molecular biology techniques. One of these sites is located in the United States, on the border between Texas and Mexico and the other in state of Minas Gerais, in the Brazilian cerrado (savannah). Dated prior to contact with Europeans, these results confirm that Chagas disease affected prehistoric human groups in other regions outside the Andean altiplanos and other transmission areas on the Pacific Coast, previously considered the origin of T. cruzi infection in the human host. PMID:19753453

  8. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Diane J; Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Steele, Jennifer A; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Tzipori, Saul

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  9. Clostridium difficile infection: epidemiology, diagnosis and understanding transmission.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica S H; Monaghan, Tanya M; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to affect patients in hospitals and communities worldwide. The spectrum of clinical disease ranges from mild diarrhoea to toxic megacolon, colonic perforation and death. However, this bacterium might also be carried asymptomatically in the gut, potentially leading to 'silent' onward transmission. Modern technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, are helping to track C. difficile transmission across health-care facilities, countries and continents, offering the potential to illuminate previously under-recognized sources of infection. These typing strategies have also demonstrated heterogeneity in terms of CDI incidence and strain types reflecting different stages of epidemic spread. However, comparison of CDI epidemiology, particularly between countries, is challenging due to wide-ranging approaches to sampling and testing. Diagnostic strategies for C. difficile are complicated both by the wide range of bacterial targets and tests available and the need to differentiate between toxin-producing and non-toxigenic strains. Multistep diagnostic algorithms have been recommended to improve sensitivity and specificity. In this Review, we describe the latest advances in the understanding of C. difficile epidemiology, transmission and diagnosis, and discuss the effect of these developments on the clinical management of CDI. PMID:26956066

  10. Fine structure mapping and deletion analysis of the murine piebald locus

    SciTech Connect

    Metallinos, D.L.; Tilghman, S.M. ); Oppenheimer, A.J. ); Rinchik, E.M.; Russell, L.B. ); Dietrich, W. )

    1994-01-01

    Piebald (s) is a recessive mutation that affects the development of two cell types of neural crest origin: melanocytes, responsible for pigment synthesis in the skin, and enteric ganglia, which innervate the lower bowel. As a result, mice carrying piebald mutations exhibit white spotting in the coat and aganglionic megacolon. Previously the gene had been localized to the distal half of mouse chromosome 14. To determine its precise location relative to molecular markers, an intersubspecific backcross was generated. Two anchor loci of chromosome 14, slaty and hypogonadal, in addition to simple sequence length repeat markers, were used to localize s to a 2-cM interval defined by the markers D14Mit38 and D14Mit42. The molecular markers were also used to characterize nine induced s alleles. Three of these mutations exhibited no deletions or rearrangements of the flanking markers, whereas the other six had two or more of these markers deleted. The extent of the deletions was found to be consistent with the severity of the homozygous phenotype. The location of deletion breakpoints in the induced alleles, coupled with the recombination breakpoints in the backcross progeny, provide useful molecular landmarks to define the location of the piebald gene.

  11. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  12. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  13. Involvement of SOX10 in the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung disease: report of a truncating mutation in an isolated patient

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mejías, Avencia; Watanabe, Yuli; Fernández, Raquel M.; López-Alonso, Manuel; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Bondurand, Nadege; Borrego, Salud

    2010-01-01

    SOX10 protein is a key transcription factor during neural-crest development. Mutations in SOX10 are associated with several neurocristopathies such as Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4), a congenital disorder characterized by the association of hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities and absence of ganglion cells in the myenteric and submucosal plexus of the gastrointestinal tract, also known as aganglionic megacolon or Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Several mutations at this locus are known to cause a high percentage of WS4 cases, but no SOX10 mutations had been ever reported associated to isolated HSCR patient. Therefore, non-syndromic HSCR disease was initially thought not to be associated to mutations at this particular locus. In the present study, we describe the evaluation of the SOX10 gene in a series of 196 isolated HSCR cases, the largest patient series evaluated so far, and report a truncating c.153-155del mutation. This is the first time that a SOX10 mutation is detected in an isolated HSCR patient, which completely changes the scenario for the implications of SOX10 mutations in human disease, giving us a new tool for genetic counselling. PMID:20130826

  14. Resistance to moxifloxacin in toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolates is associated with mutations in gyrA.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, G; Tang, Y J; Kueper, R; Heisig, P; Rodloff, A C; Silva, J; Cohen, S H

    2001-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated colitis and the most common cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea. Fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin are associated with lower risks of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. In this study, we have analyzed 72 C. difficile isolates obtained from patients with different clinical courses of disease, such as toxic megacolon and relapses; the hospital environment; public places; and horses. They were investigated for their susceptibilities to moxifloxacin (MXF), metronidazole (MEO), and vancomycin (VAN). Mutants highly resistant to fluoroquinolones were selected in vitro by stepwise exposure to increasing concentrations of MXF. The resulting mutants were analyzed for the presence of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of DNA gyrase (gyrA), the production of toxins A and B, and the epidemiological relationship of these isolates. These factors were also investigated using PCR-based methods. All strains tested were susceptible to MEO and VAN. Twenty-six percent of the clinical isolates (19 of 72) were highly resistant to MXF (MIC > or = 16 microg/ml). Fourteen of these 19 strains contained nucleotide changes resulting in amino acid substitutions at position 83 in the gyrA protein. Resistant strains selected in vitro did not contain mutations at that position. These findings indicate that resistance to MXF in a majority of cases may be due to amino acid substitution in the gyrA gene. PMID:11451695

  15. [Familial syndrome combining short small intestine, intestinal malrotation, pyloric hypertrophy and brain malformation. 3 anatomoclinical case reports].

    PubMed

    Nezelof, C; Jaubert, F; Lyon, G

    1976-01-01

    Anatomoclinical study of 3 cases of an exceptional malformative condition characterized by: --extreme shortness of the small intestine, --mesenterium commune, --hypertrophic pylorus, --malformation of the central nervous system (heterotopia, absence of operculum temporale). Clinically this malformative condition is characterized by failure and inertia of the intestinal peristalsis producing at intervals of 10-15 days episodes of subocclusion, the repetition of which causes death. The syndrome is familial and seems to be of autosomal recessive inheritance. The absence of mechanical obstruction, the repeated failure of colostomy and ileostomy, the normal aspect of the myenteric plexuses verified by cytoenzymatic and silver stains allow to individualize this anatomoclinical syndrome and to rule out the hypothesis of Hirschsprung's disease, Chagas' disease, idiopathic megacolon or hypoplasia of the myenteric plexuses. The association of cerebral malformations leads to consider the responsibility of a lack of synthesis of a same specific intermediate factor which is up to now poorly determined, implicated in the neuronal migration and neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1023783

  16. Pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in humans, mice and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Monika; Ludwig, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The characterisation of the pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in mammals illustrates that sensory organs and nerves are particularly affected by disorders because of the shared origin of melanocytes and neurocytes in the neural crest; e.g. the eye-colour is a valuable indicator of disorders in pigment production and eye dysfunctions. Disorders related to coat colour-associated alleles also occur in the skin (melanoma), reproductive tract and immune system. Additionally, the coat colour phenotype of an individual influences its general behaviour and fitness. Mutations in the same genes often produce similar coat colours and pleiotropic effects in different species (e.g., KIT [reproductive disorders, lethality], EDNRB [megacolon] and LYST [CHS]). Whereas similar disorders and similar-looking coat colour phenotypes sometimes have a different genetic background (e.g., deafness [EDN3/EDNRB, MITF, PAX and SNAI2] and visual diseases [OCA2, RAB38, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, TRPM1 and TYR]). The human predilection for fancy phenotypes that ignore disorders and genetic defects is a major driving force for the increase of pleiotropic effects in domestic species and laboratory subjects since domestication has commenced approximately 18,000 years ago. PMID:23583561

  17. A novel mutation in the endothelin B receptor gene in a moroccan family with shah-waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doubaj, Yassamine; Pingault, Véronique; Elalaoui, Siham C; Ratbi, Ilham; Azouz, Mohamed; Zerhouni, Hicham; Ettayebi, Fouad; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2015-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy disorder combining sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities. The presence of additional signs defines the 4 subtypes. WS type IV, also called Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS), is characterized by the association with congenital aganglionic megacolon (Hirschsprung disease). To date, 3 causative genes have been related to this congenital disorder. Mutations in the EDNRB and EDN3 genes are responsible for the autosomal recessive form of SWS, whereas SOX10 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. We report here the case of a 3-month-old Morrocan girl with WS type IV, born to consanguineous parents. The patient had 3 cousins who died in infancy with the same symptoms. Molecular analysis by Sanger sequencing revealed the presence of a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1133A>G (p.Asn378Ser) in the EDNRB gene. The proband's parents as well as the parents of the deceased cousins are heterozygous carriers of this likely pathogenic mutation. This molecular diagnosis allows us to provide genetic counseling to the family and eventually propose prenatal diagnosis to prevent recurrence of the disease in subsequent pregnancies. PMID:25852447

  18. High prevalence of tcdC deletion-carrying Clostridium difficile and lack of association with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Verdoorn, Brandon P; Orenstein, Robert; Rosenblatt, Jon E; Sloan, Lynne M; Schleck, Cathy D; Harmsen, William S; Nyre, Lisa M; Patel, Robin

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of tcdC deletion-carrying Clostridium difficile using a stool polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay that detects previously described 18- and 39-bp deletions (J. Clin. Microbiol. 2008;46:1996). We divided inpatients into 2 groups, those for whom the assay detected a deletion in tcdC and those for whom no deletion was detected. We compared risk factors (antibiotic use, hospitalization, nursing home stay, immunocompromise, age >65 years), complications (pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon, colonic perforation, colectomy, and intensive care unit admission), duration of antibiotic treatment, and 30-day mortality between the groups. Forty-two of 141 patients had deletion-positive C. difficile. Prior nursing home stay and age >65 years were significantly more common in the deletion-positive group. Other risk factors, complications, antibiotic duration, and mortality did not differ significantly. Deletion-carrying C. difficile was commonly present but not associated with more severe disease and not markedly different in terms of risk factor profile. Severity of disease was relatively low, regardless of the presence or absence of a deletion. PMID:19775847

  19. Long-term natural history and complications of collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis, a possibly heterogeneous disorder. Collagenous colitis most often appears to have an entirely benign clinical course that usually responds to limited treatment. Sometimes significant extracolonic disorders, especially arthritis, spondylitis, thyroiditis and skin disorders, such as pyoderma gangrenosum, dominate the clinical course and influence the treatment strategy. However, rare fatalities have been reported and several complications, some severe, have been attributed directly to the colitis. Toxic colitis and toxic megacolon may develop. Concomitant gastric and small intestinal inflammatory disorders have been described including celiac disease and more extensive collagenous inflammatory disease. Colonic ulceration has been associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, may evolve directly from collagenous colitis. Submucosal ‘dissection’, colonic fractures, or mucosal tears and perforation, possibly from air insufflation during colonoscopy, have been reported. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressures that may occur during radiological imaging of the colon. Neoplastic disorders of the colon may also occur during the course of collagenous colitis, including colon carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumours (ie, carcinoids). Finally, lymphoproliferative disease has been reported. PMID:22993735

  20. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  1. Sporadic Hirschsprung`s disease due to a novel nonsense mutation in the RET protooncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.M.; Donis-Keller, H.; Langer, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR, aganglionic megacolon) is characterized by a lack of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the hindgut. This is most likely due to a failure of the progenitor cells (that are destined to become the ganglion cells of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses) to complete their distal migration in the colon. Recently, mutations in the RET protoocogene have been reported in association with HSCR. We report a novel nonsense mutation resulting in a severely truncated protein. Germline DNA from a panel of 6 HSCR patients was analyzed by SSCP for 20 exons of RET. Eight exons were also directly sequenced. We identified a novel mutation within RET exon 2. The mutation (TAC{sub 36}{yields}TAG{sub 36}), which occurs at nucleotide position 108, involves the replacement of tyrosine with a stop codon and results in a truncated 35 amino acid protein. This mutation is the most 5{prime} nonsense mutation reported thus far. Interestingly, the patient has no prior family history of HSCR and was also diagnosed with multiple developmental anomalies including dysplastic kidney. Recent gene targeting studies with mouse models have shown that RET is essential for normal renal development. However, a parallel phenotype has not been seen in other reported HSCR patients with RET mutations. The observations reported here provide evidence that RET plays a role in human renal development. Ongoing studies will determine the extent of RET involvement in sporadic cases of HSCR.

  2. Mutation detection in autosomal dominant Hirschsprung disease: SSCP analysis of the RET proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Angrist, M.; Bolk, S.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital aganglionic megacolon, is the most common cause of congenital bowel obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5000. Recently, linkage of an incompletely penetrant, dominant form of HSCR to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 was reported, followed by identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR patients. RET mutations have also been reported in both sporadic and familial forms of three neuroendrocrine tumor syndromes. Unlike the clustered RET mutations observed in these syndromes, the 18 reported HSCR mutations are distributed throughout the extracellular and tryosine kinase domains of RET. In an effort to determine the frequency of RET mutations in HSCR and correlate genotype with phenotype, we have begun to screen for mutations among 80 HSCR probands representing a wide range of phenotypes and pedigree structures. Non-isotopic single strand conformation of polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was carried out using the Pharmacia PhastSystem{trademark}. Initial screening of exons 2 through 6 detected variants in 11 patients not seen in 24 controls. One additional band shift in exon 6 has been observed in both patients and controls. Preliminary sequence analysis has revealed two putative familial mutations in exon 2: a single base pair deletion (49Pro del C 296) and a point mutation that leads to a conservative amino acid substitution (93Gly{r_arrow}Ser). These results suggest that HSCR may be associated with a range of alterations in the coding sequence of the RET extracellular domain. Additional mutations will be described.

  3. Hirschsprung's disease: Historical notes and pathological diagnosis on the occasion of the 100(th) anniversary of Dr. Harald Hirschsprung's death.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Consolato

    2015-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) or congenital megacolon is one of the differential diagnoses of chronic constipation mostly in infancy and may indeed represent a challenge for pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, and pediatric pathologists. The diagnosis relies clearly on the identification of the absence of ganglion cells at the plexuses (submucosus and myentericus) of the bowel wall. HSCR is usually located at the terminal (distal) rectum with potential pre-terminal or proximal extension to the less distal large bowel (sigmoid colon). Astonishingly, there is some evidence that Hindu surgeons of prehistoric India may have been exposed and had considerable knowledge about HSCR, but this disease is notoriously and eponymously named to Dr. Harald Hirschsprung (1830-1916), who brilliantly presented two infants with fatal constipation at the Berlin conference of the German Society of Pediatrics more than one century ago. Historical milestones and diagnosis of HSCR (originally called "Die Hirschsprungsche Krankheit") are reviewed. More than 100 years following his meticulous and broad description, HSCR is still a puzzling disease for both diagnosis and treatment. HSCR remains a critical area of clinical pediatrics and pediatric surgery and an intense area of investigation for both molecular and developmental biologists. PMID:26566484

  4. The roles of host and pathogen factors and the innate immune response in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingmin; Hirota, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the most common cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. The clinical manifestation of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is highly variable, from asymptomatic carriage, to mild self-limiting diarrhea, to the more severe pseudomembranous colitis. Furthermore, in extreme cases, colonic inflammation and tissue damage can lead to toxic megacolon, a condition requiring surgical intervention. C. difficile expresses two key virulence factors; the exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are glucosyltransferases that target host-cell monomeric GTPases. In addition, some hypervirulent strains produce a third toxin, binary toxin or C. difficile transferase (CDT), which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CDI. More recently, other factors such as surface layer proteins (SLPs) and flagellin have also been linked to the inflammatory responses observed in CDI. Although the adaptive immune response can influence the severity of CDI, the innate immune responses to C. difficile and its toxins play crucial roles in CDI onset, progression, and overall prognosis. Despite this, the innate immune responses in CDI have drawn relatively little attention from clinical researchers. Targeting these responses may prove useful clinically as adjuvant therapies, especially in refractory and/or recurrent CDI. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of how C. difficile and its toxins modulate innate immune responses that contribute to CDI pathogenesis. PMID:25242213

  5. Discovery of LFF571: An Investigational Agent for Clostridium difficile Infection

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, Matthew J.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Amaral, Adam; Brewer, Jason T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Deng, Gejing; Dewhurst, Janetta M.; Ding, Jian; Dzink-Fox, JoAnne; Gamber, Gabriel; Jain, Akash; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Lac; Lister, Troy; McKenney, David; Mullin, Steve; Osborne, Colin; Palestrant, Deborah; Patane, Michael A.; Rann, Elin M.; Sachdeva, Meena; Shao, Jian; Tiamfook, Stacey; Trzasko, Anna; Whitehead, Lewis; Yifru, Aregahegn; Yu, Donghui; Yan, Wanlin; Zhu, Qingming

    2012-11-09

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that infects the lumen of the large intestine and produces toxins. This results in a range of syndromes from mild diarrhea to severe toxic megacolon and death. Alarmingly, the prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection are increasing; thus, associated morbidity and mortality rates are rising. 4-Aminothiazolyl analogues of the antibiotic natural product GE2270 A (1) were designed, synthesized, and optimized for the treatment of C. difficile infection. The medicinal chemistry effort focused on enhancing aqueous solubility relative to that of the natural product and previous development candidates (2, 3) and improving antibacterial activity. Structure-activity relationships, cocrystallographic interactions, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in animal models of infection were characterized. These studies identified a series of dicarboxylic acid derivatives, which enhanced solubility/efficacy profile by several orders of magnitude compared to previously studied compounds and led to the selection of LFF571 (4) as an investigational new drug for treating C. difficile infection.

  6. [NONSPECIFIC ULCERATIVE COLITIS COMPLICATED WITH MULTIPLE REPETITIVE PERFORATIONS AND DIFFUSE FECALIC PERITONITIS (CASE REPORT)].

    PubMed

    Antadze, A; Mukhashavria, G; Lekvtadze, N; Tomadze, G; Chikobava, G

    2016-06-01

    Nonspecific ulcerative colitis is disease with complicated and not fully studied etiology and pathogenesis, and treatment of its complications is very difficult. Especially complicated is disease course with repetitive bleeding, toxic megacolon and perforation. We present a quite rare case of complication with multiple, especially repetitive perforations of transverse colon. After 13 days from the performance of subtotal colectomy, the patient underwent to the relaparotomy because of secondary perforation of sygmoid colon 2-3 cm lower from its cult and iliac intestine 0.2-0.3 cm distance from nearby ileostoma. The full eventration took place on the 6th day and was performed repetitive laparotomy. On the 8th day patient was released from artificial ventilation of lungs and on the 66th day from hospitalization patient was discharged from the hospital with satisfactory status. Such kind of serious course of the treatment process was determined by the late hospitalization and developed serious complications. Situation mentioned above more impressively underlines the value of the positive result of presented case. PMID:27441530

  7. Myenteric plexus is differentially affected by infection with distinct Trypanosoma cruzi strains in Beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Paiva, Nívia Carolina; Fonseca, Kátia da Silva; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Diniz, Lívia Figueiredo; Caldas, Ivo Santana; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Matta; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2013-01-01

    Chagasic megaoesophagus and megacolon are characterised by motor abnormalities related to enteric nervous system lesions and their development seems to be related to geographic distribution of distinct Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations. Beagle dogs were infected with Y or Berenice-78 (Be-78) T. cruzi strains and necropsied during the acute or chronic phase of experimental disease for post mortem histopathological evaluation of the oesophagus and colon. Both strains infected the oesophagus and colon and caused an inflammatory response during the acute phase. In the chronic phase, inflammatory process was observed exclusively in the Be-78 infected animals, possibly due to a parasitism persistent only in this group. Myenteric denervation occurred during the acute phase of infection for both strains, but persisted chronically only in Be-78 infected animals. Glial cell involvement occurred earlier in animals infected with the Y strain, while animals infected with the Be-78 strain showed reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive area of enteric glial cells in the chronic phase. These results suggest that although both strains cause lesions in the digestive tract, the Y strain is associated with early control of the lesion, while the Be-78 strain results in progressive gut lesions in this model. PMID:24271001

  8. Dosage Effects of Cohesin Regulatory Factor PDS5 on Mammalian Development: Implications for Cohesinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Uzielli, Maria L. Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C.; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B−/− mice. While Pds5A−/− and Pds5B−/− mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A−/− or Pds5B−/− mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  9. Dosage effects of cohesin regulatory factor PDS5 on mammalian development: implications for cohesinopathies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A; Uzielli, Maria L Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C; Jay, Patrick Y; Heuckeroth, Robert O; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B(-/-) mice. While Pds5A(-/-) and Pds5B(-/-) mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A(-/-) or Pds5B(-/-) mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  10. Surveillance snapshot of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitals across Queensland detects binary toxin producing ribotype UK 244.

    PubMed

    Huber, Charlotte A; Hall, Lisa; Foster, Nikki F; Gray, Mareeka; Allen, Michelle; Richardson, Leisha J; Robson, Jennifer; Vohra, Renu; Schlebusch, Sanmarie; George, Narelle; Nimmo, Graeme R; Riley, Thomas V; Paterson, David L

    2014-12-01

    In North America and Europe, the binary toxin positive Clostridium difficile strains of the ribotypes 027 and 078 have been associated with death, toxic megacolon and other adverse outcomes. Following an increase in C. difficile infections (CDIs) in Queensland, a prevalence study involving 175 hospitals was undertaken in early 2012, identifying 168 cases of CDI over a 2 month period. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were recorded, and C. difficile isolates were ribotyped and tested for the presence of binary toxin genes. Most patients (106/168, 63.1%) were aged over 60 years. Overall, 98 (58.3%) developed symptoms after hospitalisation; 89 cases (53.0%) developed symptoms more than 48 hours after admission. Furthermore, 27 of the 62 (67.7%) patients who developed symptoms in the community ad been hospitalised within the last 3 months. Thirteen of the 168 (7.7%) cases identified had severe disease, resulting in admission to the Intensive Care Unit or death within 30 days of the onset of symptoms. The 3 most common ribotypes isolated were UK 002 (22.9%), UK 014 (13.3%) and the binary toxin-positive ribotype UK 244 (8.4%). The only other binary toxin positive ribotype isolated was UK 078 (n = 1). Of concern was the detection of the binary toxin positive ribotype UK 244, which has recently been described in other parts of Australia and New Zealand. No isolates were of the international epidemic clone of ribotype UK 027, although ribotype UK 244 is genetically related to this clone. Further studies are required to track the epidemiology of ribotype UK 244 in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:25631588

  11. Colonoscopy of acute colitis. A safe and reliable tool for assessment of severity.

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, F; Lavergne, A; Lémann, M; Bitoun, A; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Galian, A; Modigliani, R; Rambaud, J C

    1994-07-01

    Complications that might lead to surgery in severe attacks of ulcerative colitis have been found to be correlated with the depth of colonic ulcerations as measured by pathological examination of colectomy specimens. In order to evaluate the value of colonoscopy for the assessment of colonic ulcerations, we have reviewed the clinical, biological, colonoscopic, and anatomical findings in 85 consecutive patients with attacks of ulcerative colitis involving at least the rectosigmoid and part of the descending colon, seen in our center between 1981 and 1989. All had colonoscopy performed by a senior endoscopist at entry. Extensive deep colonic ulcerations were diagnosed in 46 of them, and moderate endoscopic colitis in 39. No complication related to colonoscopy occurred except for one colonic dilatation. Forty-three of the 46 patients with severe endoscopic colitis were operated upon; 38 of them failed to improve with high-dose corticosteroids and five had a toxic megacolon. Extensive ulcerations reaching at least the circular muscle layer were found at pathological examination of colectomy specimen in 42 of the 43 patients. Conversely, 30 of 39 patients with moderate endoscopic colitis went into clinical remission with medical treatment, and only nine patients needed further surgery because of medical treatment failure. Six of these nine patients underwent another colonoscopy prior to colectomy, and all six showed features of severe endoscopic colitis. Deep ulcerations reaching the circular muscle layer were found at pathological examination in five of these six patients and in one additional patient whose colonoscopy had been performed 21 days before colectomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8026269

  12. Clostridium difficile Spore-Macrophage Interactions: Spore Survival

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Cofre-Araneda, Glenda; Brito-Silva, Christian; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s) to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host’s innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells’ ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells. PMID:22952726

  13. In the Endemic Setting, Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027 Is Virulent But Not Hypervirulent

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Samuel L.; Alam, M. Jahangir; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Walk, Seth T.; Musick, William L.; Pham, Vy P.; Christensen, Jennifer L.; Atmar, Robert L.; Xie, Yang; Garey, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conflicting reports have been published on the association between Clostridium difficile ribotypes and severe disease outcomes in patients with C. difficile infection (CDI); several so-called hypervirulent ribotypes have been described. We performed a multicenter study to assess severe disease presentation and severe outcomes among CDI patients infected with different ribotypes. METHODS Stool samples that tested positive for C. difficile toxin were collected and cultured from patients who presented to any of 7 different hospitals in Houston, Texas (2011–2013). C. difficile was characterized using a fluorescent PCR ribotyping method. Medical records were reviewed to determine clinical characteristics and ribotype association with severe CDI presentation (ie, leukocytosis and/or hypoalbuminemia) and severe CDI outcomes (ie, ICU admission, ileus, toxic megacolon, colectomy, and/or in-hospital death). RESULTS Our study included 715 patients aged 61 ± 18 years (female: 63%; median Charlson comorbidity index: 2.5 ± 2.4; hospital-onset CDI: 45%; severe CDI: 36.7%; severe CDI outcomes: 12.3%). The most common ribotypes were 027, 014-020, FP311, 002, 078-126, and 001. Ribotype 027 was a significant independent predictor of severe disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53–3.29; P < .001) and severe CDI outcomes (aOR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.02–2.85; P = .041) compared with all other ribotypes in aggregate. However, in an analysis using all common ribotypes as individual variables, ribotype 027 was not associated with severe CDI outcomes more often than other ribotypes. CONCLUSION Ribotype 027 showed virulence equal to that of other ribotypes identified in this endemic setting. Clinical severity markers of CDI may be more predictive of severe CDI outcomes than a particular ribotype. PMID:26288985

  14. [Side effects and consequences of frequently used antibiotics in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Cerny, A

    1996-03-30

    Oral antimicrobial substances belonging to the beta-lactams, quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines and the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole combination are among the most prescribed classes of drugs in private practice. Knowledge of the potential side effects considered in the light of various patient-associated factors such as genetic makeup, renal and liver function, underlying diseases, drug allergies and coadministered drugs, is important in order to minimize the risk of adverse reactions. This article reviews important side effect patterns and focuses on more recent aspects of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and beta-lactam allergy relevant to the practicing physician. Diarrhea occurring during antibiotic treatment raises the possibility of Clostridium-difficile-associated disease, which may evolve into life-threatening toxic megacolon. Mild cases with resolving symptoms after discontinuation of the antibiotic usually do not require further workup. More severe cases with watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, dehydration and electrolyte abnormalities warrant rapid diagnosis, cessation of antibiotic treatment and specific treatment including oral metronidazole. The use of oral vancomycin as a first line drug is discouraged because of the possibility of selecting vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactams are the most important type of side effects which can often be prevented. Patients with a history of beta-lactam associated IgE-mediated hypersensitivity (hives, wheezing or hypotension) should undergo penicillin skin testing. The frequently observed maculopapular rash associated with aminopenicillins without hives is in most cases not caused by an IgE-mediated mechanism. Patients with previous life-threatening penicillin allergy such as anaphylaxis or Lyell's syndrome should not undergo skin testing. Currently available tests do not reliably predict cephalosporin hypersensitivity. More recent data suggest that crossreactivity between

  15. Hirschsprung disease is associated with an L286P mutation in the fifth transmembrane domain of the endothelin-B receptor in the N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutant line

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Ouyang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Wen-Hua; Yin, Yi-Heng; Yan, Lin-Na; Yang, Bin; Xue, Zheng-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or colonic aganglionosis, is a congenital disorder characterized by the absence of intramural ganglia along variable lengths of the colon, resulting in intestinal obstruction. It is the most common cause of congenital intestinal obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5,000 live births. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutagenesis is a powerful tool for the study of gene function and the generation of human disease models. In the current study, a novel mutant mouse with aganglionic megacolon and coat color spotting was generated by ENU-induced mutagenesis. Histological and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) whole-mount staining analysis showed a lack of ganglion cells in the colon in mutant mice. The mutation was mapped to chromosome 14 between markers rs30928624 and D14Mit205 (Chr 14 positions 103723921 bp and 105054651 bp). The Ednrb (Chr 14 position 103814625–103844173 bp) was identified as a potential candidate gene in this location. Mutation analysis revealed a T>C missense mutation at nucleotide 857 of the cDNA encoding endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) in which a proline was substituted for the highly conserved Lys-286 residue (L286P) in the fifth transmembrane (TM V) domain of this G protein-coupled receptor. The mutant mouse was named Ednrbm1yzcm (Ednrb; mutation 1, Yangzhou University Comparative Medicine Center). The results of the present study implicate the structural importance of the TM V domain in Ednrb function, and the Ednrbm1yzcm mouse represents a valuable model for the study of HSCR in humans. PMID:26923755

  16. Disrupted SOX10 function causes spongiform neurodegeneration in gray tremor mice.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah R; Lee, Inyoul; Ebeling, Christine; Stephenson, Dennis A; Schweitzer, Kelsey M; Baxter, David; Moon, Tara M; LaPierre, Sarah; Jaques, Benjamin; Silvius, Derek; Wegner, Michael; Hood, Leroy E; Carlson, George; Gunn, Teresa M

    2015-02-01

    Mice homozygous for the gray tremor (gt) mutation have a pleiotropic phenotype that includes pigmentation defects, megacolon, whole body tremors, sporadic seizures, hypo- and dys-myelination of the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system, vacuolation of the CNS, and early death. Vacuolation similar to that caused by prions was originally reported to be transmissible, but subsequent studies showed the inherited disease was not infectious. The gt mutation mapped to distal mouse chromosome 15, to the same region as Sox10, which encodes a transcription factor with essential roles in neural crest survival and differentiation. As dominant mutations in mouse or human SOX10 cause white spotting and intestinal aganglionosis, we screened the Sox10 coding region for mutations in gt/gt DNA. An adenosine to guanine transversion was identified in exon 2 that changes a highly conserved glutamic acid residue in the SOX10 DNA binding domain to glycine. This mutant allele was not seen in wildtype mice, including the related GT/Le strain, and failed to complement a Sox10 null allele. Gene expression analysis revealed significant down-regulation of genes involved in myelin lipid biosynthesis pathways in gt/gt brains. Knockout mice for some of these genes develop CNS vacuolation and/or myelination defects, suggesting that their down-regulation may contribute to these phenotypes in gt mutants and could underlie the neurological phenotypes associated with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung disease, caused by mutations in human SOX10. PMID:25399070

  17. Hirschsprung disease: a developmental disorder of the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Sonja J; Stamp, Lincon; Hao, Marlene M; Young, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), which is also called congenital megacolon or intestinal aganglionosis, is characterized by an absence of enteric (intrinsic) neurons from variable lengths of the most distal bowel. Because enteric neurons are essential for propulsive intestinal motility, infants with HSCR suffer from severe constipation and have a distended abdomen. Currently the only treatment is surgical removal of the affected bowel. HSCR has an incidence of around 1:5,000 live births, with a 4:1 male:female gender bias. Most enteric neurons arise from neural crest cells that emigrate from the caudal hindbrain and then migrate caudally along the entire gut. The absence of enteric neurons from variable lengths of the bowel in HSCR results from a failure of neural crest-derived cells to colonize the affected gut regions. HSCR is therefore regarded as a neurocristopathy. HSCR is a multigenic disorder and has become a paradigm for understanding complex factorial disorders. The major HSCR susceptibility gene is RET. The penetrance of several mutations in HSCR susceptibility genes is sex-dependent. HSCR can occur as an isolated disorder or as part of syndromes; for example, Type IV Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by deafness and pigmentation defects as well as intestinal aganglionosis. Studies using animal models have shown that HSCR genes regulate multiple processes including survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Research into HSCR and the development of enteric neurons is an excellent example of the cross fertilization of ideas that can occur between human molecular geneticists and researchers using animal models. WIREs Dev Biol 2013, 2:113-129. doi: 10.1002/wdev.57 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:23799632

  18. NAP1 Strain Type Predicts Outcomes from Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Mu, Yi; Cohen, Jessica; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Winston, Lisa G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Holzbauer, Stacy; Dunn, John; Farley, Monica M.; Lyons, Carol; Johnston, Helen; Phipps, Erin; Perlmutter, Rebecca; Anderson, Lydia; Gerding, Dale N.; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies conflict regarding the importance of the fluoroquinolone-resistant North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1 (NAP1) strain in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) outcome. We describe strain types causing CDI and evaluate their association with patient outcomes. Methods CDI cases were identified from population-based surveillance. Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the associations of strain type with severe disease (ileus, toxic megacolon, or pseudomembranous colitis within 5 days; or white blood cell count ≥15,000/mm3 within one day of positive test), severe outcome (intensive care unit admission after positive test, colectomy for C. difficile infection, or death within 30 days of positive test), and death within 14 days of positive test. Results Strain typing results were available for 2,057 cases. Severe disease occurred in 363 (17.7%) cases, severe outcome in 100 (4.9%), and death within 14 days in 56 (2.7%). The most common strain types were NAP1 (28.4%), NAP4 (10.2%) and NAP11 (9.1%). In unadjusted analysis, NAP1 was associated with greater odds of severe disease than other strains. After controlling for patient risk factors, healthcare exposure, and antibiotic use, NAP1 was associated with severe disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.22), severe outcome (aOR 1.66, 95% CI, 1.09–2.54), and death within 14 days (aOR 2.12, 95% CI, 1.22–3.68). Conclusion NAP1 was the most prevalent strain and a predictor of severe disease, severe outcome, and death. Strategies to reduce NAP1 prevalence, such as antibiotic stewardship to reduce fluoroquinolone use, might reduce CDI morbidity. PMID:24604900

  19. Specific serum microRNA profile in the molecular diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Li, Hongxing; Tang, Junwei; Wu, Wei; Qin, Jingjing; Lei, Hao; Cai, Peng; Huo, Weiwei; Li, Bo; Rehan, Virender; Xu, Xiaoqun; Geng, Qiming; Zhang, Hongwei; Xia, Yankai

    2014-08-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), a congenital gastrointestinal disorder, is one of the most common causes of neonatal bowel obstruction. Without an early screening and diagnosis, some patients develop serious complications, such as toxic megacolon or acute enterocolitis. We sought to identify specific serum microRNAs (miRNAs) that can serve as novel early, non-invasive screening signature and then to test their specificity and sensitivity in diagnosing Hirschsprung's disease. We obtained serum samples from 95 HSCR cases and 104 matched controls. An initial screening of miRNA expression was performed through TaqMan Low Density Array. The candidate miRNAs were validated by individual reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR arranged in the training and a two-stage validation set. Additional double-blind testing was performed in 23 patients with clinically suspected HSCR to evaluate the diagnostic value and accuracy of the serum miRNA profile in predicting HSCR. Following a multi-stage evaluation approach, five miRNAs were significantly increased in HSCR cases compared with controls. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of this five-serum miRNA signature were 0.895, 0.893 and 0.925 in training set and two validation sets, respectively. The accuracy rate of the five-miRNA profile as HSCR signature was 82.6%, which, in the double-blind testing set, was markedly higher than that of contrast enema (70%), the most commonly used test performed to diagnose HSCR. Our results indicate that a five-serum miRNA signature may be linked to HSCR, representing a potential, novel, non-invasive diagnostic approach for early screening of HSCR. PMID:24974861

  20. Clinical Severity of Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 027: A Case-Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Oliver W.; Rodrigues, Boaventura; Elston, Tony; Verlander, Neville Q.; Brown, Derek F. J.; Brazier, Jonathan; Reacher, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a leading infectious cause of health care associated diarrhoea. Several industrialised countries have reported increased C. difficile infections and outbreaks, which have been attributed to the emergent PCR ribotype 027 strain. Methods and Findings We conducted a case-case study to compare severity of C. difficile disease for patients with 027 versus non-027 ribotypes. We retrospectively collected clinical information about 123/136 patients with C. difficile infections admitted to hospitals in the East of England region in 2006 and from whom stool isolates were cultured and ribotyped as part of an earlier national survey. We defined severe C. difficile disease as having one or more of shock, paralytic ileus, pseudo membranous colitis or toxic megacolon. Patient median age was 83 years old (range 3 to 98, interquartile range 75 to 89), 86% were prescribed antibiotics in the eight weeks before illness onset, 41% had ribotype 027 and 30-day all cause mortality during hospital admission was 21%. Severe disease occurred in 24% (95%CI 13% to 37%) and 17% (95%CI 9% to 27%) of patients with PCR ribotype 027 and non-027 ribotypes respectively. In a multivariable model, ribotype 027 was not associated with severe disease after adjusting for sex, discharge from hospital prior to 60 days of current admission, gastroenteritis on admission, number of initiator antibiotics for C. difficile disease, and hospital where the patient was admitted. Conclusions Our study found no evidence to support previous assertions that ribotype 027 is more virulent than other PCR ribotypes. This finding raises questions about the contribution of this strain to the recent increase in C. difficile disease throughout North America and Europe. PMID:18350149

  1. Clinical management of constipation.

    PubMed

    Lennard-Jones, J E

    1993-10-01

    First, it is important to find out whether the patient is complaining of infrequent defaecation, excessive straining at defaecation, abdominal pain or bloating, a general sense of malaise attributed to constipation, soiling, or a combination of more than one symptom. Second, one must decide if there is a definable abnormality as a cause of the symptom(s). Is the colon apparently normal or is its lumen widened (megacolon)? Is the upper gut normal or is there evidence of neuropathy or myopathy? Is the ano-rectum normal or is there evidence of a weak pelvic floor, mucosal prolapse, major rectocele, an internal intussusception or solitary rectal ulcer? Is there any systemic component such as hypothyroidism, hypercalcaemia, neurological or psychiatric disorder or relevant drug therapy? Choice of treatment will depend on this clinical evaluation. The range of treatments available is: Reassurance and stop current treatment: Patients with a bowel obsession may take laxatives or rectal preparations regularly without need. Increase dietary fibre: Most cases of 'simple' constipation respond to increased dietary fibre, possibly with an added supplement of natural bran. Toilet training and altered routine of life: Young people particularly may need to recognise the call to stool and alter their daily routine to permit and encourage regular defaecation. Medicinal bulking agent: Ispaghula, methyl cellulose, concentrated wheat germ or bran, and similar preparations are useful when patients with a normal colon find it difficult to take adequate dietary fibre. These preparations increase the bulk of stool and soften its consistency. They may be useful for those patients with the constipated form of irritable bowel syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8234432

  2. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  3. Medical Therapy of Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Martin; Schmidt, Carsten; Teich, Niels; Stallmach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Medical therapy of mild and moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) of any extent is evidence-based and standardized by national and international guidelines. However, patients with steroid-refractory UC still represent a challenge. Methods A literature search using PubMed (search terms: ulcerative colitis, therapy, new, 1-2008-2015) resulted in 821 publications. For the current article, 88 citations were extracted including 36 randomized controlled studies, 18 reviews, and 8 meta-analyses. Results In steroid-refractory UC, early intensive therapy using anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies or the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus is indicated in any case to prevent progression to a toxic megacolon and/or to avoid proctocolectomy. In patients with chronic disease activity, treatment with anti-TNF antibodies has a higher level of evidence than azathioprine therapy and should therefore be preferred. However, there is a subgroup of UC patients who may achieve prolonged steroid-free remission on azathioprine monotherapy. The importance of vedolizumab, a newly registered inhibiting antibody against integrin, has not yet been fully clarified since direct comparison studies are lacking, in particular in relation to anti-TNF antibodies. Conclusion There is a great need for additional innovative therapies, especially in cases of primary non-response or secondary loss of response to anti-TNF antibodies. New small molecules (Janus kinase inhibitors) are promising with an acceptable safety profile and efficacy in UC. Further, strategies that target the intestinal microbiome are currently considered for patients with active or relapsing UC, and may in the future open up new therapeutic options. PMID:26557831

  4. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A Regulates Sporulation, but Does Not Contribute to Toxin Production, by Direct High-Affinity Binding to Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E.; Bakker, Dennis; Kuijper, Ed J.; Smits, Wiep Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI), for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative) targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely. PMID:23119071

  5. A Retrospective Analysis of 7 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Infants Infected by Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Qiu, Ye; Lu, DeCheng; Zhang, Jianquan; Zhong, Xiaoning; Liu, Guangnan

    2015-08-01

    Infection with Penicillium marneffei has rarely been reported in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative infants. We aimed to determine the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, and immunological characteristics of 7 HIV-negative infants infected by P. marneffei, and to provide insights into its diagnosis and treatment.We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 7 HIV-negative infants infected by P. marneffei who presented to the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 1, 2003 and December 1, 2014. The infants' median age was 23.43 months (SD = 8.34), and all lived in Guangxi Province in China, where P. marneffei is endemic. The median time from disease onset to diagnosis was 2.29 months (SD = 2.12). Of the cases studied, 5 (71.43%) had medical histories that included frequent pneumonia or bronchopneumonia, thrush, congenital megacolon, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and hemophagocytic syndrome. The most common symptoms were fever, cough, and anemia, followed by lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and being underweight. Four patients had slightly elevated white blood cell counts. The lymphocyte and CD4 T-cell counts were normal. The CD8 T-cell counts, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G titer, and serum IgA titer were low in 5 patients, and the serum IgM titers were high in 3 infants. Caseous necrosis was observed in 3 patients whose lymph nodes were affected. One case who received intravenous amphotericin B and 3 cases who received intravenous voriconazole improved, and these patients were cured after continual treatment with oral voriconazole for 6 or 12 months. The remaining patients died before they received antifungal treatment.P. marneffei causes severe disease and disseminated infections, and it has high mortality rates in HIV-negative infants in endemic areas. P. marneffei susceptibility may be associated with immunodeficiencies or immune disorders. In endemic areas, clinicians should aware of disseminated

  6. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile 027 infection in Vienna, Austria 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Indra, A; Huhulescu, S; Fiedler, A; Kernbichler, S; Blaschitz, M; Allerberger, F

    2009-04-30

    From November 2008 to 15 April 2009, 36 isolates of CD027 identified in Austria, all originating from four hospitals in Vienna. All isolates were positive for toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin, and showed a characteristic 18 bp deletion in the tcdC gene. Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium. Some strains may cause diarrhoea due to formation of toxins. Symptomatic C. difficile infection (CDI) is primarily linked with hospital admission and antibiotic treatment, although antibiotic exposure is neither necessary nor sufficient for CDI [1,2]. In Belgium, for instance, one third of CDI cases reported in the hospital surveillance system are not hospital-associated [3]. Symptoms range from mild diarrhoea to serious manifestations such as pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon or perforation of the colon. C. difficile challenges hygiene standards as it is forms spores. The risk of infection rises with increasing age, underlying disease and immunodeficiency [4]. In recent years, a particularly virulent strain, ribotype 027 (CD027), has emerged in a number of countries, particularly in connection with hospital outbreaks, but also in community-acquired diarrhoea cases [5]. The risk of serious disease and death associated with CD027 exceeds that of other C. difficile strains. The classical CD027 is characterised - among other things - by an increased production of toxins A and B, production of a binary toxin and resistance to newer fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin. The first three Austrian cases of CD027 occurred in 2006 and in March 2008 [6,7]. Since August 2006, the Austrian National Reference Centre for C. difficile has ribotyped approximately 2,700 human C. difficile isolates received from all nine Austrian provinces. In recent months, a drastic increase in CD027 cases has been noted, all originating from four hospitals in Vienna. From November 2008 to 15 April 2009, 36 isolates of CD027 were received at the National Reference Centre

  7. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  8. Overdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Molecular Test Era

    PubMed Central

    Polage, Christopher R.; Gyorke, Clare E.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Chin, David L.; Wang, Susan; Nguyen, Hien H.; Huang, Bin; Tang, Yi-Wei; Lee, Lenora W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra; Romano, Patrick S.; Panacek, Edward A.; Goodell, Parker B.; Solnick, Jay V.; Cohen, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care–associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making and public health reporting. Molecular tests are increasingly used to diagnose C difficile infection (CDI), but many molecular test-positive patients lack toxins that historically defined disease, making it unclear if they need treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine the natural history and need for treatment of patients who are toxin immunoassay negative and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive (Tox−/PCR+) for CDI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational cohort study at a single academic medical center among 1416 hospitalized adults tested for C difficile toxins 72 hours or longer after admission between December 1, 2010, and October 20, 2012. The analysis was conducted in stages with revisions from April 27, 2013, to January 13, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Patients undergoing C difficile testing were grouped by US Food and Drug Administration–approved toxin and PCR tests as Tox+/PCR+, Tox−/PCR+, or Tox−/PCR−. Toxin results were reported clinically. Polymerase chain reaction results were not reported. The main study outcomes were duration of diarrhea during up to 14 days of treatment, rate of CDI-related complications (ie, colectomy, megacolon, or intensive care unit care) and CDI-related death within 30 days. RESULTS Twenty-one percent (293 of 1416) of hospitalized adults tested for C difficile were positive by PCR, but 44.7% (131 of 293) had toxins detected by the clinical toxin test. At baseline, Tox−/PCR+ patients had lower C difficile bacterial load and less antibiotic exposure, fecal inflammation, and diarrhea than Tox+/PCR+ patients (P < .001 for all). The median duration of diarrhea was shorter in Tox−/PCR+ patients (2 days; interquartile range, 1-4 days) than in Tox+/PCR+ patients (3 days; interquartile range, 1-6 days) (P = .003) and was

  9. [Recent epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a major pathogen for diarrhea in hospitalized patients and because of outbreak of highly virulent strain in EU and US, increased length of hospital stay and increased numbers of severe patients and deaths have become major challenges. In recent years, transmissions through community-acquired or food-borne infections are reported. National surveillance has been already performed overseas. Guidelines for preventing C. difficile infection (CDI) is available, and education activities are promoted for preventing the infection spread. Meanwhile, in Japan, medical hospitals are reporting individual CDI incidence, however, a large-scale research has not been conducted up to the present date and therefore the entire status of CDI including infection of the highly virulent strain has yet to be revealed. This time, we performed a questionnaire-based survey at 2,537 hospitals nationwide between April 15, 2013 and May 31, 2013 to investigate CDI incidence, diagnosis and treatment. Valid responses were obtained from 321 hospitals. Regarding the annual number of CDI patients at all the hospitals, the highest group of hospitals responding "1 to 5 patients a year" was 17.8%, and the second highest group of hospitals responding "no patients a year" was 13.1%. In contrast, there was a group of hospitals with "more than 101 patients a year", which was 3.1%. This indicates that there was the difference in the CDI incidences among hospitals. According to the questionnaire results, a highest group of hospitals responding "0-20%" for CDI patients with serious complication such as toxic megacolon, gastrointestinal perforation, ileus paralytic, bacteremia, sepsis, crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis was 62.6%, and for CDI patients with recurrence more than one, a group of hospitals answering "0 to 20%" was 56.4%, which was the highest. This suggested that there was only a small number of serious CDI patients and recurrence CDI patients in Japan

  10. [When is it too early or too late for surgery in Crohn's disease? ].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Blanco Hernáiz, J I; Monturiol Jalón, J M

    2008-01-01

    The surgical boarding of Crohn's disease (CD) admitted as a last effort of treatment against behavior in those the therapy prescribes it has failed, it supposes a loss on perspective that can postpone the delay in the recovery of patients and it retracts them of a better quality of life when it is considered that 50% of patients maintain inactive illness during years after selected surgical procedures; some rate no reached by the most effective treatments. The risk to specify surgical procedure in the course of CD rises to 75% of payees, more than 50% in the first year from the diagnosis, and practically 100% patients in the evolution when it is contemplated to attend perianal lesions. Therefore gastroenterologist should be trained in the selection who, when and why these patients should be operated. To retard the surgery to advanced illness phases increases morbidity, and if it is certain that the new biological therapy allow induction of remissions it is also it that to increase the duration of the process and the patient s age and contributes to face bigger surgical risk and worse perspectives in the treatment of their acute complications and also chronic manifestations often clinically inconsiderate as: Retractile mesenteritis, the states of hipercoagulability and the appearance of malignizations phenomena. Saving absolute indications for initial selective surgery in management of CD patient like: Massive intestinal bleeding, toxic megacolon or free perforation, other surgical conditions they should be reevaluated on light of our current knowledge. Patient s genotyping constitutes a clinical element that contributes to the identification of its specific risks and it facilitates the therapeutic selection. Unfortunately until these analyses can be routinely used the precocious employment of CD surgery it will be based on the consideration clinical data: The patient age, its nutritional state, smoking, and the necessities of steroids. To differ among inflammatory